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NORTHWEST PRESS

Your Community Press newspaper serving Colerain Township, Green Township, Groesbeck, Monfort Heights, Pleasant Run, Seven Hills, White Oak

WEDNESDAY, MAY 29, 2013

75¢

BECAUSE COMMUNITY MATTERS

Colerain Twp. offers fewer summer options By Jennie Key

jkey@communitypress.com

Officials, residents, public and safety service personnel and veterans turned out for the dedication of the Colerain Township Memorial Plaza at the corner of Colerain Avenue and Springdale Road May 24. See page B1 for more photos from the dedication event. JENNIE KEY/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

COLERAIN DEDICATES MEMORIAL CORNER By Jennie Key jkey@communitypress.com

Colerain Twp. — Just in time for Memorial Day, the township now has a Memorial Plaza. Township officials, residents, public and safety service personnel, and veterans were at the dedication May 24 at the corner of Colerain Avenue and Springdale Road. The memorial honors the men and women of the community who have fought for our country, served keeping the township’s residents safe and, in some cases, gave their lives to keep those commitments – Colerain Township police, fire-

fighters, township workers and veterans from all U.S. service branches are included. The ceremony included a flag raising, short speeches by township officials, Hamilton County Commissioner Chris Monzel and State Sen. William Seitz, and U.S. Rep. Steve Chabot, and wreaths were laid by representatives of the police and fire departments and military and public services. Veteran Jim Acton, a township resident, who was active in the effort to build and pay for the project, said it was worth the work. “I am very proud,” he said. “It turned out well.” Assistant administrator and

economic development director Frank Birkenhauer said he was pleased with the turnout and the timing. “A lot of people were able to get here,” he said of the crowd of more than 200. “I am happy we were able to open the corner on Memorial Day weekend. I think that’s fitting.” Colerain Township Trustee Jeff Ritter said he was very pleased to finally see the corner memorial dedicated. “It’s been a long time coming,” he said. “And it’s a game changer for the township to have our front door look so great. And this honors our community treasurers – our veterans and our employees.”

Colerain Twp. Summer entertainment in township parks continues to shrink along with the township budget. The 2013 Sizzling Summer Events Series calendar for Colerain Township scales back again this year because of budget constraints. The loss of local government funds and reductions in other revenue sources caused the township to make cuts to many services offered. Last year, the formerly free camp program had to charge. This year, it’s just not offered. The Fourth of July Spectacular was also eliminated, but Tawanna Molter, administrative assistant for the parks and services department, said the annual 5K race is back, thanks to a partnership with the Tony Merk Foundation. The Pray-Hope-Believe 5K Run/Walk, formerly the Colerain Township Spectacular 5K, will begin at 8:30 a.m. Thursday, July 4. The Pray-Hope-Believe Foundation was established to honor the memory of Tony Merk – a 6-year-old boy who died July 4, 2011, after an almost three-year battle with brain cancer. For information, go to www.prayhopebelieve.org. Molter said the summer concert schedule is shortened and Shakespeare in the Park, which has been a popular event, is not yet on the schedule. “I’m hoping to secure a sponsor so we can still do it,” she said. Concerts run from 7 to 9 p.m.

in the Amphitheater at Colerain Park, 4725 Springdale Road. The series kicks off on Friday, June 7, with Ooh La La and the Greasers with itys oldies rock & roll. The Jump n’ Jive Show Band playing big band and swing music will perform Friday, June 21. The Friday, July 19, who will have the Cincinnati Civic Orchestra bringing its Summer Pops Series to the park. The concert season ends in August with the Sound Body Jazz Orchestra bringing big band and swing music on Friday, Aug. 2, and the Ohio Military Band performs marches, classics, show tunes and more on Friday, Aug. 23. The Friday Night Movies in the Park will also continue, thanks to a sponsorship by dentist Dr. Darcie Bradley. Movies will be shown the second and fourth Fridays in June and July and the third and fifth Fridays in August. Family Movies with Kids Karaoke at 8:30 p.m and the film begins at dusk. The movie calendar is set: » Friday, June 14: “Madagascar 3: Europe’s Most Wanted” » Friday, June 28: “Hotel Transylvania” » Friday, July 12: “Journey 2: The Mysterious Island” » Friday, July 26: “Brave” » Friday, Aug. 16: “Escape from Planet Earth” (Tentative pending release) » Friday, Aug. 30: “The Croods” See details about all summer events at the township website, www.colerain.org.

CMHA looking in Green Twp. By Kurt Backscheider kbackscheider@communitypress.com

GREEN TWP — The Cincinnati Metropolitan Housing Authority is searching for multifamily buildings available for sale in the township. “We’ve engaged a realtor who is researching for-sale properties in the area,” said CMHA spokeswoman Kelly Kramer. The housing authority is under a mandate from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) to add 32 subsidized housing units in Green Township. Green Township filed a lawsuit against HUD in August 2011 alleging the township was unfairly singled out in a voluntary compliance agreement between HUD and CMHA, which would have added about 70 public housing units in the township.

The voluntary compliance agreement between CMHA and HUD was the result of a fair-housing complaint that Linnenberg accused the housing authority of blocking public housing in Green Township for several years. The township settled with HUD in January 2012, agreeing to 32 units. In late February, CMHA floated a proposal to build a new multifamily housing facility at the corner of North Bend Road and Westwood Northern Boulevard, but after outcry from nearby residents the proposal was abandoned. The housing authority’s board of commissioners and the Green Township board of trustees both voted in March to

support a plan to scatter the 32 units throughout the township. Kramer said the housing authority’s board has since directed CMHA staff to focus on locating two-family and fourfamily buildings in the township. She said the plan is to purchase and renovate four, four-family buildings and eight, two-family buildings. CMHA has not yet made an offer on any properties, but they do intend to scatter the units throughout the township, she said. The housing authority’s board met April 30, and Kramer said the board approved a measure requiring there be no more than six public housing units added in any given township neighborhood. “We want to work with the community and do what’s in the best interest of the community

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Vol. 92 No. 16 © 2013 The Community Press ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


NEWS

A2 • NORTHWEST PRESS • MAY 29, 2013

CMHA Continued from Page A1

and the clients we serve,” she said. Green Township Trustee David Linnenberg said he and his fellow board members are in favor of scattering the units instead of concentrating them all in one area, and he hopes CMHA will be able to find multifamily resi-

Index Calendar ...............B2 Classifieds ...............C Food ....................B3 Life ......................B1 Police ................... B8 Schools .................A6 Sports ..................A8 Viewpoints ...........A10

dences throughout the township. He said CMHA representatives will host an informational meeting at 7 p.m. Wednesday, June 5, at the Nathanael Greene Lodge, 6394 Wesselman Road. Linnenberg said housing authority representatives will talk about how they plan to add the 32 units in Green Township over the course of the next year. “I’m glad they are following through on having a public meeting on the issue,” Linnenberg said. “It’s good for the residents to have an opportunity to see how it’s going.” Kramer added, “Our goal is to work in conjunction with the Green Township Trustees to provide an update for the community.”

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Jennie Key Community Editor ..........853-6272, jkey@communitypress.com Monica Boylson Reporter ..............853-6265, mboylson@communitypress.com Kurt Backscheider Reporter ............853-6260, kbackscheider@communitypress.com Melanie Laughman Sports Editor ......248-7573, mlaughman@communitypress.com Nick Dudukovich Sports Reporter .....248-7570, ndudukovich@communitypress.com Tom Skeen Sports Reporter.............576-8250, tskeen@communitypress.com

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Northwest Local School District Board of Education President David Denny presents Colerain Township resident Dan Woolum with an honorary diploma from Colerain High School. Woolum enlisted in the Army before he graduated n 1963, later getting his GED. JENNIE KEY/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Colerain student gets diploma 50 years late Enlisted in Army in 1963 a half-credit shy By Jennie Key jkey@communitypress.com

This year’s oldest Colerain High School graduate received his diploma this week. It’s been 50 years since 66-year-old Don Wollum’s classmates graduated from high school, but he finally walked across a stage May 15 to receive his diploma. He’s now officially a graduate of Colerain High School. Wollum enlisted in the Army, leaving high school

a half-credit shy of finishing. He was with the 7th Battalion, 11th Artillery, and served as a forward observer. He served two years, 18 months in Viet Nam. While in the service, he earned his GED. And when he finished his stint in the Army, having achieved the rank of sergeant, he had a job waiting. “I had a Battalion XO (executive officer) – Major Eaton – and if you didn’t have a diploma, he made sure you got your GED. Said he didn’t want any dummies in his class,” Wollum said. “I was lucky. My Dad got me a job on the B&O Railroad. I re-

tired from there after 41 and a half years.” Ohio passed a law in 2001 that allows veterans who left high school to enlist or left because of family circumstance and then enlisted the opportunity to get a diploma. Since the Northwest Local School District adopted its policy in 2002, about 15 veterans have received their deferred diploma – some posthumously. Pauletta Crowley, assistant director of community and student services, said applications for the program are available at the Northwest Administrative Office, 3240 Banning Road. You can download information

and an application at bit.ly/vetgrad. Wollum, who turns 67 this month, said when he heard about the program, he was interested. “It’s one piece of paper I decided I would like to have,” he said. So on May 15, during Colerain’s salute to its students who are enlisting in the military, his wife Nancy watched as he walked across the stage to receive his diploma from David Denny, president of the Northwest Local School District Board of Education. He also received an ovation from those in attendance. “Took me 50 years, but I’m finishing,” he said.

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NEWS

MAY 29, 2013 • NORTHWEST PRESS • A3

Family business has long history By Jennie Key jkey@communitypress.com

The signs of longevity hang all over the walls at Stehlin’s Meat Market in Colerain Township. Pictures of bygone days, and the first silver certificate dollar from a sale at the market from Maynard Matson, testify to the store’s beginnings. Signs announcing Oscar Stevens sold the first load of hogs to the meat market, and Father Kuntz, pastor at St. John Church, killed the first bull, are on display. The family business is celebrating its 100th anniversary this year, and the folks who run the Colerain Township market have plenty to celebrate. It’s smokin’. Bacon, cottage ham, sausage, they do it all in their own smokehouse behind the Colerain Avenue shop. It’s also about as fresh as it gets; the butchers slaughter the livestock on-site, hand-picked and bought from family farms. And that is the way it started in the early 1900s. The founder of the family legacy, John Stehlin, worked for Bill Espel as a drover, walking cattle to the Cincinnati stockyards. In 1913, flood waters made it impossible to get the livestock to the stockyards. The then 21-year-old’s option: butcher it himself. So, he coaxed Es-

The latest generation of Stehlin’s Meat Market is celebrating 100 years in the family business all year. From left, John, Ron, Dick and Denny Stehlin are proud to do things the way their dads and their grandfather did at their Colerain Township business. JENNIE KEY/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

pel into allowing him to slaughter the cattle in a small barn off Colerain Pike and then he sold the beef to nearby customers in Bevis, the present-day home of Stehlin’s Meat Market. Stehlin gained a reputation for fresh quality beef, pork and lamb chop. His hickory-smoked hams, cottage hams and bacon were very popular. So were the sausages that were made on site. Fresh and smoked pork sausage, liver pudding, and goetta. Pencils bore the motto, his slogan: “Made its way, by the way it’s made.” He married Eleonora Wullenweber and began a family. His sons, Vernon, Ervan and Harold, grew up in the business, working after school and any

other time they were needed. Eventually, he built his own slaughterhouse and a grocery. The grocery’s gone, but today, four of his grandsons – brothers John and Denny Stehlin and their cousins Ron and Dick Stehlin – are the latest generation working in the family business. “We’ve all worked here since we were kids,” said Ron. “We stood on a milk crate to run the register. We would work all morning and we got to have lunch with grandma. We lived out in the country; there wasn’t anything else to do. We stocked shelves, swept, whatever needed to be done. “It was fun.” In the last century, the busi-

ness has changed names, shifting from John Stehlin Meats to John Stehlin & Sons Meats, from Stehlin’s Meats to Stehlin’s Meat Market, reflecting the slaughterhouse and butcher shop sides of the family business. But the family’s commitment, both to quality and serving its generations of customers, remains the same. “That’s the word I always think of,” said Ron. “Commitment.” He says it’s evident in the men’s personal lives as well: Long marriages, and dedication to the family and the family business. The commitment works two ways. There’s more than one generation on both sides of the meat counter. “I used to come here with my mom when I was a kid,” said Michael Kramer, waiting for his order. “I grew up with John. He coached my baseball team and I still hang out with one of his boys.” Kramer says he stops frequently on the way home to pick up something for dinner. “Here, you walk in, you know what you’re getting.” Denny Stehlin says the market has third- and fourth-generation customers. And they have those kind of relationships with their suppliers as well, dealing with the same local farmers

they’ve bought from for years. On April 19, the brothers threw an anniversary party, celebrating 100 years in business. They were overwhelmed by the number of people who came to celebrate with them. State legislators, suppliers, customers, and others who just wanted to wish the family well stopped by the store at 10134 Colerain Ave. to help celebrate the firm’s success. “They brought cakes and flowers, it was unbelievable,” said Denny. He and Dick estimated there were more than 200 people in attendance. There was recognition from the Colerain Township Trustees and the Hamilton County Board of Commissioners. The family is giving away gift certificates in monthly drawings and the store will feature anniversary specials for the rest of the year. And the Stehlins celebrated the best way they know how: they fired up the grills and fed everyone. “It was a pretty good party,” Dick said. “Our customers came from around here, from Indiana and Kentucky. They sent flowers and planters. They brought cakes. It was nice.” “We could feel our parents and our grandparents looking down,” Ron said. “I think they are proud. I hope they are.”

Northwest senior flips car on way home from graduation Just an hour after walking across a stage to accept his diploma, a Northwest High School honors student flipped his car on State Route 27 on his way home

from graduation. Police said Nyet Long Nguyen Phan, 18, was eastbond on state Route 27 when he flipped his car attempting to turn west onto

Kemper Road shortly after 10 p.m. on May 21. He was on his way home from commencement exercises at Millet Hall at Miami University in

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NEWS

A4 • NORTHWEST PRESS • MAY 29, 2013

BRIEFLY Colerain Twp. continues budget talks at meetings

Colerain Township will continue working on its budget for 2014 with a town hall meeting planned for 7 p.m. Tuesday, June 4, at the Colerain Community Center, 4300 Springdale Road. This is an opportunity for the residents to speak on the reports that were to be presented at the township meeting May 28. Township officials planned to hear and discuss methods to reduce the township’s annual operating deficit in all departments by 50 percent and100 percent and determine the impact those changes would have on service levels at their meeting May 28. This meeting will be available for viewing on waycross.tv. Administrator Jim

Rowan said the township wants the community to participate. He said the conversation on June 4 is critical as the township chooses a path for the future.

Groesbeck Church of Christ marks 25th anniversary

The Groesbeck Church of Christ, 8209 Chesswood Drive, will celebrate its 25th anniversary Sunday, June 2. Members say the church has been a part of the Groesbeck community for 25 years, but their service and influence has had a positive spiritual impact that reaches through out the city of Cincinnati and into other communities around the United States. Some of the people who began their preaching ministry in the Groesbeck congregation went on to

further their education and have continued in their work in the church at other congregations. The first minister of the church was Rev. Ray Rose and current minister is the Rev. Mark W. Phillips, who has been the minister since the beginning of 2013. Mark replaced Jered West who had served the church for five years before taking a position with a church in Kentucky. The church will celebrate the anniversary with a special service at 10:30 a.m. on Sunday morning to thank God for 25 years in the community and lesson challenging the church to look to the future as a time for growth and service. Sunday services are at 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. The church offers Bible study at 9:30 a.m. on Sunday morning and 7 p.m on Wednesday evening.

The Groesbeck Church of Christ is a church with a historical connection with the American Restoration Movement which began in the early 1800s, when people grew tired of denominational doctrines, and wanted to take the Bible as their sole source of religious authority.

Colerain shred day

The Colerain Township Citizens Police Academy sponsors a free shred day from10 a.m. to noon Saturday, June1, in the lot of the old Western Home Center, 7600 Colerain Ave. While there is no fee, donations are being accepted to benefit the Colerain Community Resource Center at 7650 Colerain Ave. Paper items will be professionally and securely shredded on site. No hanging folders, metal or paper clips. There will be volunteers available to

help with unloading.

Springfield Twp. arts council wants volunteers

The Springfield Township Arts and Enrichment Council, a nonprofit organization created to plan and provide recreational events in township, is seeking volunteers. The council has five operating divisions: literary arts, visual arts, performing arts, student art education and grants/ fundraisers. They are also looking for support in administrative duties, hospitality, event logistics and many other areas. For more information, visit springfieldtwp.org/ artscouncil.cfm.

Garden seminars

White Oak Gardens presents “You Planted What? Where?” a seminar that stresses smart garden practices and gives tips to avoid garden mistakes and disasters as part of its Year-Round Gardening Series at the West Fork branch of the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County. This seminar will begin at 6:30 p.m. Monday,

June 10, at the library, 3825 West Fork Road. Call 513-369-4472 for information.

Library hosting summer reading

The Monfort Heights branch of the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County is preparing for the Library Summer Reading Program. Students are reminded to sign up for the Summer Reading program starting June 1 at he branch, at 3825 West Fork Road. They will have great prizes and lots of fun programs through July 31. Students and parents can check it all out at cincinnatilibrary.org. Stop by any library location to use your reading superpowers and sign up for summer reading. Decorate a superhero mask, while supplies last. The May Teen Night will be from 6:30 to 9 p.m. on Friday, May 31, and will be the Summer Reading Kickoff. Activities include grilling out, cornhole, horseshoes, and putt-putt golf. Call 513-369-4472 for more details.

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NEWS

MAY 29, 2013 • NORTHWEST PRESS • A5

Mt. Healthy top students love their school By Jennie Key jkey@communitypress.com

Mount Healthy Junior and Senior High School has a valedictorian and two salutatorians ready to close the book on high school and begin the first chapter of their college careers. The 2013 valedictorian is Jacob Lee Burrell, 18, son of Steve and Sharon Russell. Salutatorians are Linda Hoepf, 17, daughter of Susan and Gregory Hoepf and Kayla Whoberry,18, daughter of Richard Whoberry. Jacob is headed to Greenville College in Greenville, Ill., where he plans to study communications and business. He will also run cross country and track. While at Mount Healthy, Jacob ran track and cross country and was involved in jazz band, performance ensemble, National Honor Society, yearbook, school newspaper and also was active in his church youth group. If he could reset his high school years, he says he would do more community service. While he met his hours requirement, he said he feels as if volunteer work will be important as he gets older. One piece of advice he gives juniors about to jump on the wild ride of senior year is to “give yourself enough time to be successful.” He says a schedule that’s too crammed full of hard classes and activities can trip you up. “Having some leeway in my schedule helped,” he said. Linda Hoepf will attend Augustana College in Rock Island, Ill. and has not declared a major as yet. While at Mount Healthy, she was involved in student government, Key Club, class president freshman and sophomore year, varsity volleyball, varsity basketball, varsity softball, Beta Club, National Honor Society, Art Club, choir and Youth Leader Seminar. She says the best advice she can pass on to the class of 2014 as they begin

their junior year is “Stay on top of deadlines. Your senior year, there is always a deadline. Whether it’s a college application, a scholarship application or an English assignment, you have to meet the deadlines.” Kayla will attend Ball State University in Muncie, Ind. where she plans to major in business administration with a minor in social work. Eventually, she plans to go to law school. While at Mount Healthy, she was involved in student government, Key Club, class president junior and senior year, vice president freshman and sophomore year, Beta Club, Red Cross Club, Marching Band, Color Guard, played flute in the concert band, varsity softball, National Honor Society, Drama Club, choir and Youth Leader Seminar. Her advice to incoming seniors is “take time to take it all in and don’t rush things. It’s your last year, and it goes a lot faster than you expect. Coming into senior year, I thought I had all this time and then…it’s gone. Take it all in while you can.” If you are looking for a cheering section for Mount Healthy Junior and Senior High School than these three seniors who will be on the podium at graduation. Teachers in the school district get high marks from this trio. Kayla all said the teachers and administration at the high school sets it apart, starting with principal Marlon Styles. “Mr. Styles loves this school,” she said. “You can tell it in everything he does. He knows us by name and he makes you want to do well.” Jacob said teachers and coached had an impact on who he is today. “I had great teachers and coaches who I really connected with,” Jacob said. “You know they want you to succeed, that they are on your side. They push you, but in good ways.”And it’s not just teach-

ers at the high school; Jacob and Kayla both pointed to grade school teachers as people who inspired them to aspire to greater things. “When I was in the seventh grade, Mrs. (Brenda) Schildmeyer pointed to me one day and said I was a future valedictorian at Mount Healthy High School,” he said. “She gave me a goal. It’s been in the back of my mind and I knew I could do it. Kayla said a sixthgrade teacher, Jennifer Shelton, had also lost her mom at a young age and they connected through that shared experience. “We bonded over that loss and she really put me on track,” Kayla said. “I am going to Ball State because of her. She graduated from my college and took me to visit.” Linda’s support is even more direct. “Don’t underestimate Mount Healthy,” she said. “We will do great things.” Mt. Healthy High School graduation will be at10 a.m. Saturday, June1, on the football field at the high school, 8101 Hamilton Ave.

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SCHOOLS

A6 • NORTHWEST PRESS • MAY 29, 2013

NORTHWEST

PRESS

Editor: Jennie Key, jkey@communitypress.com, 853-6272

ACHIEVEMENTS | NEWS | ACTIVITIES | HONORS

CommunityPress.com

SCHOOL NOTES Colerain High School

At the Magnified Giving ceremony were,from left, Dan Klus (Helping Hands), junior Liz Kummer, junior Emily Klensch, junior Meghan Schwetschenau, junior Maddie Dickerson, Alicia Cachat (Helping Hands). Students involved in Philanthopy Club but unable to attend the ceremony were juniors Emma O'Connor, Monica Hermann, Amanda Meiering, and Gabby Reynolds. PROVIDED

McAuley students practice good works

The students at McAuley High School recently had an opportunity to make a real difference in the lives of cancer patients and their families. Under the leadership of Brigitte Foley, director of advancement, and assisted by Gina Keith, service coordinator, McAuley participated in the Magnified Giving program, an educational organization based in Cincinnati, with partner schools in Greater Cincinnati, Central Ohio, Northeast Ohio, and Northern Kentucky. Its mission is to educate, inspire and engage students in philanthropy, and to touch the hearts and minds of teens,

lighten the concerns of others, and magnify the impact of philanthropy. Magnified Giving’s founder and president is Roger Grein, a lifelong philanthropist. McAuley’s newest club, the Philanthropy Club, consisted of eight students who met monthly, each student researching and suggesting two non-profit organizations in need of donations. Based on their presentations and discussions, the young women narrowed the choices down to two. They then held a short assembly to explain to the student body how Magnified Giving works. They offered a choice

of those two non-profit enterprises to benefit from Magnified Giving. Helping Hands of Cincinnati, which helps families of patients undergoing treatment for cancer, was the ultimate choice of the students, who were surveyed online for their input. Money was then collected during activity bells ($253.21) and Magnified Giving matched the donation for $250 and added an additional $1000, for a total gift amount of $1503.21. There was a ceremony April 30 at McAuley for all participating schools to mark this occasion and new partnership.

The cast and crew of Mount Notre Dame High School's production of "The Drowsy Chaperone" received 14 Cappies nominations. THANKS TO JIM KAPP

MND production earns 14 Cappies nominations Mount Notre Dame High School’s production of “The Drowsy Chaperone” has received 14 nominations in the 2013 Greater Cincinnati Cappies awards competition, including Best Musical. The total number of nominations is the second highest in the history of the school’s theater department. The Greater Cincinnati Cappies began in 2002 in cooperation with theater teachers from Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky. The purpose of the Cappies is to enhance long-term growth of theater and the performing arts within Cincinnati by celebrating, promoting and improving theater at the high school level. Through the Cappies, high school student critics attend and review each other's shows, publish their reviews and participate in a year-end recognition gala. The categories and nomi-

nees (nominees are MND students unless otherwise noted) for “The Drowsy Chaperone” are: » Best Musical » Featured Actress in a Musical: Haley Gillman (White Oak) » Featured Actor in a Musical: Iain Applebee (Purcell Marian High School) » Female Dancer: Rachel Brinkman (Mason) » Male Dancer: Cian Steele (Purcell Marian High School) » Male Vocalist: Gregory Miller (La Salle High School) » Comic Actress in a Musical: Mary Lindsey » Comic Actor in a Musical: Jacob Lucas (Purcell Marian High School) » Supporting Actress in a Musical: Holly Ayres (Springfield Township) » Choreography: Rachel Brinkman (Mason) » Song: “Cold Feets”

» Sound: Maria Brandell (West Chester Township), Leah Callahan (Milford), Sabrina Dunbar (Morrow), Allyson Meloy (Colerain Township) » Lighting: Olivia DeLuca (Mason) » Sets: Sarah Drumm (West Chester Township), Lauren Hall (Amberley Village), Allyson Meloy (Colerain Township), Katie Seither (Sycamore Township) The cast will get to perform its nominated song, “Cold Feets,” at the Cappies Awards program later this month at the Aronoff Center. “The Drowsy Chaperone” attracted large crowds during its six-show run in April in the Mount Notre Dame Salerno Center for the Performing Arts. Nate Pucke, head of MND’s Theater Department, led the production which involved dozens of students as well as faculty, staff and parent volunteers.

Alyssa Elbe won first place at the Future Educators Association in Orlando in late April. Her essay in the competition was “Exploring Professional Support Services Careers,” with a focus on speech pathology. Elbe was required to submit a written report along detailing her 10 hours shadowing/observing a speech pathologist. She shadowed Christina Hannekan at Colerain Elementary. ■ Stephanie Dann, intervention specialist with the TOPS Program, has won the Franklin B. Walter Outstanding Educator Award through Hamilton County Educational Service Center. The award is given to an educator or educator team from each of the 16 state support teams in Ohio that have made extraordinary contributions to the education of students with disabilities. Dann will be honored at an Ohio Coalition of Education for Children with Disabilities luncheon in Columbus June19.

McAuley High School

It has become a spring tradition for the 15 young women in vocal ensemble, along with director Mary White, to travel during the school’s spring break to compete in a choir competition. This year, the location of the competition was the University of Staten Island in New York City, as the students participated in the Performing Arts Consultants’ Music Festivals Big Apple Classic. The vocal ensemble from La Salle High School, directed by Cindy Webb, also competed, on their own and in combination with McAuley. As a combined group, they won first place gold in mixed concert choir and second place silver in show choir. The McAuley women also were awarded first place gold in women’s choir. The La Salle students received first place gold in men’s choir and were the grand champions of the festival. Nathan Hart also won a solo award. ■ World Voice Day was April 16. On this day, each year, voice professionals worldwide celebrate the importance of educating the public about vocal health and the need for preventative care. McAuley High School’s award-winning vocal ensemble and director Mary White were invited to be a part of the local celebration, which was made possible by a consortium with Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, UC Health and the Cincinnati Opera. The 15 young women traveled to the UC Health Barrett Cancer Center in Clifton to not only sing, but to have free voice screenings and learn some vocal health tips. ■ On April 18, 37 students from McAuley High School joined students from 15 other Archdiocesan high schools for a program at Xavier University called New Hope for the World: Called by Our Faith to be Peacemakers. The McAuley students provided 12 art displays and 60 mosaic pieces that were used at the conference. The Peace on Earth event was planned by a committee for over 18 months. McAuley theology teacher Linda Goldbach served on the committee. She accompanied the young

women to Xavier, as did Ted Ward, theology teacher, and Sue Ward, retired theology teacher. Additionally, McAuley junior Cara Molulon was one of three students to share a meditation at the end of the conference to inspire others to take what they learned about peace and to go out and make a difference in the world.

Northwest High School

The marching band traveled to Florida at the end of March to perform at Epcot Center in Disney World. Sixty-five students performed and a total of 86 students, parents and family went on the trip. ■ The winter percussion ensemble qualified for the Mideast Percussion Association Championship finals. The ensemble placed second in its division with a score of 81.1 out of 100. ■ The winter drumline participated in the Scholastic Concert Open Division. The drumline consists of 15 members and performed to the theme of “Dark Psychosis.” The program was written marching band staff member Tyler Muchmore. ■ Resource officer Andy Demeropolis nominated junior Alexandra Roelofs for the Simon Lazarus Jr. Human Relations Award. Roelofs represented Northwest as an outstanding student volunteer at the AJC Cincinnati 48th annual awards presentations. She presents the physics portion of the Driving Angels Program. The student nominees received awards of gift books for their school libraries and savings bonds. ■

Elementary School

Fifth-grade students have formed an Art Club. As one of their projects, they created artwork for the Cincinnati Arts Association’s Student Art Show. The following students will have artwork in the show: Tyler Abney, Myron Bacon, Riley Baldock, Taniya Blair, Kristene Butts, Noah Davis, Kimari Johnson, Melissa Mendez and Conner Puccini.

Pleasant Run Middle School

Thirty members of the seventh- and eighth-grade Sapphire Strings Orchestra competed in the Ohio Music Education Association D-14 Solo and Ensemble Contest. Seventh-graders earning superior ratings for their solos were Christian Jacquillard and Will Jasper, bass; Alexandrea Carson and Brad Rollins, cello; Claire Walton, trumpet; Alexandria Stewart, viola; and Jade Bronson, Destinee Johnson, Nadia Kelly, Mairead Kennedy, Jackie Linville, Brennan Moore, Abby Schmidt, Madison Wallace and Sheala Worsham, violin. Eighth-graders earning superior ratings for their solos were Destiny Burnett, cello; Ashley Caldwell and Selena Neal, viola; and Cayla Harris, Tiyanna Jones, Zsanaya Massey and Thu Nguyen. Ensembles earning superior ratings were the violin duet of Cheyenne Ross and Crystina Wright; violin trio of Pyrah Cross, Destinee Johnson and Kevon Rainey; and the miscellaneous string trio of Jackson Chapin, Brennan Moore and Brad Rollins.


NEWS

MAY 29, 2013 • NORTHWEST PRESS • A7

Northwest High School graduates switch their tassels and celebrate their new status. JENNIE KEY/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

GRAD KNIGHT

Christina Sorentino and Amanda Sheely walk in the procession as it enters the hall. Sheely graduated first in the class. JENNIE KEY/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Northwest Class of 2013 graduates

Northwest High School graduated 241 senior Knights in the class of 2013 on May 21 at Millett Hall, Miami University. Speakers and their presenters included Amanda Sheely, who introduced speaker James Wells, and Christiana Sorentino, who introduced Soriah McClendon.

Terrie McClendon adjusts the hat of her daughter, Soriah McClendon, as she gets ready to graduate from Northwest High School May 21. JENNIE KEY/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Pam Hoffman, a secretary at Northwest High School, helps graduating senior Dominick Williams secure his mortar board in preparation for graduation. JENNIE KEY/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

These Northwest High School senior girls share a group hug before the ceremony begins. JENNIE KEY/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

The Northwest Knightlights performed three songs, “Let it Be,” “I’ll Be There” and “I Know Where I’ve Been,” under the direction of Anna Roof at the school’s graduation May 21. JENNIE KEY/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Northwest High School graduates, from left, Christina Sorentino, Amanda Sheely, James Wells and Soriah McClendon listen on the podium as the ceremony continues. JENNIE KEY/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Northwest High School graduation candidates file into rows of seats as the ceremony gets underway at Millett Hall at Miami University. JENNIE KEY/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Northwest High School graduated the class of 2013 May 21 at Millett Hall, Miami University. Entering the building are, from left, Lamar Packer, Cameron Mueller and Brian Cherry. JENNIE KEY/THE COMMUNITY PRESS


SPORTS

A8 • NORTHWEST PRESS • MAY 29, 2013

NORTHWEST

PRESS

Editor: Melanie Laughman, mlaughman@communitypress.com, 513-248-7573

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | RECREATIONAL

CommunityPress.com

Slinger retires after 35 years at St. X By Tom Skeen tskeen@communitypress.com

SPRINGFIELD TWP. — It wasn’t the way St. Xavier coach Bill Slinger wanted to go out. After 35 years behind the bench on North Bend, Slinger is retiring. He’ll have to do it with his last game being a 17-0 loss to Greater Catholic League rival Moeller in the Division I sectional finals. “We knew we were shorthanded all year long and we knew pitching was going to be a huge weakness,” Slinger said of his 16-12 Bombers. “When you play a good team like (Moeller) your weaknesses are going to come to the top.” As far as retirement goes, the veteran coach isn’t worried about what he will do in his free time. “We have plenty of things to do, that’s not going to be a problem,” he said. “We have six grandkids, most of them in the (Washington) D.C. area in Arlington. … So we are going to do some traveling.” It’s never easy to say goodbye to a senior class, but this year was especially tough. Not only was it a final goodbye for Slinger, but also it was a goodbye to a class that endured the team’s worst win total since 2010. “They are just good kids,” the coach said. “They are great kids. You spend more time with them than their mom and dad. … You get to know them, you get to know their families and it’s not easy.”

La Salle High School junior Tim Bell won 2013 Greater Catholic League South field athlete of the year honors and aims for the state meet in the long jump. MELANIE LAUGHMAN/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Two steps turn into leap of faith By Mark D. Motz

mmotz@communitypress.com

MONFORT HEIGHTS — Sixteen steps. La Salle High School junior Tim Bell takes exactly 16 steps on his approach before launching himself into a pit of sand. The fact he usually lands well over 20 feet past his point of departure earned him 2013 Greater Catholic League South field athlete of the year honors. “Once you get the steps down, it’s just a matter of repetition,” he said. “You do it over and over.” Bell has cleared 6-foot-4 in the high jump and is an all-GCL sprinter, but the long jump is his calling card. “I just like jumping,” he said. “I’ve been jumping forever.” Some think he stays in the air forever, as evidenced by his personal best leap of 23foot-4.5. “You’re just not on the ground,” he said. “I don’t really concentrate on the flying part. I think about the fact gravity is going to bring me down and I better land well. When I’m in the air, I’m concentrating on the landing.” That jibes perfectly with Lancer jump coach Eric Vehr’s

acronym, SEE, standing for speed, elevation and extension. Vehr sets up special hurdles at the edge of the takeoff board in practice to force jumpers up. “He’s already got the fourthlongest jump in Cincinnati history,” said head coach Frank Russo. “He’s going to be one of the best long jumpers in America. He’s definitely a Division I athlete. His size, speed and strength are such that I think colleges will want to look at him as a decathlete. “He’s tremendously coachable. He’s a great ambassador for our team. He has that type of personality where he connects with people, but he’s very humble. If you never saw him perform, you’d never know how good he is because he doesn’t talk about it. “He’s continued to improve and progress. Some of that is he’s matured, gotten bigger and stronger physically, but his work ethic has grown, too.” Vehr agreed. “He does all his training as a sprinter and then comes to jump,” he said. “He works very hard.” Part of the work meant adjusting the approach to the aforementioned 16 steps. Bell began the season with a

14-step approach. Just as he got comfortable with it and had a chance to break the school record at home, along came change. Two more steps meant no steps up the podium “I faulted four times, and you only get four jumps,” Bell said. “It was a meet where I only had to jump 20 or 21 feet to win. It was hard getting used to 16.” Hard, but worthwhile. “We experiment with an eye to a bigger goal,” Vehr said. “He was crestfallen because he had a chance to break the record at home in front of a lot family and friends. But he bounced right back and he knows we have bigger goals. “He keeps the end in mind. We’re looking at an event where a quarter of an inch can be the difference and if we can get that quarter inch by adjusting his approach, it’s worth the sacrifice.” Bell hopes the new count will lead him to Columbus and a chance to contend for a state championship. “That’s the goal; getting there,” he said. “Once we get there, all the the hard work and all the adrenaline will kick in, and who knows what can happen?”

Slinger

The Bombers finished third in the GCL with a 5-5 record and showed promise with wins over Oak Hills, La Salle, Elder, Cleveland St. Ignatius and Talawanda in the sectional semifinal. It’s an experience Slinger thinks will prove invaluable in the future for his young team. “This will be great because we were starting three sophomores most of the year,” he said. “To see we aren’t the greatest team but if you play hard, look at what you can do and how far you can get.” The person who will follow in the footsteps of the man who won more than 600 games, eight district titles and brought home the school’s lone state title in 2003 is yet to be determined, but Slinger is going to miss teaching the younger generation life lessons. “… They keep you young and give you energy,” he said. “That is why I am looking forward to spending time with the grandkids. My wife and I were both teachers and got to spend a lot of time with kids and that is what I am going to miss the most.”

St. Xavier sophomore left fielder Justin Hilliard (27) catches a fly ball in short left field and guns home to stop a Moeller runner from scoring during their Division I sectional final May 23 at Lakota West High School. TOM SKEEN/COMMUNITY PRESS St. Xavier relief pitcher Alex Kenner tosses a pitch to a Moeller batter during their Division I sectional final game May 23 at Lakota West High School. TOM SKEEN/COMMUNITY PRESS

TOURNAMENT BRIEFS By Mark D. Motz mmotz@communitypress.com

Softball

» Colerain beat Ursuline Academy 3-2 in the Division I sectional tournament May 20. The Cardinals faced Springboro for the sectional title May 25 at Fairfield High School after Press deadlines.

Track and field

The following individuals qualified for the regional track meet, which begins May 29 (Due to holiday deadlines, final results for Division II and III were not

available): » La Salle High School won the boys Division I district meet at Winton Woods and qualified several athletes to compete at regionals, including Tim Bell and Jeffery Larkin (long jump), Tyler Harmon (200, 400), Jonathan Campbell (110 hurdles), Alex Murray and Brad Kluener (pole valt), Zach Allaben (shot and disc), the 4x100 and 4x200 relays. » Colerain High School finished fourth in the both the boys ad girls DIvision I district meets at Winton Woods. Boys advancing to regionals include Jordan Asbery (100, 200), Marcus Prince II (800), Ryan Williamson and

Joel McGrinder (high jump), Dylan Wiesman (shot put), and the 4x100, 4x200 and 4x400 relays. Girls advancing include the 4x800 relay Erin Sherrer (shot and disc), Julie Bolden (shot put), Kristen Siler (800, 1,600) and Christina Haffey (300 hurdles). » Northwest High School finished second in the boys Division I district meet at Winton Woods, while the girls team took eighth. Boys advancing to regionals include DaVon Jackson (100, 200), Miles Baldwin (200), Jamiel Trimble (110 hurdles), Rasheen Jones (shot and disc), and the 4x100 and 4x400 relays.

Girls advancing include Dora Williams (300 hurdles) and the 4x100 and 4x200 relays. » McAuley was runner up in the Division I district girls meet at Winton Woods. Athletes advancing to regionals include 4x400 relay, 4x800 relay, Jordan Thiery (high jump, 800), Claire Tonnis and Brenna Silber (pole vault), McKenzie Pfiefer (800), Rebecca Ashton (long jump, 3,200), Sydney Lambert (long jump) and Taylor Bove (discus). » St. Xavier - Michael Hall, 800-meter run, 1,600-meter run; Michael Vitucci, 1,600-meter run; Zach Lynett, 300-meter hurdles; Alex Kuvin, 3200-meter

run; Evan Stifel, 3,200-meter run; 4x400 and 4x800 relay. » Mount Healthy - Lashawnda Dobbs, 100-meter dash, long jump; Shaqualia Gutter, 200-meter dash; Mike Thomas, 100-meter dash; Greg Green, 800-meter run; Joe Ingram, 110-meter hurdles; Lawrence Thompson, shot put; girls’ 4x100 and 4x200 relay; boys’ 4x100 relay.

Holiday deadlines

Because of Memorial Day deadlines, some tournament results were unable to be included in print. You may check results from the various sports on www.cincinnati.com/preps.


SPORTS & RECREATION

MAY 29, 2013 • NORTHWEST PRESS • A9

SUMMER SPORTS CAMPS

COMMITTED TO COLLEGE

Titans football camp

The Tower Titans Junior High Football Program is looking for prospective football players for the upcoming 2013 season. Two camps for the ABC’s of Football will be Sunday, June 2, and Sunday, June 9. Each camp will last from 3-4:30 p.m. Players should meet in the in the parking lot behind La Salle High School, 3091 North Bend Road in Monfort Heights, near the entrance to the stadium. Registration for participating on the team for the upcoming season will be conducted prior to the beginning of each camp for all prospective players. The Tower Titans is comprised of seventh- and eighth-grade students who are not in a position to play football because they either: Attend schools that do not offer this sport, are home schooled or are over the weight limit for their schools’ respective leagues. Practices and home games are held at La Salle High School. The team has competed in the Southwest Ohio Catholic Conference since 2007 and play additional games against other local junior high teams. This is the tenth year that the program has been available for young men. For more information contact John Bosse at 741-2368.

Three McAuley High School seniors sign letters of intent to play collegiate sports. Jamie Ertel, left, will attend Thomas More College, where she will play softball and major in biology. She is the daughter of Matt and Mary McKeever of Mt. Healthy. Alexis Bierbaum, the daughter of Phil and Denise Bierbaum of Bridgetown, will play volleyball at Thomas More College where she plans to major in nursing. Randi Kelsey will attend Heidelberg University and play softball. The daughter of Davy and Mary Kelsey of Springfield Township, Randi has plans to major in criminal justice. THANKS TO KATHY DIETRICH

SPORTS BRIEFS

Steve Rasso football camp

SIDELINES

Hole-in-one

STAR tryouts

Green Township resident Frank Campisano celebrated his 87th birthday, April 14, and then hit the greens, hitting his second-ever ace. Campisano played in the Knights of Columbus Golf League the following Monday at Woodland Golf Course, and scored a hole-in-one on the eighth hole. His first hole-in-one was at Miami View Golf Club in 2009, where he has been a longtime member.

The 32nd annual Steve Rasso Youth Football Camp for second- through eighth-graders is 9-11:45 a.m., Monday, June 10-Friday June 14, at St. Xavier High School. Camp opens at 8 a.m., Monday, for pre-registered check-in and walk-up registration. Ender the stadium through the Media Gate. This is not a conditioning or recreational camp. The aim of the St. Xavier football camp is to give players the finest football instruction possible and a week full of fun and a stepping stone to becoming a more confident football player. Campers will associate with some of the beat young athletes in the area. Early registration is encourage. Fee of $80 for early registration or of $90 for walk-up registration includes a T-shirt.

Hummer Park): U8-U14: – Girls, 6:30-8 p.m. » Thursday, June 6 (at Stephanie Hummer Park): U8-U14: – Girls, 6:30-8 p.m. » Friday, June 7 (at Stephanie Hummer Park): Rainout date –6-7:30 p.m. If you are unable to attend or have questions, email directorofcoaching@ starsoccerclub.org.

Tryouts for the STAR Soccer Club’s 2013 Fall and 2014 Spring seasons are scheduled for June 2-6. All players, including current and former STAR players, must register and participate in tryouts, which are free. Register at starsoccerclub.org. The schedule: » Sunday, June 2 (at Winton Woods High School): U15-U18 – Girls, 5-6:30 p.m.; Boys, 6:30-8: p.m. » Monday, June 3 (at Stephanie Hummer Park): U8-U14: – Boys, 6:30-8 p.m. » Tuesday, June 4 (at Stephanie Hummer Park): U8-U14: – Boys, 6:30-8 p.m. » Wednesday, June 5 (at Stephanie

FOSC tryouts The Fairfield Optimist Soccer Club tryouts will be May 28-31 for age groups U8-U14 and June 1-4 for age groups U15-U18. To find the exact times and locations and to register, visit www.foscsoccer.com.

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Indoor soccer camp

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VIEWPOINTS A10 • NORTHWEST PRESS • MAY 29, 2013

NORTHWEST

PRESS

Editor: Jennie Key, jkey@communitypress.com, 853-6272

EDITORIALS | LETTERS | COLUMNS | CH@TROOM

CommunityPress.com

CCA celebrates 15 year anniversary Tips to On June 8, the Colerain Community Association celebrated 15 years of service to the township since the association’s founding in 1998. Its mission is to promote a positive identity for Colerain Township and to promote community support for beautification projects. Over the years, its volunteers have: » Picked up litter on Saturday mornings each month at the major highway interchanges within the township. You can see our volunteers wearing lime green vests as a safety measure. » Installed and maintained landscaped beds on the hill

near Stehlin’s, Colerain Avenue both at Interstate 275 and Ronald Reagan Highway as well as Hamilton Avenue and Ken Lohr COMMUNITY PRESS I-275. » Ensured GUEST COLUMNIST that the grass is cut at these three locations. » Participated in fundraising events such as the Colerain Township Business Association’s annual golf outing, the Taste of Colerain and the Colerain Fire Department’s Safety and Fire Expo. » Served on the CTBA

Beautification Committee from 2001 to 2011. The association thanks: » Rumpke for mowing the grass and watering at Colerain Avenue and I-275 and mowing the hillside at Stehlin’s » The Colerain Township Parks Department for mowing the grass at Colerain Avenue and I-275 and Ronald Reagan, watering as needed at various locations and assisting with maintaining the landscaped beds. » Jeffrey Allen Corp. We thank the following for their financial support of the the CCA: » Butler Rural Electric

Corporation » Colerain Township Business Association » Rumpke » State of Ohio » Stehlin’s » Wal Mart The officers and trustees of the CCA are truly grateful for all the work and dedication of the current and past volunteers who have helped the Association fulfill its mission. We are always in need of additional volunteers. Please contact Ken Lohr at 513-2459650 if you would like to help. Ken Lohr is the president of the Colerain Community Association.

CH@TROOM May 22 question Do you think IRS officials targeting of conservative groups is a one-time mistake or does a culture of abusing its power exist within the organization? Why or why not?

“The recent exposure of the IRS for abuse of power was disturbing. I suspect this kind of abuse has occurred before and not just by the IRS. It bothers me even more as Obamacare would add 16,000 more IRS employees to audit employers on health benefits. If they went to a straight line tax and dumped Obamacare they could dump the IRS or most of it. Now that is a huge savings of tax money. Government keeps growing like the national debt. Go Figure!”

T.D.T.

“This so-called scandal is not a one-time mistake and was not abuse of power. The IRS has every right to scutinize returns which claim tax exemption. Many with ‘righteous’ names like ‘Patriot” are purely scams and some are associated with terrorism. The audited returns were not only from conservatives. Approximately two-thirds of groups flagged for processing had some political campaign associations. Political groups should not have tax exemptions. In spite of than, none of the conservative groups were rejected. Like some churches, they are living on the edge but pay no taxes.”

A.T.

“The IRS targeting Conservative groups is not a onetime shot but what does it matter? We have a Teflon president. Nothing sticks to this guy. How many scandals will take before the media screams for impeachment? Never going to happen; all we can do is hope that the damage this administration does for the next three and a half years is kept to a minimum. Oh, and by the way, guess what organization will be deeply embedded in overseeing parts of Obamacare; would that be the IRS? How special is that?”

T.S.

“I think people are giving the IRS too much credit for targeting conservative groups. They are generally overworked and underfunded and do not have a lot of spare time to pursue political agen-

NEXT QUESTION Do you think Congress should approve the bill that would allow the nation's 11 million unauthorized immigrants to apply for U.S. citizenship, while also providing significant new investments in border security? Why or why not? Every week we ask readers a question they can reply to via e-mail. Send your answers to northwestpress@communitypress.com with Chatroom in the subject line.

das. “Groups with certain keywords in their names, like the ones allegedly targeted, have abused the tax system for years by claiming to be charities when, in fact, they were political lobbying organizations. “It is my belief that they were ‘profiling’ these groups for audit for legitimate purposes. This was likely a well intentioned, but bungled move on their part. “As a CPA practicing before the IRS, I deal with them frequently and, for the most part, they are sincere government employees trying to do a difficult job. When they do their best, everyone hates them and when they back off, Congress investigates them for not catching the tax cheats.”

F.S.D.

“Tough call. I do believe there is politics involved in the decision to flag these groups. Nevertheless, the IRS is a huge, cumbersome bureaucracy. “I think ineptitude, uncertain guidelines and direction and the ‘snail’s pace’ movement of any government entity also played a part. “Don’t get me wrong, I am not an Obama supporter. I think, however, the Republicans can get a lot of mileage out of this (and I don’t blame them). When the shoe’s on the other foot the same thing happens.”

T.B.

“I got politically active in early 2009, including participating in Tea Party events, writing letters to the editor and emailing and calling politicians of both parties on matters important to the Tea Party. “In late 2009 my personal tax return for 2007 was audit-

NORTHWEST

PRESS

A publication of

ed, the first and only time I have ever been audited. My return for 2007 contained nothing very unusual as compared to any other year. “Of course, I can't prove it, but I absolutely believe that I was targeted as a result of my political activities. I have heard comments from other conservatives who had similar experiences with the IRS. “By the way, after many hours of work to answer all the IRS questions I did not owe them anything.”

T.H.

“I think this is just another example of the government's trying to suppress the conservative movement in order to insure the success of its socialist agenda items. Strike fear in the hearts of the people and they will shut up, allowing things as heinous as the Third Reich to occur. “It's starting to happen here and everything is being couched in the positive rationale that 'it's for the common good.' Even the seemingly beneficial reverse mortgages are just another way for the feds to grab up land that would otherwise go to the heirs of the elderly people who are just using this tactic as a way to reduce their living costs. “When the government starts overstepping its legal bounds, legislating every aspect of our lives and the choices we used to be free to make we know that tyranny has arrived. Both political parties are guilty of this. “It's time to reclaim our Constitution and get back to the honor and dignity that this country once had. We need a new, strong third party filled with uncorrupted politicians who can stop the insanity before we find ourselves living in the USSR (United States Socialist Republic). It didn't work in the original USSR and it won't work here, at least not while older Americans who remember our God-given freedoms are still alive. “Unfortunately, our system of education is promoting the socialist, liberal agenda and the younger generation thinks that this is the way to go. I miss the 'old' America ... a country in which people worked hard for a living and would rather die than to live off of the sweat of another person's brow. “Liberal, social policies de-

stroy this desire to work hard and they also destroy morality, ethics, and common decency.”

C.H.

“Oh, I am sure this is a political motivated move of the current administration on part of the IRS. Being the history of a bully, the IRS in the most part has been more user friendly these past few years.”

O.R.

“I think it is a one-time mistake based on poor oversight. “However, since the Tea Party mantra is anti-tax, and not wanting to pay anything back to the country, I don't mind that they were being investigated. “If any group would seek to abuse a non-profit status to further their political agenda it would be the Tea Party.”

I.P.

May 15 question Should Ohio’s legislature pass a right-to-work law? Why or why not?

“Right to Work is a pleasant but misleading title for a very dangerous piece of legislation. The result will actually be to weaken and eventually starve the most important sources of worker’s rights in our nation’s history, our labor unions. “It will not attract living wage jobs or improve working conditions. It will only ensure that corporate CEOs continue to put profits before people. As employees, it is not in our best interest to risk lower wages, disappearing benefits and unsafe working conditions simply to avoid the price of union dues. Will we sell our silence for so little? If this legislation is such a great deal, then why is it the big corporations who are donating big money to help our Republican lawmakers pass it, and not the workers?”

K.M.

“Yes! Locally, Ohio needs a right-to-work law so that we are attractive for businesses to operate here as compared to our similar neighboring states Michigan and Indiana that have right-to-work laws. Globally, we need this law so that foreign investment in manufacturing and jobs will want to come to Ohio.”

5556 Cheviot Road Cincinnati, Ohio 45247 phone: 923-3111 fax: 853-6220 email: northwestpress@communitypress.com web site: www.communitypress.com

Charles Tereck

help reduce smog

As summer weather quickly approaches, so does the potential of smog. The warm weather and increase in sunlight can bake certain chemicals forming ozone – one of the primary pollutants in smog. By making small changes in our daily habits, we can all help improve air quality. Consider taking the following actions to reduce smog formation: » Take the bus (METRO: 513-621-4455 or TANK: 859331-8265). » Carpool or vanpool (RiMegan deShare: 513Hummel COMMUNITY PRESS 241-RIDE). » Ride a GUEST COLUMNIST bike, in-line skate or walk instead of driving. » Combine trips or eliminate unnecessary vehicle trips. » Refuel your vehicle after 8 p.m.; do not top off when refueling and tighten the gas cap. » Do not idle your vehicle. » Avoid quick accelerations and sudden stops as they increase fuel consumption. » Keep your vehicle maintained with properly inflated tires and timely oil changes. » Avoid use of gasolinepowered lawn equipment. » Avoid use of oil-based paints and stains. » Conserve electricity. » Spread the word. Smog can be harmful to many sensitive groups such as children, the elderly and those with respiratory conditions, and so it is important to know the air quality forecast. You can receive air quality notifications by email by registering at www.EnviroFlash.info. Current local air quality is also available at SouthwestOhioAir.org. Megan Hummel is the public relations coordinator for the Southwest Ohio Air Quality Agency.

ABOUT LETTERS AND COLUMNS We welcome your comments on editorials, columns, stories or other topics important to you in The Northwest Press. Include your name, address and phone number(s) so we may verify your letter. Letters of 200 or fewer words and columns of 500 or fewer words have the best chance of being published. All submissions may be edited for length, accuracy and clarity. Deadline: Noon Friday E-mail: memral@community press.com Fax: 853-6220 U.S. mail: See box below Letters, columns and articles submitted to The Northwest Press ay be published or distributed in print, electronic or other forms.

Northwest Press Editor Jennie Key jkey@communitypress.com, 853-6272 Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday See page A2 for additional contact information.


NORTHWEST

PRESS

WEDNESDAY, MAY 29, 2013

LIFE

PEOPLE | IDEAS | RECIPES

Veterans representing each branch of the service at the dedication of the Colerain Township Memorial Plaza. From left are Roger Argalas, representing the U.S. Coast Guard; Marine Sgt. Jeremiah Sanchez and Marine veteran Gene Trifilio; Jim Acton representing the Air Force; Tom Mahoney representing the U.S. Navy; and Army Staff Sgt. Eric Tanner and veteran Dan Stahl .

Conrad Thompson, decked out in his Air Force uniform, attends the dedication. He served in the Army in World War II in the Air Force during the Korean War. The 86-year-old Colerain Township resident is a familiar face to many from his days working as a greeter at the Colerain Township Wal-Mart.

NEVER FORGET

Ohio State Highway Patrol Trooper Chris Krantz sounds taps during the dedication ceremonies at Colerain Township Memorial Plaza May 24.

Township officials, residents, public and safety service personnel, and veterans were at the dedication May 24 at the corner of Colerain Avenue and Springdale Road. The memorial honors the men and women of the community who have fought for our country, served keeping the township’s residents safe and, in some cases, gave their lives to keep those commitments – Colerain Township police, firefighters, township workers and veterans from all U.S. service branches are included. Photos by Jennie Key/The Community Press

The Naval Jr. ROTC honor guard and the Emerald Society Pipes and Drums wait for the dedication ceremonies to begin at the corner of Colerain Avenue and Springdale Road.

The American flag will fly over the Colerain Township Memorial Plaza day and night.

The Naval Junior ROTC Honor Guard stands at rest while Colerain Township Assistant Administrator Frank Birkenhauer speaks during dedication ceremonies at the Colerain Township Memorial Plaza at Colerain Avenue and Springdale Road.

Marine Cpl. Chad Ohmer, recovering after being wounded serving in Afghanistan, at the dedication with his helper dog Sam and his family. From left are his dad, Dave Ohmer, Chad, his wife Renae holding their daughter Emma, and Colerain Township Police Chief Dan Meloy. JENNIE KEY/COMMUNITY PRESS

Air Force veteran Jim Acton, who worked to get funding for the memorial and pushed for it to include veterans, puts his hand over his heart as the flag is raised over the Colerain Township Memorial Plaza.

Army veteran Ray Dumont, who served with the Army’s 4th Infantry, was among veterans who attended the dedication of the Colerain Township Memorial Plaza May 24.

The Colerain Township Memorial Plaza also honors public servants who have died on the line of service. Firefighters locally and those who died in the 9/11 terrorist attack in New York City are remembered. This piece of iron beam came from the World Trade Center.


B2 • NORTHWEST PRESS • MAY 29, 2013

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD THURSDAY, MAY 30

Springfield Township.

Dance Classes

Recreation

Waltz Classes, 7 p.m., Parky’s Farm Hayloft Barn, 10073 Daly Road, Beginner-level dance class open to all capable ages. Wear smooth-soled shoes. With instructors Betty and Estil Owens. Free. Presented by Southwestern Ohio/Northern Kentucky Square Dancers Federation. 671-7219; www.sonksdf.com. Springfield Township. Square Dance Lessons, 7:309:30 p.m., Forest Park Activity Center, 651 W. Sharon Road, Low-impact activity to improve your mind, body and spirit. Ages 9 and up. $5. Presented by Happy Time Squares. 232-1303. Forest Park.

Pioneer Pastimes, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Parky’s Farm, 10037 Daly Road, Watch the sheep get sheared, try carding and spinning wool, dance around the maypole, pat baby farm animals and milk a goat. Ride a wagon to the garden and have fun in the playbarn. Recommended for pre-kindergarten through first grade. Daily activities vary. Dress for weather.$7 children, $3 adults; vehicle permit required. Presented by Hamilton County Park District. 521-3276, ext. 100; www.greatparks.org. Springfield Township.

SATURDAY, JUNE 1

Exercise Classes

Exercise Classes

Hatha Yoga, 10-11 a.m., Colerain Township Community Center, 4300 Springdale Road, Daytime class ages 50 and up on Thursdays. Evening class ages 18 and up on Mondays. Bring mat and engage in stretching, breathing and relaxing techniques. $5. 741-8802; www.coleraintwp.org. Colerain Township. Flex Silver Sneakers Exercise Class, 9:30-10 a.m., Colerain Township Community Center, 4300 Springdale Road, Instructor-led, mixing core, strength and cardio. For ages 65 and up. $3, free with participating insurance companies. 741-8802; www.colerain.org. Colerain Township.

Zumba Kids Dance Fitness Class, 10:30-11:15 a.m., Great Commission Bible Church, 10200 Hamilton Ave., Family Life Center. Healthy program featuring explosion of music, dance and energy. Ages 4-12. $4. 851-4946. Mount Healthy.

Farmers Market College Hill Farm Market, 3-6:30 p.m., College Hill Presbyterian Church, 5742 Hamilton Ave., Variety of local, healthful foods. Beginning in May with greens and asparagus and mulch and plants for your garden. Strawberries and wide variety of summer produce. Food truck, music and special events on Thursdays beginning in June. Presented by College Hill Farm Market. 542-0007; www.collegehillfarmmarket.org. College Hill.

Karaoke and Open Mic Karaoke Thursdays with Mean Jean, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Club Trio Lounge, 5744 Springdale Road, 385-1005. Colerain Township. Open Mic Night with the Toddy O Band, 8 p.m.-midnight, Junior’s Tavern, 1839 W. Galbraith Road, Free. 729-0416. North College Hill.

Support Groups Strengths in Marriage, 7-8:30 p.m., Family Life Center, 703 Compton Road, Learn how to communicate with new language to grow your marriage into a stronger one. Free. 9315777. Finneytown.

FRIDAY, MAY 31 Exercise Classes Flex Silver Sneakers Exercise Class, 9:30-10 a.m., Colerain Township Community Center, $3, free with participating insurance companies. 741-8802; www.colerain.org. Colerain Township.

Hamilton County Recycling and Solid Waste District Yard Trimmings Drop-Off, 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Kuliga Park, 6717 Bridgetown Road, Hamilton County residents can drop off yard trimmings for free. Free. Presented by Hamilton County Recycling and Solid Waste District. 598-3089; bit.ly/11UQb9r. Green Township. Hamilton County Recycling and Solid Waste District Yard Trimmings Drop-Off, 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Rumpke Sanitary Landfill, 3800 Struble Road, Hamilton County residents can drop off yard trimmings for free. Free. Presented by Hamilton County Recycling and Solid Waste District. 851-0122; bit.ly/11UQb9r. Colerain Township.

Nature Free Firsts Appreciation Days, 7 a.m.-8 p.m., Winton Woods, 10245 Winton Road, Residents can enjoy any park without the need for a motor vehicle permit, while enjoying a host of other free and discounted activities. Dress for weather. Family friendly. Free, no vehicle permit required. Presented by Hamilton County Park District. 521-7275; www.greatparks.org/freefirsts. Springfield Township. Free Firsts Appreciation Days, 7 a.m.-8 p.m., Farbach-Werner Nature Preserve, 3455 Poole Road, Residents can enjoy any park without the need for a motor vehicle permit, while enjoying a host of other free and discounted activities. Dress for weather. Family friendly. Free, no vehicle permit required. Presented by Hamilton County Park District. 521-7275; www.greatparks.org/freefirsts. Colerain Township.

On Stage - Theater

Lettuce Eat Well Farmers Market, 3-7 p.m., Cheviot United Methodist Church, 3820 Westwood Northern Blvd., Special activity: Lettuce Eat Well, Lettuce Eat Seasonally, Lettuce Eat Locally. Market vendors will conduct demos using market food. Locally produced food items. Free. Presented by Lettuce Eat Well. 481-1914; www.lewfm.org. Cheviot.

Music - Religious

Religious - Community

Epic Summer Kick-Off, 7-11 p.m., Xenos Christian Fellowship, 1016 W. North Bend Road, With Corpus Christi, The Rose Hill, Witness, The Bear and the Racoon, A Breath Beneath the Silence and Crosely Court. All ages. $8, $4 advance. 542-4149. Finneytown.

Take a Walk on the Wild Side, 11 a.m.-7 p.m., New Hope Community Church, 3707 Edgewood Drive, Musical drama; ventriloquist show; illusionist and the Extreme, Exotic, Exciting Animal Extravaganza. Concludes with music by Church Worship Band at 6 p.m. Free. 661-2428. Green Township.

On Stage - Theater Phil Dalton Theater of Illusion, 7 p.m., Finneytown Performing Arts Center, 8916 Fontainebleau Terrace, Illusionist will divide himself in half while standing up, cause random audience member to levitate and pass a solid object through a human body. He will attempt two new death-defying escapes. Benefits Finneytown High School Theater Program. $15 ages 12 and up, $12 ages 3-12. 728-3712; www.phildalton.com.

Exercise Classes Iyengar Yoga: Beginner Series, 5:45-7:15 p.m., Grace Episcopal Church, 5501 Hamilton Ave., Weekly through June 25. Sessions geared toward those who are brand new to yoga or those from other traditions who want to renew basics. Ages 18 and up. $40. Presented by College Hill Yoga. 541-2415. College Hill.

Lectures Rookwood Pottery Reception and Seminar, 7-9 p.m., College Hill Coffee Company and Casual Gourmet, 6128 Hamilton Ave., Discussion begins 7:30 p.m. Rookwood information session and discussion with Jim Robinson, artist and glaze chemist at Rookwood Pottery Company. Spirited and informative talk on pottery’s past and present. Attendees eligible for Rookwood door prize. $20. Admission includes wine and beverage selection, house-made bites and desserts. Registration required. Presented by Rookwood Pottery Company. 542-2739; www.rookwood.com. College Hill.

Home & Garden

Phil Dalton Theater of Illusion, 2 p.m. and 7 p.m., Finneytown Performing Arts Center, $15 ages 12 and up, $12 ages 3-12. 728-3712; www.phildalton.com. Springfield Township. Mystery Dinner: Superhero Shakeup, 6:30-10 p.m., Mill Race Banquet Center, 1515 W. Sharon Road, Evening of adult humor. Outrageous storylines, laughs and audience participation. Ages 18 and up. $34.50. Reservations required. Presented by Hamilton County Park District. 521-7275, ext. 285; www.greatparks.org. Springfield Township.

Farmers Market

ed by Hamilton County Park District. 860-4746; www.greatparks.org. Springfield Township.

Summer Camps - Horses Summer Horse Camps: One Week and Full-Day, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., Winton Woods, 10245 Winton Road, Riding Center. Session 3. No camp on July 4. Through July 5. Campers learn about safety, breeds, colors and markings, anatomy, grooming, tacking and riding lessons. Two week, half-day camps. Ages 7-17. $310; $248 Session 3; vehicle permit required. Registration required online. Presented by Hamilton County Park

Support Groups Phil Dalton brings his Theater of Illusion to the Finneytown Performing Arts Center, 8916 Fontainebleau Terrace at 7 p.m. Friday, May 31. Dalton will divide himself in half while standing up, cause random audience member to levitate and pass a solid object through a human body. He also will attempt two new death-defying escapes. The performance benefits the Finneytown High School theater program. Tickets are $15, $12 ages 3-12. For more information, call 728-3712 or visit www.phildalton.com. PROVIDED.

ABOUT CALENDAR To submit calendar items, go to www.cincinnati.com and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to life@communitypress.com along with event information. Items are printed on a spaceavailable basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to www.cincinnati.com and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page. District. 521-7275. Springfield Township.

SUNDAY, JUNE 2 Home & Garden Hamilton County Recycling and Solid Waste District Yard Trimmings Drop-Off, 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Kuliga Park, Free. 598-3089; bit.ly/11UQb9r. Green Township. Hamilton County Recycling and Solid Waste District Yard Trimmings Drop-Off, 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Rumpke Sanitary Landfill, Free. 851-0122; bit.ly/11UQb9r. Colerain Township.

Support Groups Caregivers Support Group, 3:30-5 p.m., Family Life Center, 703 Compton Road, For those who care for or supervise the frail, elderly or disabled. Free. 931-5777. Finneytown.

MONDAY, JUNE 3 Exercise Classes Hatha Yoga, 7-8 p.m., Colerain Township Community Center, $5. 741-8802; www.coleraintwp.org. Colerain Township. Pilates Class, 11 a.m., Colerain Township Community Center, 4300 Springdale Road, Improve strength, flexibility, balance, control and muscular symmetry. Instructor Celine Kirby leads core-strengthening exercises using bands and weights. Bring yoga mat. $5. 741-8802; www.coleraintwp.org. Colerain Township. Cardio Dance Party, 7:45-8:45 p.m., Cincinnati Dance and Movement Center, 880 Compton Road, Incorporates variety of dance styles, including jazz, hip hop, Latin, jive and more danced to popular music. $10. Registration required. Presented by Cardio Dance Party. 617-9498; www.cardiodanceparty.com. Springfield Township. Flex Silver Sneakers Exercise Class, 9:30-10 a.m., Colerain Township Community Center, $3, free with participating insurance companies. 741-8802; www.colerain.org. Colerain Township.

Music - Blues Blues and Jazz Jam, 9 p.m.-12:30 a.m., Poor Michael’s, 11938 Hamilton Ave., Featuring rotating musicians each week. Free. 825-9958. Springfield Township.

Summer Camps - Nature Growing Up a Farm Kid, 9:3011 a.m., Parky’s Farm, 10037 Daly Road, Daily through June 6. Get close to farm animals and learn with toddler or preschooler. Assist with some farm chores, read stories, make crafts and play games. Ages 2-5. $60 with one complimentary caregiver; vehicle permit required. Presented by Hamilton County Park District. 521-3276, ext. 100; www.greatparks.org. Springfield Township.

Summer Camps Religious/VBS Kingdom Rock Vacation Bible School, 9 a.m.-noon, White Oak Christian Church, 3675 Blue Rock Road, Music, Bible adventures, energizing games, crafts and snacks. Monday-Friday. For kindergartners through fifth graders. Free. Registration required. 385-0425; www.thewocc.com. White Oak.

Summer Camps - Sports Soccer Unlimited Camps, 6-9 p.m., Stefanie Hummer Park, 661 North Bend Road, Through June 7. Jack Hermans & Soccer Unlimited organize camps and clinics to improve/maintain your soccer talents by playing serious, training with intensity, and keeping the element of “FUN” involved at all times. Family friendly. $85. Presented by Soccer Unlimited. 232-7916. Springfield Township.

Support Groups Strengths Based Career Management, 7-9 p.m., Family Life Center, 703 Compton Road, Identify how to leverage your strengths to reach your goals. Free. Registration required. 931-5777. Finneytown.

TUESDAY, JUNE 4 Community Dance Team Jeff Anderson Line Dancing, 6-7 p.m., Colerain Township Community Center, 4300 Springdale Road, Line dancing fitness party. Ages 18 and up. $5. 741-8802; colerain.org. Colerain Township.

Dance Classes New Beginner Western Square Dancing Class, 7:309:30 p.m., Parky’s Farm Hayloft Barn, 10073 Daly Road, No experience necessary. Free, vehicle permit required. Present-

Grief 101: New to Loss, 6:30-8 p.m., Family Life Center, 703 Compton Road, Learn what to expect and gain some insight and perspective on how to manage the emotional roller coaster a death creates. Find support and caring from those who have been on a similar journey. Ages 18 and up. Free. Registration required. 931-5777. Finneytown.

field Township.

Support Groups Guided Meditations on Forgiveness, 7-8:30 p.m., Family Life Center, 703 Compton Road, Gentle process to help you through situations where hurt or bad feelings were never resolved. Free. Registration required. 931-5777. Finneytown.

THURSDAY, JUNE 6 Dance Classes Waltz Classes, 7 p.m., Parky’s Farm Hayloft Barn, Free. 6717219; www.sonksdf.com. Springfield Township. Square Dance Lessons, 7:309:30 p.m., Forest Park Activity Center, $5. 232-1303. Forest Park.

Exercise Classes Hatha Yoga, 10-11 a.m., Colerain Township Community Center, $5. 741-8802; www.coleraintwp.org. Colerain Township. Flex Silver Sneakers Exercise Class, 9:30-10 a.m., Colerain Township Community Center, $3, free with participating insurance companies. 741-8802; www.colerain.org. Colerain Township.

Farmers Market College Hill Farm Market, 3-6:30 p.m., College Hill Presbyterian Church, 542-0007; www.collegehillfarmmarket.org. College Hill.

Karaoke and Open Mic

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 5

Karaoke Thursdays with Mean Jean, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Club Trio Lounge, 385-1005. Colerain Township. Open Mic Night with the Toddy O Band, 8 p.m.-midnight, Junior’s Tavern, Free. 729-0416. North College Hill.

Exercise Classes

Summer Camps - Arts

Zumba Toning, 7:15 p.m., Colerain Township Community Center, 4300 Springdale Road, Targeted body sculpting exercises and high energy cardio work. Bring a mat or towel, and a water bottle. $5. 741-8802; www.coleraintwp.org. Colerain Township.

Waycross Summer Film Workshop for Kids, 2-5 p.m. and 6-9 p.m., Waycross Community Media, 2086 Waycross Road, Grades 6-8. Thursdays through Aug. 9, also Aug. 16, no class July 4. Workshop led by Cincinnati filmmaker Bob Leibold will expose students to the process of filmmaking, the mechanics of creating a short movie an audience will watch. $100. Reservations required. 825-2429; www.waycross.tv/summercamp.html. Forest Park.

Health / Wellness Pathways Connect, 7-8 p.m., Bilog Coffee, Tea & Gelato, 1212 Springfield Pike, Meet likeminded community members. Topics include wellness and nutrition, child development, birth and pregnancy, and more. First Thursday of each month. Free. Registration required. Presented by Apex Chiropractic and Wellness Center. 931-4300. Wyoming.

Music - Benefits Music for Marriage, 7-8 p.m., Grace Episcopal Church, 5501 Hamilton Ave., Sanctuary. Music by Price Hill String Quartet. New music composed by Cincinnati native Peter Dayton. Benefits Freedom to Marry Ohio, a marriage equality advocacy organization. Free, donations requested. Presented by Price Hill String Quartet. 541-2415; bit.ly/musicformarriage. College Hill.

Support Groups Strengths in Marriage, 7-8:30 p.m., Family Life Center, Free. 931-5777. Finneytown.

FRIDAY, JUNE 7 Exercise Classes Flex Silver Sneakers Exercise Class, 9:30-10 a.m., Colerain Township Community Center, $3, free with participating insurance companies. 741-8802; www.colerain.org. Colerain Township.

Farmers Market Lettuce Eat Well Farmers Market, 3-7 p.m., Cheviot United Methodist Church, Free. 481-1914; www.lewfm.org. Cheviot.

Music - Concerts

Festivals

Greenhills Concert on the Commons, 7-9 p.m., Greenhills Village Commons, Winton and Farragut roads, Kyle Ryan with his Elvis Tribute. With Funny Companie Clowns. Bring seating. Free. Presented by Village of Greenhills. 608-2141; greenhillsconcertsonthecommons.com. Greenhills.

Church of the Assumption Festival, 6 p.m.-midnight, Church of the Assumption, 7711 Joseph St., Fish dinner available for purchase. Food available: hamburgers, brats, metts, fried foods, corn, sauerkraut balls, funnel cakes and more. 5217274. Mount Healthy. St. Bernard Summer Festival, 6 p.m.-midnight, St. Bernard of Clairvaux Church, 7130 Harrison Ave., Music by The Remains. Brats, metts, hot dogs, hamburgers, corn on the cob, City Barbeque and NYPD Pizza available. Rides, games and raffles. Beer garden with alcohol available for purchase with ID. Free. Presented by St. Bernard Church. Through June 9. 3534207; www.bernardfest.com. Colerain Township.

Senior Citizens Zumba Gold, 1-2 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Modified Zumba for seniors and beginners with standing and chair participation. For seniors. $3, $25 for 10 classes. Presented by Deb’s Fitness Party. 205-5064; www.debsfitnessparty.com. Green Township.

Summer Camps Miscellaneous Ultimate Challenge Camp, 9 a.m.-2:30 p.m., Winton Woods, 10245 Winton Road, Adventure Outpost. Session 1. Daily through June 7. Outdoor recreation including low ropes course, wall climbing, canoeing, archery, driving range, nature exploration. Ages 10-14. $140; vehicle permit required. Registration required online. Presented by Hamilton County Park District. 521-7275, ext. 240; www.greatparks.org. Spring-

On Stage - Dance Cinderella, 7 p.m., St. Xavier High School, 600 W. North Bend Road, Classic production, adapted and choreographed by Daniel R. Simmons. Features principal guest artists Erica de la O and Kristopher Wojtera of Louisville Ballet and students of Ballet theater Midwest Academy. $15-$20. Presented by Ballet theater Midwest. Through June 9. 520-2334; www.ballettheatermidwest.com. Finneytown.


LIFE

MAY 29, 2013 • NORTHWEST PRESS • B3

Corn bread and detox bath – both make you feel good When I put in requests for recipes, I usually just put them in once, maybe twice. If I don’t get a response from you or have nothing in my files, I go on to the next request. Rita But this Heikenfeld one from RITA’S KITCHEN Mark Burnhimer has touched my heart in a way that I am asking, once again, if any of you can help. Mark told me: “After a minor health issue, my caregiver had shared with me that he and his wife really missed Zino’s and that he would be eternally happy if someone had some of the old restaurant recipes, including the Zino Burger. Have you got anything that might resemble that in your file? I’d like to pay back someone for the excellent care I received while I was not at my best.” Mark has continued to follow up, asking if I’ve received anything. So if any of you can come even close, or can get the recipe, do let me know.

Kit Whiteman’s corn bread

“I’m such a fan and read your recipes every week. Here’s my recipe for corn bread. So quick and easy and tastes good, too,” Kit said. She’s right on all three counts. 1 box Jiffy Yellow Cake mix 1 box Jiffy Corn Bread mix

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Follow package directions for each box.

⁄3 cup Epsom salt ⁄3 cup sea salt 1 ⁄3 cup baking soda 1 tablespoon powdered/ground ginger 1 cup apple cider vinegar 10-20 drops Eucalyptus spearmint oil, or just Eucalyptus oil 1

1

Draw a bath with water as hot as you stand it. As tub fills, add all ingredients. Water will turn yellow/orange but don’t worry. Soak for about 40 minutes. While soaking, drink 24 oz. ice water. If you want, rub skin gently (always toward your heart) to stimulate lymphatic system and help clean out toxins. Dry off and drink another 24 oz. water as soon as possible, then relax. HEIKENFELD.

Place all ingredients in one bowl and blend. Pour into a greased 8-inch round or square pan and bake 25 minutes, until golden brown.

Cornbread from scratch

onion 2 cups shredded cheddar cheese 1 ⁄2 pound bacon, cut up and sautéed

Dressing Whisk together:

Check out my Cooking with Rita blog for this recipe. Go to Cincinnati.Com/blogs.

1 cup mayonnaise 1 ⁄2 cup sugar 1 ⁄4 cup red wine vinegar or more to taste (I usually add more)

Buffet broccoli salad

Pour dressing over salad ingredients. Toss well. When serving, dig deep so that you get all the goodies that tend to fall to the bottom.

Broccoli was on sale at the grocery and I had a craving for this salad. It’s not low fat or low sugar, but it’s always the first to go on the buffet table. Salad Mix together: 1 large head of broccoli, cut into florets (if stems are tender, use them, too, sliced thinly) Generous 1⁄2 cup chopped red

Tonya Fischer’s detox bath

After I shared recipes for natural scrubs, etc., I had more requests for natural bath soaks, especially ones using Epsom salts. I met Tonya during

a presentation I did at Macy’s corporate offices on healthy living. She works with Executive Chef Rick Toennis. Rick and Tonya believe, as I do, in Mother Nature’s healing powers. She told me about a soothing detox bath she enjoys, and I asked her to share the recipe. “When I’m not feeling so good or after a long day at work or workout, I soak in this bath,” Tonya told me. I’m going to make this myself and soothe the sore muscles I now have after our car got hit with a 200-pound deer.

How’s Your

Bath Tub? E... BEFOR

Y quilters help children at Ronald McDonald House engagement specialist with the Clippard Family YMCA said the Y quilters take the summer off but will be back working on the comfort quilts in August. The quilters meet the fourth Friday of each month, from noon until 3 p.m. at the Y, 8920 Cheviot Road. For more information call 513-923-4466 or email ndashley@ cincinnatiymca.org.

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Epsom salt: Makes you sweat, reduces inflammation, relieves muscle aches. Sea salt: Helps leach out toxins, soothes open sores or blemishes. Baking soda: Balances an overly acidic system, softens water, skin and helps eliminate chlorine. Ginger: Increases

Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator and author. Find her blog online at Cincinnati.Com/blogs. Email her at columns@communitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-248-7130, ext. 356.

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Do You Have Ulcerative Colitis?

Is it hard to control your symptoms using your current medication? What

This study will evaluate whether the study medication, budesonide MMX®, is safe and effective in people with ulcerative colitis that is not well controlled using anti-inflammatory medications known as 5-aminosalicylic acids (5ASAs). Budesonide MMX®, is approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA). This study is looking to see whether budesonide MMX® (given by mouth as tablet) and 5-ASA medication used together can better control the symptoms of ulcerative colitis.

Who

Adults 18-75 years old who have been diagnosed with mild or moderate ulcerative colitis (UC) and continue to have symptoms even when taking a 5-ASA medication (such as Asacol® and Lialda®) to treat UC.

Pay

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back to our community,” Schwegman said. “We welcome everyone to join us; no sewing skills are needed.” She said the fabric and materials are donated. Janet Weas of North College Hill hopes the children that receive them know that they are receiving a quilt, but it’s much more than that. “It is really a gift of love, love made out of fabric,” she said. Nora Dashley, senior

Participants will be compensated for time and travel. All medication will be provided at no cost to participants.

Details

For more information, contact Lauren Plageman at 513-558-5529 or lauren.plageman@uchealth.com

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Nancy Watts describes it as a “happy hobby.” For the past two years, Watts and 30 other members of the Clippard Family YMCA have carefully sewn colorful six-inch squares into comfort quilts. On Friday afternoons, Watts and the others sit at sewing machines and tables at the Y surrounded by piles of brightly colored fabric and squares that will ultimately become a comfort quilt for a child. The quilts are donated to children at Cincinnati’s Ronald McDonald House, a facility that provides a supportive “home away from home” for families and their children who are receiving medical treatment at Children’s Hospital Medical Center. Nora Kelly launched the Comfort Quilts program at the Ronald McDonald House over four years ago. “The quilts are part of welcome bags that are given to the families of children receiving treatment at Children’s,” said Kelly. “They come from 47 states and 22 countries. The 40-inch by 40-inch quilts, no two alike, provide a sense of security for the children and become a cherished belonging they keep long after their hospital stay ends.” Barbara Schwegman of Monfort Heights co-ordinates the Y’s Comfort Quilters group. “It is a great way for us to give

Tips from Tonya

Rita says her broccoli salad is always the first to go on buffet tables. THANKS TO RITA

circulation, opens pores, makes you sweat. Vinegar: Restores acid-alkaline balance, softens skin, helpful for acne. Massage oil: Relaxes body and senses.

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LIFE

B4 • NORTHWEST PRESS • MAY 29, 2013

Library starting its summer reading program It’s time to “power up” your reading skills and earn prizes for participating in the 40th annual Summer Reading Program at the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County. This year’s theme, Power Up ... Read!, offers all sorts of excitement by spotlighting “superheroes.” To kick off a fun season of reading (June 1-July 31), all library locations around Hamilton County are holding summer reading activities related to this exciting theme on Saturday, June 1. Children and their families are invited to stop by their neighborhood library to decorate a superhero mask (while supplies

last). Special kickoff events at selected Library locations on June 1: » Music with Zak Morgan, 1 p.m. at the Wyoming Branch Library, 500 Springfield Pike, 513-3696014. » The Frisch Marionettes Variety Show, 2 p.m. at the Delhi Township Branch Library, 5095 Foley Road, 513-369-6019. » Heroes Alliance Ohio featuring superheroes , 2 p.m. at the Symmes Township Branch Library, 11850 East Enyart Road, 513-369-6001. » The Amazing Portable Circus entertains with juggling, face painting, and balloon animals, 2 p.m. at the Anderson Township Branch Li-

brary, 7450 State Road, 513-369-6030. And just like the caped crusader friends who have a diverse range of super powers, you can find your niche within the Summer Reading Program. Whether you’re an adult reading to a small child or perusing your favorite magazine or a teen reading a graphic novel or a kid discovering chapter books – it all counts. Plus, there are a variety of ways to read. Download eBooks to your tablet, listen to audiobooks on your smart phone, or enjoy having a book in hand. The more you read the more prizes you win — plus chances to win grand prizes such as Reds tickets courtesy of the

INDEPENDENT BAPTIST

UNITED METHODIST

EVANGELICAL PRESBYTERIAN

FRIENDSHIP BAPTIST CHURCH 8580 Cheviot Rd., Colerain Twp 741-7017 www.ourfbc.com Gary Jackson, Senior Pastor Sunday School (all ages) 9:30am 10:30am Sunday Morning Service Sunday Evening Service 6:30pm Wedn. Service/Awana 7:00pm RUI Addiction Recovery (Fri.) 7:00pm

Christ, the Prince of Peace

At CHURCH BY THE WOODS

BAPTIST SHARON BAPTIST CHURCH 4451 Fields Ertel Road Cincinnati, OH 45241 (513) 769-4849 gstep77507@aol.com

Services

Sunday School - 10:00 am Sunday Morning - 11:00 am Sunday Evening - 6:00 pm Wednesday - 7:00 pm Evening Prayer and Bible Study VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL June 25 through June 29 Ages 3 to 15 Theme: Amazing Adventures Wyoming Baptist Church

(A Church For All Seasons) Burns and Waverly Avenues Cincinnati OH 45215 821.8430

Steve Cummins, Senior Pastor Sunday School..............................9:00 am Coffee & Fellowship...................10:00 am Praise & Worship........................10:30 am www.wyomingbc.homestead.com Visitors Welcome!

EPISCOPAL Christ Church Glendale Episcopal Church 965 Forest Ave - 771-1544 christchurch1@fuse.net www.christchurchglendale.org The Reverend Roger L Foote 8am Holy Eucharist I 9am Holy Eucharist II 11am Holy Eucharist II Child Care 9-12

“Small enough to know you, Big enough to care”

CHURCH OF THE SAVIOUR 8005 Pfeiffer Rd. Montgomery 791-3142 www.cos-umc.org "Going All In: My Mind" Traditional Worship 8:20am & 11:00am Contemporary Worship 9:40am Sunday School (All ages) 9:40 & 11am Nursery Care Provided

Dr. Cathy Johns, Senior Pastor Rev. Doug Johns, Senior Pastor

Monfort Heights United Methodist Church

3682 West Fork Rd , west of North Bend Traditional Worship 8:30 & 11:00am Contemporary Worhip 9:45am

Nursery Available * Sunday School 513-481-8699 * www. mhumc.org Spiritual Checkpoint ... Bearing the Love of Christ...for you!

Sharonville United Methodist

8:15 & 11amTraditional Service & Kingdom Kids 9:30am Adult & Children’s Sunday School 7:00pm Wednesday, Small Groups for all ages Infant care available for all services

3751 Creek Rd.

513-563-0117

www.sharonville-umc.org

LUTHERAN

NON-DENOMINATIONAL

Faith Lutheran LCMC

HIGHVIEW CHRISTIAN CHURCH

8265 Winton Rd., Finneytown www.faithcinci.org Pastor Robert Curry Contemporary Service 9am Traditional Service 11:00am

“Life on Purpose in Community” 2651 Adams Rd. (near Pippin) Worship Assembly-Sunday 10:45am Phone 825-9553 www.highviewchristianchurch.com

Sunday School 10:15

Trinity Lutheran Church (ELCA) “Growing Closer to God, Growing Closer to Neighbor”

www. trinitymthealthy.org 513-522-3026

1553 Kinney Ave, Mt. Healthy

Worship: 8:30 am traditional - 10:45 am contemporary Sunday School: 9:45 am Nursery provided

Pastor Todd A. Cutter

Trinity Lutheran Church, LCMS 5921 Springdale Rd

Rev. Richard Davenport, Pastor Worship & Sunday School 10:30 a.m, Bible Study 9:15 a.m. Sundays

Classic Service and Hymnbook

www.trinitylutherancincinnati.com

385-7024

EVANGELICAL COMMUNITY CHURCH

Mt Healthy United Methodist Church

Corner of Compton and Perry Streets 513-931-5827 Sunday School 8:45 - 9:45am Traditional Worship 10:00 - 11:00am Contemporary Gathering: Bible & Conversation 11:30 - 12:30 Nursery Available Handicap Access "Come as a guest. Leave as a friend".

VINEYARD CHURCH NORTHWEST Colerain Township Three Weekend Services Saturday - 5:30 pm Sunday - 9:30 & 11:15 am 9165 Round Top Road 1/4 mile south of Northgate Mall 513-385-4888 µ www.vcnw.org

AJ Moll of Delhi Township checks out some comic books at the Main Library. PROVIDED

Who wants to be a Rising Star?

Registration now open for Delhi competition

www.churchbythewoods.org 3755 Cornell Rd., Sharonville , Ohio 45241 You have a choice of Ministry: 1. Traditional Sunday Worship at 10:00 AM. Language: English Multi-cultural, multi-generational, and multi-ethnic. 2. Contemporary Sunday Worship with Freedom Church at 10:30 AM. Language: English It’s not about Religion; it’s about relationships! www.freedomchurchcincinnati.com 3. Taiwanese Traditional Sunday Worship st 2:00 PM. Language: Taiwanese, UC Campus Fellowship on Saturdays, www.cincinnatitaiwanese.org Saturday 4. Seventh Day Adventist Worship at 10:00 AM. Language: Spanish Loving - Caring - and Sharing God’s Word Notes: Nursery School is provided at each Worship time English as a Second Language (ESL) is taught on Saturday 10-12 AM. Various Bible Studies are available.

Sunday School Hour (for all ages) 9:15 - 10:15am Worship Service - 10:30 to 11:45am (Childcare provided for infants/ toddlers) Pastor: Rich Lanning Church: 2191 Struble Rd Office: 2192 Springdale Rd

542-9025

Visitors Welcome www.eccfellowship.org

PRESBYTERIAN Northminster Presbyterian Church 703 Compton Rd., Finneytown 931-0243 Growing Faith, Sharing Hope, Showing Love Sunday Worship Schedule Traditional Services: 8:00 & 10:15am Contemporary Services: 9:00 & 11:30am Student Cafe: 10:15am Childcare Available Jeff Hosmer, Rich Jones & Nancy Ross- Zimmerman - Pastors

Northwest Community Church 8735 Cheviot Rd, by Colerain HS Rev. Kevin Murphy, Pastor 513-385-8973 Worship and Sunday School 10AM Handicap Accessible/Nursery Available

Abby Bolling of Finneytown was the winner of last year’s Rising Star competition. FILE PHOTO

F ESTIVA l Assumption Church STUART SNOW WILL PRESENT AN

“ELVIS LIVE”

SUNDAY AFTERNOON AT 2:30PM. THIS SHOW IS BEING SPONSORED BY NIEDHARD/SNOW FUNERAL HOME.

TRIBUTE SHOW ON

HE WILL ARRIVE BY LIMO WITH AN ESCORT TO THE STAGE.

MT. HEALTHY

FRIDAY, JUNE 7TH - 6PM TO 11PM SATURDAY, JUNE 8TH - 5PM TO 11PM SUNDAY, JUNE 9TH - 1PM TO 10PM

$3 ADMISSION FOR EVERY GUEST OVER 10 YEARS OLD

GREAT FOOD ALL WEEKEND! FUNNEL CAKES, PORK CHOP SANDWICHES, BLOOMIN’ ONIONS TURTLE SOUP, CORN ON THE COB, BRATS, METTS, AND BACK AGAIN THIS YEAR - DEEP FRIED PICKLES!

Salem White Oak Presbyterian

UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST FLEMING ROAD United Church of Christ

LIVE BANDS ALL WEEKEND! FRIDAY - THE IROCS - 7PM-11PM SATURDAY - STUCK IN TIME - 7PM-11PM SUNDAY - BACK STREET BAND - 5:30PM

691 Fleming Rd 522-2780 Rev Pat McKinney

Sunday School - All Ages - 9:15am Sunday Worship - 10:30am

CHICKEN DINNER!

St. Paul United Church of Christ

SPONSORED BY PAUL R.YOUNG FUNERAL HOME

HOMESTYLE • HOMEMADE SUNDAY, JUNE 9TH - NOON-6PM ADULTS $9.00 - CHILDREN $4.00

Nursery Provided

5312 Old Blue Rock Rd., off Springdale

Phone: 385-9077 Rev. Michelle Torigian Sunday Worship: 10:30am Sunday School: 9:15am Nursery Available/Handicap Access www.stpaulucccolerain.org www.facebook.com/StPaulUCC

&(#"))"'!%"$%#)"

Active Youth, College, Senior Groups Exciting Music Dept, Deaf Ministry, Nursery

United Methodist Church 10507 “Old” Colerain Ave (513) 385-7883 Rev. Mark Reuter Sunday School 9:15am Worship 10:30am - Nursery Available www.cpopumc.org

Cincinnati Reds, a $25 Gold Star gift card courtesy of Gold Star Chili, a LeapFrog LeapPad1 Explorer tablet courtesy of PNC Bank, a Samsung Galaxy Tab 2 7.0 courtesy of Newman’s Own Foundation, or a $100 Kroger gift card courtesy of The Kroger Co. Summer Reading is sponsored by the Friends of the Public Library, The Library Foundation, Kroger, Newman’s Own Foundation, PNC Bank, Gold Star Chili and the Cincinnati Reds. With support from Costco Wholesale, Dollar General Literacy Foundation, Wing Eyecare, and the Junior Woman’s Club of Wyoming. For details about Summer Reading events and prizes, and to register, go to www.CincinnatiLibrary.org/SummerRead. Call the Main Library at 513-369-6900.

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CE-0000550755

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The Delhi Civic Association and the Delhi Skirt Game are sponsoring the second Delhi Rising Star singing competition. The first round of competition will be Thursday, June 20. The winners of the competition will be selected during the final elimination round scheduled at the Delhi Skirt Game tailgate party on Thursday, Aug. 1. Various elimination rounds will be held in between. The competition is open to anyone 16 years of age or over. Contestants under the age of 18 must be accompanied by a parent. All contestants in the first round will be required to sing a two-minute song a cappella. Contestants who move on to subsequent rounds will be permitted to bring musical accompaniment to those subsequent rounds. Each round of competition will be an elimination round. Contestants who are not eliminated in a particular round will be notified of the date, time and location of the next round of the competition. The first place winner will receive a cash prize of $250 and will be scheduled to perform at the Delhi Skirt Game on Friday, Aug. 2. The second place winner will receive a cash prize of $100 and the third place winner will receive a cash prize of $50. No other prizes or compensation will be awarded. A registration fee of $15 will be collected on the day of the event. Contestants who pre-register and pay in advance will receive a $5 discount, making their registration fee only $10. Fees collected will go toward programs supported by the Delhi Civic Association or the Delhi Skirt Game. Preregistrations will be accepted through Tuesday, June 18. To pre-register or to for information, visit delhicivicassociation.org.


LIFE

MAY 29, 2013 • NORTHWEST PRESS • B5

THE ANSWER IS…

ACADEMY GRADUATES

The Hamilton County Sheriff's Office Basic Corrections Academy graduation class No. 108 are, in back, from left, Travis A. Buckmeier, Harrison; Ryan M. Braun, St. Bernard; Timothy S. Roy, West Chester; Derek S. Bischoff, Harrison; Benjamin B. Sukys, Mariemont; Bryan B. Burger, Norwood; Justin D. Thompson, Miamitown; Frank E. Shuber, Eastgate; Joshua S. Noel, Mason; and John B. Perry, Kettering; in middle, Nicholas R. Pittsley, Milford; Alexander C. Kramer, Lawrensburg; Eric D. Wagner, Anderson; Travis P. Schimmel, Hyde Park; Chad J. McGuffey, Colerain; John A. Boyd, Hamilton; Kiya L. Denmark, Norwood; Joshua P. Holden, Batavia; Evamaria A. Alcala, Colerain; and Lieutenant Daniel Ems; and in front, Daniel B. Erwin, Springfield Twp; Katie N. Vossler, Reading; Kelly M. Rodseth, Middletown; Alison M. Duebber, Delhi; Aerial E. Bryson, Harrison; Jennifer K. Henson-Arlinghaus, Batavia; Jamelia B. Durham, Forest Park; Dominique S. Bates, Clifton; Shane C. Wiseman, Colerain; and Stefan G. Endicott, Mariemont. THANKS TO JIM KNAPP

Make these

moments yours

Make it Your Home Be thrify at the Village Discount Thrift Store at 9529 Pippin Road in the Northbrook Shopping Center. Correct answers came from Mary Bowling, Kenny Holbert, Gail Hallgath, Debbie Fales, Joane Donnelly, Pat Merfert, Dennis Boehm, Bill Courter, Pat Powell, Phyllis Seger, Jack Glensman, Mimi and Papa Threm, Emily, Megan and the boys, Ron and Erma, Annette, Larry Klug, Debi Ferguson, Greg Kohl and Florence Back. Thanks for playing. See this week’s clue on A4. JENNIE

Last week’s clue.

ntt Imagine days filled with friends, a leisurely stroll through fragrant gardens or the simply enjoyment of a peaceful evening on your patio. Our homes feature spacious living areas, ample storage space, one-car garages and large patios perfect for entertainment. Or, live closer to the many amenities, dining options and array of activities by choosing one of our spacious independent or assisted living apartments.

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LIFE

B6 • NORTHWEST PRESS • MAY 29, 2013

PWC project helps out Colerain homeowner

Eva Taylor can get in and out of her Colerain Township home more easily thanks to the installation of a wheelchair ramp by a group of Northwest Community Church members volunteering through the People Working Cooperatively's Repair Affair. PROVIDED

MT. HEALTHY NIGHT OWL BINGO

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The Northwest Community Church in Colerain Township rolled up its sleeves this spring with a number of projects as part of its mission to Be the Church. One project was at the Colerain home of elderly People Working Cooperatively client Eva Taylor, who needed a wheelchair ramp, yard work, a few doors fixed and other small repairs. “I just can’t thank you enough,” she said. “I am so grateful for these volunteers and for PWC.” The job was part of People Working Cooperatively’s Repair Affair” and was funded by one of the event’s sponsors, Rumpke. During Repair Affair, individuals, businesses, and church and community groups can volunteer for a day – and in cases such as Taylor’s, more than one day – to help people with various home repair needs, ranging from the simple ones such as fixing handrails and installing grab bars to more extensive projects, such as home modifications for the disabled, ramps and drywall. “It was really a great project – the homeowner was so appreciative,” said church elder Jim Irvine. “We feel that mission work like this is the core of the church.” Repair Affair was developed by People Working Cooperatively in 1983 as a free outreach program to help very low-income elderly and disabled homeowners with the home repairs they need to keep their

homes safe and habitable. Low-income, elderly and disabled homeowners are often the most vulnerable residents in a community. When they physically or financially lose the ability to care for their homes, their quality of life can diminish. The main Repair Affair Day took place across Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky May 11. Kim Sullivan, a spokeswoman for People Working Cooperatively, said about 700 people volunteer for Repair Affair, and they provided home repairs for about 70 homes. Major sponsors of the day were Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, Prus Construction, Rumpke, The Home Depot Foundation, Advanced Testing Laboratory, Macy’s, Recker and Boerger and Viox Services. Northgate Mall was a supporting sponsor. The City of Cincinnati was a presenting sponsor. In the fall, the agency does Prepare Affair, volunteers to help elderly homeowners prepare their homes for winter, performing services ranging from raking leaves and cleaning gutters to other small winter preparation tasks. There are a number of ways to donate to People Working Cooperatively including its annual support campaign. Visit pwchomerepairs.org to learn how to make a donation online or see other ways to support the work of the agency.

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LIFE

MAY 29, 2013 • NORTHWEST PRESS • B7

DEATHS Phyllis Anderson Phyllis Holt Anderson, 87, Colerain Township, died May 5. Survived by children Ruth Ann (Lee) Moncrief, Joyce (Bob) Griffin, James (Janet) Walker; stepson Richard (Mary Ann) St. John; 12 grandchildren; 18 great-grandchildren; many nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by husbands Thomas Anderson, James St. John, son Joseph Walker III, siblings Jean Schmaling, William Holt, former husband Joseph Walker Jr. Services were May 8 at St. James Church. Arrangements by Frederick Funeral Home. Memorials to: Colerain Township Community Center, 4300 Springdale Road, Cincinnati, OH 45251.

Margaret Barth Margaret Gregory Barth, 97, died May 13. Survived by children Thomas (Dottie), Clifford “Tip” (Paula) Barth, Marge (Bob) Schwaeble, Kathy (Bill) Lair; 12 grandchildren; 34 great-grandchildren; six great-great-grandchildren. Preceded in death by husband Clifford Barth, one great-grandson, nine siblings. Services were May 16 at St. Matthias. Arrangements by Frederick Funeral Home. Memorials to: Hospice of Cincinnati, 4310 Cooper Road, Cincinnati, OH 45242.

Janice Bernhardt Janice Bernhardt, 73, Colerain Township, died May 20. Survived by husband Harvey Bernhardt; children Clifford, Harvey Jr. (Polly), Darin (Kristy), Donald (Kathleen) Bernhardt, Brenda Hite; siblings Sheila Weingardner, Elaine Koeller, Karen Fox, Kenneth (Marilyn), James (Joanne) Reifenberger; 11 grandchildren; nine greatgrandchildren. Services were May 25 at Arlington Memorials Gardens. Arrangements by NeidhardSnow Funeral Home. Memorials to the Hospice of Cincinnati.

ABOUT OBITUARIES Basic obituary information and a color photograph of your loved one is published without charge by The Community Press. Please call us at 853-6262 for a submission form. To publish a larger memorial tribute, call 242-4000 or pricing details.

Trudy Bohn Gertrude “Trudy” Graber Bohn, 92, Colerain Township, died May 14. Survived by children George, Bruce (Karen) Biedenbach, Susan (Bob) Burgher, Debbie (Dave) Spaeth; sister-in-law Joyce Graber; 13 grandchildren; 29 great-grandchildren; seven great-great-grandchildren. Preceded in death by husbands Raymond Bohn, George Biedenbach, daughter Judith Bussell, brother Marvin Graber. Services were May 17 at the First United Church of Christ. Arrangements by Frederick Funeral Home. Memorials to: First United Church of Christ or Library for the Blind, 17121 Lake Shore Blvd., Cleveland, OH 44110.

Michael Miller Michael L. Miller, 67, Colerain Township, died May 7. Survived by wife Virginia “Ginny” Miller; children Robert (Sarah), Michael, Jennifer Miller; grandchildren Hannah, Robbie; brothers Ronald (Tami), Emery Miller; parents-in-law Robert, Alison Headlee; sistersin-law Linda (John) Cloud, Susan (Terry) Moeller, Sandra (William) Heckel, Alison (Mark) Whitaker; many nieces and nephews. Services were May 11 at Groesbeck United Methodist Church. Arrangements by Frederick Funeral Home. Memorials to: The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, 4370 Glendale-Milford Road, Cincinnati, OH 45242.

Donald Oelling Donald Oelling, 66, Colerain Township, died May 7.

Survived by wife Cathy Oelling; siblings Bobby (Janet), Steve (Cheri), David (Benita) Oelling, Susan (Bud) Ireland; brother-in-law Jim Oliver; nieces and nephews Services were May 10 at St. Ann Church. Arrangements by Frederick Funeral Home. Memorials to: Our Lady of Grace Tuition Fund, 2940 W. Galbraith Road, Cincinnati, OH 45239 or Colerain Township Fire Department, 3251 Springdale Road, Cincinnati, OH 45251.

Joan Otten Joan Devine Otten, 75, Colerain Township, died May 19. Survived by sons Matt (Linda), Mark (Dianne), Mike (Amy) Otten; grandchildren Christopher, Otten Kayleigh, Kyle, Alex, Mitchell, Joshua; siblings Mary Del Vecchio, James (Loraine) Devine. Preceded in death by husband Robert Otten. Services were May 22 at St. Ann Church. Arrangements by Frederick Funeral Home.

Anna Pfeiffer Anna Gross Pfeiffer, 85, Colerain Township, died May 16. She was a longtime member of the Donauschwaben Society. Survived by daughter Betty (Paul) Ellis; granddaughter Heather (Michael) Harlow; great-grandsons John, James Harlow; nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by husband John Pfeiffer, sister Katherine (David) Strecker.

Services were May 22 at St. Ignatius of Loyola. Arrangements by NeidhardMinges Funeral Home. Pfeiffer Memorials to: Donauschwaben Society, 4290 Dry Ridge Road, Cincinnati, OH 45252 or Vitas Hospice, 11500 Northlake Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45249.

Jo Ann Sexton Jo Ann Sexton, Green Township, died May 11. She retired from Good Samaritan Hospital after 40 years. Survived by siblings Edward (Frances) Sexton, Mary (the late Joseph) Griffin; friends Marge (John) Rogers, Jennie (Eric) Dunn; seven nieces and nephews; nine great-nieces and nephews; one great-greatnephew. Services were May 16 at St. Ignatius of Loyola. Arrangements by Frederick Funeral Home. Memorials to: College of Mount St. Joseph College of Nursing, 5701 Delhi Road, Cincinnati, OH 45233-1670 or

Father Beiting Appalachian Mission Center, 332 Riverbend Road, Louisa, KY 41230.

Matthew Smith Matthew Paul Smith, 33, died May 10. Survived by wife Missy Meyers; parents Don, Connie Smith; siblings Ryan Smith, Julie (Joel) Pinnix; nephew Grant Pinnix; aunts and uncles Smith Linda Hacker, Tim Smith, Peggy, Jack (Debbie) Cronin; many cousins. Arrangements by Meyer & Geiser Funeral Home. Memorials to a charity of the donor’s choice.

Carol Stein Carolyn “Carol” Godbey Stein, 63, Colerain Township, died May 14. Survived by daughters Renee (David) Lindy, Alysha Stein; grandchildren Kayla, Jebidiah, Ivalynn, Haven Lindy; brothers Richard (Brenda) Godbey; nieces and nephews. Preceded

in death by husband Allen Stein. Services were May 17 at Frederick Funeral Home. Memorials to: Cincinnati Firefighters Memorial Park, 1011 W. Eighth St., Cincinnati, OH 45203.

Ruby Zugelter Ruby Burkhardt Zugelter, 80, Green Township, died May 19. She was a secretary at Oakdale Elementary School. Survived by daughter Holly (Pete) Nicolaou; grandchildren Peter (Holly), Christopher, Kaitlin Nicolaou. Preceded in death by husband Robert Zugelter Sr., son Robert ZugelZugelter ter Jr. Services were May 21 at the Gump-Holt Funeral Home. Memorials to: Alois Alzheimer Center, 70 Damon Road, Cincinnati, OH 45218 or Heartland Hospice, 3960 Red Bank Road, Suite 140, Cincinnati, OH 45227.

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LIFE

B8 • NORTHWEST PRESS • MAY 29, 2013

POLICE REPORTS CINCINNATI DISTRICT 5 Arrests/citations Dwayne Rusk, born 1989, criminal trespassing, 2701 Hillvista Lane, May 9. Dontonio Morris, born 1986, possession of an open flask, possession of drugs, 5131 Colerain Ave., May 10. Dwayne Rusk, born 1989, possession of drugs, 5117 Colerain Ave., May 10. Latisha Devon, born 1988, disorderly conduct, 5115 Hawaiian Terrace, May 12. Lawrence Stapleton, born 1977, disorderly conduct, 2568 W. North Bend Road, May 12. Ricky Lackey, born 1987, drug abuse, trafficking, 1519 Elkton Place, May 13. Eugene Hafford, born 1990, misdemeanor drug possession, possession of drug paraphernalia, 5499 Bahama Terrace, May 15. John W. Sess, born 1984, trafficking, 2602 West Fork Road, May 15. Vincent Brown, born 1989, criminal trespassing, 5065 Hawaiian Terrace, May 15. Joshua A. Bishop, born 1987, domestic violence, 2618 Chesterfield Court, May 16. Darryn Penn, born 1991, breaking and entering, 5854 Hamilton Ave., May 17. Keenan Bell, born 1991, falsification, theft $300 to $5000, 1543 Marlowe Ave., May 17. Timothy Haslon, born 1990, misdemeanor drug possession, possession of drug paraphernalia, 5376 Bahama Terrace, May 18. Allen Gurton, born 1975, unauthorized use of a motor vehicle, 1673 Cedar Ave., May 19. Jashiah Crawford, born 1993, misdemeanor drug possession, 5900 Hamilton Ave., May 19. Joshua Willoughby, born 1983, possession of drug abuse instruments, 5826 Renee Court, May 19. Michael Ellison, born 1979, possession of an open flask, 6100 Hamilton Ave., May 19.

Incidents/reports Aggravated robbery

Incidents/reports

ABOUT POLICE REPORTS The Community Press publishes the names of all adults charged with offenses. The information is a matter of public record and does not imply guilt or innocence. To contact your local police department: » Colerain Township: Chief Daniel P. Meloy, 245-6600 » Green Township: Chief Bart West, 574-0007; vandalism hotline 574-5323 » Hamilton County: Sheriff Jim Neil, 825-1500 » Springfield Township: Chief David Heimpold, 729-1300 2431 W. North Bend Road, May 13. Assault 4914 Hawaiian Terrace, May 9. Breaking and entering 1160 Cedar Ave., May 15. Burglary 2669 W. North Bend Road, May 10. 5658 Redcedar Drive, May 11. 6256 Cary Ave., May 13. 1100 Groesbeck Road, May 14. 6584 Edwood Ave., May 15. 5399 Kirby Ave., May 15. 1522 Marlowe Ave., May 16. Criminal damaging/endangering 5023 Hawaiian Terrace, May 12. 5115 Hawaiian Terrace, May 12. 4938 Hawaiian Terrace, May 13. 2365 W. North Bend Road, May 14. 2618 Chesterfield Court, May 14. 5899 Shadymist Lane, May 15. 5380 Bahama Terrace, May 9. Domestic violence Reported on Ambrose Avenue, May 12. Reported on West North Bend Road, May 14. Menacing 6014 Hamilton Ave., May 13. Menacing by stalking 5530 Goldenrod Drive, May 10. Misuse of credit card 6012 Waldway Lane, May 14. Taking the identity of another 5613 Sugarberry, May 13. 5817 Shadymist Lane, May 13. Theft 1624 Marlowe Ave., May 10. 5730 North Way, May 10. Vogel Road, May 11. 5870 Belmont Ave., May 12. 1402 W. North Bend Road, May 13.

1616 Marlowe Ave., May 13. 5870 Belmont Ave., May 13. 2366 Kipling Ave., May 13. 2509 Flanigan Court, May 13. 1081 Springbrook Drive, May 15. 1500 Groesbeck Road, May 15. 1336 Thomwood Drive, May 17. 5069 Hawaiian Terrace, May 8. 4914 Hawaiian Terrace, May 9. Unauthorized use of motor vehicle 4836 Hawaiian Terrace, May 15.

COLERAIN TOWNSHIP Arrests/citations Jade Pullam, 18, 7604 Greenland Place, theft at 9505 Colerain Ave., May 10. Juvenile female, 17, theft at 9505 Colerain Ave., May 10. Erikca Maya, 33, 3592 Woodsong, operating vehicle impaired at Interstate 275, May 11. Brent Marvin, 18, 9950 Loralinda, assault at 8451 Colerain Ave., May 11. Jessica Finke, 26, 5549 Vogal Road, disorderly conduct at 2805 Topview, May 12. Brent Strader, 41, 3126 Westbourne, theft at 9501 Colerain Ave., May 11. Angela Brown, 47, 8590 Colerain Ave., theft at 9690 Colerain Ave., May 8. Sean Robinson, 22, 9174 Round Top Road, assault at 9501 Colerain Ave., May 13. Rico Maser, 26, 2801 Maryland Ave., drug possession, carrying concealed weapons, obstructing official business at 3298 March Terrace, May 14. Juvenile female, 13, criminal trespassing at 3711 Stone Creek Blvd., May 14.

Arson Garage set on fire at 8244 Georgianna Drive, May 9. Assault Victim struck at 3169 Lapland, May 12. Victim struck at 9601 Colerain Ave., May 13. Breaking and entering Victim reported at 6862 Grange, May 8. Burglary Residence entered and firearm of unknown value removed at 2250 Miles Road, May 8. Residence entered and tools, laptops and guitar of unknown value removed at 5775 Dunlap, May 8. Residence entered at 6806 Thompson Road, May 9. Residence entered and TV removed at 3989 Woodsong, May 1. Residence entered and items of unknown value removed at 2302 W. Galbraith Road, May 11. Residence entered and Xbox of unknown value removed at 3633 Struble Road, May 13. Residence entered and laptop, Xbox of unknown value removed at 3470 Crest Road, May 9. Criminal damaging Vehicle had eggs thrown at it at 11252 Templeton Drive, May 8. Mailbox damaged at 11735 Stone Mill Road, May 10. Domestic Female reported at Niagara, May 10. Gross sexual imposition Reported at Manistee Way, May 8. Misuse of credit cards Victim at 9821 Regatta Drive, April 29. Robbery Victim threatened at 9600 Colerain Ave., May 11. Theft $240 removed at 2526 Highwood, May 6. Ring of unknown value removed at 3147 Niagara, May 8. Credit cards removed at 8920 Cheviot Road, May 9. iPod of unknown value removed at 3818 Ridge Valley Court, May

9. Wallet of unknown value removed at 10240 Colerain , May 10. Wallet and contents of unknown value removed at 9690 Colerain Ave., May 11. Wallet and contents of unknown value removed at 9678 Marino Drive, May 11. Items of unknown value removed from vehicle at 8738 Planet , May 14. Unauthorized use of motor vehicle Vehicle used without consent at 8605 Colerain Ave., May 1.

GREEN TOWNSHIP Arrests/citations Julie A. Denny, 36, 4336 Simca Lane, drug abuse and possessing drug abuse instruments at 4336 Simca Lane, May 8. Melissa J. Taylor, 37, 5465 Childs Ave., failure to confine dog at 5465 Childs Ave., May 9. Michael Becker, 47, 3934 Delmar Ave., disorderly conduct at 6300 Glenway Ave., May 9. Abigail M. Freudemann, 22, 6378 Starvue Drive, domestic violence at 6378 Starvue Drive, May 9. Sarah L. Gresham, 31, 300 Lytle St., theft at 6580 Harrison Ave., May 9. Alex G. Pietrosky, 20, 4281 Pictureview Lane, violating protection order at Blue Rock Road and Wheatcroft, May 10. Brittany E. Durbin, 22, 922 Hawthorne Ave., theft at 6300 Glenway Ave., May 10. Crystal Helton, 22, 6505 Hasler, theft and warrant at 6300 Glenway Ave., May 10. Scott J. Christopfel, 42, 5839 Weston Court, domestic violence and assault at 5839 Weston Court, April 27. Elizabeth R. Decker, 30, 4612 Rapid Run Road No. 4, soliciting on roadway at Rybolt Road and Harrison Avenue, May 10. Joshua R. Drain, 22, 3248 Stanhope Ave., possession of drugs at 6300 Glenway Ave., May 10. Tina M. Davis, 47, 2857 Harrison Ave., drug paraphernalia at 6100 Glenway Ave., May 11. Angela Barker, 34, 3480 Law-

renceburg Road No. 21, theft at 6550 Harrison Ave., May 11. Brian G. Pyles, 36, 6200 Charity Drive, domestic violence at 4307 Bridgetown Road, May 11. Eric B. Vaughn, 28, 3364 North Bend Road No. 5, drug possession and possessing drug abuse instrument at 3364 North Bend Road No. 5, May 11. Deacsa Brown, 24, 2669 W. North Bend Road No. 1107, assault at 5404 North Bend Road, May 11. Danielle M. Tatum, 28, 4422 Reading Road No. 3, drug abuse at Glenway Avenue and Westbourne Drive, May 13. Elizabeth R. Decker, 30, 4612 Rapid Run Road No. 2, soliciting contributions at North Bend Road and Interstate 74, May 13. Juvenile, 15, theft at 5071 Glencrossing Way, May 14. Juvenile, 16, aggravated menacing at 5071 Glencrossing Way, May 14. Holly M. Powell, 32, 7054 State Route 128 No. 1, theft and forgery at 5830 Harrison Ave., May 15. Ashley L. Jusbasic, 29, 7054 State Route 128 No. 2, theft and forgery at 5830 Harrison Ave., May 15. Matthew Heffner, 42, 2960 Bailey, failure to confine dog at 2960 Bailey, May 16. Juvenile, 17, theft at 5750 Harrison Ave., May 16. Juvenile, 14, theft at 5750 Harrison Ave., May 16. Juvenile, 14, theft at 5750 Harrison Ave., May 16. Tracy L. Scheidt, 33, 1535 Grove St., theft at 6580 Harrison Ave., May 16. Jaime Caruso, 36, 758 Terry St. No. 5, theft and criminal trespass at 6300 Glenway Ave., May 18. Juvenile, 15, felonious assault at 3458 Ridgewood Ave., May 18. Ryan C. Cullin, 38, 1021 Stratford, criminal trespass at 6075 Harrison Ave., May 19. Kirsy Gomez, 20, 20 Robin Way, possession of marijuana at North Bend Road and Boomer Road, May 19.

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LIFE

MAY 29, 2013 • NORTHWEST PRESS • B9

POLICE REPORTS Continued from Page B8

Incidents/reports Assault Suspect threw victim to the ground at 5551 Jamie’s Oak Court, May 14. Victim reported being punched and assaulted by several suspects during the past few months at St. Joseph Orphanage at 5400 Edalbert Drive, May 16. Breaking and entering Window broken at Wesbanco during break-in attempt at 5511 Cheviot Road, May 7. Copper piping stolen from home at 4094 West Fork Road, May 16. Burglary Video game system and a ring stolen from home at 3729 Eyrich, May 4. Money stolen from vehicle at 4300 Homelawn Ave., May 5. Three televisions, stereo system, television and DVD remote controls, several pieces of jewelry, money and coin collection stolen from home at 5750 Sprucewood Drive, May 11. Door handle broken on home during burglary attempt, but no entry was made at 5513 Goldcrest Drive, May 13. Box of Magic role-playing cards stolen from home at 6521 Taylor Road, May 13. Six collectible coins and 21 video games stolen from home at 4459 Hickory Bark Court, May 14. Lawn mower stolen from home at 6019 Harrison Ave., May 14. Home entered, but nothing found missing at 1557 Pasadena, May 15. Two jewelry boxes, several pieces of jewelry, two Apple iPods, television and stereo headphones stolen from home at 2919 North Bend Road, May 15. Computer, scanner, computer router, television and two model boats stolen from home at 2788 Mt. Airy Ave., May 17. Handgun, laptop computer, ring and medication stolen from home at 6328 Muddy Creek Road, May 17. Criminal damaging Section of fence and a fence post damaged at Glenway Storage at 6251 Glenway Ave., May 6. Windows broken on two vehicles at 5264 Ralph Ave., May 7. Suspect kicked victim’s vehicle, causing a dent in the door at 5740 Cheviot Road, May 10. Flower pot damaged at Westside Pilates and Fitness at 3233 Westbourne Drive, May 11. Large amount of wood chips and mulch dumped in victim’s yard at 3346 Jessup Road, May 10. Thirty pounds of sod and dirt dumped inside vehicle at 5615

Green Acres Drive, May 15. Rear window broken and roof dented on vehicle at 1694 Brunnerwood, May 18. Windshield broken on vehicle at 5403 Bluesky Drive, May 19. Criminal simulation Suspect paid for movie ticket with a counterfeit $20 bill at Rave Cinemas at 5870 Harrison Ave., May 10. Domestic dispute Argument between parent and child at Audro Drive, May 5. Argument between spouses at LaGrange Lane, May 5. Argument between former spouses at Hutchinson Road, May 11. Argument between man and woman at Westbourne Drive, May 14. Argument between man and woman at Cheviot Road, May 15. Argument between spouses at Meadowview, May 18. Felonious assault Suspect stabbed victim in the torso and arm at 3902 Virginia Court, May 14. Misuse of credit card Victim had their credit card used to make several unauthorized purchases at 5474 Audro Drive No. 3, May 13. Property damage Window broken on vehicle when struck by unknown object at 6696 Bridgetown Road, May 4. Theft GPS stolen from vehicle at 6232 Elkwater, May 4. Wallet and contents stolen from purse sitting in victim’s shopping cart at Meijer at 6550 Harrison Ave., May 4. Portable computer hard drive stolen from vehicle at 6510 Werk Road, May 4. Prescription medication stolen from home at 5543 Sunnywoods Lane, May 4. Money stolen from one vehicle; and driver’s license and Apple iPod stolen from second vehicle at 6163 Kingoak Drive, May 4. Handgun, digital camera and

money stolen from vehicle at 5941 Bridgeview Court, May 4. Cellphone stolen from T-Mobile at 5457 North Bend Road, May 4. Money stolen from cash register at Arby’s restaurant at 5680 Harrison Ave., May 5. Basket full of assorted merchandise stolen from Walgreen’s at 5508 Bridgetown Road, May 5. Laptop computer stolen from home at 4451 Oakville Drive, May 8. Money stolen from purse inside vehicle at 5521 Northglen Road, May 8. Engagement ring stolen from vehicle at 2867 Robers Ave., May 9. Necklace stolen from home at 3484 Tallahassee Drive, May 9. Two heavy-duty batteries stolen from vehicle at Colerain Market at 5915 Colerain Ave., May 9. Dog stolen from home’s front yard at 4180 Ebenezer Road, May 10. Vehicle stolen from home at 3143 South Road, May 12. Two necklaces stolen from home at 3382 Hammersmith Lane, May 12. Money and cellphone stolen from victim’s purse at Big Lots at 3690 Werk Road, May 12. Catalytic converter stolen from vehicle at 6024 Harrison Ave., May 13. Lawn mower and an edger stolen from home’s shed at 5401 Lever Court, May 13. Catalytic converter stolen from vehicle at 6350 Glenway Ave., May 13. Two video games, money, pack of cigarettes and a lighter stolen from vehicle at 3369 Hammersmith Lane, May 14. Nine aluminum pots stolen from Bridgetown Finer Meats at 6135 Bridgetown Road, May 14. Cellphone stolen from victim when left unattended on cafeteria table at Oak Hills High School at 3200 Ebenezer Road, May 14. Assorted drill bits stolen from Home Depot at 6300 Glenway Ave., May 15.

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Two lamps, set of end tables, trash can and a welcome rug stolen from Family Dollar at 6134 Colerain Ave., May 15. Ring, two coin sets and a silver plate stolen from home at 5820 Reemelin Road, May 16. Vehicle stolen from Martini Service Center at 4417 Bridgetown Road, May 16. Wallet and contents stolen from vehicle at 3226 Algus, May 16. Money and two speakers stolen from vehicle at 3319 Parkhill Drive, May 16. Delivery package containing prescription medicine stolen from home’s mailbox at 5239 Race Road, May 17. Purse and contents stolen from vehicle at 6550 Harrison Ave., May 17. Wallet and contents stolen from vehicle at 6080 Colerain Ave., May 17. Vehicle stolen from home’s driveway at 5004 Rybolt Road, May 18. Unauthorized use of motor vehicle Suspect used victim’s car without permission, and returned it with missing parts at 5740 Cheviot Road, May 12.

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Colony, operating vehicle impaired at 8280 Daly, May 12.

Arrests/citations

Incidents/reports

Kaleb Runyon, 22, 3468 Number Nine Road, drug abuse at 1195 Compton Road, May 6. George Kelley, 32, 1628 Linden Drive, drug abuse at 7524 Edgemont Road, May 6. Andre Phelps, 21, 1000 Sycamore, robbery at 10981 Hamilton Ave., May 6. Ryan Phelps, 23, 1000 Sycamore, robbery at 10981 Hamilton Ave., May 6. Brandon Jackson, 21, 5660 Winton, obstructing at Winton and Valleyview, May 6. David Rice, 51, 6239 Stella Ave., operating vehicle intoxicated at 8151 Winton Road, May 7. Charles Cook, 27, 29 Lawson St., carrying concealed weapon at 8464 Winton Road, May 7. George Roulhac, 43, 1774 Fullerton Drive, obstructing official business at 1774 Fullerton Drive, May 11. Alandus Fields, 47, 1020 Delmonte, operating vehicle impaired at Compton and Cherry Blossom, May 11. Sherwin Waugh, 25, 563 Dutch

Assault Victim struck at 1557 Pleasant Run road, May 6. Breaking and entering Victim reported at 1464 Meredith, May 6. Shed entered and lawnmower of unknown value removed at 1421 Meredith Drive, May 6. Burglary Residence entered at 2341 Aquarius Drive, May 8. Church entered and computer and keyboard valued at $1,500 removed at 2082 Compton Road, May 12. Criminal damaging Victim struck at 8409 Mockingbird Lane, May 7. Window of residence entered at 1072 Galbraith Road, May 7. Window pane damaged at 1036 Thunderbird Drive, May 8. Vehicle damaged at 10943 Birchridge, May 12. Domestic Reported at Arvin Ave., May 12. Falsification Victim reported at 10948 Hamilton Ave., May 6.

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LIFE

B10 • NORTHWEST PRESS • MAY 29, 2013

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Northwest press 052913