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PRICE HILL

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CELEBRATING

120 YEARS page 3A

Your Community Press newspaper serving Price Hill and Covedale

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WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 11, 2017

BECAUSE COMMUNITY MATTERS

Snowflakes bring salt trucks in first 2017 snow Jennie Key jkey@communitypress.com

Mother Nature made the first snow of 2017 a light one, easing local road departments back in to the business of salting and clearing streets. By afternoon, many communities, including Hamilton County, were under a level one snow emergency, which means many school districts were closed Jan. 5, and across the West Side, public works directors said it was a good snow event for reentry to the snow treatment and removal season.

Delhi Township Delhi Township public works director Ron Ripperger says the Jan. 5 snow event was pretty easy to handle, and he hopes the remainder of the winter follows that pattern. Salt trucks were out by 4:30 a.m. in Delhi Township, Ripperger said. It takes about teo and a half hours to clear the township’s 54 miles of streets if applying salt, about five and a half hours if plows are required. Ripperger said most primary roads in Delhi are maintained by Hamilton County. A rule of thumb is if the road has a speed limit of 35 or has the

word ‘Road’ in the name, it is likely not a township street. There is a list of county-maintained roads on the township website at www.delhi.oh.us. Some of the streets in the newer subdivisions have not yet been dedicated as Delhi Township roads and cannot be treated by the township. A list of undedicated streets is also available on the township website.

Green Township Green Township public services director Joe Lambing says snow removal in his community went off without a hitch. He says his crew put out road salt without additives. “We stuck with that and it worked fine,” he said. Green Township has about 110 road miles to treat, and Lambing says he has 12 routes being cleared. “With a snow like this morning’s, we can clear the whole township in about two hours. If we have to plow, it obviously takes longer. And traffic can also affect our time. We get stuck in it, just like everyone else.” The township has two salt See SNOW, Page 2A

THANKS TO EMILY BUCKLEY

Christina Cooper’s second grade Spanish immersion class poses for a photo on the first day of school. Oak Hills voted to keep and expand the district’s Spanish immersion program.

Oak Hills keeping, expanding Spanish immersion program Marika Lee mlee1@communitypress.com

PROVIDED.

Green Township’s salt dome on Harrison Avenue holds about 2,500 tons of salt to treat the township’s 110 miles of township streets.

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Despite unknown costs and possible obstacles, Oak Hills is giving more students the chance to become bilingual adults. The Oak Hills Local School District Board of Education approved implementing the Spanish immersion program at all five of the elementary schools by a vote of 3-2. Board members Scott Bischoff, Julie Murphy and Paul Cooper voted for it while Jeannie Schoonover and Jan Hunter voted against it. “There are some risks, it is not completely risk free. There are obstacles that we need to work together to overcome, but we have to see the vision of what it could look like down the road. I see bilingual students, who become bilingual adults, who become bilingual professionals,” Bischoff said. The program started three years ago and teaches students in the program at C.O. Harrison, J.F. Dulles and Oakdale Elementary schools math and science in Spanish. With the board’s vote, the program will expand into Delshire and Springmyer ele-

mentary schools within five years. Assistant Superintendent Tim Cybulski said a Spanish immersion elective course will be added at all three of the middle schools and different or additional Spanish electives will be created for Oak Hills High School. “I just think there are too many unanswered questions about our ability to recruit and maintain quality bilingual teachers. There are too many unknowns on our present staff,” Hunter said. Cybulski said when the program is fully expanded there will need to be six to 12 teachers for the programs at Delshire and Springmeyer. Cybulski said he estimated the best-case and worst-case scenarios for the costs of the program. Staffing costs could be $0 to $1.26 million, aide costs could be $90,000 to $150,000 and recruiting cost is estimated at $20,000. “There have been minimal costs to the district in terms of staffing so far. The $1.26 million is the worst case, if we have to hire three to six new teachers at all the buildings. We were charged with sharing the best to the worst-case scenarios,” Cy-

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ho hours of college credit earned in 2015

stud ts students participate in daily community service

Learn more at elderhs.org

graduates ad te since 1922


NEWS

A2 • PRICE HILL PRESS • JANUARY 11, 2017

Brandt named Oak Hills superintendent at Oak Hills High School and director of Human Resources. He lives in A long-time Oak Hills Bridgetown and has two Local School District ad- sons, who are attending ministrator is hoping to the high school. help students reach their “I have thoroughly enfull potential as superin- joyed serving the stutendent. dents, staff, parJeff Brandt, ents and Oak who has been Hills community serving as the inas interim superterim superintenintendent dent since July, through the first was appointed by semester and the school board look forward to at a meeting Jan. Brandt continuing that 2. work to serve all “The school board is students and families,” excited to appoint such a Brandt said. talented leader to this imHe will earn an annual portant position. Jeff’s salary of $135,000. He professional and per- started as interim supersonal experiences within intendent after Todd Yothe Oak Hill School Dis- hey was appointed supertrict have prepared him intendent of the Lebanon well to lead us into the fu- City School District. ture,” Board President “Our talented and dedScott Bischoff said. icated team of adminisBrandt, 46, has been trators, teachers and supworking in the district port staff will continue to for 19 years, including as provide challenging opthe assistant principal of portunities to assist stuRapid Run Middle dents in reaching their School, principal at Delhi maximum potential,” Middle School, principal Brandt said. Marika Lee

mlee1@communitypress.com

PRICE HILL PRESS

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News Richard Maloney Editor ................248-7134, rmaloney@communitypress.com Melanie Laughman Sports Editor ......768-8512, mlaughman@communitypress.com Adam Baum Sports Reporter ...........513-364-4497, abaum@communitypress.com Twitter: @adamjbaum

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Snow Continued from Page 1A

storage locations: a dome on Harrison Avenue and a barn on Blue Rock Road. Lambing says the township should have plenty of salt to get through the rest of the winter. Residents can help salt truck drivers by watching for them on the road, and allowing them the space required to do their jobs.

Springfield Township Turns out, vodka is good for more than Bloody Marys. In Springfield Township, it can also help clear streets of snow and ice. The township is mixing it up this year and using a by-product of the vodka distillation process to punch up its road salt applications. It got a realworld test in the township Jan. 5. The new de-icing treatment solution is called Ice B’Gone Magic Liquid and it’s made from a blend of magnesium chloride combined with the vodka byproducts. Springfield Township public works director Michael Gould says the additive is sprayed onto regular rock salt, transforming it into IBG Magic Solid, a highly effective ice-melting product. IBG Magic Solid is safe to use on concrete, is non-corrosive, does not harm curbside grassed areas, or plants, and continues to melt ice to more than 35 degrees below zero. Gould says the new system got rave reviews. The first snow event of the season was a little tricky, because the temperature hovered in the low 20s. The township has two snow removal protocols and 20 degrees is the

Index Calendar ................6A Classifieds ................C Food .....................7A Police .................... 7B Schools ..................4A Sports ....................1B Viewpoints ............10A

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The Delhi Township Public Works Department maintains a 1,500-ton salt storage facility shared by the township and Hamilton County to provide winter snow removal service.

dividing line. When temperatures are above 20 degrees, the township adds a salt brine mixture to help road salt stick to the pavement better and activate on contact. It is mixed with the salt inside the auger of the truck to an oatmeal-like consistency before it’s spread onto the road. The strategy is to keep road salt from hitting the pavement and simply rolling into the grass, which happens to about 30 percent of the salt spread using traditional methods. The residual salt may remain on the road that will immediately begin working with the next storm. The prewetting with brine stretches the salt supply. If it’s colder, a different solution is needed. In the past, calcium chloride was the only treatment, which caused harm to plants and increased the corrosion rate for roads

and sidewalks. So the township made a change to the IBG solution. Gould says using the brine or the IBG solution means roads are safer sooner. Both help conserve salt. “We probably used about 20-25 percent less salt than we would have without the Ice B’Gone,” he said.

Colerain Township It’s not Colerain Township public services director Tom Bosarge’s first snow-deo. He took over the helm of the department where he has worked for 10 years in November. Comfortable behind his desk or the wheel of a salt truck, he drove a route Jan. 5 for the first snow of 2017. “I’m looking to give that up,” he said. Running the department keeps him plenty busy. Bosarge said 2017’s first snow was easy to

Spanish Continued from Page 1A

bulski said. Schoonover and Hunter both expressed concern about the cost of the program, not being able to find qualified teachers and the program not being equitable. “There are a group of parents that are very passionate about this program, but they represent a very small percentage of the parents in this district. The Spanish immersion parents only represent about 3 to 4 percent of the parents. So equity within in this program is a big issue for me,” Hunter said. “There are very few things in the district that are equal for all students. Equability just means it has to be fair,” Bis-

handle, with trucks out by 5:30 a.m. and roads were treated with no problems. Trucks were reloaded and ready to make another round of the routes if necessary later in the day. Bosarge said the township bought 4,000 tons of salt for the 2016-2017 winter season, so the salt dome is filled with 5.5 thousand tons of salt. The township has nine routes covering more than 110 miles of township streets. The township isn’t responsible for Colerain or Hamilton avenues, which are state routes, or roads such as Pippin or Compton roads, which are the responsibility of the county. Bosarge did have a request for residents. “We ask residents to avoid parking on the street if at all possible during snow events and not to shovel snow from their driveways onto plowed streets,” he said.

choff said. Murphy added that Rapid Run Middle School is the only middle school that teaches Mandarin Chinese. Murphy said despite there being unknowns with the program, it has been successful based on the number of students looking to get in and the reaction from parents. “The pilot is successful. I don’t think it was the intention that our district becomes a Spanish immersion district. We are fortunate to be a district of size and can offer quite a few magnet programs so we can serve all students in the district. We are trying to make sure that we are serving students in a way that education is meaningful for them,” Murphy said. Want to know more about what is happening in Oak Hills? Follow Marika Lee on Twitter: @ReporterMarika

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NEWS

JANUARY 11, 2017 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • 3A

Remke Markets Makes Online Grocery Shopping Convenient Pat Iasillo Over the past decade our world has become more accustomed to shopping online for the products we want. It makes sense not to waste time and effort shopping if we can just as easily click a few buttons to accomplish the same thing. However, there has been some reluctance when it comes to products we like to feel and touch before we buy. We don’t mind purchasing a book online or the latest toy, but some of us like to try on a pair a shoes before we buy them or like to feel the material on an article of clothing. The same thing is even more true when it comes to shopping for food. We want to be

in control when we pick our apples or our lettuce, or a beef roast. Therefore, shopping online for our groceries has met with some resistance. It can also be painful to sort through over 30,000 products to find what we want. That is all changing. Remke Markets has carefully thought through these issues before we offered an online solution to our customers. After all, we have been in business for almost 120 years, partly because we keep the wants and needs of our customers at the top of the list on our approach to the grocery business. That is why we offer something a little different; a personal shopper. Our personal shoppers

are carefully chosen to be as picky as our pickiest customers when it comes to choosing what to put in the basket. They also are people who are anxious to learn just what you like, how you like it, and if they don’t know, they will call you and ask before they choose. We feel confident you will be pleased that your shopper will far exceed your expectations. Couple a personal shopper with the ease of the Remke Mobile Markets website and you have a means of shopping for your groceries that is second to none. With your registration of your Remke Rewards card on our website, you now have access to the top 100 items you normally purchase at your fingertips. You may also like to shop our weekly ad. Now all you need do is click on an item when viewing our ad and presto, it

is on your shopping list. In addition, we have made it simple to shop for anything in our store by using our search bar, or by searching through every department and category. We even have an app available for download on your Apple or Android mobile device, and you can use it to scan the UPC barcodes of the items in your house to add them directly to your list. Once you finish your order, you may choose a pick up time even on the same day! Drive to the store, call or text the phone number on the sign posted in our designated pick up spot, and your order will be brought out and loaded into your car. Scan your credit card and you are on your way. The fee is waived on your first four orders so you have nothing to lose to give Remke Mobile Markets a try!

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4A • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • JANUARY 11, 2017

SCHOOLS

COMMUNITY PRESS

Editor: Richard Maloney, rmaloney@communitypress.com, 248-7134

ACHIEVEMENTS | NEWS | ACTIVITIES | HONORS

CommunityPress.com

SCHOOLS NOTEBOOK Elder High School » A two-hour school delay and single-digit temperatures would not deter the students, faculty and volunteers of Elder High School from delivering food and gifts to needy families during the school’s annual Christmas food and toy drive. The Elder Family was in full force as moms, dads, faculty members, graduates and friends came together to wrap gifts all morning so that the deliveries could be made as scheduled. About 200 students and faculty members volunteered their time after school to prepare and deliver the food baskets and bags of new toys directly to families’ front doors around the city. The drive originated in the mid-1970s as a food-only drive serving about 25 families, and it has grown to serve more than 260 families today. Toys were added to the drive in the early-1980s. “We think it makes a big difference to wrap these gifts,” said Pete Witte, a 1986 graduate of Elder and one of the event coordinators. “It’s fun for a kid to actually open a gift and not just be given a present of an unwrapped toy. The fact that it’s wrapped makes this toy drive a little different than a lot of other toy drives.” Event coordinators, including Witte, his wife, Ann, and Elder’s campus minister Roger Auer, work with local schools, churches, and other agencies to identify families in need within

Elder Principal Kurt Ruffing with wife, Tara, and daughters Mollie and Megan, spent valuable time together wrapping presents for needy families during Elder’s Christmas food and toy drive.

Elder guidance counselors Joe Driehaus and Kelly Kinross shop for toys during Elder’s Christmas food and toy drive.

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Elder senior Alex Hilsinger and student council president Roman Lee are ready to make their special deliveries to needy families.

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See NOTEBOOK, Page 8A

PHOTOS THANKS TO BRIAN BILL

Event coordinators Ann Witte, Roger Auer and Pete Witte enjoy their roles in Elder’s Christmas Food and Toy Drive.

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NEWS

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6A • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • JANUARY 11, 2017

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD THURSDAY, JAN. 12 Education Computer and Internet Navigation, 6-8:30 p.m. 2 of 3, Elder High School Schaeper Center, 4005 Glenway Ave., 3-day course (8 hours). Create, modify, animate and present slide shows using digital uploads. Bring flash drive. Requires knowledge and experience from Foundation Level coursework. Ages 18 and up. $35. Reservations recommended. Presented by TechReach at Elder High School. 921-3457; www.tech-reach.org. West Price Hill.

Exercise Classes Spintensity, 5:45-7 p.m., Seton High School, 3901 Glenway Ave., Studio located off 3rd floor garage connector and down the right hallway. Intense cycling class offered on RealRyder motion bikes with boot camp intervals throughout. $100 for 10-class pass, $15 walk-in. Presented by SpinFit LLC/RYDE Cincinnati. 236-6136; www.rydecincinnati.com. West Price Hill. January Intro to Yoga for Beginners, 6-7 p.m., EarthConnection, 370 Neeb Road, For participants who have never tried yoga. Ages 18 and up. $80 for 8-class series. Reservations recommended. Presented by Yoga by Marietta. 675-2725. Delhi Township.

FRIDAY, JAN. 13 Drink Tastings Biltmore Wine Tasting, 5-8 p.m., BIERmarkt, 420 Three Rivers Parkway, $12. 941-2437; www.biermarktusa.com. North Bend.

Exercise Classes RealRyder Cycling, 5:15-6:15 a.m., Seton High School, 3901 Glenway Ave., Off 3rd floor garage connector, right hallway. Group cycling workout. Ages 14-99. $100 for 10-class series, $15 walk-in. Presented by SpinFit LLC/RYDE Cincinnati. 236-6136; www.rydecincinnati.com. West Price Hill.

ABOUT CALENDAR To submit calendar items, go to Cincinnati.com/share, log in and click on “submit an event.” Send digital photos to kynews@communitypress.com along with event information. Items are printed on a space-available basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to Cincinnati.com/calendar.

Vinyasa Flow Yoga, 6-7 p.m., EarthConnection, 370 Neeb Road, $85 for 10 class pass, $50 5-class pass, $11 drop-in. Presented by Yoga by Marietta. 6752725; www.yogabymarietta.com. Delhi Township.

Health / Wellness Bayley Lunch and Learn, 12:30-1:30 p.m., Bayley Community Wellness Center, 401 Farrell Court, Jaychele Charles discusses healthy habits for New Year. Bring lunch, drinks provided. Ages 18 and up. Free. Reservations required. 347-1400. Delhi Township.

Music - Classic Rock Quiet Storm, 9:30 p.m. to 1:30 a.m., Club Trio, 5744 Springdale Road, Free. 385-1005. Colerain Township.

Recreation Pickleball, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Sayler Park Community Center, 6720 Home City Ave., Learn game of Pickleball, simple paddle game played using special perforated, slow-moving ball over tennis-type net on badminton-sized court. Membership required: $25 ages 25-49, $10 ages 50 and up and ages 18-24. 941-0102. Sayler Park.

Support Groups Caregiver Support Group: Bayley, 9:30-10:45 a.m., Bayley Community Wellness Center, 401 Farrell Court, Support group for caregivers caring for elderly or disabled loved one. For seniors. Free. Registration recommended. Presented by Caregiver Assistance Network. 869-4483; www.ccswoh.org/caregivers. Delhi Township.

SATURDAY, JAN. 14 Drink Tastings Wine Tasting, noon to 5 p.m., Henke Winery, 3077 Harrison Ave., 7 tastes, souvenir glass. Appetizers and meals available. Ages 21 and up. $10. Reservations recommended. 662-9463; www.henkewine.com. Westwood.

Exercise Classes Dance Jamz, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Emerge Dance Academy, 5882 Cheviot Road, High energy cardio dance fitness class that includes toning exercises. Ages 18 and up. $40 10-class pass, $5 single. Presented by Dance Jamz. 460-6696. White Oak.

Literary - Libraries Our Cincinnati, 1-4 p.m., Westwood Branch Library, 3345 Epworth Ave., Hamilton County residents can share personal stories and memories for inclusion in Our Cincinnati, digital celebration of neighborhoods throughout Hamilton County. Residents should bring in paperbased memorabilia like photos, letters, maps and advertisements to be scanned. Free. Presented by Public Library of Cincinnati & Hamilton County. 369-4474; cincinnatilibrary.org. Westwood.

Music - Rock Amish Mafia, 9:30 p.m. to 1:30 a.m., Club Trio, 5744 Springdale Road, Free. 385-1005; www.clubtriolounge.com. Colerain Township.

Sports Kentucky Enforcers, 7 p.m. v. Indy Naptown Allstars., Cincinnati Christian University, 2700

ASSISTED LIVING 8 MEMORY CA CARE INDEPENDENT LIVING

FILE PHOTO

January Intro to Yoga for Beginners will be offered 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 12, at EarthConnection, 370 Neeb Road, Delhi Township. Cost is $80 for and eight-class series. Reservations are recommended. Call 675-2725.

Glenway Ave., Basketball team in American Basketball Association (ABA). $10, $5 senior and student, free ages 4 and under. Presented by Kentucky Enforcers. 244-8100; www.kentuckyenforcers.com. East Price Hill.

SUNDAY, JAN. 15

Movers and Shakers, 1:30-2 p.m., Green Township Branch Library, 6525 Bridgetown Road, You and child sing, dance and enjoy music, movement, and fun. Free. Presented by Public Library of Cincinnati & Hamilton County. 369-6095; www.cincinnatilibrary.org. Green Township.

Exhibits

Literary - Story Times

Delhi in Bloom and The Language of Flowers, 12:30-3 p.m., Delhi Historical Society Farmhouse Museum, 468 Anderson Ferry Road, Learn history of Delhi Township through its floriculture with new exhibits. Delhi in Bloom explains how grapes, growers and greenhouses shaped history of Delhi Township and The Language of Flowers explores Victorian’s love of flowers. Free. Presented by Delhi Historical Society. 7200942; www.delhihistoricalsociety.org. Delhi Township.

Preschool Storytime, 10:30-11 a.m., Green Township Branch Library, 6525 Bridgetown Road, Enjoy books, songs, activities and more, while building early literacy skills. For ages 3-6. Free. Presented by Public Library of Cincinnati & Hamilton County. 369-6095; www.cincinnatilibrary.org. Green Township.

MONDAY, JAN. 16 Dining Events

PRE

Gourmet Monday Night Buffet, 4 p.m.-8 p.m., The Meadows, 59 E. Main St., The Grand Ballroom. Menu changes weekly. $15. Reservations for large parties available. 513-941-7638; www.themeadowsbanquet.com. Addyston.

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-OPE

EABSLE! T A ROW AVAIL

Exercise Classes RealRyder Cycling, 5:15-6:15 a.m., Seton High School, $100 for 10-class series, $15 walk-in. 236-6136; www.rydecincinnati.com. West Price Hill. Vinyasa Flow Yoga, 6-7 p.m., EarthConnection, $85 for 10 class pass, $50 5-class pass, $11 dropin. 675-2725; www.yogabymarietta.com. Delhi Township.

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TUESDAY, JAN. 17

brings a desirable new senior living option to the residents of Loveland and greater Cincinnati. Our residents will enjoy the privacy of their own residence, while still able to participate in a variety of social, recreational, spiritual and educational activities.

Education Computer and Internet Navigation, 6-8:30 p.m. 3 of 3, Elder High School Schaeper Center, $35. Reservations recommended. 921-3457; www.tech-reach.org. West Price Hill. ABLE/GED Orientation, 6-8:30 p.m. 2 nights-must attend both 1/10 and 1/17, Elder High School Schaeper Center, 4005 Glenway Ave., To register for GED class, attendance at 2-day orientation required. Both sessions required. Ages 18 and up. Free. Presented by Great Oaks Institute of Technology and Career Development. 921-3457. West Price Hill.

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Exercise Classes RealRyder Cycling, 5:45-6:45 p.m., Seton High School, $100 for 10-class series, $15 walk-in. 236-6136; www.rydecincinnati.com. West Price Hill. Dance Jamz, 10-11 a.m., Emerge Dance Academy, $40 10-class pass, $5 single. 460-6696. White Oak. January Intro to Yoga for Beginners, 6-7 p.m., EarthConnection, $80 for 8-class series. Reservations recommended. 675-2725. Delhi Township.

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WEDNESDAY, JAN. 18 Exercise Classes Yoga for the Back (Therapy), 7:15-8 p.m., EarthConnection, 370 Neeb Road, $85 for 10-class, $50 for 5-class, 11 drop-in. Presented by Yoga by Marietta. 675-2725; www.yogabymarietta.com. Delhi Township. Vinyasa Flow Yoga, 6-7 p.m., EarthConnection, $85 for 10 class pass, $50 5-class pass, $11 dropin. 675-2725; www.yogabymarietta.com. Delhi Township.

Recreation Pickleball, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Sayler Park Community Center, Membership required: $25 ages 25-49, $10 ages 50 and up and ages 18-24. 941-0102. Sayler Park.

THURSDAY, JAN. 19 Drink Tastings Bell’s Hopslam Release Event, 5-8 p.m., BIERmarkt, 420 Three Rivers Parkway, Craft beer tasting for release of Hopslam (on tap). Other beer includes Oatsmobile (on tap), Double Cream Stout (on tap), Two Hearted Ale (in bottles) and Smitten (in bottles). Normal menu prices apply. Ages 21 and up. Free admission. 941-2437; www.biermarktusa.com. North

Bend.

Education Microsoft Word, 6-8:30 p.m., Elder High School Schaeper Center, 4005 Glenway Ave., 3-day (8 hour) course. Ages 18 and up. $35. Reservations recommended. Presented by TechReach at Elder High School. 921-3457; www.tech-reach.org. West Price Hill. Genealogy Club, 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Green Township Branch Library, 6525 Bridgetown Road, Free. Presented by Public Library of Cincinnati & Hamilton County. 369-6095; www.cincinnatilibrary.org. Green Township.

Exercise Classes Spintensity, 5:45-7 p.m., Seton High School, $100 for 10-class pass, $15 walk-in. 236-6136; www.rydecincinnati.com. West Price Hill. January Intro to Yoga for Beginners, 6-7 p.m., EarthConnection, $80 for 8-class series. Reservations recommended. 675-2725. Delhi Township.

On Stage - Theater Doubt: A Parable, 7:30 p.m., Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, 4990 Glenway Ave., Powerful drama about Bronx school principal who takes matters into her own hands when she suspects young Father Flynn of improper relations with male student. $23-$26. Presented by Cincinnati Landmark Productions. 241-6550; www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. West Price Hill.

FRIDAY, JAN. 20 Drink Tastings Wine Tastings, 5:30-7:30 p.m., Nature Nook Florist and Wine Shop, 10 S. Miami Ave., Taste 4 wines from small production wineries around world. Appetizers included. Visit website for list of wines. Ages 21 and up. $5. 467-1988; www.naturenookwinetime.com. Cleves.

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NEWS

JANUARY 11, 2017 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • 7A

Bone broth, purple food trending for new year Broccoli cheddar soup like Panera It was a request I had to fill. “Do you have a recipe for cheddar broccoli soup like Panera?” I looked up a bunch of recipes and found a few that sounded promising. I tried out a couple and adapted only slightly to suit my taste. I used my chicken bone broth. Find a step-by-step photo primer on my abouteating.com site for both the bone broth and this recipe. 2 tablespoons butter 3/4 to 1 cup finely diced onion (not sweet or red) 4 tablespoons melted butter 4 tablespoons flour Dijon mustard - to taste, start with a little and go from there 2 cups half & half 2 cups low sodium, fat free, chicken broth Heaping 3 cups broccoli, chopped - I used frozen, thawed 1 nice carrot, cut into matchsticks, a heaping cup Nutmeg to taste - I grated a whole nutmeg and used a generous 1/4 teaspoon 8 oz. extra sharp or sharp grated cheddar plus extra for garnish Salt and pepper to taste THANKS TO RITA HEIKENFELD

This copycat Panera broccoli and cheddar soup can be made with nutritious bone broth.

Yesterday I walked across the field to I have to chuckle when I read trends. check on my elderly neighbor, John, and Heck, I’ve been trending way before the saw lots of grass-like blades poking through trends hit the news - we’ve been growing the soil. Farmer Bruner sowedhow rye elderberries and Indian/purple corn for right after he harvested pumpkins from the years! same field and that’s what was popping up. There are lots of more interesting food Husband Frank told me it’s called “winter and drink trends for 2017. I’ll be talking rye” since it can germinate through the more about them as we segue into the New snow. I look forward to early spring when it Rita Year. Heikenfeld becomes a field of wavy green. Tip from Rita: why this recipe is Since we’re beginning a new year, let’s RITA’S KITCHEN good for you talk trends for 2017. Guess what one is? Bone broth! Now I’ve been making super nutriBlack rice is whole grain, and used to be called tious bone broth for years the same way my Mom “forbidden rice” since it was eaten only by Empedid. Just basically cooking up a lot of bones with riors and commoners were not allowed to eat it. aromatics to make a healthful stock. No waste was Curry powder contains turmeric, a spice with her motto. anti-inflammatory qualities. The trend is to embrace the “no waste” philosoCinnamon helps lower blood sugar. phy. From root to seed is how chefs are cooking Garlic is good for your heart. now, using everything from the plant in some Cloves contain magnesium, calcium and iron, nutritious way. great for bone and overall health. Another trend is purple veggies and fruit, like Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educaeggplant, purple cauliflower, black rice (yes, it’s tor, Jungle Jim’s Eastgate culinary professional dark purple), elderberries, and even purple corn. and author. Find her blog online at The reason is that the anthocyanin (makes the Abouteating.com. Email her at purple color) in purple plants holds huge amounts rita@communitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchen” of nutrients, fiber and antioxidants. in the subject line.

Cook onion in butter on medium until translucent . Set aside. Make a roux: whisk melted butter and flour over low heat until bubbly and a bit golden, not brown. Whisk in mustard. Whisk in half & half and broth and cook to a simmer about 10 minutes. Add broccoli, carrots and onions. Cook over low heat about 20 minutes. Add nutmeg, salt and pepper to taste. Take off heat and stir in cheese until melted.

Barbara’s Indian-inspired rice The Indian spices elevate this to a new level. Thanks to Barbara D. for sharing. A good recipe to sub in black rice for white. 1/4 cup water 1 (14.5 ounce) can chicken broth 1 cup long grain rice or black rice 1 teaspoon curry powder 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/8 teaspoon paprika 1-2 pinches ground cloves 1 small onion, coarsely chopped

Bring water and chicken broth to a boil. Combine rice, curry powder, garlic powder, cinnamon, paprika, and cloves in a bowl; stir to mix. Add spiced rice and onion to the boiling broth. Cover and cook until rice is tender, about 25 minutes.

513-268-1186


NEWS

8A • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • JANUARY 11, 2017

COLLEGE CORNER Dean’s Lists University of Evansville Rachel Barkalow.

Graduates Wilmington College - Herman G. Clark.

On campus » Baldwin Wallace University Michael Hubert and Kyra Wrentz of Cincinnati were among more than 400 firstyear students who claimed $5.2 million in merit scholarships for their outstanding high school achievements. Michael Hubert, a graduate of Oak Hills High School majoring in finance, earned a $13,000 Trustees Scholarship. Wrentz, a graduate of Scarlet Oaks Career Development majoring in biology, earned an $11,000 Deans Scholarship. Lucas Clark was among more than 500 students who earned endowed scholarships at Baldwin Wallace University this fall. Clark, a graduate of School for Creative and Performing Arts majoring in theater stage management and arts management and entrepreneurship, earned the Douglas Hall Memorial Theatre Scholarship. Molly Huey was part of a

talented cast and crew that staged J.M. Barrie’s “Quality Street” during the fall semester. Huey, a graduate of McAuley High School majoring in theater acting and directing, played the part of Miss Willoughby. Lucas Clark was inducted into the Dayton C. Miller Honor Society. In order to be considered for induction, students must have earned a minimum of 70 semester hours, with at least 32 semester hours earned at BW. From those meeting the semester hour requirement, the top 100 current student GPAs are eligible for membership. » Berea College - Trisha Lucas was initiated into The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi, the nation’s oldest and most selective collegiate honor society for all academic disciplines. Membership is by invitation and requires nomination and approval by a chapter. Only the top 10 percent of seniors and 7.5 percent of juniors, having at least 72 semester hours, are eligible for membership. Graduate students in the top 10 percent of the number of candidates for graduate degrees may also qualify, as do faculty, professional staff and alumni who have

SCHOOLS NOTEBOOK

achieved scholarly distinction. » Miami University - These students spent the summer 2016 semester studying abroad: Samantha Bosse studied in Nepal; Adelaide Lottman studied in Luxembourg, Austria, Switzerland and France; Rebekah Duquette studied in Nepal; Samuel Jerow studied in Germany; Alexander Meloy studied in China; Sarah Wullenweber studied in Spain, France and Portugal. » University of Findlay – Jack Burg participated in the University of Findlay’s theater production of “Silent Sky,” by American playwright Lauren Gunderson. Burg served as a scenic shop assistant. Burg also participated in the Theatre Program’s female version of Neil Simon’s “The Odd Couple.” Burg served as a member of the props, set and costume run crew and as a member of the lighting crew. » Wofford College - Elena Kathleen Helmers-Wegman, a member of the class of 2019, is one of the many students on Wofford’s Orientation Staff who greeted first-year students Aug. 31 as the college welcomed the Class of 2020.

Teddy letters THANKS TO EMILY BUCKLEY

Oakdale students wrote letters of thanks to Teddy Kremer after his recent visit to the school, from left: front, Addison Schlesner, Ben Klaserner and Eli Richmond; back, Ava Miller, Julia Freese, Jack Weisker, Drew Stephens, Petros Vidas and Jayde Hughes.

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Continued from Page 4A

the Price Hill community and beyond. Those organizations include Santa Maria Community Services, the Contact Center, Holy Family, Resurrection, and Community Matters based out of Lower Price Hill. The drive would not be possible without the tireless help of so many volunteers and the generosity of others within the Elder Family. JTM Food Group donates products to be included in the boxes of food. The boxes themselves are donated by Elder grads Joe Sabato, Tom Brunst, Ron Dreyer and Scott Wegman. Students, faculty members, grads and friends make monetary donations. People like Mary Keilholz and Jim and Vicki Eckstein buy new toys. ery date. In addition, hams are donated by Butch and Karen Hubert, and turkeys are donated by school families and friends of Elder, making it possible to for families to have a Christmas dinner. Added Witte, “This represents what Elder is about. It is giving back to the community. It is creating grads that understand that giving back is about as important of a thing you can do in life.”

Mother of Mercy High School » Mother of Mercy Religion teacher Bob Bonnici traveled to the Holy Land to interact with Catholic students in Palestine. He traveled with HOPE Voices, an organization that promotes educational outreach and interaction between Catholic schools in the United States and the Holy Land. Bonnici and HOPE president Ann Andriacco spent time with students at the Visitation Parish and School in the village of Zababdeh, the only majority Christian village in the Northern West Bank. Most of the students are Catholic; however, a few Muslim students attend Visitation. Bonnici, Andriacco and the school’s principal initiated a digital photography project illustrating the cooperation and camaraderie among the Catholic and Muslim students and teachers at the school. Organizers say this is one way to create dialogue and to build trust between the two groups of students. Bonnici says it’s important to connect withr Catholics in the Holy Land because “we are a Global Church, and the Catholics who live where Jesus walked the earth can give us a deeper appreciation of our Lord’s life and mission.” Bonnici also visited sites in Jordan, Bethlehem and Jerusalm. Bonnici worked with students in Palestine; teachers at Visitation School plan to visit Cincinnati and Mother of Mercy next year. Bonnici says he will share some of his experiences in the Holy Land with his classes at Mercy. “I hope to share some of the joys and hopes of the students in the Catholic schools and refugee camps in the Holy Land with my students to help us appreciate that we are a very big and global Church with fellow faithful sisters and brothers around the world.” While this trip is the farthest Bonnici has traveled. the effort is part of Bonnici’s regular service activity in Cincinnati. Bonnici spearheads an effort at Mother of Mercy to participate in ser-

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THANKS TO CHRISTY SCHUTTE

Seton High School students tutored and read to students at Carson Elementary School as part of the Share the Sisterhood all-school service day. Counterclockwise, from left: senior Abby Niederhausen, sophomore Mary Peters, students from Carson Elementary, senior Sara Neumeister and senior Anna Macenko.

vice projects with Muslim students at the Islamic Center of Greater Cincinnati and Jewish students at the Mayerson JCC. The three groups continue to serve alongside each other at the Imago Earth Center in Price Hill twice a year. As for what he liked most about his trip, Bonnici said, “I enjoyed meeting the Palestinian children in the Catholic schools. They are so much like our students here in the States, eager to learn and make friends.”

Seton High School » Seton High School students participated in learning that happens outside of the classroom with a day of service. The morning began with breakfast in their mentor groups and then listening to guest speaker Clare Blankemeyer from the Mayerson Foundation. Students and staff were divided into 24 groups to serve in various organizations throughout the city. From as close as Holy Family in Price Hill to as far away as troops that are deployed overseas, students were touching lives and making a difference. From Bayley to Bethany House to the Down Syndrome Association, Santa Maria, Kenzie’s Closet and so many more -- these students say thank you to all of the organizations that allowed them to be of service.

TAYLOR HIGH SCHOOL HONOR ROLLS TAYLOR HIGH SCHOOL

These students have earned 4.0 honors and 3.5-3.999 honors for the first quarter of 20162017 (to see the entire honor roll, go to Cincinnati.com http://cin.ci/2gL57Rt):

Freshmen

1

PROVIDED

Bob Bonnici, Mercy religion teacher, poses with three students from Visitation School in Palestine.

3.500-3.999 GPA - Samantha Alloway, Anna Bracken, Emily Brettschneider, Sophia Bruns, Xander Chatman, Emma Cummins, Lydia Cundiff, Erin Day, Jack Dreyer, Breanna Gratz, Chase Grauel, Hunter Hanauer, Matthew Hibbard, Megan Holbrock, Sarah Kelley, Kyle Knue, Brooklynn Linneman, Reagan McDonald, Elizabeth Meyer, Dailey Moore, Emma Neiheisel, Rachel Nienaber, Grace Pastrick, Magot Paul, Madelynn Peace, Mitchell Peter, Stephanie Rohlfer, Ryan Seibert, Evette Ullmann, Bennett Weiherer. 4.00 GPA - Benjamin Wessel.

Sophomores 3.500-3.999 GPA - Nicholas Bartholomew, Charles Becker, Shelby Bibee, Steven Bledsoe, Sydney Budke, Morgan Childs, Hailey Colligan, Eric Dart, Abbi Davis, Brooke Davis, Katelyn Day, Darien Denney, Nicholas

Detzel, Maxwell Fries, Nicole George, Therese Gerth, Luke Hannum, Taylor Howard, Alexandra Huston, Jacob Janszen, Morgan Kincaid, Hannah Korte, Thomas Kreisa, Jade Krimmer, Caitlin Lanham, Kylie Luttrell, Justin Mahoney, Margaret Miller, Andrew Murphy, Jensen Murphy, Trevor O’Brien, Kody Penn, Kristopher Penn, William Pitzer, Jordan Renner, Ashley Richards, Kellie Smith, Koryn Thomas, Megan Tice, Jesse Timmerman, Maggie Todorov, Elizabeth Urmston, Allison Weis, Emily Weis, Isabella Wentz, Emma Wilson, Aaron Wood. 4.00 GPA - Anna Becker, Clare Forbes, Mary Kleier, Samuel Konerman, Hayden Lang, Brittney Olding, Jessica RochaTorres, Olivia Wolfe.

Juniors 3.500-3.999 GPA - Christos Batsakis, Gunner Booth, Logan Bray, Lydia Bruns, Jennnifer Coffey, Eden Craig, Derrik Deidesheimer, Alexis Drake, Kaitlin Fellinger, Megan Finley, Jaid Freudiger, Katie Godar, Emily Good, Rachel Hardtke, Luciana Harvey, Jacob Haussler, Noah Heller, Brandi Hines, Mikayla Hinton, Mogan Hodge,

Sophie Hutzel, Madison Illing, Shayla Jennings, Grace Kelley, Kyle Kent, Megan Kilby, Kurt Knue, Emily Korte, Audrianna Kramer, Bridget Lanham, Allison Leone, Robert Martini, Aaron Meeks, Hallie Menkhaus, Garrett Murphy, John Pierce, Jacob Pierson, Sydney Poynter, Kaylee Rattie, Audrey Simonson, Elizabeth Voss, Jordan Whitt, Skyler Yates. 4.00 GPA - Jessica Lakamp.

Seniors 3.500-3.999 GPA - Ben Alsip, Thomas Beam, Lydia Blanton, Maria Bowman, Olivia Burger Kayla Coleman, Sara Coombs, Boaz Craig, Allison Draughn, Kylee Draughn, Katherine Ellwood, Madeline Gleckler, Bradley Greene, Brandyn Greene, Nakayla Hammond, Nathan Hellebusch, Nicole Herbert, Tessa Kennedy, Evan Lamb, Kayley Lane, Kelsey Lawless, Rebecca Leisure, Isabelle Murray, Teresa Oliver, Allie Pangallo, Abigail Rapien, Katelyn Rohlfer, David Scheurer, Jenna Snowden, Joseph St John, Teagan Stapleton, Nicolaus Triplett, Destiny Trivett, Sadie Vincent, Lydia Wasserbauer, AJ Weiherer. 4.00 GPA - Holly Wanek.


NEWS

JANUARY 11, 2017 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • 9A

AROUND YOUR COMMUNITIES CHEVIOT

Slaughter takes over as law director Deborah M. Slaughter was sworn in by Judge Pat Dinkelacker Jan. 3 as the Cheviot law director. She replaces Mark Waters, who retired after 21 years. Slaughter has been an Ohio licensed attorney for 10 years. She graduated with honors from Seton and graduated magna cum laude from Mount St. Joseph with a bachelor of arts in paralegal studies and a minor in business management. Returning to school late in life, she graduated with a Juris Doctorate from Chase Law School and became a licensed attorney at 50 concentrating her practice on estate planning and administration and family law. Slaughter served as the council president for nine years. Appointed in August 2007 to fill an unexpired term, she was elected in November 2007 and was re-elected in 2009 and in 2013. As council president, she brought her legal education and her experience as an attorney, educator and manager to council to lead and drive the agenda. She was active in the community as a board member and treasurer for CWCA and a member of Cheviot Rocks. She attended regional meetings and LSDMC meetings at Cheviot School. She was instrumental in the Realtors’ Brunches

Slaughter

and initiated the Cheviot Family Day. She formed two task forces - fiscal sustainability is a plan to improve the city’s capital assets while maintaining city services, and Vision 2020’s goal is to set forth a bold vision for the future that is unique to our small city by providing a set of innovative, transformative strategies that chart the course for achieving the vision. Slaughter is a lifelong West Sider, and has lived in Cheviot for 18 years. She and her husband, Charlie, have five children and 10 grandchildren.

DELHI TOWNSHIP

Administrator search continues The Delhi Township Board of Trustees continues its search for a replacement for former township administrator Pete Landrum. There were 30 applicants for the position, and trustess are now in a second round of interviews with six candidates. They are: » Steven Burns is

chief operating officer and fiscal director of Summit Behavioral Healthcare. He was formerly chief deputy of operations and served as budget and finance director for the Hamilton County Recorder’s Office. » Jack Cameron is administrator in Clear Creek Township in Warren County. He was formerly the administrator for Evendale and was safety services director and chief project coordinator for Norwood. » Barry Chambers is the deputy director/director of finance for the Housing Authority of Covington, Kentucky. He was formerly an adjunct accounting and finance facutly member at American National University and was assistant finance officer for the Hamilton County Department of Public Health. » Larry L. Collins is chief of the Ann Arbor Fire Department in Ann Arbor, Michigan. He also served as an interim assistant city administrator and acting city administrator for Ann Arbor. » Melanie Hermes is assistant administrator and director of operations for Liberty Township, Butler County. She serves as a member of the Greenhills Village Council and sits on the Community Media Programming Board. » Kimberley Lapensee is assistant administrator for Fairfield Township, Butler County. She was formerly the township

administrator in Butler Township, Montgomery County, deputy director and executive director of the Warren County Regional Planning Commission and served as the assistant city manager in the city of Madeira.

Playground grant sought The Delhi Parks and Recreation Department has submitted a grant application for a “Build It With KaBoom!” grant offered by KaBoom! Officials say the $80,000 grant for a playground structure for Five Points Park would require a potential cash match of up to $8,500 which would be paid through the Tax Increment Finance or using park funds.

HAMILTON COUNTY

What to do with your Christmas tree Hamilton County residents are invited to compost their Christmas trees and holiday greenery by bringing these materials to one of the county’s three yard trimmings drop-off sites. Hamilton County Recycling and Solid Waste District’s free program will accept these organic materials from noon to 3 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 7, and Saturday, Jan. 14. Trees and greenery will be composted. Drop-off sites are: East: Bzak Landscaping, 3295 Turpin Lane (off state Route 32) in An-

LOWER PRICE HILL

derson Township West: Kuliga Park, 6717 Bridgetown Road in Green Township North: Rumpke Sanitary Landfill, 3800 Struble Road (and Colerain Avenue) in Colerain Township Residents are asked to follow these guidelines: » Whole Christmas trees are accepted; residents should remove all ornaments, tinsel, tree bags, etc. » Brush and tree branches from the yard should be cut into lengths of four feet or less – branches must not exceed one foot in diameter. » Bundle brush and tree branches with twine – bundles must not be more than 50 pounds or; » Bring yard trimmings in containers or bags – brown paper bags preferred. Containers and plastic bags will be returned. » Hamilton County residents only. Bring proof of residency. » No large trailers or trucks larger than pickups. » No pallets, boards, nails, fence, wire, bricks, stones, or soil accepted. » All children must stay inside vehicles. » Landscapers and commercial establishments are not eligiblefor this program. » Illegal dumping is prohibited. For more information, call 946-7766 or visit HamiltonCountyRecycles.org.

Bleach spill at MSD plant A bleach spill at the Metropolitan Sewer District in Lower Price Hill Jan. 4 resulted in Hazmat at the scene, but no injuries were reported, according to an MSD spokesperson. The spill happened at 9:30 a.m. at the MSD’s headquarters at 1600 Gest St., said Deb Leonard, MSD communications manager. Leonard said two contractors cut into the sodium hypochlorite line – the chemical name for bleach – in MSD’s sludge dewatering building. The line feeds bleach into scrubbers that control odors. Leonard said 200 gallons was spilled inside the building. “One of the contractors got splashed with the sodium hypochlorite and went to an eye wash station to wash off,” she said. MSD’s Safety Team investigated the incident, Leonard said, wherein both contractors refused medical treatment. Just after 10 a.m., MSD called 911 to have an EMT check them over “to be safe,” Leonard said. “The 911 operator apparently misunderstood the call and sent in the Cincinnati Fire Department’s Hazmat Squad,” she said. Leonard said the EMT signed off for no treatment for the contractors and both are back to work.

Whitewater Twp. trustee dies after wreck on tractor Ben Goldschmidt bgoldschmidt@enquirer.com

Hubert Brown, a Whitewater Township Trustee, has died following an accident with a car while he was driving his tractor. He was ejected from his tractor Dec. 26, police say, when he was rearended by a Buick sedan driven by Richard Campos, 41, on Ind. 350 in Ripley County, Indiana. Brown died Jan. 2 at University of Cincinnati Medical Center, said his friend, Tammy Simendinger. At the scene, Campos had a blood-alcohol level of 0.26 percent, more than three times the legal limit, Indiana State Police said. He was not injured in the crash. Brown, 65, known as “Brownie,” was doing the thing he set out to do when he retired: spend more time on his farm, Simendinger said. “I thought about that on his last day, he was

spending time on his farm,” she said. “So at least I know he died happy.” Simendinger met Brown when she moved to Harrison about eight years ago. Being a trustee and a fellow member of the Democratic party, the two shared a lot of the same interests. He became a mentor to Simendinger – “a father figure,” even, she said. He played that role for a lot of people in the community. Simply put, he enjoyed helping people in any way he could. “He touched so many people’s lives,” Simendinger said. “To me, that is a lasting legacy that so many people would aspire to.” Brown served as trustee for 20 years and ran unsuccessfully for the Ohio Statehouse in 2012, but don’t call him a politician – a public servant, rather, Simendinger said. After Brown ran for the Statehouse, he encouraged and helped Simendinger run as well, albeit

with the same result. “You never heard anyone say anything bad about him,” Simendinger said. Campos is facing charges of operating a vehicle while intoxicated while endangering another person, operating a vehicle while intoxicated with a prior conviction and operating a vehicle while causing serious

bodily harm. Enquirer Reporters Kaitlin L Lange and Cameron Knight contributed.

PHOTO PROVIDED BY INDIANA STATE POLICE

One person was seriously injured after a car rear-ended his tractor.

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A10 • PRICE HILL PRESS • JANUARY 11, 2017

VIEWPOINTS

COMMUNITY Editor: Richard Maloney, rmaloney@communitypress.com, 248-7134

EDITORIALS | LETTERS | COLUMNS | CH@TROOM

PRESS

Cincinnati.com/communities

‘Glory Days’ appreciated, questioned The feature “Glory Days” article (Dec. 21) recounting Elder’s 1973 basketball state championship title was very much appreciated by all who “lived it” (including me). However, after some reflection the commentary just didn’t sit right with me. That’s because at Elder the concept of “team” is paramount. I’m convinced that those who were in the cheering section will say, “If any Elder player deserves to be featured in an article about the ’73 state

championship team it’s the “sixth man”. So I question, “Why was the “Glory Days” story portrayed as the Jim Grawe Henry Miller COMMUNITY PRESS Story?” GUEST COLUMNIST Don’t get me wrong. I have nothing against Henry. He’s a personal friend of mine. A family man with a great family. His all-around-nice-

guy status alone is front page news-worthy. To showcase his team contribution with a Christmas family portrait is to me a couple of notches past funny. His twin brother, George, the team’s leading scorer, was mentioned as a mere afterthought. George could have at least been photo shopped into the family picture. Now, on a more serious note, was the local-boy-makesgood story line really necessary? Saying Henry grew up

in St. Lawrence Parish but now lives “near St. Antoninus!” Hey Henry, call me crazy but isn’t “Antoninus near” really Covedale?! On the East Side people say, “Hyde Park near” all the time! So why didn’t you say “Covedale near”? Are you afraid you’ll be called an elitist? That people will say you forgot where you came from? It’s all the West Side anyway so what difference does it make what parish you live in? And what’s all the hoopla

about Steve Grote being the team’s “undisputed leader”? Well maybe he was, but another “good old St. William boy” was the team’s unsung hero! Remember John Sharbell?! Why wasn’t he mentioned?... I wonder what parish he lives in now? Maybe Dr. Schweinberg knows…

immigration into this country. “Better trade deals? You betcha and Donald can accomplish this one. However, we all know who will be paying for it. Relations with Russia? The talk of boosting our and their nuclear arsenals is just plain crazy talk. But demonstrating that America still has a backbone after the wimp-in-the-oval finally departs, will be paramount to future success. Yet, even backbone costs large sums of money and we all know who will pay for that. “ISIS? This one makes me triply glad that I am not sitting at the head of the table in the White House. “Godspeed President Trump. Please make us proud and pretty please don’t blow us up. After all, we have a lot of stuff to pay for.”

should go on a diet. With all the stress, he needs to be healthy. “He needs to stop tweeting. A president needs more than the limits of a tweet to fully communicate with America and the world. “Get Mexico to pay for a real wall, not some lame ‘fence.’ He promised this. Now make it happen.”

Jim Grawe is a “St. William Boy” (aka St. Bill’s Boy) and a patient of Dr. Thomas Schweinberg, clinical psychologist.

CH@TROOM Jan. 4 question What should be the priorities for President-elect Trump during his first 100 days?

“I believe he will be pretty much unable to set priorities until overcoming the obstacles being thrown in his path as quickly as the outgoing administration can. The efforts to deligitimize everything in his opening decisions will be heralded by the ‘no longer necessary’ press, media blogs and testing by the other world powers. “To start with a $20 trillion debt, repairing damage of the last-minute spitefulness of John Kerry with Israel, and the demand to return to Cold War status with Russia, as proclaimed by Obama, will create a very legitimate possibility of the No. 1 priority to be figuring out how to get out of this job, that he foolishly, but thankfully, sought. So far, his cabinet picks seem to have all been tested in the ‘fires of the unknowns.’ He now must seek counsel. This job is way to ‘Yuuuge’ to go alone or to believe there are easy solutions. I believe in prayer and know we all need to

THIS WEEK’S QUESTION What are you most looking forward to in your community in 2017? Every week we ask readers a question they can reply to via email. Send your answers to rmaloney@communitypress.com with Ch@troom in the subject line.

have real hope.”

“Overhaul of the personal and corporate tax code. Nominee for the Supreme Court. Fill the 100 vacancies on the federal courts. Curtail government agencies over each. Determine what our military should look like going forward then get it there. Do a comprehensive review of government regulations and get rid of those that are not needed. School vouchers. Fix Social Security. Obamacare - come up with a better system.”

D.B.

R.B.

“Trump should get his replacement plan for the Affordable Care Act, which he has claimed will be better, through Congress. “He should end his bromance with Russian President Putin. As a former top level KGB agent, Putin’s beliefs are what the U.S. fought against and continually denounced during the Cold War portion of the Reagan administration. “Finally, he should cancel his Twitter account or have someone monitor his Tweets so they don’t consistently create controversy, anger or panic.”

“President Trump (still have a bit of trouble with that, but then again, who thought Reagan would do a more than credible job?) should focus on getting his cabinet right. I don’t believe it is currently, and I fully expect some key ‘You’re fireds’ to hit the news circuits in the coming months. I fervently hope he will eventually get it correctly populated. “Next he must get some sanity around his platforms. Build a wall that Mexico will pay for? Doubtful. Perhaps a fence and we all know who will be paying for it. Better yet, streamline the legal process for

C.S.

M.J.F.

“He should release his tax information. There is no legal reason not to and this way we will be assured he’s always acting in the American people’s interests and not his own business interests. As Ronald Reagan said, ‘Trust but verify.’ “In his first 100 days, he

G.H.

Dec. 28 question What do you consider to be the most significant development of your lifetime?

“Without a doubt, the most significant technological achievement occurred on July 4, 2013, when it was announced by scientists that they converted light into matter. A photon (particle of light) produced a proton and neutron (the nucleus of an atom, i.e. matter) at 125 billion Electron Volts. This happened at the Large Hadron Collider in Switzerland. “Atoms are the building blocks of all matter in the universe. This is astounding; a gift from science to the world.”

CE-0000663766

PRICE HILL PRESS

A publication of

7700 Service Center Drive West Chester, Ohio 45069 phone: 923-3111 fax: 853-6220 email: pricehillpress@communitypress.com web site: Cincinnati.com/communities

Price Hill Press Editor Richard Maloney rmaloney@communitypress.com, 248-7134 Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday See page A2 for additional contact information.

B.N.


JANUARY 11, 2017 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • 1B

SPORTS

COMMUNITY Editor: Melanie Laughman, mlaughman@communitypress.com, 513-248-7573

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | RECREATIONAL

PRESS

CommunityPress.com

Brocker bowls Elder’s 4th perfect game Adam Baum abaum@communitypress.com

DePaul Cristo Rey hoops off to historic start PHOTOS THANKS TO GARY MAKIN

DePaul Cristo Rey junior Ky’Trell Simpson takes a shot in a 2016 game.

Adam Turer Enquirer contributor

For a program as young as DePaul Cristo Rey’s, it’s not a surprise to see records being broken. The Bruins are off to historic start to the 2016-17 season. Never before had the Bruins been five games above .500 at any point in a season. DePaul Cristo Rey had never before won six of its first seven games. The Bruins had never beaten Miami Valley Christian Academy or New Miami. DePaul Cristo Rey entered the holiday break at 6-1, tied for first place atop the Ohio Valley Christian Conference. This is a season of many firsts for the program. Randy Cornelius, formerly an assistant, is now the varsity head coach. The Bruins are playing in the newly formed OVCC for the first time. The team’s home gym has been dubbed the Bruin Cave, and it has been rocking early this season. “It’s not just the students, teachers, and administrators,” said Cornelius. “Former players coming back are excited about the start. The whole school and community is excited.” Two years ago, the Bruins made a run to the semifinals of the Ohio Christian School Athletic Association state tournament. That energized the program, but the games were a disappointment. This year’s team is determined to return to the state final four and avenge those losses. “We still have a few of those kids who had that experience. It helped a lot, going through that,” said Cornelius. “Even though we went up there, we didn’t do very well. Our kids feel like we have to get back and do a lot better.” This year’s squad is a blend of players who contributed to that run, plus transfers and a group of DePaul Cristo Rey seniors who decided to try out for the team this year. Junior Delando Little leads the team and conference with 18.5 points per game. Three seniors who did not play last year came out for the team this year. One played as a freshman, but the other two did not try out until this year. “We go 12 strong. All 12 play in just about every game,” said Cornelius. “The biggest thing is that our mixture of kids is meshing. Kids from the final four team, transfers, and newcomers. All three groups have meshed. The biggest thing we worried about in the beginning was how would they mesh. So far, it’s been great.” The coaching staff has meshed, too. Cornelius still relies on his cousin, Gary Makin, the junior varsity head coach. He added Jeff Birkofer to his staff this year. The players bought into the coaches’ system in the summer.

PRICE HILL - Staring intently at a perfect game, there’s not a lot a bowler can do, other than to breathe, to combat that nervousness. The nerves started for Conner Brocker, an Elder High School senior, after the ninth frame. Nine consecutive strikes in a game were the most he’d ever recorded prior to Jan. 3 at Brentwood Bowl in a Greater Catholic League quad match. “I didn’t really get nervous until after the ninth strike cause that’s the farthest I’ve ever gotten,” said Brocker, who's now the fourth bowler in Elder history to roll 300 in a competition. “When you get to the 10th frame, you realize you only need three more (strikes) to get to 300.” Brocker, 17, said, “I was shaking, I was so nervous.” So the right-hander took a few extra deep breaths and did what came naturally. Elder coach Dave Sievers said, “Anytime you’re going through a situation like that you want to make sure you breathe. Being a bowler myself, you always want to make sure that they’re taking their time and not rushing it, cause your adrenaline is so high when you’re going through something like that. “The great thing was no one stopped talking to him. Almost

THANKS TO DAVE SIEVERS

Elder senior Conner Brocker smiles and points to the monitor displaying his perfect game at Brentwood Bowl on Jan. 3.

like a pitcher with a no-hitter; same way in bowling. When you’re going into the ninth and 10th frame, everyone will stop and almost watch. The other teams did back off in the 10th frame which was very respectful and sort of what you do. But our team was still up there talking to him; they weren’t talking about the 300 but they weren’t backing away from being up there with him.” See BOWLER, Page 2B

Hunt: West High’s double-double machine ticed her. Her ability to impact the game at both ends of the floor WESTERN HILLS - Anyone makes Hunt a valuable piece who’s wandered by the Hall of the Mustangs can build around. Honor at Western Hills High In West High’s win over Aiken School and stopped to read the Dec. 13, Hunt was the most dompictured plaques that recognize inant player on the floor, postthe Hall of Fame inductees, ing 18 points, 19 rebounds and might have suspected that Jor- six blocks. dan Hunt knows her way That ability has already gararound a basketball court. nered a few calls from college Hunt, a 6-foot-2 junior coaches. standout for the Mus“Jordan has the potangs, is the daughter of tential to be a next-level Tonya Hunt, a 1990 West player,” said Hardman. High graduate and Hall “She really does. With of Fame member who her, we’re working on played college baskether outside game a little PROVIDED more because she’s gonball at Grambling State. When Tonya was still Jordan Hunt na have to be more than a sporting maroon and back-to-the-basket playcream, she averaged 29.6 points er. She’s on track to be a nextand 18.4 rebounds per game, ac- level player. cording to current West High “I’ve gotten some calls from athletic director Chuck Rich- schools. Mostly small schools, ardson. but if her outside game imJordan is well on her way to proves a little bit she has the following in her mother’s foot- chance to be a lower Division I, steps. As of Jan. 6, Jordan, who’s Division II player.” averaging a double-double with Even with a game-changer 10.4 points and 11.1 rebounds, like Hunt on the floor, the Musleads the Cincinnati Metro Ath- tangs have only won three of letic Conference in rebounds their first nine games. Hardand blocks (3.5) per game. man said a big reason for the “In nine games she’s had slow start has been a complete eight double-doubles already,” renovation of how they play the said first-year coach David game. Hardman. “She has skills to get “It’s a complete change,” he up and down the floor; she can said, “we’ve really changed our really move. She can run just game. In the past, it’s sort of like a guard.” been up and down the floor. Hunt transferred from Wal- We’ve sort of adjusted our nut Hills after her freshman thinking process and started year. That’s when Hardman, pounding the ball inside more.” who was a Walnut Hills assistant coach at the time, first noSee HUNT, Page 2B Adam Baum

abaum@communitypress.com

The DePaul Cristo Rey Bruins gather for a pregame huddle, including senior Rameko Rumph, junior Ky’Trell Simpson, senior Zach Jones, sophomore Deshaun Little, junior Michael Williams and senior Cameron Mulligan.

“I have been coaching at the school since 2012. The talent level, unselfishness, and willingness to learn is at a level I have not seen before,” said Makin. “The competitiveness in practices has taken the team to a new level. The Bruins are now a family and that makes them that much stronger.” The tallest player is 6-2 senior captain Cam Mulligan, a four-year varsity starter. He leads the team with 7.8 rebounds per game. The Bruins make up for their lack of team height with relentless defense. If they’re not playing intense man-to-man, they are in a trapping zone that often flummoxes opponents. “Defense has been the biggest improvement. We’re always moving,” said Cornelius. “We have a lot of kids who can score, but all 12 are playing very good defense. If you don’t play defense in our system, you don’t play.” The Bruins are hoping that their defense and camaraderie will carry the program to new heights. They want to bring the OCSAA state title to the school on Clifton Hills Avenue.


LIFE

2B • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • JANUARY 11, 2017

LA SALLE’S WHITE HEADED FOR UC 4-star football recruit eager to join Fickell Adam Baum abaum@enquirer.com

MONFORT HEIGHTS The new era of the University of Cincinnati football program received its first local commitment Tuesday when La Salle senior standout Jarell White announced he will play for the Bearcats. White, a Rivals.com fourstar recruit and starter on all three of the Lancers’ recent state championship teams, had his decision narrowed down to Cincinnati and Purdue – two schools in the midst of assembling new coaching staffs. The Bearcats announced new head coach Luke Fickell on Dec. 10 and it wasn’t long after when White began to take UC seriously. “It changed a lot,” said White of his decision after UC hired Fickell. “I never considered staying home at all, but when I thought about it ... long nights and over this whole winter time, (Fickell) reaching out and coach (Marcus) Freeman reaching out, it felt comfortable with me. “Both coach Fickell and coach Freeman reached out to me once they got into the office and I felt comfortable with both of them just knowing they were great coaches. I just knew they were gonna be the right people for me for the next four years. “At first I thought it was a joke because UC never recruited me hard, I just got the offer and that was it.” White said being able to further his education in his hometown and being able to play in front of his family were factors, but the interest shown by Fickell and Freeman, a former Huber Heights Wayne and Ohio State standout linebacker who was previously the co-defensive coordinator and linebackers coach at Purdue, was significant. “It’s been amazing,” said

ALEX VEHR FOR THE ENQUIRER

Jarell White rushes against Massillon Perry in the Division II state title game.

White. “(Fickell’s) a good guy and I know that he knows what he’s doing when it comes to football and becoming a man ... that’s one of the things we talked about a lot.” White, listed at 5-foot-10, 200 pounds, has been Greater Catholic League-South first team in each of the last three seasons at three different positions (running back, linebacker and defensive back). As a senior, White played both ways, recording 45 tackles, 1.5 sacks and an intercep-

tion return touchdown as a linebacker. He also led the Lancers in rushing with 413 yards and six touchdowns in the regular season. During his three seasons starting at La Salle, the Lancers went a combined 40-5 with a share of the GCL South title in 2014, and the outright title – the first in school history – this past season. White said early indications are that he’ll be helping the Bearcats on defense. “It will be looking like nickel

back and safety and special teams right now – that’s perfect for me.” La Salle coach Jim Hilvert said, “Jarell’s a very versatile football player who’s a winner, comes from a winning program, three state championships. Other people and other kids in the city can gravitate to that and say ‘I had a great career in high school ... why not look at UC?’ Set a legacy at UC and get a great academic career and play football in front of all

your friends and family. And I think people in Cincinnati, they’ll be vested to be able to see a guy like that come to Cincinnati and do a lot of great things.” White added that “starting tonight” he’ll begin helping the Bearcats recruit some talent across the state of Ohio to join him at UC. “We’re definitely about to get this thing going on and for the next couple years you’re gonna see us in some bowl games for sure,” he said.

Boys bowling

» St. Xavier 193, La Salle 91 on Jan. 4. 200MR–St. Xavier 1:46.76; 200 free–Schell (SX) 1:57.79; 200IM–Sobolewski (SX) 2:06.96; 50 free–Prather (SX) 25.83; 100Fly–Van Nort (SX) 56.23; 100 free–Eisele (LS) 55.37; 500 free– Seilkop (SX) 5:15.85; 200FR–St. Xavier 1:37.35; 100Back–Nader (LS) 58.15; 100Breast–Hale (LS) 1:12.35; 400FR–St. Xavier 3:31.47.

SHORT HOPS Adam Baum abaum@communitypress.com

Girls basketball » Oak Hills fell to Fairfield 58-38 on Jan. 4. Seniors Carlie Hulette and Haley Scott led the Highlanders with nine points each. The Highlanders beat Seton 64-49 on Dec. 30. Carly Perrmann led the Saints with 20 points. Hulette led Oak Hills

Bowler Continued from Page 1B

Brocker’s 300 came in the second game of the match. Sievers had an idea he was dialed in based on how he closed out the first game. “He was lined up from the end of the first game,” said Sievers. “He threw three in a row at the end of the first game. I knew he had a great shot at it. At Brentwood Bowl, you have to worry about the pin carry, so the only thing I was worried about was him leaving a solid 10 pin standing. “He threw three really good shots in the 10th frame. The second ball in the 10th was a little heavy but it should have carried and it did. And as soon as he laid down the 12th ball I knew he had the right spot. All 12 (of

with 28 points, eight rebounds and four steals. Baylie Wieck added 11 points and five boards. » Western Hills lost 46-31 to Taft on Jan. 3.

Boys basketball » Taylor lost to Indian Hill 59-44 on Jan. 3. Jacob Haussler had a team-high 17 points. » On Jan. 3, Oak Hills beat Colerain 69-43 behind 14 points from senior Luke Rudy. » Western Hills held off

his shots) were right there.” Congratulations were quickly in order, even from his GCL South counterparts. “I was getting congratulated by people I didn’t even know,” said Brocker, who was the Panthers’ sixth man in the rotation last year as a junior. While Conner was a parttime starter as a junior, serving as the Panthers’ sixth man, Sievers said he believed Conner had the game to do it. “I think he’s fourth on our team in average,” the coach said. “I was surprised he was the first (300), but I for sure thought he could do it. Absolutely.” However, even with the excitement, it ended up being a roller-coaster-type match. On one hand, witnessing perfection, Sievers said, “It’s very exhilarating, and the atmosphere just gets turned up with all the time and the

North College Hill 60-59 on Jan. 4. Evan Walker led the Mustangs with 20 points, followed by Tyrell Anderson’s 18 points and 13 rebounds. » St. Xavier lost to Alter 5542 on Jan. 3. Senior Daniel Keyes led the Bombers with 21 points. » La Salle lost in the championship of the Kingdom of the Sun tournament to Madison (Wisconsin) 43-38 on Dec. 30.

work that these guys put into the sport. (Conner) has been bowling for 11 years. I know how long they work at it; how many hours they put in. Just seeing perfection, nobody can take that away from you.” However, as a team, it wasn’t Elder’s best night. The Panthers finished third out of four teams in the quad match, but still hold the GCL South lead as of press time, said Sievers. “Except for Conner, we were off,” Sievers said. “We’re the No. 1 team in the city and we’re fighting for a GCL championship and we’re not bowling the way we’re capable except for one guy. “I was hoping I could be talking about an undefeated GCL season along with the perfection of Conner. But we’re still in first place, so our goal is still there.”

» La Salle 2,709, St. Xavier 2,647, Elder 2,531, Moeller 2,179 on Jan. 3. High series: LS– Schott 503. SX–Tuerck 443. E– Brocker 480.

Girls bowling » Seton 2,441, St. Ursula 1,866 on Jan. 3. High series: S–Ruch 479. SU–Reynolds 334.

Boys swimming

Hunt Continued from Page 1B

Change regularly requires time and patience, but Hardman feels like they have girls already in the program who can be a part of something great. “We have a pretty strong junior class,” said Hardman. “We have quite a few juniors; we only have two seniors.” Another one of those impressive juniors is 5-foot-11 Mya Bond, whom Hardman described as “an inside-outside player.” Hardman added that Bond is academically on track to attend Ohio State, “She’s a top-notch kid, but a great athlete too.” And the Mustangs have a crew of freshmen playing junior varsity, gaining valuable experience. Hardman added that one approach the Mustangs have util-

ized has nothing to do with basketball on the surface. “We’ve partnering with a group out of Orlando, Florida, known as ‘Life Game’ — it’s about bringing life skills and handling themselves as people as well as being athletes on the floor. We’ve been working with them over the last three or four months about just instilling life skills and how they can carry that over onto the floor. It’s been huge; it’s not about wins and losses, it’s about getting better.” So far, Hardman said, it’s paid off in the classroom as the Mustangs currently carry a combined 3.1-grade point average throughout the entire program. The Mustangs have a treacherous stretch of road games at Shroder Jan. 9, Finneytown Jan. 11, Taylor Jan. 12, Gamble Montessori Jan. 13 and Hughes Jan. 17. West High is back at home on Jan. 19 against Ross.


LIFE

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JANUARY 11, 2017 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • 3B


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4B • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • JANUARY 11, 2017

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BUSINESS UPDATE CPA firm expands into Western Hills Sheldon Reder Certified Public Accountants has expanded into the Western Hills area with a merger of the former Blersch Weisner CPAs firm at 3406 Werk Road. Sheldon Reder CPAs offers a full range of accounting services for businesses and individuals. The expansion brings a second office location, additional staff and new clients. “We are pleased to be expanding our reach in the community and bringing a broader range of services to Western Hills. Joining the resources of both offices enable us to add new offerings there such as business advisory, valuation, and audit services, as well as continue the full scope of tax and accounting on which west side clients rely,” says Mark Reder, firm owner. Sheldon Reder CPAs is a team of 30 people including 14 certified public accountants, two certified valuation analysts and one enrolled agent. The company has been locally owned and focused on Cincinnati area businesses and residents for more than 30 years. Call 513-771-4100, or visit www.sheldonreder.com.

Gruber to take over at Great American Insurance Green Township resident Gary J. Gruber is the new president and chief operating officer of Great American Insurance Co. Gruber is the 17th president in Great American’s 145-year history, assuming this title from Wyoming resident Donald D. Larson, who has been president and chief operating offiGruber cer for even years, and was the senior reporting officer within Great Larson American’s P&C Group for the past 18 years. Larson announced that he will retire March 10, after more than 43 years. Carl H. Lindner III, co-chief executive offi-

cer, American Financial Group, said, “We are excited to promote Gary Gruber to president and chief operating officer of Great American, given his outstanding executive leadership abilities and approximately 40-year tenure within our operations. We are also grateful for Don’s tremendous contributions to Great American over his 43 years with the company.” Gruber has served as executive vice president for the Great American Property and Casualty Insurance Group since 2010. He serves as a member of Great American’s Board of Directors and recently served on the Board of Directors of National Interstate Corp., prior to its merger with Great American Insurance Co. Gruber started his career with Great American Insurance Co. in 1977. He held various positions including vice president of accounting, controller, and senior vice president & treasurer. In 1995, Gruber moved into an operational reporting officer role. Gruber is a graduate of the University of Cincinnati, graduating with a bachelor of business administration in finance, and is a certified public accountant (inactive). He is a member of the Board of Trustees for St. Xavier High School and the Athenaeum of Ohio.

Company wins graphic design award Schaiper Design of Covedale has been named a recipient of a 2016 American Graphic Design Award from Graphic Design USA for work on the McAuley High School Viewbook. The American Graphic Design Awards are sponsored by Graphic Design USA magazine and showcase the best in design work across multiple media, including point-ofpurchase, interactive, print, packaging and more. For many years, GDUSA has provided an opportunity for designers to be recognized for their talent and contributions. “It’s very exciting to receive this award. The focus was to make this a visually appealing piece for my client and attract interest for prospective high school students,” said Jackie Schaiper, owner of Schaiper Design.

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JANUARY 11, 2017 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • 5B

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PHOTOS THANKS TO KATHY BAKER

Muriel Cook of Covedale, Jeanette Mather of Delhi Township, Arlene Stewart of Delhi Township, Frank (Skip) and Karen Threm of Western Hills, Joyce Weeke and Joan Lonneman of Cleves at the Bayley Christmas party.

Bayley staff Lynn Lander of Hamilton, Sandy Kuhlmann of Bridgetown and Chris Parks of Harrison having breakfast together before starting the day.

CHRISTMAS AROUND THE CLOCK AT BAYLEY The holiday season was quite busy at Bayley with parties, secret Santas and extra visitors. Close to 160 Fitness Club members gathered fordinner Dec 6. Everyone exercised their vocal cords by singing Christmas songs, accompanied by Sabra Charles on the keyboard, before raffle winners were announced. The resident Christmas party was Dec. 8 starting with refreshments at 6 p.m. Families filled the Enrichment Center and the upstairs balcony to participate in photos and enjoy lively entertainment provided by Curly and the Q-balls The employee Christmas breakfast was Dec. 9 with visits from Santa and Mrs. Claus, inviting staff to stop by the employee dining room for breakfast and a chance to win one of many gifts. The Adult Day Program festivities began early Dec. 16 when the decoration committee transformed the meeting rooms into a winter wonderland for the Christmas Dance. Members ate lunch at noon and afterward, pictures were taken by the tree with Santa before dancing to the music of DJ John Summers. Each received a

Margaret Hilbert (center) sporting props and having fun with family members Barb and John Doherty of Monfort Heights at the Bayley Christmas party.

gift and everyone appreciated the Oak Hills High School students who volunteered their time dancing and visiting with members.

Bayley Christmas Dance King Lou Bedel of Delhi Township and Queen Linda Wilke of Westwood.

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JANUARY 11, 2017 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • 7B

POLICE REPORTS

REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS

DELHI TOWNSHIP

ADDYSTON

Incidents/investigations Assault Reported at 4000 block of Delhi Road, Nov. 28. Criminal damaging Window damaged at 5500 block of Cleander Drive, Nov. 28. Identity theft Reported on 4400 block of Valence Drive, Nov. 29. Misuse of credit card Reported on 5200 block of Farm House Lane, Nov. 28. Reported on Tony Court, Nov. 29. Theft Generator valued at $29,000 removed from 4700 block of Delhi Road, Nov. 29. Video games valued at $160 removed from 5400 block of Cannas Drive, Nov. 29. GPS valued at $100 removed from 4900 block of Duebber Drive, Nov. 28. Bobcat valued at $1,500 removed from 5000 block of Delhi Road, Nov. 25. Trailer valued at $600 removed from 5000 block of Delhi Road, Nov. 25. PlayStation valued at $400 removed from 400 block of Wilke Drive, Nov. 28.

Reported at Hoock Court, Dec. 25. Reported at Harrison Road, Dec. 25. Reported at Kingoak Drive, Dec. 27. Reported at Timberpoint Drive, Dec. 26. Reported at Ebenezer Road, Dec. 26. Reported at Childs Ave., Dec. 25. Reported at Harrison Road, Dec. 26. Drug offense Reported at Glenway Ave./ Werk Road, Dec. 20. Reported at Harrison Road, Dec. 23. Reported at Taylor, Dec. 26. Falsification/obstruction Reported at Cheviot Road/ Jessup Road, Dec. 23. Forgery Reported at Harrison Ave., Dec. 20. Identity fraud Reported at Grove Ave., Dec. 20. Reported at Springmeyer Drive, Dec. 23. Menacing/threats Reported at Glencrossing Way, Dec. 23. Missing child Reported at Boudinot Ave., Dec. 21. Reported at Beechmeadow Lane, Dec. 27. Reported at Kingoak Drive, Dec. 26. Recovered stolen vehicle Reported at North Bend Road, Dec. 21. Reported at W. 70th St., Dec. 21. Robbery Reported at Crookshank Road, Dec. 23. Reported at Glenway Ave., Dec. 20. Theft Reported at Glenway Ave., Dec. . 20. Reported at Jessup Road, Dec. . 20. Reported at Kingoak Drive, Dec. 20. Reported at Glenway Ave., Dec. 21. Reported at Eastridge Lane, Dec. 21. Reported at Harrison Road, Dec. 21. Reported at Ruwes Oak Drive, Dec. 21. Reported at Harrison Ave., Dec. 21. Reported at Lawrence Road, Dec. 22. Reported at Harrison Road, Dec. 22. Reported at Harrison Ave., Dec. 22. Reported at Casa Loma Blvd., Dec. 23. Reported at Harrison Road, Dec. 23. Reported at Werk Road, Dec. 23. Reported at Harrison Road, Dec. 24. Reported at Mack Road, Dec. 25. Reported at Childs Ave., Dec. 25. Reported at N. Glen Ave., Dec. 25. Reported at North Bend Road, Dec. 27. Reported at Blue Rock Road, Dec. 27.

Assault Reported at North Bend Road/Westwood, Dec. . 21. Breaking and entering Reported at Robroy Drive, Dec. 21. Reported at Werk Road, Dec. 22. Burglary Reported at Westwood Northern Blvd., Dec. 20. Reported at Bridgetown Road, Dec. 20. Reported at Colonial Drive, Dec. 23. Reported at North Bend Road, Dec. 23. Reported at Glenmore Ave., Dec. 24. Reported at Cheviot Road, Dec. 24. Reported at Visitation Drive, Dec. 27. Reported at Ebenezer Road, Dec. 25. Reported at Jessup Road, Dec. 26. Reported at Lauderdale Drive, Dec. 26. Criminal damaging/vandalism Reported at Glenway Ave., Dec. 22. Reported at Muddy Creek Road, Dec. 23. Reported at High Pointe Lane, Dec. 23. Disorderly person Reported at North Bend Road, Dec. . 20. Reported at Crookshank Road, Dec. 23. Reported at Relluk Drive/ Leona Drive, Dec. 24. Domestic trouble Reported at Eyrich Road, Dec. 20. Reported at Joey Terrace, Dec. 20. Reported at Russell Heights Drive, Dec. 20. Reported at Faycrest Drive, Dec. 22. Reported at Sidney Road, Dec. 22. Reported at Hader Ave., Dec. 24. Reported at McFarran St., Dec. 24. Reported at North Bend Road, Dec. 24. Reported at Neisel Ave., Dec. 25. Reported at Eyrich Road, Dec. 25.

FREE ESTIMATES

6355 Harrison Ave., Green Township, OH (513) 922-4455

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545 Claymore Terrace: $87,545; Dec. 21. 5492 Courier Court: $95,000; Dec. 20. 1245 Ebenezer Road: $42,301; Dec. 19. 877 Martini Road: $105,000; Dec. 21. 5516 Palomino Drive: $116,555; Dec. 16. 5389 Plumridge Drive: $108,000; Dec. 19. 5287 Serenade Drive: $116,500; Dec. 16. 5417 Tilbury Court: $144,000; Dec. 21. 5415 Whitmore Drive: $88,200; Dec. 20.

EAST PRICE HILL 768 Summit Ave.: $50,000; Dec. 21. 813 Terry St.: $29,500; Dec. 21. 3428 Warsaw Ave.: $60,000; Dec. 22.

GREEN TOWNSHIP 5472 Asbury Lake Drive: $88,000; Dec. 19. 5584 Biscayne Ave.: $112,000; Dec. 21. 5673 Candlelite Terrace: $104,000; Dec. 20. 5599 Childs Ave.: $124,300; Dec.

Information is provided as a public service by the office of Hamilton County Auditor Dusty Rhodes. Neighborhood designations are approximate. 19. 1811 Ebenezer Road: $119,900; Dec. 21. 2580 Ebenezer Road: $253,000; Dec. 20. 3766 Eyrich Road: $115,000; Dec. 16. 5560 Fairwood Road: $139,900; Dec. 20. 3571 Gailynn Drive: $122,000; Dec. 16. 5560 Goldcrest Drive: $140,000; Dec. 19. 6611 Hayes Road: $124,500; Dec. 20. 4810 Highland Oaks Drive: $279,900; Dec. 19. 5372 Meadow Walk Lane: $87,000; Dec. 20. 3705 Monfort Heights Drive: $79,500; Dec. 22. 3193 North Bend Road: $98,000; Dec. 21. 7157 Ruwes Oak Drive: $290,000; Dec. 20. 2232 Sable Drive: $138,000; Dec. 19. 6230 Seiler Drive: $130,000; Dec. 20. 5749 Summit View Court: $123,000; Dec. 21. 5344 Werk Road: $56,900; Dec. 19. 5352 Werk Road: $56,500; Dec. 21.

$174,000; Dec. 19. 3758 Numerator Drive: $108,000; Dec. 19. 7564 Silver Creek Road: $278,400; Dec. 21.

SAYLER PARK 6951 Gracely Drive: $40,000; Dec. 19. 151 Huey Ave.: $30,000; Dec. 20. 157 Huey Ave.: $30,000; Dec. 20. 231 Monitor Ave.: $118,000; Dec. 21.

WEST PRICE HILL 1245 Mckeone Ave.: $34,500; Dec. 16. 1000 Rutledge Ave.: $17,920; Dec. 20. 1233 Texas Ave.: $52,500; Dec. 19. 624 Trenton Ave.: $16,750; Dec. 21.

WESTWOOD 3918 Boudinot Ave.: $91,461; Dec. 22. 3224 Cavanaugh Ave.: $19,000; Dec. 21. 2835 Montana Ave.: $80,000; Dec. 20. 3103 Ruth Ave.: $38,300; Dec. 19. 3603 Schwartze Ave.: $108,500; Dec. 16. 3611 Schwartze Ave.: $144,900; Dec. 22. 3613 Schwartze Ave.: $144,900; Dec. 22. 2063 West Fork Road: $120,000; Dec. 20.

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CLEVES

Reported at Orchardpark Drive, Dec. 27. Reported at Werk Road, Dec. 26. Reported at Glencrossing Way, Dec. 26. Reported at Harrison Road, Dec. 26. Reported at Neiheisel Road, Dec. 27. Reported at Race Road, Dec. 27. Reported at North Bend Road, Dec. 25. Reported at Childs Ave., Dec. 26. Unauthorized use of a motor vehicle Reported at Cheviot Road, Dec. 22. Reported at Muddy Creek Road, Dec. 27. Vehicle pursuit Reported at Pedretti Ave./ Delhi Road, Dec. 20. Welfare check Reported at W. North Bend Road, Dec. 21. Reported at Colerain Ave., Dec. 24. Reported at Regency Ridge Court, Dec. 26.

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DELHI TOWNSHIP

Incidents/investigations

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CHEVIOT

Community Press publishes incident records provided by local police departments. All reports published are public records. To contact your local police department: » Delhi Township, 922-0060 » Cincinnati District 3, 263-8300

GREEN TOWNSHIP

UP TO

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6355 Harrison Ave., Green Township, OH (513) 922-4455 CE-0000663921


LIFE

8B • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • JANUARY 11, 2017

PHOTOS PROVIDED

2016 ARF “Doctor of the Year” award winners, from left: Dr. Ilias Illiopoulos, Dr. Marc Richardson, Dr. Paul Rupp, Dr. Stephanie Ware and Dr. Kenneth Zwergel.

Aubrey Rose Foundation founders Jerry and Nancy Hollenkamp of Bridgetown.

2016 ARF “Above and Beyond” Doctor of the Year award winner Dr. Paul Rupp.

15 years of hope delivering more than $1 million in aid The Aubrey Rose Foundation has been helping struggling families all over Greater Cincinnati and the US since 2001. Their mission is, and always has been, to help families that are caring for medically-fragile children suffering from life-threatening illnesses, while maintaining a focus on family unity. The Aubrey Rose Foundation gives families a means to lift the weight of life’s complexities during their difficult time by providing emotional and financial support. The 100 percent volunteer driven non-profit organization was founded in memory of Aubrey Rose Hollenkamp who passed away suddenly in 2000, just before her third birthday.

Aubrey’s parents, Jerry and Nancy Hollenkamp, started the foundation in Aubrey’s honor and to carry on her spirit. “Aubrey was always a very happy baby, throughout everything she endured, and she smiled continuously. She brought a great light into the world…we wanted to pass that light along.” Jerry Hollenkamp, Aubrey Rose Foundation founder On Nov. 11, the Aubrey Rose Foundation celebrated 15 years of giving back during their 15th Annual “Let’s Dance for the Heart of It!” An Evening in Paris celebration at the Hilton Cincinnati Netherland Plaza. More than 500 Greater Cincinnati and Northern Ken-

tuckians joined the foundation’s board and volunteers to celebrate a decade and a half of helping those in need. Guests enjoyed a gorgeous venue, delicious dinner and dessert, silent auction, music and dancing commemorating the tireless efforts of the Aubrey Rose Foundation. The foundation also marked this momentous anniversary by honoring five area pediatric care physicians that were of the many nominated by tristate residents for the foundation’s prestigious “Doctor of the Year” award, with 1 being honored as “Above & Beyond” in pediatric care excellence. “Physicians like these are crucial to the unbelievable number of critically ill children and their families in need

of help – their recognition is very well-deserved,” Nancy Hollenkamp said. The 2016 Aubrey Rose Foundation Doctor of the Year Award Winners were: Dr. Ilias Illiopoulos (Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center) Dr. Marc Richardson (Pediatric Associates, Fairfield) Dr. Paul Rupp (Mercy Health) Dr. Stephanie Ware (Indiana University Medical Center – Genetics) Dr. Kenneth Zwergel (Tri Health Pediatrics) Dr. Paul Rupp was named “Above and Beyond” in his field. To date, the Aubrey Rose Foundation has gifted well more than $1 million to those

in need. There aren’t any plans by the founders or the countless volunteers to halt their efforts at now, or in the future. “Nancy and I are so grateful to all of those who, over the past 15 years, have made this possible. We couldn’t do what we’ve done without our dedicated volunteers, donors and family support,” Jerry Hollenkamp said. “Every family that we have been fortunate enough to help is special to us. And we know that there are many, many more out there who need help. We will not stop doing all we possibly can,” Nancy Hollenkamp said. To learn more about the Aubrey Rose Foundation, visit www.aubreyrose.org.


LIFE

JANUARY 11, 2017 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • 9B

DEATHS Richard Lewis Barnes

Timothy M. Moore

Kenneth J. Schorsch Sr.

Richard Lewis Barnes, 92, of Green Township died Nov. 4. He was retired as a sales representative from the CSX Transportation Corporation after more than 42 years of railroad service, and served with Barnes the U.S. Army during WWII having been discharged in 1943 as a Staff Sergeant. Survived by wife of 69 years Marilyn Louraine (nee Carrigan) Barnes; daughters Linda (Steve) Staat, Patricia (David) Schultze and Karen (Rick) Kurzhals; seven grandchildren; two great-grandchildren. Preceded in death by parents Earl and Dorothy (nee Schweitzer) Barnes; Earl Barnes. Memorials to the Alzheimer’s Association, 644 Linn St., Suite 1026, Cincinnati, OH 45203, or VITAS Hospice, P.O. Box 645352, Cincinnati, OH 45264.

Timothy M. Moore, 56, formerly of Cheviot and Price Hill died Oct. 29. Survived by children Michael J. (Melissa) Moore, Jennifer Moore and Lisa (Brian) Hauser; grandchildren Nicolas, Elizabeth, Timothy II, and Michael P. Moore, Aaron Jr., Ava, Aaden and Jason Smith, Jakesen, Jessie, Cater and Kyler Hauser; sister Sharon Neighbors; Lifetime companion Lisa Fiasco. Preceded in death by brother Theodore Moore. Memorials to M.A.D.D., 4015 Executive Park Drive, Suite No. 110, Cincinnati, OH 45241, or American Legion Post 313, 1077 E. New Circle Road, Lexington, KY 40505.

Kenneth J. Schorsch Sr., 69, died Oct. 19. He was a police officer for the city of Cincinnati and an Army veteran of Vietnam. Survived by wife Joanne (nee Whitton) Schorsch; children Ken (Michelle), Schorsch Tony and Adam (Melissa) Schorsch; grandchildren Hanna, Jenna and Mia Schorsch; mother-inlaw Anna Mae Whitton; brother-in-law Joe (Terri) Whitton; nieces Sarah and Lauren; siblings Joe, Erma, Stanley, Willie

Jacqueline Hahn Jacqueline “Jackie” (nee Lederle) Hahn, 77, of Brookville, IN, formerly of Sayler Park died Nov. . 2. Survived by husband William J. “Pete” Hahn; children Robert W. (Taryn), Timothy A. (Susan) and Bradley J. (Tara) Hahn; grandchildren Ashley and Kelly, Katlyn (David), Kelsey, Timothy Jr., Micaela, Karlie, Josephine and Rodney; great-grandchildren Ava, Madeline and Cooper; siblings Linda (late Gene) Peak, Carolyn (Phil) Prewitt and Al (Terry) Lederle Jr. Preceded in death by son Rodney J. Hahn; parents Albert and Amanda (nee Dierker) Lederle. Memorials to St. Peter United Church of Christ, 11001 Bossert Road, Brookville, IN 47012

Hadley Jean Ingles Hadley Jean Ingles, two weeks, of Cleves died Nov. 2. Survived by parents Nate and Michelle (nee Phillips) Ingles; siblings Garrett and Gabriel; grandparents Herman and Sarah Ingles and Mike and Sue Phillips. Memorials to StarShine Hospice, 3333 Burnet Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45229-3026. www.cincinnatichildrens.org/ service/s/starshine.

June Keith June (nee Bratton) Keith, 82, of Green Township died Nov. 3. Survived by children Kerry (Jodie), Eric and Cathy; grandchildren Kelly (Seth), Jason, Justin (Stephenie), Kara, Ben Keith (Adrienne), Rachel (Nathan), Lindsay, Nick (Amanda) and Matt; 10 great-grandchildren; sisters Dorothy (Bob) Ohrlund and Hazel Godfrey. Preceded in death by husband James Keith Jr.; daughter Debbie Ducker; siblings Nancy Frazier, Ruby Templeton and Clarence Bratton. Memorials to Hospice of Cincinnati or charity of one’s choice.

Jane T. Moore Jane T. (nee Teipel) Moore, 74, of Western Hills died Oct. 26 at Mercy West Hospital. Survived by husband Gary B. Moore; children Michelle (John) Heis of Colerain Moore Township, Kim (Jeff Winkler) Berding, Jenny (Tony) Tirey, Mike, Mark (Julie) and Scott (Christina) Moore; 13 grandchildren; five great-grandchildren; siblings Ann Buerger and William (Mary) Teipel. Preceded in death by brother Robert Teipel. Memorials to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, P.O. Box 1000 Dept. 142, Memphis, TN 38101-9908.

and Dan; numerous other family and friends. Preceded in death by parents Joseph and Frieda Schorsch; father-in-law Joseph Whitton. Memorials to the Barrett Cancer Center, The University of Cincinnati Foundation, P.O. Box 19970, 45219-0970, or Greater Cincinnati Police Historical Society Museum, 308 Reading Road, Cincinnati, OH 45202.

James Stegman James Stegman, 83, of Delhi Township died Oct. 24.

HOW TO SUBMIT OBITUARIES Basic obituary information and a color photograph of your loved one is published without charge by The Community Press. Most notices are submitted by the funeral homes. We no longer provide forms. Please include the specific community in which the person lived, so we can make sure we publish it in the correct paper. Because of space, we may limit publication to the paper which covers the community in which the person lived. Email to rmaloney@communitypress.com and bbeasley@communitypress.com. To publish a larger memorial tribute, call 242-4000 for pricing details. Because of the number of notices we receive, it may be several weeks before a notice is published.

Tammy L. Porter Tammy L. Porter, of Western Hills died Oct. 31. She worked at the social security office in downtown Cincinnati. Survived by parents William and Carol Porter; sister ShanPorter non (Jim) Price; nephews Caleb and Braeden Price; aunt Connie Graham; numerous aunts, uncles and cousins. Memorials to Cranston Memorial Presbyterian Church, Union and Washington St., New Richmond, OH 45157.

START 2017 RIGHT!

Frederick Raisor Frederick “Ricky” Raisor, of Western Hills died Oct. 30. Survived by daughter Ali (Phil) Godel; grandchildren Thea and Stephen Godel; brothers Don, Nick and Mike; many nieces, nephews, cousins and friends. Preceded in death by wife Mary Frances (nee Ohmer) Raisor; daughter Moriah Raisor. Memorials to the American Legion Post No. 534, 4618 River Road, Cincinnati, OH 45204.

Henry F. Rohe Henry F. “Hank” Rohe, 90, of Delhi Township died Nov. 1. Survived by wife Melva (nee Schack) Witschger Rohe; daughter Julie (Jay) Morman Gelock; step-children Theresa (Kevin) Eagan, Jerome Witschger, Joan (Brandt) Junker, Kathleen Witschger, Susan Witschger and Richard (Jaime) Witschger; grandchildren Chris (Brittany) Morman, David (Sarah) Morman, Ryan Morman, Katie (Jon) Downing, Michael (Megan) Eagan, Justine Junker, Celina Junker and Addison Witschger; great-grandchildren Dax, Brock, Henry, Harrison Morman and Maeve Downing. Preceded in death by wife Florence “Flo” (nee Harmeyer) Rohe. Memorials to City Gospel Mission or Hospice of Southwest Ohio.

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$16,494 2016 Kia Forte LX

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2009 Chevy Impala LT #J16548A

2010 Dodge Challenger #D16162A

WAS $9,991

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Charles J. Schirmann Sr. Charles J. Schirmann Sr., 97, of Green Township died Oct. 31. He was a 1937 graduate of Elder High School and a lifelong member of St. Catharine Church in Westwood. He was an avid tennis player for more than 50 years and he organized the Western Tennis and Fitness Senior League. He was a member of The Purcell Council Knights of Columbus No. 2798. Survived by children Janice (Kenneth) Schmidt, Marianne (Ted) Miller, Nancy Jo (late Steve) Shiels, Chuck (Dianne) Schirmann Jr. and Larry (Bev) Schirmann; 12 grandchildren; 17 great-grandchildren; sister Mary Stevens. Preceded in death by wife of 64 years Rosemary (nee Klosterman) Schirmann; brother Robert (Marilyn) Schirmann. Memorials to the St. Catherine Grace Fund, BAWAC, Boone Adult Worker Activity Center, 7970 Kentucky Drive, Florence, KY 41042, or Hospice of Cincinnati.

$8,592

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2013 Nissan Pathfinder SL #D16175A $23,544

2015 Jeep Cherokee #R16240B $17,981

2014 Jeep Grand Cherokee #J16674A $25,491

2015 Dodge Journey #R1784B $17,981

2014 Dodge Durango #Z0643 $31,494

2015 Jeep Wranger #J16508A $32,981

2013 Honda Accord #C1775A $17,221

2015 Dodge Durango #Z0646 $34,981

2007 Ford Expedition EL #J17131A $13,981

2014 Ford Fiesta #J16555A $10,992

2016 Nissan Murano #J16399A $25,691

2010 Ford Explorer #J16193A $12,934

2014 Dodge Avenger #Z0658 $14,881

2014 Ford Mustang #J16505A $15,494

2013 Ford Escape #J16307A $10,494

2014 Audi A4 #J17121A $25,492

2013 Mazda 3 #Z0654 $12,981

2016 Dodge Dart #Z0651 $13,981

2016 Chevy Cruze #J16472A $15,481

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LIFE

10B • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • JANUARY 11, 2017

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE

ANSWERS ON PAGE 6A

No. 0108 THE DOWNSIZING OF NATHANIEL AMES

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RELEASE DATE: 1/15/2017

1 Loops in, in a way 5 Goddess with a throne headdress 9 Tempo 13 Figs. on drivers’ licenses 16 When repeated, a Pacific tourist destination 17 Fish whose name is a celebrity’s name minus an R 18 Old bandleader with an Egyptianinspired name 19 Outrigger projections 20 Things smoked by singer Courtney? 23 Scandalmaker in 2002 news 24 Speed demon 25 Headwear the N.B.A. banned in 2005 26 Game involving sharp projectiles and alcohol 28 Parrot’s cry 29 1950s prez 31 “Charlie Hustle is my name/I am banned from Hall of Fame,” e.g.? 33 Fist bump 34 “Yes, ____!” 36 Put a coat on 37 “Eureka!” moments 40 Press Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 4,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year).

42 Cloth colorist 43 Feature of Africa 44 ____ oil 46 Televangelist Joel 48 Alternative to “News” and “Maps” in a Google search 50 Road restriction 51 Pugnacious Olympian 53 Relative of a ferret 54 Cold and wet 55 F.B.I.’s div. 56 Hoopster Steph not playing at home? 60 Riffraff 62 Japanese watchmaker 64 Like Granny Smith apples 65 Endless chore 66 Dickens’s Uriah 68 Sega Genesis competitor, in brief 69 Radiant 71 Intersect 73 The sport of boxing in the 1960s and ’70s, essentially? 75 “Nothing to write home about” 76 Groups with co-pays, briefly 78 Jockey strap 80 “Star Trek: T.N.G.” role 81 Installment 83 Personalized gifts for music lovers 85 Valet in P. G. Wodehouse stories 89 Contemporary hybrid music genre 90 Sots’ sounds

91 Nickname for Louise 93 Feast 94 Sail support 95 In unison 97 Echo effect 99 El operator in the Windy City, briefly 100 Hat for pop singer Corey? 103 Anthem contraction 104 “Uhh …” 105 Show what you know, say 107 “In all probability” 109 Regular 111 Obstinate one, astrologically 112 Two-time Best Actor winner arriving early? 115 Four-star rank: Abbr. 116 Monopoly purchase 117 Singer/songwriter Laura 118 Little foxes 119 Slump 120 ____ cosa (something else: Sp.) 121 Wanders (about) 122 They begin in juin DOWN

1 Original airer of “The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy” 2 Pop competition 3 Something smoked by comic Chris? 4 Hang on to 5 Org. against doping

6 Spindly limbed 7 Shakespeare villain 8 Photo of Canada’s former prime minister Stephen? 9 “Stay ____” 10 Aardvarks, by another name 11 Enter surreptitiously 12 Press lightly, as the brakes 13 He was buried in 1915 and died in 1926 14 Dressage gait 15 Invoice figs. 18 ____ lily 19 Fulminating 21 Dwarf planet more massive than Pluto 22 Atypical 23 Summer hrs. in Phila. 27 Literary device used to address plot inconsistencies 30 Nephrologists study them 32 Spies, informally 35 M.L.K.’s title: Abbr. 38 “Today” personality 39 Shark’s home 41 Close by 43 Egg producer 45 Arctic fliers 47 Blow it 49 Like a handyman’s projects, for short 50 “Anything! Anything at all!” 52 Shade of pink 54 Sword fight, e.g. 56 Filament sites, in botany

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84 Tahoe, for one 86 Entourage of a 1990s white rapper? 87 Musical intermission 88 Continuous 90 Flamboyantly successful sort 92 Trampolinist’s wear 96 Start to -scope 97 Cincinnati squad 98 Dude, in British lingo

101 Smallish batteries 102 Long spear 105 Makes “it” 106 Zone 108 “Dark Sky Island” singer 110 Drink sometimes served hot 113 “Snowden” org. 114 ____, cuatro, seis, ocho …

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JANUARY 11, 2017 µ WEST - COMMUNITY µ 1C

2016 Sales Leaders MEGA VII

MEGA II

Jeanne Rieder Team Over 185 Sales

Jeanne Rieder

Congratulations Jeanne Rieder Team!!

Maria Nicolls

Tina Rieder

Rick Hoeting

MEGA I

Laurie Wissel

Dick Schneider

Lisa Ibold

Mike Wright

Julie Pieczonka

Heather Claypool

Brian Bazeley

Sylvia Kalker

SALES MASTER

Steve Florian

Doug Rolfes

Vicki Schlechtinger

Bill Dattilo

Joe Biggs

Brianne Biggs

Jeanne Haft

Jennifer Hamad

Josette Binder

Joe Darwish

Karen Oswald

Dan Grote

Marily Hoehne

Karen Menkhaus

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Mike Rolfes

WE MADE THINGS

HAPPEN in 2016...

Call us at 451-4800 for all your real estate needs in 2017! OPEN SUNDAY 11:30-1

Bridgetown - 6975 Summit Lake Dr 10 3 Bdrm/2.0 $109,900 Dir: Harrison Ave. to street. In the circle across from Clubhouse. H-9195

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OPEN SUNDAY 12-1:30

Colerain East - 2812 Overdale Dr 3 Bdrm/1.1 $126,900 Dir: Pippen to Greenbrook to Overdale. H-9205

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Josette Binder

OPEN SUNDAY 12-1:30

Springfield Twp. - 9645 Leebrook Dr 4 Bdrm/2.1 $194,900 Dir: Winton Rd to Fleming to L on Leebrook located on the end of st in cul-de-sac H-8988

Hoeting-Wissel Team

OPEN SUNDAY 2-3:30

Cheviot - 3855 Delmar Ave 3 Bdrm/2.0 $99,500 Dir: Harrison Ave. to North on Delmar (one way section) by 5/3 Bank. H-9173

Hoeting-Wissel Team

OPEN SUNDAY 2-3:30

Covedale - 4939 Ralph Ave 3 Bdrm/1.1 $79,900 Dir: Off Covedale, between Cleves Warsaw & Sidney H-9108

Sylvia Kalker

OPEN SUNDAY 2-3:30

Westwood - 3614 Fieldcrest Dr 3 Bdrm/2.1 $134,900 Dir: Robb Ave to Parkcrest to Street. H-9145

Jeanne Rieder

OPEN SUNDAY 12:30-1:30

Cheviot - 4290 Selby Ct 2 Bdrm/1.1 $79,500 Dir: Robb to Alex to R on Tangent to Selby. H-9110

Sylvia Kalker

OPEN SUNDAY 2-3:30

Delhi - 5344 Plumridge Dr 4 Bdrm/2.0 $129,900 Dir: Anderson Ferry to Edfel Way (Across from Delhi Middle School) to R on Plumridge H-9179 Dick Schneider

OPEN SUNDAY 3-4:30

Westwood - 2918 Urwiler Ave 3 Bdrm/2.1 $139,900 Dir: Epworth to Urwiler H-9022

Marilyn Hoehne

OPEN SUNDAY 2-3:30

Cheviot - 3853 Ruth Ln 3 Bdrm/1.1 $89,900 Dir: Harrison to School Section to Ruckle to Right on Ruth H9208

Heather Claypool

OPEN SUNDAY 12-1:30

Delhi - 5412 Boutique Ct 4 Bdrm/2.1 $161,900 Dir: Rapid Run to Bandana to Boutique. H-9188

OPEN SUNDAY 12-1:30

Cincinnati - 18 E Fourth St 701 2 Bdrm/2.0 $399,900 Dir: 4th St. between Vine & Walnut. H-9049

Jeanne Rieder

OPEN SUNDAY 11:30-1

Green Twp - 2008 Sylved Ln 2 Bdrm/1.1 $85,900 Dir: Between Sidney & Muddy Creek Roads. H-9133

OPEN SUNDAY 12-1:30

Colerain - 7210 Southwind Ter 2 Bdrm/2.0 $238,000 Dir: Harrison to Athaus, Left on Austin Ridge, left on Southwind. H-9183

Jeanne Rieder

OPEN SUNDAY 2-3:30

Monfort Hts. - 3391 Diehl Rd 16 2 Bdrm/2.0 $83,000 Dir: Heritage Green condominium, off of North Bend Road. H-9204

Dick Schneider

Doug Rolfes

Biggs Team

MiamiTownship-RareGem!Charming 4 bdrm home w/5.9 acres - 1800 + sq ft, hdwd flrs, coved ceiling, repl winds, 2 baths, FP, deck, C/A & 100’x30’ barn! $289,900 H-9121 Doug Rolfes

Westwood - Brick 4 Family 2 - 2 bdrm, 2 - 1 bdrm, 4 car garage. Newer windows, electric & fuse boxes. Fully equipped kitchens. Coin op washer & dryer. $149,000 H-9192

Westwood - This property features 2 store fronts with 2-1 bedroom apts. Also includes all inventory with license’s. $190,000 H-9206

Art Chaney

Megan Vollrath


2C µ WEST - COMMUNITY µ JANUARY 11, 2017

Classifieds cincinnati.com

JOBS

VISIT: cincinnati.com/classifieds TO PLACE YOUR AD

Tom Deutsch, Jr.

LIS JUST TED West Shell

LI JUS ST T ED

CROSBY TOWNSHIP

West Shell

513-460-5302 6871 BRAGG LANE

CHECK OUT ONE OF OUR BEAUTIFUL FIRST NEW LISTINGS FOR 2017. It's only one year old with many attractive upgrades that you have to see to appreciate. This fantastic home is located on a cul-de-sac street in the well known Fort Scott Community which offers a community pool, a clubhouse, a fitness center and a children's play area. Don't miss out! Call The Deutsch Team today for a showing.

Homes for Sale-Ohio

Tom Deutsch, Jr.

513-460-5302

LI JUS ST T ED

Tom Deutsch, Jr.

513-460-5302

WESTWOOD NT ME ITY EST TUN INV PPOR O

NT ME ITY EST TUN INV PPOR O

4888 GUERLEY ROAD Are you ready for a great investment this year? If so,you have to see this awesome investment opportunity that is just waiting for the right person.Great location,close to everything in a high exposure area for commercial property or possible 2 family. We have 4 Real Estate Agents waiting to help you find your next investment! ContactThe DeutschTeam today.You’ll be glad you did!

West Shell

MIAMI TOWNSHIP

West Shell

Industrial Crating, Warehousing, Logistics Sales, and Business Leader

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968 which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, national origin, handicap or familial status or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newpaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Kentucky Commission on Human Rights 800-292-5566 H.O.M.E. (Housing Opportunities Made Equal) 513-721-4663

Real Estate

Rentals great places to live...

Springdale: 2 br, 2 ba, no steps. 1 car garage. $1700/mo. Seniors Only. 513-253-2644

B O N D HILL-- 1 BR, quiet, clean, 4 family. Appls incl. Water paid. Laundry & storage in bsmt. No pets, no sec 8. $450+dep. 513-348-0451 Cincinnati Family & Senior Low Income Apts. Section 8. Very nice locations. 1-3 BR Equal Opportunity Housing. 513-929-2402 Harrison-Remodeled Deluxe 1 & 2BR, $600-$710, d/w, a/c, balc, No pets. Sec. dep. 513-574-4400

Destin, FL, Gulf front, 2BR, Condo Rentals, in Beautiful Destin, Local owner. 513-528-9800 Office., 513-752-1735 H

Roselawn Now LeasingOffice & Storefront spaces, newly renovated & updated, 500-5,000 sf, 513-631-0100

HARTWELL/ELMWOODFurnished rooms on busline. $95 to $105/week w/$100 dep. 513-617-7923, 513-617-7924, 513-919-9926

Careers

Jobs new beginnings...

Don’t put your loved one in a nursing home! Looking for Ft/Pt time, elderly or disabled. Your home or mine. Prefer W side of town. Background & ref’s avail. 513-317-2113 Seeking Detail Oriented CAREgivers Serving DDS (fka MRDD) for imm openings in Ham ilton & Clermony. Co. Includes signing bonus. 513-681-2472 LM or fax: resume to 513-681-0710

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT

Westwood psychiatrist seeking part-time administrative assistant with flexible availability. Rate of pay is highly competitive and negotiable. Email resume to keggerman@fuse.net

FIND GOOD HELP!  

Avondale, Elmwood, Madisonville & Reading. Refrig, cablelaundry, utils, Wi-Fi, bus, kitchen, a/c, balcony $340 & up. 513-851-0617

CHECK OUT CLASSIFIED online at cincinnati.com

3323 QUEEN CITY AVENUE With the beginning of the NEW YEAR it’s a great time for a NEW INVESTMENT!!! Give The Deutsch Team a call to take a look at this amazing 6 unit money maker. Great location near shopping and bus-line. Don’t miss out! Contact us today. Tom Deutsch, Jr.

513-460-5302 9705 MT. NEBO ROAD Take a look at this incredible home that we helped our clients find. They made the move to start 2017 off in this great home. Contact The Deutsch Team so we can help you find your home sweet home in 2017. We’ll be waiting for your call. Tom Deutsch, Jr.

513-460-5302

Homes for Sale-Ohio DEUFOL

Brick Apt Bldg, 2 Apts & Commercial Space., May be converted in to 4 apts. 504 Nowlin Ave, Greendale, IN, $178,500. 812-537-2956, No Realtor Solicitations please

COLERAIN WEST 6731 SPRINGDALE ROAD Are you looking to start 2017 off in a new home? If so,start by taking a look at this fantastic custom built home. Great location only a few minutes to I-74 and 275. You would be close to everything but still have your privacy on this beautiful 5+ acre private lot. Contact The Deutsch Team soon because this one won’t last long!

VISIT CLASSIFIEDS online at cincinnati.com

The main purpose of this position is to introduce Deufol in the US market, interact with major industrial, manufacturing and engineered products clients to establish business opportunities and then to work with Deufol to meet the demand within existing sites or by expansion through greenfield or acquisition growth. 10+ years of Industrial Packaging, Warehousing and/or Supply Chain experience. Experience in designing, developing, and delivering technical demonstrations of software solutions, with understanding of existing prospect / client infrastructure, current and future needs, motivation, and timelines. Possess top sales skills as well as modern operational and management skills in industrial export packaging, warehousing and logistics. Demonstrate exemplary verbal and written communication, and presentation skills; ability to tailor communications for technical and non-technical audiences. Strong command presence for both internal and external stakeholders. Qualified candidate send resume to: amber.haas@deufol.com or Mail to 924 S Meridian St. Sunman, In 47041

AUTOMOTIVE MECHANIC Open Exam sign up ends 2/4/17 Makeup to $53,753.31 annually and substantial benefits package. The city of Cincinnati , Fleet Services is seeking Automotive Mechanics to troubleshoot / repair automobiles, Trucks, construction equipment, Fire Pumpers, and nonautomotive equipment. Must have 3 years paid experience in automotive repair work. Valid Ohio class A CDL , OR obtain one during probation period. ASE Automotive certifications preferred. May be required / willing to work shifts other than normal business hours including nights , weekends , holidays. Application and test date details available at the link below. http://agency.governmentj obs.com/cincinnati/default. cfm

Tractor-Trailer Mechanic 2nd shift, Full-Time needed, light repairs and PM services Sharonville, Oh area Call 513-910-7146

Attn: Amber Haas No Phone Calls Please

Halperns Steak and Seafood Experienced Meat Cutters Needed - Apply at Halperns Steak & Seafood 13151 Apex Dr. Walton, KY

LIBRARIAN Indian Hill Historical Society Hours are flexible 10 hours per week

Please call 891-1873 or Email: ihhist@cinci.rr.com

LPN/RN Full Time & Part Time Days ALF, Excellent Pay Visit terracecommunity.com Contact Tina at 513-471-3491

CHECK OUT CLASSIFIED online at cincinnati.com

Driver: CDL-A Truck Driver Great Local Route! Get Home Daily, 100% No-Touch Freight Call for Details 844-303-9802

PETS & STUFF

OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY - EFNEP PROGRAM SPECIALIST EFNEP Program Specialist – Ohio State University – Job Number 423566 Program Specialist will implement and manage the components of the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) in Hamilton County, Located in Cincinnati, Ohio. Provide functional and administrative supervision over paraprofessional and support EFNEP staff; work with the EFNEP Program Director and County Extension Director to supervise core responsibilities of EFNEP Program Assistants. MS/MA degree in Nutrition, Family and Consumer Sciences, Public Health, or Education is required, or an equivalent combination of education and experience; experience in program planning and administration. OSU is an EEO employer. Applications/Resumes are due by January 15, 2017. Quick Link: http://www.jobsatosu.com/postings/74819

Mechanic / Maintenance Worker City of Loveland The City of Loveland will be holding a civil service examination for the full-time position of Mechanic/Maintenance Worker. For a full position announcement, employment and test applications and info on the position, visit www.lovelandoh.com/employment , or pick up copies at City Hall, 120 W. Loveland Avenue, Loveland OH 45140. No phone calls, please. Loveland is an equal opportunity employer.

The Cincinnati Enquirer has carrier routes available in the following areas:

Central St. Bernard @ Walnut Hills @ Wyoming @ Avondale East Amelia / Batavia @ Bethel @ Brown County @ Goshen @ Hyde Park @ Madeira/Indian Hill/Milford/Loveland @ Montgomery / Silverton @ Oakley West Colerain Twp. @ Groesbeck @ Harrison Monfort Heights @ Northside Western Hills / Westwood @ Wyoming North Fairfield @ Liberty Township @ Maineville @ Morrow Mason @ Sharonville @ West Chester Kentucky Cold Spring @ Crescent Springs Edgewood Erlanger Florence / Burlington Independence / Taylor Mill Park Hills / Ft. Mitchell Union @ Walton / Verona @ Warsaw Indiana St. Leon @ Lawrenceburg @ West Harrison Must be 18 with a valid drivers license and proof of insurance. If interested please call: 1-855-704-2104 deliveryopportunities.gannett.com/

BOONE COUNTY SHERIFF MICHAEL A. HELMIG

P.O. BOX 198 BURLINGTON, KY. 41005-0198 Phone: 859-334-2175 FAX: 859-334-2234

Boone County Sheriff’s Department Deputy Sheriff Position

The Boone County Sheriff’s Department is now accepting applications for the position of deputy sheriff. Applicants must be at least 21 years of age and be capable of passing a physical agility, written, and oral interview testing. Applicants must have a high school diploma (or equivalent), be a citizen of the United States, possess a valid driver’s license, have no felony convictions, have not been prohibited from carrying a firearm and have the physical strength/agility to perform the duties of a peace officer. Candidates must pass post-offer medical and psychological examinations, polygraph testing, drug testing, and an in-depth background investigation. As a condition of employment, recruits must successfully complete an extensive twenty-three (23) week training course in Richmond, Kentucky where they will obtain their Peace Officer Professional Standards (P.O.P.S.) certification. Applications are available for pickup at the Boone County Sheriff’s Department located at 3,000 Conrad Lane in Burlington, Kentucky 41005 Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. & Saturday 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. Completed applications must be returned to the Sheriff’s Department by Friday, February 17, 2017 by 5:00 p.m. The Boone County Sheriff’s Department is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

CE-0000667030

PRODUCTION ASSOCIATES NEEDED Honda Manufacturing of Indiana APPLY NOW AT:

Drivers: $5,000.00 Orientation Completion Bonus! Dedicated! Get Home Weekends! Platinum Orientation flight, with upscale lodging and meals.1 year Class-A Call Today: 855-450-2267

www.carespring.com/employment

COVEDALE

West Shell

LIS JUST TED

Bill Lutts 513-607-2015

OPEN SUNDAY 1/15

BO BUYE UG R HT !

11671 HAWK DR. 3 BDRM Brick home w/ 2 car attached garage, Full finished BSMT, & back covered patio on a 1.8 acre lot! Spacious Kitchen area & separate formal dining room. $399,900

RIDES

To place your ad visit: cincinnati.com/classifieds or search: classifieds

Homes of Distinction HARRISON, OH

HOMES

HIRING FOR FT

Housekeeping Positions $350 Sign On Bonus After 60 Days of Employment. Apply online to join our team!

Indiana.Honda.com/Job-Opportunities PROSPECTIVE APPLICANTS SHOULD: • Be committed to working in a fast-paced environment • Be flexible and open-minded • Have the ambition to succeed and build products that exceed customers’ expectations • Be motivated to actively seek new challenges • Have the ability to take initiative • Be committed to safety and quality • Be committed to open communication and teamwork REQUIREMENTS: • Be willing to work 2nd shift • Be eighteen (18) years of age • Provide proof of a High School Diploma or GED • Reside in one of the 31 counties listed on our website We are committed to recruiting candidates from diverse backgrounds. Honda is an equal opportunity employer. CE-0000664364

CHECK OUT CLASSIFIED online at cincinnati.com


JANUARY 11, 2017 µ WEST - COMMUNITY µ 3C General Auctions

Sand Casting Foundry and CNC Machine Shop By Order of Court Appointed Receiver Pride Cast Metals, Inc. 2735 Colerain Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio Thursday, January 12, 9:00 am Inspection: Wednesday, January 11, 10-5 Featuring: Sinto FBO-III Flaskless Molding System, New 1998 Inductotherm Powertrak 400-10 Melting Furnace Sand Molding Machines * Beardsley & Piper Speed Muller Harrison Shell Core Machines * Redford Core Blowers Complete Pattern Shop * Foundry Lab Equipment (10) Okuma CNC Turning Centers * VMC’s Doosan & Okuma-Howa Twin Spindle Turning Centers Mills * Lathes * Grinders * Saws * Drills Fork Lifts * Air Compressors * Shop Support Items Thompson Auctioneers, Inc. Steve Thompson, Auctioneer 937-426-8446 * www.thompsonauctioneers.com Ohio License 63199566109

Special Notices-Clas Drivers:, CDL-A: LOCAL Lawrenceburg, IN!! Regional & OTR Home Weekends! Sign-On Bonus!! Excellent Pay, Benefits! Drue Chrisman Inc.: 877-346-6589 x103 Drivers: OPEN HOUSE HIRING EVENT! Dedicated Routes! Home Weekends!! $5,000.00 Orientation Completion Bonus! Platinum Orientation flight, with upscale lodging and meals. 1 year Class-A Come & Apply with Koch Trucking: Fri 1/13 or Sat 1/14 8a-6p Homewood Suites by Hilton 9226 Schulze Dr, West Chester Township, OH 45069 Or Call 855-450-2267 Driver Wanted Highly safe and dependable driver needed in the Eastgate area to transport military applicants to Columbus for processing. Applicants must have a valid operating license with clean driving record, able to pass D.O.T. physical and drug screen, and criminal background check. Being a vet is preferable, but not necessary. Must work well with Military recruiters and applicants. Schedule is Wednesday-Friday, starting pay is $10/hr. Resumes can be faxed to 937-898-5951, or emailed to: msmith@chartervans.com

Community

Announce announcements, novena... Special Notices-Clas ! ADOPTION: ! Loving Home with Successful Professionals; Laughter, Music, Celebrations await Miracle Baby. Expenses Paid ! 1-800-563-7964 !

CHECK OUT CLASSIFIED online at cincinnati.com

ATTENTION GE EVENDALE (1961-70) & Fernald (FMPC) (1951-83) FAMILIES. Did you, your spouse or your parent become ill after working @ GE or Fernald? You maybe entitles to up to $400,000 from the United States. For more information call Attorney Hugh Stephens at 1-800548-4494, even if your claim has been accepted or denied. We assist with claims, dose reconstructions, appeals, impairment ratings, wage loss, health care and home care. No Recovery-No Fee. 2495 Main St, Buffalo, NY.

Assorted

Stuff all kinds of things... Looking to buy porcelain and painted advertising signs, I buy advertising signs. I am looking for large or small signs that are original. Please only signs older than 1970 , $Any . (513)265-4334 filcallc @gmail.com

Affordable Firewood Seasoned, Split Hardwood. $185 per Cord, $95 per 1/2 Cord, plus sales tax. Free delivery to most areas around Hamilton County. Stacking available Call Brian at B&B Queen City Tree Service 513-542-7044

FIREWOOD - Kentucky Seasoned Hardwood: cut, split, delivered, dumped- $225/cord. 35+ yrs experience. Call 859-393-5002 LOW PRICED Seasoned & Split Firewood WITH FREE DELIVERY 513-574-3950

CASKETS $300 & URNS $99 ALL CASKETS 16 & 18 gauge metal only $300 & Solid Wood only $500 All funeral homes must accept our caskets. IT"S THE LAW! Buy ahead save thousands, churches, police, firemen, businesses. 8455 Winton Rd in Brentwood shopping Center Call Today 513-383-2785 thecasketcompany.com Dining room set and cabinet with hutch, Drexel seating for 4-10. Hutch with cabinets, drawer space and display shelving, $$1,495.00. (865)368-6497 jjnowiski@aol. com GRAND OPENING Lowest Prices In Cincinnati Great floor model discounts Living Room, Dining Rooms, Mattresses, Bunkbeds, Futons, Electric Adjustable Beds w/ memory foam mattresses. REALLY HOT MATTRESS PRICES 100’s of premium king sets Lots of floor model specials. SHOP US TODAY! First Come---First Served Lowest Prices--Highest Quality 8455 Winton Rd* Brentwood Plaza Call me, BILL, w/ your questions513-383-2785! Mattress & Furniture Express mattressandfurnitureexpress.com Apply online everyone approved. Guaranteed financing, No Credit Check

Electric H ospital Bed , barely used, great cond., removable bed rails. $500 obo 513-954-4213

HANDYMAN Experienced, Reasonable, No Job Too big or Too Small. Call Steve 513-491-6672

TOTAL GYM XLS--With Accessories. Already Assembled. Used 1x. Best offer. 513-312-1592

BUYING-RECORD ALBUMS & CDs, METAL, JAZZ, BLUES, ROCK, RAP, INDIE, R&B & REGGAE. 513-683-6985

PRIME SPLIT FIREWOOD Delivered & Stacked 513-275-8565

CASH PAID for unopened unexpired Diabetic Strips. Up to $35 per 100. 513-377-7522 www.cincytestrips.com

VISIT: cincinnati.com/classifieds TO PLACE YOUR AD

Great Buys Cleves-239 S Miami Ave, 45002. (right off Hwy 50). Sat 1/14 & Sun 1/15, 10a-2p: Lg wardrobe, vintage dressers, multiple collectibles, kitchenware, Christmas collection, many toys & games.

Lawrenceburg IN Estate Sale 19753 Ventura Dr Lawrenceburg, IN 1/14 & 1/15 Sat. 9-4, #’s @ 8:45; Sun. 9-4 Contents of home & garage. Walnut Dining Table & Hutch, Curio cabinet, glass door bookshelf, rattan glass top table & chairs, bookshelf, large oak & glass door entertainment center, electronics, barstools, patio bench, electric grill, gas grill, carpet cleaner, leaf blower, Power, hand & yard tools, exercise bike, coll. of adv. signs, mirrors, lamps, nautical theme items, scuba equipment, air compressor, tablesaw, snowblower, misc. kitchen items, too much to list all priced to sell! Info and pics – hsestatesales.com or 859–992-0212. Directions – Route 50 – Stateline Road – L on Alpine Dr – L on Ventura Dr (Hidden Valley Lake)

JANUARY CLEARANCE

50% Off Everything! Thur-Fri Jan 13 & 14 Thur-Fri Jan 20 & 21 10am-4pm The Franciscan Peddler 60 Compton Rd. 45215 All Proceeds benefit the Ministries of The Franciscan Sisters of The Poor

UPDATED ALL DAY.

Blue Ash OH Estate Sale 5492 Kenridge Dr, Blue Ash, OH 1/13, 1/14 & 1/15 Fri - 9-4, #’s @ 8:45; Sat & Sun 9-4 Contents of Home, Garage & Out building. Large 3 Day Sale! Lots of Misc. Collectibles, Antiques, Old Toys, Old Radios, Old Phonographs, Electronics, Cameras, Stereo viewers, Old Books, Records, Clocks, Lamps, Painted China Hutch, Old Chairs, Drop Leaf Table, Desks, Carpenter Bench Coffee Table, Cast Iron, Violins, Accordion, Key board, Guitar, Lift Chair, Oliver Typewriter & Case, Old P & G items, Popcorn maker, Lots of office supplies, lots of Holiday, Linens, Crafts, Antique tables, Stain Glass, Leaded Glass, Ladders, Garden Tools, Hand Tools, Patio Furniture, Lots of Kitchen Items and Smalls. Still unpacking boxes! Too Much to list, All priced to sell! Info & pics hsestatesales.com or 859-468-9468 Directions - Kenwood Rd Kenridge Dr or Meyers Ln (Parking on Meyers Ln,house is at the end of Meyers Ln)

$$$ PAID for LPs,CDs, CASSETTES-ROCK, BLUES, INDIE, METAL, JAZZ, ETC + VINTAGE STEREO EQUIP, DVDs & MEMORABILIA. 50 YRS COMBINED BUYING EXPERIENCE! WE CAN COME TO YOU! 513-591-0123 Want to Buy Antique Leather Sofa, I am looking for a specific type of sofa that is leather. Has brass buttons and lots of buttons throughout. Please let me know if you have one. It needs to be antique not a newer one. , $Any. (513)265-4334 filcallc@ gmail.com

WAR RELICS US, German, Japanese Uniforms, Helmets, Guns, Swords, Medals Etc, Paying Top Dollar Call 513-309-1347 Adopt Me

Pets find a new friend...

American Bulldogs Pups NKC reg., brindle&white, shots & wormed, $400/obo. 812-593-7012 DOG, Mini Schnauzers, 2 males, 4 females, $1000, 7 weeks , salt pepper, black, white, calm Full AKC (513)526-3138 mpartinlpn@g mail.com PUG PUPPY AKC, Adorable & Energetic, (2) M. Fawn $700; (2) F. Fawn $800; (2) M. Black $800. 513-305-5528 Schnauzer Puppies, Mini - AKC, 9 weeks, shots, wormed, black & silver, Males only. $375. Call 937-205-2305

Garage & Yard Sale

neighborly deals...

INSTANT CASH PAID For Baseball Cards Coins, Gold, Silver, Antiques, Old Toys, Watches, Comics, Case Knives Military, Trains, Autographs, Many Others! We Pick-up. 513-295-5634

Quickie QM715 Wheelchair, cost $35,000, will trade for anything. Pronto $450 & GoGo Scooter $495 Invacare IV, $75; 513-886-9960

CHECK OUT CLASSIFIED online at cincinnati.com

Garage Sales

# I BUY VINYL RECORDS Rock, Metal, Punk, Indie, R&B, Reggae, etc. We make house calls. 513-428-4695

NOW THAT’S REFRESHING.

Automotive

Rides best deal for you... 2011 FORD FUSION SE : blue, 31k miles, excellent condition. 1 Owner $10,000. 513-675-3979 Audi 2015 A4, Coupe, 58000 mi., 4 dr., Automatic, Black ext., Black int., VIN#WAIJAFAFL2FN042611, 04 Cylinders, FWD, A/C: Front, A/C: Rear, Airbag: Driver, Airbag: Passenger, Airbag: Side, Alarm, Alloy Wheels, Anti-Lock Brakes, CD Player, Cruise Control, Fog Lights, Leather Interior, Moonroof, Power Locks, Power Seats, Power Steering, Power Windows, Premium Sound, Rear Window Defroster, Sunroof, Tinted Glass, Driven 800 expressway miles per week for management position. One owner--all records at Audi dealership. Oil changed every 5000 miles. New radial tires w/ less than 100 miles.-Showroom condition. Email contact for photos, $22,900. Jim Eveslage (513)926-1351 Lexus 1999 RX300, Pearl. 1 owner, Lux. accessories, mint. Test drive, make an offer. Jim: 513-941-4881

2014 BMW C 650 GT, Like New, 875 miles, Silver, includes matching full face helmet, cover, and Battery Tender, $7,250. Edward Strauss (740)645-3172

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION THE NEWS IS ALWAYS CHANGING. SO ARE WE.

VISIT US ONLINE TODAY

Public Notice At its 1/3/17 meeting, the Council of the City of Cheviot adopted the following legislation: Ord 17-01 To Amend The 2017 First Quarter Budget Appropriations, And To Declare An Emergency. WST,Jan11,18,’17#1839802

Killing time while at the airport? On the train? Waiting in line? Find and apply for jobs on the go. Download CareerBuilder.com’s mobile app today.

Public Auction

A NEW JOB... RIGHT IN THE PALM OF YOUR HAND.

General Auctions


4C µ WEST - COMMUNITY µ JANUARY 11, 2017

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