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PRICE HILL PRESS

Your Community Press newspaper serving Price Hill and Covedale

SPEEDING B1 Food helps enrich math skills.

75¢

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30, 2013

BECAUSE COMMUNITY MATTERS

Incline Public House set to open soon Has a spacious view of downtown By Kurt Backscheider kbackscheider@communitypress.com

It’s only a matter of time before West Siders have a new place to grab a bite to eat. The Incline Public House in East Price Hill will soon open for business. Owned by West Side brothers Tony and Dominic Cafeo, the 2,500-square-feet restaurant overlooks downtown Cincinnati from its perch adjacent to where the old Price Hill Incline used to transport passengers up and down the hill. “We are very excited about this project,” Tony Cafeo said. “We look forward to seeing you and bringing great food and service to this area.” He said the Incline Public House will serve brick oven pizzas, gourmet sandwiches, appetizers, salads, craft beer and wine. The restaurant will be able to seat up to 65 guests inside, and, when the weather is nice, an additional 60 to 65 guests outside on a 1,500square-feet, two-tier deck. Dan Altom, the restaurant’s general manager, said the kitchen staff will make as

The new owners of The Incline Manor apartment building in East Price Hill are completely renovating the 24-unit apartment complex. THANKS TO NATASCHA BLAKELY

INCLINED TO RENOVATE

Downtown Cincinnati can be seen through the large windows at the Incline Public House in East Price Hill. The new restaurant, which is located next to where the old Price Hill Incline used to stand, is gearing up to open soon. KURT BACKSCHEIDER/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

many ingredients as possible from scratch, including bacon, sausage and pastrami. “We’re going to offer quality dining in a casual, genuine and welcoming atmosphere,” he said. “Taking care of our guests is going to be very important.” See HOUSE, Page A2

Outside of their restaurant in East Price Hill, Tony, left, and Dominic Cafeo show what the view looks like from their Incline Public House. The restaurant, part of the Incline Village development, will open soon. FILE

Couple almost done with apartments By Kurt Backscheider

PHOTO

kbackscheider@communitypress.com

East Price Hill’s Incline District has seen a lot of development in the past couple of years, and the owners of the Incline Manor are working to ensure progress continues. Westwood couple Natascha and Harley Blakely are nearly finished with their complete redevelopment of the 24-unit apartment building at 2812 Price Ave. “We’ve stripped and renovated everything,” Mrs. Blakely said. “We want to offer quality, contemporary housing for middle-income people.” Mr. Blakely said he purchased the building in July

COLLECTION TIME Westwood residents Natascha, left, and Harley Blakely own The Incline Manor apartment building on Price Avenue in East Price Hill, and have been renovating all the units in the building. Their goal is to offer quality, affordable housing in the neighborhood. KURT BACKSCHEIDER/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

“We want to offer quality, contemporary housing for middle-income people.” NATASCHA BLAKELY

Renovating East Price Hill apartment building

See RENOVATE, Page A2

STARTERS

RITA’S KITCHEN

The seven members who began Gamble’s team seeing succes. See story, A8

Johnson the ‘provost’ of barbecue sauce. See story, B3

In the next few days your Community Press carrier will be stopping by to collect $3.50 for delivery of this month’s Price Hill Press. Your carrier retains half of this amount as payment for his or her work. If you wish to add a tip to reward the carrier’s good service, both the carrier and The Community Press appreciate your generosity. This month we're featuring Zachary Schmidt, a fifthgrader at St. Teresa of Avila School. Schmidt likes to play baseball, basketball and soc-

Contact The Press

News .........................923-3111 Retail advertising ............768-8357 Classified advertising ........242-4000 Delivery ......................853-6263 See page A2 for additional information

cer. He is a big Cincinnati Reds fan and is looking forward to playing for the West Stars this spring. If you have Schmidt questions about delivery, or if your child is interested in becoming part of our junior carrier program, please call 853-6263 or 853-6277, or e-mail circulation manager Sharon Schachleiter at sschachleiter@communitypress.com.

Vol. 86 No. 4 © 2013 The Community Press ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


NEWS

A2 • PRICE HILL PRESS • JANUARY 30, 2013

Renovate Continued from Page A1

2011 and began remodeling it last summer. The building has a mix of one- and two-bedroom apartment units, and each unit has new windows, custom paint, new laminate flooring or carpeting, updated fixtures, new bathrooms and new kitch-

ens. Mrs. Blakely said the exterior of the building has also been updated and professional landscaping has been added. She said they also plan to add a private dog park, a garden and courtyard, a grilling area and security fencing around the parking lot. Six remodeled one-bedroom units are available for lease now, and she said several two-bedroom

PRICE HILL

PRESS

Find news and information from your community on the Web Covedale • cincinnati.com/covedale Price Hill • cincinnati.com/pricehill Hamilton County • cincinnati.com/hamiltoncounty

News

Marc Emral Senior Editor ...............853-6264, memral@communitypress.com Monica Boylson Reporter ..............853-6265, mboylson@communitypress.com Kurt Backscheider Reporter ............853-6260, kbackscheider@communitypress.com Melanie Laughman Sports Editor ......248-7573, mlaughman@communitypress.com Tom Skeen Sports Reporter .............576-8250, tskeen@communitypress.com

Advertising

Melissa Martin Territory Sales Manager ...............768-8357, mmartin@enquirer.com Lisa Lawrence Sales Manager.........................768-8338, llawrence@enquirer.com

Delivery

For customer service...................853-6263, 853-6277 Sharon Schachleiter Circulation Manager ..................853-6279, sschachleiter@communitypress.com Stephanie Siebert District Manager.......................853-6281

Classified

To place a Classified ad ................242-4000, www.communityclassified.com

To place an ad in Community Classified, call 242-4000.

units will be renovated and ready for lease in the spring. Lease rates start at $550 per month. Mr. Harley said they hope the building attracts a nice new mix of residents to the area. The apartments are ideal for professionals who work downtown, young couples, college students and people who want the convenience of a downtown lifestyle at a modest cost, Mrs. Blakely said. “This area is the new Mount Adams,” she said. “It definitely has its charm. It just needs some more believers.” With its five-minute drive to downtown, city views, restaurants and designation as the city’s third entertainment district, she said the Incline District is growing as a destination. For information, visit www.citylimitrealty.com or call 513-389-1408.

Index Calendar .................B2 Classifieds ................C Deaths ...................B8 Food ......................B3 Police .................... B8 Schools ..................A7 Sports ....................A8 Viewpoints ............A10

‘RAISING THE STANDARDS’

In honor of Catholic Schools Week 2013, students at St. William School in Price Hill gathered in the parking lot and formed the logo representing the theme of this year’s celebration of Catholic schools. The theme for the week is “Catholic Schools Raise the Standards.” Catholic Schools Week is Jan. 27 to Feb. 2. THANKS TO KATHLEEN HIRTH

Alumnus donates $500K to La Salle High School La Salle High School hopes to double a graduate’s $500,000 commitment to $1 million dollars for scholarships and financial aid. The donation is the largest single pledge from an individual in the school’s history.

Citing the impact La Salle has had on his life, the donor is asking other alumni, parents and friends of the all-male Catholic high school to raise another $500,000 by June 30. To achieve the goal, Principal Tom Luebbe said the school has initiated the Lancers Helping Lancers challenge and has begun accepting contributions. “This pledge, and the matching funds it will raise, will help La Salle attract and retain the kind of young men we want: those who are committed to excelling in the classroom and

House Continued from Page A1

Tony Cafeo, who lives in Westwood, said he and his brother, a Price Hill resident, decided to open the restaurant in the Incline District because they wanted to be involved in the growth and progress of the neighborhood, and they know West Siders are fiercely loyal patrons. The tremendous, unob-

preparing for their future, built upon a strong Catholic faith,” Luebbe said. The alumnus wishes to remain anonymous, according to Advancement Director Ken Barlag. “Many of our alumni tell us that La Salle provided the foundation for the success they experienced in college and in life,” Barlag said. “We are overwhelmed by the generosity of this graduate, who is demonstrating an extraordinary level of commitment to La Salle and its growth.”

structed view of the city didn’t hurt either. “That view is spectacular,” Cafeo said. Altom said the restaurant will open as soon as the finishing touches of construction are complete and the building passes inspections. He said people are calling frequently to find out when they’re opening. They plan to announce the opening when an exact date is known, he said. “It’s very exciting,” he said.

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NEWS

JANUARY 30, 2013 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • A3

New group offering sports in Oak Hills

This sixth-grade select basketball team is a part of Oak Hills Youth Athletics. Pictured, front row, from left, are Parker Niehaus, Zack Hartman, Sander Vest, Zach Moeller and coach Tommy Price; back row, Christian Vanover, coach Tom Price, Grant Rembold, Gaven Florimonte, Gavin McCarthy, Balor Appiarius and Jacob Berkemeier.

Youth Athletics wants to give ‘all kids the chance to play’ By Monica Boylson mboylson@communitypress.com

Winter sports sign-ups are under way and new to the mix is Oak Hills Youth Athletics, an athletic organization formed in January 2012 to unite Oak Hills youth sports teams and offer unique training opportunities. Youth Athletics Board President Gary Jerow said the organization was meant to unite Oak Hills sports teams, help with administration of those teams, and prepare students for organized school sports. “Our goal is to mirror all the sports that are covered at the high school,” he said. Already, Youth Athletics offers basketball, football, volleyball, swimming, wrestling and track. They plan to include baseball, soccer, softball, lacrosse and cheerleading next year and have plans to offer golf and tennis. So far this year, there are about 950 athletes registered in Youth Athletics. Oak Hills High School head football coach Dan Scholz said he likes the idea of working with a youth athletic group. “Anytime there’s a collaboration between youth groups leading to your program it is a good thing,” he said. “For the very selfish reason, it will

help the high school in the long run.” Scholz said he’s worked with youth groups when he coached in Colerain and New Richmond and found it to be a success. “I want the kids to grow up dreaming about playing football on Friday nights at the high school,” he said. In Delhi Township, Youth Athletics joins the Delhi Athletic Association and select organizations such as J. B. Yeager Baseball to offer youth sports to athletes. Youth Athletics board members approached the Delhi Athletic Association to see if they would be interested in being a part of the Oak Hills organization. “We just didn’t feel that it was a fit to join the organization,” Delhi Athletic Association president Marc Reed said. “We’ve been around since 1947. We felt that the diversity of the youth organizations seemed better.” The Delhi Athletic Association offers soccer, softball and baseball through high school and has cheerleading and football through sixth grade. They serve about 700 kids each year. While both organizations pull youth from the Oak Hills Local School District, Reed said the Delhi Athletic Associa-

tion has a good relationship with Youth Athletics. “We’re going to continue to work together to better our community,” he said. “The goal is to give all kids the chance to play. We haven’t seen a drop off in sign-ups as of yet.” Oak Hills High School Athletic Director Jan Wilking said the high school has a working relationship with all the youth groups in the district. “Our role is to serve all kids in our district,” she said. Youth Athletics caters to students through sixth grade with some sports such as basketball continuing with intramural teams through high school. Some sports are exclusive to students in the Oak Hills Local School District; however other teams within the organization are open to players outside the district or who attend another school within the district. Parents should consult team coaches for eligibility. For more information about Oak Hills Youth Athletics or to sign up, visit www.oakhillsathleti cs.org. The Delhi Athletic Association has sign-ups available online at www.daasports.com or sign up in person from 6 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 12, at the Delhi Park Lodge, 5125 Foley Road.

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NEWS

A4 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • JANUARY 30, 2013

Schutte creates website for hobbyists By Kurt Backscheider kbackscheider@communitypress.com

Like many folks, Mark Schutte has hobbies and interests to occupy his free time. The 28-year-old Green Township resident collects and restores antique tractors, tinkers with

scale models and is learning the ropes of farming. A couple of years ago, while restoring a 1986 Ford 1710 offset tractor with his father, Schutte discovered a new interest – website development. “There are all kinds of hobbies out there,” he said. “I thought, ‘Why not

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Green Township resident Mark Schutte, who collects and restores antique tractors as a hobby, has created a social networking website where people can share photos, engage in forums and chat about their different hobbies and interests. KURT BACKSCHEIDER/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

create a site where everyone who has a hobby can share their interests with each other?’” For the past two years he’s been working to launch his website, Universal Stop. The site, found at www.universalstop.com, is now fully functional

and ready for any and all hobbyists. Schutte, who is a police officer in Cincinnati District 3, said he’s loved tractors since he was a child, and he has a specific interest in Ford offset tractors because they were only manufactured for a few years and are

own profile pages and then communicate with other members who share similar interests. So far, Universal Stop has forums and chat rooms for 40 different topics of interest, which are called “hubs” on the site. Schutte said there are hubs for everything from boating and gardening, to cigars and stamps. Some other hubs on the site include automobiles, pets, fitness, beer and wine, jewelry, film-making, trains, literature, cooking and vinyl records. “Everyone has different hobbies, so we can add hubs for any hobby,” he said. “My aunt recently took an interest in pottery and she asked if we could include a hub for pottery, so we added a pottery hub.” He said his brother-inlaw helped him develop the site, which will always be evolving as he is open to suggestions and ideas from members .

rare to find. He said Ford only made 600 of the 1710 model, and he owns three of them. The idea for the website was born while he was restoring his 1986 model, he said. Since Ford didn’t produce many 1710 offset tractors, he said parts were hard to come by and it took quite some time to track down the parts he needed. And when he finally finished the project, he said it was difficult to find places to showcase the restored tractor. That’s when he realized it would be helpful if there was a social networking website giving hobbyists a forum for sharing photographs, discussing ideas and chatting about their interests. “On Universal Stop, I can upload photos and talk with other people who are interested in tractors,” Schutte said. Hobbyists can join the site for free, create their

Uptown Express ridership goes up One of Metro’s newest routes made great gains in 2012. Route 38X Glenway Crossing-Uptown Express ridership was up about 18 percent in December 2012 compared to the same time in 2011. In all, Metro provided nearly 21,000 rides on the Route 38X in 2012. The Glenway Crossing-Uptown Express started operating in August 2011. The direct service connects Cincin-

nati’s West Side neighborhoods with the growing Uptown area with six morning and six afternoon trips on weekdays. In addition to the University of Cincinnati, the route serves Good Samaritan and Christ sospitals and University of Cincinnati Medical Center, as well as the Cincinnati VA Hospital and Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. Route 38X also serves

Road (across from HH Gregg). The transit center provides a free park and ride for commuters and easy connections with other West Side Metro routes. In 2012, Metro had an overall 4.2 percent ridership increase compared to 2011, significantly higher than the national average increase for bus systems. Last year, Metro provided almost 17.4 million passenger trips.

the Environmental Protection Agency, the Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden, and other uptown employers. The route does not go downtown. The route serves Metro’s Glenway Crossing Transit Center & Park & Ride, which opened in December 2011, at the Glenway Crossing Shopping Center at the intersection of Glencrossing Way and Anderson Ferry

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NEWS

JANUARY 30, 2013 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • A5

Dance helps developmentally disabled adults By Kurt Backscheider

kbackscheider@communitypress.com

West Siders are invited to put on their dancing shoes and help an area nonprofit raise money to build a residential community for adults with disabilities. BeauVita, an organization founded in 2010 by several West Side families who have children with developmental disabilities, will present its second Diamonds & Denim fundraiser Saturday, Feb. 9, at Seton High School, 3901 Glenway Ave. “Last year’s event went over really, really

well,” said Barry Ross, a Green Township dentist who serves on BeauVita’s board of directors. “We sold out the small gym at Seton, so this year they’re graciously allowing us to host the dance in their large gym.” Ross and his wife, Carolyn, who is also a BeauVita board member, are among the group’s founding families. They have a son with special needs, and they helped establish the organization to make sure their son and others like him can lead fulfilling, independent lives, while also receiving the support they need, when they are adults.

“That’s our goal and our mission,” he said. “The dream has been growing and Ricke we’re real excited about it.” Michael Ricke, a Green Township resident and BeauVita board member who has a developmentally disabled daughter, said the group plans to build the residential community on roughly 3 acres on Edgewood Drive, off of North Bend Road in Green Township. The organization is

Library hosting Valentine Day fun Red may be the color of love, but it’s also the color of your library card from the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County. Use it this year to create your own special Valentine’s Day gift or to send an old-fashioned card to your modern-day sweetheart. Plus, be sure to visit the display of antique Victorian valentines on display at the Main Library. Visitors to the Main Library, 800 Vine St., can view the Victorian valentines that are on display in cases by the elevators on the second and third floors of the South Building. Valentine photos are of cards in the public library’s Victorian Valentines Collection.

If you can’t make it downtown to the Main Library, visit the digital Victorian valentine collection at http://tinyurl.com/ b5wh6bp.

Call the Main Library at 513-369-6900 or your local Library branch. Visit www.CincinnatiLibrary.org to view the calendar.

working with a development team, and he said they hope to begin construction sometime in 2014. “Everything is moving along well,” he said. The plan is to build a cluster of residential buildings each housing four efficiency-style units with shared living rooms, dining rooms and kitchen areas, Ricke said. Each resident would be responsible for maintaining their private bedroom and bathroom space, and they could work together to upkeep the common areas. BeauVita will also provide support services for

residents, and staff will work with residents to help identify their needs and develop a plan to help them reach their own personal goals. Ricke said the idea is to allow residents to be as independent as possible, while also providing a community setting in which residents can avoid isolation through socialization, interaction and helping one another. Ross said proceeds from the dance will go toward helping the organization achieve its mission. Tickets are $30 each, and includes food, raffles and entertainment pro-

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vided by The Forever Diamond Band, which Ross said performs Neil Diamond favorites. Cincinnati Enquirer sports columnist Paul Daugherty will serve as the master of ceremonies. Ross said the evening also features an auction, that includes a one-week stay in a house in Telluride, Colo., and a oneweek stay in a condo in Marco Island, Fla.. For ticket information, or to learn more about the organization, visit www.beauvita.org. Those interested in attending the fundraiser can also email beauvita@ gmail.com.

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NEWS

A6 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • JANUARY 30, 2013

BRIEFLY Trustee meeting canceled

The Delhi Township Board of Trustees meeting scheduled for 6 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 30, has been canceled as all township business was handled during a special meeting Jan. 23. The next trustee meeting is at 6 p.m. Wednes-

day, Feb. 13.

Seton dance team headed to nationals

Seton High School’s dance team, the Highlighters, will compete in the National Dance Team Championship on Saturday, Feb. 2 and Sunday, Feb. 3, at the Walt Disney World Resort in Orlando,

Fla. “We couldn’t be prouder of our student dancers,” said Seton Athletic Director Janie Schaefer. “They have had an extremely successful year and we know they will represent us well in Orlando.” This season the varsity team has won first place in the pom and jazz

categories at five different competitions. In addition to a successful competition season, the Highlighters have also performed at Xavier University and University of Cincinnati basketball games.

Library helping children get healthy

The Price Hill Branch Library hosts a monthly health and fitness program for children. The next Get Healthy program is 4:30-5:30 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 5, at the library, 3215 Warsaw Ave. The free program engages children in fitness, fun and healthy choices. Participating in the program and reading allows children to track “miles” on their Hog Logs and become eligible to take part in the Kids’ Marathon 26th-Mile event on the day of the Flying Pig Marathon. For more information, call the branch at 3694490.

Shawnee Indian history in Delhi

The Delhi Historical Society is hosting the Area History of the Shawnee Indians at 7 p.m. Monday, Feb. 11, at the Delhi Park Lodge, 5125 Foley Road. There will be a free presentation by Fred Shaw/Neeake a Native American storyteller of the Shawnee Tribe in Cincinnati. He will discuss the oral traditions, history, and stories of the Shawanoodasse (now known as Shawnee) with representative attire, accoutrements and paint of an Olammapise (storyteller). Examples of songs and drumming will be included. For more information, call Peg Schmidt at 4514313.

Celebrating apresident’s birthday

Area residents are invited to the village of North Bend to celebrate President William Henry Harrison’s birthday. Village officials and

Ex-Stream Explorations where children age six to nine get to explore creeks to find cool critters; Great Outdoors Camp where kids age 8 to 14 challenge themselves on low ropes, canoeing, rock-wall climbing and more; and Survival Camp for those ages 12 to 17 to learn how to start a fire in the wilderness, build a shelter, signal for help and more. For a full list of summer day camps, including dates, locations, age ranges, costs and online registration deadlines, visit www.GreatParks.org.

residents will observe Harrison’s birthday at 10:30 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 2, at North Bend’s Council Hall, 21 Taylor Ave. After gathering at the Council Hall, those in attendance will then march to Harrison’s tomb, where a personal emissary of the president of the United States will lay a wreath on the tomb. For more information, call the village at 9410610.

St. William frying up fish on Fridays

St. William Church in Price Hill will host a fish fry every Friday during Lent, from Feb. 15 through March 22. Dine in and carryout/ drive-thru options are available. The drivethrough hours are 4-7:30 p.m. and the dining room in the church undercroft is open 4:30-7:30 p.m. Menu items include fried and baked fish, fried shrimp, crab cakes, pizza, mac & cheese, soup of the week, desserts and beverages. The undercroft seats up to 200 guests. Live musical entertainment will be provided each week. St. William is at 4108 West Eighth St. Call 921-0247 or visit www.saintwilliam.com for more information.

Mercy hospitals win approval

The American College of Surgeons has awarded Mercy Heath – Mount Airy and Western Hills hospitals three-year approval with commendation for their Community Hospital Cancer Programs. The hospitals earned the approval with commendation following the completion of an extensive survey of the activities of both the Mount Airy and Western Hills cancer programs over the three-year period from 2008 to 2010. The American College of Surgeons evaluated the hospitals’ cancer programs on their compliance with 36 standards developed by the Commission on Cancer. The American College of Surgeons identified many areas of excellence including: The high performance rate of the pathology laboratory. The high participation rate of the patients in clinical trials. The numerous prevention and early detection programs the hospitals offered to the community each year. Consistently meeting all submission requirements of the collected data to the National Cancer Data Base. The publication of annual reports for each cancer program.

County parks have summer camps

Keep the kids physically and mentally active over summer break with day camps at the county parks. Beginning in early June, children ages 2 to 17 will have opportunities to explore nature through hands-on activities, hikes, games and much more. Those who register online at www.GreatParks.org before March 31 will receive the early bird discount of $20 off each camp. Some of the camps being offered in 2013 include: Growing Up a Farm Kid where children age 2 to 5 can help with barn tasks;

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SCHOOLS

JANUARY 30, 2013 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • A7

COMMUNITY

PRESS

Editor: Marc Emral, memral@communitypress.com, 853-6264

ACHIEVEMENTS | NEWS | ACTIVITIES | HONORS

CommunityPress.com

HONOR ROLLS ST. URSULA ACADEMY

The following students earned honors for the first quarter for the 2012-2013 school year.

Freshmen First honors: Melissa Daeschner, Kathleen Doherty, Anna Kelley, Emma Maliborski, Maureen Reilly, Cathryn Schoeppner and Alexandra Wall. Second honors: Carolyn Chin, Madelyn Hart, Karly Hofmann, Sarah Price, Caroline Wall and McKenzie Young.

Sophomores First honors: Anna Arar, Claire Berding, Lydia Breitenstein, Caitlyn Cappel, Katlyn Colvin, Natalie Danenhauer, Abigail Engelhardt, Katelyn Ferguson, Nicole Kitko, Anna McManus and Sydney Springer. Second honors: Christina Diersing, Hanna Earley, Elena Helmers-Wegman and Carolyn Knollman.

Juniors Chavarria, Mariah Childs, Brittany Dixon, Shelby Rolfes and Erin Grace look over a brain during an AP psychology class at Oak Hills High School PROVIDED

Oak Hills students study human brains Mount professor takes over class

Oak Hills High School AP psychology students welcomed College of Mount St. Joseph associate professor Tracy Reed 12 to their classroom recently. The hands-on presentation tied into the learning materials they are taught by their teacher Mandy Rice. Reed, along with some of her pupils from the College of Mount Saint Joseph, brought real human brains with them during her neuroscience presentation. The visit afforded the the students the opportunity to talk to a college professor and students working in the field that they are studying. It also offered them a chance to physically see and handle the brain, which is what they are learning about. “Each year Dr. Reed brings a great presentation to our AP psychology students,” Rice said. “They get to experience hands on, exactly what they’ve been learning about for weeks, and then apply that information. Not very often does anyone get to say they’ve held a human brain in their hands.” Reed’s visit created vivid memories that will never be forgotten by the students who got hands-on brain experience that day. “It was really cool to have a guest speaker from Mount Saint Joseph. We not only learned a lot of new stuff about the brain, but about the college too,” said junior Kaellie Korman. “The college students who

First honors: Allison Budde and Sarah Clark. Second honors: Laurel Cappel, Samantha DiTullio, Megan Huber and Madeleine Schulcz.

Seniors First honors: Katherine Berding, Elise Earley, Emily Engelhardt, Lucy Gaynor, Elizabeth Kehling, Sarah Kelley, Elizabeth Kelly, Grace Liesch, Donai Long, Maria Moore, Priya Mullen and Julia Springer. Second honors: Anne Dixon and Alison Younts. The following students have earned honors for the second quarter of the 2012-2013 school year.

Freshmen First honors: Melissa Daeschner, Kathleen Doherty, Anna Kelley, Emma Maliborski, Maureen Reilly, Cathryn Schoeppner and Alexandra Wall. Second honors: Carolyn Chin, Madelyn Hart, Karly Hofmann, Sarah Price, Caroline Wall and Mckenzie Young.

Sophomores First honors: Claire Berding, Lydia Breitenstein, Caitlyn Cappel, Katlyn Colvin, Natalie Danenhauer, Abigail Engelhardt, Katelyn Ferguson, Elena Helmers-Wegman, Nicole Kitko and Sydney Springer. Second honors: Anna Arar, Anna McManus and Claudia Vollman.

Juniors First honors: Allison Budde, Laurel Cappel and Sarah Clark. Second honors: Anna Butler, Samantha DiTullio, Megan Huber and Madeleine Schulcz.

Seniors First honors: Katherine Berding, Anne Dixon, Elise Earley, Emily Engelhardt, Sarah Kelley, Elizabeth Kelly, Grace Liesch, Donai Long, Maria Moore, Priya Mullen, Julia Springer and Alison Younts. Second honors: Lucy Gaynor and Elizabeth Kehling.

URSULINE ACADEMY

The following students earned honors for the first quarter of the 2012-2013 school year.

Juniors and seniors First honors: Heather Knorr.

Ben Voigt holding a brain he studied in his AP psychology class. PROVIDED

Mother of Mercy students await the opening of Bob Evans Restaurant on Oct, 23 to celebrate Mole Day at 6:02 a.m. PROVIDED

Mercy celebrates with chemists on Mole Day Studying a brain are, from left, Mariah Vonluerhte, Rachel Voss, Jessica Neack and Brook Brannon. PROVIDED

came with Dr. Reed were really helpful and the class was very thankful that they came for Brain Day.” “I was kind of nervous at first about being in the same room as human brains, but I

learned new information and it surprised me - the brain is actually smaller than I thought,” added junior Sabrina Peters. Reed is an associate professor in Mount St. Joseph’s department of biology.

One hundred Mother of Mercy students packed the Bob Evans Restaurant in Western Hills to celebrate Mole Day on Oct. 23. Chemists and chemistry students throughout the world celebrate the mole, which is used to represent an extremely large quantity: 6.02 times 10 to the 23rd power objects. Chemists can calculate the mass of a mole of one element, and then for another element. When the two masses are mixed, chemists know that they are mixing the same number of atoms; one mole of each type of atom. To celebrate Mole Day, Mercy chemistry students met at 6:02 a.m. for breakfast. The celebration continued throughout the school day as students wore homemade T-shirts and hung posters alerting all students to Mole Day.

COLLEGE CORNER Dean’s list

Ian Gillespie was named to the fall semester dean’s list at Heidelberg University. ■ The following students were named to the fall dean’s list at Chatfield College’s Findlay Market Campus: Linda Fantetti, Emily Herzner, Corina Johnson, Omega Maddox, Stephanie Sawyer and Jacqueline Walker. ■ The following students were named to the fall dean’s list at Thomas More College: Holly Beckemeyer, Brittney Brunner, Lauren Crain, Jacob Fishburn,

Elizabeth Hageman, Michael Hager, Jalen Harris, Nicole Kettler, Kyle Lyons, Cody Makin, Kevin Naltner, Rhonda Norwood, Michael O’Connell, Kenneth Orloff, Max Robbins, Kelle Ross, Erin Rowekamp, Michael Schmalle, Stephanie Sias, Kristin Smyth, Amanda Soldano, Emily Stautberg and Katherine Sullivan. ■ Brandon Alverson was named to the fall semester president’s list at Clemson University.

Graduates

Randall Gibson has graduated with a master of arts in teaching in the biological sciences from Miami Univer-

sity as a member of the second class of graduates from the Global Field Program master’s degree. The Global Field Program from Miami’s Project Dragonfly brings together master’s degree candidates, scientists, educators and community leaders at key conservation sites across the globe for firsthand experience with inquiry-driven education, environmental stewardship and global understanding. Since joining the master’s program in 2010, Gibson has explored conservation and education in Baja, Kenya and the Amazon. Gibson works at Hughes STEM High School.

One hundred Mother of Mercy students filled Bob Evans in Western Hills. The school holds its annual Mole Day celebration at the restaurant each year. PROVIDED


SPORTS

A8 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • JANUARY 30, 2013

COMMUNITY

PRESS

Editor: Melanie Laughman, mlaughman@communitypress.com, 513-248-7573

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | RECREATIONAL

CommunityPress.com

Highlanders look to strike at state

Boys team ranked No. 1 in local poll By Tom Skeen tskeen@communitypress.com

GREEN TWP. — The stars are aligning for a postseason run by the Oak Hills boys’ bowling team. As of Jan. 23, the Highlanders are 12-2, ranked No. 1 in The Enquirer Ohio boys bowling poll and are atop the Greater Miami Conference by a half game over second-ranked Middletown, whom the Highlanders

beat by 35 pins Dec. 4. “Not too bad,” coach Kurt Francisco said of his team’s performance this season. “There have been some humps in the road but nothing we can’t get over. There has been a lot of improvement.” It has been a year of firsts for the Highlanders. Senior Justin Lange rolled a 795 three-game series (299 high game) at the Holiday Classic Dec. 8 to set a new school record, while junior Cole Weisbrod set a new school record with a 553 two-game series against Colerain Jan. 10.

On the season Weisbrod is averaging a 216.3, good enough for second in the GMC. It wasn’t easy but some changes to his game have led to his success. “Last year he was a one-hander and this year he converted to two hands,” Francisco said. “A lot of these kids are converting to that and you create a lot more (revolutions) on the ball and a lot more pin action.” The only person better than Weisbrod in the GMC is teammate Kyle Helmes. The junior is averaging 218.2 a game and has a high game of 279 that came against the Middies Dec.

SPECIAL 7 LEAVE MARK

Gamble boys started team 2 seasons ago By Tom Skeen tskeen@communitypress.com

WINTON TERRACE — It was two seasons ago when seven Gamble Montessori basketball players made the choice to start a basketball program and build it from the ground up. Seniors Chris Martin, Chevez Floyd, Isaac Phillips, Aaron Watkins, Reggie Foote and Shelby Tekulve along with junior Kenney Mil have led the Gator program to its first Ohio High School Athletic Association-sanctioned season and have the team at 6-8 and in third place in the Ohio Valley Athletic League. “I look at it as a reward for our guys because the last two years we played without a light at the end of the tunnel,” coach Brad Wolfzorn said. “… This is what they have been looking forward to.” The program started with those seven individuals who instead of starting a program could have left with Clark Montessori when they separated from Gamble. With both schools in the same building, Clark was the OHSAA sanctioned team, but moved out of the building leaving the Gators behind and the kids to make a tough decision. “Clark was the bigger school to begin with so we were like the little brother and I think that kind of motivated them,” Wolfzorn said. “They wanted to prove that we could be successful and that we weren’t just the little-brother team.” When the seniors were sophomores and Mil a freshman, the Gators were basically a club team and suffered through a 4-16 season last year while going through their oneyear probationary period that is necessary before becoming a sanctioned program. Wolfzorn and his seven guys used their first season with a team as a learning experience and placed third in the state at a non-sanctioned schools state tournament. “That turned out to be a great year,” Wolfzorn said. “We got 20 games in and that season laid the foundation a year early. …I think back to that year and however much success we have this year, there is no doubt that (season) helped and will have contributed to the success this year.” Not only did the special seven start the program and

4.

The evolution of Helmes’ career has been interesting. His first season with varsity came as a sophomore and he finished the season eighth in the conference based on average and followed it up by finishing third last season with a 210.8 average. What makes this even more remarkable is the Highlanders are doing it with a first-year coach. While mechanically Francisco didn’t make changes, he wanted to stress team attitude. “Mainly just to work together,” Francisco said of his mes-

sage to the team when he took over. “The best bet is to make everybody happy, but you aren’t going to make everybody happy so just do your best. If not, talk it out and that is one thing we have been good at doing.” With five bowlers inside the top10 in the GMC based on average, Francisco knows his team has some serious potential come postseason time. “We have the potential of winning state,” he said. “There is no doubt in my mind. We just have to stay concentrated, keep everything in front of us and take everything in stride.”

PRESS PREPS HIGHLIGHTS By Tom Skeen tskeen@communitypress.com

Boys basketball

» Elder beat Anderson 6344, Jan. 20 in the consolation round of the Royal 8 Hardwood Classic at Fairfield High School. Devin Pike led the Panthers with 12 points. The Panthers overcame of four-point halftime deficit to defeat Turpin 58-46, Jan. 21 for fifth-place at the Royal 8 Hardwood Classic. Elder lost to Moeller 55-43, Jan. 25. Devin Pike led the Panthers with 11 points. » Gamble defeated Miami Valley Christian Academy 6763, Jan. 22. Junior Kenny Mil and senior Chris Martin led the Gators with 18 points. The Gators defeated the Cincinnati Trailblazers 82-76, Jan. 25 behind 20 points from Kenney Mil and Chris Martin. » Oak Hills couldn’t hang on to a four-point halftime lead and lost to Colerain 49-46, Jan. 25. Richmond scored15 points. » Kevin Bracy-Davis led all scorers with 21 points as Western Hills defeated Woodward 65-55, Jan. 25. » La Salle defeated GCL rival St. Xavier 49-41, Jan. 25 after overcoming a five-point halftime deficit. Connor Speed led the Lancers with 12

points.

Girls basketball

» McNicholas knocked off Seton 51-47, Jan.19. Senior Marisa Meyer led with 16 points. The Saints rebounded and took down New Richmond 5039, Jan. 22. Meyer and Loretta Blaut both scored 10 points. Mercy defeated GGCL and Westside rival Seton 58-50, Jan. 24. Emily Budde and Kelly Wiegman each scored 16 points for the Bobcats, while Meyer led the Saints with 18. » Oak Hills lost to Colerain 31-25, Jan. 19. Olivia Kilgore led with nine points. Mercy defeated Oak Hills 56-45, Jan. 22 behind 14 points from Rebecca Tumlin. Sydney Leitz led with 10 points. » After scoring just six points in the first half, Western Hills put up 34 in the second half to beat Woodward 4038, Jan. 22. Dan’shae Hill finished with 19 points in the win. » Miami Valley Christian Academy outscored Gamble 35-23 in the second half of its 57-47 victory Jan. 22. Ra’keia Johnson led the Lady Gators with 18 points.

Boys bowling

» Oak Hills won the Lancer Baker Bash Jan. 19. See HIGHLIGHT, Page A9

The Elder hockey team celebrates after winning the Ottawa Hills Martin Luther King tournament for the second time in three years. THANKS TO RICK WARMAN

Scholar-athletes up for ‘That’s My Boy Award’ Chevez Floyd of Gamble Montessori puts up a jumper during the Gators’ home game against MVCA Jan. 22. Floyd scored six points in the victory. TOM SKEEN/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

stick with it, they have represented Gamble to the highest expectations anyone could have asked for. “It’s nice to know you have kids you don’t have to worry about,” Wolfzorn said. “…The biggest thing that sits with them and the program is that first year and that they decided we are going to be Gamble Montessori’s basketball team. We are going to be the ones to start it and be the ones that

build it up and I think they take a lot of pride it that.” While a conference title may be out of reach, there is still one thing left to experience for the first time: An OHSAA postseason game. “I think for (those seven) it’s kind of the culminating experience for them to be able to say they played in a postseason game,” Wolfzorn said. “… They have been looking forward to it since last season.”

Kerry Coombs, Ohio State University assistant football coach, will be the keynote speaker at the 46th National Football Foundation’s “That’s My Boy” Award banquet, which is based upon the accumulation of points in three areas: Football achievement, academic achievement, and extracurricular / community activities. The award will be announced at the Scholar-Athlete Dinner, which will be in the Presidential Ballroom at the Westin Cincinnati at 7 p.m., Thursday, Feb. 28. Cash bar

begins prior to the dinner at 6 p.m. The finalists for Ohio’s award are: » Gabe Archer, Batavia. » Nicholas Collado, Kings. » Pat DiSalvio, McNicholas. » Ramir Hollis, North College Hill. » Brandon Kelly, Withrow. » Gus Madden, Ross. » Max Mazza, Elder. » Will Steur, Madeira. » Dylan Wiesman, Colerain. See AWARD, Page A9


SPORTS & RECREATION

HIGHLIGHT

JANUARY 30, 2013 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • A9

SIDELINES

St. Xavier and Moeller Jan. 24.

Wrestling

Continued from Page A8

» Western Hills placed seventh at the Sycamore Invitational Jan. 19. Fred Nayou (152 pounds), Earl Danzy (170) and Josh Batchelor (220) were runner-up in their respective weight classes. » Elder defeated Loveland 42-36 at the Wyoming duals Jan. 19. The Panthers finished fifth at the 2013 Catholic Invitational at Olentangy Liberty High School Jan. 20. » Oak Hills lost to St. Xavier 56-16, Jan. 23 in Division I OHSAA Regional Team Tournament action at Elder. Bryan Baxter (106 pounds), Dylan Roth (113), Dylan Buls (120) and Dallas Burke (145) earned victories for the Highlanders.

Behind a 449 high-series from Kyle Helmes, Oak Hills defeated Mason 2,840-2,477, Jan. 22. The Highlanders got a 505 high-series from sophomore Brandon Combs to lead them to victory over St. Xavier 3,016-2,670, Jan. 23. » Elder placed sixth at the Lancer Baker Bash Jan. 19. The Panthers lost to GCL rival St. Xavier 2,848-2,803, Jan. 24 despite a 432 series from Nick Roth. » La Salle beat Moeller, 2,609-2,306 Jan. 21. Eric Blessing rolled a 427 high series. La Salle beat Wilmington, 2,702-2,333, Jan. 22. Matt Nichols rolled a 432 high series.

Girls bowling

Hockey

» Seton placed second at the Lancer Baker Bash Jan. 19. Seton lost to Mason 2,444-2,406, Jan. 23 despite a 380 series from McKenzie Frommeyer. » Junior Rachel Horn rolled a 438 high-series to lead Mercy over McAuley 2,535-2,175, Jan. 22. Mercy improved to 19-2 following a 2,5522,321 victory over GGCL rival Seton Jan. 24. Sabrina Weibel rolled a 408 high-series, while senior Jordan Schmidt led the Saints with a 370.

» The Elder hockey team won the Ottawa Hills Martin Luther King hockey tournament Jan. 20 in Toledo, OH. The Panthers beat Dublin Scioto 6-0 and Ottawa Hills 7-0 to advance to the finals where they defeated Perrysberg 3-1. The title was the Panthers’ second in three years. Goalie Nick Spicker had two shutouts and a 96.4 save percentage. Peter Augliera led the team in scoring with four goals and four assists. A.J. Harvey had three goals and two assists.

Boys swimming

» Elder’s Mitch Godar placed fifth at the 30th Annual Southwest Ohio Diving Classic at the University of Cincinnati Jan. 20. The Panthers lost to

Gymnastics

» Oak Hills placed eighth at the Mason Comet Cup Invitational Jan. 19.

Free admission

» Sat, Feb 16 – Winter Skills Clinic, defense (drills for both infielders and outfielders, pitching and catching drills also available) Second through sixth grades are scheduled for 1:30-3:30 p.m. each day. Grades seven to 12 are 4-6 p.m. each day. Cost is $35 per session; two sessions are $30 each. Registration can be downloaded form www.oakhillssoftball.com. For questions, e-mail oakhillssoftball@gmail.com or call 703-6109.

As a special treat, Elder High School basketball is offering free admission to all students in kindergarten through eighth grades wearing their team uniform or other school spirit wear for the Friday, Feb. 1, game against McNicholas High School. The freshman team plays at 4:30 p.m.; JV at 6 p.m.; and varsity at 7:30 p.m.

Softball clinics

Jackie Cornelius-Bedel, Oak Hills varsity coach and director of softball operations at Sports of all Sorts, and her staff, will conduct the sixth-annual Winter Softball Skills Clinic at Oak Hills High School Gym, 3200 Ebenezer Road. The clinic will be run by current and former college and professional players and coaches to ensure that each player receives the highest quality instruction available in the area. Players will work in small groups with multiple station rotation so that every player receives individualized instruction regardless of their ability. Clinics are open to all Cincinnati area girls. Both beginners and more advanced players will benefit from these clinics. Parents and coaches are welcome to come and watch. Clinics being offered include: » Saturday, Feb 2 – Winter Skills Clinic, offense (covers all areas of hitting, bunting, slapping, base-running)

including the Atlanta Braves, over a 10-year career. Styles was a Cincinnati Reds fifth-round draft choice and played for its affiliates. He is active in the Reds’ Reviving Baseball in Inner Cities program that provides inner-city youth an opportunity to learn and enjoy the game of baseball. Fourth-year head varsity coach Joe Voegele and other Lancer coaches will be on hand to assist at the Feb. 10 clinic. They include varsity coach Art Bellamy, junior varsity coaches Joe Schmetzer, Chris Dooros and David Middendorf, and freshmen coaches Keith Ruter and Joe Andrews. To register , call Voegele at 741-4353. For questionable weather Feb. 10, participants may call 588-6607.

Coaches clinic

Award Continued from Page A8

The finalists for Northern Kentucky include: » Blake Bir, Covington Catholic. » Jared Bowling, Simon Kenton. » A.J.Collins, Cooper. » Donovan McCoy,

OhioCollegeFootball.com has named College of Mount St. Joseph running back James Clay, who led the Lions and the nation with 2,124 rushing yards and added 23 touchdowns, the All-Ohio Division III Offensive Player of the Year. Clay was also selected to the OFC.com offen-

Price Hill baseball registration dates are: Thursday, Jan 31, at Dunham Recreation Center; and 10 a.m. to noon, Saturday, Feb 2, at Carson Elementary. For questions, call 731-3048 or e-mail pricehillphoenix@gmail.com.

Highlands. » Dexter Smith, Lloyd. Tom Crosby, former head football at Purcell Marian and Mariemont high schools will receive the NFF Chapter’s “Lifetime Achievement” award. The Anthony Munoz Foundation will present its Offensive Lineman and Defensive Lineman

of the Year and the Marvin Lewis Community Fund will present their Coach of the Year Award. Four scholar athletes, one from each of the local colleges – Elder graduate Nick Gramke, Thomas More College; Elder graduate Tony Miliano, University of Cincinnati; Brian Pitzer, College of Mount St. Jo-

seph and Jason Semmes, Miami University – will be honored also. Sam Becker from McNicholas High School will receive the Tom Potter Memorial Award of Courage. For ticket information, please contact: Pat Mouch, 936-0999; Julia Gandert, 619-1645 (day); or Ron Woyan, 382-3173 (night).

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VIEWPOINTS A10 • PRICE HILL PRESS • JANUARY 30, 2013

Editor: Marc Emral, memral@communitypress.com, 853-6264

EDITORIALS | LETTERS | COLUMNS | CH@TROOM

LETTER TO THE EDITOR Criticism accepted

I’m disappointed, with myself, that you think my Covedale articles disparage other neighborhoods. Thanks for bringing it to my attention. Sometimes it’s hard for me to curb my Covedale enthusiasm. I will try to be more sensitive, and politically correct when expressing my West Side pride. As I indicated in my apology to Jennifer and Bill, Covedale is not my only civic interest. I have, and will continue to work tirelessly, on many fronts, to improve Price Hill. It seems that this is our common interest. If so, we should join forces. Please contact me at covedaleneighborhoodassoc@gmail.com. For the record I am also a Betty Kamuf fan! Jim Grawe Covedale

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ABOUT LETTERS AND COLUMNS We welcome your comments on editorials, columns, stories or other topics important to you in The Western Hills Press. Include your name, address and phone number(s) so we may verify your letter. Letters of 200 or fewer words and columns of 500 or fewer words have the best chance of being published. All submissions may be edited for length, accuracy and clarity. Deadline: Noon Friday E-mail: westernhills@ communitypress.com Fax: 853-6220 U.S. mail: See box below Letters, columns and articles submitted to The Western Hills Press may be published or distributed in print, electronic or other forms.

Oak Hills High School senior Curtis Robertson received a plaque and check for $250 as the Western Hills Exchange Club Student of the Month. From left are Ken Hauck, OHHS assistant principal; Roberston; club member Bill Robbe; and counselor Katie Hunter. The award is sponsored by the Kroger Co. PROVIDED.

College job led to career at library Feed sacks were used for more than just feed

How many of us have the good fortune of falling into a rewarding and enjoyable career during our freshman year in college? That’s exactly what happened to me when I started my 25-plus year career with the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County as a student assistant at the Overlook Branch (now Covedale) in 1986. Growing up in Covedale I was a frequent Maria Sferra COMMUNITY PRESS visitor to the Overlook GUEST COLUMNIST Branch and several other libraries, never imagining that I would work there – eventually even becoming a librarian. Who would have guessed that my parttime college student job would turn into a lifelong passion and commitment! For the past 13 years, my service has focused exclusively on “West Side” branches, including as a children’s librarian at Monfort Heights and Harrison, then as Harrison Branch Manager, and now regional manager for the entire west region of branches in Hamilton County. As regional manager, I will be regularly visiting and actively involved with 17 locations (Cheviot, College Hill, Covedale, Delhi, Elmwood Place, Forest Park, Green Township, Greenhills, Groes-

beck, Harrison, Miami Township, Monfort Heights, Mount Healthy, North Central, Northside, Westwood, and Wyoming), ensuring that service needs are met in those communities. Together with branch staff, we will work towards the following goals for all locations: » Excellent customer service, for all ages and interests. » A well-rounded collection of materials and resources in a variety of formats (including eBooks, downloadable music, and soon digital magazines). » Technology equipment and training that is responsive to ever-changing devices and capabilities. » High-interest and highquality programming and events. The library I know today is certainly different than the one I remember using as a child and teenager, but also better – so many new services and programs, as well as numerous choices for accessing information and resources. If you haven’t visited your local library branch in a while, I encourage you to do so and see what new things are there for you. And, just like the days when I was growing up, library cards are still free for all residents of Ohio. Maria Sferra is the service operations regional manager for the West Region at the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County.

In the middle 1800s manufacturers were looking for better shipping containers for food grain, seed, and animal feed that was transported in tins, boxes and wooden barrels. Tins rusted and boxes and barrels were heavy and difficult to ship. They saw farmers using cloth bags of homespun linen to store their products. But the hand sewn seams wouldn’t hold up in heavy use until 1846, when the invention of the sewing machine with its double-locking seams came along. Manufacturers initially used heavy canvas bags to ship flour, sugar, meal, grain, salt and feed from the mills. They were reusable and the farmers took their own empty sacks to be filled. The North Eastern Mills saw a new market and started weaving inexpensive cotton fabric in the late 1800s. They were plain white cloth in sizes that corresponded to barrel sizes. A one barrel bag held 196 pounds of flour. A 1⁄8 barrel bag only held 24 pounds. The brand name of the flour was simply printed on the side of the bag. Flour sacks were 42 percent of the market and sugar 17 percent followed by feed, seeds, rice, and fertil-

izer. By 1914, sacks came in 10-, 6-, 4-, 3-, 2- and 1-pound sizes, although these sizes varied by Betty manufacturKamuf er. President COMMUNITY PRESS Roosevelt GUEST COLUMNIST standardized sizes in 1937. A 50-pound feed sack measured 34 inches by 38 inches. A 100 pound sack measured 39 inches by 46 inches. Farmers’ wives started using the white bags for underwear, diapers, towels, table cloths, washcloths, pillowcases and nightgowns. It was difficult to get the logos off by soaking the cloth in lye, bleach and fels naphtha. In the mid 1920s, mills started producing sacks in printed fabrics. More than 40 mills made fabric for bags in thousands of different patterns. Instead of printing logos directly on the sack, factories sewed the logos in the seams. Bags were stamped with stitching lines for roller towels, embroidery patterns for aprons and pillowcases. Curtains and dresses could be made by sewing two or three together. During the Depression

solid colors were available. In the 1940s, feed sack sewing was deemed patriotic and prints with “V” for victory and Morse code appeared. In the 1950s Mexican and tropical prints appeared. Movie themes like Davy Crockett, Cinderella, Alice in Wonderland, Donald Duck, Mickey Mouse, Goofy, and “Gone With the Wind” were printed. Comic book themes like Buck Rogers or nursery rhyme themes like Little BoPeep and Humpty Dumpty were available. Before long magazines and pattern companies printed patterns for feed sack prints. Directions were given for using the strings from feed sacks in knitting and crocheting. A 1942 estimate showed that 3 million women and children of all income levels were wearing print feedbag garments. After the war more sanitary methods for making paper and plastics appeared and heavy paper and plastic containers became more cost effective. Today Amish and Mennonite communities demand, and receive, their goods in feed sacks, and the old feed sacks have become collector’s items. Betty Kamuf can be reached by email at westnews@community press.com.

MEETINGS » Cincinnati City Council meets at 2 p.m. every Wednesday in room 300 at Cincinnati City Hall, 801 Plum St. When there is a Monday holiday, all meetings including committee meetings are pushed back a day. City Manager: Milton Dohoney Jr. Mayor: Mark Mallory. » Cincinnati Public Schools Board of Education usually meets at 7 p.m. the second and fourth Mondays of the month at 2651 Burnet Ave. Board of Education phone: 475-7000. Superintendent: Mary Ronan. Board President: Eve Bolton. » East Price Hill Improvement

Association meets the third Monday of each month at 7:30 p.m. at Holy Family Church, 814 Hawthorne Ave., Phone: 549-3744. Association President: Tom Gamel. » Delhi Township Trustees meet at 6 p.m. the second and last Wednesday of the month at township offices, 934 Neeb Road. Phone: 922-3111. Administrator: Pete Landrum and President: Marijane Klug. » Oak Hills Local School District Board of Education members meet the first Monday of the month at 7 p.m. at various locations within the district. District office: 6325 Rapid

PRICE HILL

PRESS

A publication of

Run Road. Phone: 574-3200. Superintendent: Todd Yohey. Board President: Jeannie Schoonover. » Price Hill Civic Club meets the second Tuesday of each month at 7:30 p.m. at Seton K of C Hall on West Eighth St. (across from St. William Church), Phone: 251-0880. Club President: Charles Bazeley. Hamilton County » Board of County Commissioners meet at 9:30 a.m. every Wednesday in Room 603 of the County Administration Building, 138 E. Court St., downtown. Call 946-4400 for information.

» Educational Service Center Governing Board meets on the third Wednesday of the month at 11083 Hamilton Ave. Call 672-4200 for information. » General Health District meets at 6:30 p.m. the second Monday of the month at 250 William Howard Taft Road, Clifton. Call 946-7800 for information. » Regional Planning Commission meets at 12:30 p.m. the first Thursday of the month at the County Administration Building, eighth floor, 138 E. Court St., downtown. Call 946-4500 for information.

5556 Cheviot Road Cincinnati, Ohio 45247 phone: 923-3111 fax: 853-6220 email: pricehillpress@communitypress.com web site: www.communitypress.com

» Rural Zoning Commission meets at 1 p.m. on the third Thursday of the month at the County Administration Building, 138 E. Court St., downtown. Call 946-4501 for information. » Board of Zoning Appeals meets at on the second and fourth at Wednesday at the County Administration Building, 138 E. Court St., downtown. Call 946-4502 for information. If you would like your meeting to be considered for this, send the information to memral@communitypress.com.

Price Hill Press Editor Marc Emral memral@communitypress.com, 853-6264 Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday See page A2 for additional contact information.


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30, 2013

LIFE

Fifth-graders Julia Lindenschmidt and Cassie James build their vehicle's frame. PROVIDED.

COMMUNITY PRESS

PEOPLE | IDEAS | RECIPES

Fifth-graders Jenna Kiely and Eli Darnell test their vehicle. PROVIDED.

MATH ENRICHMENT M Class learns by moving food

ath enrichment at St. Teresa of Avila School is filled with surprises and, in this case, food. Students were challenged to design and build a delivery vehicle within a given budget to move a package from a “store” to a “school” made of Legos, which equaled the distance of about the length of two desks. They were given food items such as Cheez-Its, marshmallows, cookie wafers, Oreos, pretzels, donuts, Rice Krispie treats, granola bars and stir straws. The students first drew their designs, then presented their ideas to their teacher, Mike Kehling. Once approved, students were given the clearance to build their vehicles. Finally, they had to determine their budgets for the projects.

Sixth-graders Ben Dudley and Jarod Timmers test their vehicle. PROVIDED.

Sixth-grader Lucy Knight builds her vehicle. PROVIDED.


B2 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • JANUARY 30, 2013

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD THURSDAY, JAN. 31

FRIDAY, FEB. 15

On Stage - Theater

Exercise Classes

Broadway Bound, 8 p.m., Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, 4990 Glenway Ave., Part three of Neil Simon’s acclaimed autobiographical work. $23, $20 students and seniors. 241-6550; www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. West Price Hill.

FitChixx, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Sayler Park Community Center, $45 per month. 205-9772; www.fitchixx.com. Sayler Park.

Farmers Market Lettuce Eat Well Winter Farmers Market, 3-7 p.m., Cheviot United Methodist Church, Free. 661-1792; www.lewfm.org. Cheviot.

Youth Sports Instructional Basketball, 4:30-5:30 p.m., Sayler Park Community Center, 6720 Home City Ave., Classes are introduction to basketball skills presented in informative, fun and healthy way. Kindergartensecond grade. $10, plus $2 membership. Through Feb. 28. 941-0102; www.cincyrec.org. Sayler Park.

Health / Wellness Free Hearing Screenings, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., The Place for Better Hearing, Free. Reservations required. 922-0123; www.hearingbetter.net. Green Township.

On Stage - Theater Broadway Bound, 8 p.m., Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, $23, $20 students and seniors. 241-6550; www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. West Price Hill.

FRIDAY, FEB. 1 Exercise Classes FitChixx, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Sayler Park Community Center, 6720 Home City Ave., Full-body workout consisting of weights, cardio and core work. All ages and abilities welcome. $45 per month. Presented by FitChixx. 205-9772; www.fitchixx.com. Sayler Park.

Farmers Market Lettuce Eat Well Winter Farmers Market, 3-7 p.m., Cheviot United Methodist Church, 3820 Westwood Northern Blvd., Locally produced food items. Free. Presented by Lettuce Eat Well. 661-1792; www.lewfm.org. Cheviot.

On Stage - Theater Broadway Bound, 8 p.m., Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, $23, $20 students and seniors. 241-6550; www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. West Price Hill.

SATURDAY, FEB. 2 Exercise Classes Spinning, 9-10 a.m., Western Sports Mall, 2323 Ferguson Road, Racquetball Center. Group cycling workout. Ages 14-99. $8-$10. Presented by SpinFit LLC. Through June 29. 451-4920; www.spinfitcincinnati.com. Westwood.

On Stage - Theater Broadway Bound, 8 p.m., Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, $23, $20 students and seniors. 241-6550; www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. West Price Hill. The Traveling Jekyll and Hyde Show, 7 p.m., Glenmore Playhouse, 3716 Glenmore Ave., Tells story of tiny touring theatre valiantly attempting to tell story of infamous scientist who learns to split his good side from his evil one. Ages 6-12. Benefits The Drama Workshop. $5. Presented by Playhouse in the Park. 5988303; www.thedramaworkshop.org. Cheviot.

Shopping

SATURDAY, FEB. 16 Exercise Classes Suzanne Blunk, Phillip Ray Guevara, Margaret Ivey and Heather Petersen star in “The Travelling Jekyll and Hyde Show,” a Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park's Off the Hill production, at 7 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 2, at the Glenmore Playhouse, 3716 Glenmore Ave. The show tells story of tiny touring theater group trying to tell story of infamous scientist who learns to split his good side from his evil one. The show is aimed at children ages Ages 6-12. Tickets are $5. For more information, call 598-8303 or visit www.thedramaworkshop.org. THANKS TO TONY ARRASMITH & ASSOCIATES. Glenmore Ave., The audition will consist of cold reads from the script. No appointments are necessary. If available, please bring head shot and resume. For questions, contact producer Mary Stone at maryinnyc@yahoo.com. Callbacks will be held on February 8th, if necessary. Free. Presented by The Drama Workshop. Through Feb. 6. 598-8303; www.thedramaworkshop.org. Cheviot.

Exercise Classes Introduction to Ashtanga Yoga Class, 6-7 p.m., EarthConnection, 370 Neeb Road, Rookie introduction of a progression of pranayanma (breathing tech), focus of gaze (drishti) and asanas (postures) leading to a unique practice for each participant. $30 for fiveclass pass. Presented by Yoga by Marietta. 675-2725; www.yogabymarietta.com. Delhi Township. FitChixx, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Sayler Park Community Center, $45 per month. 205-9772; www.fitchixx.com. Sayler Park. Spinning, 5:45-6:45 p.m., Western Sports Mall, $8-$10. 4514920; www.spinfitcincinnati.com. Westwood.

Health / Wellness Natural Solutions to Digestive Problems, 11 a.m.-noon, Miami Township Senior Center, 8 North Miami Ave., Information on acid reflux, hiatal hernias, ulcers, irritable bowel syndrome, colitis, and Crohn’s disease. Free. Presented by Foundation for Wellness Professionals. 941-0378. Cleves.

Prom Dress Exchange/Sale, 9 a.m.-2:30 p.m., St. Dominic Church, 4551 Delhi Road, O’Connor Hall. Drop off gently worn dresses 9-11 a.m. $7 donation for every dress brought in to sell. Sale is 11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Benefits FORCE, Facing Our Risk of Cancer Empowered. Free. Presented by FORCE: Facing Our Risk of Cancer Empowered. 471-7741; www.facingourrisk.org/cincinnati. Delhi Township.

TUESDAY, FEB. 5

SUNDAY, FEB. 3

Barefoot in the Park, 6:30-9:30 p.m., Glenmore Playhouse, Free. 598-8303; www.thedramaworkshop.org. Cheviot.

Education Dave Ramsey’s Financial Peace University, 7-8:30 p.m., Vineyard Westside Church, 3420 Glenmore Ave., Buyer Beware. Learn to get rid of debt, manage your money, spend and save wisely and more. Price is per household for lifetime membership. $99. Registration required. 922-7897; www.daveramsey.com/fpu/preview. Cheviot.

On Stage - Theater Broadway Bound, 2 p.m., Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, $23, $20 students and seniors. 241-6550; www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. West Price Hill.

MONDAY, FEB. 4 Auditions Barefoot in the Park, 6:30-9:30 p.m., Glenmore Playhouse, 3716

Exercise Classes Faith-Based Yoga, 6:45-7:45 p.m., Vineyard Westside Church, 3420 Glenmore Ave., Second Floor Green Room. Faith-based yoga class open to all levels. Free, donations requested. 295-5226; www.tailoredfitonline.com. Cheviot.

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 6 Auditions

Dance Classes Dance Class, 4:30-8:30 p.m., Douce Dance Studio, 3772 Shady Lane, Dance instructions. Ages 2 1/2-adult. Tap, ballet, jazz/hiphop, gymnastics, baton twirling. $25 monthly. Registration required. 941-0202. North Bend.

Education Boating Skills & Seamanship Course, 7-9 p.m., Diamond Oaks Career Development Campus, 6375 Harrison Ave., Continues through May 8. U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary 13-week class for boat operators. $40. Registration required. Presented by U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary. 742-4699; www.cgaux.org. Dent.

Exercise Classes FitChixx, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Sayler

ABOUT CALENDAR To submit calendar items, go to www.cincinnati.com and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to life@communitypress.com along with event information. Items are printed on a spaceavailable basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to www.cincinnati.com and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page. Park Community Center, $45 per month. 205-9772; www.fitchixx.com. Sayler Park.

Religious - Community Wednesday Night Solutions, 7-8:30 p.m., Vineyard Westside Church, 3420 Glenmore Ave., Weekly interactive DVD presentation hosted by Dr. Henry Cloud and Dr. John Townsend. Variety of topics addressing everyday issues such as communication, conflict and more. 922-7897; www.cloudtownsend.com/ resources/solutions. Cheviot.

Support Groups Western Hills Job Search Satellite Group, 9-11 a.m., Westwood First Presbyterian Church, 3011 Harrison Ave., Community members welcome to learn from and support each other in job-seeking process. Speakers present valuable content about latest in electronic resumes, LinkedIn, effective networking, interview skills, available funding and community resources. Group members provide support and accountability to one another during this stressful time. Free. 6089359. Westwood.

THURSDAY, FEB. 7 On Stage - Theater Broadway Bound, 8 p.m., Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, $23, $20 students and seniors. 241-6550; www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. West Price Hill.

Youth Sports Instructional Basketball, 4:30-5:30 p.m., Sayler Park Community Center, $10, plus $2 membership. 941-0102; www.cincyrec.org. Sayler Park.

FRIDAY, FEB. 8 Exercise Classes FitChixx, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Sayler Park Community Center, $45 per month. 205-9772; www.fitchixx.com. Sayler Park.

Farmers Market Lettuce Eat Well Winter Farmers Market, 3-7 p.m., Cheviot United Methodist Church, Free. 661-1792; www.lewfm.org. Cheviot.

Music - Blues Chuck Brisbin & the Tuna Project, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Jim & Jack’s on the River, 3456 River Road, $4. 251-7977. Riverside.

On Stage - Theater Broadway Bound, 8 p.m., Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, $23, $20 students and seniors. 241-6550; www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. West Price Hill.

SATURDAY, FEB. 9 Exercise Classes Spinning, 9-10 a.m., Western Sports Mall, $8-$10. 451-4920; www.spinfitcincinnati.com. Westwood.

Music - Benefits Diamonds and Denim 2, 7-11 p.m., Seton High School, 3901 Glenway Ave., Music by Forever Diamond, Neil Diamond tribute band. Cash bar. Baskets, raffles and split-the-pot. Ages 21 and up. Benefits BeauVita. $30. Reservations required. Presented by BeauVita. 574-8777; www.beauvita.org. West Price Hill.

On Stage - Theater Broadway Bound, 8 p.m., Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, $23, $20 students and seniors. 241-6550; www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. West Price Hill.

SUNDAY, FEB. 10 Education Dave Ramsey’s Financial Peace University, 7-8:30 p.m., Vineyard Westside Church, The Role of Insurance. $99. Registration required. 922-7897; www.daveramsey.com/fpu/ preview. Cheviot.

On Stage - Theater Broadway Bound, 2 p.m., Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, $23, $20 students and seniors. 241-6550; www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. West Price Hill.

Your Energy, Vitality and Youth, 1:30-2:30 p.m., Renaissance West, 5156 North Bend Crossing, Learn to take better care of health and about benefits of maintenance care. Topics: how exercise and nutrition play a role in contributing to living a long, healthy life; simple solutions to health that can be fit into one’s life. For seniors. Free. Presented by Foundation for Wellness Professionals. 9410378. Monfort Heights.

TUESDAY, FEB. 12 Exercise Classes Faith-Based Yoga, 6:45-7:45 p.m., Vineyard Westside Church, Free, donations requested. 295-5226; www.tailoredfitonline.com. Cheviot.

Health / Wellness Free Hearing Screenings, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., The Place for Better Hearing, 3302 Westbourne Drive, Free. Reservations required. 922-0123; www.hearingbetter.net. Green Township.

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 13 Dance Classes Dance Class, 4:30-8:30 p.m., Douce Dance Studio, $25 monthly. Registration required. 941-0202. North Bend.

Exercise Classes FitChixx, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Sayler Park Community Center, $45 per month. 205-9772; www.fitchixx.com. Sayler Park.

Health / Wellness Free Hearing Screenings, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., The Place for Better Hearing, Free. Reservations required. 922-0123; www.hearingbetter.net. Green Township.

Religious - Community Wednesday Night Solutions, 7-8:30 p.m., Vineyard Westside Church, 922-7897; www.cloudtownsend.com/resources/solutions. Cheviot.

Spinning, 9-10 a.m., Western Sports Mall, $8-$10. 451-4920; www.spinfitcincinnati.com. Westwood.

Health / Wellness Free Hearing Screenings, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., The Place for Better Hearing, Free. Reservations required. 922-0123; www.hearingbetter.net. Green Township.

On Stage - Theater Broadway Bound, 8 p.m., Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, $23, $20 students and seniors. 241-6550; www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. West Price Hill.

SUNDAY, FEB. 17 Education Dave Ramsey’s Financial Peace University, 7-8:30 p.m., Vineyard Westside Church, Retirement and College Planning. $99. Registration required. 922-7897; www.daveramsey.com/fpu/preview. Cheviot.

Holiday - Valentine’s Day A Sinatra Valentine, 4-8 p.m., Willie’s Sports Cafe, 6380 Glenway Ave., Music of Frank Sinatra by Matt Snow. Drink specials. Free. 922-3377; www.willieswesternhills.com. Green Township.

On Stage - Theater Broadway Bound, 2 p.m., Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, $23, $20 students and seniors. 241-6550; www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. West Price Hill.

MONDAY, FEB. 18 Exercise Classes FitChixx, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Sayler Park Community Center, $45 per month. 205-9772; www.fitchixx.com. Sayler Park. Spinning, 5:45-6:45 p.m., Western Sports Mall, $8-$10. 4514920; www.spinfitcincinnati.com. Westwood.

TUESDAY, FEB. 19

Faith-Based Yoga, 6:45-7:45 p.m., Vineyard Westside Church, Free, donations requested. 295-5226; www.tailoredfitonline.com. Cheviot.

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 20

Religious - Community

Support Groups

Clubs & Organizations

A Transformed Life, 1-4 p.m., Sisters of Charity of Cincinnati, 5900 Delhi Road, Motherhouse. Provides context within which to understand both the challenges and the blessings of our journey of seeking God and living in a more contemplative way. $50. Registration required. Through March 10. 347-5449. Delhi Township.

Western Hills Job Search Satellite Group, 9-11 a.m., Westwood First Presbyterian Church, Free. 608-9359. Westwood.

Pioneer Antique & Hobby Association Monthly Meeting, 7:30 p.m., Nathanael Greene Lodge, 6394 Wesselman Road, Mulberry Room. Guests welcome. Presented by Pioneer Antique & Hobby Association. 451-4822. Green Township.

MONDAY, FEB. 11 Exercise Classes Introduction to Ashtanga Yoga Class, 6-7 p.m., EarthConnection, $30 for five-class pass. 675-2725; www.yogabymarietta.com. Delhi Township. FitChixx, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Sayler Park Community Center, $45 per month. 205-9772; www.fitchixx.com. Sayler Park. Spinning, 5:45-6:45 p.m., Western Sports Mall, $8-$10. 4514920; www.spinfitcincinnati.com. Westwood.

Health / Wellness How to Increase and Maintain

THURSDAY, FEB. 14 Health / Wellness Free Hearing Screenings, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., The Place for Better Hearing, Free. Reservations required. 922-0123; www.hearingbetter.net. Green Township.

Dance Classes

On Stage - Theater

Exercise Classes

Broadway Bound, 8 p.m., Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, $23, $20 students and seniors. 241-6550; www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. West Price Hill.

FitChixx, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Sayler Park Community Center, $45 per month. 205-9772; www.fitchixx.com. Sayler Park.

Youth Sports Instructional Basketball, 4:30-5:30 p.m., Sayler Park Community Center, $10, plus $2 membership. 941-0102; www.cincyrec.org. Sayler Park.

Dance Class, 4:30-8:30 p.m., Douce Dance Studio, $25 monthly. Registration required. 941-0202. North Bend.

Religious - Community Wednesday Night Solutions, 7-8:30 p.m., Vineyard Westside Church, 922-7897; www.cloudtownsend.com/resources/solutions. Cheviot.


LIFE

JANUARY 30, 2013 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • B3

‘Cooking Provost’ shares barbecue sauce recipe cooks from scratch and preserves jars and jars of food. He’s legendary for bringing staff and students together through quarterly foodie events. Last fall he made 400 pounds of potato salad and slaw for a barbecue event. This is his way of team building. By bringing students and staff together to share his food, camaraderie abounds everyone starts out on a trustful, friendly footing. Larry is a spontaneous and generous cook, and shares his Findlay Market award-winning barbecue sauce today. Wouldn’t this be delish brushed over a big slab of ribs for the Super Bowl!

won’t get from other sweeteners. The heat and unique flavors come from hot sauce and spices. Finally, garlic adds a component not usually found in barbecue sauces. Adjust proportions to meet your tastes. Once you have mixed all ingredients together and let simmer on the stove under slow heat for two to three hours, the sauce gets thicker and flavors all meld into a rich sauce. As it simmers, stir periodically or sugar in sauce will burn, but if it burns a little all is not lost, you’ll just have a nice, smoky flavor.”

Roasted shrimp cocktail shooters with firecracker sauce

Bubba/Larry Johnson’s barbecue sauce

Larry’s words of wisdom: “When I make something I try to understand the ‘theory’ of the dish so I don’t fol-

Roasting keeps every bit of flavor right in the shrimp. A Super Bowl fave at our house.

Larry Johnson, provost at the University of Cincinnati, preserves jars of food he cooks from scratch. THANKS TO LARRY JOHNSON.

low recipes closely. Rather, I understand what makes the essence of the dish I am trying to create and I adjust components to accommodate what I am trying to create to make something unique. In this recipe I’m trying to

Johnny Cash opens Covedale season Johnny Cash and Tony Bennett will all appear at the Covedale Center of the Performing Arts next theater season. Or at least their music will. “Ring of Fire” and “I Left My Heart” are two of the six productions on the schedule for the theater’s Subscription Season that begins Sept. 5. All of the shows will run for 16 performances. “The response to our expanded season last year was phenomenal.” said Tim Perrino, Covedale artistic director. The Covedale will now have plenty of great subscriber seats available with great views of the stage – for renewing subscribers and new patrons alike. New subscribers are encouraged to get their seats now, for best seating choices. Cincinnati Federal Savings is back as the Covedale season sponsor. “We’ll now feature a full theater season and enough shows and seats for our expanding patron base,” Perrion said. Show titles, dates and descriptions: » “Ring of Fire” – The Music of Johnny Cash Sept. 5-29 Created by Richard Maltby Jr.; conceived by William Meade; crchestrations by Steven Bishop and Jeff Lisenby A set of gifted singers and instrumentalists sing through some of the greatest songs of one of America’s most brilliant singer/songwriters, Johnny Cash. Though he is never impersonated, his remarkable life story is told through his music.

» “Dracula” Oct. 17Nov. 10 By John L. Balderston, Hamilton Deane and Bram Stoker Lucy Seward, whose father is the doctor in charge of an English sanatorium, has been attacked by some mysterious illness. Dr. Van Helsing, a specialist, believes that the girl is the victim of a vampire, a sort of ghost that goes about at night sucking blood from its victims. The vampire is at last found to be a certain Count Dracula, whose ghost is at last laid to rest in a striking and novel manner. » “A Christmas Carol” Nov. 29-Dec. 22 Book and Lyrics by Tim Perrino; music by Jeremy Helmes; based on the book by Charles Dickens Come enjoy a fresh take on a Christmas classic. Share the holidays with thousands of Covedale patrons for this special musical version of Dickens’ all time favorite tale. » “The 39 Steps” Jan. 23-Feb. 16, 2014 Adapted By Patrick Barlow; from the novel by John Buchan; and the movie of Alfred Hitchcock Mix a Hitchcock masterpiece with a juicy spy novel, add a dash of Monty Python and you have “The 39 Steps,” a fastpaced whodunit for anyone who loves the magic of theater. This two-time Tony and Drama Desk award-winning play is packed with nonstop laughs, over 150 zany characters (played by a

cast of 4), an on-stage plane crash, handcuffs, missing fingers and some good old-fashioned romance. » “I Left My Heart. A Salute to the Music of Tony Bennett Feb. 27March 23, 2014 Created by David Grapes and Todd Olson “I Left My Heart” sports a thrilling score of 40 standards all recorded by Bennett, including “Because Of You,” “Stranger In Paradise,” “Top Hat, White Tie And Tails.” » “Gypsy” April 10May 4, 2014 Book by Arthur Laurents; music by Jule Styne; lyrics by Stephen Sondheim; luggested by memoirs of Gypsy Rose Lee; original production by David Merrick and Leland Hayward; originally directed and choreographed by Jerome Robbins. “Gypsy” is the ultimate story about an aggressive stage mother. Join Rose, June and Louise in their trip across the United States during the 1920s, when vaudeville was dying and burlesque was born. Jule Styne’s music and Stephen Sondheim’s lyrics include: “Let Me Entertain You” and “Some People.” Subscriptions tickets are $114 for the six-show series; single tickets $21 for student/seniors and $24 for adults Tickets available at the Box Office, 4990 Glenway Ave., by phone at 513-241-6550 and online at www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com.

make barbecue sauce that is tangy, sweet, with a little bite and unique flavors. The ketchup and vinegar provides tang. The dark brown sugar provides sweetness, and using dark brown sugar provides a richness you

Firecracker sauce

All I can say is this is addictive. Whisk together:

1 cup mayonnaise 1 ⁄4 cup Mae Ploy sweet chili sauce Up to 1 tablespoon Sriracha or other hot sauce (optional) Lemon juice to taste: start with a tablespoon and go from there

1 pound jumbo shrimp (16-20 count), shells peeled, deveined, tails left on 1 generous tablespoon minced garlic Olive oil Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste Palmful of fresh minced parsley

Check out my blog for this “American table” heirloom recipe.

Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator and author. Find her blog online at Cincinnati.Com/blogs. Email her at columns@communitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-248-7130, ext. 356.

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LIFE

B4 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • JANUARY 30, 2013

Lemon Law also also applies to leased vehicles Do you know what rights you have if the new vehicle you lease suddenly starts having major problems? An area man took his vehicle back to the dealership several times – for more than a year – but complains the problem never went away. George Spinner of Pleasant Ridge said he leased his new vehicle at the end of 2011. Although he loved the car’s styling and interior he soon had problems with stalling. “The car started dying at stop lights or if you stopped in traffic. It also would hesitate and lose power. Sometimes it wouldn’t go above 3,000 RPMs or 25 miles an hour,” Spinner said. Spinner took the car to his dealership several times and, although parts were replaced, the dealer could not reproduce the problems. “The car produced no computer codes. Occasionally it would do all those things, but they were inconsistent. You could drive for a week and it’ll be fine and then, all of a sudden, it would do it three or four times a day,” Spinner said. Over a period of several months the dealership replaced several fuel sensors and fuel pumps, but the problem

didn’t go away. Then, the last time Spinner says it happened, it was scary. Howard “The Ain car starts HEY HOWARD! jerking back and forth. I got off the highway on Route 4 and the car stalled at the light. I almost got in an accident because of it because cars behind me were coming and I just had a chance to pull over,” he said. Spinner said he has a stack of service records to prove the vehicle just is not safe. In fact, he says, he’s afraid to drive it. While the average yearly miles put on a vehicle is about 12,000 miles, Spinner has only put a little more than 4,700 miles on his car. What about the new car Lemon Law, which declares a vehicle to be lemon if it’s in the shop more than three times for the same problem within one year or 18,000 miles? It applies to leases as well as purchases and Spinner did file a claim with the manufacturer. He argued his problems certainly affect the safety, value or use of the vehi-

cle, as required by the statute. But, he says, the manufacturer denied the claim because it believed all the repairs had fixed the vehicle. After that latest incident in which he almost got into an accident, Spinner brought the car back to the dealership again. He also began filing with the Better Business Bureau’s Auto Line Program. “At this point, the way I see it I really don’t want this car back because it’s unsafe. It clearly, to me, qualifies for a Lemon Law,” he said. Fortunately that last incident prompted the manufacturer to call him and say it will take back the vehicle under the Lemon Law. Spinner says he still loves that model but just wants to get another one. Remember, if you have a new vehicle and feel it qualifies as a lemon under the law, you can file with the Better Business Bureau’s Auto Line Program. Howard Ain answers consumer complaints weekdays on WKRC-TV Local 12. Write to him at 12 WKRC-TV, 1906 Highland Ave., Cincinnati 45219.

HOME video uses humor in message for families Housing Opportunities Made Equal is beginning a new media campaign spotlighting the housing rights of families with children. As part of the campaign, HOME is debuting a short, fun video featuring an out-of-touch landlord who uses multiple excuses to avoid renting to families. “While our topic is serious, we wanted to use a bit of humor to help get our message across,” said Elizabeth Brown, HOME executive director. “As a fair housing agency, our mission is to educate property owners and managers about their obligations under the federal Fair Housing Act and to advocate on behalf of those who feel their rights have been violated.” The video begins with

the landlord placing signs on the lawn stating that children are not permitted to live in the Brown building. As the video progresses, families ask about the apartment only to be told various reasons why they cannot see it. “The signage is a flagrant violation of the law, but unfortunately many small landlords don’t know the law,” Brown said. “While other forms of illegal discrimination may be subtle, HOME continues to find many landlords openly saying they don’t accept families with children because they are ignorant of the

law, even though protections for families have been in place since the Reagan administration. Signs saying ‘no children’ are equivalent to those saying ‘no blacks’ or ‘no Jews.’ Our hope is that rental property owners in the Cincinnati area will learn from the video in a humorous way before they find out in a serious way by receiving a formal fair housing complaint.” In 2012 HOME filed six such complaints, and any family who believes they have been denied housing because of their children should call the agency. The video can be viewed now on the HOME website www.homecincy.org. Billboards promoting it are up until early February along four well-traveled roadways.

Library, marathon encourages kids to be fit The Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County is partnering with the Cincinnati Flying Pig Marathon and the Nutrition Council of Greater Cincinnati to help youngsters “Be Smart, Eat Well and Move More.” Once again this year kids can get their “oink” on at the Price Hill, 3215 Warsaw Ave., Avondale, Corryville, and West End branch libraries and the Main Library’s Children’s Learning Center. There will be a Pig Party Kickoff at 2 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 2, at the main li-

brary’s Children’s Learning Center, at Ninth and Vine streets, downtown. There will be fun Pig games for the family, Flying Pig mascot race, prizes and healthy refreshments. Through May 4, children (ages 5-12) are invited to keep track of the distances they move, the healthy food choices they make, and the time they spend exercising their brains with the Public Library by logging their efforts on the Kids’ Marathon “Hog Log,” available at all five of these Library

locations and online at www.flyingpigmarathon.com. The Kids’ Marathon allows youngsters to finish the 26.2 miles of a marathon in incremental steps, a half-mile or a mile, throughout the weeks leading up to the Flying Pig Kids Marathon on May 4. To learn more about healthy nutrition choices, tap into the vast reading resources and fun stuff go to the library’s kid friendly website at http://kidspace.cincinnatilibrary.org.

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LIFE

JANUARY 30, 2013 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • B5

Mercy cardiologists Woman’s club using new heart stent studies global MD of Mercy Health – Anderson Hospital, have all used the stent. They noted that Haq the procedures have gone well and have been positive about its deployment. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recently approved the Xience Xpedition DrugEluting Stent System from Abbott. The new stent system offers advanced technology paired with the largest variety of stent sizes in the U.S. market, making it suitable to treat a wide range of patients. Interventional cardiologists can place the

Xience Xpedition through direct stenting, meaning that physicians don’t need to use another device, such as a balloon dilatation catheter, to make way for the stent. This makes the stent particularly useful in treating difficult-toreach blockages in blood vessels. Direct stenting can also help save time and resources in the catheterization laboratory. Drug-eluting stents release a drug that helps prevent stent blockages. To learn more visit, www.e-mercy.com and engage in the conversation via Mercy Health’s social media channels @mercy_health on Twitter and Mercy Health on Facebook.

Emerging artists on display Summerfair Cincinnati will host its annual exhibit featuring the artwork of students from local colleges and universities. Fourteen local art students have been selected to display their artwork in Summerfair Cincinnati’s 2013 Emerging Artist Exhibition, opening Jan. 25. Those selected to exhibit in the Emerging Artists Exhibition were nominated by their professors and selected into the exhibit. They represent the next generation of local

artists to emerge in the broader arts community. “Every year we’re astonished by the remarkable work of these art students,” said Sharon Strubbe, executive director of Summerfair Cincinnati. “This exhibit is an opportunity for these students to showcase their tremendous work to the community. Their talent says so much to the future of Cincinnati’s already rich pull of talented artists.” The exhibition will showcase a diverse col-

lection of pieces. “Art enthusiasts can expect to see everything from photography and sculptures to fabric design, printmaking and multi-media,” said Strubbe. The exhibition will open to the public on Friday, Jan. 25, at the Clifton Cultural Arts Center during the opening reception from 6-8 p.m. The reception is free and open to the public. Summerfair Cincinnati will present one $1,000 Purchase Award to one of the 14 participating students.

SOUTHERN BAPTIST

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“Come Hear The Story of Jesus” 5421 Foley Rd. • 513-922-8363 Rev. Bob Overberg Sunday School..................................10:00a.m. Sunday Morning Worship ..................11:00a.m. Sunday Evening ..................................6:00p.m. Wednesday Evening Bible Study .........6:00p.m.

Liberty Missionary Baptist Church "Where Everybody is Somebody" 1009 Overlook Ave. 513-921-2502 Rev. Kendell Hopper Sunday School 10:00 am Sunday Morning Worship-11:00 am Sunday Evening 6:00 pm Wednesday Bible Study - 7:00 pm

CHEVIOT UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 3820 Westwood-Northern Blvd. Kerry Wood, Senior Pastor Lois Schalk-Hartley, Associate Pastor

9:20 a.m. Traditional Worship 10:20 a.m. Sunday School for All Ages 11:20 a.m Contemporary Worship Service 662-2048 www.cheviotumc.org

OAK HILLS PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 6233 Werk Rd. (Enter off Werkridge) 922-5448 Rev. Jerry Hill 10:00 a.m Worship & Sunday School Nursery Care Avail.

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St. Peter & St. Paul United Church of Christ

3001 Queen City Ave. 513-661-3745 Rev. Martin Westermeyer, Pastor Bible Study: 9 am Worship & Church School: 10 am Dial-A-Devotion 426-8957 www.stpeterandstpaulucc.org

economic issues

The Cincinnati Woman’s Club (CWC) began the year with an informative program focused on Greece and effects on the European debt crisis that was offered by the Greek Circle and Finance Class. Fred Copper, CFA, who is managing director and head of international equity for Columbia Investment Advisers in New York City, shared his knowledge and perspectives with CWC members and guests. Copper discussed the economic situation in Greece, its effects throughout Europe, and the ramifications for the U. S. economy and personal investing. Attendees valued his expertise and enjoyed informally interacting with him during a question and answer period

Speaker Fred Copper, managing director and head of international equity for Columbia Investment Advisers; Jill Haft of resident of Western Hills, co-chairwoman of the day and chairman of The Cincinnati Woman’s Club’s Greek Circle; and Terry Pattorini, regional vice president of Columbia Investment Advisers, at a presentation at The Cincinnati Woman's Club in January. PROVIDED

following his presentation. Since 1894 the Cincinnati Woman’s Club has focused on educating its members and working to make Greater Cincinnati a better place.

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LIFE

B6 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • JANUARY 30, 2013

Heart disease can cause hearing loss Is it really possible to listen with your heart? We hear with our ears and process speech and language in our brains, so what does the heart have to do with it? Heart disease damages hearing. Hearing loss happens 54 percent more often in people with heart disease than in the

general population. This is because the inner ear is extremely sensitive to blood flow. Inadequate blood flow and consequent trauma to the blood vessels of the inner ear can contribute to hearing loss. Researchers at Harvard University believe the hearing nerves are so fragile that the ears are

likely the first organs damaged by cardiovascular disease. Heart disease is DeWine the No. 1 killer in the United States. While this risk is widely

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known and many people – not all – take appropriate steps to deal with this threat, there is very little awareness of the growing body of research which indicates that an individual’s hearing health and cardiovascular health frequently correspond. Dealing fully with heart disease means a hearing check is also in order. The Place for Better Hearing is participating in American Heart Month by offering free hearing screenings throughout February. “It’s an opportunity to highlight the connection that heart health has on hearing health and to empower people with that knowledge. People with heart disease should not have to contend with the

additional stress that untreated hearing loss takes on their quality of life,” explained Laurie DeWine, doctor of audiology. “We are raising awareness of the threat that heart disease poses and the connection between cardiovascular health and hearing health,” added audiologist Stefanie Godbey. A family history of early heart disease and age are two key risk factors for heart disease. Controllable risk factors include smoking, high blood pressure, high blood cholesterol, overweight/obesity, physical inactivity and diabetes. Key elements for a healthy cardiovascular system – eating right and exercising – can have a

positive effect on hearing as well. It is reassuring to note that establishing an appropriate plan to deal with both problems does not require a daily visit to the gym. One study saw a 32 percent reduction in risk for heart disease when exercising once a week. If you are at risk for heart disease or have heart disease, get a free hearing check at The Place for Better Hearing. Call 513-922-0123 for an appointment. For more information on American Heart Month, contact www.AmericanHeart.org . For more information about The Place for Better Hearing, go to www.HearingBetter.net.

NEW PARK RANGER CHIEF

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LIFE

JANUARY 30, 2013 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • B7

LAROSA’S AWARD

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The second annual Buddy LaRosa “Reach Out and Make Smiles” Founder’s Award was recently presented to Tim O’Hara, second from left, owner of LaRosa’s Mount Orab restaurant. A resident of Mount Orab, O’Hara was recognized for his active involvement and long-term commitment to serving the community. With O’Hara are, from left, Mark LaRosa, LaRosa’s president and chief culinary officer and resident of Covedale; O’Hara; Buddy LaRosa, LaRosa’s founder and resident of Price Hill; Michael T. LaRosa, LaRosa’s CEO and resident of Delhi Township. PROVIDED

Parks having dinner, mystery or a high school horror? » Feb. 9 – Death Sucks. Beware! There is a vampire among us! Who will be his next victim? » Feb. 16 – Mardi Gras Mayhem. Has Tommy Tissuepaper’s temper finally driven his float makers to commit a Cajun killing? » Feb. 23 – NASCAR Knock-off. The checkered flag has been waved, but the real fight is just beginning in pit row! The cost is $34.50 per person, plus tax. Due to the popularity of the dinners, tickets must be purchased in advance and are subject to availability. Tickets may be purchased

Adults won’t want to miss out on great laughs during the Murder Mystery Dinners at The Mill Race Banquet Center in Winton Woods. The first mystery of the season begins Saturday, Jan. 26, and runs through September. Doors open at 6:30 p.m., dinner begins at 7 p.m. and the show starts at 8 p.m. Upcoming Murder Mystery Dinners are (note: shows contain adult humor and may not be unsuitable for children under 18 years of age): » Feb. 2 – A Reunion to Remember. It’s been 20 years since Filmore’s finest have reunited. Will the gathering be glamorous

online at GreatParks.org. No refunds will be accepted within 10 days of the ticket’s event. For additional information, call 513-521PARK (7275), ext. 240.

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LIFE

B8 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • JANUARY 30, 2013

DEATHS Betty Lou Burkhart

Geiser Funeral Home.

Betty Lou Knight Burkhart, 87, Delhi Township, died Jan. 4. She was a bookkeeper. Survived by children Kathy DeWitt, Tim (Charlotte), Michael (Felecia), Dan, Tom, Scott, Patty Burkhart; daughter-inlaw Nancy Burkhart; 18 grandchildren; 13 greatgrandchildren. Burkhart Preceded in death by husband James Burkhart. Services were Jan. 9 at St. Martin of Tours. Arrangements by Gump-Holt Funeral Home. Memorials to: Hospice of Cincinnati, P.O. Box 633597, Cincinnati, OH 45263-3597.

Paul Gangloff

Floyd Crooker Floyd M. Crooker, 87, died Jan. 18. He was a member of the Cincinnati Fire Department for 32 years. He wad an Army veteran of World War II and Korea. Survived by wife Diane Crooker; daughters Cheryl (Bernie) Meister, Mary Jo, Jaqueline Crooker; sister Ethel Holiday. Preceded in death by brothers William Jr., Robert Crooker. Services were Jan. 22 at St. Aloysius-on-the-Ohio. Arrangements by Brater-Winter Funeral Home. Memorials to St. Aloysiuson-the-Ohio Church or the Hospice of Cincinnati.

Laura Dolan Laura Cuozzo Dolan, 100, died Jan. 19. Survived by sisters Rose Brunner, Angela Costello; many nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by Dolan husband Dominick Dolan, siblings Joseph Cuozzo, Jeanette Menchen, Mary Barbieux, Grace Richter, Carol Wilburn. Arrangements by Meyer &

Paul A. Gangloff, 79, died Jan. 17. He was an electrician. Survived by wife Eileen Gangloff; children Karen (Bill) Graser, Paul (Janet) Gangloff, Monica (Art) Wells, Mary Lee (Terry) Boling; sisters Annette Mohrhaus, Alice Fischbach, Jane Denney, Betty Roy; grandchildren Krista (Brian), Nicole (Scott), Joshua (Emily), Arty, Sarah (Josh), Brandie, Olivia, Haley, Mason, Gangloff Muriel. Preceded in death by grandson David Gangloff, parents Al, Marie Gangloff, siblings Mary Ellen Smith, Robert, Albert Gangloff. Services were Jan. 21 at St. Joseph Church. Arrangements by B.J. Meyer Sons Funeral Home. Memorials to: Hospice of Cincinnati, P.O. Box 633597, Cincinnati, OH 45263-3597, American Cancer Society, 2808 Reading Road, Cincinnati, OH 45206 or St. Joseph Church of North Bend General Fund.

Lowell Griffith Sr. Lowell F. Griffith Sr., 72, died Jan. 16. He was owner of Lowell & S-Hair-Ins Hair Design. Survived by companion Sue Laughlin; children Melissa (Mike) Hausfeld, Lowell Griffith Jr.; grandson Michael Hausfeld; many nieces and Griffith nephews. Preceded in death by wife Sharon Griffith. Services were Jan. 23 at Our Lady of Lourdes. Arrangements by Radel Funeral Home. Memorials to the Bonnie J. Addario Lung Cancer Foundation.

Robert Hamilton Robert E. Lee Hamilton, 73, died Jan. 19. He was a machinist for Powell Valve.

Survived by wife Margaret Hamilton; daughters Karen (Dave) Bollinger, Jackie (Tom) Riggs, Deborah Amrhein; grandchildren Amber, Cody Ochs, Eric Amrhein; sisters Betty (Paul) Nieheisel, Rita Spies; two greatgrandchildren. Services were Jan. 24 at Radel Funeral Home. Memorials to: American Heart Association, 15120 Collections Center Drive, Chicago, IL 60693.

Byrd Knauber Byrd E. Knauber, 83, died Jan. 17. He was a dentist. Survived by daughter Marti (Tom) Schoenfeld; grandchildren Sarah Knauber, Emily (Colin) Crotty, Robert (Deborah), Nicholas (Lauren) Schoenfeld; greatgrandchildren Shane Knauber, Kendall, Cameron Crotty. Preceded in death by wife Janet Knauber, son David Knauber. Knauber Services were Jan. 21 at Meyer Funeral Home. Memorials to: The Salvation Army, 114 E. Central Ave., P.O. Box 596, Cincinnati, OH 45202 or Oak Hills Presbyterian Church Memorial Fund, 6233 Werk Road, Cincinnati, OH 45248.

Matthew Koppers Matthew David Koppers, 23, died Jan. 18. He was deployed to Afghanistan and also to Haiti to help in hurricane relief efforts. Survived by parents Susan (Mike) Lambert, William Koppers; sisters Brittany (David) Schulte, Amanda Koppers; Koppers nephew Adam Schulte; grandparents Janet, John Lynch, Ginny Koppers; step-grandmother Audrey Lambert; many aunts, uncles and cousins. Preceded in death by grandfather Wilhelmus Koppers,

step-grandfather John Lambert. Services were Jan. 22 at St. Teresa of Avila. Arrangements by Neidhard-Minges Funeral Home. Memorials to: Wounded Warrior Project, 230 W. Monroe St., Suite 200, Chicago, IL 60606.

Joan McGuire Joan Elizabeth McGuire, 56, Cheviot, died Jan. 22. She taught art at Mother of Mercy High School for 34 years. Survived by siblings James, Andrew (Holly), Matthew McGuire, Ellen (J.B.) Conner, Gwen (late McGuire William) Slater; many nieces and nephews, great-nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by parents James, Jane McGuire. Services were Jan. 25 at St. Martin of Tours. Arrangements by Neidhard-Minges Funeral Home. Memorials to: Joan McGuire Art Scholarship Fund, Mother of Mercy High School, 3036 Werk Road, Cincinnati, OH 45211.

Nicholas Miceli Nicholas Miceli, 92, died Jan. 22. Survived by children Dennis (Frances), Steven (Tina), Kevin (Mary) Miceli, Marlene (the late Fred) Flick, Donna (John) Kurcz; 10 grandchildren; seven greatgrandchildren. Preceded in death by wife Carol Miceli, siblings Virginia, Mary, Vincent, James, George, S. Gregory, Nicola Miceli Miceli, Febronia Oliver. Services were Jan. 26 at St. Teresa of Avila. Arrangements by Meyer & Geiser Funeral Home. Memorials to: Old St. Mary’s Pregnancy Center, 123 E. 13th St., Cincinnati, OH 45210.

Margaret Morgan Margaret Phillips Morgan, 93,

Price Hill, died Jan. 21. She was a homemaker. Survived by sons Daryl (Kelly), Edward (Tina) Morgan; grandchildren Sean, Kate, Ben, Molly, Ryan, Evan, Erin; great-grandchildren Aidan, Charlie, Tony, Alex, Eidur. Preceded in Morgan death by husband Charles Morgan, son Charlie Boy Morgan, parents Edward, Irene Phillips, siblings William Phillips, Dorothy Becker. Services were Jan. 25 at St. William. Arrangements by Ralph Meyer & Deters Funeral Home. Memorials to: Msgr. Kennedy Scholarship Fund, St. William Church, 4108 W. Eighth St., Cincinnati, OH 45205.

Joseph Sellmeyer Joseph W. “Baldy” Sellmeyer, 79, Delhi Township, died Jan. 19. He was a dry wall installer. He was an Army veteran. Survived by siblings MarcelSellmeyer la Wright, Robert Sellmeyer, Margaret “Sissy” Wetterich; many nieces and nephews, grand-nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by parents Frank, Helen Sellmeyer, siblings Frank, Elmer, Anthony Sellmeyer, Caroline “Tiny” Manzi, Mary Bratton. Services were Jan. 24 at Ralph Meyer & Deters Funeral Home. Memorials to the American Cancer Society.

Mary Sinnard Mary Strotman Sinnard, 82, died Jan. 21. Survived by children Linda (Gary) Willig, Kathie (Mark) Zoellner, Bob (Kim), Patrick (Kim), Jim (Maria) Sinnard; siblings Robert Strotman, Kathleen Hansbauer, Margie Kinne, Patty Zepf; 13 grandchildren; 10 greatgrandchildren. Preceded in death by husband Robert SinSinnard nard, siblings Joseph Strotman, Judy Madigan. Services were Jan. 26 at Our Lady of Victory. Arrangements by Meyer & Geiser Funeral

Home. Memorials to: Santa Maria, 617 Steiner Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45204 or Bayley Benevolent Fund, 990 Bayley Place, Cincinnati, OH 45233.

Mary Louise Wanninger Mary Louise Liegibel Wanninger, 89, Delhi Township, died Jan. 22. Survived by husband Lawrence Wanninger; children Karen (Jim) Hadder, Bob, Bill (Kathy), Dick (Pam), Mary Patricia, Mark (Brenda), Tom (Paula) Wanninger, Kathy (Jim) Ernst, Anna (Dave) McCarthy, Joan (Patrick) Mohan; grandchildren Michelle "Mickie," Chris, Jeff, Dan, Emily, Nollis, Adam, Laurie, Miranda, Melissa Wanninger, Ella Wanninger Myers, Erin Ernst Womble, Amy Ernst Jenkins, Tim, Mark, Elizabeth, Andrea Ernst, Eric, Kevin, Nathan Hadder, Julie Hadder Warner, Carrie, Maria, Jonathan McCarthy, Allie, Mitchell Mohan; great-grandchildren Aiden Ernst, Allison, Carson Hadder, Madison Jenkins, Aleicia, Zachary, Joshua, Alyssa, Kylie, Samara, Asher Wanninger, Nathaniel, Rylan, Austin, Clay Warner, Karleigh, Keaton Womble; sisters-in-law Jackie, Angela Wanninger; many nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by great-granddaughter Ashleigh Hadder, sisters Laura May Liegibel, S.C, Rosemary Ell. Services were Jan. 26 at St. Teresa of Avila. Arrangements by Meyer Funeral Home. Memorials to: Bayley, 990 Bayley Place Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45233-9967 or Seton High School, Development Office, 3901 Glenway Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45205.

Al Zeiser Alfred A. “Al” Zeiser, 84, died Jan. 16. Survived by children Steven (Lauri), Daniel (Lori) Zeiser, Mari Beth (Thomas) Koopman, Nancy (Kenny) Hale; grandchildren Thomas Jr., Andrew, Christopher, Kacey, Patrick, Steven, Kathleen, Rachel, Jacob, Sarah; brothers Don, Andrew “Peach” Zeiser; many nieces and nephews. Zeiser Preceded in death by wife Doris Zeiser, nine siblings. Services were Jan. 25 at St. Dominic. Arrangements by Vitt, Sterner & Anderson Funeral Home. Memorials to Elder High School.

POLICE REPORTS CINCINNATI DISTRICT 3 Arrests/citations

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Lawrence Henderson, born 1986, possession of drugs, 3431 Warsaw Ave., Jan. 11. Debra Wehr, born 1985, possession of drug abuse instruments, 1038 Winfield Ave., Jan. 11. Aaron Underwood, born 1992, possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of drugs, 3421 Kensington Place, Jan. 12. Darryl Reynolds, born 1968, possession of drugs, possession of drug paraphernalia, 825 Chateau Ave., Jan. 13. Anthony Asher, born 1974, criminal trespassing, theft under $300, 3609 Warsaw Ave., Jan. 14. Curron Jones, born 1994, 1014 Parkson Place, Jan. 14. David Allen Grubbs, born 1960, theft under $300, 3609 Warsaw Ave., Jan. 14. Mandy L. France, born 1983, 539 Elberon Ave., Jan. 14. Bryant Green, born 1985, misdemeanor drug possession, 4100 Glenway Ave., Jan. 14. Cedric Collins, born 1983, criminal trespassing, 1912 Westmont Lane, Jan. 14. Deonte Turnbow, born 1992, criminal trespassing, 1916 Westmont Lane, Jan. 14. Rolando Reese, born 1957, 4014 St. Lawrence Ave., Jan. 14. Ashley May, born 1989, theft under $300, 3201 Warsaw Ave., Jan. 15. Clarissa Stevens, born 1991, trafficking, 825 Chateau Ave., Jan. 15. Richard Lee Elkins, born 1954, possession of drug abuse instruments, possession of drug paraphernalia, trafficking, 1091 Grand Ave., Jan. 15. Deandre D. Rucker, born 1993, 2146 Ferguson Road, Jan. 15.

Shantrea Coston, born 1987, 3201 Warsaw Ave., Jan. 16. Donta M. Kornegay, born 1986, possession of drug paraphernalia, trafficking, 1415 Beech Ave., Jan. 16. Kathryn E Heinlein, born 1991, telecommunication harassment, 1237 Purcell Ave., Jan. 17. Latosha Brown, born 1967, menacing, 3201 Warsaw Ave., Jan. 17. Ronald Carl Eldred, born 1955, notice of residence address change, 3201 Warsaw Ave., Jan. 17. Charles Arnold James, born 1954, 1159 Coronado Ave., Jan. 17. Denise Lundy, born 1959, 934 Sunset Ave., Jan. 17. Lashawn Harris, born 1994, carrying concealed weapons, 1647 Dewey Ave., Jan. 17. Jeffrey Scott Ross, born 1982, 3400 Glenway Ave., Jan. 18. Jeremy Stigall, born 1993, possession of a dangerous drug, 3050 Mickey Ave., Jan. 18. Johnny D. Smith, born 1969, 814 Purcell Ave., Jan. 18. Ronald Hines, born 1989, criminal damaging or endangering, 3050 Mickey Ave., Jan. 18. Antonio Clemons, born 1975, drug abuse, 4000 W. Liberty St., Jan. 18. Stacey Derrick, born 1989, carrying concealed weapons, having weapon under disability, 1234 Iliff Ave., Jan. 18. Salih Alawi, born 1980, obstructing official business, 76 Ivanhoe Ave., Jan. 19. Danielle M. Hunt, born 1980, disorderly conduct, 1234 Elberon Ave., Jan. 20. Gregory T. Koch, born 1969, felonious 606 Trenton Ave., Jan. 20. Massiach Hayward, born 1984,

See POLICE, Page B9


LIFE

JANUARY 30, 2013 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • B9

POLICE REPORTS Continued from Page B8 3745 Westmont Drive, Jan. 20.

Incidents/reports Aggravated menacing 1819 Tuxworth Ave., Jan. 12. 3792 Westmont Drive, Jan. 15. Aggravated robbery 4023 St. Lawrence Ave., Jan. 11. 3436 Warsaw Ave., Jan. 15. Assault 1702 Grand Ave., Jan. 10. 406 Purcell Ave., Jan. 11. 2144 Ferguson Road, Jan. 11. 4345 Guerley Road, Jan. 11. 5131 Glenway Ave., Jan. 11. 3701 Warsaw Ave., Jan. 12. 1026 Winfield Ave., Jan. 13. 1014 Parkson Place, Jan. 14. 539 Elberon Ave., Jan. 14. 3773 W. Liberty St., Jan. 14. 3609 Warsaw Ave., Jan. 16. 3050 Mickey Ave., Jan. 17. 3400 Glenway Ave., Jan. 18. Breaking and entering 1053 Wells St., Jan. 11. 2605 Ring Place, Jan. 11. 1734 Wyoming Ave., Jan. 11. 1038 Underwood Place, Jan. 12. 4241 Glenway Ave., Jan. 12. 3417 Warsaw Ave., Jan. 13. 1376 Covedale Ave., Jan. 14. 2543 Warsaw Ave., Jan. 15. 4935 Western Hills Ave., Jan. 16. 389 Elberon Ave., Jan. 17. 4023 St. Lawrence Ave., Jan. 17. Burglary 1029 Ross Ave., Jan. 11. 1148 Considine Ave., Jan. 12. 4366 Ridgeview Ave., Jan. 12. 3312 W. Eighth St., Jan. 13. 955 Purcell Ave., Jan. 13. 1820 Sunset Ave., Jan. 13. 4159 St. Lawrence Ave., Jan. 15. 466 Considine Ave., Jan. 16. 545 Elberon Ave., Jan. 16. 1237 Beech Ave., Jan. 16. 1256 Gilsey Ave., Jan. 16. Criminal damaging/endangering 1131 Seton Ave., Jan. 12. 6340 River Road, Jan. 12. 1743 Grand Ave., Jan. 14. 1819 Tuxworth Ave., Jan. 14. 1016 Sturm St., Jan. 15. Domestic violence Reported on River Road, Jan. 12. Reported on Purcell Avenue, Jan. 17. Reported on Sunset Avenue, Jan. 17.

ABOUT POLICE REPORTS The Community Press publishes the names of all adults charged with offenses. The information is a matter of public record and does not imply guilt or innocence. To contact your local police department: » Delhi Township: Chief Jim Howarth, 922-0060 » Cincinnati District 3: Capt. Russell A. Neville, 263-8300 Felonious assault 3434 Beaumont Place, Jan. 12. Robbery 5010 Glenway Ave., Jan. 17. 587 Elberon Ave., Jan. 18. Theft 3431 Warsaw Ave., Jan. 11. 3609 Warsaw Ave., Jan. 12. 522 Grand Ave., Jan. 12. 1023 Winfield Ave., Jan. 12. 591 Trenton Ave., Jan. 12. 3006 Glenway Ave., Jan. 14. 3050 Mickey Ave., Jan. 14. 3609 Warsaw Ave., Jan. 14. 4438 Ridgeview Ave., Jan. 14. 4806 Prosperity Place, Jan. 14. 4840 Glenway Ave., Jan. 14. 2670 Lehman Road, Jan. 15. 2701 Lehman Road, Jan. 15. 947 Grand Ave., Jan. 15. 1233 Fairbanks Ave., Jan. 16. 1276 Fairbanks Ave., Jan. 16. 1757 Iliff Ave., Jan. 17. 4400 Rapid Run Road, Jan. 17. 2600 Bushnell St., Jan. 18. Unauthorized use of a motor vehicle 1150 Purcell Ave., Jan. 12. Unlawful sexual conduct with a minor Reported on Wells Street, Jan. 11.

DELHI TOWNSHIP Arrests/citations Charles S. Loechel, 49, 2749 Glenway, driving under suspension at 500 Rosemont Ave., Jan. 14. Christopher R. Doherty, 33, 886 Suncreek Court, driving under suspension at 5179 Rapid Run Road, Jan. 15. Jordan N. Boeh, 19, 646 Roebling Road, driving under suspension at 501 Rentz Place, Jan. 15. Tomy Lander Elder, 19, 4539 Fehr Road, driving under suspension at 501 Rentz Place, Jan. 15. Sophia T. Henderson, 26, 5451 Hillside Ave., driving under suspension at 500 Greenwell

Ave., Jan. 16. Hane Stiens, 44, 222 Adela, driving under suspension at 4900 Delhi Road, Jan. 16. Donald Ray Asher, 48, 101 Margaret Street, driving under suspension at 5801 Cleves Warsaw Pike, Jan. 17. Roger Moore, 36, 2433 Glenway Ave., driving under suspension at 4600 Foley Road, Jan. 17. Thomas H. Brock II, 25, 4152 Delhi Road, driving under suspension at 4000 Delhi Road, Jan. 18. Michael Anthony Smith, 23, 4466 St. Dominic Drive, disorderly conduct at 4466 St. Dominic Drive, Jan. 15. Christian Mealor, 19, 365 Anderson Ferry Road, theft at 5080 Delhi Road, Jan. 20.

Incidents/reports Breaking and entering Theft of copper pipes, air conditioning unit and water heater at 4395 Cloverhill Terrace, Jan. 14. Copper pipes stolen at 5313 Plover Lane, Jan. 16. Burglary Jewelry and money stolen at 4685 Fehr Road, Jan. 18. Dryer and DVDs stolen from home at 4497 St. Dominic Drive, Jan. 19. Criminal damaging Car window broken at 570 Greenwell Ave., Jan. 18. Criminal mischief House egged at 5344 Orangelawn Drive, Jan. 19. Robbery Theft of backpack with gun, ammo and Nintendo games at 500 Rentz Place, Jan. 19. Theft Theft of merchandise from store at 4958 Delhi Road, Jan. 13. Stereo stolen from car at 5075 Dellers Glen Drive, Jan. 14. CE-0000536059

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LIFE

B10 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • JANUARY 30, 2013

Studio exhibiting art from alumni Studio San Giuseppe Art Gallery at the College of Mount St. Joseph presents its biennial Alumni Excellence Exhibition through Feb. 15. This exhibition of art and design alumni showcases works by five selected Mount graduates from years spanning 1971 to 2006. Three visual artists: Constance McClure (1971), Cynthia Matyi (1993) and Natalie Hellmann Shelly (2006); one graphic designer, Aimee Sposito Martini (1994); and one interior designer/ architect, Nodas Papadimas (1995) are featured in the exhibition. Constance McClure (BA – Art 1971) has taught at the Art Academy of Cincinnati since 1974. She has continued as professor emerita (1998), and is known beyond the Tristate for her painting and fresco work. McClure received her MFA in painting from the University of Cincinnati in 1974 as well as following specialized interests at Skowhegan School of Painting in Maine and the Fresco Workshop in Massachusetts. Her own teaching experience extends from the Art Academy to area colleges and the Ringling School of Art & Design in Sarasota, Fla. “I love the craft of the old masters,” she has said. “The history of materials is fascinating. For me, reading about pigments is recreation.” She paints in egg tempera, oils, encaustic, watercolor, fresco and her drawings can be gold, silver or copper point as

well as charcoal or graphite. Cynthia R. Matyi (BFA – Fine Arts/Painting 1993) returned to school after a lengthy career in health care to pursue art and her Appalachian and ScotsIrish roots. In 1985, while on a visit to Scotland, she encountered a rhythmic style of art which has intrigued and dominated her paintings ever since. Interlacing, spiraling, restless motifs used by ancient tribes on tombs, weapons and jewelry and later transformed by monks into the beautiful, disturbing and complex Celtic illuminated manuscript pages, now play an important part in the large oil paintings she creates. “I feel that this style, with its fantastical variations on the interconnectedness of the natural world, adapts well to the themes of my work which include ecology, peace, renewal and creativity,” she said. “The intimacy of the designs fascinate people, and I add many chromatic variations to delight and attract viewers on the aesthetic basis, first, while gently luring them into the world of the painting and the message it contains.” Matyi still finds time to play traditional music with the band, Silver Arm, and the founder and artistic director of the Cincinnati Celtic World Festival. Nodas Papadimas (BA – Interior Design 1995) subsequently completed the master’s of architecture program at Miami

“The Flabella Bearers” is an oil on canvas painting by Cynthia R. Matyi. PROVIDED

University in 1998. Since then he has worked as a draftsman/interior designer with Federated Department Stores and Greiwe Architects, residential designer and project manager for Elam and Associates, architectural intern and project manager with Anderson Associates Architectures, associate architect with Kennedy Homes and, since 2010, as principal/ partner, Synthesis Architecture Planning & Interiors. And, since 2005, he has shared his expertise as an adjunct faculty member in the (renamed) Department of Interior Architecture & Design at the Mount. “I really enjoy working together with diverse groups of knowledgeable people at Synthesis in order to find creative design solutions for our clients,” Papadimas said. “The different work experiences that I have received have given me profound insight into the different design and building industries. I strongly believe that my background and learning compliments the larger goals

of Synthesis, and these varied experiences have served well in the classroom. I feel I am a talented designer, with a professor’s mind and a salesman’s heart.” His travels have taken him to Central and South America and throughout much of Europe including an eight-week independent travel study in his boyhood home of Greece. “Ever since I came to this country, my dream was to practice residential and commercial architecture,” he said. “My attention to detail while balancing form and function has always been my primary focus. I design buildings not just for the aesthetics and for the families who will occupy them, but also for the impact that these buildings will have on the environment in the coming years, as well as for the next generations.” Aimee Sposito Martini (BA – Graphic Design 1994) has for the past 10 years served as Cincinnati Opera’s in-house graphic designer, design manager and illustrator. Working directly with the

marketing team, Sposito designs and manages all the printing for the company, including: programs, posters, brochures, billboards, banners, bus shelters, websites, newspaper and magazine ads, postcards, invitations and identity systems. She also designs merchandize that includes: t-shirts, buttons, posters, notecards, and mugs. “I have always had a passion for painting and illustration. With the summer festival season illustrations my goal is to convey the beauty, magic and heightened emotion associated with each individual opera,” Sposito said. “We’re inspired by a particular aria, a character, or a turning point in the opera’s story. I merge and cut photographs to create the images’ foundation/ composition, then add airbrushing to smooth and soften the image. Ultimately, I aspire to create something ‘painterly’ that also allows some of its photographic quality to shine through.” Natalie Hellman Shelly (BA – Art Education & BFA – Fine Arts/Ceramics 2006) pursued her interest in clay at the University of Missouri with an MFA in ceramics completed in 2011. Following her teaching assistant experience at Missouri, she was a visiting ceramic artist through the Kentucky Museum of Art and Craft with multi-week workshops in Elizabeth, Ind., and two in Louisville. She is now in her second

year as an instructor at Indiana University – Southeast in New Albany. Her undergraduate minor in art history and graduate minor in drawing serve her well in teaching several foundation courses that also includes beginning Ceramics. Her own contemplative ceramic work has been shown in galleries in Arkansas, Kentucky, New York, Missouri, Ohio, South Carolina, and Texas. “I seek to establish responsive relationships through mapping, drawing, and nurturing intimate interactions between line, shape, and object in my ceramic sculpture and drawings. These relationships open and affirm the connections between viewers and their surroundings by emphasizing careful and meditative interaction,” Shelly said. “Through my use of chosen materials, I present a temporal experience rooted in this sensitive interdependence while also commenting on the potential for objects and materials to express relationships of beauty and fragility. Studio San Giuseppe is a nonprofit art gallery in the Dorothy Meyer Ziv Art Building on the campus of the College of Mount St. Joseph. Gallery hours are Monday through Friday 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday 1-5 p.m. Admission is free. For more information, call Studio San Giuseppe at 244-4314.

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