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NORTHWEST PRESS

Your Community Press newspaper serving Colerain Township, Green Township, Groesbeck, Monfort Heights, Pleasant Run, Seven Hills, White Oak

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2013

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Shelter rentals kick off March 1 By Jennie Key jkey@communitypress.com

What’s a certain sign that it’s almost spring? It’s sign-up time for Colerain Township park shelters. Park staff will begin processing shelter applications from township residents only – in person – at 7:30 a.m. Friday, March 1, at the Colerain Township Government Complex, 4200 Springdale Road. After March 1, reservations will be made at the Colerain Township Public Services Office, 4160 Springdale Road. Parks personnel moved to the new office last year, and the Coleraine Historical Society now uses the old office as a museum.

Township residents can rent shelters first and get a better rate. Rental fee is $80. That’s a $10 increase from last year. RegistraSchwartzhoff tion to nonresidents will start on Monday, April 1, and the fee will be $120. All shelter rentals requests must be made in person. This year, the rental program will accept credit cards, but you will be charged a 3 percent service fee. The township has 10 shelters available for rental. There are four at Colerain Park, three shelters at Clippard Park, one shelter each at Heritage Park,

The township has 10 shelters available for rental. They feature picnic tables, grills and other amenities. This shelter is at Heritage Park on East Miami River Road. FILE PHOTO

Groesbeck Park and at Obergiesing Soccer Complex at Dravo Park. Shelters are available to rent seven days a week from April 15 through Oct. 15. Tawanna Molter, administrative assistant for the parks and services department, said mid-

week rentals were popular last year. “We had 380 rentals last year,” Molter said. “As the summer went on, we saw Thursday and Friday rentals of the shelters at Clippard were booked pretty frequently. I think we

will continue to see a gradual increase in the weekday rentals there.” Colerain Township Parks and Services Director Kevin Schwartzhoff said shelter renters will also need to get motor vehicle permits this year. There is a special $1, one-day rate for shelter renters, but those permits must be purchased in advance. Molter said purchase of these passes must be done at the public services department no later than the last business day before the date of the rental. Standard fees for permits are $10 per year or $5 per day. For information call 3857503 or visit the website at www.coleraintwp.org.

Northwest announces new superintendent

St. Bernard Catholic School teacher Terri Kersey and La Salle junior Kelly Palmer look over Mount Kilamanjaro in an atlas in the St. Bernard school library. Next year, they hope to look out from the summit of the mountain in person. They plan to climb the mountain Climb For EE, an effort to raise awareness of eosiniphilic esophagitis, an allergic inflammatory disease of the esophagus from which Palmer suffers. JENNIE KEY/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

CLIMBING FOR A CURE By Jennie Key jkey@communitypress.com

16-year-old Kelly Palmer loves pizza. It doesn’t love him back. Nothing dairy does. Neither does wheat. Nor soy. Not fish either. Eggs? Nope. Tomatoes are are also a no-go. Peanuts and tree nuts are also off the menu. That leaves him with some pretty narrow dietary choices. In a world where so much of people’s social lives revolve around food, the La Salle High School junior found himself a little isolated. He has digestive disorder: eosinophilic esopha-

IT’S COLD OUT THERE These rescues take practice Photos B1

The Northwest Local School District Board of Education plans to hire Andrew Jackson as the new superintendent. District spokeswoman Pauletta Crowley says Jackson will fill the vacancy left by the resignation of current Superintendent Rick Glatfelter, effective April 1. Jackson began his career with the Northwest district in 2008 when he was hired as the director of business. He became director of curriculu for four years. In 2012, Jackson was promoted to assistant superintendent of business services, while continuing to co-chair the Race to the Top Transformation Team. Prior to coming to the Northwest district, Jackson spent 14 years at Milan (Ind.) Community Schools where he served as a middle school administrator, high school administrator, central office administrator, and superintendent.

Trek will raise funds and awareness for EE

YOU CAN HELP Terri Kersey and Kelly Palmer’s goal is to raise $15,000 by April 2014. The money goes to CURED, a tax exempt, nonprofit dedicated to find a cure for eosinophilic esophagitis. Donations are tax-deductible. You can donate at www.terri4ee.com. Kersey asks that you make a note in the notes section that the donation is “sponsoring Terri Kersey.”

gitis, an allergic inflammatory disease of the esophagus. The Cincinnati Center for Eosinophilic Disorders says

EE is a digestive system disorder in which eosinophils, a type of white blood cell, are found in above-normal amounts in one or more specific places in the digestive system and/or the blood. When the body wants to attack a substance, such as an allergy-triggering food or airborne allergen, eosinophils respond by moving into the area and releasing a variety of toxins. But when the body produces too many eosinophils, they can cause chronic inflammation, resulting in tissue damage. Many EEs sufferers can

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He graduated from Indiana University with a bachelor’s degree in elementary education. He received his master’s and Jackson educational specialist degrees, and his doctorate of education in 2011, from Ball State University. Board president David Denny says Jackson brings a wealth of knowledge to the district. “His educational background and previous experience gives him an outsider’s perspective, and he has earned a great deal of respect from colleagues within the Northwest community,” Denny said. Crowley says the board of education plans to vote on Jackson’s appointment at the Monday, Feb. 25, board meeting. If approved, Jackson will take over as superintendent April 1.

COLLECTION TIME In the next few days your Community Press carrier will be stopping by to collect $3.50 for delivery of this month’s Northwest Press. Your carrier retains half of this amount as payment for his or her work. If you wish to add a tip to reward the carrier’s good service, both the carrier and The Community Press appreciate your generosity. This month we're featuring siblings Andrew and Amanda Wood. Andrew, a senior at La Salle High School, enjoys soccer, fourwheeling, video games and hanging out with friends. His collection money will help pay for college. Amanda, an eighth-grader ay St. Ignatius,

Contact The Press

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enjoys music, drama, art, writing and acting. She is saving her collection earnings for a car. If you have questions about delivery, or if your child is interested in becoming part of our junior carrier program, please call 853-6263 or 853-6277, or e-mail circulation manager Sharon Schachleiter at sschachleiter@communitypress.com.

Vol. 92 No. 3 © 2013 The Community Press ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


NEWS

A2 • NORTHWEST PRESS • FEBRUARY 27, 2013

Climb Continued from Page A1

only eat a handful of foods, as others cause the body to mistakenly send white blood cells to attack their GI tract. Getting to a diagnosis and then coping with the fact that your child is basically allergic to food was a huge stress for mom Teresa Palmer. “Children’s diagnosed him, and we got a lot of information, but it was hard to understand what was happening,” she said. “His body’s in effect allergic to food and tries to fight it off when he eats almost anything. How do you cope with something like that?” After the diagnosis, doctors eliminated top known allergens from

Kelly’s diet, leaving him with an expensive medical formula for nourishment. Insurance doesn’t cover the cost. But the Palmers say they are blessed. Cincinnati is home to a research center for EE. And changing Kelly’s diet and beginning medication is getting the EE under control. And following a clean endoscopy, which allows doctors to look at the esophagus using an instrument called an endoscope, the doctors began reintroducing food items to Kelly’s diet. Now the plan is to reintroduce foods slowly so doctors can more closely monitor how specific foods affect him. He and his mom are label readers, on the lookout for potential problem ingredients. He’s been able to identify some restaurants

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News

Jennie Key Community Editor ..........853-6272, jkey@communitypress.com Monica Boylson Reporter ..............853-6265, mboylson@communitypress.com Kurt Backscheider Reporter ............853-6260, kbackscheider@communitypress.com Melanie Laughman Sports Editor ......248-7573, mlaughman@communitypress.com Nick Dudukovich Sports Reporter .....248-7570, ndudukovich@communitypress.com Tom Skeen Sports Reporter.............576-8250, tskeen@communitypress.com

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Mount Kilimanjaro is in Tanzania. FILE PHOTO

that have menu items he can eat and that’s returning some normalcy to his life. And he’s feeling better and more in control. “I know what I can and can’t eat,” he said.

Kelly’s mom works at St. Bernard Catholic School and Monfort Heights resident Terri Kersey is a teacher there. As Kersey watched Teresa’s worry and struggles

to deal with Kelly’s EE, she says she wished she could help. When she heard about a unique fundraising opportunity for EE research, she knew she had found something she could do. An Arizona man started Climb for EE. The father of three children who live with EE, Ira Feurstein formed a team of 10 teen EE patients and others to climb Mount Kilimanjaro, the highest freestanding mountain in the world, to help build awareness of the disease and fund research to help find a cure. Kelly and Kersey are working to be part of that team. Both are raising money for research and the climb to make people more aware of EE. Kelly’s climb will also show that EE doesn’t have to be so debilitating that it limits

what he can do. “It’s going to be a great senior trip,” he said. He doesn’t let EE slow him down. He plays the marimba in the Pride of La Salle Marching band. He’s also a Big Brother to a sixth-grader at St. Boniface School, meeting weekly to help with homework, play games and hang out. But the EE must be controlled. So he has to be intentional about things other people do without thinking. He avoids restaurants where he knows he can’t eat anything. He will handle it for the rest of his life. Until there’s a cure. And that’s why he and Kersey will strap on their backpacks in July 2014 and trek up the tallest freestanding mountain in the world. To push for a cure.

Green Township teen earns his Eagle Scout By Kurt Backscheider kbackscheider@communitypress.com

When Alex Lindner first joined the Boy Scouts he set a goal to become an Eagle Scout by age 16. The Green Township teen, who is a sophomore at Oak Hills High School, accomplished his goal, earning the rank of Eagle Scout just before he turned 16. He achieved the rank in October and received his Eagle Scout badge at ceremony in December. “It was a big relief,” Lindner said about completing the all the requirements and paperwork to receive the highest honor in Boy Scouts.

A member of Boy Scout Troop 98 at Monfort Heights United Methodist Church, he said he’s been involved in scouting since he was a first-grader. “My dad got me started in scouting with the Cub Scout pack at Oakdale (Elementary School),” he said. “I’ve really enjoyed all the outings and visiting new places.” To earn the Eagle Scout rank a scout must complete 12 Eagle merit badges, assume a leadership role within his troop for at least six months and plan and coordinate a community service project. For his project, Lindner said he led a group of volunteers in renovating storage space at the West End Emergency Center, a food and clothing pantry on Ezzard Charles Drive. He said they installed in-

Index

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Calendar .................B2 Classifieds ................C Food ......................B3 Life ........................B1 Police .................... B8 Schools ..................A6 Sports ....................A7 Viewpoints ............A10

Alex Lindner

dustrial strength shelving units for food storage and repaired the wooden clothing racks at the

center. “We tripled their storage space,” he said. Prior to his project, he said the center stored food and supplies in a back room on a small shelving unit and when clients came to the pantry they were handed a bag of food. Now the food is arranged on the shelves like a grocery store and clients can browse the shelves and choose the food they want, he said. “I wanted to do something that would last and would help people,” Lindner said. “This project will have a lasting impression on the community and will benefit the people who go to the pantry for years to come. It feels good being able to help the community.” Laura Lindner, Alex’s mother, said her son spent two days working at the center, coordinating close to 30 volunteers who put in a total of 208 volunteer

hours on the project. She said at his Eagle Scout ceremony he reflected on his path in scouting and thanked everyone who helped him along the way. “Without their support he could not have achieved his goal,” she said. “ Alex said he earned 35 merit badges on his way to becoming an Eagle Scout, and he enjoys the fact they cover a variety of topics and allowed him to explore areas in which he’s interested like chemistry, rock climbing and space exploration. And since 2012 marked the 100th anniversary of the Eagle Scout award, he said it was even more special to achieve his scouting goal in 2012. Mrs. Lindner said she and her husband, Rob, who has been by Alex’s side since he was a Tiger Cub, are extremely proud of their son and appreciate the life skills scouting has taught him. “I think it’s a great accomplishment,” she said. “Scouting is a great opportunity for boys and girls to get out in the community and be active. We look forward to watching Alex continue to make a difference.”

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Property Owners Want Equal Rights, a non-profit group active on issues connected to the Rumpke landfill in Colerain Township, will have an organizing meeting from 2 to 3:30 p.m. Sunday, March 3, at Pleasant Run Presbyterian Church, 11566 Pippin Road. POWER president Rich McVay says the Ohio Environmental Protection agency has set a public hearing for Rumpke’s request to receive approval to increase deodorizing emissions for April 2. McVey said the group will define questions to have answered in the public hearing and discuss what Colerain Township is doing to resolve issues with Rumpke. The meeting includes reports from treasurer Joe Platt. Dennis Deters, president of the Colerain Township Board of Trustees will speak as well.


NEWS

FEBRUARY 27, 2013 • NORTHWEST PRESS • A3

Server’s recipe judged winner at LaRosa’s By Amanda Hopkins northwestpress@communitypress.com

Michelle Maddy almost didn’t make it to work the day LaRosa’s announced she was the winner of the restaurant’s first recipe contest. Maddy, a Fairfield resident and a server at the White Oak LaRosa’s, said she wasn’t feeling well and hadn’t slept much the night before. “I figured I would go for a little bit and see how I felt,” Maddy said. It turned out to be a great day for Maddy to come in for a shift. Her recipe for a buffalo chick-

en hoagy took the top spot in the company-wide recipe contest. Mark LaRosa, president of LaRosa’s, said Maddy’s recipe stood out as the clear-cut winner. “There were multiple sensations and textures that all came together,” LaRosa said. LaRosa said this first recipe contest which received over 200 entries may have created an annual event. He said an eight-person committee narrowed down the recipes to the top 12 based on taste, ease of preparation and ability to sell. Maddy said she en-

White Oak LaRosa’s server Michelle Maddy’s recipe for a buffalo chicken hoagy took the top spot in the company-wide recipe contest. PROVIDED

tered around 10 different recipes and most were hoagys. She said tried to make the recipes fit the restaurant menu. “I knew the buffalo taste was one that people

really enjoy,” Maddy said. Maddy, who has worked at LaRosa’s for 27 years, said all of her coworkers were encouraging each other and it was fun to watch everyone get

Cincinnati Children’s set to open outpatient center By Kurt Backscheider kbackscheider@communitypress.com

West Side families will have pediatric care close to home this spring when Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center opens its new outpatient facility in Green Township. Cincinnati Children’s is building an 80,000square-feet pediatric outpatient center on Harrison Avenue near Filview Circle, next to The Christ Hospital’s outpatient center. Danielle Jones, a spokeswoman for children’s hospital, said the new building will be open to patients beginning Monday, April 29. “The new outpatient center will combine family-focused, child-friendly, forward-thinking design with the pediatric expertise of a nationally ranked children’s hospital,” she said. The Green Township location will improve access to the hospital’s services for more than 90,000 children under the age of 18 who live in western Hamilton County and southeastern Indiana, she said. Barb Matthews, an administrator for Cincinnati Children’s, said the outpatient center will save many families a trip to the hospital’s main campus on Burnet Avenue. “This facility provides a convenient option for our families,” she said. Matthews said the

Green Township center’s four floors, each offering 20,000 square feet of space, are designed with patients and families in mind. In addition to evening and weekend urgent care services, she said the services available each day include radiology and imaging, physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech/language pathology, behavioral medicine and clinical psychology, partial-day psychiatry services and laboratory and testing services. Some of the pediatric specialty clinics offered include adolescent medicine, allergy, audiology, cardiology, dermatology, gastroenterology, neurology, ophthalmology, orthopaedics, pulmonary and urology, she said. The energy efficient building incorporates a great deal of natural light,

excited about the contest. She said the cash prize she received also helps in providing a little extra for her four children. “I’ve always been so grateful to work for LaRosa’s for so long. It’s just really a great place to work,” Maddy said. Both Maddy and LaRosa said the recipe contest was good for creating a sense of competitiveness and camaraderie between team members. “The response was so overwhelming and positive,” LaRosa said. The second place winner was Matt Hyland, a driver and cook from the

Rapid Run store, for his recipe for a dessert calzone that featured a mixture of granny smith apples, icing, brown sugar and cinnamon. There was a tie for third place between Terry Heinrich, the general manager of the Harrison store, and Matt McGrath, assistant manager of the Amelia store. Heinrich created a rondo with cinnamon and icing and McGrath made a zesty barbeque chicken hoagy. All winners received cash prizes and Maddy’s hoagy recipe was featured on the LaRosa’s menu for a limited time.

SUMMER FUN IS CALLING

and she said the artwork that will be displayed inside the center was created by students from West Side schools and colleges. “We really wanted to engage the community,” Matthews said. “The artwork created by area students reflects what they like about their community and celebrates the history and culture of the West Side.” Jones said 60 employees will work at the center full-time, and several physicians and clinical staff will float in and out. She said Children’s is planning festivities for a ribbon-cutting ceremony and community open house, which are scheduled for April 20 and 21. To learn more about the Green Township outpatient center, visit incinnatichildrens.org /green-township.

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Your neighborhood YMCA has been providing outstanding day camps and specialty programs for boys and girls, ages 2-15, for generations. Located in neighborhoods across Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky, the camps provide the perfect settings to appreciate nature, build skills, create memories, and establish friendships that will last a lifetime. Visit any YMCA of Greater Cincinnati on March 2 and we’ll waive your reigstration fee. Visit the website www.MyY.org or call (513) 362-YMCA to learn more!

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Steeped in tradition and built on the YMCA values of caring, honesty, respect, and responsibility, Camp Ernst hosts overnight campers who enjoy top notch counselors, making new friends, and doing a wide variety of activities including zip-line, banana boat, 100 foot waterslide, giant swing, horseback riding, the BLOB, and much more! Come see for yourself at our Open House Sundays: March 3, April 7, and May 5, from 1 p.m. - 4 p.m. Visit the website www.MyYcamp.org or call (859) 586-6181 to learn more!

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NEWS

A4 • NORTHWEST PRESS • FEBRUARY 27, 2013

BRIEFLY Art class learns to sculpt like Picasso

Springfield Township’s After School Art Program, for students in grades second through sixth, is gearing up for their March session. Classes meet from 4 to 5 p.m. Wednesdays at the Springfield Township Senior and Community Arts Center. The project for March is Picasso-style sculptures. For more information or to sign up, visit springfieldtwp.org/ artclub.cfm or call 5221410. Participants must register one week in advance.

Colerain Monte Carlo is March 9

Save the date for the Colerain Booster’s 10th annual Monte Carlo Night. The annual fundraiser for the Colerain Boosters will be from 7 p.m. to midnight, Saturday, March 9, at Receptions Fairfield, 5975 Boymel Drive, in Fairfield. Everyone 21 or older is invited to attend. Proceeds support Colerain High School, Colerain Middle School, and White Oak Middle School to provide facilities and opportunities. Purchase a Reverse Raffle ticket for a 1 in 300

chance to win $10,000 with another $2,500 in prizes to be given away. The advanced admission/reverse raffle tickets are now available. For tickets purchased prior to March 1, a couple admission and Reverse Raffle Ticket is $125. The cost of a reverse raffle ticket only is $100 and advance admission tickets after March 1 are $25 per person, $45 per couple. At the door, admission is $30 per person, $55 per couple. By advanced admission and reverse raffle tickets at the Colerain High School Athletic Office, 8801 Cheviot Road, during business hours. Contact Dawn Ostertag at 513-741-5054 or email her at dostertag@nwlsd.org for more information.

School district sets waiver workshop

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The Northwest Local School District presents a Parent Informational Workshop, “Waivers, Funding and Resources for Families with Special Needs.” The workshop will be 6 to 8 p.m. Wednesday, March 20. Registration is required by Wednesday, March 13. This workship will be presented by Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center personnel at the Houston Educational Service Center, 3310 Compton Road. A light dinner will be served at no charge. To RSVP, contact Parent Mentor/Parent Involvement Coordinator Nancy Dragan at 513-522-

stores toward the purchase of a compost bin. A local session will be at 7 p.m. Wednesday, March 27, at the Mount Healthy City Park Community Room, 1541 Hill Ave. To register, call 9467734, or go to http://bit.ly/ YAnclN

COLORFUL CROSS Any idea where this might be? We didn’t think so. Time to go hunting in the neighborhood to see if you can find it. Call 513-853-6287 and leave your name and your best guess or send your name and guess to northwestpress@ communitypress.com by noon on Friday. If you’re correct, we’ll publish your name in next week’s newspaper. See last week’s answer on B5.

6700, extension 28 or send an email to ndragan@nwlsd.org.

St. Ann has ‘Indiana’ chicken dinner

St. Ann Church presents its annual “Indiana Style” Chicken Dinner on Sunday, March 10, from 1 to 6 p.m. at the church, 2900 W. Galbraith Road. The menu includes fried chicken with all the trimmings, including homemade desserts and beverage. There will be a separate carryout line. Cost for adults is $11; cost for children under 12 is $5. There will also be a split-the-pot raffle and a raffle with prizes that include a $500 cash prize, a hand-carved angel from The Moroder Family in Italy; Coach handbag and accessories, a 7-inch Kin-

Mt. Healthy band dinner, concert this weekend

The Mount Healthy Band Boosters group sponsors its annual Pizza or Pasta Dinner from 4 to 7 p.m. Saturday, March 2, in the Mount Healthy High School Cafeteria, 8101 Hamilton Ave. The event features performances by the Mount Healthy High School Concert Band, Mount Healthy Junior High Band, as well as the Mount Healthy Elementary Band, and Mount Healthy Jazz Band, which will take place throughout the evening. Menu includes an adult pasta portion or two slices of pizza for $7. Seniors and children under 12 pay $6 for child/senior pasta portion or one slice of pizza. All dinners also include salad, drink, dessert and the concert. Admission without the meal is $2. Raffles will also be offered throughout the evening. All proceeds benefit Mount Healthy band programs. For tickets or for more information, contact Rose Kahsar at 513-522-1612 or 513-729-0784 or e-mail rkahsar@mthcs.org.

del Fire, and a gift certificate to the French Lick/ West Baden Indiana resort.

Composting seminars set

Interested in learning more about composting? Now is the time! This spring the Hamilton County Solid Waste Management District will move around to different communities throughout the county and offer an hour-long evening seminar focusing on the basics of backyard composting. Learn how to balance a compost bin, what materials are compostable, and some troubleshooting. At the end of the hour, Hamilton County residents will receive a free kitchen collector, a magnet as well as a $20 coupon redeemable at partnering

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NEWS

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SCHOOLS

A6 • NORTHWEST PRESS • FEBRUARY 27, 2013

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Editor: Jennie Key, jkey@communitypress.com, 853-6272

ACHIEVEMENTS | NEWS | ACTIVITIES | HONORS

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SCHOOL NOTES Colerain Elementary School Second-grader Dior Betts and kindergartener Simeon Betts attended the Martin Luther King March breakfast at the Freedom Center, then led the parade to Fountain Square for the interfaith prayer service. At the service, they held the banner in front of the crowd at Fountain Square, then marched (still holding the banner) to Music Hall. The two students are given this honor every year as their mother is a member of the MLK Coalition, which strives to include members of every age, ethnicity and religion.

Colerain High School

St. Xavier freshman basketball head coach Matt Tedford, left, worked with religion teacher and assistant basketball coach Jim Telles, at right, to get junior Rico Hill to serve as an assistant coach for the team. MONICA BOYLSON/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

St. X athletes ask, ‘What’s next?’ By Monica Boylson mboylson@communitypress.com

Rico Hill said he was devastated when he was cut from the St. Xavier High School varsity basketball team and it had him wondering: What’s next? The high school junior and honors student said it was hard not to take it personally when he had to figure out what to do instead of basketball practice. “It hurt me personally,” Hill said. “I didn’t want it to affect how I was doing in school though, so I had to talk to a couple of people about it.” One person he talked to was religion teacher and freshman basketball assistant coach Jim Telles who has teamed up with fellow religion teacher Paul Rieselman to give student athletes options after being cut from sports teams. “We talk to them and say, ‘Now that you’ve been cut from something you absolutely love, what’s next? What can you do with this anger and sorrow that you’re feeling?’” Telles said.

“We try to have them use those emotions to be the motivating force to get involved in something else, whether it be another sport, activity or club.” Telles collaborated with freshman basketball head coach Matt Tedford to come up with a plan for the former basketball guard. Hill was given the opportunity to serve as an assistant coach for the freshman team. “We reached out to him,” Tedford said. “I asked him, ‘What do you think about coaching?’” Hill told Tedford he was happy to get the opportunity. “I felt like I was very proud of myself,” he said. “I was given the chance to work on the sidelines and be with the guys who coached me.” The basketball coaches took it one step further when they announced on the morning of Jan. 29 that Rico would be getting his head coaching debut that night during a game against Covington Catholic High School.

“It was unexpected. It was a rush,” Hill said. “It was a great experience. Everyone said I looked confident but I didn’t personally feel confident.” Tedford said the team has gained new respect for the 18year-old Hill. “After the game all the guys signed the stat sheet for him and the freshman got together to chant Rico on three,” he said. “They started calling him coach now instead of Rico.” When Hill isn’t doing school work or coaching, he can be found in the gym practicing or playing games in a select basketball league. He recently joined the school’s rugby team. Hill said he’s still determined to make the varsity team next year but will continue to work with the freshman team. After he graduates high school, he said he’s going to attend college. “I want to be a math teacher or an accountant,” he said, “but I definitely want to keep coaching.”

ALUMNI HONOR

Saint Ignatius School honored two men who have modeled Christian values as distinguished alumni. Brothers Ron and Bob Hewald have a long history of involvement with Saint Ignatius. The two are lifelong residents of Monfort Heights and are charter members of Saint Ignatius. They have provided many services to the parish and the community over the years and are currently active in the Saint Ignatius Alumni Association and the Senior Association. Honoring the two are, from left, the Rev. John Wall; honorees Bob and Ron Hewald; Assistant Principal Laura Sieve; and The Rev. Bryan Reif. PROVIDED

Senior Stacey Marshall has completed the requirements for the Girl Scout Gold Award, Girl Scouting’s highest honor. Her special project was titled “Going for the Gold.” She organized a health and wellness program at the North College Hill Community Center to promote good health and family involvement. The event included information about healthy living and ways to stay connected as a family. A special ceremony and dessert reception will be held in her honor on Girl Scout Sunday, March 10, to recognize her outstanding accomplishments and her service to the community. The keynote speaker is Major General Deborah A. Ashenhurst, adjutant general of the Ohio National Guard.

McAuley High School

Catholic Schools Week was celebrated in many ways at McAuley. There were letters of appreciation written to Sisters of Mercy and to teachers. An allschool Life Mass was celebrated to focus attention on the sanctity of all life and to welcome back the students who attended the Life March in Washington, D.C. Various personal hygiene items and shoes were collected to be donated to the St. Vincent de Paul Society. The celebration ended with Raise the Spirit Day. The students and teachers were in full McAuley spirit wear and, at the urging of the students, the day ended in a faculty-on-faculty volleyball game. Employees participated in many roles: players, line judges, referee, scorekeeper, photograher and announcer. The game came down to a final game point, with the losing team having to dress up in whatever silly costumes the winning team chose. ■ Sixth- and seventh-grade girls are invited to McAuley High Schools’s Red Carpet Event, the Sixth- and SeventhGrade Sleepover. Girls can come with their friends, or make some new friends while they are at the overnight. The 12-hour event will include a night full of celebrity-worthy activities, including, games, prizes and food. Pizza will be served on Friday night and breakfast will be served Saturday morning. The sleepover is 9 p.m. March 8 to 9 a.m. March 9. Each girl should bring a pillow and sleeping bag. The event is free, but online registration is required. Register at www.mcauleyhs.net/sleepover2013. For more information, contact Marie Knecht at knechtm@live.mcauleyhs.net or 513-681-1800, ext. 2272.

Northwest High School

Northwest sent 26 students to the Ohio Music Education Association District 14 Solo and Ensemble Competition, several

earning a superior rating. Recognized were soloists Bailei Davis, cello; Andre Eam, violin; Alexis Ford, violin; Nathan Grigsby, bass; Lydia Jasper, violin; Brianna Moore, violin; Ashley Steiner, bass; and Khanh Phuong Truong, violin. Ensemble groups honored were the string quartets of Kristin Bradshaw, Haley Ford, Sydney Frazier and Kerri Powell, Bailei Davis, Emily Estes, Kelly McKee and Will Sweeney, and Alexis Ford, Kristen Merkle, Elizabeth Pickering and Danita Reddick; and the violin duets of Kristin Bradshaw and Brianna Moore, and Tori Kepics and Elizabeth Pickering. ■ Librarian Bethany Miller extends a thank you to all who participated in the children’s book drive. Over 150 books were collected, which will benefit the GRADS program, the Houston Early Learning Center library and the Clippard YMCA. Special thanks to English teacher Sara Neville for encouraging her students to contribute. Her students donated more than half of the books that were collected. ■ Seniors Christine Sorentino and Brianna McWhorter, coleaders of the Driving Angels Program, along with several members of the NWLSD Driving Angels Program, participated in the Celebrate My Drive program hosted by State Farm Insurance at Tri-County Mall. The Driving Angels students shared beer goggles with the public to wear while they attempted to play cornhole at one station. Anyone with a bag that stayed on the board or got close to the board, received a candy bar. The three-hour event was the first of its kind. Schools that participated in the event were entered into competition to win $100,000. The Northwest Driving Angels Program did not win, but for taking part in the Celebrate My Drive program, they were awarded a grant of $2,500.

Northwest Local Schools

Several PTA Reflections contest winners on to the State level of competition. The theme of the competition was “The Magic of the Moment. District students who won at the county level are: » Music – Andrew Walker, Colerain High School. » Film – Evan Mauntel, Colerain High School; and Brianna Jones, White Oak Middle School. » Literature – Mallory Burke and Christian Gehring, Monfort Heights Elementary; Natalie Alcorn, Connor Boehm and Emma Fankhauser, Struble Elementary School; and Emma Fitzgerald and Alexander Krueger, White Oak Middle School. » Photography – Mackenzie Smith, Colerain High School; Hannah Mossman, Northwest High School; and Brianna Jones (two entries), White Oak Middle School. » Photography, intermediate – Lucas Campbell and Harper Gable, Monfort Heights Elementary School. » Visual arts – Mitchell Bolden, Colerain Elementary School; Kayla Dillon, Colerain Middle School; Ellena Burgin, Karlie Sturgill and Katie Wernicke, Monfort Heights Elementary School; Tessie Havig, Northwest High School; Selena Neal, Pleasant Run Middle School; Riece Crooks, Weigel Elementary School; and Hazel Swisshelm, White Oak Middle School.


SPORTS

FEBRUARY 27, 2013 • NORTHWEST PRESS • A7

Editor: Melanie Laughman, mlaughman@communitypress.com, 513-248-7573

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | RECREATIONAL

PRESS

CommunityPress.com

FIVE JIVE

Knights roll to an end at Districts

IS

By Nick Dudukovich ndudukovich@communitypress.com

FOR ST. XAVIER

Title is school’s 34th overall By Tom Skeen tskeen@communitypress.com

CANTON — St. Xavier is your Division I state swimming champion for the fifth consecutive season. It’s the school’s 34th overall state title. The Bombers tallied 270 points, besting Cleveland St. Ignatius by 84 points and third-place Centerville by 157. Nine Aqua Bombers placed in 14 different events, led by Jack Hendricks who brought home an individual state championship in the 500-yard freestyle event. The senior beat Joey Long of Upper Arlington by less than a second. “Last year, he came in here and finished third,” Brower told Gannett News Service. “This year he was motivated and had focus. He trains hard. This is the capstone of a twoyear process.” Hendricks almost pulled off a double state championship, but was narrowly defeated by Long in the 200-yard freestyle event by less than .60 seconds. The Bombers’ 200-yard freestyle relay team also claimed a state title, edging North Canton Hoover by just .20 seconds. In the 400-yard freestyle relay the Bombers placed third, while notching a fourth-place finish in the 200-yard medley relay. Senior Ian Wooley was second in the 100yard butterfly event for the second-consecutive season after coming up just .33 seconds short to Youngstown Boardman’s Ryan Bailey. Wooley also brought home a third-place medal in the 100-yard backstroke

NORTHWEST

St. Xavier's Jack Hendricks celebrates after he winning the 500-yard freestyle event at the Swimming and Diving Championships in Canton, Feb. 23. TONY TRIBBLE/FOR THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Hendricks swims to 200-free state title By Tom Skeen tskeen@communitypress.com

St. Xavier head coach Jim Brower celebrates after Jack Hendricks won the 500-yard freestyle event at the Swimming and Diving Championships in Canton, Feb. 23. Brower coached the Aqua Bombers to their fifth consecutive state championship. TONY TRIBBLE/FOR THE COMMUNITY PRESS

RESULTS Individual state swim results for St. Xavier: 200-yard medley relay (Ian Wooley, Steve Russo, James Delgado, Grant Carr) 4th-place; 200-yard freestyle relay (Jack Hendricks, Mitchell Frey, Cam Young, Grant Johnson) 1st-place; 400-yard freestyle relay (Hendricks, Frey, Wooley, Johnson) 3rdplace; 200-yard freestyle, Hendricks (2nd-place), Young (7th-place), Kevin Mosko (16th-place); 200-yard individual medley, Frey (6th-place), Delgado (5th-place); 50-yard freestyle, Johnson (6thplace); 100-yard butterfly, Wooley (2nd-place); 100-yard freestyle, Johnson (7th-place); 500-yard freestyle, Hendricks (1st-place), Delgado (5th-place), Mosko (16th-place), Matt Slabe (13th-place); 100-yard backstroke, Wooley (3rd-place); 100-yard breaststroke, Russo (5th-place).

CANTON — After losing out on a state championship in the 200-yard freestyle event by half a second, St. Xavier’s Jack Hendricks exacted his revenge on Joey Long in the 500 free. The senior earned an individual state championship after besting Long by less than a second. “It feels great,” Hendricks told Gannett News Service. “I saw a window of opportunity and jumped right through it.” Hendricks – who will swim at Ohio State University next season – was able to hold off the late-charging Upper Arlington student down the stretch. “We knew Long likes to make a late charge,” coach Jim Brower said to Gannett News Service. “We were just hoping he would wait long enough to give Jack some daylight.” The victory was even more impressive considering the senior was battling nerves and throwing up after his narrow defeat in the 200 free before taking the pool in the 500. “We settled him down, got him out of his suit and got some fluids in him, Brower said. “We knew we had plenty of time to get ready for the 500.” In his final state meet the senior played another vital role, helping the Bombers’ 200-yard freestyle relay team to a state title and helping the Aqua Bombers clinch their 34th state championship in school history. Hendricks finishes his career with four team state championships in as many years.

BEAVERCREEK — Northwest High School ended its season at the OHSAA District Championships at Beaver-Vu Bowling Feb. 23. The Knights rolled into the tournament qualifying as a team after placing third at the Colerain Bowl sectional Feb. 15. Northwest finished 18th out of 24 teams, and was led by Damien Marques, who rolled a three-game series of 513, including a 203 in his final game. Colton Lipps had the Knights’ next best score, with a 520 series. Other bowlers to compete at districts included Jayme Ahr, Nate Bender, Andy Deininger, Vito Amato and Kyle Kostoff. Despite a 5-13 record this winter, the Knights finished eighth in the final Enquirer Division I Coaches’ Poll. The squad also fielded five of the Southwest Ohio Conference’s top 10 averages. Deininger (208.1) was third, while Ahr (203.6) was fourth. Marques (201.1) was sixth, Lipps was seventh (195.9) and Kostoff was tied for ninth (193.0). Ahr was also responsible for Northwest’s best game, according to SWOCsports.com. The junior rolled a 279 in the Knights win over Elder Feb. 6.

Northwest sophomore Nate Bender reacts to a shot during the District Championships at Beaver-Vu Bowling Feb. 23. NICK DUDUKOVICH/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Germaine Britten of Northwest lays it up for two against Western Hills. Britten was key down the stretch for the Knights finishing with seven points, five coming in the fourth quarter. TOM SKEEN/COMMUNITY PRESS

Knights advance

Kevin Worsham of Northwest tosses up a floater between Western Hills defenders. Worsham scored 12 points, pulled down seven rebounds and had five blocks. TOM SKEEN/COMMUNITY PRESS

Northwest upset Western Hills 76-69, Feb. 22 in Division I sectional tournament action at Oak Hills High School. The Knights will play Kings Feb. 26 at Fairfield after press deadline.

Ramar Hairston of Northwest looks to pass to a teammate. Hairston finished with a game-high 22 points and six assists. TOM SKEEN/COMMUNITY PRESS


SPORTS & RECREATION

A8 • NORTHWEST PRESS • FEBRUARY 27, 2013

Bowling: Bakers’ game By Nick Dudukovich ndudukovich@communitypress.com

COLLEGE HILL — Baker matches and bowling go handin-hand. For those unfamiliar with the terminology, this type of match refers to a team-based contest where the squad combines to bowl one game. And chances are if you’re bowling a baker match against McAuley, you’re also taking on the Baker sisters. The combination of sisters Alexis “Lexi” and Madison Baker helped propel McAuley into the district tournament, which was bowled at Beaver-Vu Lanes in Beavercreek Feb. 25 (after Press deadline). At the Colerain sectional, Lexi, who is a junior, rolled a three-game high series of 612, while Madison, who is a freshman, was fifth after rolling a 585. Together, the tandem owns two of the top 15 averages in the Girls’ Greater Cincinnati League. Bowling is a passion for both girls, who were introduced to the sport by their dad Todd Baker, who also serves as McAuley’s junior varsity coach. Before this season, the sisters had never bowled on the same team growing up because of age. But now that the girls are pursuing a common goal, they’re relying on each other for support. “Madison has kind of motivated me to get everybody excited,” Lexi said. “She’s always been there for me and I can always count on her.” Madison looks up to her big sister, whose 184.2 pins-per-

game average is the fifth best mark in the GGCL. “I watch her when she bowls during matches and tournaments, and I watch and see what she’s doing so I can help myself do that too,” Madison said. The girls have a drive to do the best they can, while matching each other, according to Todd. “If one throws a 200, the other wants to throw a 200 just as well,” he said. Bowling is a big part of both players’ lives and both work hard in the classroom to ensure they have a spot on the roster. Lexi and Madison have learning disabilities, which can pose challenges in the classroom that could affect their eligibility. “I have to make sure my grades are up…so I’m able to bowl,” Madison said. “I don’t want to let any players on my team down.” The freshman uses the sport as motivation to stay on the team. “It motivates me a lot, just knowing we had a match a week, it motivates me to pay attention in school, and to just do my best...” Lexi added that it’s difficult to juggle bowling and school, but manages as best as she can so she can share in the success of the team. Todd commends his daughters for their dedication to the game, while also doubling-down on homework. “McAuley is a good school,” he said. “To keep up that pace is a commendation to them. I’m pretty proud of them on that end of it.”

Milton Davis of Colerain throws up an acrobatic shot over an Amelia defender. Davis led all scorers with 26 points. TOM SKEEN/COMMUNITY PRESS

Cardinals soar Behind 26 points from Milton Davis and 11 from C.J. Reed, Colerain defeated Amelia 62-46, Feb. 22 in the opening round of the Division I sectional tournament at Oak Hills High School. The Cards advance to play St. Xavier Feb. 26 at Fairfield after our press deadline.

By Nick Dudukovich and Tom Skeen ndudukovich@communitypress.com tskeen@communitypress.com

Swimming and Diving

The OHSAA State Swimming and Diving Championships were held in Canton, Ohio Feb. 20-23. The following indidviduals competed. » La Salle: 1-meter diving, Jimmy McMahon finished 16th. » St. Xavier: 200-yard medley relay (Ian Wooley, Steve

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SPORTS & RECREATION

LANCERS SIGN OFF

La Salle High School seniors signed national letters of intent to play college sports during National Signing Day Feb. 6. From left: John Schwettmann (football, Thomas More), Nate Sparks (football, Centre College), Jaleel Hytchye (football, track, Kentucky), Jake McNamara (track, Christian Brothers), David Baumer (football, Kentucky), Devejuan Brown-Norris (football, Kentucky), Dan Keller (football, Johns Hopkins) and Trey Thompson (football, Tennessee Tech).

FEBRUARY 27, 2013 • NORTHWEST PRESS • A9

SIDELINES Camping

Hamilton County Park District is accepting reservations for campsites. Winton Woods campground, which opens March 1, includes eight large deluxe cabins that sleep up to six with all the luxuries of home, 25 RV back-in and 12 RV pullthrough sites all with full hookup, 10 basic cabins and 68 sites with 30 amp hookups. The campground office includes a store and a snack bar. There is also a group activity shelter, playground, visitor parking, two dump stations and Wi-Fi. Reservations can be made online at www.GreatParks.org by calling 851-2267.

Olympian sports The Olympian Club needs players for all boys and girls sports. Call 825-1835.

HIGHLIGHTS Continued from Page A8

Cincinnati.com

» Northwest: Ameer Daniels, 285 » St. Xavier: Ben Heyob (132)

Boys basketball

Bowling

Boys district bowling tournaments were contested at Beaver-Vu Lanes in Beavercreek Feb. 23. The following individuals advanced to state, which will be bowled at Wayne Webb’s Bowling Center in Columbus March 2. » St. Xavier: Joey Francis The girls district championship - which included Northwest and Colerain High School’s girls team - was postponed due to weather Feb. 22. The event was moved to Feb. 25, after press deadline. For results, visit

» Colerain handed Amelia a 62-46 defeat Feb. 22. Milton Davis scored 26 points. Colerain played St. Xavier Feb. 26 (after press deadline). If victorious, the Cardinals will play the winner of Kings/ Northwest at the University of Cincinnati March 3. » Northwest beat Western Hills 76-69 Feb. 22. Ramar Hairston scored 22 points. The Knights played Kings Feb. 26. If victorious, Northwest will play the winner of St. Xavier/Colerain at UC March 3. » La Salle beat Little Miami 69-30 Feb. 23. The Lancers play the winner of Fairfield/Anderson at Lakota West High School

Feb. 27. » Roger Bacon beat Blanchester 92-17 Feb. 22. Erik Edwards scored 14. The Spartans played Ripley Feb. 26 (after deadline). If victorious, the Spartans play the winner of Badin/Mariemont for a Division III sectional title at the Cintas Center March 1.

Girls basketball

» McAuley beat Sycamore 52-42 Feb. 19. Sydney Lambert scored 15. In the Harrison sectional final Feb. 22, the Mohawks upset Lakota East in overtime, 58-57. Lambert scored 11. McAuley plays the winner of Centerville/ Miamisburg for a district title at Harrison High School March 2.

A special conference for parents, educators and families! Are you interested in outdoor play, getting your child ready to read or how your child learns through play? Well, these topics and dozens more will be covered at the fifth annual Learning Through Play conference on March 2, 2013. But this isn’t your typical “conference.” You can bring your kids! We have many family interactive sessions where your children can create art, learn about insects or sign and dance while you learn how these activities are important for your child’s development. Our popular event also consists of a free Information Fair, held in our Rotunda and open to the public, where you can meet with representatives from more than thirty local organizations dedicated to educating and supporting young learners and families. For full descriptions of each session visit cincymuseum.org/learningthroughplay. Sessions range from $15 to $25 and parking is $6.

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I TRY TO CALL ON ALL OF US TO BE OUR BETTER SELVES. TO GIVE US A VISION OF WHO – ON OUR BEST DAY – WE CAN BE. Cincinnatians get it. They’re not bystanders. When they see a need, they step up to help, again and again and again. It’s what I love most about them. From bags of reader mail and impromptu grocery store chats to Twitter & Facebook posts, readers are right there with me developing each story. That tells me I’m exactly where I’m meant to be.

STRIKE UP A CONVERSATION WITH ME IN THE GROCERY STORE OR VIA FACEBOOK. I CAN’T WAIT TO HEAR YOUR STORY. Connect with KRISTA RAMSEY kramsey@enquirer.com facebook.com/krista.ramsey.52

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VIEWPOINTS A10 • NORTHWEST PRESS • FEBRUARY 27, 2013

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Editor: Jennie Key, jkey@communitypress.com, 853-6272

EDITORIALS | LETTERS | COLUMNS | CH@TROOM

CommunityPress.com

Lawmakers gear up for big year Now that the election is over, committees have been assigned and are beginning to meet, and we’re hitting the budget head on; I would like to take a moment and thank everyone for the support and for affording me the opportunity to represent you in Columbus in the 130th General Assembly. It is most certainly a daunting task to which anyone might feel ill-equipped, but I have several wonderful people helping me out and making the transition less arduous. I have been assigned to three committees: Public Utilities; Commerce, Labor and Technology; and Policy and Legislative Oversight. I’m

very excited about these assignments as my engineering experience comes into play immediately with the Louis W. first two asBlessing III signments. COMMUNITY PRESS The last comGUEST COLUMNIST mittee, however, is my favorite in the sense that some of the more controversial bills will likely end up there. At the moment we’re hearing testimony on HB 7, which deals with Internet cafes. Thus far, we’ve only heard the sponsor testimony as well as that of

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Honest representation

It’s the pot calling the kettle black. Recently Alex Triantafilou appeared on Fox Cable News ranting about how unscrupulous it is that a person voted more than once. Fox published the following: “I’m outraged, and every voter, regardless of their political affiliation, should be outraged,” said Hamilton County Board of Elections member Alex Triantafilou, who is also chairman of the county Republican Party. “It causes folks to have real doubts about the fabric of our very democratic process, and it’s dangerous. It is disconcerting that someone would be so bold as to admit their conduct in such a fashion ... We fully intend to prosecute these cases.” I agree voting more than ones is a crime. But, past appearances of impropriety pollutes the message. Alex Triantafilou did not step up to the plate when his wife was unabashedly hired to fill a township position. Knowing that his wife was not qualified for the position and knowing her hiring was contrary to township policy he, through his wife, took the money. I find it incredulous that Triantafilou believes he can profit from illicit propriety and others can’t. It’s clear that the Republicans are in need of honest representation, but I’m sure I won’t see it in my lifetime. Gary Dressler Green Township

Save early

I feel I must respond to Richard O. Schwab’s opinion piece in the Feb. 20 edition of the Northwest Press (“Making College More Affordable”). Mr. Schwab is operating under a common delusion. Student loans don’t make college more affordable, they make it easier to borrow money. The real way to make college more affordable is sound financial planning. The minute parents find out that they have a child on the way, they should begin to save and invest money for that child’s higher education; the time to plan for higher education expenses is not when the child reaches high school; they have eighteen years to prepare. Paying in cash for as many of these expenses as possible can save many thousands of dollars in accrued interest charges later. Of course these parents may have to put off purchases like homes and cars; Mr. Schwab feels that would “create a situation that stifles economic growth”. Nonsense! Since when is it a bad thing to buy only what you can afford? Richard Weyda Green Township

NORTHWEST

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Attorney General Mike DeWine. However, I’m sure that there will be much more testimony and I look forward to hearing from my constituents on the matter; I’ve already heard from a few of them and that is certainly encouraging. As a whole, though, the legislature is gearing up for a rather big year. Education, tax policy and the like are always big issues, but this year we will be deciding whether or not to expand Medicaid. It behooves all of us to pay as much attention as possible to this issue as the consequences of our actions will not be insignificant. As far as my personal goals

in the legislature are concerned I would like to see a shifting of government power from the state level to local governments. The idea is called Federalism and we should return to its core principles. No two political jurisdictions needs are exactly alike, so how much sense does it make to pass one-size-fits-all legislation? Moreover, what group of Ohio legislators can possibly obtain enough information to craft legislation that works perfectly for 11 to 12 million citizens acting independently and in their own self-interest? Bear in mind that Ohio’s current population is more than that of the

entire United States in 1820. My contact information is below, so please feel free to contact me with whatever is on your mind. Should you bump into me, please don’t hesitate to say hi and introduce yourself. Have a great week and, again, I look forward to hearing from you. Louis W. Blessing III is the State Representative for the 29th District, which includes Addyston, , Cleves, Colerain Township, Crosby Township, Harrison, Harrison Township, Miami Township, North Bend, part of Price Hill, Sayler Park and Whitewater Township. You can email him at Rep29@OhioHouse.gov or call his office at 614-466-9091.

CH@TROOM Feb. 20 question

“How will the Horseshoe Casino, scheduled to open March 4 in downtown Cincinnati, affect Cincinnati? Do you plan to patronize the casino? Why or why not? “The Horseshoe Casino opening March 4th will have a good effect on Cincinnati, Hamilton County and the State of Ohio revenue coiffures. Judging by the positives from the Argosy Casino in Lawrenceburg, I expect great things from Cincinnati’s new casino. Dollars that were flowing out of state will now remain in the state. The Broadway Commons neighborhood will, over time, improve and downtown hotels will benefit with the casino shuttle running to seven of them. The new casino’s 2,500-car parking garage will be free to casino patrons at night. “My guess is projections might be a bit high as seen from the other Ohio casinos, but the good will by far outweigh the short comings. Go Figure!”

NEXT QUESTION Do you think the U.S. Supreme Court will decide to eliminate the $123,200 political contribution cap placed on an individual donor during an election cycle? Why or why not? Every week we ask readers a question they can reply to via e-mail. Send your answers to northwestpress@communitypress.com with Chatroom in the subject line.

my life, and feel no desire to return. Some of the people playing slots look like zombies. And there is an atmosphere of sadness and compulsion that I saw. “Would I patronize the casino? No, because although I used to enjoy certain kinds of gambling when I was younger (pulling tips, playing poker, etc ... ) the ‘sport’ holds no appeal for me now.”

T.D.T.

Bill B.

“Well I think the casino will finally bring some of the vice this city has always been lacking. I believe there will be more downside than upside. The negative social toll casinos and gambling typically take on a community usually outweigh the gains. Plus, no matter what the perceived gains are, you can never beat the house. “I won’t go because gambling doesn’t have an intrinsic appeal to me and the entertainment or dining at casino’s seem a bit too corporate and cookie cutter to me. I’d rather spend an evening at Arnold’s downtown listening to local live music in a unique, only in Cincinnati, setting.”

“I believe the Horseshoe Casino will have a detrimental effect on our city – it will suck out money that would have been spent on necessities or on other leisure activities such as sports, movies, cultural events. It will give compulsive gamblers a too near and present place to gamble. “Based on reports from other areas casinos do not encourage development or support other businesses but attract pawn shops and check-cashing places. Based on a recent Enquirer article, drunk driving incidents will likely increase. “The building itself is a disappointment – a ‘big box’ with a glitzy facade and ugly sign; check out the view from Gilbert Avenue. “The negatives far outweigh the positives of new jobs and possibly increased tourism. I will never patronize the casino. “Hope it underperforms and is closed down soon. The space could be repurposed into a convention or event center or a downtown mall.”

I.P.

“How will the Horseshoe Casino affect Cincinnati? No one can really answer that with certainty. There are arguments in favor of such establishments and against them. You can spend some time researching articles about the impact of gambling establishments in places like Indiana and Kentucky, but you must be careful that the reports are subjective and unbiased. “I have relatives and friends who patronize casinos, and I concede that this is their prerogative. Some of the commentaries say that tax revenues from casinos are very helpful to the local economy, but I don’t know how much of the taxes that are levied on Horseshoe Casino will go exclusively to Cincinnati. “My personal feeling is that people should have a right to patronize these places, but I also think it is naive to fail to admit that they prey on the psychological weakness of compulsive gamblers. The same is true of alcoholic beverages, I suppose, and we saw what resulted from attempts to outlaw alcohol. “I’ve been to a couple of casinos in

A publication of

J.R.B.

“Current news stories suggest the other major Ohio cities which already have casinos are not producing as expected. In the case of Cincinnati the two nearby casinos in Indiana may cause the same disappointment in the Tristate. “There is a finite pool of gamblers in our society and even a plush new casino in the downtown area could prove the golden goose of gambling cannot lay enough eggs to solve the fiscal problems of government. “I am not a gambler so it’s not likely I’ll visit the Horseshoe Casino. I consider gambling a vice and do not believe it is proper for our government to encourage it. “The basic premise of gambling is the operators of the games of chance have control of the odds which guarantee the players will lose. That is why the players are called gamblers while the operators have a sure thing.”

R.V.

“I seldom gamble, even when I am in Las Vegas or on a cruise ship, although every now and then I lose some money in slot machines as I walk by them on the way to a conference or convention. “I would not take the time or energy to go to the Horseshoe Casino as a destination unless there was some other reason to be there. I hope all my friends and neighbors visit often and play until their eyes glaze over. “Given the well-published odds, virtually all gambling is a tax willingly paid by the mathematically challenged. Let them pay as much as they want and reduce government’s need to tax me.”

F.S.D.

“Although I have gambled in my lifetime, I have never put a dime into the slots and I don’t plan to start now just because a casino is in my backyard. “I am glad that Ohio got over its stupidity and finally allowed gambling, but they will get none of my money.”

Dave D.

ABOUT LETTERS AND COLUMNS We welcome your comments on editorials, columns, stories or other topics important to you in The Northwest Press. Include your name, address and phone number(s) so we may verify your letter. Letters of 200 or fewer words and columns of 500 or fewer words have the best chance of being published. All submissions may be edited for length, accuracy and clarity. Deadline: Noon Friday E-mail: memral@communitypress.com Fax: 853-6220 U.S. mail: See box below Letters, columns and articles submitted to The Northwest Press ay be published or distributed in print, electronic or other forms.

5556 Cheviot Road Cincinnati, Ohio 45247 phone: 923-3111 fax: 853-6220 email: northwestpress@communitypress.com web site: www.communitypress.com

Northwest Press Editor Jennie Key jkey@communitypress.com, 853-6272 Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday See page A2 for additional contact information.


NORTHWEST

PRESS

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2013

LIFE

A pair of Springfield Township firefighters signal to shore to pull them in during the training exercises Feb. 1. TONY JONES/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

PEOPLE | IDEAS | RECIPES

Springfield Township firefighters are ready to hit the icy water in their Ice Commander dry suits. TONY JONES/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

COLD

TRAINING

Springfield Township Fire Department joined with Hamilton County Park District Rangers in an annual ice rescue training program at Winton Woods, Parky’s Farm. TONY JONES/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

S

pringfield Township Fire Department joined with Hamilton County Park District Rangers in an annual ice rescue training program at Parky’s Farm in Winton Woods Park Feb. 1. They where training proper techniques in retrieving victims from icy cold waters and air temperature where hypothermia can set in quickly. “Our business is one of extremes, from extreme cold temperature to extreme high ones,” said Springfield Township Fire Chief Rob Leininger.

Emerging from the lake covered with ice is Springfield Township Lt. Kevin Richards, who spent the most time in the water conducting the training exercise. TONY JONES/THE

Springfield Township Fire Capt. Mark Thurman helps on a line to pull a pair of firefighters out of the water at Winton Woods Park lake Feb. 1. TONY JONES/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

COMMUNITY PRESS

Zack Flick, left, hand signals with Lt. Kevin Richards during the cold weather training. Both are with the Springfield Township Fire Department. TONY JONES/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Firefighters and park rangers pull in rescuers from icy water during training Feb. 1 at Winton Woods Park. TONY JONES/THE COMMUNITY PRESS


B2 • NORTHWEST PRESS • FEBRUARY 27, 2013

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD THURSDAY, FEB. 28 Dance Classes Waltz Classes, 7 p.m., Parky’s Farm Hayloft Barn, 10073 Daly Road, Beginner-level dance class open to all capable ages. Wear smooth-soled shoes. With instructors Betty and Estil Owens. Free. Presented by Southwestern Ohio/Northern Kentucky Square Dancers Federation. 671-7219; www.sonksdf.com. Springfield Township. Square Dance Lessons, 7:309:30 p.m., Forest Park Activity Center, 651 W. Sharon Road, Low-impact activity to improve your mind, body and spirit. Ages 9 and up. $5. Presented by Happy Time Squares. 232-1303. Forest Park.

Exercise Classes Zumba Fitness Classes, 7-8 p.m., Colerain Township Community Center, 4300 Springdale Road, Greg Insco, instructor. $5. 741-8802; www.coleraintwp.org. Colerain Township. Hatha Yoga, 9:15 a.m., Colerain Township Community Center, 4300 Springdale Road, Daytime class ages 50 and up on Thursdays. Evening class ages 18 and up on Mondays. Bring mat and engage in stretching, breathing and relaxing techniques. $5. 741-8802; www.coleraintwp.org. Colerain Township.

Health / Wellness Mobile Mammography Unit, 7 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Kroger Finneytown, 8421 Winton Road, Fifteen-minute screenings. Cost varies per insurance plan. Financial assistance available for qualified applicants. Appointment required. Presented by Mercy Health Partners. 6863310; www.e-mercy.com. Finneytown.

Holiday - Black History Month The Black Excellence, 9 p.m., Skatin’ Place, 3211 Lina Place, Skating Party. Music by DJ HD. Ages 18 and up. $10. 522-2424; www.cincyticket.com. Colerain Township.

FRIDAY, MARCH 1 Dining Events Pleasant Run Presbyterian Church Fish Fry, 5-7:30 p.m., Pleasant Run Presbyterian Church, 11565 Pippin Road, Includes fish or chicken nuggets’ dinner with two sides, dessert and beverage. Carryout available. Benefits Church Women’s Association and Boy Scout Troop 640. Dinner: $8.50, $4.50 per child; carryout: $8, $4 per child. 4170888; www.pleasantrunpc.org. Colerain Township. Fish Fry, 5-7 p.m., St. Matthias Catholic Church, 1050 W. Kemper Road, Lonsway Hall. Dinners and a la carte items. $7 per dinner. 851-1930. Forest Park. St. Vivian Church Lenten Fish Fry, 4:30-7:30 p.m., St. Vivian Church, 7600 Winton Road, Dinner choices include: fried shrimp, baked cod and baked salmon along with the more traditional fried fish sandwich. Dinners are combined with fries and coleslaw or red potatoes and green beans. Other offerings include macaroni and cheese, cheese pizza and soup. Desserts available. Carryout available. Cost varies with food choices. 378-5482; www.stvivian.org. Finneytown. Fish Fry, 5-7 p.m., VFW Post 7340 Charles R. Gailey, 8326 Brownsway Lane, Cod, catfish, shrimp, chicken, platters come with choice of two sides. Carryout available. $7.50 platter, $4.50 sandwich. Presented by VFW Post 7340 Ladies Auxiliary. 521-7340; http://gaileypost.webs.com. Colerain Township. Our Lady of the Rosary Fish Fry, 5:30-7 p.m., Our Lady of the Rosary Church, 17 Farragut Road, Drive through only. Drive-thru menu: Battered cod sandwich on salted rye or hoagie with french fries and coleslaw. Meals delivered directly to vehicle. Family friendly. $5 drive through; dine-in or carryout menu varies. 825-8626; www.olr.net. Greenhills. St. Ignatius of Loyola Church Fish Fry, 5-9 p.m., St. Ignatius of Loyola Church, 5222 North Bend Road, Fried and baked fish, shrimp, as well as options for children including pizza, bread sticks, and macaroni and cheese. Dessert of the week available for purchase. Benefits St. Ignatius Loyola Church’s endowment

fund and tuition assistance. $1-$7. 661-6565; saintiaa.countmein.com. Monfort Heights. Fish Fry, 4:30-7 p.m., West Side Masonic Center, 4353 West Fork Road, Dine in or carry out. 922-3234. Green Township.

Farmers Market Lettuce Eat Well Winter Farmers Market, 3-7 p.m., Cheviot United Methodist Church, 3820 Westwood Northern Blvd., Locally produced food items. Free. Presented by Lettuce Eat Well. 661-1792; www.lewfm.org. Cheviot.

Music - DJ DJ Night, 7:30 p.m., The Underground, 1140 Smiley Ave., Doors open 7 p.m. With DJ Rathman, DJ Waveshapes and othes. $8. 825-8200; www.theug.com. Forest Park.

On Stage - Theater Quartet, 8 p.m., North College Hill City Center, 1500 W. Galbraith Road, Cecily, Reggie and Wilfred reside in a home for retired opera singers in Kent, England. Each year, on the 10th of October, there is a concert to celebrate Verdi’s birthday. Jean, who used to be married to Reggie, arrives at the home and disrupts their equilibrium. She still acts like a diva and refuses to sing. But the show must go on in this funny and poignant play. $15; $12 seniors, students and active military. Presented by CenterStage Players of Ohio. 588-4910; www.centerstageplayersinc.com. North College Hill.

SATURDAY, MARCH 2

On Stage - Children’s Theater Rumpelstilkin, 10-11 a.m., The Grove Banquet Hall, 9158 Winton Road, Performance of ArtReach’s touring production. Free. Presented by ArtsWave. 931-4255; www.theartswave.org. Finneytown.

On Stage - Theater Quartet, 8 p.m., North College Hill City Center, $15; $12 seniors, students and active military. 588-4910; www.centerstageplayersinc.com. North College Hill.

SUNDAY, MARCH 3 Dining Events Sons of the American Legion Breakfast, 8:30-11:30 a.m., American Legion Post 513, 7947 Hamilton Ave., Made-to-order eggs, omelets, bacon, goetta, ham, pancakes, biscuits and gravy, fried potatoes, fruit and muffins. $8, free for children 6 and younger. Through April 7. 729-0061. Mount Healthy.

On Stage - Theater Quartet, 2 p.m., North College Hill City Center, $15; $12 seniors, students and active military. 588-4910; www.centerstageplayersinc.com. North College Hill.

Support Groups Caregivers Support Group, 3:30-5 p.m., Family Life Center, 703 Compton Road, For those who care for or supervise the frail, elderly or disabled. Free. Through Nov. 3. 931-5777. Finneytown.

Benefits

MONDAY, MARCH 4

Brotherly Love Tour, 6:30 p.m., Clovernook Country Club, 2035 W. Galbraith Road, Open bar, drinks and appetizers, seated dinner 7:20 p.m., program at 8:30 p.m., theme baskets, silent auction, raffles and music. VIP includes meet-and-greet reception with Buddy LaRosa. Benefits Little Brothers-Friends of the Elderly. $150 VIP; $80. Reservations required. Presented by Little Brothers-Friends of the Elderly. 521-0333; cincinnati.littlebrothers.org. College Hill.

Auditions

Dining Events Band Boosters’ Pasta Dinner, 4-7 p.m., Mount Healthy Jr./Sr. High School, 8101 Hamilton Ave., Cafeteria. Performances by High School Concert Band, Jr. High Band, Elementary Band and Jazz Band. $5-$7. Presented by Mount Healthy Band Boosters. 522-1612. Mount Healthy.

Exercise Classes Zumba Kids Dance Fitness Class, 10:30-11:15 a.m., Great Commission Bible Church, 10200 Hamilton Ave., Family Life Center. Healthy program featuring explosion of music, dance and energy. Ages 4-12. $4. 851-4946; www.debsfitnessparty.com. Mount Healthy. Rhythm and Movement Workshop, 1:30-2 p.m., The Grove Banquet Hall, 9158 Winton Road, Ritmo: fitness program incorporates rhythm, movement and games to build strong bodies and agile minds. Free. Presented by ArtsWave. 9314255; www.theartswave.org. Finneytown.

Music - Classical School House Symphony, Noon-12:45 p.m., The Grove Banquet Hall, 9158 Winton Road, Music education concert for the entire family. Free. Presented by ArtsWave. 9314255; www.theartswave.org. Finneytown.

Music - Concerts Celtic Crossroads, 7:30-10 p.m., McAuley High School, 6000 Oakwood Ave., Fusions of traditional Irish music, bluegrass, gypsy and jazz. $35. Presented by Greater Cincinnati Performing Arts Society. 484-0157; www.gcparts.org. College Hill.

Sylvia, 7-9:30 p.m., North College Hill City Center, 1500 W. Galbraith Road, Auditions will consist of cold readings from the script. Contact director, Dee Dunn, at dunnt@fuse.net, with any questions. Free. Presented by CenterStage Players of Ohio. 588-4910; www.centerstageplayersinc.com. North College Hill.

Clubs & Organizations West Hills Music Club Meeting, 7 p.m., Green Township Branch Library, 6525 Bridgetown Road, Oak Hills High School Jazz Band, directed by Larry Welsh. Guests welcome. Refreshments. Free. Presented by West Hills Music Club. 9222052. Green Township.

Exercise Classes Hatha Yoga, 6:30 p.m., Colerain Township Community Center, $5. 741-8802; www.coleraintwp.org. Colerain Township. FitBodz, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Colerain Township Community Center, 4300 Springdale Road, Instructed by Gary Terry, West Point graduate, Army master fitness trainer and certified personal trainer. Focusing on helping individuals improve their strength, stamina, flexibility and weight loss. Bring mat, 3- or 5-pound dumbbells and water. $8. 741-8802; www.coleraintwp.org. Colerain Township. Cardio Dance Party, 7:45-8:45 p.m., Cincinnati Dance and Movement Center, 880 Compton Road, Incorporates variety of dance styles, including jazz, hip hop, Latin, jive and more danced to popular music. $10. Registration required. Presented by Cardio Dance Party. 617-9498; www.cardiodanceparty.com. Springfield Township.

Seminars Job Search Seminar, 1:30-3 p.m., Family Life Center, 703 Compton Road, Diane Kinsella, Family Life Center director, presents: A Strengths Based Approach to Your Career. Weekly speakers advise job seekers on how to conduct an effective job search. Family friendly. Free. Registration required. 931-5777. Finneytown.

Music - Latin

TUESDAY, MARCH 5

Latin Jazz Ensemble, 2:15-2:45 p.m., The Grove Banquet Hall, 9158 Winton Road, Upbeat Latin jazz. Free. Presented by ArtsWave. 931-4255; www.theartswave.org. Finneytown.

Auditions

Music - Rock All the Above, 7:30 p.m., The Underground, 1140 Smiley Ave., With Fret 23 and others. Doors open 7 p.m. $8. 825-8200; www.theug.com. Forest Park.

Sylvia, 7-9:30 p.m., North College Hill City Center, Free. 588-4910; www.centerstageplayersinc.com. North College Hill.

Dance Classes New Beginner Western Square Dancing Class, 7:309:30 p.m., Parky’s Farm Hayloft Barn, 10073 Daly Road, No experience necessary. Free,

The Greater Cincinnati Performing Arts Society presents Celtic Crossroads at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, March 2, at the McAuley Performing Arts Center, 6000 Oakwood Ave. Tickets are $35. The band performs a mix of traditional Irish music, bluegrass, gypsy and jazz. For more information, call 484-0157 or visit www.gcparts.org. PROVIDED. vehicle permit required. Presented by Hamilton County Park District. 860-4746; www.greatparks.org. Springfield Township.

Exercise Classes Zumba Fitness Classes, 7-8 p.m., Colerain Township Community Center, $5. 741-8802; www.coleraintwp.org. Colerain Township.

Senior Citizens Life Story Workshop, 1:30-3:30 p.m., Springfield Township Senior and Community Center, 9158 Winton Road, Discover new techniques to remember and tell stories of your life journey thus far. Bring pens and sense of adventure. Appropriate for adults of any writing level and both new and returning students. $57.50, $50 residents. Registration required. Presented by Extraordinary Lives. 522-1154. Springfield Township.

Support Groups Finding Your Way through Loss, 6:30-8 p.m., Family Life Center, 703 Compton Road, Fresh approach to the heartache of grief. Free. Registration required. 931-5777. Finneytown.

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 6 Art & Craft Classes Jewelry Design, 9-11:30 a.m., Colerain Township Community Center, 4300 Springdale Road, Bring jewelry beads and create with assistance from Linda Schneider. For ages 50 and up. Free. 741-8802; www.coleraintwp.org. Colerain Township.

Clubs & Organizations Mothers of Preschoolers Monthly Meeting, 9-11:30 a.m., LifeSpring Christian Church, 1373 W. Galbraith Road, Mothers with children newborn to kindergarten. Relationshipbuilding with other moms, breakfast, speakers on variety of topics, crafts, games, group discussion and more. Free child care provided. Membership: $23.95 per year. Presented by Mothers of Preschoolers - LifeSpring. 271-5775; www.mops.org. North College Hill.

Exercise Classes FitBodz, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Colerain Township Community Center, $8. 741-8802; www.coleraintwp.org. Colerain Township.

Senior Citizens Zumba Gold, 1-2 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Modified Zumba for seniors and beginners with standing and chair participation. For seniors. $3, $25 for 10 classes. Presented by Deb’s Fitness Party. 205-5064; www.debsfitnessparty.com. Green Township.

Support Groups Coping with Depression, 7-8:30 p.m., Family Life Center, 703 Compton Road, Discuss coping strategies. Free. Registration required. 931-5777; www.northminsterchurch.net. Finneytown. Holistic Health and Wellness Group, 7-8:30 p.m., Family Life Center, 703 Compton Road, Learn ways to manage your physical, mental and spiritual fitness. Free. Registration required. 931-5777. Finneytown.

THURSDAY, MARCH 7 Dance Classes Waltz Classes, 7 p.m., Parky’s Farm Hayloft Barn, Free. 6717219; www.sonksdf.com. Spring-

ABOUT CALENDAR To submit calendar items, go to www.cincinnati.com and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to life@communitypress.com along with event information. Items are printed on a spaceavailable basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to www.cincinnati.com and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page. field Township. Square Dance Lessons, 7:309:30 p.m., Forest Park Activity Center, $5. 232-1303. Forest Park.

Education Maximize Your Social Security Benefits, 7-8:30 p.m., Family Life Center, 703 Compton Road, Marc D. Kiner and Jim Blair of premier Social Security Consulting provide insights into questions you should have about Social Security and your future. Free. 931-5777. Finneytown.

Exercise Classes Zumba Fitness Classes, 7-8 p.m., Colerain Township Community Center, $5. 741-8802; www.coleraintwp.org. Colerain Township. Hatha Yoga, 9:15 a.m., Colerain Township Community Center, $5. 741-8802; www.coleraintwp.org. Colerain Township.

Health / Wellness Pathways Connect, 7-8 p.m., Apex Chiropractic and Wellness Center, 8624 Winton Road, Suite B, Meet like-minded parents and community member. Topics include wellness and nutrition, child development, birth and pregnancy, and more. First Thursday of each month. Free. Registration required. 931-4300; www.apexchirocenter.com. Finneytown.

FRIDAY, MARCH 8 Dining Events Pleasant Run Presbyterian Church Fish Fry, 5-7:30 p.m., Pleasant Run Presbyterian Church, Dinner: $8.50, $4.50 per child; carryout: $8, $4 per child. 4170888; www.pleasantrunpc.org. Colerain Township. Fish Fry, 5-7 p.m., St. Matthias Catholic Church, $7 per dinner. 851-1930. Forest Park. St. Vivian Church Lenten Fish Fry, 4:30-7:30 p.m., St. Vivian Church, Cost varies with food choices. 378-5482; www.stvivian.org. Finneytown. Fish Fry, 5-7 p.m., VFW Post 7340 Charles R. Gailey, $7.50 platter, $4.50 sandwich. 5217340; http://gaileypost.webs.com. Colerain Township. Our Lady of the Rosary Fish Fry, 5:30-7 p.m., Our Lady of the Rosary Church, Dine in or carry out only. $5 drive through; dine-in or carryout menu varies. 825-8626; www.olr.net. Greenhills. St. Ignatius of Loyola Church Fish Fry, 5-9 p.m., St. Ignatius of Loyola Church, $1-$7. 661-6565; saintiaa.countmein.com. Monfort Heights.

Farmers Market Lettuce Eat Well Winter Farmers Market, 3-7 p.m., Cheviot United Methodist Church, Free. 661-1792; www.lewfm.org. Cheviot.

Music - Rock Jimmy Needham and Tony Nolan, 7:30 p.m., The Underground, 1140 Smiley Ave., Doors open 7 p.m. 825-8200; www.theug.com. Forest Park.

On Stage - Theater Quartet, 8 p.m., North College Hill City Center, $15; $12 seniors, students and active military. 588-4910; www.centerstageplayersinc.com. North College Hill.

Support Groups GrandFamilies: Grandparents Raising Grandchildren, 1-2:30 p.m., Family Life Center, 703 Compton Road, Support from caring leaders for challenges of parenting second time around. Free. Registration required. 931-5777. Finneytown.

SATURDAY, MARCH 9 Education Maximize Your Social Security Benefits, 9-10:30 a.m., Family Life Center, Free. 931-5777. Finneytown.

Exercise Classes Zumba Kids Dance Fitness Class, 10:30-11:15 a.m., Great Commission Bible Church, $4. 851-4946; www.debsfitnessparty.com. Mount Healthy.

Music - Rock Sweet Addiction, 7:30 p.m., The Underground, 1140 Smiley Ave., With As of August, Greek Myth and Season Ten. Doors open 7 p.m. $8. 825-8200; www.theug.com. Forest Park.

On Stage - Theater Quartet, 8 p.m., North College Hill City Center, $15; $12 seniors, students and active military. 588-4910; www.centerstageplayersinc.com. North College Hill.

Special Events Johann Strauss Ball, 8 p.m.midnight, Donauschwaben Haus, 4290 Dry Ridge Road, Strauss Waltz Dancers of Donauschwaben Society perform show of dances set to songs by famous Austrian composer, Johann Strauss. Includes music by Spitzbuam Band from Saint Louis. $12.50. Reservations required. Presented by Donauschwaben Society. 385-2098; www.cincydonau.com. Colerain Township.

SUNDAY, MARCH 10 Dining Events Venison Dinner, 3-9 p.m., Germania Society of Cincinnati, 3529 W. Kemper Road, Dinner includes either kirsch (venison) or Hungarian (beef) goulash, spaetzle (noodles), rot kohl (red cabbage), tossed salad and dessert. Music by Ben Geers. $12, $6 ages 11 and under. Registration required by March 3. 741-9310; www.germaniasociety.com. Colerain Township. Indiana’s Finest Chicken Dinner, 1-6 p.m., St. Ann Church - Groesbeck, 2900 W. Galbraith Road, Fried chicken with all the trimmings, including homemade desserts and beverage. Carryout, utilizing separate line, available. $11, $5 ages 11 and under. 521-8440. Colerain Township.


LIFE

FEBRUARY 27, 2013 • NORTHWEST PRESS • B3

Sometimes we forget about the really easy meals. Quiche is one of those. Most of us have eggs, onions and cheese on hand and those ingredients alone, with milk added, make a delicious quiche. When I want to make the quiche special, I use whipping cream. Now be sure to mince the onions very small so they cook well. Otherwise, just sauté them in a bit of butter until they’re translucent before adding to the egg mixture. I got the original recipe, before I adapted it, from a food magazine, but can’t recall which one. 9- or 10-inch pie pan lined with pie dough 10-12 slices bacon, crisply fried and crumbled (optional, but so good) 1 heaping cup shredded Swiss cheese (or your favorite, try extra sharp cheddar) 1 ⁄3 cup minced onions 4 large eggs, room temperature 2 cups whipping cream,

Northside Knights of Columbus

Nutritious combined with simple ingredients add up to an easy meal. THANKS TO RITA HEIKENFELD. half and half or milk About 1 teaspoon salt and 1 ⁄2 teaspoon pepper

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Sprinkle bacon, cheese and onion in pan. Whisk eggs well and whisk in cream and seasonings. Pour into pan. Pour mixture into pie pan. Bake 45-60 minutes or until knife inserted 1 inch from edge comes out clean.

Tips from Rita’s kitchen

Substitute about 1 cup chopped ham or 1⁄2 pound cooked sausage for the bacon. A few dashes cayenne pepper are good in here. If crust browns too much before quiche is done, make a “collar” of foil around the crust.

Pineapple crunch cake

Don’t look for a high and fluffy cake here. This is a moist, dense cake that keeps well in the refrigerator. Yes, it’s even better the next day. I’ve tweaked the recipe through the years and now add more vanilla than I used to. I like to toast my pecans in a 350 degree oven for about 8 minutes or so, until they smell fragrant, before chopping. You don’t have to toast the nuts, though. Now if you don’t add nuts, just call it pineapple cake. This is a yummy snacking cake.

2 large eggs, room temperature, lightly beaten 2 cups sugar 2 cups all-purpose flour 2 teaspoons baking soda 1 tablespoon vanilla 1 ⁄2 to 1 cup chopped pecans mixed with a little of the flour (optional)

1 20 oz. can unsweetened, undrained, crushed pineapple Extra chopped pecans for garnish

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Whisk sugar, flour and baking soda together. Add vanilla, eggs and pineapple and blend well. Stir in nuts Pour into sprayed 9-inch by 13-inch pan. Bake in preheated 350 degree oven for 35-40 minutes until toothpick inserted in center comes out fairly clean. Don’t overbake. Cool, and frost with cream cheese icing. Serves 12 generously.

Tip from Rita’s kitchen

By tossing nuts with a bit of flour, they will remain suspended in the cake and not sink to the bottom. Cream cheese icing

The K of C will hold a fish fry from 5 to 7:30 p.m. Fridays through March 15, at the clubhouse, 3144 Blue Rock Road. The menu includes a fish sandwich on salted rye bread, jambalaya, or a baked potato. Menu sides include salad, macaroni and cheese, cole slaw, and fries. Dinners include a sandwich and two sides for $7.25. Soup and pizza also are available. For more information, call 513-741-7700.

Our Lady of Grace Athletic Association

The Our Lady of Grace Athletic Association will sponsor fish fries from 5:30-7 p.m. on Fridays through March 15, in the cafeteria at Little Flower Parish, 5560 Kirby Ave. Proceeds benefit all of the parishes that feed into the school. Menu includes fish, spaghetti, pizza, shrimp, macaroni and cheese, potatoes, fries and salad.

Pleasant Run Presbyterian Church

Sponsored by the Women’s Association and Boy Scouts at Pleasant Run Presbyterian Church, fish fries are planned from 5-7:30 p.m. Fridays through March 22, at the church, 11565 Pippin Road. Menu includes choice of fish or chicken nuggets and choice of two sides: macaroni and cheese, green beans, cole slaw, applesauce. The meal also

Check out my blog for this tip. Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator and author. Find her blog online at Cincinnati.Com/blogs. Email her at columns@communitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-248-7130, ext. 356.

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St. Ignatius will have a fish fry from 5 to 9 p.m. Fridays through March 22 at the church, 5222 North Bend Road, Fried and baked fish, shrimp, as well as options for children including pizza, bread sticks, and macaroni and cheese. Menu items range from $1 to $7. Dessert of the week is also available for purchase. Proceeds benefit St. the church’s endowment fund and tuition assistance. Call 513-6616565 or visit saintiaa.countmein.com.

St. James Church

The annual St. James Fish Fry “God and Cod” will not be open this year because of renovations to the undercroft. Call 513-7415311 for information.

St. John Neumann

St. John Neumann Church will have a fish fry from 5 to 7:30 p.m. each Friday through March 22 in Daniel Hall, 12191 Mill Road. The menu will feature fried and baked fish and shrimp dinners, vegetable lasagna, spaghetti, grilled cheese, cheese pizza, served a la carte or as dinner with 2 sides. Sides include macaroni and cheese, green beans, cole slaw, salad, applesauce, french fries and onion rings. Pop and beer sold separately. For carryout orders, call 513-742-2224.

VFW Post 7340

The Charles R. Gailey Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 7340 Ladies Auxiliary presents fish fries for the Lenten season from 4:30- 7 p.m. Fridays, through March 15, at the hall, 8326 Brownsway Lane. Menu includes cod, catfish, shrimp, and chicken; platters come with choice of two sides. Carryout is available. $7.50 for a platter and $4.50 for a sandwich. Call 513-521-7340 or visit http://gaileypost.webs.com.

West Side Masonic Center

The West Side Masonic Center presents its Lenten Fish Fries from 4:30 to 7 p.m. Fridays through March 29 at the 4353 West Fork Road. Fish dinner is $9 for adults, $3 for youngsters 6-12 and free to children 5 and under. There is also a $3 kids grilled cheese dinner. Menu also includes fish sandwiches, fries, onion rings, macaroni and cheese, green beans and coleslaw. Beverages are also available.

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Beat butter and cream cheese. Add sugar and vanilla. Blend. Frost cooled cake. Sprinkle on nuts if using.

Making store-bought icing taste like homemade

St. Ignatius of Loyola

presents its annual fish fry from 4:30-7:30 p.m. Fridays through March 22, in the church undercroft, 5361 Dry Ridge Road. Dine-in or drive-through carryout is available. Proceeds from the fish fry benefit the Help-aStudent Education Fund which provides financial assistance to families in need with the cost of tuition to attend St. John the Baptist School. For carryout, call 513-923-2900 during the fish fry hours.

Alliance Home Security What Home Security Should Be

⁄2 stick butter or margarine, softened 8 oz, cream cheese, softened 1 to 11⁄2 cups confectioners sugar 2 teaspoons vanilla 1

NOTICE

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Corpus Christi Church, 2014 Springdale Road, will have a fish fry from 5 to 8 p.m. on Fridays through March 22 in the church undercroft. The menu features fish and shrimp dinners, special feature entrees and menu items a la carte. Beer is also available for purchase.

includes bread, dessert and either coffee, lemonade or ice tea. The price is $8 per adult and $4 per child. Carryout prices are $7.50 per adult and $3.50 per child. The profits will be used for mission projects and camping fees.

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Simple quiche

Corpus Christi Church

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The only reason we keep chickens is to get fresh eggs. I grew up eating eggs just about every day, especially on school days. And eggs are so versatile. If I have eggs in the refrigerator, I feel like I’ve got a meal, Rita no matter Heikenfeld how lean RITA’S KITCHEN the budget or how bare the pantry. Think about this: Eggs are all natural, and one egg has lots of vitamins and minerals with only about 70 calories. The nutrients in eggs can play a role in weight management, muscle strength, healthy pregnancy, brain function, eye health and more. Eggs got a bad rap a few years ago but now health professionals are back on the egg bandwagon – just don’t overdo eating them. One of the first table foods we feed the babies for breakfast are eggs. The protein in eggs is the highest-quality protein found in any food.

FISH FRIES

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Simple ingredients make quiche a tasty, easy meal


LIFE

B4 • NORTHWEST PRESS • FEBRUARY 27, 2013

Watch for insurance rate hikes

INDEPENDENT BAPTIST FRIENDSHIP BAPTIST CHURCH 8580 Cheviot Rd., Colerain Twp 741-7017 www.ourfbc.com Gary Jackson, Senior Pastor Sunday School (all ages) 9:30am Sunday Morning Service 10:30am 6:30pm Sunday Evening Service 7:00pm Wedn. Service/Awana RUI Addiction Recovery (Fri.) 7:00pm Active Youth, College, Senior Groups Exciting Music Dept, Deaf Ministry, Nursery

Howard Ain HEY HOWARD!

every six months but when you go up to $514 every six months, come on that’s kind of ridiculous,” Human

said. Human called her insurance agent and was told it was due to Hurricane Sandy and the destruction it caused on the east coast. Human said that came as quite a surprise. “I was told if a disaster happened in your state you could see the rates going up in that state, but not the whole entire United States ... The insurance agent explained to me that she had received many, many calls about this. I

LUTHERAN

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EVANGELICAL COMMUNITY CHURCH

Trinity Lutheran Church, LCMS Rev. Richard Davenport, Pastor Classic Service and Hymnbook

www.trinitylutherancincinnati.com

385-7024

UNITED METHODIST

SHARON BAPTIST CHURCH

Christ, the Prince of Peace

Services

Sunday School - 10:00 am Sunday Morning - 11:00 am Sunday Evening - 6:00 pm Wednesday - 7:00 pm Evening Prayer and Bible Study VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL June 25 through June 29 Ages 3 to 15 Theme: Amazing Adventures Wyoming Baptist Church

(A Church For All Seasons) Burns and Waverly Avenues Cincinnati OH 45215 821.8430

Steve Cummins, Senior Pastor Sunday School..............................9:00 am Coffee & Fellowship...................10:00 am Praise & Worship........................10:30 am www.wyomingbc.homestead.com Visitors Welcome!

CHRISTIAN CHURCH DISCIPLES Mt. Healthy Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)

7717 Harrison Ave Mt. Healthy, OH 45231 Rev. Michael Doerr, Pastor 513-521-6029 Sunday 9:00 a.m...... Contemporary Service 9:45a.m...... Sunday School 10:45 a.m........ Traditional Worship Nursery Staff Provided “A Caring Community of Faith” Welcomes You

EPISCOPAL Christ Church Glendale Episcopal Church 965 Forest Ave - 771-1544 christchurch1@fuse.net www.christchurchglendale.org The Reverend Roger L Foote 8am Holy Eucharist I 9am Holy Eucharist II 11am Holy Eucharist II Child Care 9-12

LUTHERAN Faith Lutheran LCMC

8265 Winton Rd., Finneytown www.faithcinci.org Pastor Robert Curry Contemporary Service 9am Traditional Service 11:00am

Sunday School 10:15

United Methodist Church 10507 “Old” Colerain Ave (513) 385-7883 Rev. Mark Reuter Sunday School 9:15am Worship 10:30am - Nursery Available www.cpopumc.org “Small enough to know you, Big enough to care”

CHURCH OF THE SAVIOUR

8005 Pfeiffer Rd. Montgomery 791-3142 www.cos-umc.org "Jesus: The Touch of His Hand" Traditional Worship 8:20am & 11:00am Contemporary Worship 9:40am Sunday School (All ages) 9:40 & 11am Nursery Care Provided

Dr. Cathy Johns, Senior Pastor Rev. Doug Johns, Senior Pastor

Monfort Heights United Methodist Church

3682 West Fork Rd , west of North Bend Traditional Worship 8:30 & 11:00am Contemporary Worhip 9:45am

Nursery Available * Sunday School 513-481-8699 * www. mhumc.org Spiritual Checkpoint ... Bearing the Love of Christ...for you!

Mt Healthy United Methodist Church

Corner of Compton and Perry Streets 513-931-5827 Sunday School 8:45 - 9:45am Traditional Worship 10:00 - 11:00am Contemporary Gathering: Bible & Conversation 11:30 - 12:30 Nursery Available Handicap Access "Come as a guest. Leave as a friend".

Sharonville United Methodist

8:15 & 11amTraditional Service & Kingdom Kids 9:30am Adult & Children’s Sunday School 7:00pm Wednesday, Small Groups for all ages Infant care available for all services

3751 Creek Rd.

513-563-0117

www.sharonville-umc.org

NON-DENOMINATIONAL HIGHVIEW CHRISTIAN CHURCH “Life on Purpose in Community” 2651 Adams Rd. (near Pippin) Worship Assembly-Sunday 10:45am Phone 825-9553 www.highviewchristianchurch.com

PRESBYTERIAN At CHURCH BY THE WOODS

www.churchbythewoods.org 3755 Cornell Rd., Sharonville , Ohio 45241 You have a choice of Ministry: 1. Traditional Sunday Worship at 10:00 AM. Language: English Multi-cultural, multi-generational, and multi-ethnic. 2. Contemporary Sunday Worship with Freedom Church at 10:30 AM. Language: English It’s not about Religion; it’s about relationships! www.freedomchurchcincinnati.com 3. Taiwanese Traditional Sunday Worship st 2:00 PM. Language: Taiwanese, UC Campus Fellowship on Saturdays, www.cincinnatitaiwanese.org 4. Seventh Day Adventist Saturday Worship at 10:00 AM. Language: Spanish Loving - Caring - and Sharing God’s Word Notes: Nursery School is provided at each Worship time English as a Second Language (ESL) is taught on Saturday 10-12 AM. Various Bible Studies are available.

Northminster Presbyterian Church 703 Compton Rd., Finneytown 931-0243 Growing Faith, Sharing Hope, Showing Love Sunday Worship Schedule Traditional Services: 8:00 & 10:15am Contemporary Services: 9:00 & 11:30am Student Cafe: 10:15am Childcare Available Jeff Hosmer, Rich Jones & Nancy Ross- Zimmerman - Pastors

Northwest Community Church 8735 Cheviot Rd, by Colerain HS Rev. Kevin Murphy, Pastor 513-385-8973 Worship and Sunday School 10AM Handicap Accessible/Nursery Available

Salem White Oak Presbyterian

UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST FLEMING ROAD United Church of Christ 691 Fleming Rd 522-2780 Rev Pat McKinney

Sunday School - All Ages - 9:15am Sunday Worship - 10:30am

Nursery Provided

St. Paul United Church of Christ Phone: 385-9077 Rev. Michelle Torigian Sunday Worship: 10:30am Sunday School: 9:15am Nursery Available/Handicap Access www.stpaulucccolerain.org www.facebook.com/StPaulUCC

Pastor Todd A. Cutter

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1553 Kinney Ave, Mt. Healthy

5312 Old Blue Rock Rd., off Springdale

We all talk to our pets. But Green Township resident Amy Hoh’s conversations with Cortez hold special meaning. Cortez is Hoh’s service dog, who, she says, was born just for her. You can get a glimpse into their life together Saturday, March 2, at Circle Tail’s Dinner, Art & Wine for Canines, where Hoh will be the keynote speaker. “We were partnered in July of 2006, very close to independence day,” says Hoh, who has been in a wheelchair for almost 15 years. “He truly gave me my independence back.” She just recently retired from her position with Hamilton County and soon returned to the workforce at the Council on Aging and has no plans to slow down any time soon. This is due to Cortez, who, she points out, “has been right by my side every day.” “I can do anything and go anywhere with him. He gave me back the part of my life that my disability took away from me,” she says. She said she is feels

Evelyn Place Monuments Quality Granite & Bronze Monuments & Markers

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“Growing Closer to God, Growing Closer to Neighbor”

Worship: 8:30 am traditional - 10:45 am contemporary Sunday School: 9:45 am Nursery provided

Howard Ain answers consumer complaints weekdays on WKRC-TV Local 12. Write to him at 12 WKRC-TV, 1906 Highland Ave., Cincinnati 45219.

Visitors Welcome www.eccfellowship.org

Trinity Lutheran Church (ELCA) www. trinitymthealthy.org 513-522-3026

make a change in her deductible. I found her auto insurance policy has a very low $250 deductible. Human said she didn’t think that would be a problem – until now. I told her she can reduce her premium by increasing her deductible from $250 to $500. When it comes to Human’s homeowner’s insurance policy, she can decrease that premium by increasing her deductible to $1,000. Remember, filing a homeowner’s insurance claim will go against your record and your policy could be canceled if you have too many claims. Therefore, depending on the size of your house, it may even pay you to increase your deductible to $3,000. After all, homeowners insurance is really only designed to cover major losses so it often doesn’t pay to file a claim if the damage is less than $3,000.

Sunday School Hour (for all ages) 9:15 - 10:15am Worship Service - 10:30 to 11:45am (Childcare provided for infants/ toddlers) Pastor: Rich Lanning Church: 2191 Struble Rd Office: 2192 Springdale Rd

Worship & Sunday School 10:30 a.m, Bible Study 9:15 a.m. Sundays

BAPTIST 4451 Fields Ertel Road Cincinnati, OH 45241 (513) 769-4849 gstep77507@aol.com

said, ‘Are a lot of people dropping you?’ and she said, ‘Yes, they are.’” In addition to her auto insurance, Human says she’s seen her homeowner’s premiums going up. She had it renewed once and has seen the premium go from $790 to $981 – almost a $200 increase – and that was even before the east coast storm. In talking with her insurance agent Human says she’s learned her rate hikes aren’t unusual. “She said that there are some increases of 30 percent on some people, people who hadn’t even filed any claims,” Human said. Human says she’s decided to switch to another insurance company. I told her that’s fine but when she switches she needs to

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Natural disasters around the country and here in the Tristate are leading to higher insurance premiums. Although the Ohio Department of Insurance says auto and homeowner’s insurance rates are among the lowest in the country, increases are coming. The Cincinnati Insurance Board tells me increases can be expected from more and more insurance companies – and rate hikes up to 30 percent are not uncommon. Wanda Human of Reading said she had been noticing her insurance premiums going up for the past year and a half. It began with her auto insurance. “$341 every six months was very satisfactory. I dealt with it when it went to $395

Secret life of a service dog

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Owner: Pamela Poindexter

evelynplacemonumentsoh.com 4952 Winton Rd. • Fairfield

Green Township resident resident Amy Hoh with her service dog Cortez. PROVIDED

blessed to have Circle Tail in her life. “It has given me ways to give back more than anyone knows. Not one week goes by that I don’t talk to at least one or more people about Circle Tail and service dogs.” The Dinner, Art & Wine for Canines – Great Night Out, Benefits Service Dog Training is 6-10 p.m. Saturday, March 2, at Receptions Loveland, 10681 Loveland-Madeira Road, Loveland. Cost is $55 single, $100 ticket pair; $500 tables for 10. For reservations go to www.circletail.org or call 513-877-3325 or mail check to Circle Tail Inc., 8834 Carey Lane Pleasant Plain, OH 45162. RSVP by Friday, Feb. 22. For questions call 513877-3325 or email events@circletail.org.


LIFE

FEBRUARY 27, 2013 • NORTHWEST PRESS • B5

Photo series goes beyond the park district borders Travel the world without even leaving your seat. The Hamilton County Park District presents the 2013 Photography Travel Series on Fridays, at 7:30 p.m. at Sharon Woods Sharon Centre. These programs are free and offer a unique look around the world by local photographers. » March 1: A Trip Through Ancient Egypt – Cliff and Fran Turrell tour Egypt’s ancient sites. Highlights include the Pyramids and Sphinx, Aswan, Abu Simbel, Valley of the Kings and Karnak and Luxor Temples. » March 8: 20 Years Exploring The Amazon – Albert J. Klee recounts his experiences; subjects include bird life, primates,

insects, fishes, reptiles, people and the region’s future as civilization encroaches. » March 15: Cuba: Impressions Of Havana – See the pre-1959 architecture and resilient people through the eyes of Cliff Goosmann. » March 22: The Great Loop Cruise – Capt. Alan Lloyd, author of “Great Loop Navigation Notes,” shares images of his 6,000 mile boat excursion from Chicago to the Florida Keys, to New York City and to back to Canada. » April 5: Arches and Canyonlands National Parks – The natural wonders of Arches and Canyonlands National Parks are explored through Mike Rank’s camera lens.

THE ANSWER IS…

» April 12: Backyard Birds – Mark Kraus and Jerry Fritsch give you a closer look at birds with them and Allan Claybon. » April 19: English Channel Islands & Normandy Beaches – Echoes Of World War II with Neal Jefferies. » April 26: An Israel Travelogue – Visit sites including the Dome of the Rock, Western Wall, Church of the Holy Sepulcher and Garden of Gethsemane with David Feldstein. For additional information, visit GreatParks.org or call 513-521PARK (7275). Also, be sure to check out the park district’s Facebook page and Twitter.

The grotto reminds us of miracles at St. John the Baptist Church, 5361 Dry Ridge Road. Correct answers came from Ellie Richter and Mamaw, Catherine and Grace Martini, Terry Rotert, Gail Hallgath, Debbie Fales, Nancy Bruner, Joan Donnelly, Pat Merfert, Dennis Boehm, Sandy Rouse, Jake and Jamie Spears, Bill Courter, Pat Powell, Mimi and Papa Threm, Emily, Megan and the boys, Ron and Erma, Annette, Bob Carle, Tim Kallaher, Marilyn Day, Kathy Foley, Steve Templin, Joan Wilson and Terri Molony. Thanks for playing. See this week's clue on A3.

Last week’s clue.

County fights fencing of stolen property

Hamilton County Clerk of Courts Tracy Winkler addressed the Hamilton County Police Chiefs Association Feb. 6 to offer the assistance of her office in the prevention of the fencing of stolen property. New provisions of state law allow the Clerk to provide a “do not buy” list to police chiefs who, in turn, provide that information to pawn shops and scrap metal dealers in their jurisdiction. The list includes people with prior convictions for theft-related offenses. Pawn shops and scrap metal dealers who receive this information are prohibited by law from doing business with the listed persons. “My office stands ready to assist local law enforcement agencies with timely, accurate information to help dramatically slow the growth of theft and expedite the process of prosecution of these types of property crimes, “ said Winkler. “This is just another example of the resources this office provides and cooperation I pledge to

partner with law enforcement.” Hamilton County Sheriff Jim Neil said, “This is exactly the type of information these businesses need to prevent them

from violating the law by purchasing from persons known to be thieves or receivers of stolen property and thus relieve them from possible prosecution.”

The list will be available to all Hamilton County agencies so they can provide the appropriate list to the pawn shops and scrap metal dealers in their jurisdiction.

Free Community Grief Seminars – with Dr. Alan Wolfelt If you have lost a loved one, or are helping someone who has, please join us at either of our Free grief seminars featuring Dr. Alan Wolfelt, America’s leading counselor on grieving, mourning—and healing.

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Head west for your journey. Start your daily journey at breakfast with friends in our beautiful dining room. Exercise in our 24-hour state-of-the-art fitness room. Take in an afternoon show at the Aronoff Center or play cards with the girls in one of our many activity rooms. Whether you’re joining a book club or making new friends, your journey will begin at

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Renaissance West at North Bend Crossing. Fulfilling your journey one day at a time. Where will your daily journey begin? Spacious Floor Plans • Health & Wellness Exceptional Amentities • Social & Special Events Outings • Safe, Convenient Location

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LIFE

B6 • NORTHWEST PRESS • FEBRUARY 27, 2013

College Hill Community Urban Redevelopment Corporation is hosting the third annual Derby Day Party and fundraiser on Saturday, May 4, at Historic Laurel Court, 5870 Belmont Ave. The party starts at 5 p.m. with live entertainment prior to the Run for the Roses. Admission includes mint juleps, bar, catered derby fare, silent auction, raffles, hat contests and more. Attire is dressy casual. “Proceeds from this fun-filled evening will assist with CHCURC’s efforts to revitalize the College Hill business district,” said CHCURC President Michael Cappel. “Last year’s Derby Day helped CHCURC reach the $200,000 challenge match which enabled us to purchase a key building in the business district – 5917 Hamilton Ave. All funds raised through this year’s event will be used toward additional property acquisitions and the renovation of 5917 Hamilton Ave., which will bring a new business to

the College Hill business district.” “This annual event has really caught on in Greater Cincinnati. Last year’s party was a sell out,” said Derby Day cochair Carolyn Royalty. “Reservations are limited to just 220 guests. Of course the elegance of the mansion setting at Historic Laurel Court is a major attraction in itself. So don your best Derby Hat and help us celebrate as CHCURC meets new goals.” Early bird tickets are $65 per person until April 1, $75 thereafter, and may be purchased online at www.myeasytix.com or by calling 1877-840-0457 toll free. An estimated $30 or $40 of ticket price is tax deductible depending on ticket cost. Consult your accountant for tax deduction guidelines. For more information visit: www.chcurc.com or contact either cochair: Carolyn Royalty (513) 542-9792 royaltyct@fuse.net or Tony Thompson (513) 276-7391 tonyt@fuse.net.

Notice to the -owners and lienholders of the real property located at 2762 Niagara, Cincinnati, OH, and their executors, administrators, guardians, heirs, successors, and assigns: On February 12, 2013, the Colerain Township Board of Trustees passed Resolution No. 26-13 for Demolition of 2762 Niagara, Cincinnati, OH (Parcel No. 510-0052-0049). This property has been found to be unfit for human habitation by the Colerain Township Fire Department. If the owners and lienholders and their executors, administrators, guardians, heirs, successors choose to object to this action, they may do so at the Colerain Township Board of Trustees meeting on April 9, 2013 at 6:00 PM, 4200 Springdale Rd, Cincinnati, OH. The costs for the demolition will be assessed to the property tax bill. Any questions may be directed to the Colerain Township Planning & Zoning Office: 4200 Springdale Rd., Cincinnati, OH - 513385-7505. 1001750215 Notice to the owners and lienholders of the real property located at 2919 Jonrose, Cincinnati, OH, and their executors, administrators, guardians, heirs, successors, and assigns: On February 12, 2013, the Colerain Township Board of Trustees passed Resolution No. 25-13 for Demolition of 2919 Jonrose, Cincinnati, OH (Parcel No. 510-0071-0264). This property has been found to be unfit for human habitation by the Colerain Township Fire Department. If the owners and lienholders and their executors, administrators, guardians, heirs, successors choose to object to this action, they may do so at the Colerain Township Board of Trustees meeting on at 6:00 PM, 4200 Springdale Rd, Cincinnati, OH. The costs for the demolition will be assessed to the property tax bill. Any questions may be directed to the Colerain Township Planning & Zoning Office: 4200 Springdale Rd., Cincinnati, OH - 513-385-7505. 1750246

Mount students design artwork series for new medical building The new Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center facility in Green Township will including student artwork, featuring 36 posters placed around the building designed by sophomore graphic design students at the College of Mount St. Joseph. The hospital invited the Mount, as well as several schools in the Oak Hills Local School District including Oak Hills High School, Bridgetown Middle School and C.O. Harrison Elementary School, to have students design artwork for the new facility when it opens this year. Mount sophomore graphic design students created a series of original posters that feature a recognizable West Side icon within the design. The “seek-and-find” concept will be used as a game for waiting patients and their parents. Some of the West Side connections hidden within the poster project include Western Bowl, cornhole and football. “Being from the West Side, I was already aware of that ‘West Side’ thing,” said design student Leesa

Scudder. “It was interesting to see how other students who weren’t from this part of town discovered the feel of the west side and what made it stand out.” “This is an amazing opportunity for our students,” said Beth Belknap Brann, associate professor of graphic design at the Mount. “Sophomore year is the first time our students work with design programs on the comput-

er. These sophomores have jumped in and really landed on their feet.” Kolar Design and the nonprofit arts organization ArtWorks worked with Mount students during the fall semester on the project. Students began with a concept, turned it into a graphic element, and presented them to representatives from Kolar Design and ArtWorks. Students used the color palette that is tied into the

CCHMC brand, creating posters that are upbeat, calming and intriguing. “This is such a great collaboration between emerging student talent, a highly regarded hospital and top design professionals in the city,” said Brann. “We are honored to have so many posters chosen to be a part of the project. I’m sure there will be lots of smiles when people see the significance of the icons.”

Covedale theater showcases ‘African Folktales’ The Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, 4990 Glenway Ave., West Price Hill, continues the Saturday Morning Children’s Series with the

Bright Star Touring Company presentation of “African Folktales.” The performance is at 11 a.m. Saturday, March 16. The performance is

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Nicholas Olson, a College of Mount St. Joseph sophomore graphic design student, discusses a design for the new Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center facility in Green Township. He was presenting to employees of Kolar Design and the nonprofit arts organization ArtWorks. THANKS TO DON DENNEY.

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geared toward grades pre-kindergarten through fifth grade. In “African Folktales, Akili shares tales that were traditionally passed down by word of mouth. These stories bring to life the vastness of the African landscape and a variety of clever animals, and include valuable character-education themes. It celebrates world cultures, literature and the art of African storytelling.

Tickets are $5 and can be purchase by one of the following methods: » Call the box office at 513-241-6550. » Log on to: www.cincinnatilandmark productions.com to purchase online. » In person at the box office ticket counter – 4990 Glenway Ave. The next show in the series is The Frisch Marionettes’ presentation of “Rumpelstiltzkin“ on Saturday, April 27. Akili shares “African Folktales” tales that were traditionally passed down by word of mouth. PROVIDED


LIFE

FEBRUARY 27, 2013 • NORTHWEST PRESS • B7

Former ‘Top Model’ will share her story of faith

Leah Darrow, a former contestant on “America’s Next Top Model” will speak at the Underground n Forest Park March 19. Her talk is sponsored by Ruah Woods. PROVIDED

“Today’s youth are facing an onslaught of messages encouraging them to find happiness by being the strongest, prettiest or most popular,” Brown said. “It’s difficult for our young people to discover who they truly are. Leah’s witness inspires them to a life of true greatness.” Each year, Ruah Woods sponsors an evening presentation and guest speaker for local young people. “We’ve had a packed house in the past,” said Brown. “Young people are hungry to know that they are made by love and for love. They want to know that they are made for more.” Darrow said, “I don’t pretend to be the ‘Best Christian of the Year’ or to have all the answers, and I make my fair share of mistakes too. However,

The ancient Fathers of faith called the deepest of the deep, the souls soul – “the very.” It is from this place that Gopal brings to life his stories of faith and the human condition. PW Gopal will be in concert at 8:30 p.m. Friday, March 1, in the Upper Room at Northminster Presbyterian Church, 703 Compton Road, . The concert is free. PW Gopal is the founder of the Hundred Movement, a U.S. movement to rebuild the underground railroad,

partnering communities with government and local non-government agencies and non-profits to bring young women and children out of the bondage of human trafficking. He works to educate the public through forums and seminars on issues of poverty and the modern slave trade. Touring fulltime since 2003, he has shared the stage with such artists as Jeremy Camp, Bebo Norman, Sara Groves, Bethany Dillon and Derek Webb. For more info, go to www.pwgopal.com.

what I can offer is the truth that God doesn’t make junk – you’re not junk and it’s about time we all stop acting, talking, and dressing like trash.” For more information, contact Brown at courtneybrown@ruah woods.org or 513-4078672.

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A former contestant on “America’s Next Top Model” starring Tyra Banks will address Cincinnati area young people on March 19 about her journey of faith that has led her to a more fulfilling, joyful life. Following a conversion after her reality television debut and professional modeling career, Leah Darrow has become an international speaker, focusing on faith, conversion, human dignity, mercy and modesty. The evening presentation, which is free, begins at 6:45 p.m. Tuesday, March 19, at Underground, 1140 Smiley Ave., Forest Park. The talk is open to teens in eighth grade and high school, as well as to young adults. It is sponsored by Ruah Woods, a Cincinnati education center dedicated to restoring the family and renewing the culture. “Happiness is a universal good. Searching for happiness in finite things will never satisfy. It will always leave us hungry for more. More money, more love, more attention,” said Darrow. “The world sells a kind of happiness that rests in the finite. I’d like to propose and encourage a kind of happiness that rests in the Infinite.” Courtney Brown, Theology of the Body education coordinator at Ruah Woods, said Leah Darrow’s message is timely for young people to hear.

Northminster hosts PW Gopal in concert

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LIFE

B8 • NORTHWEST PRESS • FEBRUARY 27, 2013

DEATHS Agnes Ashbrook Agnes Poe Solzsmon Ashbrook, 73, died Feb. 6. Survived by husband Edward Ashbrook; children Tim, Greg Solzsmon, Cyndi (Jim) Peffer; stepdaughters Lucy Semona, Lindy (Larry) Waters, Liz (David) Dietrich; siblings Janice (Hap) Baas, Glenda (Stanley) Schiltz, Carolyn (Jimmie) Fulton, Wayne (Jeannie) Cooper; nine grandchildren; four great-grandchildren. Preceded in death by first husband Robert Solzsmon, parents William Poe, Emma Litzinger Poe Cooper, sister Juanita Poe Curtis. Memorials to a charity of the donor’s choice.

Richard Bergheger Richard J. Bergheger, 83, White Oak, died Feb. 15. He was a Navy veteran, served as a radioman for over 30 years in the United States Naval Reserve and was a member of the member of OH-KY-IN Amateur Radio Club. Survived by children Janet (Michael) Bayer, Douglas (Amy) Bergheger; grandchildren Colleen, Keith, Christopher

ABOUT OBITUARIES Basic obituary information and a color photograph of your loved one is published without charge by The Community Press. Please call us at 853-6262 for a submission form. To publish a larger memorial tribute, call 242-4000 or pricing details. Bayer, Lindsey, Ryan Bergheger; brother Robert (Mary) Bergheger. Preceded in death by wife Olivia “Billie” Bergheger, daughter Amy Bergheger. Services were Feb. 19 at St. Ignatius of Loyola. Arrangements by Mihovk-Rosenacker Funeral Home. Memorials to the OH-KY-IN Amateur Radio Club or Roger Bacon High School Alumni.

Robert Junk Robert E. Junk, 74, Colerain Township, died Feb. 14. Survived by wife Loraine Junk; children Thomas Junk, Laura (Omar) Thompson, Kathryn (Boyd) Lake;siblings Thomas (Patty) Junk, Mary Ann (the late Donald) Burns; stepchildren Tera Hungler, Nisa Hobeika; nine grandchildren; friends Paul,

Nancy Heisel. Preceded in death by brother Eddie Junk. Services were Feb. 19 at St. Bernard Junk Church, Taylor Creek. Arrangements by Neidhard-Minges Funeral Home. Memorials to: Hospice of Cincinnati Inc., P.O. Box 633597 Cincinnati, OH 45263 or a charity of the donor’s choice.

Annabelle McAlister Annabelle Toomey McAlister, 93, died Feb. 15. She was a registered dietitian at Mercy Hospital-Mariemont. Survived by children Barbara (Michael) Schoenfeld, William R.

(Trina) McAlister, Patricia (Luke) Walker; sister Rose Marie Smith; 10 grandchildren; nine greatgrandchildren. Preceded in death by husband William B. McAlister. Services were Feb. 19 at St. Veronica. Arrangements by Radel Funeral Home. Memorials to the American Heart Association or St. Veronica Church.

3900 Vincent Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45205 or Our Daily Bread, P.O. Box 14862, Cincinnati, OH 45250-0862.

Karen Payne

George Moeller George J. Moeller, 82, Green Township, Feb. 17. Survived by children Kathie (Dennis) Jones, Linda (Ron) Coffaro, Steve Moeller; grandchildren Andy Jones, Danielle Mullins, Chris, Charlie Coffaro, Maria Bowllan. Moeller Preceded in death by wife Jeanne Moeller, brothers Harry, Charles Moeller, grandson Ryan Jones. Services were Feb. 23 at Our Lady of the Visitation. Arrangements by Meyer Funeral Home. Memorials to: Elder High School,

Karen Reidel Payne, 55, Green Township, died Feb. 16. Survived by husband Bob Payne; daughter Megan (Adam) Kamm; siblings Betsy, Steve Reidel, Lisa Frey, Gayle Wergers; nieces and nephews. Services Payne were Feb. 23 at Meyer Funeral Home. Memorials to: The Beechwood Home, 2140 Pogue Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45208 or Ovarian Cancer Research Fund.

Jean Schroth Regina “Jean” Williams Schroth, 89, died Feb. 21. Survived by children William (Mary Ann), James (Joan), Thomas (Pam), Robert (Lisa) Schroth, Mary Ellen (Steve) McBride, Sally (Ray) Ebersole;grandchildren James, Jennifer, Steven, Anna,

Thomas, Michael, Scott, Katie, Sara, Meghan, Cara, Nicholas, Kelly, Eric, Samantha, Kyle, Tony, Chad, Joseph; Schroth 11 greatgrandchildren. Services were Feb. 25 at Our Lady of Lourdes. Arrangements by Dalbert, Woodruff & Isenogle Funeral Home. Memorials to: Hospice of Cincinnati, P.O. Box 633597, Cincinnati, OH 45263.

Jeanne Young Jeanne McCroskey Young, 89, Green Township, died Feb. 18. Survived by children Carol Stites, Sandra Miles Ledford, Deborah Federle, Thomas, Henry Young, Mary Ann Enderle; brother William McCroskey; many grandchildren and greatgrandchildren. Preceded in death by husband George Young, brother Jack McCroskey. Services were Feb. 21 at St. Aloysius Gonzaga. Arrangements by Neidhard-Minges Funeral Home. Memorials to Shriners Hospital.

POLICE REPORTS CINCINNATI DISTRICT 5

ABOUT POLICE REPORTS

Arrests/citations Curtis Whittle, born 1969, domestic violence, 6481 Devonwood Drive, Feb. 11. Kendra Edmonds, born 1988, unauthorized use of a motor vehicle, 5365 Bahama Terrace, Feb. 11. Derrick Horton, born 1992, obstructing official business, 6033 Hamilton Ave., Feb. 12. Taraysha Cornelison, born 1992, criminal damaging or endangering, 5473 Kirby Ave., Feb. 12. Dwight A. Williams, born 1956, misdemeanor drug possession, possession of drug paraphernalia, 5712 Hamilton Ave., Feb. 13. Timothy Hope, born 1987, misdemeanor drug possession, possession of drug parapherna-

The Community Press publishes the names of all adults charged with offenses. The information is a matter of public record and does not imply guilt or innocence. To contact your local police department: » Colerain Township: Chief Daniel P. Meloy, 245-6600 » Green Township: Chief Bart West, 574-0007; vandalism hotline 574-5323 » Hamilton County: Sheriff Jim Neil, 825-1500 » Springfield Township: Chief David Heimpold, 729-1300 lia, 5269 Colerain Ave., Feb. 13. Antonio Hill, born 1984, misdemeanor drug possession, 6029 Lantana Ave., Feb. 15. William Mitchell, born 1988, grand theft auto, 1194 West Way, Feb. 15. Kye Cheatham, born 1991,

assault, 6132 Tahiti Drive, Feb. 17. Timothy S. Smith, born 1967, burglary, 1555 Ambrose Ave., Feb. 17.

Incidents/reports Assault

5428 Bahama Terrace, Feb. 7. Breaking and entering 1635 Larch Ave., Feb. 9. Burglary 2627 Allaire Ave., Feb. 11. 5117 Colerain Ave., Feb. 11. 1187 Cedar Ave., Feb. 13. 5831 Monfort Hills, Feb. 9. Domestic violence Reported on Hawaiian Terrace, Feb. 6. Felonious assault 6598 South Oak Knoll Drive, Feb. 9. Menacing 1350 W. North Bend Road, Feb. 8. Robbery 6033 Hamilton Ave., Feb. 12. Theft 2619 Richwill Court, Feb. 11. 5571 Colerain Ave., Feb. 13. 1000 Ebony Lane, Feb. 6. 5560 Colerain Ave., Feb. 8.

5538 Ruddy Court, Feb. 9.

COLERAIN TOWNSHIP Arrests/citations Michael Benz, 39, 3781 Eastern Hills Lane, possession of drug paraphernalia, drug possession at 8451 Colerain Ave., Jan. 30. Salina Whitson, 24, 5377 Winneste Ave., theft at 9040 Colerain Ave., Jan. 31. Simiko Smith, 32, 2344 Kenton St., theft, possession of criminal tools at 9501 Colerain Ave., Jan. 31. Derek Warner, 18, 5607 Leumas Road, theft at 9505 Colerain Ave., Feb. 1. Juvenile male, 17, receiving stolen property at 8801 Cheviot Road, Feb. 1. Brenda Williams, 50, 2390 W. North Bend Road, theft at 9040

Colerain Ave., Feb. 1. Brandon Ford, 42, 3178 Woodsfield St., resisting arrest, disorderly conduct at 8134 Hamilton Ave., Feb. 2. Brent Ertel, 22, 7113 County Road 200 North, domestic violence at 11021 Hamilton Ave., Feb. 2. Jacinta Schwering, 26, 2618 Chesterfield Court, resisting arrest, disorderly conduct at 3254 Niagara Street, Feb. 2. Juvenile male, 14, theft at 3520 Springdale road, Feb. 3. Alex Stewart, 22, 6500 Parrish Ave, resisting arrest, theft at 9501 Colerain Ave., Feb. 2. Natalie Irwin, 27, 517 Rosary Drive, theft at 9501 Colerain Ave., Feb. 2. Troy Richardson, 20, 1812 Comp-

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LIFE

FEBRUARY 27, 2013 • NORTHWEST PRESS • B9

POLICE REPORTS Continued from Page B8 ton Road, drug possession at 9100 Ranchill Drive, Feb. 4. Derek Warner, 18, 5607 Leumas Road, theft at 8451 Colerain Ave., Feb. 4. Darla Gandy, 45, 2327 Walden Glen, theft at 11865 Hamilton Ave., Feb. 4. Thomas Burnett, 20, 3698 Twinview Drive, drug possession at 9991 Flick Road, Feb. 1. Marques Rycraw, 25, 1093 Peachtree, drug possession at 8000 Colerain Ave., Feb. 2. Jeremy Coffey, 19, 8351 Firshade Terrace, drug possession at 6859 Blue Rock Road, Feb. 1. Telisha Smiley, 19, 2834 E. Tower, theft at 9501 Colerain Ave., Feb. 5.

Incidents/reports Burglary Residence entered and tools of unknown value removed at 2500 Strawberry Lane, Jan. 26. Attempt made to enter residence at 8438 East Miami River Road, Feb. 1. Garage door opened and TVs of unknown value removed at 5935 Orchard Hill Lane, Feb. 1. Residence entered and jewelry of unknown value removed at 9118 Whitehead Drive, Feb. 4. Attempt made at 8946 Summercrest Drive, Feb. 5. Criminal damaging Rock thrown through window at 3266 Lapland Drive, Jan. 29. Vehicle window damaged at 6080 Day Road, Feb. 2. Windows broken out of house at 10053 Pippin Road, Feb. 5. Criminal simulation Victim reported at 11865 Hamilton Ave., Feb. 2. Forgery Victim reported at 9690 Colerain Ave., Feb. 2. Menacing Victim threatened at 3564 Springdale Road, Feb. 1. Victim threatened at 3810 Brockton Drive, Feb. 5. Rape Female victim reported at Amberway Court, Jan. 29. Robbery Apartment entered and victims threatened with handgun and

items of unknown value removed at 2432 Walden Glen, Jan. 30. Victim threatened and money of unknown value removed at 8720 Colerain Ave., Feb. 4. Theft Items of unknown value removed at 10214 Colerain Ave., Jan. 30. Vehicle entered and stereo equipment of unknown value removed at 9455 Colerain Ave., Jan. 30. Reported at 9720 Colerain Ave., Jan. 30. Vehicle entered items of unknown value removed at 10116 Windswept, Jan. 30. Merchandise of unknown value removed at 9040 Colerain Ave., Jan. 31. Merchandise of unknown value removed at 9481 Colerain Ave., Jan. 31. Gun removed at 2735 Legrove Circle, Jan. 27. Vehicle entered and video camera of unknown value removed at 9132 Colerain Ave., Feb. 1. Catalytic converter of unknown value removed at 9911 Colerain Ave., Feb. 1. Dog of unknown value removed at 8475 Popllux Court, Feb. 3. Vehicle entered and currency removed at 2960 Stout Road, Feb. 4. Merchandise valued at $58.43 removed at 11865 Hamilton Ave., Feb. 4. Purse entered and items of unknown value removed at 10795 Hughes Road, Feb. 4. Gasoline of unknown value removed at 9178 Colerain Ave., Feb. 1. Merchandise of unknown value removed at 9477 Colerain Ave., Feb. 5.

GREEN TOWNSHIP Arrests/citations Jill E. Moore, 31, 3284 Congress Drive, theft at 6251 Glenway Ave., Feb. 8. Eric J. Schnurr, 28, 5971 Snyder Road, drug possession and possessing drug abuse instruments at Harrison Avenue and Interstate 74, Feb. 8.

Bryan Schnurr, 30, 5971 Snyder Road, drug possession and driving under suspension at Harrison Avenue and Interstate 74, Feb. 8. Jason P. Deaton, 35, 3427 Glenway Ave. No. 2, theft and probation violation at 5071 Glencrossing Way, Feb. 8. Juvenile, 13, disorderly conduct and criminal damaging at 5400 Edalbert Drive, Feb. 8. William P. Beeman, 28, 5452 Phillorette Drive, domestic violence at 5452 Phillorette Drive, Feb. 9. Juvenile, 17, theft at 6580 Harrison Ave., Feb. 9. Joseph A. Bearse, 38, 3753 Mack Ave., drug abuse at 6121 Taylor Road, Feb. 11. Sarah Elza, 25, 3370 State Route 56, theft at 6550 Harrison Ave., Feb. 11. Marissa Reeves, 24, 319 Water St., theft at 6550 Harrison Ave., Feb. 11. Desiree Weber, 23, 448 Coachman, theft and possession of drugs at 5071 Glencrossing Way, Feb. 11. Nina M. Huber, 33, 4436 Harrison Ave., failure to send at 6303 Harrison Ave., Feb. 11. Roger J. Zurborg, 29, 118 Eaton St., robbery at 3491 North Bend Road, Feb. 12. Christian A. Tidwell, 20, 7063 New Haven Road, possession of drug paraphernalia at Kildare Drive and Sally Court, Feb. 14. Alexander Krupa, 18, 6775 Jimjon Court, possession of drug paraphernalia at 5440 Northcrest, Feb. 14. Shaun P. Combs, 32, 662 Elsburry Court, theft at 6550 Harrison Ave., Feb. 14. Juvenile, 15, drug possession at 3200 Ebenezer Road, Feb. 13. Juvenile, 16, aggravated trafficking in drugs at 3200 Ebenezer Road, Feb. 13. Nicholas D. Trotta, 30, 6500 Glenway Ave., felonious assault, inducing panic, possessing weapons under disability and possession of drugs at 6500 Glenway Ave., Feb. 15. Ronnie R. Russell, 35, 4993 Race Road, failure to send at 6303 Harrison Ave., Feb. 15.

Join others like you – with helpful tips for raising kids, saving money, keeping healthy, and finding a bit of time for yourself through it all – all on CincyMoms.com blog network.

Notice to the -owners and lienholders of the real property located at 4344 Dry Ridge, Cincinnati, OH, and their executors, administrators, guardians, heirs, successors, and assigns: On February 12, 2013, the Colerain Township Board of Trustees passed Resolution No. 23-13 for Demolition of 4344 Dry Ridge, Cincinnati, OH (Parcel No. 510-0182-0068). This property has been found to be unfit for human habitation by the Colerain Township Fire Department. If the owners and lienholders and their executors, administrators, guardians, heirs, successors choose to object to this action, they may do so at the Colerain Township Board of Trustees meeting on April 9, 2013 at 6:00 PM, 4200 Springdale Rd, Cincinnati, OH. The costs for the demolition will be assessed to the property tax bill. Any questions may be directed to the Colerain Township Planning & Zoning Office: 4200 Springdale Rd., Cincinnati, OH 1001750186 513-385-7505.

Notice to the -owners and lienholders of the real property located at 3159 Niagara, Cincinnati, OH, and their executors, administrators, guardians, heirs, successors, and assigns: On February 12, 2013, the Colerain Township Board of Trustees passed Resolution No. 18-13 for Demolition of 3159 Niagara, Cincinnati, OH (Parcel No. 510-0052-0396). This property has been found to be unfit for human habitation by the Colerain Township Fire Department. If the owners and lienholders and their executors, administrators, guardians, heirs, successors choose to object to this action, they may do so at the Colerain Township Board of Trustees meeting on April 9, 2013 at 6:00 PM, 4200 Springdale Rd, Cincinnati, OH. The costs for the demolition will be assessed to the property tax bill. Any questions may be directed to the Colerain Township Planning & Zoning Office: 4200 Springdale Rd., Cincinnati, OH - 5131001750216 385-7505.

Notice to the -owners and lienholders of the real property located at 9743 Dunraven, Cincinnati, OH, and their executors, administrators, guardians, heirs, successors, and assigns: On February 12, 2013, the Colerain Township Board of Trustees passed Resolution No. 24-13 for Demolition of 9743 Dunraven, Cincinnati, OH (Parcel No. 510-0041-0192). This property has been found to be unfit for human habitation by the Colerain Township Fire Department. If the owners and lienholders and their executors, administrators, guardians, heirs, successors choose to object to this action, they may do so at the Colerain Township Board of Trustees meeting on April 9, 2013 at 6:00 PM, 4200 Springdale Rd, Cincinnati, OH. The costs for the demolition will be assessed to the property tax bill. Any questions may be directed to the Colerain Township Planning & Zoning Office: 4200 Springdale Rd., Cincinnati, OH 513-385-7505. 1001750190

Notice to the -owners and lienholders of the real property located at 5277 Old Blue Rock, Cincinnati, OH, and their executors, administrators, guardians, heirs, successors, and assigns: On February 12, 2013, the Colerain Township Board of Trustees passed Resolution No. 14-13 for Demolition of 5277 Old Blue Rock, Cincinnati, OH (Parcel No. 510-0204-0033). This property has been found to be unfit for human habitation by the Colerain Township Fire Department. If the owners and lienholders and their executors, administrators, guardians, heirs, successors choose to object to this action, they may do so at the Colerain Township Board of Trustees meeting on April 9, 2013 at 6:00 PM, 4200 Springdale Rd, Cincinnati, OH. The costs for the demolition will be assessed to the property tax bill. Any questions may be directed to the Colerain Township Planning & Zoning Office: 4200 Springdale Rd., Cincinnati, OH 513-385-7505. 1001750218

Notice to the -owners and lienholders of the real property located at 9743 Dunraven, Cincinnati, OH, and their executors, administrators, guardians, heirs, successors, and assigns: On February 12, 2013, the Colerain Township Board of Trustees passed Resolution No. 24-13 for Demolition of 9743 Dunraven, Cincinnati, OH (Parcel No. 510-0041-0192). This property has been found to be unfit for human habitation by the Colerain Township Fire Department. If the owners and lienholders and their executors, administrators, guardians, heirs, successors choose to object to this action, they may do so at the Colerain Township Board of Trustees meeting on April 9, 2013 at 6:00 PM, 4200 Springdale Rd, Cincinnati, OH. The costs for the demolition will be assessed to the property tax bill. Any questions may be directed to the Colerain Township Planning & Zoning Office: 4200 Springdale Rd., Cincinnati, OH 513-385-7505. 1001750192

Notice to the -owners and lienholders of the real property located at 10298 Owl Creek, Cincinnati, OH, and their executors, administrators, guardians, heirs, successors, and assigns: On February 12, 2013, the Colerain Township Board of Trustees passed Resolution No. 15-13 for Demolition of 10298 Owl Creek, Cincinnati, OH (Parcel No. 510-0250-0001). This property has been found to be unfit for human habitation by the Colerain Township Fire Department. If the owners and lienholders and their executors, administrators, guardians, heirs, successors choose to object to this action, they may do so at the Colerain Township Board of Trustees meeting on April 9, 2013 at 6:00 PM, 4200 Springdale Rd, Cincinnati, OH. The costs for the demolition will be assessed to the property tax bill. Any questions may be directed to the Colerain Township Planning & Zoning Office: 4200 Springdale Rd., Cincinnati, OH 1001750230 513-385-7505.

Notice to the owners and lienholders of the real property located at 2848 Brampton, Cincinnati, OH, and their executors, administrators, guardians, heirs, successors, and assigns: On January 8, 2013, the Colerain Township Board of Trustees passed Resolution No. 5-13 for Demolition of 2848 Brampton, Cincinnati, OH (Parcel No. 5100041-0438). This property has been found to be unfit for human habitation by the Colerain Township Fire Department. If the owners and lienholders and their executors, administrators, guardians, heirs, successors choose to object to this action, they may do so at the Colerain Township Board of Trustees meeting on March 12, 2013 at 6:00 PM, 4200 Springdale Rd, Cincinnati, OH. The costs for the demolition will be assessed to the property tax bill. Any questions may be directed to the Colerain Township Planning & Zoning Office: 4200 Springdale Rd., Cincinnati, OH - 5131001750164 385-7505.

Notice to the owners and lienholders of the real property located at 2715 Niagara, Cincinnati, OH, and their executors, administrators, guardians, heirs, successors, and assigns: On January 8, 2013, the Colerain Township Board of Trustees passed Resolution No. 613 for Demolition of 2715 Niagara, Cincinnati, OH (Parcel No. 510-0052-0032). This property has been found to be unfit for human habitation by the Colerain Township Fire Department. If the owners and lienholders and their executors, administra tors, guardians, heirs, successors choose to object to this action, they may do so at the Colerain Township Board of Trustees meeting on March 12, 2013 at 6:00 PM, 4200 Springdale Rd, Cincinnati, OH. The costs for the demolition will be assessed to the property tax bill. Any questions may be directed to the Colerain Township Planning & Zoning Office: 4200 Springdale Rd., Cincinnati, OH 513-385-7505. 1001750167

Notice to the owners and lienholders of the real property located at 7300 Harrison Avenue, Cincinnati, OH, and their executors, administrators, guardians, heirs, successors, and assigns: On January 8, 2013, the Colerain Township Board of Trustees passed Resolution No. 3-13 for Demolition of 7300 Harrison Avenue, Cincinnati, OH (Parcel No. 510-0440-0111). This property has been found to be unfit for human habitation by the Colerain Township Fire Department. If the owners and lienholders and their executors, administrators, guardians, heirs, successors choose to object to this action, they may do so at the Colerain Township Board of Trustees meeting on March 12, 2013 at 6:00 PM, 4200 Springdale Rd, Cincinnati, OH. The costs for the demolition will be assessed to the property tax bill. Any questions may be directed to the Colerain Township Planning & Zoning Office: 4200 Springdale Rd., Cincinnati, OH - 513-385-7505. 1001750157

Notice to the owners and lienholders of the real property located at 9184 Pippin, Cincinnati, OH, and their executors, administrators, guardians, heirs, successors, and assigns: On January 8, 2013, the Colerain Township Board of Trustees passed Resolution No.7-13 for Demolition of 9184 Pippin, Cincinnati, OH (Parcel No. 510-00530318). This property has been found to be unfit for human habitation by the Colerain Township Fire Department. If the owners and lienholders and their executors, administrators, guardians, heirs, successors choose to object to this action, they may do so at the Colerain Township Board of Trustees meeting on March 12, 2013 at 6:00 PM, 4200 Springdale Rd, Cincinnati, OH. The costs for the demolition will be assessed to the property tax bill. Any questions may be directed to the Colerain Township Planning & Zoning Office: 4200 Springdale Rd., Cincinnati, OH - 513-3851001750168 7505.

Notice to the owners and lienholders of the , real property located at 10762 Pippin Cincinnati, OH, and their executors, administrators, guardians, heirs, successors, and assigns: On January 8, 2013, the Colerain Township Board of Trustees passed Resolution No. 4-13 for Demolition of 10762 Pippin, Cincinnati, OH (Parcel No. 510-00320142). This property has been found to be unfit for human habitation by the Colerain Township Fire Department. If the owners and lienholders and their executors, administrators, guardians, heirs, successors choose to object to this action, they may do so at the Colerain Township Board of Trustees meeting on March 12, 2013 at 6:00 PM, 4200 Springdale Rd, Cincinnati, OH. The costs for the demolition will be assessed to the property tax bill. Any questions may be directed to the Colerain Township Planning & Zoning Office: 4200 Springdale Rd., Cincinnati, OH - 513-3857505. 1001750160

Notice to the -owners and lienholders of the real property located at 3142 Deshler, Cincinnati, OH, and their executors, administrators, guardians, heirs, successors, and assigns: On February 12, 2013, the Colerain Township Board of Trustees passed Resolution No. 20-13 for Demolition of 3142 Deshler, Cincinnati, OH (Parcel No. 510-0052-0486). This property has been found to be unfit for human habitation by the Colerain Township Fire Department. If the owners and lienholders and their executors, administrators, guardians, heirs, successors choose to object to this action, they may do so at the Colerain Township Board of Trustees meeting on April 9, 2013 at 6:00 PM, 4200 Springdale Rd, Cincinnati, OH. The costs for the demolition will be assessed to the property tax bill. Any questions may be directed to the Colerain Township Planning & Zoning Office: 4200 Springdale Rd., Cincinnati, OH - 513385-7505. 1001750184


LIFE

B10 • NORTHWEST PRESS • FEBRUARY 27, 2013

Saftey personnel recognized for pileup response Colerain Township firefighters were presented with letters of commendation for their actions during the 103vehicle pileup on I-275 at the Feb. 12 meeting. Colerain Township Fire Chief Bruce Smith said units from the Colerain fire department were dispatched to an auto accident Jan. 21 on the highway during an unanticipated snow squall. Smith said first-arriving units recognized the scope of this incident and immediately put procedures in place to assemble additional resources that would be required to mitigate this situation. The letter he read said their skill and proficiency in doing their jobs minimized loss of life and ensured prompt treatment and transport to more than 27 injured people on the scene. Smith also recognized the contributions of neighboring agencies. He said ten EMS transport units from eight neighboring communities assisted with the transport of these patients. Commended Colerain Township personnel were: firefighter/medics Mike Cramerding, Paul Riedel, Lindsey Sippola, James Williams, Michael Hilton, Steve May, Mike

Witterstaeter, Phillip Klug, Bruce Metzler, Doug Ruhe, Dave Strittholt, Kyle Temple, Dave Simonson, Nick Hauser, Kris Prosser; James Montgomery, Brian Timmers, Jordan Shepherd, Doug Rolf and Dominic King; Firefighter/EMTs Jason Davis, Tom Ehrman, Tom Holland, Paul Littlefield, Zach Hardesty ; probationary firefighter/EMT Tim Michael, Don Hueneman; Captains Dave Pickering, Chris Hopkins, Shawn Stacy, Darian Edwards and division chiefs Brad Miller and Mike Reenan and battalion chief Chuck Palm. The Colerain Township Department of Fire and EMS also recognized and thanked other agencies for “their professionalism and outstanding assistance they provided during this disaster.” Recognized were the Hamilton County Sheriff's Office and traffic safety, the Hamilton County Communications Center, fire departments from Springfield Township, Forest Park, Mount Healthy, Greenhills, North College Hill, Springdale, Green Township, Fairfield, and Ross and the Colerain Police Department.

REAL ESTATE Colerain Township

9502 Anaheim Court: Dearborn County, Indiana, LLC to Boenning, Richard A.; $35,500. 7166 Vail Court: Fischer Single Family Homes II LLC to Schweitzer, Deborah A. and James R.; $250,407. 2877 Kingman Drive: Dearborn County, Indiana, LLC to Boenning, Richard A.; $44,500. 3472 Redskin Drive: Dearborn County, Indiana, LLC to Boenning, Richard A.; $32,500. 8851 Livingston Road: Lane, Robert to The Bank of New York Mellon; $134,000. 3106 Deshler Drive: Dearborn County, Indiana, LLC to Lee, Merell D.; $36,500. 3071 Darbi Dew Lane: Wineberg, Mary to Kuester, Donald S. and Cathleen A.; $142,500. Fay Lane: Fifth Third Bank to Potterhill Homes LLC; $12,000. 2812 Overdale Drive: Back, Shannon Lee to Bank of America NA; $50,000. 3713 Woodsong Drive: WDWP WNN LLC to Rosser, Mark A. and Nancy L. Baumer; $138,250. 3604 Sweetwood Court: Dearborn County, Indiana, LLC to Boenning, Richard A.; $18,500. 2629 Ontario St.: The Bank of New York Mellon Tr. to VBOH Annex LLC; $22,450. 3266 Deshler Drive: Stoner, Robert to Alejo, Menandro L. and Genedith; $62,000. Fay Lane: Potterhill Homes LLC to Bedford, Dennis L.; $198,146. 3071 Lapland Drive: Lade, John H. and Karen S. Justice to Deutsche Bank Trust Company Americas; $36,000. 3379 Ainsworth Court: Marsh, Robert to McDonald, Patrick W.; $64,000. 6705 Grange Court: The Bank of New York Mellon Trust Company NA to Home Equity Corp.; $60,000. 9528 Pippin Road: Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation to Cincinnati Neighborhood Housing Group LLC; $21,000. 3345 Niagara St.: Dearborn County, Indiana, LLC to Lee,

Notice to the -owners and lienholders of the real property located at 9713 Manhattan, Cincinnati, OH, and their executors, administrators, guardians, heirs, successors, and assigns: On February 12, 2013, the Colerain Township Board of Trustees passed Resolution No. 22-13 for Demolition of 9713 Manhattan, Cincinnati, OH (Parcel No. 510-0052-0328). This property has been found to be unfit for human habitation by the Colerain Township Fire Department. If the owners and lienholders and their executors, administrators, guardians, heirs, successors choose to object to this action, they may do so at the Colerain Township Board of Trustees meeting on April 9, 2013 at 6:00 PM, 4200 Springdale Rd, Cincinnati, OH. The costs for the demolition will be assessed to the property tax bill. Any questions may be directed to the Colerain Township Planning & Zoning Office: 4200 Springdale Rd., Cincinnati, OH 513-385-7505.

Notice to the -owners and lienholders of the real property located at 2556 Niagara, Cincinnati, OH, and their executors, administrators, guardians, heirs, successors, and assigns: On February 12, 2013, the Colerain Township Board of Trustees passed Resolution No. 19-13 for Demolition of 2556 Niagara, Cincinnati, OH (Parcel No. 510-0051-0358). This property has been found to be unfit for human habitation by the Colerain Township Fire Department. If the owners and lienholders and their executors, administrators, guardians, heirs, successors choose to object to this action, they may do so at the Colerain Township Board of Trustees meeting on April 9, 2013 at 6:00 PM, 4200 Springdale Rd, Cincinnati, OH. The costs for the demolition will be assessed to the property tax bill. Any questions may be directed to the Colerain Township Planning & Zoning Office: 4200 Springdale Rd., Cincinnati, OH - 513385-7505. 1001750213

Notice to the -owners and lienholders of the real property located at 2884 Wheatfield, Cincinnati, OH, and their executors, administrators, guardians, heirs, successors, and assigns: On February 12, 2013, the Colerain Township Board of Trustees passed Resolution No. 17-13 for Demolition of 2884 Wheatfield, Cincinnati, OH (Parcel No. 510-0041-0330). This property has been found to be unfit for human habitation by the Colerain Township Fire Department. If the owners and lienholders and their executors, administrators, guardians, heirs, successors choose to object to this action, they may do so at the Colerain Township Board of Trustees meeting on April 9, 2013 at 6:00 PM, 4200 Springdale Rd, Cincinnati, OH. The costs for the demolition will be assessed to the property tax bill. Any questions may be directed to the Colerain Township Planning & Zoning Office: 4200 Springdale Rd., Cincinnati, OH 513-385-7505. 1001750234

Notice to the -owners and lienholders of the real property located at 9982 Prechtel, Cincinnati, OH, and their executors, administrators, guardians, heirs, successors, and assigns: On February 12, 2013, the Colerain Township Board of Trustees passed Resolution No. 16-13 for Demolition of 9982 Prechtel, Cincinnati, OH (Parcel No. 510-0183-0014 & 510-183-0015). This property has been found to be unfit for human habitation by the Colerain Township Fire Department. If the owners and lienholders and their executors, administrators, guardians, heirs, successors choose to object to this action, they may do so at the Colerain Township Board of Trustees meeting on April 9, 2013 at 6:00 PM, 4200 Springdale Rd, Cincinnati, OH. The costs for the demolition will be assessed to the property tax bill. Any questions may be directed to the Colerain Township Planning & Zoning Office: 4200 Springdale Rd., Cincinnati, OH - 513-385-7505. 1001750231

Notice to the -owners and lienholders of the real property located at 10170 Windswept, Cincinnati, OH, and their executors, administrators, guardians, heirs, successors, and assigns: On August 16, 2012, the Colerain Township Board of Trustees passed Resolution No. 37-12 for Demolition of 10170 Windswept, Cincinnati, OH (Parcel No. 510-0042-0029). This property has been found to be unfit for human habitation by the Colerain Township Fire Department. If the owners and lienholders and their executors, administrators, guardians, heirs, successors choose to object to this action, they may do so at the Colerain Township Board of Trustees meeting on April 9, 2013 at 6:00 PM, 4200 Springdale Rd, Cincinnati, OH. The costs for the demolition will be assessed to the property tax bill. Any questions may be directed to the Colerain Township Planning & Zoning Office: 4200 Springdale Rd., Cincinnati, OH 513-385-7505. 1001750236

Notice to the -owners and lienholders of the real property located at 6064 Thompson, Cincinnati, OH, and their executors, administrators, guardians, heirs, successors, and assigns: On February 12, 2013, the Colerain Township Board of Trustees passed Resolution No. 21-13 for Demolition of 6064 Thompson, Cincinnati, OH (Parcel No. 510-0230-0235). This property has been found to be unfit for human habitation by the Colerain Township Fire Department. If the owners and lienholders and their executors, administrators, guardians, heirs, successors choose to object to this action, they may do so at the Colerain Township Board of Trustees meeting on April 9, 2013 at 6:00 PM, 4200 Springdale Rd, Cincinnati, OH. The costs for the demolition will be assessed to the property tax bill. Any questions may be directed to the Colerain Township Planning & Zoning Office: 4200 Springdale Rd., Cincinnati, OH 513-385-7505. 1001750232

Merell D.; $27,000. 9604 Ridgemoor Ave.: J.P. Morgan Chase Bank NA to Penklor Properties LLC; $23,100. 3443 Coleen Drive: Dearborn County, Indiana, LLC to Lammers, Jeffrey P.; $20,500. 8249 Colerain Ave.: P&J Inc. to White Oak Properties No. 4 L.; $2,310,000. 7075 Vail Court: Vaught, Kevin J. and Katherine E. Reindl to Obert, Michael J. and Jessica; $228,000. 8246 Lyness Drive: Wolfe, James A. III Tr. to Suntrust Mortgage Inc.; $137,127. 9767 Pebble View Drive: Dusold, Michael J. and Connie A. to Cinfed Employees Federal Credit Union; $170,000. 2965 Michaels Run Drive: McCann, John and Arlene to Mitchell, Theresa A. and Ryan P.; $155,000. 9752 Sacramento St.: Dearborn County, Indiana, LLC to Boenning, Richard A.; $21,500. 3338 Harry Lee Lane: Union Savings Bank to Smith, Micahel W. and Tammie J. Weber; $76,000. 11646 Willowcrest Court: U.S. Bank NA to Home Investors of Cincinnati 3 LLC; $76,200. 2490 Owlcrest Drive: Mastropaolo, Timothy M. Sr. and Amy to Bragg, Kenneth S.; $139,900. 5534 Dry Ridge Road: Jackson, Mary H. to Ruhe, David J. and Melanie L. Riedel; $263,000. 2373 Mercury Ave.: Tri State Home Buyers LLC to Heidi Hill Properties LLC; $30,000. 5534 Dry Ridge Road: Jackson, Mary H. to Ruhe, David J. and Melanie L. Riedel; $263,000. 8265 Haskell Drive: Habedank, Matthew D. and Kathleen C. Schwab to Citimortgage Inc.; $36,000. 11475 Gravenhurst Drive: Wagner, Stephanie L. to Baldwin, Benjamin C. and Stephanie L. Marsh; $124,000. 3245 Heritage Square Drive: Vordenberge, Mary B. to Doll, Carolyn K.; $27,450. 9156 Trinidad Drive: Shircliff, Chad and Dustin Hepburn to Foley, Michael A. 4; $75,000. 10023 Fernhaven Court: Garrison, Susan M. to Federal Na-

tional Mortgage Association; $54,000. 2373 Mercury Ave.: Wesbanco Bank Inc. to Tri State Home Buyers LLC; $21,000. 7600 East Miami River Road: Muradyan, Armen to Wood, Thomas C. and Betty F.; $300. 9397 Wilcox Drive: Strahan, Jeremiah to U.S. Bank NA; $70,000. 3369 Blue Rock Road: Alessandro, Lori to MVB Mortgage Corporation; $50,000. 2909 Glenaire Drive: 2909 Glenaire David Peters Tr. to Jared, Daniel; $92,000. 3440 Amberway Court: FV-1 Inc. to Smith, Ashley; $24,000. 2592 Willowspring Court: U.S. Bank NA Tr. to WDWP Winn LLC; $63,000. 9588 Amarillo Court: Millner, Matthew P. to Fannie Mae; $44,000. 7153 Vail Court: Celsus J. Belletti LLC to Fischer Single Family Homes II LLC; $42,436. 8237 Sandy Lane: Campbell, Wanda S. to Letzler, Dan; $26,000. 3371 Blue Rock Road: Alessandro, Lori to MVB Mortgage Corporation; $50,000. 3220 Pebblebrook Lane: Kesse, Andrew S. to Shelley, William J. and Barbara M.; $75,000. 7266 Harrison Ave.: Dearborn Savings Bank to Green, Dawn B. and Thomas Willingham; $650,000. 3441 Ringwood St.: Burnet Capital LLC to Abode Choice LLC; $43,500. 9566 Ridgemoor Ave.: Fosmire, Thomas Q. to Guardian Savings Bank FSB; $40,000. 9436 Brehm Road: Allen, Melissa and Daniel to U.S. Bank Trust NA Tr.; $211,750. 7129 Vail Court: Celsus J. Belletti LLC to Fischer Single Family Homes II LLC; $42,436. 8318 Cheviot Road: Dearborn County, Indiana, LLC to HHM Holdings LLC; $46,000. 3346 March Terrace: Zeinner, John to Shepard, Shurdina; $112,900. 3775 Vernier Drive: Dearborn County, Indiana, LLC to Millard, Jeffrey and Cathy; $41,500. 2564 Ontario St.: Riley, Edward

and Cassandra G. to RWLS III LLC; $28,000. 5909 Day Road: Combs, Karl and Carla to Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation; $162,000. 7133 Memory Lane: Lanter, Michael R. and Sheri L. to Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation; $48,000. 2469 Schon Drive: Sprague, Paul J. and Elizabeth A. to Fannie Mae; $28,000. 3584 Vernier Drive: Hume, Mark J. and Jennifer E. to Walden, Gina M.; $118,700. 2515 Bracebridge Drive: Hastings, Mary Lou to SS Properties I LLC; $22,000.

Green Township

7463 Bridge Point Pass: Fischer Single Family Homes II LLC to Shepherd, Linda N. and Jerry A. II; $310,844. 7513 Bridge Point Pass: Fischer Single Family Homes II LLC to Scholtes, Stephanie; $317,500. 5452 Bluesky Drive: Thiemann, Nancy J. to Ruwan, John P.; $52,000. 3601 Ebenezer Road: Bepler, Beverly Tr. to Abrams, Thomas J.; $102,000. 6444 Glenway Ave.: FFF Management Inc. to Chicken Little Real Estate LLC; $987,000. 3718 Eyrich Road: Penklor Properties LLC to Cobblestone Street LLC; $42,000. 4758 Ebenezer Road: Lambrinides, Alex J. to Sterwerf, Daniel S.; $92,900. 3102 Jessup Road: Nicroy Investments LLC to Scheidt, Brooke A. and Michael J.; $147,000. 5209 Clearlake Drive: Murrell, Coby and Heather to Deutsche Bank National Trust Company Tr.; $78,000. 6360 West Fork Road: Griffin, Timothy D. Tr. to Iacobucci, Dominic A. and Jessica Kinnemeyer Iaco; $140,000. 6379 Springmyer Drive: Davis, Beverly J. 4 to Taylor, Mark W.; $150,000. 5658 Lauderdale Drive: Gerbus, Walter II to McBee, Brandon and Bethany; $142,000.

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