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Your Community newspaper serving Colerain Township, Green Township, Groesbeck, Monfort Heights, Pleasant Run, Seven Hills, White Oak E-mail: northwestpress@communitypress.com We d n e s d a y, J a n u a r y 2 7 , 2 0 1 0

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School levy heads for May ballot

Senior guard Quinton Turner

Volume 92 Number 51 © 2010 The Community Press ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Northwest extends renewal to five years

Collection time

In the next few days your Community Press carrier will be stopping by to collect $2.50 for delivery of this month’s Northwest Press. Your carrier retains half of this amount as payment for his Holterman or her work. If you wish to add a tip to reward the carrier’s good service, both the carrier and The Community Press appreciate your generosity. This month we’re featuring Allison Holterman, a freshman at Colerain High School, where she is a member of the varsity bowling team and was on the girls golf team. She also likes to read, travel and plays soccer. If you have questions about delivery, or if your child is interested in becoming part of our junior carrier program, please call 853-6263 or 8536277, or e-mail circulation manager Sharon Schachleiter at sschachleiter@community press.com.

felter has said those potential cuts will be spelled out by the end of March. If the levy fails, the board would consider Detzel placing another renewal on the November ballot. If it passes in November, no additional cuts would be necessary and the $2.5 million in Unger cuts following the May loss would be reinstated as quickly as possible. If it would fail again in November, an additional $2.4 million in reductions would be implemented by August 2011. The meeting was well attended by parents and staff members from the district, many of whom came to honor the Colerain High School Band for earning a superior rating at state competition. Questions were pointed at Unger and Gauck regarding their lack of support for the levy. Unger said he doesn’t want to support a levy until it can pass. He says the district must do more to convince voters who are skeptical that the district is being wise with its spending by being more open with financial information. He

By Jennie Key jkey@communitypress.com

The Northwest Board of Education took the first step toward asking voters to renew an emergency levy in May. If it fails, the district will face $2.5 million in cuts. Three board members – Pam Detzel, Jim Detzel and David Denny – voted to ask to extend the levy for five years at a Jan. 21 board meeting at Colerain High School. Dan Unger and Elaine Gauck said no. The levy currently generates about $6.4 million annually for the district and costs the owner of a $100,000 home about $117 annually, according to Hamilton County Auditor Dusty Rhodes. The renewal would not raise taxes. The board voted to enact $1.9 million in cuts this year that will not be reinstated, even if the levy passes. If the renewal passes in May, no further cuts would be needed. If it fails, an additional $2.5 million in cuts are expected by Aug. 1. The reductions being discussed include the elimination of secondary electives, salary and benefit savings, and reductions in classified and administrative departments. Superintendent Rick Glat-

JENNIE KEY/STAFF

There was a big crowd at the Northwest Local School District Board of Education meeting Jan. 21, thanks to a recognition ceremony for the Colerain High School Band.

Levy requirements Putting a tax issue on the ballot in Hamilton County takes two separate actions by officials: one declares the intent to place an issue on the ballot; the second, with the actual amounts and millage certified by the Hamilton County Auditor's office, places it on the ballot. The board took the first action Jan. 21. Once the auditor sets the millage, a wants the district to make a number of changes including posting more financial information online and changing purchasing policies. Gauck said she is concerned that senior citizens can’t afford the levy, but said she might be more supportive of the issue if it is placed on the November ballot. Parent Todd Underiner, who has three children in the district,

second resolution is required to place the issue before voters in the May 4 election. The board of education will consider that resolution at its meeting at 7 p.m. Monday, Feb. 8, in the board offices at 3240 Banning Road. The deadline to pass the resolution for the May ballot is Feb. 18. told Unger while he appreciates his stand as a financial watchdog, it’s time to find common ground. “The board has voted to place the levy on the ballot,” he said. “It would send a clear signal to the community if you would come out publicly in support. Find a way to compromise and work with your fellow board members to support this levy.”

Bus road to honor the Hardwicks

Any idea where this might be? We didn’t think so. Time to go hunting in the neighborhood to see if you can find it. Send your best guess to northwestpress@ communitypress.com or call 853-6287, along with your name. Deadline to call is noon Friday. If you’re correct, we’ll publish your name in next week’s newspaper along with the correct answer. See last week’s answer on B5.

By Jennie Key jkey@communitypress.com

Share your news

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Peek-a-boo

TONY JONES/STAFF

Vivian Owens, 6, starts on her raccoon puppet at the LaBoiteaux Woods Nature Preserve in College Hill during the puppet program to help the members of Scout Troop 46824 earn a patch. For more photos, see B1. To place an ad, call 242-4000.

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Employees of the Mount Healthy school district’s transportation department asked officials to name the new transportation drive after an old transportation driver and his family. Diana Singhoff and Verna Kilgore asked the board of education to name the new road between Harrison Avenue in Mount Healthy and the north end of the bus garage Hardwick Way to honor the family that started a transportation tradition in the Mount Healthy City School District. The women presented a petition signed by transportation employees. Singhoff said Clyde Hardwick and his family owned and operated the district’s school bus fleet for many years, taking over from his father in 1955. “He started with three buses,” she said. “But over the years, he increased the fleet to 36 buses, all of which he owned and operated.” He eventually became the district’s first transportation supervisor. “It was due to the Hardwick family’s many years of hard work

and dedication that our transportation services are what they are today,” Singhoff said. “It was not just Clyde who was involved in that success. His father started the tradition and Clyde and his wife Marion continued it.” She said it seemed a fitting way to honor the contribution of the entire family. And the board agreed. The road will be named Hardwick Lane to honor the family. Kilgore and Singhoff, who said Clyde Hardwick was a mentor to her, said they were pleased. So was Clyde and Marion Hardwick’s daughter, Bonnie Fitzharris. “For mom and dad, it was really their whole life,” she said. “We grew up with the buses in the backyard and the drivers stopping by the kitchen at the end of the day. They were like family. My parents would be so honored.” Formal dedication ceremonies will come later, when the weather is warmer. Superintendent David Horine said a sign will be installed at the end of Harrison where the drive begins.

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A2

Northwest Press

News

January 27, 2010

Schools continue Haitian outreach Students and staff at area schools continue to find ways to help the survivors of the Haitian earthquake.

Colerain Elementary

A letter went home asking for donations of personal hygiene items, clothing being a secondary request as the need is greater at this time for personal hygiene items. The items will be delivered to Matthew 25 Ministries.

Colerain High School

A Hike to Help Haiti goes on during lunch this week. Students are bringing donations of personal care items

or money to donate during lunch. The school is 1,600 miles away from Haiti and that is the number of donations staff and students hope to receive.

Colerain Middle School

Colerain Middle School student council is having a penny war to raise money to send to Haiti. Teacher Sarah Chisom has friends who volunteer at the Restavek Foundation, which runs orphanages for children to help keep them from being sold into slavery. It was founded by Jean Cadet from Haiti, who him-

Index Calendar ......................................B2 Classifieds.....................................C Deaths .........................................B7 Father Lou ...................................B3

Police...........................................B8 School..........................................A6 Food.............................................B4 Viewpoints ................................A10

Your Community newspaper serving Colerain Township, Green Township, Groesbeck, Monfort Heights, Pleasant Run, Seven Hills, White Oak

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Find news and information from your community on the Web Colerain – cincinnati.com/coleraintownship Hamilton County – cincinnati.com/hamiltoncounty News Jennie Key | Community Editor . . . . . . . . 853-6272 | jkey@communitypress.com Heidi Fallon | Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 853-6265 | hfallon@communitypress.com Kurt Backscheider | Reporter . . . . . . . . . 853-6260 | kbackscheider@communitypress.com Melanie Laughman | Sports Editor . . . . . . 248-7573 | mlaughman@communitypress.com Tony Meale | Sports Reporter . . . . . . . . . . 853-6271 | tmeale@communitypress.com Advertising Doug Hubbuch | Territory Sales Manager. 853-6270 | dhubbuch@communitypress.com Sue Gripshover Account Relationship Specialist. . . . . . . . . 853-6267 | sgripshover@communitypress.com Linda Buschmann Account Relationship Specialist. . . . . . . . . 768-8276 | lbuschmann@communitypress.com Delivery For customer service. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 853-6263 | 853-6277 Sharon Schachleiter | Circulation Manager. 853-6279 | schachleiter@communitypress.com Mary Jo Schablein | District Manager . . . 853-6278 | mschable@communitypress.com Classified To place a Classified ad . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242-4000 | www.communityclassified.com To place an ad in Community Classified, call 242-4000.

self was sold into slavery. Several of his buildings were completely destroyed. This is an organization funding only Haitian children. If the students reach their goal of $1,000, there will be a celebration. As an incentive, the grade level that raises the most money will be taping a teacher to the wall during lunch. The students all asked to do something crazy to a teacher as the incentive.

Frost Elementary

Staff and students collected money through a Hats for Haiti day at the school.

Mount Healthy High School

Staff and students are collecting donations in a barrel at the high school. And two students, Brittany Loechel and Emily Bass are heading up a “Teens for Jeans fundraiser. They hope to collect 200 pairs of jeans in conjunction with a program sponsored by Aeropostale and an organization called dosomething.org.

by it.

Pleasant Run Elementary

Staff and students are sponsoring a Change for Haiti drive. The PTA is sponsoring a competition between the homerooms and set a $1,000 goal for the school. Each homeroom has a mason jar to collect money in and then bring to the lunchroom to fill an aquarium. Fifth grade students may go into classrooms and teach about the location of Haiti and teach about earthquakes.

Pleasant Run Middle School

Staff and students are collecting change during lunch and this money will be sent to a Haitian Orphanage Foyer de sion. A teacher at the school has adopted two children from this orphanage.

St. John the Baptist School

Staff and students are collecting personal hygiene and cleaning items the rest of the month of January – will deliver those to Matthew 25 Ministries.

St. John students collected non-perishable food and cleaning supplies for Matthew 25 Ministries. Students decorated a cafeteria wall with colored hearts to form a rainbow and wrote on the hearts their prayers and hopes for Haiti. Junior high students researched facts about Haiti and read them in morning announcements.

Northwest High School

Struble Elementary

Monfort Heights Elementary

Sophomore class is spearheading a fundraising effort for the Restavek Foundation. Restavek Foundation is run by Haitian author Jean Cadet – the sophomores read his book this year and were moved

The “Wee Deliver” innerschool mail delivery system is organizing a collection of donations from students and staff during the month of January – will be delivered to Matthew 25 Ministries.

AMIE DWORECKI/STAFF

Prayers for Haiti

Cindy Cooper stands with Marlena Cooper, 10, of Colerain Township, and sings during a candlelight vigil held for Haiti at Matthew 25: Ministries on Jan. 17. The ministry is collecting donations, nonperishable food and bottled water, personal care products, cleaning products, first aid supplies and summer clothing for Haitians and has 16 shipments of aid ready to leave as soon as ports are clear.

Local firefighters not going to Haiti … for now Community Press Staff Report Some local firefighters are just standing by, hoping to help out in Haiti soon. Green Township Fire Capt. Ed Thomas, Colerain Township Fire Capt. Darian Edwards and Colerain firefighter/parapmedic Mike Rusin are part of the 80member FEMA Ohio Task Force One whose search and rescue mission in Haiti was deactivated Sunday, Jan. 17. The team was deployed to Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Dayton Thursday, Jan. 14, where they waited for days before finding out they would not be deployed to Haiti to help

with the search and rescue of victims of a 7.0 magnitude earthquake which rocked the country Tuesday, Jan. 12. Hundreds of thousands of people are suspected to have died in the earthquake, with more trapped under rubble. Edwards said the team’s gear and equipment are still in Dayton and the team members are ready to go at a moment’s notice. “We have been told Ohio would be the next ones sent out if another team is deployed or a current team needs replacement,” Edwards said. “I think there are 27 teams there now and six are from the U.S.”

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Northwest Press

January 27, 2010

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Northwest Press

News

January 27, 2010

Northwest area boards elect 2010 officers By Jennie Key jkey@communitypress.com

It’s official. Local government boards have all conducted organizational meetings and handed out assignments. Now officials are ready to get down to business. In the Northwest Local School District, Pam Detzel was elected president of the board, defeating fellow board member Dan Unger with a vote of 3-2. Board

member Dave Denny was elected vice president, defeating Unger 3-2. Board member Jim Detzel will serve as the board representative to the Butler Tech Board of Education. Unger will continue to serve as legislative liaison. The Mount Healthy Board of Education also elected officers. Carole Ellis was elected president, defeating fellow board member Steve Harness by a 3-2 vote. Harness declined

to run for vice president against Don Wolf, who was elected. The Colerain Township Board of Trustees elected Jeff Ritter as president, and newcomer Dennis Deters will serve as the vice president. Deters will serve as the board’s representative to the Hamilton County Solid Waste Committee. Ritter will be the township’s representative to the OKI Regional Council of Governments and

Murder mystery dinners start this month One week, a tell-all game show could end with a jolt if the truth is revealed. And when the Cougar Cuties make the bowling finals, will a murderer strike? Or will someone’s life be spared? The Hamilton County Park District will be serving clues with its cuisine as it presents its Murder Mystery Dinner series beginning next weekend. On Saturdays between Jan. 30 and March 20, would-be sleuths may gather at The Mill Golf Course, 1515 West Sharon Road, Winton Woods in Forest Park. The dinners are filled with excitement, outrageous story lines, plenty of laughs and audience participation. Dinner includes chefcarved prime rib, beef au jus, marinated herb-roasted chicken breast and veg-

etable lasagna along with fresh mixed green salad, assorted side dishes and gourmet desserts. Soft drinks and coffee are complimentary. A cash bar is also available. These very special dinners are filled with excitement, outrageous storylines, plenty of laughs and audience participation. Cost is $33.50 per person, plus tax. Doors for the event open at 6:30 p.m. Dinner begins at 7 p.m. and the show starts at 8 p.m. Due to the popularity of the dinners, tickets must be purchased in advance and are subject to availability. Tickets may be purchased at GreatParks.org. Once tickets are purchased, a guest can get a refund on those tickets, less a $5 handling/processing fee per ticket. No refunds will be accepted within 10

Dates and themes

Dates and dinner themes for the Murder Mystery dinners are are: • Jan. 30: The Momentous Truth. • Feb. 6: The Cruise Ship Killer. • Feb. 13: Death By Chocolate. • Feb. 20: Mardi Gras Mayhem. • Feb. 27: A Super Slaughter. • March 6: Lounge Lizards Lament. • March 13 Tainted Love. • March 20 Bowling Alley Bust Up. Get more information at www.GreatParks.org. days of the ticket’s event. A valid Hamilton County Park District Motor Vehicle Permit which cost $5 for an annual permit or $2 for a daily permit, is required to enter the parks. For more information about the Murder Mystery Dinners or to purchase a gift certificate, visit GreatParks.org or call 521-7275.

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trustee Joseph Wolterman will be the board’s liaison to the Special Events Committee, which plans the Fourth of July Spectacular and the Taste of Colerain events. Green Township trustees elected David Linnenberg as chairman of the board for 2010, and Tony Upton was named vice chairman. Springfield Township trustees elected Joe Honerlaw as chairman and Gwen McFarlin will serve as vice chairwoman.

PHILIP GROSHONG/CONTRIBUTOR

Band benefit

Shoot Out the Lights band members Joshua Howard of Mount Healthy, Josh Muddiman of Colerain Township, and Matt McCormick of Covington, Ky. perform at the Mad Frog in a tribute to The Rolling Stones and a benefit for VH1 Save The Music Foundation this month.

Sign up for emergency notifications Gannett News Service Local politicians and the head of emergency management in Hamilton County unveiled a new high-tech alert system Thursday that they say will change the way people find out about and respond to emergencies. The Emergency Alert Notification System allows emergency officials to send alerts via telephone, cell phone, text message or email to people in targeted neighborhoods, or the entire county, about everything from natural disasters to missing persons. Emergency officials are urging people to register their cell phone numbers and e-mail addresses. Land line phones are already in the database. For example, if a man with Alzheimer’s is missing, emergency workers can notify everyone in an eightblock radius of his house to be on the lookout for him. If a river or creek is expected to flood overnight, residents living in the flood zone will receive calls telling them to evacuate. If a major natural disaster or widespread emergency occurs, everyone in Hamilton County can be notified within half an hour. The ability to target specific areas and to notify people via cell phones and e-

How to use the system To sign up for the system, go to https://hamcooh.smartmsg.com to register cell phone numbers, business phone numbers or e-mail addresses. Registration is free. You can register as many phone numbers or e-mail addresses as you like. You can also sign up to receive alerts via text message. You can opt out or change your preferences at any time. Businesses are also encouraged to sign up. All land lines in the 513 and 859 area codes are already registered in the system. There is no need to sign up to receive alerts to those numbers. The program sends a recorded phone message, e-mail or text message to phone numbers and e-mail addresses mail is a huge leap forward for public safety in this region, said Hamilton County Commissioner Todd Portune. Previously the only way to notify people of an emergency was through the news media or by using the county’s emergency siren system, which has long been viewed as inadequate in many situations, he said. “I think this will literally save lives,” added Hamilton County Commissioner David Pepper. Cincinnati Mayor Mark Mallory called the system a strategic new tool to keep people safe.

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News

Northwest Press

January 27, 2010

A5

BRIEFLY St. James open house

St. James School in White Oak, 6111 Cheviot Road, will have its annual Open House from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Sunday, Jan. 31. Tours will be given. There will be a $100 tuition raffle for visitors completing a tour of the building. The many programs and activities of the school will be represented throughout the building and there will be activities for children to do as well. Visitors may explore the school, meet the faculty, and register for the 2010-2011 school year. Information about registration for the 2010-2011 school year will be given out and registration will open up to the public.

Scholarships available

The Colerain Township Business Association is once again seeking applicants for its scholarship awards. The student applicant must be a Colerain Township resident for no less than three years, as of Sept. 1 of their senior year or must be attending an accredited high school located in Colerain Township. A senior meeting the criteria of the scholarship can apply for the Colerain Township Scholarship Award of $500 towards their college tuition. Deadline for registration is Feb. 15. You can find the application online at www.ctbaweb.com .

Wesley pen house

The John Wesley Early Learning Center Star Quality Preschool will have an open house and registration from 10 to 11:30 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 30, at the preschool, 1927 W. Kemper Road on the grounds of the John Wesley United Methodist Church in Pleasant Run. New Administrator Beth Hoendorf and staff are planning to show off a Step Up to Quality preschool program. Parents and children are invited. The preschool is licensed through the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services. The preschool has 3-, 4-, and 5-year-old classes running mornings from 9 a.m.-11:30 a.m. and afternoons from 12:30 p.m.-3 p.m. For more information, call Beth at 825-0879.

Puppet show

The Madcap Puppets will perform at 7 p.m. Friday, Feb. 5, at The Grove Banquet Hall, 9158 Winton Road in Springfield Township. This show will feature the tales of Aesop’s Fables. In Madcap’s production, Aesop is an old man recalling three best-loved stories re-told by a cast of puppets and the audience. Stories are: “The Boy Who Cried Wolf,” “The Lion and the Mouse” and “The Hare and the Tortoise.” The show is free. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Stay to meet the characters and to enjoy a snack after the show.

Colerain Stag

The Colerain High School Booster Stag will be Thursday, Feb. 11, at the Kolping Center at 10235 Mill Road. This year’s guest speaker is former Cincinnati Bengal, current Bengal radio analysis and Big 12 TV analysis Dave Lapham. Tickets are $50. The ticket includes admission, dinner and drinks. A silent auction will also be held during the stag. A social hour will begin at 6 p.m. with dinner following at roughly 7 p.m. and our guest speaker at roughly 8 p.m. All proceeds benefit the Colerain Boosters who over the last 10 years have donated more than $1 million dollars for Colerain High School’s student-athletes, clubs and organizations. Tickets are available from booster members or in the Colerain High School Athletic Office from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Marriage class

Ruah Woods - Theology of the Body is offering God’s Plan for a Joy-Filled Marriage – A Marriage Preparation Class for Engaged Couples, from 7-10 p.m. Friday, Feb. 5, and 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 5. For more information, visit www.ruahwoods.org. This class does not replace PreCana; couples can register in addition to the Pre-Cana classes offered by the Archdiocese of Cincinnati. Ruah Woods is on Wesselman Road in Green Township.

Registration is not required for this program. This free event is made possible through a Target community programming grant. For details, call 522-1410.

Job fair

The Hamilton County Park District will conduct an Employment Open House from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 6, at four park district locations: • Miami Whitewater Forest Visitor Center, 9001 Mount Hope Road, • Sharon Woods Sharon Centre, 11450 Lebanon Road, • Winton Woods Mill Race Banquet Center, 1515 West Sharon Road and • Woodland Mound’s Sweetwine Banquet Center, 8250 Old Kellogg Road. Positions will be available in fishing and boating, camping, food service, golf, grounds maintenance, outdoor education and in safety. Applicants will have the opportunity to fill out applications for the summer 2010 season. There are more than 150 positions available. For more information go to: www.GreatParks.org.

Self-defense class

Worm bin workshop

The Hamilton County Solid Waste Management District, along with Cincinnati Parks, is offering a Vermicomposting at Home workshop from 2-4 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 7, at the California Woods Nature Center. Residents who would like to participate need to submit registration and payment by Jan. 31. The cost to participate is $20 per family for Hamilton County residents. The cost for non-Hamilton County residents is $40 per family. Vermicomposting uses worms to break down kitchen food waste into compost. Vermicomposting produces a high quality compost for gardens and indoor plants while keeping the waste out of the landfill. The Vermicomposting at Home workshop will teach participants how to set up and maintain a healthy worm bin. Participants will receive a

CARRIE COCHRAN/STAFF

Gotta dance!

Kimheart Moeung of Colerain Township, left, and Derrek Burbridge of Forest Park, both members of the 20/Twenty Cru dance team, teach Kate LaMothe, 5, and her brother Noah LaMothe, 7, a few moves during a hip-hop workshop at the Duveneck Arts Center in Covington. bin, bedding and worms. Additionally, each participant will also receive a copy of “Worms Eat My Garbage” by Mary Applehof. To register, please contact Pat Agnew at 542-2909 or at pat.agnew@cincinnati-oh.gov.

Become a tutor

The Literacy Network of Greater Cincinnati champions the development of literacy by raising awareness, improving

access and serving as a catalyst for literacy efforts. Once a month, the organization holds a Saturday training session for anyone interested in becoming a volunteer tutor. Upcoming training dates are Feb. 27 and March 27. Each class runs from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Those who are interested or would like more information, call 621-7323, or visit www.lngc.org.

The Springfield Township Police Department has a Choose Courage Not Fear selfdefense class Wednesday, Feb. 3. The free program featuring Debbie and Mike Gardner will

REAL ESTATE THIS WEEK By Mark Schupp

FOREIGN BUYERS WANT U.S. PROPERTIES While many prospective American home buyers are still sitting on the fence waiting for prices to come down further, foreign buyers are actively looking for and acquiring U.S.properties believing this to be an excellent time to invest in American real estate. Prices and financing costs are lower and they are confident the market will soon turn around. Foreign buyers are particularly targeting mid-level and luxury market properties. About 18 percent of Realtors surveyed by the National Association of Realtors report increasing interest and sales transactions from international clients. They consider property offerings in this country to be real bargains at this point when taking into account the currently weak dollar. Generally, foreign buyers are showing strong confidence in the health of the U.S. real estate market – a positive view that is still lacking with many domestic buyers. Take a tip from our foreign friends. Now, with new home sales rising nationally, is a great time to purchase a home or other property. With interest rates still at near record low levels, there couldn’t be a better time to act before those bargain rates inevitably rise Mark Schupp has been a Real Estate Agent for the past 29 years and is a Certified Residential Specialist. He has won many awards including the Top Unit Producer for 1999 and 2000 (last year awarded) in the Cincinnati Board of Realtors and Top 1% Residential Real Estate Agent in the Nation. For professional advice on all aspects of buying or selling real estate, contact Mark Schupp at Star One Realtors. Please call me at 385-0900 (office) or 385-0035 (home) or visit my website: www.markshupp.com 0000379437

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Receptions Western Hills presents: “Dueling Pianos!” The evening features a prime rib dinner buffet and unique entertainment. Dueling Pianos will present a variety of musical adventure where the audience will pave the way to a wild and zany performance. The show includes comedy, music and a whole lot of improv. Dueling Pianos starts at 7 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 13, at Receptions, 3302 Westbourne Drive. Entertainment, prime rib dinner buffet and cash bar is $49 per couple, $25 per single ticket. For reservations, call 9433601 or e-mail krobers@receptionsinc.com.

teach residents how to protect themselves in a variety of situations. Registration is being taken for the class, which will be 7-9 p.m. in the Grove banquet hall, 9158 Winton Road. Visit springfieldtwp.org for information and registration or call 729-1300.

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SCHOOLS A6

Northwest Press

January 27, 2010

ACHIEVEMENTS

Editor Jennie Key | jkey@communitypress.com | 853-6272

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Your Community newspaper serving Colerain Township, Green Township, Groesbeck, Monfort Heights, Pleasant Run, Seven Hills, White Oak

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Give Kids a Smile kicks off locally

A national dental access program for children will kick off at the Colerain High School Career Center next month. The Ohio Dental Association will have the state kick-off for the Give Kids a Smile program at the career center Feb. 5. Give Kids a Smile is a national children’s dental access program, designed to help children in need receive needed dental services; these children are uninsured or underinsured. Many don’t complain of dental pain because to them, this pain is a way of life. The program was started in 2003 by the American Dental Association as a one-day program to highlight the issue of children’s access to dental care. This is the Ohio Dental Association’s opportunity to showcase the giving spirit of Ohio dentists and other dental professionals who give freely to children in need, and to thank those sponsors and donors who give so much to help dentists give this care for free. Each year, the kick-off is held in an Ohio community where large groups of children will receive significant oral care for free. The Ohio Dental Association has selected the Cincinnati Dental Society, Northwest Local School District and Colerain - Butler Tech Career Center for the 2010 event – three entities that exemplify how

community partnerships make programs such as Give Kids a Smile stronger. From August 2008 through May 2009, the Cincinnati dental community gave more than $110,000 in free dental care to hundreds of children in need. The kick-off event will begin with a 30-minute program including speakers, presentations, and fun entertainment for the children, which will be staggered throughout the day. At 10 a.m., dental care for the youngsters begins. Throughout the day, 60 area children will receive comprehensive dental care; these children have been pre-examined and identified as in need of dental care and have no Medicaid eligibility, private insurance or other family means to afford dental care. An additional 60 children will be treated in the same clinic on Friday. Youngsters in need of restorative care will receive that treatment for free from the volunteer dentists in the dental assisting clinic in the Colerain-Butler Tech Career Center. This care will be provided from 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. both dates. All children receive a goody bag with dental care products, educational materials, popcorn, fluoridated water and fun goodies. This is also a great opportunity for the Colerain Butler Tech Dental Assisting students to assist the dentists in their work.

FILE ART

Dr. Jan Tepe works on Kaylee Hathaway while Meggie Kinne works on the chart and Ciara Carson observes at last year's Give Kids A Smile event in the Colerain/Butler Tech dental assisting process.

Teams raise cancer research funds Some local basketball teams are taking their best shot against cancer this month. Together the Norwood, Mount Healthy, and Northwest communities are hoping to make a difference in the fight against cancer. Each community and their respective high school boy’s or girl’s basketball teams will be competing on and off the court, battling to see which high school can raise the most money for the American Cancer Society and the Kay Yow/WBCA Cancer Fund. The losing high school principal will wear the winning high school’s sweatshirt for an entire school day. Norwood High School will be raising money internally between the boys and girls teams, while Mount Healthy and Northwest will be raising money throughout their entire high schools. The kickoff was Jan. 21, when fundraising began. Student athletes from each participating team received buckets to collect donations and information about the organizations they will be supporting.

Art scholarship

Northwest High School senior Josh Kimmey has received a $2,000 scholarship as a winner in the Selections ‘09 art exhibition at the College of Mount St. Joseph. Kimmey submitted a photo, “La Esperanza,” he took of fellow Northwest student Jolie Hasselbeck, an essay on why he wants to study at the Mount and a recommendation from his art teacher, Andrea Steward. Selections ‘09 runs though Dec. 4 at the Mount’s Studio San Giuseppe. PROVIDED.

About the Kay Yow/WBC Cancer Fund

The Kay Yow/WBCA Cancer Fund is a 501c(3) charitable organization committed to being a part of finding an answer in the fight against women’s cancers through raising money for scientific research, assisting the underserved and unifying people for a common cause. All donations are tax deductible and can be mailed to: WBCA Attention: Megan Smith, 4646 Lawrenceville Highway, Lilburn, GA 30047. For more information, visit www.wbca.org/kayyowwbcacancerfun d.asp. You may also contact Megan Smith at 770-279-8027, ext. 103. Each school and their local community can raise funds through noon, Jan. 29, ending at noon. On Jan. 29 starting at 4:30pm at Norwood High School, all three (freshman, junior varsity, and varsity) boys basketball teams will be holding their first Coaches vs. Cancer Suits and Sneakers game against Mount Healthy High

School. All funds raised will support the mission of the American Cancer Society that is helping creating a world with less cancer and more birthdays. The girls basketball teams junior varsity and varsity will be playing against the Northwest High School teams at 1 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 30, at Norwood High School. All funds raised will support the mission of the Kay Yow/WBCA Cancer Fund. Coaches vs. Cancer is a nationwide collaboration between the American Cancer Society and the National Association of Basketball Coaches (NABC) that empowers basketball coaches, their teams, and local communities to make a difference in the fight against cancer through year-round awareness efforts, fundraising activities, and advocacy programs. For more information, you can contact Karen Mahaney, local American Cancer Society representative at 888-227-6446, extension 4213, or visit the Web site at cancer.org.

COLLEGE CORNER Graduates

The following students have graduated from Ohio University: Andrew Gerber, bachelor of science in sport sciences; Andrea Maas, bachelor of science in early childhood education; and Anthony Urso, bachelor of science in communication. • The following students have graduated from the University of Cincinnati: Harry Allen, bachelor of science; Tyler Amann, bachelor of science in mechanical engineering; Conrad Aquino, bachelor of arts; Lindsey Aschbacher, master of science; Mitchell Binford, bachelor of science in information technology; Daniel Bird, bachelor of science; Seraphine Bitter, master of arts; Brenda Brooks, bachelor of arts; Brittany Brundidge, associate of arts; Daniel Burke, bachelor of business administration; Melanie Cannon, master of science; Jennifer Carper, associate of technical studies; Farai Chaimiti, master of business administration; Rebecca Chavez, bachelor of arts; Lissa Clarke, bachelor of business administration; India Cole, bachelor of science; Charlene De La Torre, master of science in nursing; Amanda Embry, master of science in nursing; Ndeye Faye, bachelor of business administration; Matthew Fitzgerald, bachelor of science; James Foster, bachelor of science in nursing; Emily Gallegos, bachelor of fine arts; Mallory Grimmeissen, associate of applied science; Lindsay Hagstrom, bachelor of arts; Deanna Hoskins, master of science; Emily Jandacek, bachelor of science; Thurman Jones, bachelor of business administration; Jennifer Kuhn, bachelor of arts; Keri Lozier, bachelor of business administration; Shannon Lyons, master of arts;

Jennifer Maslyn, bachelor of business administration; Heather May, bachelor of arts; Tessa Neiheisel, bachelor of arts; Robert Nevin, bachelor of science; Sarah Nugent, bachelor of arts; Chinelo Nwankwo, associate of arts; Jason O'Hara, bachelor of arts; Melissa Pflanz-Blaut, bachelor of science; Polly Rainey, master of science in nursing; Kara Reddert, bachelor of arts; Yonel Robinson, bachelor of science; Richard Robles, post-baccalaureate certificate; Brian Schnur, bachelor of arts; Gregory Seyferth, bachelor of arts; Heather Sheffield, master of education; Kelly Shepard, bachelor of arts; Kyle Shepard, bachelor of science; Latoshia Simmons, associate of applied business; Sheree Sims, bachelor of arts; Mark Skinner, bachelor of business administration; Jill Smith, bachelor of science; Paige Taylor-Fulton, associate of arts; Alice Tennenbaum, associate of applied science; Tanya Todd, bachelor of science; Aisha Tzillah, master of science; and Joshua Williams, bachelor of science in information technology.

Dean’s list

The following students were named to the fall dean’s list at Ohio University: Kellie Asmus, Sarah Beeler, Kyla Boertlein, Christopher Brausch, Andy Brown, Gabrielle Buckner, Maria Castro-Reece, Timothy Ernst, Sarah Geers, Sarah Grothjan, Mariah Harden, Mary Hautman, Alyse Kordenbrock, Alexander Kummer, Bradley Kummer, Sara Lorenz, Josh Melzer, Shannon Miranda, Rachel Mousie, Arlissa Norman, Thomas Raabe, Kayla Roush, Kristin Todd, Robin Tracy, Frank Trotta, Ann Wiebell, Chelsea Wylie and Michael Young. • Anne Delisio, Bradley Rentz and Rachael Rogers were named to the fall semester dean’s list at Marquette University. • Joy Lao was named to the fall semester dean’s list at Clarkson University.

Second round H1N1 set Northwest students who missed the first round of vaccinations against the H1N1 virus get a second chance. The Hamilton County General Health District is sponsoring a second-round H1N1 vaccination clinic at the Houston Educational Service Center, 3310 Compton Road, from 4 to 8 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 3. Roger Argalas, administrative assistant for student services for the district, said the clinic is open to children 9 and under who need

the second dose booster for the flu vaccination and also to those school children in preschool through grade 12 who missed the first vaccination clinic. It has been recommended children under 10 receive two doses of the H1N1 vaccine. If you have questions regarding this clinic please send an e-mail to h1n1updates@hamilton-co.org . For more information, see the Northwest district’s Web site at www.nwlsd.org.


Schools

January 27, 2010

Northwest Press

A7

SCHOOL NOTES Bevis second graders had a Gift Tag and Ornament Sale to raise money for St. Jude Hospital. They talked about producers, consumers, income, factory, and goods as they learned about business. Each student had a job position on the assembly line creating gift tags and ornaments. This was the third year that second graders participated in this activity. This class sent $281 dollars to St. Jude Research Hospital this year, surpassing last year’s total by more than $100. • Bevis fifth graders decided to start their own company in the hopes of adopting a zoo animal. They handcrafted Santa Claus, wreath, and snowflake ornaments and determined the price of the ornaments based on the costs of materials and the time it took to make the ornaments. Students set up an assembly line make the ornaments, which they sold on Grandparent’s Day. They sold out of the ornaments and made a profit of $107. The amount of money raised allowed the students to adopt two animals, a cheetah and a zebra. • Jazmin Ramsey, age 10, is a fifthgrade student in Barb Jarrold’s class at Bevis Elementary. Jazmin volunteered to wrap gifts for senior citizens at the Queensgate office of Home Instead Senior Care. The gifts were collected through “giving trees” in Tuesday Morning stores and Mullaney’s Pharmacy. This was the first time that Jazmin had volunteered for this community service. She found out about the opportunity through her mother who works at the Queensgate office.

Colerain Elementary

The 51 fifth graders in Amy Smith’s classes at Colerain Elementary made cards for the residents of The Home at Taylor’s Point before going on winter break. All fifth grade students at Colerain Elementary are participating in a program called “Life Skills.” Teachers saw a need for character education, so they developed a list of life skills for students to practice as the school year progresses. The teachers post the life skills on cards outside their classrooms and refer to them often with their students. One of the life skill cards is about performing random acts of kindness. Smith’s mother-in-law, Betty Smith, moved into this nursing home at the beginning of the school year. The teacher noticed that some of the residents did not receive much mail or visitors. After sharing this information with her students, they agreed that this would be a great way to perform a random act of kindness in their community: sending cards to the seniors at The Home at Taylor’s Point. There were several different cards that were used. Some students made pop-up cards. Other students designed cards to color and then added personal notes to them. The cards were such a hit with the residents that the students plan to do this again for Valentine’s Day. The teacher said, “This was just one of those spontaneous moments in which a conversation with my students turned into a service project. It reminded me that children have “big hearts” and made me feel blessed to be their teacher.”

Colerain High School

Colerain High School junior bowler

Northwest High School/Butler Tech students volunteered as student guides for the Special Olympics Ski Training Day at Perfect North Slopes on Jan. 6. Northwest High School/Butler Tech teacher Pam Tonne and her Business Foundations class assisted students from Pleasant Run Middle School athletes with their equipment and escorted them on the slopes. Teachers Glenna Klei and Erika Bompiani of Pleasant Run Middle School and Richard Dunn of Northwest High accompanied the student athletes. The students and teachers had a great time and didn’t seem to mind the cold. They are looking forward to making this an annual event. PROVIDED

Card makers

Colerain Elementary School fifth-graders John Paul Demmel, Caleb Ponting, Shurvonna Paige, Abigale Marshall with the cards they made for residents of The Home at Taylor's Point. Matt Crooker bowled a 300 (perfect game) in the team’s victory over Lakota West on Jan. 6. This is the first perfect game for the Cardinals Bowling team.

Houston Early Learning Center

Mona A. Burts -Beatty, Hamilton County Educational Service Center school psychologist serving Houston Early Learning Center and Welch Elementary, defended her dissertation for her doctoral program at Miami University in school psychology and graduated from Miami University, Oxford campus on Dec. 18, with a degree of Doctorate of Philosophy in Educational Leadership. • The Houston Early Learning Center Pre-school had a ribbon-cutting ceremony Jan. 11 to open and dedicate the newly established school library. Barb Hill, principal of the Houston Early Learning Center, worked with the Colerain Target management team. Target has donated more than $1,000 retail value in books that are ageappropriate for the preschool program. Target has also donated three bean bag chairs for the library and expressed interest in donating VTech reading systems to the library in the near future. The Fraternal Order of Police Credit Union has donated two large gift bags full of books for the new library estimated at $200. The Hamilton County Friends of the Library organization also will be donating age-appropriate books to the Houston preschool program. The library staff is thrilled to have at least two parent volunteers to work in the library twice each week for the students to hear stories read to them, and also to take books out for home use. The parent volunteers, along with district librarian Chris Rabold, spent hours preparing the books for circulation. Jenny Blust and her Cat in the Hat character was also part of dedication ceremonies. Staff thanked the Northwest Local School District maintenance team for repurposing the room for the new school library.

Northwest High School

Mary “Cassie” Norton Is the 2010 Northwest High School Franklin B. Walter County Superintendent’s Awardee. This award recognizes senior students who have excep-

tional histories of activities, grade point averages, ACT/SAT scores, have been distinguished by other awards, and can impress the scholarship committee with a clear written statement of their professional and personal goals. This year’s finalists were Heather Flick, Michael Teed, Emily Laugle, Sarah Douglas, and Stephanie Fisher, all of whom have had wonderful accomplishments at Northwest. This year’s winner Cassie Norton, daughter of Christi and Bret Norton, has had a life full of leadership roles with the Girls Scouts, instrumental music; Marching Band, Pep Band, Winter Drum Line, Concert Band, four years of Girls Varsity Golf and Academic Quiz Team, all while maintaining high class rank in honors classes. • The Northwest High School third quarter book club book is “The Hunger Games” by Suzanne Collins. This title is also the Cincinnati public library’s “On the Same Page” book for teens and adults for 2010. The Northwest library will have 50 copies on loan from the public library to circulate among staff and students. Parents who are interested can find more information on the Web page at http://nwhslmic.wikispaces.com under the Books and Reading link. • The Northwest High School Library staff, under the direction of Bethany Miller, holds a yearly Children’s Book Drive during the holidays. The books that are donated are given to students in the Graduation, Reality, And DualRole Skills class to read to their new babies, and also to the YMCA. The Northwest Staff and others collected more than 500 books in this year’s children’s book drive. The rest of the books were delivered to the Clippard YMCA. Sue Garten, GRADS teacher, thanked donors and said the girls in her program appreciated the books. The largest group donation came from Coach Debbie Fields and the Lady Knights Basketball Team. Other supporters included Sarah Neville and her students, Michelle Thompson and her students, Carol Strotman and the Family, Career and Community Leaders of America, Andrea Stewart and Art Club and Patty Dailey, Shannon Bowling and the Northwest Student Senate. •

The Northwest High School boy’s and girl’s bowling teams took first place on Jan. 9, in the Fort Ancient Valley Conference Tournament. This is the boy’s third straight first place tournament finish and the girl’s second first place finish. Rickey Bender was second on the All-Tournament team with a 706 3-game series. Sarah Gadberry was first on the AllTournament team with a 662 3game series. Katie Johnson was second on the All-Tournament team with a 638 3-game series. All-Tournament teams consist of the top 5 league individuals. Kenny Goodin is the head Boys and Girls bowling coach for Northwest High School. • Students in Pam Kariofiles’ Career Based Intervention class at Northwest High School adopted students from St. Joseph’s Orphanage during the holiday season. Northwest students budgeted money from their co-op jobs. Students shopped for gifts which included clothing, arts and crafts, books, toys, and winter gear. Students wrapped the gifts and filled out holiday cards. Students, along with their teacher, Kariofiles delivered the gifts to the orphanage.

Jake Carroll was runner-up. Pleasant Run Middle School: Winner was seventh grader Sydney Wilzbach; first runner-up was seventh grader Kevin Smith and second runner-up was sixth grader Alex Weller. Struble Elementary: winner was fifth grader Mandy Land. Weigel Elementary: winner was fourth grader Phillip Lawson. Runner up was fourth grader Brandon Jones. Lawson won spelling the word “circuitous.” White Oak Middle School: winner was eighth grader Brodie Hensler. • These Northwest Local School District/Butler Tech culinary arts seniors participated in the Hopes of Hope event benefiting Cincinnati’s Shriners Hospital for Children Award Winner Dee Bacon of Northwest earned “Most Decora-

Taylor Elementary

Taylor Elementary’s art teacher Janne Peterson, a member of the Professional Photographers of Ohio, entered the 2009 fall competition. Out of approximately 230 entries in the PPO competition, Peterson won first place in the portrait category for the state of Ohio. She also won first and second place for her High School Senior albums and a $500 Leo Wilhelm scholarship. This scholarship is for an accredited photography school, and Peterson will use it to attend the Winona School of Photography in June. Peterson is also a member of the Professional Photographers of Southwest Ohio and entered their yearly competition. She won first place in the portrait category, second place in the children’s portraits, third place in the illustrative category, and second place in the album category. She also won the prized “Judges Choice” and the “Photographer of the Year” for Southwest Ohio.

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Northwest district

Several Northwest schools had recent Spelling Bees with the winners moving on to the WCPO citywide competition: Colerain Elementary: winner was fifth grader Trevor Wood. Colerain Middle School: winner was eighth grader Kevin McCarthy and runner-up was seventh grader Joe Brinker. Monfort Heights Elementary Spelling Bee winner was Nick Lekson.

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tive” in the high school division. Winning third place overall in the high school division was Samm Robbins of Northwest and Casey Hammonds of Fairfield. • Twin brothers Frank Russo, White Oak Middle School teacher, and Ron Russo, Colerain High School counselor were inducted into the LaRosa’s 2009 Hall of Fame. The Russos are among an elite few area athletes/coaches who have won state titles as both a player and a coach. Frank coaches at LaSalle High School and has led his track team to a state title in 1994, and cross country state championships in 2005 and 2006. Ron has coached Colerain High School girls cross country teams and won four consecutive state titles from 1997-2000. He now coaches at McAuley High School.

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SPORTS

A8

Northwest Press

BRIEFLY

This week in basketball

• Mt. Healthy High School boys lost to Edgewood 51-48, Jan. 15. Derrick Floyd was the top-scorer for Mt. Healthy with 12 points, including two three-pointers. • La Salle High School boys beat McNicholas High School 58-40, Jan. 15. La Salle’s top-scorer was Michael Schmidt with four three-pointers. • La Salle High School boys beat Mason County 5038, Jan. 16, in the National Hoops Classic. La Salle’s topscorer was Brandon Neel with 17 points. • Mt. Healthy girls beat Talawanda 55-42, Jan. 16. Mt. Healthy’s top-scorer was Jonessa Moore with 25 points. • Northwest High School girls lost to Edgewood 51-49, Jan. 16. Northwest’s topscorer was Arienne Gazaway with 21 points, including four three-pointers. • La Salle boys beat Oak Hills High School 70-33, Jan. 19. La Salle’s top-scorer was Matt Woeste with 14 points, including one three-pointer. • Northwest boys beat Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy 66-56, Jan. 19. Northwest’s top-scorer was Quinton Turner with 25 points, including three 3-pointers. • Colerain High School girls beat Fairfield High School 58-19, Jan. 19. Colerain’s top-scorer was Ashley Wanninger with 17 points, including four three-pointers. • Northwest girls beat Taylor High School 62-49, Jan. 19. Northwest’s top-scorer was Ashley McNeil with 26 points, including two threepointers.

This week in bowling

• St. Xavier High School boys came in first place in the Greater Catholic League Tournament, Jan. 18, beating Roger Bacon in the finals 3-0. St. Xavier’s Chris Weber made the All-Tournament team with a score of 429, and St. X’s Bryan Eltzroth made the team as well with a 421. • Northwest High School boys beat Mt. Healthy 2,8032,357, Jan. 19. Northwest’s Justin Ahr bowled a 532. Mt. Healthy’s Beddinghaus bowled a 363. Northwest advances to 9-2 with the win. Mt. Healthy falls to 3-7 with the loss.

Scholarly soccer player

Thomas More College junior forward Aaron Osborne, a La Salle High School graduate, recently was named Scholar East All-Region by the National Soccer Coaches Association of America (NSCAA). Osborne, the 2009 Presidents’ Athletic Conference Player of the Year, carries a 3.45 grade point average in political science. He set the single-season school records for goals (22) and points (49) this season and also set the career school records for goals (48) and points (108). Osborne had two hat tricks in 20 matches played and took 84 shots, including 45 on goal. Osborne and the rest of the Saints finished the 2009 season, 17-3-1 overall and won the PAC regular season and tournament titles for the first time in school history with a 5-0-1 mark in conference and advanced to the NCAA Division III Men’s Soccer Championship for the first time in school history.

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January 27, 2010

| Editor Melanie Laughman | mlaughman@communitypress.com | 248-7573 HIGH

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Knights finding rhythm on hardwood By Tony Meale

tmeale@communitypress.com

It had to be frustrating. After getting blown out 64-43 at Turpin in the season-opener, the Northwest High School boys’ basketball team lost by five points to Badin, by three points to Edgewood and by one point in overtime to Anderson in a game in which Redskins guard Mike Wilkison scored 48 points. “There was some anxiousness because we really had a chance to win (a lot of) those ball games,” head coach Brooks Posta said. “But we knew we had a good ball club. We just had to keep working and stay tough.” So they did. Trailing Talawanda 3433 at halftime in their next game Dec. 18, the Knights rode the hot hand of senior guard Quinton Turner, who drilled three three-pointers and netted 15 points in the 76-55 rout. “That was great, and the kids enjoyed it,” Posta said. “It was nice to win convincingly.” Although the Knights dropped their next game – a 71-66 loss to Milford Dec. 18 – they’ve since won six of seven, defeating Harrison, Finneytown, Hughes, Norwood, Ross and Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy all by at least eight points. “This year, playing hard is a constant,” said Posta, who is his second year at Northwest. “We haven’t had one game – except maybe the first game – where we didn’t play as hard as we could have.” Sparking the Knights has been junior guard Melvin Hunter, who leads the Fort Ancient Valley Conference Scarlet division in scoring (15.6 points per game) and is third in rebounding (8.5) and blocks (1.4). “He does so much for us; we rely on him for everything,” Posta said. “And one thing that doesn’t show

TONY MEALE/STAFF

Northwest High School senior guard Quinton Turner scored a game-high 25 points in a 66-56 win at Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy Jan. 19. His 25 points are the most scored in one game by any Knight this season.

Other hoops happenings

Colerain

• Senior Ashley Wanninger scored a game-high 17 points in a 58-19 win over Fairfield Jan. 19, while sophomore Sheaira Jones and junior Alexis Fitzpatrick each added 11. The Lady Cards (10-3, 6-2) are tied for first place in the GMC with Oak Hills and Sycamore.

Mount Healthy

• The Lady Owls won 5542 at Talawanda Jan. 16. Junior forward Jonessa Moore scored a game-high 25 points, while Ke Ke Williams added 15. Mount Healthy (10-5, 5-1) has won five straight. up in the stats is that he’s our best on-ball defender. When he’s playing with energy, we play with energy. The kids feed off him.” But Northwest isn’t a one-man band. Far from it. The Knights have four players averaging between 7.1 and 11.3 points per game. Among those key players are junior guard Marcus Lane, who is second on the team in scoring and second in the league in steals (2.3);

TONY MEALE/STAFF

Northwest senior Marcus Lane scores a basket over CHCA senior Ryan Chappelle. Lane finished with 11 points. senior guard Mark Allen, who is averaging 10.3 points and 6.4 rebounds; senior forward Preston Brown, who is scoring 8.2 points a game and is second in the league in rebounds (8.7); and the aforementioned Turner, who scored a game-high 25 points in a 66-56 win at CHCA Jan. 19. “It’s definitely something that’s good to have,” Posta said of his team’s balance, which has also been a theme in the FAVC-Scarlet this season. Entering play the week of Jan. 18, Northwest was in a five-way tie for first place with Norwood, Edgewood, Mount Healthy and Ross, and each of those teams’ overall record was 66, 6-5 or 5-6. “We’re all (around)

.500, but it’s due to the fact that we all beat up on each other,” Posta said. “Anyone can beat any other team. It comes down to matchups.” With the win at CHCA, the Knights (7-6, 3-2) have nearly doubled their win total from last season when they went 4-17. “It feels good for me, but I’m happier for the kids,” Posta said. “I’m ecstatic for them.” The Knights plat at Edgewood Jan. 22 and at Talawanda Jan. 29. The Northwest girls’ team, meanwhile, has struggled to a 4-9 overall record but is a respectable 3-3 in league play and trails Mount Healthy and Ross by two games each for FAVCScarlet supremacy. Leading the Lady

Knights are seniors Arienne Gazaway and Erica Mathis. Gazaway is second in the league in scoring (12.2) and tops the team in assists (2.4), while Mathis is fourth in the league in rebounding (8.6) and second on the team in scoring (11.4). Also contributing are seniors Jaira Jones and Ashley McNeil. Jones is fifth in the league in rebounding (7.5) and leads the entire FAVC in steals by a landslide; she is averaging 5.5 swipes per game and had a season-high 12 in a 47-38 loss at Edgewood in early December. McNeil, meanwhile, is averaging 8.8 points per game. The Lady Knights have road games against Milford and Talawanda Jan. 27 and Jan. 30, respectively.

Colerain progressing on the mats By Tony Meale tmeale@communitypress.com

The Colerain High School wrestling team has performed solidly in recent weeks. The Cardinals wrestled Northwest High School in a dual meet Jan. 5 and won 39-37. “We wrestled (a rival in the same school district), so it was a very tough-fought match on both sides,” Colerain head coach Jim Wandsnider said. Colerain then participated in the Fairfield Invitational, which was held Jan. 8-9 and featured some of the best teams in the city.

The Cardinals finished 15th out of 19 teams but had three placers: Jake Hammer (119) finished fifth, Zach Powell (189) finished fourth and Andy Boiman (285) finished sixth. “Zach came out of nowhere and shocked a lot of people,” Wandsnider said. “He won four matches as an unseeded kid.” Wandsnider was also impressed with the way Boiman, who is 15-6, responded after losing some close matches early in the tournament. “He got on the podium like he always does,” Wandsnider said.

Colerain had a much better team showing in the Sycamore Invitational, which was Jan. 15-16, placing fifth out of 17 teams. Hammer, who leads Colerain with 16 wins and 11 pins, and Powell, who is 127 with six pins, both won their respective weight classes. It was the first time Hammer won a tournament. “He’s always placed but never had an opportunity to win,” Wandsnider said. “We were very excited.” Boiman finished second, as did Will Grosselin (215). Quinton Pryor (152) placed third, while Austin Cox (112) was fifth.

“This is the first varsity tournament (Cox) placed in,” Wandsnider said. “He gets better every week.” The Colerain wrestling program also received strong performances from several members of the freshman and junior varsity squads. Freshman Ameer Daniels (285) finished first in his weight class at the Centerville Buckeye Freshman Classic Jan. 15-16. The reserve team, meanwhile, traveled to the Mason Invitational that same weekend. Andy McMahon, Evan Inman and Arthur Curry all finished

first, while Jason Meyer and Major Abrams placed second. The performance of the freshman and JV teams – coupled with that of the varsity – had Wandsnider feeling pretty pleased. “This is my second year at Colerain, and this was one of the happiest weekends I’ve had,” he said. “I’ve had kids step up their ability and believe in themselves.” The varsity team will participate in the Dave Bean Wrestling Classic at Finneytown High School Jan. 30, with the Greater Miami Conference Tournament slated for Feb. 13 at Oak Hills.

sponsored by the Fairfield Optimist Soccer Club and the Optimist Club of Fairfield. There will be a women’s game Friday, April 9, just before the girls’ weekend, and a men’s game Friday, April 16, before the boys’ weekend begins. Contact Kelly Farrell at masc.alumni@gmail.com for details.

Umpire classes

SIDELINES Spring sports sign-ups

The Olympian Club, is conducting spring sports sign-ups from noon to 4 p.m., Sunday, Jan. 31, and Saturday, Feb. 13, and from 6-8 p.m., Wednesday, Feb. 17, at the club at 10054 Pippin Road. Call 825-1835 for more information.

Baseball sign-ups

The Cincinnati Padres baseball

RBI team is looking for youth 910 years old to participate in a select league for this year’s baseball season. Contact Coach Fowler at 522-0096. Youth cannot turn 11 prior to May 1, 2010.

MASC alumni game

Have you played in the Mid-American Soccer Classic (MASC), one of the largest soccer tournaments in the region? As part of the tournament’s 25th anniversary, the MASC volunteers are sponsoring alumni games. The tournament, which last year had more than 590 teams from seven states and Canada participate, is

Blue Chip High School Umpires Association is offering a 10- week course for umpires who would like to obtain their certification to umpire high school baseball. The course will take place from 79 p.m., Tuesday, Feb. 2, at Finneytown High School. Contact Max McLeary at eyemax48@yahoo.com or 309-1331.


Sports & recreation

Northwest Press

January 27, 2010

A9

Classic swimming MARK CHALIFOUX/STAFF

Colerain High School senior Lauren Weaver swims in the 200 butterfly at the 2010 Southwest Ohio High School Swimming and Diving Classic at St. Xavier’s Keating Natatorium Jan. 17. Weaver finished seventh in the consolation final and 15th overall in a time of 2:18.45. She also won the championship in the 50 free (24.21), finished fourth in the 100 fly (59.05) and placed fifth in the 100 free (53.97).

MARK CHALIFOUX/STAFF

St. Xavier High School senior Alex Miller swims in the final of the 1,650 freestyle. Miller won the event in a time of 15:47.36.

La Salle High School junior Mark Specker swims in the 50 butterfly. He finished third in the consolation final and 11th overall in a time of 25.79.

MARK CHALIFOUX/STAFF

BRIEFLY • St. Xavier High School boys beat Fenwick High School 60-33, Jan. 15. Luke Massa was the top-scorer for St. Xavier with 21 points, including three 3-pointers. • McAuley High School girls beat Fenwick 64-57 in triple overtime, Jan. 19. Jenny Burgoyne was McAuley’s topscorer with 17 points. • Wyoming boys beat Mt. Healthy High School 42-39, Jan. 20. Mt. Healthy’s topscorer was Derrick Floyd with nine points, including two three-pointers. • Mercy girls beat Seton 57-49, Jan. 21. Mercy’s topscorer was Kelly Wiegman with 20 points, including one three-pointer. • Northwest girls beat Roger Bacon 60-35, Jan. 21. Northwest’s top-scorer was Jaira Jones with 16 points.

More in swimming

• Sycamore High School boys came in first place with a score of 52 against secondplace La Salle High School’s 33 and Turpin High School’s 17. La Salle’s Joe Scherpenberg won the 500-meter freestyle in 5:04.18, Ben Schneider won the 100-meter backstroke in 57.75 and Nathan Laux won the 1-meter dive.

• Taylor High School boys beat Northwest High School 46-37, Jan. 21. Northwest’s Alex Klei won the 200-meter freestyle in 2:01.78, Tanner Agin won the 50-meter freestyle in 25.34, Agin won the 100-meter freestyle in 57.32, Jon Schlacta won the 500-meter freestyle in 7:02.59 and Klei won the 100-meter breaststroke in 1:09.52. • Taylor girls beat Northwest 57-18, Jan. 21. Northwest’s Savannah Huegel won the 100-meter breaststroke in 1:25.15.

sica Homer bowled a 426. Oak Hills advances to 6-2 with the win. • Mercy girls beat Princeton High School 2,457-2,227, Jan. 19. Mercy’s Emily Schmitt bowled a 426. Mercy advances to 10-1 with the win. • Northwest boys beat Mt. Healthy 2,515-2,246, Jan. 20. Northwest’s Rickey Bender

Northwest’s Sarah Gadberry bowled a 496. Mt. Healthy’s Nevoteni Daniels bowled a 372. • La Salle High School boys came in first place with a score of 2,896 to Badin’s 2,476 and Carroll’s 2,108, Jan. 21. La Salle’s Joe Kramer bowled a 509. • Mercy High School girls beat McAuley High School

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More in bowling

• St. Xavier boys lost to Hamilton 2,871-2,487, Jan. 19. St. X’s David Weiskittel bowled a 392. St. X falls to 201 with the loss. • Oak Hills High School boys beat La Salle High School 2,964-2,942, Jan. 19. Oak Hills’ Bryan Lubbers bowled a 505. La Salle’s T.J. DeLaet bowled a 536. • Northwest girls beat Mt. Healthy 2,509-2,044, Jan. 19. Northwest’s Johnson bowled a 432. Mt. Healthy’s Tracey Wallace bowled a 380. Northwest advances to 11-0 with the win. Mt. Healthy falls to 45 with the loss. • Oak Hills girls beat McAuley High School 2,5492,512, Jan. 19. McAuley’s Jes-

bowled a 368. Mt. Healthy’s Chris Beddinghaus bowled a 398. • St. Xavier boys came in first place with a score of 2,736 to Roger Bacon’s 2,366 and Fenwick’s 2,234. St. X’s Chris Weber bowled a 484. St. X advances to 9-1 with the win. • Northwest girls beat Mt. Healthy 2,625-2,186, Jan. 20.

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2,639-2,123, Jan. 21. Mercy’s Lindsay Doll bowled a 458. McAuley’s Katie Markus bowled a 369. Mercy advances to 11-1 with the win.

This week in wrestling

• St. Xavier High School came in 15th in the Charlie Moore Invitational, Jan. 16.

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A10

Northwest Press

January 27, 2010

EDITORIALS

As the Colerain Community Association begins a new year, we want to thank the companies which have donated resources to help beautify the Township during 2009. • Rumpke (Bill Rumpke) for the effort at Colerain Avenue/Interstate 275. A special thank you goes to Mike Brink for cutting the grass at this interchange and for watering the landscaped beds as needed. We also appreciate the disposal of the bags of litter our volunteers pick up each month. • Stehlin Lawn Care (Greg Stehlin) for keeping the grass mowed at Colerain Avenue/ Ronald Reagan Highway. • Acme Tree & Landscaping (Kevin Griffin) for fertilizing all the trees at the three main highway interchanges where the CCA has landscaped beds. • Wal-Mart (David Seymore) for having his associates pick up litter at Colerain Avenue/Ronald Reagan and for mulching and taking care of the landscaped beds at the interchange. • Jeffrey Allen Corp. (Jeff Bresnen) for spraying weeds in the beds on the hillside by Stehlin & Sons. Kenneth Lohr Pebbleknoll Drive President of the Colerain Community Association

Fantastic nurse

The Northwest school district is blessed with many fantastic teachers and staff members. Amy Piening is one of those people. She is the school nurse at Weigel Elementary and she does an incredible job. Amy is caring and works daily to make sure that the many needs of the students who come to see her are taken care of. The biggest example of her work, I believe, was the impressive way in which she organized our H1N1 vaccination day. Not only was she incredibly organized, but she made sure that the students felt safe and secure on a potentially stressful day. Volunteers read to classes, accompanied students through the entire vaccination process and even kept them on their laps if necessary. Amy was aware of which students would need extra attention and care during this process. PTA moms were ready with treats, videos and hugs after the kids were done. I can tell you that if tears came, Amy had a teacher, staff member or volunteer waiting to console them. She keeps the needs of all of her children in mind each day at Weigel Elementary. Thank you, Mrs. Piening. Theresa Strong Timberchase Court Monfort Heights

Congratulations for Driehaus

Congratulations are due Rep. (Steve) Driehaus for stepping up to the plate to help the people of this country while still holding to his personal values regarding abortion It appears that the congressmen that oppose the proposed health bill don’t really care about the rising cost of health care or the discriminatory policies of the insurance companies. While they agree that health care in this country is faulty and needs to be corrected, their families happily live under government health care. Still, they make no effort to help our families. Perhaps their vote is political? Meanwhile, the Right to Lifers,

About letters & columns

We welcome your comments on editorials, columns, stories or other topics important to you in The Northwest Press. Include your name, address and phone number(s) so we may verify your letter. Letters of 200 or fewer words and columns of 500 or fewer words have the best chance of being published. All submissions may be edited for length, accuracy and clarity. Deadline: Noon Friday E-mail: northwestpress@ communitypress.com Fax: 923-1806 U.S. mail: See box below Letters, columns and articles submitted to The Northwest Press may be published or distributed in print, electronic or other forms. et. Al., are willing to cut off their nose to spite their face. They refuse to look at the positives in the health care bill, holding out for one narrow-minded issue. If they are so pro-life, how can they refuse to consider the improvements to the overall health of our country? Insurance costs will be contained, the famous Donut Hole will be eliminated, fraud and waste can be eliminated. Thanks again to Rep. Steve Driehaus for his courageous stand for health care. Ann Thompson Robers Avenue Green Township

Response to column

LETTERS

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COLUMNS

Editor Jennie Key | jkey@communitypress.com | 853-6272

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

CCA says thanks

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I am writing in response to your guest columnist article titled “Feeling Unsafe in Colerain” in the Jan. 20th edition of the Northwest Press. First, I would like to let Ms. Hammelrath know that the Colerain Township Police Department is one of the best based on the accreditation that they have received. I would also like to inform her of a program they have in place that would be perfect for her. It’s called the “Citizen’s Police Academy” and is offered to all residents of Colerain Township. This is a wonderfully informative 8 or 10 weeks and it let’s you “walk in their shoes.” With the population of Colerain, our officers cannot be everywhere and I can only imagine what crime would be like without them. Second, I’m a little older at 53, but was never educated to believe my government’s main goal was as she described. Based on the fact that a police officer usually isn’t there when a crime is taking place, I believe that it is a personal responsibility to take care of yourself and each other. Community policing doesn’t get any better than Colerain’s “men in blue” when it comes to teaching and recommending ways to do this. Do you have a Block Watch Program set up in your neighborhood? Have you landscaped properly, so bushes do not hide windows? Have you installed motion detectors and lights? As far as the robberies on Colerain Ave go, I would love to hear the description of the suspect that the police were given. I would almost be willing to bet it wasn’t very detailed. If we want this sort of behavior out of our community, we must be willing to get involved. Pay attention to your surroundings and if something doesn’t look right, call the police and let them do the job they are so good at – they live here, too! Tom Gray Schunk Court

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CH@TROOM

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Fire safety tips for winter weather Winter weather brings with it the requisite salt-dome reports, hyped-up weather forecasts, school closings and crowded grocery stores as the community prepares for the “next” weather-related calamity on the horizon. This is Greater Cincinnati. We're used to it. We practically thrive on the anxiety that any anticipated snowfall might bring. However, with these “minor inconveniences” listed above, winter weather also requires a changed mindset in terms of protecting you and your family. Fire Safety should be front and center in our mind as we find ways to keep warm and comfortable in our homes. Each year we hear countless stories of devastating fires caused by alternative heating solutions, space heaters and improper use of electric heaters. 2010 has already seen a drastic increase in the number of fatal fires when compared to other years. In the first four days of the New Year, the Ohio Fire Marshal reported that 9 Ohioans had lost their lives in residential fires! In terms of protecting your family from residential fires and hazardous conditions during cold weather, the following list provides a good starting point to make the winter season safer:

• It is imperative that any heating product be examined and operated according to the manufacturer's instructions. • Chimneys, Capt. Steve fireplaces and Conn wood burning Community stoves should be and Press inspected cleaned annualcolumnist ly. Make sure dampers are fully opened to prevent smoke from entering your living quarters. • Smoke detectors provide the essential warning needed to escape a fire situation but only when they are properly installed and operating. (Please contact your local fire department for current information regarding Photoelectric smoke detectors.) • Carbon Monoxide detectors should also be installed in every home … not just homes with gas burning appliances. Carbon monoxide can also enter the home from garages. • NEVER allow your car to run in the garage in order to get it warm. Exhaust gases and carbon monoxide can enter the home causing a deadly situation. Winter can also be a time of

great fun, not only for kids, but for adults as well. Skiing, sled riding and snowball fights provide a welcome break to "cabin fever". Many communities around Colerain have small ponds and fishing lakes that freeze over providing a tempting surface for the amateur hockey player or budding figure skater. Since ice seldom forms uniformly across a pond's surface, all ice should be considered dangerous. We urge all people to steer clear of frozen ponds and instead go ice skating at the local skating rink or check with your local park district to inquire about their ice skating opportunities. Hamilton County Park District provides several winter-time activities, including ice skating when appropriate. The park district recommends contacting their office at 521-7275 to check on availability. The greater Cincinnati area has seen its share of winter time emergencies with several multi-alarm fires in just the last week or so. Keeping safety in mind as we conduct our daily routines can make our winter season more enjoyable and memorable. Capt. Steve Conn is a public information officer with the Colerain Township Department of Fire and Emergency Medical Services.

Home businesses must follow zoning code Running a small business from one's house can seem like a great option in these difficult economic times, but there are many things to consider before getting started. Specifically, there are a number of zoning restrictions which will be discussed here. These rules are designed to ensure that home businesses do not conflict with the residential character of the neighborhood and do not pose a disturbance to the neighbors. The complete zoning rules for home occupations in Colerain Township are in Article 10 of the Zoning Resolution. What follows is a brief discussion of these rules. In general, the owner and all employees must live in the house where the business is located. Immediate family members of the business owner may also be employed there, however. The business may only take up 20 percent of the floor area of the house. And, the home may not be used as a gathering place for employees who will be working on sites elsewhere. The use of the

house must remain primarily as a residence. No evidence of the business is permitted on the exterior of the house, except for one 4Susan square-foot wall Roschke sign. There shall not be a separate Community entrance for the press business, and columnist accessory buildings may not be used for home occupations. Parking may not be expanded to accommodate a home business, and commercial vehicles may not be parked at the house. Also, no items for sale may be displayed outside or stored on the premises. A home occupation must not conflict with the residential uses in the neighborhood. Therefore, businesses which add noticeably to local traffic are not permitted. This includes numerous customers visiting the business as well as frequent deliveries by truck. Also,

CH@TROOM Last week’s question

Will you still watch “American Idol” after Simon Cowell leaves? “ I stopped watching American Idol years ago when they changed the format. Back in the old days, the audience saw more people trying out. Now it seems to focus more on the judges, etc. And different people have become judges. Not to mention, Ellen DeGeneres coming on this year. Forget it-there has to be something better to watch than American Idol”. JET JR “I did not watch it before he left. Why would I start now?” F.S.D.

“Of course. I watch for the (wacky!) contestants, not Simon. I usually don’t watch until the end of the season, when there are about eight contestants left who actually are talented, but I have caught a couple episodes already this season ... and boy is that funny! “Contrary to what Simon might think, his departure won’t be that devastating of a blow. It’ll be good with or without him. It’ll still be fun and entertaining ... and America will still have the (ultimate) vote at the finale, which is what matters on this show. “Pants on the ground ...” Joy K. “Yes, as long as Ellen stays!” N.H. “Yes, because it’s about the participants, not the judges. If

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Your Community newspaper serving Colerain Township, Green Township, Groesbeck, Monfort Heights, Pleasant Run, Seven Hills, White Oak

Your Community newspaper serving Colerain Township, Green Township, Groesbeck, Monfort Heights, Pleasant Run, Seven Hills, White Oak

Northwest Press Editor . . . . . . . .Jennie Key jkey@communitypress.com . . . . . . . . . .853-6272

businesses which produce noise, vibration, fumes, or heat, or which draw excessive power or cause electrical or radio interference are prohibited. No dangerous or controlled materials or chemicals may be used or stored. Again, these rules are designed to allow home occupations which are compatible with residential uses. According to Article 7 of the Zoning Resolution, residential zoning districts are established to “protect residents from the harmful effects of excessive noise, population density, traffic congestion, and other significant environmental effects.” Many small home businesses will meet these standards, but many other common small businesses will not. It is important to research what is permitted before setting up shop at home. If you have any questions about your home occupation plans, please contact the Planning and Zoning Department at 385-7505. Susan Roschke is the Colerain Township Zoning Administrator.

This week’s question For which team will you root in the Super Bowl? Why? Every week The Northwest Press asks readers a questions that they can reply to via e-mail. Send your answers to northwestpress@community press.com with “chatroom” in the subject line. you’ve watched the preliminary auditions, they’ve had various guest judges. “Simon has softened since he began. I think he’s become more human and is not as harsh or mean. It’s more interesting to have different judges than the same three all the time.” R.L.H. “I never have watched ‘American Idol,’ so Cowell’s departure means nothing to me. Our household watches PBS almost exclusively, except for sporting events.” M.P.B.

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Puppet masters

Brownie scouts from Troop 46824, with members from Colerain Township and Mount Airy, went to the LaBoiteaux Woods Nature Preserve to learn how to make puppets and put on a show so they could fulfill all the requirements to get their Try-It patch for Puppets, Dolls and Plays.

PHOTOS BY TONY JONES/STAFF

From left, Vivian Owens, Terra Sprague and Kathleen Cagle watch together as another group puts on their puppet show.

Taylynn Barr, 6 cut out a raccoon face for her puppet.

Faith Halter and her group of hidden puppeteers put on their last show at the LaBoiteaux Woods Nature Preserve as they work on a Try-It patch for Puppets, Dolls and Plays.

Mount Airy resident Amy Cagle helps her daughter Abigail get started on her puppet at the LaBoiteaux Woods Nature Preserve during the puppet program.

Faith Halter plays a squirrel hiding in a tree at the LaBoiteaux Woods Nature Preserve at the puppet program.

Naturalist Bobbi Sack points out some of the detail that make a raccoon look like a raccoon at the LaBoiteaux Woods Nature Preserve during the puppet program for Brownie Scouts.


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Northwest Press

January 27, 2010

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD MUSIC - CLASSIC ROCK

T H U R S D A Y, J A N . 2 8

ART EXHIBITS

Mount Art and Design Faculty Exhibition, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Studio San Giuseppe Art Gallery at the College of Mount St. Joseph, 5701 Delhi Road. Survey of recent work. Presented by College of Mount St. Joseph. 244-4314. Delhi Township.

DANCE CLASSES

Line Dance Class, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Springfield Township Senior and Community Center, 9158 Winton Road. Dancing with Jerry and Kathy Helt, instructors. Wear smoothsoled shoes. No partner dances and no prior dance experience required. $4. Presented by Southwestern Ohio/Northern Kentucky Square Dancers Federation. Through Dec. 30. 321-6776. Springfield Township. Waltz and Two-Step Dance Classes, 7-10 p.m., Parky’s Farm Hayloft Barn, 10073 Daly Road. Wear comfortable and casual attire and smooth-soled shoes for dancing. No prior dance experience is necessary. Free. Presented by Southwestern Ohio/Northern Kentucky Square Dancers Federation. 9292427; www.so-nkysdf.com. Springfield Township.

FARMERS MARKET

Hollmeyer Orchards, 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Hollmeyer Orchards, 3241 Fiddler’s Green Road. Open year round. 574-0663. Green Township.

LITERARY - STORY TIMES Preschool Story Time, 10 a.m., Winton Woods, 10245 Winton Road, Winton Centre. Free, vehicle permit required. Pajama party. Wear PJs and being a blankie or favorite stuffed animal. Presented by Hamilton County Park District. 521-7275; www.greatparks.org. Springfield Township.

ON STAGE STUDENT THEATER

Love, Tax and the IRS, 7:30 p.m., Oak Hills High School, 3200 Ebenezer Road, Holt Auditorium. Farce. $5. 70305496. Green Township. The Diviners, 8 p.m., La Salle High School, 3091 North Bend Road, Blackbox Theater. In a small farm community during the depression, water and faith are in short supply. A preacher drifts into town and meets boy with gift of divining or water-witching. Two outcasts help each other divine for truth, faith and hope. Ages 13 and up. $8. Presented by La Salle High School Drama. Through Jan. 31. 741-2369; www.lasallehs.net. Green Township.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Tuesdays With Morrie, 8 p.m., Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, 4990 Glenway Ave. Former student is reunited with former college professor, who is battling Lou Gehrig’s disease, 16 years after graduation. $21, $19 seniors and students. Reservations recommended. Through Feb. 7. 241-6550; www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. West Price Hill.

SENIOR CITIZENS

Thursday Lecture Series: Census Information, 11 a.m., North College Hill Senior Center, 1586 Goodman Ave. 521-3462. North College Hill. F R I D A Y, J A N . 2 9

EXERCISE CLASSES

Step Aerobic Class, 10-11:30 a.m., Westside Boxing and Fitness Club Inc., 3428 Warsaw Ave. With trained personal trainer. Family friendly. $5, $20 for five classes. Through Feb. 12. 314-7315. East Price Hill.

For more about Greater Cincinnati’s dining, music, events, movies and more, go to Metromix.com.

FOOD & DRINK

Wine Tasting, 5-8 p.m., Piazza Discepoli Wine Merchants & Wine Bar, 5872 Cheviot Road. Includes light hors d’oeuvres. $10. 9231300; www.piazzadiscepoli.com. White Oak. Wine Tasting, 4-7 p.m., Bridgetown Finer Meats Wine Shop, 6139 Bridgetown Road. $10. 574-3900; www.bridgetownfinermeats.com. Bridgetown. Wine Tasting, 6-8 p.m., Bigg’s, 5025 Delhi Road. Local wines of Valley Vineyard with Esther of Buckeye Distributing. Three samples with snacks. $2. 354-1700. Delhi Township.

Carole Moore Band, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., The Lucky Lady, 9962 Hamilton Ave. With Larry & Bill. Ages 21 and up. 403-5100. Springfield Township.

MUSIC - CONCERTS

Antsy McClain and the Trailer Park Troubadours, 8-10:30 p.m., St. Xavier High School, 600 W. North Bend Road. $25. Presented by Greater Cincinnati Performing Arts Society. 484-0157; www.gcparts.org. Finneytown.

ON STAGE STUDENT THEATER

Love, Tax and the IRS, 7:30 p.m., Oak Hills High School, $5. 70305496. Green Township. The Diviners, 8 p.m., La Salle High School, $8. 741-2369; www.lasallehs.net. Green Township. Cheaper by the Dozen, 7:30 p.m., McAuley High School, 6000 Oakwood Ave. Comedy with heart about family with 12 children. $8, $6 students and seniors. Through Jan. 31. 681-1800, ext. 2276. College Hill.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Tuesdays With Morrie, 8 p.m., Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, $21, $19 seniors and students. Reservations recommended. 241-6550; www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. West Price Hill.

Wilderness Skills: Wilderness First Aid, 2 p.m., Winton Woods, 10245 Winton Road. $5, vehicle permit required. Registration required online by Jan. 28. Presented by Hamilton County Park District. 521-7275. Springfield Township.

Night Senses Hike, 6 p.m., Winton Woods, 10245 Winton Road. Night hike on two unpaved trails. No strollers. Free; vehicle permit required. Registration required online by Jan. 28. Presented by Hamilton County Park District. 521-7275. Springfield Township.

ON STAGE STUDENT THEATER

Love, Tax and the IRS, 7:30 p.m., Oak Hills High School, $5. 70305496. Green Township. The Diviners, 8 p.m., La Salle High School, $8. 741-2369; www.lasallehs.net. Green Township. Cheaper by the Dozen, 7:30 p.m., McAuley High School, $8, $6 students and seniors. 681-1800, ext. 2276. College Hill.

ON STAGE - THEATER

North College Hill Historical Society Monthly Meeting, 11 a.m., Hilltop United Methodist Church, 1930 W. Galbraith Road. 522-3934. North College Hill.

Murder Mystery Dinners, 6:30 p.m., Mill Race Banquet Center, 1515 W. Sharon Road. Cash bar. “The Momentous Truth.” Audience participation. Adults. $33.50; vehicle permit required. Reservations required. Presented by Hamilton County Park District. Through March 20. 521-7275; www.greatparks.org. Springfield Township. Tuesdays With Morrie, 8 p.m., Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, $21, $19 seniors and students. Reservations recommended. 241-6550; www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. West Price Hill.

EDUCATION

SUPPORT GROUPS

S A T U R D A Y, J A N . 3 0

CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS

Yellowstone & Grand Teton National Parks Slideshow, 2 p.m., Winton Woods, 10245 Winton Road, Winton Centre. Free, vehicle permit required. Presented by Hamilton County Park District. 521-7275. Springfield Township.

EXERCISE CLASSES

Spinning, 8-8:45 a.m., Western Tennis and Fitness Club, 5490 Muddy Creek. Endurance Ride Saturday classes. Strength Ride Sunday classes. $12; free members. Registration required. 451-4233; www.westerntfc.com. Green Township.

FARMERS MARKET

Hollmeyer Orchards, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Hollmeyer Orchards, 574-0663. Green Township.

FOOD & DRINK

Wine Tasting, 2-5 p.m., Bridgetown Finer Meats Wine Shop, $10. 574-3900; www.bridgetownfinermeats.com. Bridgetown.

MUSIC - ACOUSTIC

Beatles Night, 7-10 p.m., Henke Winery, 3077 Harrison Ave. Acoustic Beatles music by Denny Melchers and specials guests. Wine and food menu available. Reservations required. 662-9463; www.henkewine.com. Westwood.

My German Experience of Cincinnati, 2-5 p.m., German Heritage Museum, 4790 West Fork Road. Dr. Andrea Fieler of Northern Kentucky University, speaker. Free. Presented by German-American Citizens League of Greater Cincinnati. 574-1741; www.gacl.org. Green Township.

MUSIC OLDIES

Mike Davis Show, 7-9 p.m., Jim & Jack’s on the River, 3456 River Road. Vegas revue with tribute artist. Full dinner menu. $10. Reservations recommended. 251-7977. Riverside.

NATURE

MUSIC - OLDIES

Cincy Rockers, 9 p.m.-1:30 a.m., Jim & Jack’s on the River, 3456 River Road. 2517977. Riverside.

LECTURES

Creating Your Journey for the Second Half of Life, 10:30 a.m.-noon, Family Life Center, 703 Compton Road. For anyone eager to explore the opportunities and develop a travel plan for the second half of life. Includes financial planning, downsizing and moving, planning for a healthy lifestyle, traveling with purpose (working, volunteering, time management) and spirituality. Free. Registration required. Through April 10. 9315777. Finneytown. S U N D A Y, J A N . 3 1

ART EXHIBITS

Mount Art and Design Faculty Exhibition, 1-5 p.m., Studio San Giuseppe Art Gallery at the College of Mount St. Joseph, 244-4314. Delhi Township.

EXERCISE CLASSES

Spinning, 12:45-1:30 p.m., Western Tennis and Fitness Club, $12; free members. Registration required. 451-4233; www.westerntfc.com. Green Township.

FOOD & DRINK

Pancake Breakfast, 8 a.m.-1 p.m., Taylor High School, 36 E. Harrison Ave., cafeteria. Benefits Pregnancy Center. $5, $3 ages 510, free ages 4 and under. Presented by St. Joseph of The Three Rivers Council 11550 Knights of Columbus. 467-3200; http://geocities.com/kofc11550/mypage. North Bend.

Davis

NATURE

Winter Adventure Hike, 1 p.m., Bender Mountain Nature Preserve, Bender Road. Strenuous hike. Dress for weather and wear sturdy hiking boots. Uneven, hilly terrain. Call on event day if weather is questionable. Family friendly. Free. Presented by Western Wildlife Corridor. 922-2104. Delhi Township. Celebrate Winter, 1-3 p.m., Winton Woods, 10245 Winton Road. Winton Centre. Try on a “blubber mitt,” create a wintery craft and read a story in a bear cave. Presented by Hamilton County Park District. 521-7275. Springfield Township.

ON STAGE STUDENT THEATER

The Diviners, 8 p.m., La Salle High School, $8. 741-2369; www.lasallehs.net. Green Township. Cheaper by the Dozen, 7:30 p.m., McAuley High School, $8, $6 students and seniors. 681-1800, ext. 2276. College Hill.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Tuesdays With Morrie, 2 p.m., Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, $21, $19 seniors and students. Reservations recommended. 241-6550; www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. West Price Hill.

SCHOOLS

Open House, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., St. James School, 6111 Cheviot Road. Meet teachers, students, and alumni of grades K-8. Tours and information available. Free. 741-5333. White Oak.

SHOPPING

Mattfeld’s Bridal Show, 1-3 p.m., Mattfeld Greenhouses and Florist, 8730 Cheviot Road. Designers present bouquets and arrangements perfect for weddings. $5. Reservations required. 385-6577; www.mattfelds.com. Colerain Township. M O N D A Y, F E B . 1

ART & CRAFT CLASSES

Art Classes, 4-5:30 p.m., LaBoiteaux Woods, 5400 Lanius Lane. Weekly through March 22. Explore 3-D art, combining clay, organic forms and recycled materials. Outdoor activities enhance art experience. With Mary Provosty. $50, $40 for city residents. Registration recommended. Presented by Cincinnati Park Board. 542-2909; www.cincyparks.com. College Hill.

ART EXHIBITS

PROVIDED.

The Greater Cincinnati Performing Arts Society presents Antsy McClain and the Trailer Park Troubadours at 8 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 30, at St. Xavier High School, 600 W. North Bend Road. Tickets are $25. For more information, call 484-0157 or visit www.gcparts.org.

About calendar

To submit calendar items, go to “www.cincinnati.com” and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to “life@communitypress.com” along with event information. Items are printed on a space-available basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to “www.cincinnati.com” and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page. T U E S D A Y, F E B . 2

CIVIC Council Meetings, 7 p.m., Greenhills Municipal Building, 11000 Winton Road. Presented by Village of Greenhills. Through Dec. 21. 825-2100. Greenhills. DANCE CLASSES

Beginner Square Dance Class, 7:30-9:30 p.m., Parky’s Farm Hayloft Barn, 10073 Daly Road. No prior dance experience necessary. Wear casual dress and smooth soled shoes. Free. Presented by Southwestern Ohio/Northern Kentucky Square Dancers Federation. 929-2427; www.so-nkysdf.com. Springfield Township. Line Dance Class, 10-11 a.m., Dunham Recreation Complex, 4356 Dunham Lane. Line dancing with Jerry and Kathy Helt, instructors. Wear smooth-soled shoes. No partner dances and no prior dance experience required. $4. Presented by Southwestern Ohio/Northern Kentucky Square Dancers Federation. 321-6776. West Price Hill.

MUSIC - OLDIES

Bop Club Dance, 7-11 p.m., Jim & Jack’s on the River, 3456 River Road. Dance lessons, 7-8 p.m., except last Tuesday of month. $3, members free. Presented by Cincinnati Bop Club. 251-7977; www.cincibop.com. Riverside. W E D N E S D A Y, F E B . 3

BUSINESS SEMINARS Remarkable Resume Roundup, 9:30-11:30 a.m., True North Achievement Center, 650 Northland Blvd., Suite 100. Meet one-on-one with certified career coach and resume expert and receive feedback from peers during roundtable discussion. $69.95. Reservations required. Presented by ProTrain True North. 825-1555; www.careerachievementnetwork.com. Forest Park.

DANCE CLASSES

Square Dance Class, 10-11:30 a.m., Dunham Recreation Complex, 4356 Dunham Lane. Dancing with Jerry and Kathy Helt, instructors. Wear smooth-soled shoes. No partner dances and no prior dance experience required. $4. Presented by Southwestern Ohio/Northern Kentucky Square Dancers Federation. 321-6776. West Price Hill.

EDUCATION

Boating Skills & Seamanship Course, 79:30 p.m., Diamond Oaks Career Development Campus, 6375 Harrison Ave. Continues through April 28. U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary 13-week class for boat operators. $35. Registration requested. Presented by U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary. 742-4699. Dent.

FARMERS MARKET

Hollmeyer Orchards, 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Hollmeyer Orchards, 574-0663. Green Township.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Tuesdays With Morrie, 8 p.m., Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, $21, $19 seniors and students. Reservations recommended. 241-6550; www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. West Price Hill.

SENIOR CITIZENS

Ceramics, 9 a.m.-2 p.m., North College Hill Senior Center, 1586 Goodman Ave. Materials and training provided. Free. Through March 31. 521-3462. North College Hill.

Mount Art and Design Faculty Exhibition, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Studio San Giuseppe Art Gallery at the College of Mount St. Joseph, 244-4314. Delhi Township.

CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS Unicorners Singles Square Dance Club, 810 p.m., Trinity Lutheran Church, 1553 Kinney Ave. Experienced western style square dancers and round dancers. Singles and couples welcome. $5. Presented by Southwestern Ohio/Northern Kentucky Square Dancers Federation. Through Dec. 27. 9292427; www.so-nkysdf.com. Mount Healthy.

EXERCISE CLASSES

Cardio Tennis Class, 8-9 a.m., Western Tennis and Fitness Club, 5490 Muddy Creek. Includes warm-up, cardio workout and cool down. No tennis experience required. $15, $12 members. Registration required. 4514233. Green Township.

SENIOR CITIZENS

Uphill Gang Luncheon, Noon, Mount Healthy United Methodist Church, 7612 Perry St., fellowship hall. Theme is “Reminiscence.” Guest are encouraged to bring an old photo and share memories. Door prizes. $5. 8251254. Mount Healthy. PROVIDED

The Greater Cincinnati area will roar with the sound of the nation’'s most competitive monster trucks as they are unleashed in the Bank of Kentucky Center, 500 Nunn Drive, Highlands Heights. See Big Dawg, Tailgator, American Guardian, Anger Management and more. Plus, meet the drivers and see the trucks up close at the pre-event Autograph Pit Party on the arena floor. The Monster Truck Show will be 7:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. 29, and 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 30. Gates open at 5:30 p.m. for the Pit Party. Tickets range from $27-$19 for adults; $10 for children ages 2-12. Gold Circle tickets are $42-$40. Charge by phone at 800-745-3000. Visit www.ticketmaster.com or www.bankofkentuckycenter.com.

SUPPORT GROUPS

Job Search Group, 1:30-3 p.m., Family Life Center, 703 Compton Road. Consultants teach on topics to help with job search. Participants share leads and resumes. Free. Registration required. 931-5777. Finneytown.

PROVIDED

The Opera Show presents the most beautiful music ever written performed in a spectacular 21st century showcase at the Aronoff Center. Mitch Sebastian's MTVstyle presentation will delight opera enthusiasts and newcomers alike. The show takes place 8 p.m. Friday, Jan. 29, at 650 Walnut St., in downtown Cincinnati. Tickets are $48 to $35. Call 513-621-2787 or visit ticketing@cincinnatiarts.org.


Life

Northwest Press

January 27, 2010

B3

A marital lament: ‘You’re not the person I married’ Eventually, one spouse may lament to the other, “You’re not the person I married.” Actually, they never were. They were always somebody else, a stranger barely known years ago and known only a little better now. Some reasons for our partial knowledge of another person is the depth of their person and the psychological mysteries he or she carries there. Add to that the habits developed over years and our limited understanding and insights, and one can see why our conclusions of knowing another are vast understatements. Besides, when we’re young and the other person is popular, has a beautiful body, or an abundance of money – who cares about knowing them?

There are other h u m a n tendencies that can obscure our knowing a perFather Lou son, even eone Guntzelman saso m close as Perspectives a spouse. O n e tendency is that of projection. We project onto other persons faults or qualities we expect or think we see in them. (A bride believes she sees in her husband some of her father’s characteristics, and a groom thinks he sees in his bride characteristics of his mother.) Like a movie projector casts images on a screen some distance away, so we cast (project) suspected qualities or faults onto other

people. Then we claim we know them. Actually, we may have placed in them some of the alleged characteristics we claim we see. Living together on a daily basis ever so gradually wears away these projections. The loss of our projections leaves our partner as she, or he, actually is. Where we wanted agreement, we may be called upon to accept differences; where we imagined we’d find the other half that makes us whole, we must now recognize that there is rather a whole person other than me. And I must learn the difficult task of loving otherness. We can never love our partner’s otherness unless we have a good sense of what it is to be that person. After all, that’s the essence of growing through relationships, isn’t it?

Joining my life with someone else’s is not just expecting more of me, but learning to care about, communicate with, and compromise with someone who is other than me. That’s the work of relationships that produce mature people and develop true love. Another tendency that prompts the complaint, “You’re not the person I married,” is the old illusion of the Magical Other. We are haunted in adulthood by the cozy nostalgia of infancy and childhood. So we continue to unconsciously look for a special person (termed the Magical Other) who will treat us with the positive parental care of earlier times. We look for someone who will give us whatever we need or want, who will erase loneliness, make us the center of their life, tend

to our pleasure, take away our fears, handle our responsibilities, and keep threatening ghosts out of our room. What a tall order! What an impossible order for another human being! How difficult it is for us to realize that whomever we draw close to is just another human like us. In fact, they are also projecting and looking for their Magical Other – whom, by the way, they think might be you. Partners certainly can ask each other for love, support, understanding and forgiveness. But he or she is not my rescuer, nor my enemy, but my partner. In one way, it’s a step forward to realize, “You’re not the person I married.” The one we married was originally an impressionistic painting. He or she was painted with tones of infatu-

ation, illusion, desire and a touch of naiveté. Hopefully much of that has washed off. Now it’s time to say, “I don’t see you any longer as my mother or father, or as my Magical Other to rescue me from the challenges of life, or the one to serve me as I was taken care of as a child. “I still choose you as my partner. Let us continue together as adults to learn more of each other and this wonderful mystery of relational love and life.” Father Lou Guntzelman is a Catholic priest of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati. Reach him at columns@ communitypress.com or contact him directly at P.O. Box 428541, Cincinnati, OH 45242. Please include a mailing address or fax number if you wish for him to respond.

Free tax prep available for deaf individuals Community Services for the Deaf is holding a free tax preparation day for individuals who are deaf. The prgram will be from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 12, at The Hearing Speech and Deaf Center, Fourth Floor Conference Room, 2825 Burnet Ave. The United Way is providing the deaf community with two tax preparers who will assist with tax preparation for free for the deaf community. Contact Johnny Schumacher to see if you qualify

and to make an appointment at videophone 2069330 or email: jschumacher@hearingspeechdeaf.com. The Hearing Speech and Deaf Center strengthens the community by supporting individuals and families to overcome obstacles to communication. The center believes that communication is the foundation of all human interactions and provides a barrierfree, inclusive and nurturing environment for anyone seeking to overcome obstacles regarding speech, hear-

ing or deafness. Community Services for the Deaf (CSD) is a department within the center and is one of ten designated Community Centers for the Deaf in the State of Ohio. CSD provides outreach, advocacy, education, summer programming for children and teens who are deaf, sign language interpreting, C-Print transcription, sign language classes, Deaf Teen Club, mentoring, “Deaf” zoo day where exhibits are interpreted by volunteer interpreters, ADA

consultation, assistance with activities of daily living, video phones for public use, leadership training activities for adults, assistive device consultation, sales and provision of devices at reduced rates for

those needing financial assistance. To make a donation to the center, contact 2210527, visit www.hearingspeechdeaf.com or mail to 2825 Burnet Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45219.

If you’re looking for buyers, you’re in the right neighborhood. To place an ad call 513.242.4000 or 859.283.7290, or visit CommunityClassified.com

One of Life’s Most Difficult Discussions What is the most difficult discussion a person can have? It might depend whether it is a discussion with one of your children, a spouse, an employer you are leaving, an employee you are letting go or perhaps a friend. Today I want to have a difficult discussion with a friend. Jesus left us an example in Acts 1 when he met with the closest of His friends, the disciples. Jesus had completed His task on earth. He had lived a sinless life, demonstrated that He was the Son of God, offered Himself to be mankind s sacrifice for sin being crucified and resurrecting on the third day according to the scripture. His disciples had been taught and trained and now He was having His last discussion with them. He genuinely loved them and they were about to be separated for some time; in fact, until His second coming. What did he tell them? Read Acts 1:4-9. Jesus reminded his disciples to count on the promises of the Father. In an article from Time Magazine dated December 4, 1956, a schoolteacher named Everet R. Storms said after reading the Bible through 27 times, he came up with 7,487 promises God had made to man. While I cannot deny nor defend that number, I accept it as a pretty close count. I can however, tell you of my favorite promise from the Lord and it is found in Romans 10: 12, For there is no difference between the Jew and the Greek: for the same Lord over all is rich unto all that call upon him. For whosoever shall call upon the name of the Lord shall be saved. How wonderful to know that in Jesus last words He reminded us that God wants to see everyone saved regardless of who they are or how sinful they have been. He promises that through simple faith in His death, burial and resurrection we are saved! Secondly, Jesus reminded them there was more work to do His work is now in heaven and our work is here on earth. Believers have been given one task and that is to share the good news of salvation with all.

YMCA: A source of strength for nearly 160 years.

Over the last six years I have either co-authored with Pastor Emeritus, Preston Richardson or authored the article, From the Pastors Pen, a weekly thought on current events from a biblical perspective. This page comes to an end with this article. Thank you for taking your valuable time each week to read the articles. I hope they have encouraged you to consider each subject in light of the infallible Word of God. Although we may have never met, we have become friends. One final thought is a promise we can all rejoice in, Jesus Saves.

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B4

Northwest Press

Community

January 27, 2010

Chili, chowder to chase the cold away

We ate the perfect breakfast today: homemade goetta and fresh eggs from “the girls” – my chickens. After years of making goetta and trying to replicate my Germ a n mother-inl a w ’ s recipe, which was Rita so simple Heikenfeld ( p o r k shoulder, Rita’s kitchen o n i o n s , celery, bay leaf, pinhead oats, salt and pepper) it dawned on me that the reason hers was so good was that they slaughtered their own pigs for the goetta, and I am sure that pork shoulder had a nice layer of fat. Well, I found fresh pork shoulder with WOW, a nice layer of fat and used it for goetta (I also added hot sausage and some seasonings). Now I know what you’re thinking: fat is bad, but it

wasn’t that much and boy, did it add flavor. The consensus from my family is it’s the best I’ve ever made. My son, Shane, was scooping it out of the pot and putting it directly on bread. Look for a column soon just on goetta. It’s that popular. And if you have a goetta recipe to share, please do.

Steak & Shake chili clone for the crockpot

For Robin Haboush from Montgomery reader John Augustin. “This recipe comes close,” he said.

2 tablespoons oil 11⁄2 pounds ground beef 1 ⁄2 teaspoon salt 1 can onion soup 1 tablespoon chili powder 2 teaspoons ground cumin 1 ⁄2 teaspoon black pepper 2 teaspoons cocoa 2 cans kidney beans, drained 6 oz. tomato paste 8 oz. tomato sauce

1 cup cola (your choice)

Brown ground beef with salt in oil. Put soup in blender, blend for one minute. Drain beef. Add everything to crock pot. Let simmer on low for six hours or on high for two hours.

Chuck wagon chowder

For Kathy Telscher’s friend who is ill and who wanted a chuck wagon chowder recipe from Central High School in the 1960s. “He sure will appreciate it if it turns out like he remembers,” she said. This one may work. 11⁄2 pounds ground sirloin or round 1 ⁄2 cup onion, diced very fine 10-16 oz frozen peas, thawed 3 cans, 14.5 oz. each, diced tomatoes, undrained 5-6 cups tomato juice (or V-8) 1 pound wide egg noodles 1 teaspoon dry basil

Salt and pepper to taste 2 generous cups shredded cheese (I’m thinking it was either cheddar or American)

Cook beef with onion until meat is done. Drain if necessary. Stir in peas, tomatoes and 5 cups juice. Stir in noodles and seasonings. Cover and cook for 15 minutes, and stir several times. Turn heat to simmer and cook about 15 minutes longer until noodles are done. If mixture starts looking dry, add a cup of tomato juice. Sprinkle cheese on top and the heat from the chowder will melt the cheese.

Sophisticated grilled cheese

Not your ordinary sandwich. We love these.

Mix together:

1 cup each: shredded Swiss and cheddar

1

⁄3 cup mayonaise 1 tablespoon each: yellow mustard and chopped green or red onion

Spread on bread and grill in butter. Makes four sandwiches.

Can you help?

• Whiskey’s Restaurant’s (Lawrenceburg) peanut coleslaw and hearty nobean Texas chili. For Claree “Cookie” Ballew. • Jeff Ruby’s macadamia ice cream pie with ganache topping. For Sally Garretson. “I wonder if it’s gone since I didn’t find that ice cream on Graeter’s list.” • Barleycorn’s bleu cheese dressing. For Amber Moore, Cold Spring. “I can’t seem to find a recipe that even comes close. It is thick and has pieces of red onion in it.” • Crockpot beef vegetable pearl barley soup with ground beef and mock turtle soup. For Lucine Erb, a Hilltop reader, who can’t find recipes for these

favorites. “After 66 years of marriage and cooking for my husband and four children, I am learning to prepare meals in an entirely different way, due to the acquisition of a crockpot,” she said. • Grilled pork loin. For Tom Ohmer • Withrow’s cafeteria dinner rolls.

Coming soon

• Roasted herb potatoes • Maribelle’s Restaurant spicy chicken soup

Thanks!

To Pat Sayre, who sent me clippings of older recipes from newspapers, etc. Rita Nader Heikenfeld is Macy’s certified culinary professional and family herbalist, an educator and author. E-mail her at columns@communitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Or call 513-2487130, ext. 356. Visit Rita at www.Abouteating.com.

Help the Junior League celebrate The Junior League of Cincinnati has planned a year of festivities in celebration of its 90th Anniversary. March 20 marks the culmination of these events as the Junior League of Cincinnati invites past and present members, community friends and potential future members to celebrate in grand style with a night of dinner and dancing at the Madison Place Office Complex at 100 W. RiverCenter Boulevard in Covington, Ky. The evening begins at 7 p.m. and will salute community projects founded and supported by the Junior League of Cincinnati and cel-

ebrate their successes. Ticket prices start at $90 for the evening with a late night option at 9 p.m. starting at $45. The Junior League of Cincinnati has trained more than 4,000 women, given back over $3 million to the community and founded and played a key role in developing more than 40 not-forprofit organizations to benefit the Greater Cincinnati community. Today the JLC can look back with pride at the impact it has had and look forward with anticipation to where it is going today. The Junior League of Cincinnati is an organization

of women committed to promoting voluntarism, developing the potential of women, and improving communities through the effective action and leadership of trained volunteers. The JLC was responsible for the founding and the development of Girls on the Run, ProKids, Fernside, the Children’s Museum and MindPeace. Kids in the Kitchen is the newest JLC project and the JLC’s newest cookbook, “Cincinnati Seasoned,” was just launched in October. JLC’s purpose is exclusively educational and charitable. Call 871-9339or visit www.JLCincinnati.org.

PROVIDED.

Local residents in the Junior League of Cincinnati are, from left, Melanie Chavez, active; Kathryn Balnes, active co-chair; Blaire Beattie, active; Katie Hayden, provisional; and Kristel Johnson, active vice-chair. Not pictured: Shannon Cathey, active.

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3110 Springdale Rd at Pippin

-9258

367 Haven Road ew 10515 N rrison, OH Ha

0000378878

Family Owned

Conveniently Located at

a 1242 M ton, OH Hamil

825-1565

Weekday Specials

restrictions apply

NOW OPEN

Tuesday All-You-Can-Eat Ribs Wednesday Aunt Wawa’s Homemade Chicken & Dumplings Thursday Homemade Meatloaf

Excludes tax & alcohol. Limit one coupon per party. Dine-in only. Not valid w/other specials. Valid Tuesday thru Sunday. Exp. 2/23/10.

3456 Springdale Road Cincinnati, Ohio 45251

2 OFF any purchase of $

513-385-1600

$20 or more

Excludes tax & alcohol. Limit one coupon per party. Dine-in only. Not valid w/other specials. Valid Tuesday thru Sunday. Exp. 2/23/10.

$

1 OFF

any purchase Excludes tax & alcohol. Limit one coupon per party. Dine-in only. Not valid w/other specials. Valid Tuesday thru Sunday. Exp. 2/23/10.

0000379409

www.waltsbarbeque.com

Expires 2-13-10

HAIRSTYLING

3 OFF

any purchase of $25 or more

with

25% OFF all retail

Redkin, Matrix, Big Sexy, Bed Head, Paul Mitchell Hiring Full or Part Time HAIRDRESSERS with clientele

Gift Certificates Available

HAVE-A-BALL LEAGUE Short Term Program • Just For The FUN of IT!

$11.00

Only Per Person Per Week

UPGRADES: $13.00 weekly - Columbia Freeze, Storm Tropical & Hammer Vibe $15.95 weekly - Brunswick Wild, Hammer Black Widow, Ebonite Magic, Transformer, UC Bearcats, or any Have-it-your-Way Ball

STAY LOCAL FILLER

6341 Cheviot Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45247 (513) 385-0039 • www.heidslanes.com Don’t want a ball? You can still participate for just $7.00 League Starts: Monday, Feb. 1st, 2010 7PM 3 to a team Wednesday, Jan. 27th, 2010 6:30 PM 4 to a team Sunday, Feb. 7th, 2010 Adult-Youth 3:00 PM 2-3 to a team Adults-Co-ed 5:00 PM 4 to a team HERE’S WHAT YOU GET - 15 WEEKS: • A new custom-drilled polyester bowling ball in a choice of colors • A new bowling bag • 10 Free Games (value $32.50) • A great program where you’ll bowl two leagues games every week.


Community IN THE SERVICE

Downing

Justin M. Downing has joined the United States Army under the Delayed Entry Program. Downing, a 2009 graduate of Northwest High School, Cincinnati, Ohio, reported to Fort Leonard Wood, Waynesville, Mo., for basic training in January. He is the son of Jesse and Kimberly Ferneding of Pleasant Run.

Haffey

Army Spec. Shane M. Haffey has been named Soldier of the Quarter for the 197th Infantry Brigade at Fort Benning, Columbus, Ga. The specialist is a 2004 graduate of Northwest High School, Cincinnati. He is the son of Sharon Gramke of Cincinnati. Selection was based on the individual's exemplary duty performance, job knowledge, leadership qualities, teamwork, significant self-improvement, personal achievements, notable accomplishments and community service and support.

Haffey, an infantryman with more than two years of military service, is assigned to the 1st Battalion, 29th Infantry Regiment at Fort Benning, Columbus, Ga.

Hauser

Thomas M. Hauser has joined the United States Army under the Delayed Entry Program. Hauser, a 2008 graduate of Colerain High School, Cincinnati, Ohio, reported to Fort Leonard Wood, Waynesville, Mo., for basic training in January. He is the son of Kimberly Hauser of Colerain Township.

Henderson

Jiles J. Henderson has joined the United States Army under the Delayed Entry Program. Henderson, a 2008 graduate of Middletown High School, will report to Fort Leonard Wood, Waynesville, Mo., for basic training in March. He is the son of Anthony and Yvonne Palmore of Coleran Township.

Knab

James J. Knab has joined the United States Army under the Delayed Entry Program. Knab, a 1998 graduate of Northwest High School, reported to Fort Benning, Columbus, Ga., for basic training in January.

About service news

Service news is printed on a space-available basis. Deliver it to our office no later than noon Wednesday, one week before publication. Mail announcements and photographs to: The Community Press, 5556 Cheviot Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45247. Send a S.A.S.E. for photo return. E-mail northwestpress@communitypress.com with “In the service” in the subject line. Questions? Call 853-6272. He is the son of Jim and Sandy Knab of Colerain Township.

Krabbe

Aaron S. Krabbe has joined the United States Army under the Delayed Entry Program. Krabbe, a 2003 graduate of Roger Bacon High School, will report to Fort Jackson, Columbia, S.C., for basic training in February. He is the son of Ethelsue Pauley of Colerain Township.

Kuethe

Curtis A. Kuethe has joined the United States Army Reserve under the Delayed Training Program. Kuethe, a 2004 graduate of Colerain High School, Cincinnati, Ohio, will report to Fort Leonard Wood, Waynesville, Mo., for basic training in March. He is the son of June Kuethe of Monfort Heights.

Ray

Desmon L. Ray has joined the United States Army Reserve under the Delayed Training Program. Ray, a 2010 graduate of Colerain High School, Cincinnati, Ohio, will report to Fort Jackson, Columbia, S.C., for

ODOT road crews prepared for winter weather The winter-fighting road crews from the Ohio Department of Transportation are on the move again. ODOT has more than 1,700 plow trucks and more than 3,000 drivers ready to clear ice and snow. ODOT maintains nearly 39,000 lane miles of highway which carries approximately two thirds of the state’s daily traffic. ODOT’s Smart Salt Strategy aims to keep highways safe and passable by using the right amounts of salt and manpower at the right times and locations. This time of year, one Smart Salt Strategy is the application of a saline solution (brine) to road pavements before the occurrence of a winter event. This prevents the formation of frost, black ice, or a freeze bond of snow and ice to the surface. Pre-wetting salt with this same solution before application also helps the rock salt stick to the surface and jumpstarts the melting process. Also, infrared temperature sensors installed on ODOT snow plows allow drivers to see the exact surface temperature of the roadways they are driving on, so they apply salt brine only where needed on bridge decks, overpasses or roadway sections, especially where black ice might form. During initial winter events, crews will constantly monitor pavement conditions and temperatures and only treat areas that are freezing, instead of the entire highway route. Staying alert and being a cincinnati.com/community

careful and informed driver is the best way motorists can travel safely this winter. ODOT’s best advice: in “Ice and snow ... Take it Slow.” Up-to-the-minute road conditions are always available by logging onto www. buckeyetraffic.org. Last winter, ODOT’s Web site received more than 35 million hits between November and March.

B5

basic training in June. He is the son of Mia Ray, and grandson of Nellie Ray, both of Cincinnati.

Ruch

Sean M. Ruch has joined the United States Army Reserve under the Delayed Training Program. Ruch, a 2010 graduate of Colerain High School, will report to Fort Knox, Ky., for basic training in June. He is the son of James Ruch of White Oak.

Wells

Chris J. Wells has joined the United States Army Reserve under the Delayed Training Program. Wells, a 2010 graduate of Colerain High School, Cincinnati, Ohio, will report to Fort Benning, Columbus, Ga., for basic training in June. He is the son of Paul Wells of Colerain Township.

JENNIE KEY/STAFF

The answer is…

You can find Good Eats at the Tumbleweed Southwest Grill, 9343 Colerain Ave. Correct answers came from M a r y Bowling, Ariel McCoy, L a u r a B e n n e t t , E v a n G i n n , H o w y H u n t , G a i l H a l l g a t h , D e b b i e Fa l e s , Nancy Bruner, Pat Merfert, Joane Donnelly, Jake and Jamie Spears, and Mark Bruner, Mimi and Papa Threm, Emily, Megan and the boys, Ron and Erma, and Annette, Joan and Jim Wilson, Angela Riegler, Doylene Windeler, D a v i d a n d Y v o n n e S c h m e u s s e r, Joe Geiger and J i m m i e a n d G l e n n a M a t h e n y. Last week, G e r r y N e u m a n n correctly guessed Long John Silvers as the scavenger location but was left off the list. Thanks for playing. See this week's clue on A1.

Williams

Army Pvt. Brian T. Williams has graduated from Basic Combat Training at Fort Sill, Lawton, Okla. He is the son of Joe Williams of Pleasant Run. Williams is a 2006 graduate of Northwest High School.

Last week’s Clue

Preschool Open House & Registration For New Families Considering Enrollment for the 2010-2011 School Year

Sat. January 30 10:00-11:30 AM

1927 W. Kemper Rd.

The school offers half-day classes for 3, 4 & 5 year olds taught by teachers with bachelor-master degrees in education. JWELC serves children from Fairfield, Colerain and Springfield Townships.

For questions or additional information, please call Beth at (513) 825-0879 or www.jwumc.net and go to the JW Early Learning Center link.

Movies, dining, events and more Metromix.com

You provide the New Year’s resolution, we’ll provide the incentives. Up to $3,500 for downsizing, moving, packing and unpacking services OR up to $3,500 for staging services and realtor fees. NEW! 30% Flat Fee Option. Pay only 30% of the Traditional Declining Entrance Fee for villas in Eastwood, Westminster I and Coventry Court. With this new plan, you pay a much lower entrance fee which means you have more money to keep as a legacy to your family. Free market analysis appraisal on your house by Sue Lewis from Sibcy Cline Realtors® Federal tax incentives of $6,500 tax credit for existing home buyers and $8,000 federal tax incentives for first time home buyers. This is great news if you have a house to sell! Maple Knoll Village offers maintenance free living for those 55 and older.

Call today to schedule a visit!

11100 Springfield Pike, Cincinnati, OH 45246

513.782.2717 | mapleknoll.org

0000376959

Richard Byrd has joined the United States Army Reserve under the Delayed Training Program. Byrd, a 2004 graduate of Colerain High School, Cincinnati, Ohio, will report to Fort Jackson, Columbia, S.C., for basic training in February.

Northwest Press

0000379287

Byrd

January 27, 2010


Community IN THE SERVICE

Downing

Justin M. Downing has joined the United States Army under the Delayed Entry Program. Downing, a 2009 graduate of Northwest High School, Cincinnati, Ohio, reported to Fort Leonard Wood, Waynesville, Mo., for basic training in January. He is the son of Jesse and Kimberly Ferneding of Pleasant Run.

Haffey

Army Spec. Shane M. Haffey has been named Soldier of the Quarter for the 197th Infantry Brigade at Fort Benning, Columbus, Ga. The specialist is a 2004 graduate of Northwest High School, Cincinnati. He is the son of Sharon Gramke of Cincinnati. Selection was based on the individual's exemplary duty performance, job knowledge, leadership qualities, teamwork, significant self-improvement, personal achievements, notable accomplishments and community service and support.

Haffey, an infantryman with more than two years of military service, is assigned to the 1st Battalion, 29th Infantry Regiment at Fort Benning, Columbus, Ga.

Hauser

Thomas M. Hauser has joined the United States Army under the Delayed Entry Program. Hauser, a 2008 graduate of Colerain High School, Cincinnati, Ohio, reported to Fort Leonard Wood, Waynesville, Mo., for basic training in January. He is the son of Kimberly Hauser of Colerain Township.

Henderson

Jiles J. Henderson has joined the United States Army under the Delayed Entry Program. Henderson, a 2008 graduate of Middletown High School, will report to Fort Leonard Wood, Waynesville, Mo., for basic training in March. He is the son of Anthony and Yvonne Palmore of Coleran Township.

Knab

James J. Knab has joined the United States Army under the Delayed Entry Program. Knab, a 1998 graduate of Northwest High School, reported to Fort Benning, Columbus, Ga., for basic training in January.

About service news

Service news is printed on a space-available basis. Deliver it to our office no later than noon Wednesday, one week before publication. Mail announcements and photographs to: The Community Press, 5556 Cheviot Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45247. Send a S.A.S.E. for photo return. E-mail northwestpress@communitypress.com with “In the service” in the subject line. Questions? Call 853-6272. He is the son of Jim and Sandy Knab of Colerain Township.

Krabbe

Aaron S. Krabbe has joined the United States Army under the Delayed Entry Program. Krabbe, a 2003 graduate of Roger Bacon High School, will report to Fort Jackson, Columbia, S.C., for basic training in February. He is the son of Ethelsue Pauley of Colerain Township.

Kuethe

Curtis A. Kuethe has joined the United States Army Reserve under the Delayed Training Program. Kuethe, a 2004 graduate of Colerain High School, Cincinnati, Ohio, will report to Fort Leonard Wood, Waynesville, Mo., for basic training in March. He is the son of June Kuethe of Monfort Heights.

Ray

Desmon L. Ray has joined the United States Army Reserve under the Delayed Training Program. Ray, a 2010 graduate of Colerain High School, Cincinnati, Ohio, will report to Fort Jackson, Columbia, S.C., for

ODOT road crews prepared for winter weather The winter-fighting road crews from the Ohio Department of Transportation are on the move again. ODOT has more than 1,700 plow trucks and more than 3,000 drivers ready to clear ice and snow. ODOT maintains nearly 39,000 lane miles of highway which carries approximately two thirds of the state’s daily traffic. ODOT’s Smart Salt Strategy aims to keep highways safe and passable by using the right amounts of salt and manpower at the right times and locations. This time of year, one Smart Salt Strategy is the application of a saline solution (brine) to road pavements before the occurrence of a winter event. This prevents the formation of frost, black ice, or a freeze bond of snow and ice to the surface. Pre-wetting salt with this same solution before application also helps the rock salt stick to the surface and jumpstarts the melting process. Also, infrared temperature sensors installed on ODOT snow plows allow drivers to see the exact surface temperature of the roadways they are driving on, so they apply salt brine only where needed on bridge decks, overpasses or roadway sections, especially where black ice might form. During initial winter events, crews will constantly monitor pavement conditions and temperatures and only treat areas that are freezing, instead of the entire highway route. Staying alert and being a cincinnati.com/community

careful and informed driver is the best way motorists can travel safely this winter. ODOT’s best advice: in “Ice and snow ... Take it Slow.” Up-to-the-minute road conditions are always available by logging onto www. buckeyetraffic.org. Last winter, ODOT’s Web site received more than 35 million hits between November and March.

B5

basic training in June. He is the son of Mia Ray, and grandson of Nellie Ray, both of Cincinnati.

Ruch

Sean M. Ruch has joined the United States Army Reserve under the Delayed Training Program. Ruch, a 2010 graduate of Colerain High School, will report to Fort Knox, Ky., for basic training in June. He is the son of James Ruch of White Oak.

Wells

Chris J. Wells has joined the United States Army Reserve under the Delayed Training Program. Wells, a 2010 graduate of Colerain High School, Cincinnati, Ohio, will report to Fort Benning, Columbus, Ga., for basic training in June. He is the son of Paul Wells of Colerain Township.

JENNIE KEY/STAFF

The answer is…

You can find Good Eats at the Tumbleweed Southwest Grill, 9343 Colerain Ave. Correct answers came from M a r y Bowling, Ariel McCoy, L a u r a B e n n e t t , E v a n G i n n , H o w y H u n t , G a i l H a l l g a t h , D e b b i e Fa l e s , Nancy Bruner, Pat Merfert, Joane Donnelly, Jake and Jamie Spears, and Mark Bruner, Mimi and Papa Threm, Emily, Megan and the boys, Ron and Erma, and Annette, Joan and Jim Wilson, Angela Riegler, Doylene Windeler, D a v i d a n d Y v o n n e S c h m e u s s e r, Joe Geiger and J i m m i e a n d G l e n n a M a t h e n y. Last week, G e r r y N e u m a n n correctly guessed Long John Silvers as the scavenger location but was left off the list. Thanks for playing. See this week's clue on A1.

Williams

Army Pvt. Brian T. Williams has graduated from Basic Combat Training at Fort Sill, Lawton, Okla. He is the son of Joe Williams of Pleasant Run. Williams is a 2006 graduate of Northwest High School.

Last week’s Clue

Preschool Open House & Registration For New Families Considering Enrollment for the 2010-2011 School Year

Sat. January 30 10:00-11:30 AM

1927 W. Kemper Rd.

The school offers half-day classes for 3, 4 & 5 year olds taught by teachers with bachelor-master degrees in education. JWELC serves children from Fairfield, Colerain and Springfield Townships.

For questions or additional information, please call Beth at (513) 825-0879 or www.jwumc.net and go to the JW Early Learning Center link.

Movies, dining, events and more Metromix.com

You provide the New Year’s resolution, we’ll provide the incentives. Up to $3,500 for downsizing, moving, packing and unpacking services OR up to $3,500 for staging services and realtor fees. NEW! 30% Flat Fee Option. Pay only 30% of the Traditional Declining Entrance Fee for villas in Eastwood, Westminster I and Coventry Court. With this new plan, you pay a much lower entrance fee which means you have more money to keep as a legacy to your family. Free market analysis appraisal on your house by Sue Lewis from Sibcy Cline Realtors® Federal tax incentives of $6,500 tax credit for existing home buyers and $8,000 federal tax incentives for first time home buyers. This is great news if you have a house to sell! Maple Knoll Village offers maintenance free living for those 55 and older.

Call today to schedule a visit!

11100 Springfield Pike, Cincinnati, OH 45246

513.782.2717 | mapleknoll.org

0000376959

Richard Byrd has joined the United States Army Reserve under the Delayed Training Program. Byrd, a 2004 graduate of Colerain High School, Cincinnati, Ohio, will report to Fort Jackson, Columbia, S.C., for basic training in February.

Northwest Press

0000379287

Byrd

January 27, 2010


B6

Northwest Press

Community

January 27, 2010

Volunteers start working on Fine Arts Fund campaign

The Fine Arts Fund kicked off an important part of the 2010 annual community campaign with a tea and performance from Jamie Leigh Medina, a member of Cincinnati Opera’s education tour, at Cincinnati Opera. While the 2010 campaign, under the leadership of Julie Janson, president, Duke Energy Ohio & Kentucky, does not officially get under way until Feb. 17, dozens of volunteers from across the region began working on this broadbased effort before the end of the year.

This part of the annual campaign fills a unique niche–community volunteers encourage their friends, family and neighbors to support theaters, galleries and art centers throughout the region by contributing to the Fine Arts Fund community campaign. This group is vital to the overall success of the campaign as it provides an opportunity for individuals who do not participate in workplace-based campaigns to support the arts in our community. Many of FAF’s volun-

teers have given more than 10 years of service supporting its efforts. Christine G. Meyer celebrates her leadership of this grassroots effort as Chair of the Residential Division for 25 years. “Through this neighbor to neighbor effort, volunteers broaden the base of support for the arts across our region through the Fine Arts Fund annual community campaign,” said Meyer. Community Chair Leaders of the Residential Division include Groesbeck resident Dea Huber, and Monfort Heights resident Joan Miller.

PROVIDED

Trinity Lutheran Church (ELCA)

Well staffed Nursery, Active Youth & College Groups, Exciting Music Dept, Seniors Group, Deaf Ministry www.friendshipbaptistcincinnati.org

BAPTIST Creek Road Baptist Church 3906 Creek Rd., Sharonville, Cincinnati, OH 513-563-2410 elder@creekroad.org Sunday School 9:30am Sunday Worship 10:45am, 6:00pm Wednesday Worship 7:00pm Pastor, Rev. David B Smith

ROMAN CATHOLIC St. Martin Dr Porres Catholic Church

9927 Wayne Ave * Lincoln Hts, Ohio 45215 513-554-4010 Pastor: Fr Thomas Difolco African American in History & Heritage Roman Catholic in Faith & Practice Services: Saturday at 7:00p & Sunday at 10:00a You are always welcome at St. Martin de Porres

CHRISTIAN CHURCH DISCIPLES Mt. Healthy Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)

7717 Harrison Ave Mt. Healthy, OH 45231 Rev. Michael Doerr, Pastor 513-521-6029 Sunday 9:00 a.m...... Contemporary Service 9:45a.m...... Sunday School 10:45 a.m........ Traditional Worship Nursery Staff Provided “A Caring Community of Faith” Welcomes You

EPISCOPAL ChristChurchGlendaleEpiscopalChurch 965 Forest Ave - 771-1544 christchurch1@fuse.net www.christchurchglendale.org The Reverend Roger L Foote The Reverend Laura L Chace, Deacon 8am Holy Eucharist I 9am Holy Eucharist II 11am Holy Eucharist II Child Care 9-11 Healing intercessory prayer all services

LUTHERAN Christ Lutheran Church (LCMS)

3301 Compton Rd (1 block east of Colerain) 385-8342 Sunday School & Bible Class (all ages) 9:45am Sunday Worship 8:30 & 11:00am Saturday Evening Worship 5:30pm A great community church in a great community! Also home to Little Bud Preschool 385-8404 enrolling now! Visit our website: www.church-lcms.org

Faith Lutheran Church 8265 Winton Rd., Finneytown www.faithcinci.org Pastor Robert Curry Contemporary Service 9am Traditional Service 11:00am

Sunday School 10:15

HOPE LUTHERAN CHURCH 9:30 am Traditional Service 11:00 am Contemporary Service 4695 Blue Rock Road Colerain Township South of Ronald Reagan and I-275 923-3370 www.hopeonbluerock.org

Trinity Lutheran Church, LCMS 5921 Springdale Rd 1mi west of Blue Rock

Rev Lyle Rasch, Pastor

Worship 10:30 am Sunday School: 9:20 am Traditional Service and Hymnbook

www.lutheransonline.com/joinus

385-7024

NON-DENOMINATIONAL

“Growing Closer to God, Growing Closer to Neighbor”

www. trinitymthealthy.org 513-522-3026

1553 Kinney Ave, Mt. Healthy

Worship: 8:30 am traditional - 10:45 am contemporary Sunday School: 9:45 am Nursery provided

Pastor Todd A. Cutter

UNITED METHODIST Christ, the Prince of Peace United Methodist Church 10507 “Old” Colerain Ave (513) 385-7883 Rev. Meghan Howard, Pastor Church School for all ages 9:15am Worship 10:30am - Nursery Available www.cpopumc.com “Small enough to know you, Big enough to care”

CHURCH OF THE SAVIOUR 8005 Pfeiffer Rd Montgmry 791-3142 www.cos-umc.org "Playing in God’s Symphony: Keep Time ")

Traditional Worship 8:20am & 11:00am Contemporary Worship 9:40am Sunday School (All ages) 9:40 & 11am Nursery Care Provided

Dr. Cathy Johns, Senior Pastor Rev. Doug Johns, Senior Pastor

FOREST CHAPEL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

EVANGELICAL PRESBYTERIAN EVANGELICAL COMMUNITY CHURCH

Sunday School Hour (for all ages) 9:15 - 10:15am Worship Service - 10:30 to 11:45am (Childcare provided for infants/ toddlers) Pastor: Rich Lanning Church: 2191 Struble Rd Office: 2192 Springdale Rd

542-9025

Visitors Welcome www.eccfellowship.org

PRESBYTERIAN Northminster Presbyterian Church 703 Compton Rd., Finneytown 931-0243 Transforming Lives for Jesus Christ Sunday Worship Schedule Traditional Services: 8:00 & 10:15am Contemporary Services: 9:00 & 11:30am Student Cafe: 10:15am Childcare Available Jeff Hosmer & Nancy Ross- Zimmerman - Pastors

680 W Sharon Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45240

513-825-3040

Traditional Service: 9:30am ConneXion Contemporary Service: 11:15am Sunday School: 10:30am

Monfort Heights United Methodist Church

3682 West Fork Rd , west of North Bend Traditional Worship 8:30 & 11:00am Contemporary Worhip 9:44am

Nursery Available * Sunday School 513-481-8699 * www. mhumc.org Spiritual Checkpoint ... Stop In For An Evaluation!

Mt Healthy United Methodist Church

Corner of Compton and Perry Streets 931-5827 Sunday School 8:45 - 9:45am Traditional Worship 10:00 - 11:00am Contemporary Worship 11:30 - 12:30 Healing Service, last Sunday of the month at 5 pm "Come as a guest. Leave as a friend".

Sharonville United Methodist

8:15 & 11am Traditional Service & Kingdom Kids 9:30am Contemporary Worship & Sunday School 7:00pm Wednesday, Small Groups for all ages Infant care available for all services

3751 Creek Rd.

513-563-0117

www.sharonville-umc.org

NON-DENOMINATIONAL HIGHVIEW CHRISTIAN CHURCH “Life on Purpose in Community” 2651 Adams Rd. (near Pippin) Worship Assembly-Sunday 10:45am Phone 825-9553 www.highviewchristianchurch.com

VINEYARD CHURCH NORTHWEST COLERAIN TOWNSHIP Three Weekend Services! Saturday - 5:30 pm Sunday - 9:30 & 11:15 am 9165 Round Top Rd (1/4 mi. so. of Northgate Mall)

513-385-4888 www.vcnw.org

Northwest Community Church 8735 Cheviot Rd, by Colerain HS Rev. Kevin Murphy, Pastor 513-385-8973 Worship and Sunday School 10AM Handicap Accessible/Nursery Available

Salem White Oak Presbyterian

Church By The Woods PC(USA) Sun Worship 10:00am Childcare Provided 3755 Cornell Rd 563-6447 www.ChurchByTheWoods.org ............................................

Film festival features award-winning movies Movie buffs and cultural arts enthusiasts will be able to see six award-winning and critically acclaimed films at the 2010 Cincinnati Jewish and Israeli Film Festival at the Mayerson JCC (8485 Ridge Road, next to Ronald Reagan Highway, in Amberley Village). The festival runs Saturday evening, Jan. 30 through Thursday, Feb. 4. Opening Night starts at 7 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 30, with the acclaimed film, “A Matter of Size.” This film was nominated for 14 Israeli Academy “Ofir” awards in 2009 and recently premiered at the San Francisco Jewish Film Festival, the first and largest Jewish film festival in the world. This light-hearted comedy is about a group of overweight friends who give up dieting and learn to accept themselves by becoming Sumo

wrestlers. This showing will be followed by a decadent chocolate dessert reception, included in the price for the opening night event. “Four Seasons Lodge,” a documentary of Holocaust survivors who come together each summer to dance, cook, fight, flirt and celebrate their survival, will be shown at 3 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 31, as a matinee, and again at 7 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 4. On Sunday evening, Jan. 31, audiences will enjoy the two-time award-winning film, “Noodle,” at 7 p.m. This comedic-drama tells the story of a woman whose life is turned upside down when she tries to help an abandoned boy reunite with his mother. “Love and Dance” will be shown at the JCC at 7 p.m. Monday, Feb. 1, and also as a matinee at 1 p.m.

Evelyn Place Monuments

Quality Granite & Bronze Monuments & Markers

858-6953

Owner: Pamela Poindexter

evelynplacemonuments.com 4952 Winton Rd. • Fairfield

Taiwanese Ministry 769-0725

2:00pm

3:30pm

UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST FLEMING ROAD United Church of Christ 691 Fleming Rd 522-2780 Rev Pat McKinney

Sunday School - All Ages - 9:15am Sunday Worship - 10:30am

Nursery Provided

St. Paul United Church of Christ 5312 Old Blue Rock Rd., off Springdale

MT. HEALTHY NIGHT OWL BINGO

Mt. Healthy High School Cafeteria 2046 Adams Rd. Mt. Healthy - 729-0131

WED. NIGHT ONLY

Pastor: Jessica Taft 385-9077

Doors Open 6:00 pm Bingo Starts 6:55 pm • No Computers Guaranteed $3500 Payout With 150 Players or More

Sunday Worship: 10:30am Sunday School: 9:15am

Nursery Available/Handicap Access

www.stpaulucccolerain.org

St Paul - North College Hill

6997 Hamilton Ave 931-2205 Rev. Virginia Duffy, Interim Minister Lollie Kasulones, Minister for Program Evelyn Osterbrock, Minister for Children Sundays: Music & Announcement 9:45am Worship at 10:00am Sunday School and Child Care Nurtured And Fellowship Groups For All Ages www.stpaulnch.org

MT. NOTRE DAME H.S. - EVERY TUESDAY EVE. SmokeFree Bingo Do O ors 5:00pen pm

711 East Columbia • Reading PROGRESSIVE GAME $13,500 & GROWING

aries Prelimin Start 6:45

Wednesday, Feb. 3. This movie (suitable for adults and kids, ages 12 and older) features a young boy who manages to bridge his family’s cultural differences through ballroom dancing classes and young love. “Saviors in the Night,” a powerful World War II drama, shows at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 2. This film premiered in the U.S. for the first time at the 2009 New York Jewish Film Festival, and premiered internationally at the Locarno International Film Festival in Switzerland. Based on the memoir of Holocaust survivor, Marga Spiegel, this film portrays how courageous German farmers risked their lives to hide a Jewish family. The five-time award winning movie “Bittersweet” takes a contemporary look at modern day life in Tel Aviv, and will be shown at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 3. This movie focuses on various life issues of a close-knit group of young and middle-aged adult friends, such as marriage, children, sexuality, and assisting aging parents. The cost of admission for the Opening Night showing of “A Matter of Size,” which includes the dessert reception, is $18 per person. Tickets for each matinee or evening film shown Jan. 31 through Feb. 4 are $10 per person, or $7 each for a senior adult (age 60+) or a student. A Festival Pass, good for all 6 movies and 1 free meal at the on-site J Café at the Mayerson JCC, may be purchased in advance for $50 (or $35 for a senior adult, age 60+, or a student). Films will be shown in the Amberley Room at the JCC, with graduated stadium-style seating for unobstructed viewing. Movie previews, reviews, and online Tickets may also be purchased by calling the Jewish Federation of Cincinnati at 985-1500.

Make Plans Early To Play New Year’s Eve Call Cathy at 513-494-1391 to get on mailing list for monthly specials.

Save the Animals Foundation BINGO

11330 Williamson Rd. off Cornell, in Blue Ash TUESDAY & FRIDAY Evenings - Doors Open 6pm

SHARE photos, events and stories at Cincinnati.com/community

1001527724-01

LUTHERAN

Friendship Baptist Church 8580 Cheviot Rd 741-7017 Gary Jackson, Senior Pastor Sunday School 10:00am Sunday Morning Services 8:45 & 11:00am Sunday Evening Services 6:30pm Wednesday Service 7:00pm AWANA (Wed) 7:00 - 8:45pm

Preliminary Games 7:00pm - Reg Games 7:30pm OVER 25 DIFFERENT INSTANTS

RINKS BINGO Non-Smoking

1001527773-01

INDEPENDENT BAPTIST

2010 Fine Arts Fund campaign's district chairs are, seated in front from left: Ann Meranus, Hyde Park District VII Chair; Christine G. Meyer, Indian Hill, Residential Division Chair; Dea Huber, Groesbeck, District IV Chair; middle row: Joanne Sloneker, Indian Hill, District 1 Chair; Linda Johnson, Florence, Ky., District Chair Boone County; Florence Johnson, Morrow, District Chair Warren County; Betty Cookendorfer, Harrison, District V Chair; Joan Miller, Monfort Heights, District IV Chair; back row: Lanita Bradley Boyd, Ft. Thomas, Ky., District Chair Campbell County; and Heather Bennett, Lebanon, District Chair Butler County/Community Chair Mason.

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Franklin Baur

Franklin C. Baur, 73, died Jan. 11. Survived by children David Baur, Deborah Henderson; two grandchildren. Preceded in death by daughter Kimberly Baur, parents John, Agnes Baur, five siblings. Services were Jan. 25 at St. Clement Church. Arrangements by Egbert Funeral Home.

Ronald Casteel

Ronald L. “Ron” Casteel, 49, of Whitewater Township, died Jan. 18. Her was a carpenter. Survived by his mother Bev Neumeister; siblings Debra Santa, Mike Casteel, Kevin Grosardt, Angela Briley and Diedre Neumeister; numerous nieces, nephews and great-niece and great-nephew. Services at 6:30 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 24, at First Baptist Church of Miamitown 5830 state Route 128, Miamitown. Memorials to: Neidhard-Minges Funeral Home, 3155 Harrison Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio 45211.

David Daugherty

David F. Daugherty, 63, of Colerain Township, died Jan. 14. Survived by his wife Betty (nee Beiderbeck); daughters Tina (Mike) Beckner and Kris (Jim) Harper; grandchildren Michaela, Lindsey and Avery; siblings Dennis (Kathy) Daugherty, Shari (Ron) Stehlin and Diane (Mike) Allen;. Services were Jan. 16 at Paul R. Young Funeral Home, Mount Healthy. Memorials to: St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital 501 St. Jude Place Memphis, TN 38105.

Mary Day

Mary Nutley Day, 80, died Jan. 18. She was a member of the Pearl Harbor Survivors Association. Survived by children Michele (the late Kenneth) Pennington, Debbie (Michael) Farrell, Michael Day, Kathy Blanton, Terry (Don) Wolf; grandchildren Jennifer, Kristin, Stephanie, Andrew, Amanda, Candice, Charles, Tyler, Michael, Jessica, Katelyn, Chelsea, Alex; great-grandchildren Andrew, Kyle, McKenna, Kendall, Aaliyah, Aalysah, Ahmya, Frankie, Farrell; brother Carl Nutley; niece Marilyn Grismere. Preceded in death by husband Allen Day. Services were Jan. 22 at Neidhard-Gillen Funeral Home. Memorials to the American Heart Association.

Marcella Douthwaite

Marcella Douthwaite, 90, Monfort Heights, died Jan. 19. Survived by daughters Janice, Karen Douthwaite; siblings Eileen Kramer, Harvey (Janice) Bernhardt. Preceded in death by husband Melvin Douthwaite, siblings Virginia Sorn, Ellen Nieman, Stanley, Edward, Ralph Bernhardt, Rita Wurzelbacher. Services were Jan. 23 at St. James Church. Arrangements by Mihovk-Rosenacker Funeral Home.

DEATHS

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POLICE

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REAL

Editor Jennie Key | jkey@communitypress.com | 853-6272

communitypress.com

Dorothy Erdman DransmanMagliano, 86, White Oak, died Jan. 16. Survived by husband Paul Magliano; children Michael (Teresa), Mark (Judy), Barry (Kim) Dransman, Pam (Rick) Fuller; stepson Victor (Patty) Magliano; grandchildren Jenny Lynn, Jenny Marie, Joe, Julie, Cathy, Michele, John, Dianne, David, Kristen, Lauren, Ryan; siblings Rose Denton, John Erdman, Lucille Suddendorf. Services were Jan. 20 at St. James Church. Arrangements by Mihovk-Rosenacker Funeral Home. Memorials to the Alzheimer’s Association.

Kenneth Edwards

Kenneth A. Edwards, 51, died Jan. 16. He worked in food service for the Sisters of Charity. Survived by mother Helen Pachoud; stepfather Ray Pachoud; siblings Tracey (Mike) Koth, Dan (Karen) Edwards; aunt Gloria (Gail) Stewart; many nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by father John Edwards, grandmother Lucille Hoffman. Services were Jan. 22 at St. Dominic. Arrangements by Vitt, Stermer & Anderson Funeral Home.

Mary Hayes

Mary A. (nee O’Brien) Hayes, 103, died Jan. 20. Preceded in death by her husband Milton M. Hayes; son Edward Hayes; five brothers and two sisters. Survived by grandson Thomas (Sandra) Hayes; daughter-in law Judith Thomas Hayes; sister of Gertrude Murphy; and many loving nieces and nephews. All services were held at the convenience of the family. Memorials to: Mary’s family, c/o Meyer & Geiser Funeral Home, 4989 Glenway Ave., 45238.

John Krebs

John E. Krebs, 87, Mount Healthy, died Jan. 19. He was an Army veteran of World War II. Survived by wife YvonneKrebs; children Jack (Marilyn), Jim (Debbie) Krebs, Jill (Gary) Guy; grandchildren Pat, Devon, Lisa, Doug, Brandy; two great-grandchildren. Services were Jan. 23 at Neidhard-Gillen Funeral Home. Memorials to the Freestore Foodbank.

Jerome Herman “Jerry” Krekeler, 80, Green Township, died Jan. 18. He was a chemical engineer. Survived by wife Teri Krekeler; children Tom, Dan (Yvonne) Krekeler, Kathy (Joe) Loxterkamp, Jayne (Jim) Close; grandchildren Ben, Kyle, Elizabeth, Jason, Abrielle, Jared, Felicia, Taylor, Connor, Kristin; many nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by siblings Rita Weber, Claude, Paul Krekeler. Services were Jan. 23 at St. Ignatius of Loyola. Arrangements by

Neidhard-Minges Funeral Home. Memorials to: Autism Society, 4340 East-West Highway, Suite 350, Bethesda, MD 20814 or St. Ignatius of Loyola Church, 5222 North Bend Road, Cincinnati, OH 45247.

Cornelius Kuyper

Cornelius J. Kuyper, 87, died Jan 16. Survived by children Donald J. (Wanda), Robert A., Kenneth N. (Phyllis) Kuyper; daughter-in-law Patty Kuyper; grandchildren Steven (Carrie), Scott (Amy) Kuyper, Sara (Steven) Renner; step-grandchildren James Townsend; great-grandchild Kayla Kuyper; step-great-grandchild of Tyler Vincent; and sister-in-law of Margaret Kuyper. Preceded in death by his wife Johanna H. (nee Boss), brother William D., and brothers Matthew and Thomas Kuyper. Services were Jan. 21 at Paul R. Young Funeral Home, Mount Healthy. Memorials to: Faith Fellowship Church, 6734 Bridgetown Road, Cincinnati, OH 45248.

Judy Mink

Judy Marie Mink, 46, of White Oak, died Jan. 19. Survived by her mother Phyllis; siblings Donna (Dennis) Laake, Jim (Kathy) Mink and Patty (Tom) Steffee; nieces and nephews aunt of Brian, Mark, Jeff and Monica Laake, Dan, Tim and Jill Mink, Ericka, Brad and Michael Steffee. Preceded in death by her father Donald Mink. Mass of Christian Burial was at St. Ann Church, Groesbeck. Memorials to: Heartland of Mount Airy c/o Kelly Ranson 2250 Banning Road, Cincinnati, OH, 45239. Mihovk-Rosenacker Funeral Homes handled arrangements.

Martin Norman

Martin Norman, 73, Cheviot, died Jan. 18. He was a plant manager for US Shoe. Survived by wife Jean Norman; children Robin (Jim) Mueller, Michael, Tim Norman, Toni (Rocky) Kraemer, Michele (Tom) Anderson, Mari (Jerry) Kitchens, Jenny (Tony) Dirksing; siblings Betty Simmons, Donald (Jean), Jack (Helen), Charles (Joyce), Lou (Shirley) Norman; 23 grandchildren; 10 great-grandchildren; many nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by brothers Robert, Forrest Norman. Services were Jan. 22 at St. Ignatius of Loyola. Arrangements by Neidhard-Minges Funeral Home. Memorials to Hematology-Oncology Clinic for Nursing Education, c/o Children’s Hospital Medical Center, or Vantage Oncology.

Pat Parr

William “Pat” Parr, 57, of Colerain Township, died Jan. 8. Survived by son Jared; siblings Tom (Mary Ann) Parr and Sharon King; and many nieces and nephews. Services were Jan. Jan. 14 at

PRESS

About obituaries Paul R. Young Funeral Home, Mount Healthy. Memorials to: Mount Healthy Alliance, P.O. Box 31028, Cincinnati, OH 45231.

Larry Rankin

Hutchinson), 87, died Jan. 22. She was a retired seamstress for Sunshine Cleaners. Preceded in death by her husband Ralph Schroder; and brothers Paul and Bud Hutchinson. Survived by children Bev (Greg) Wenz and Gary Schroder; grandchildren Heather (Damon) Roa, Brittany Schroder and Beth (Brian) Woods; great-grandchildren Olivia and DJ Roa and Morgan Woods; siblings Roberta Love, Jewell Meyer, Marvin Hutchinson, Dorothy Cichowski Services were Jan. 25, at Rebold, Rosenacker & Sexton Funeral Home, 3700 Glenmore Ave., Cheviot. Memorials to the charity of your choice.

Larry L. Rankin, 69, of Springfield Township, died Jan. 18. He was a volunteer for the Hamilton County Park and Recreation. Survived by wife Jean M. (nee Cahill); children Beth Ann (Jon) Woods, Michelle (Scott) Heim, Larry (Regina) Rankin, Jody (Ray) Zitkus and Jennifer Rankin; grandchildren Timothy and Abby Woods, Trevor and Megan Heim, Caitlyn and Jeremy Zitkus, Lucy and Maggie Rankin; mother Margaret (nee Toopes) Rankin; and sister Gerry (William) Hensley. Mass of Christian Burial was Jan. 21 at St. Patrick’s Church, Columbus. Memorials to: Hamilton Co. Parks and Recreation 10245 Winton Road, Cincinnati, OH 45231; Audubon Society of Cincinnati 3398 W. Galbraith Road, Cincinnati, OH 45239; or a charity of the donor’s choice. Paul R. Young Funeral Home, Mount Healthy, handled arrangements.

Carl Seider Jr., 74, died Jan. 17. Survived by children Carl III (Edna), Bobby (Lori), Colleen, David, James (Amy); seven grandchildren; sister Rosella Ginn. Preceded in death by sister Ann Marie Heller. Services were Jan. Jan. 20 at Paul R. Young Funeral Home, mount Healthy. Memorials to: American Cancer Society, Ohio Southwest Region, 2808 Reading Road, Cincinnati, OH 45206.

Joy Roberts

Stephanie Zeinner

Joy E. Roberts (nee Deckelmeier), 82 of Colerain Township, died Jan. 13. Survived by her husband William Roberts; children Tony (Kim), Terry, Marty Roberts and Kelly Wood; grandchildren A.J., Jeremy, Jake, Samantha, Megan, Luke and Savannah; sisters Sandy and Kathy. Preceded in death by brother Bob and sister Dee;. Services were Jan. 16 at Paul R. Young Funeral Home, Mount Healthy. Memorials to: National Breast Cancer Foundation 2600 Network Blvd. Suite 300 Frisco, Texas, 75034.

Carl Seider

Stephanie M. Zeinner, 25, died Jan. 16. Survived by parents Robert, Angela Zeinner; sister Ashley Zeinner; grandparents Robert, Maryellen Zeinner, Rita Freese; nephew Bradley Zeinner. Preceded in death by brother Robby Zeinner, grandfather Paul Freese. Services were Jan. 21 at St. James Church. Arrangements by Mihovk-Rosenacker Funeral Home. Memorials to: Children’s Hospital, 3333 Burnet Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45229.

Avery Sage

Avery J. Sage, 88, died Jan. 19. Preceded in death by his wife Florence Finke Sage and brother John B. Sage. Survived by children Jackie (Jan) Gardiner, Judge Michael J. (Deby) Sage, Barbara (Bob) Fulcher and Laura Sage; grandchildren Nate, Matt, Sage Mike, Bekka, Mandie, Lindsey, Lori, Rob, Melissa and Tim; and many nieces and nephews. Services were at Assumption Church. Memorials to: American Red Cross or Vitas Hospice. Mihovk-Rosenacker Funeral Homes handled arrangements.

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Ralph Williams

Ralph Kenneth Williams, 74, died Jan. 21. Survived by his wife Joan (nee Massel); children Steve (Linda) Williams, Debbie (Patrick) Hirt and Jeff (Tina) Williams; grandchildren Nathan and Jason Hirt and Ryan and Sara Williams; nieces and nephews Ric, Gayle, Mark, Pam, Lisa, Barbara, Lloyd and Nancy. Services were Jan. Jan. 22 at Paul R. Young Funeral Home, Mount Healthy. Memorials to: St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, 501 St. Jude Place, Memphis, TN 38105, or Northwest Community Church, 8735 Cheviot Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45251.

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Your Community newspaper serving Colerain Township, Green Township, Groesbeck, Monfort Heights, Pleasant Run, Seven Hills, White Oak

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January 27, 2010

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January 27, 2010

POLICE REPORTS CINCINNATI DISTRICT 5 Arrests/citations

Charles A. Robinson, born 1990, possession of drugs, 4956 Hawaiian Terrace, Jan. 16. Colleen Mayne, born 1975, possession of drug paraphernalia, 5817 Shadymist Lane, Jan. 14. Edison R. Thompson, born 1979, telecommunication harassment, 2745 Robers Ave., Jan. 15. George A. Bridges Jr., born 1969, menacing by stalking, assault and burglary, 2687 Hillvista Lane, Jan. 11. Kenneth Cornist, born 1968, possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of drugs and breaking and entering, 2641 Richwill Court, Jan. 18. Lemar W. Gibert, born 1960, assault, 2665 W. North Bend Road, Jan. 16. Dominique Burks, born 1990, unlawful use of vehicle joyriding, 4848 Hawaiian Terrace, Jan. 16. Makhtar- Fall, born 1986, theft motor vehicle and resisting arrest, 2762 W. North Bend Road, Jan. 14. Prince Ervin, born 1981, consuming liquor in vehicle, 2760 Hillvista Lane, Jan. 12. Ulema Arrazzaq, born 1979, simple assault, 5454 Bahama Terrace, Jan. 9.

Incidents Aggravated robbery

2568 W. North Bend Road, Jan. 14.

Burglary

2626 Chesterfield Court, Jan. 9. 2665 W North Bend Road, Jan. 7.

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Criminal mischief

Rape

Criminal simulation

Counterfeit money passed at 9500 Colerain Ave., Dec. 29.

Vehicle theft

Disorderly conduct

2641 Richwill Court, Jan. 9. 2762 W. North Bend Road, Jan. 14.

COLERAIN TOWNSHIP Arrests/Citations

Theresa Adams, 56, 5424 Hamilton Ave., theft at 9505 Colerain Ave., Jan. 9. Torry Asher, 48, 3737 Lovell , assault at 3737 Lovell , Jan. 2. Brandon Battle, 27, 8514 Pollax Court, possession of marijuana at 3363 Niagara Street, Jan. 9. Niambi Brady, 17, 312 W. McMicken, theft, obstructing official business at 8451 Colerain Ave., Jan. 5. Anthony Brumfield, 49, 8967 Zodiac Drive, assault at 8967 Zodiac Drive, Jan. 1. Randell Burns, 47, 6230 Erman Street, theft at 8451 Colerain Ave., Jan. 2. Scott Chaffen, 39, 5588 Bridgetown Road, theft at 3711 Stone Creek Blvd., Dec. 28. Sharon Chapple, 43, 2041 Fifth Ave., theft at 8451 Colerain Ave., Jan. 10. Robert Cornell, 39, 2806 Loorover Drive, theft at 3461 Joseph Drive, Dec. 31. Marcus Crittenden, 45, 4200 Colerain Ave., open container at 7300 Colerain Ave., Dec. 26. Richard Drew, 36, Unknown, violation of protection order at 2691 Springdale Road, Dec. 21. Maria Dunlap, 26, 541 Bull Oak Street, disorderly conduct at 8215 Colerain Ave., Dec. 29. Roy Hadley, 51, 2745 Town Terrace, domestic violence at 2745 Town Terrace, Jan. 10. Justin Hoffman, 27, 2601 Royal Glen, possession of drugs, drug paraphernalia at US 27 and Cross County Highway, Jan. 16. Katisha Logan, 28, 11037 Quail Ridge Court, drug abuse at 3573 Springdale Road, Jan. 1. James McArthur, 31, 8816 Wuest Road, theft at 10240 Colerain Ave., Jan. 3. Matt Mills, 21, 3498 W. Galbraith Road, criminal trespassing at 3498 W. Galbraith Road, Jan. 4. John Mistler, 29, 4365 Poole Road, operating motor vehicle intoxicated at 4340 Blue Rock Road, Dec. 26. Robert Myers, 43, 6607 Thompson Road, assault at 3814 Harrison Ave., Jan. 2. Tobias Reed, 24, 96 Grand Ave., assault at 10159 Arborwood Drive, Dec. 23. Michael Ridder, 28, 9656 Gertrude Lane, criminal trespassing at 9972 Arborwood Drive, Jan. 7.

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Identity fraud

Dana Roberts, 42, 1922 DeArmand Ave., open container at 9501 Colerain Ave., Jan. 8. Andrew Ross, 43, 5210 Montgomery Road, theft at 3711 Stone Creek Blvd., Dec. 18. Courtney Shaw, 21, 2975 High Forest Lane, disorderly conduct at 8504 Colerain Ave., Dec. 22. Norbert Stacey, 23, 3737 Lovell , assault at 3814 Harrison Ave., Jan. 2. Justin Stark, 18, 8686 Pringle Drive, underage consumption at 8282 Lyness drive, Dec. 27. Britton Stevenson, 22, 4641 Ashtiler Road, possession of marijuana at 7539 Colerain Ave., Jan. 2. Leverne Tuck, 49, 2863 Andina Ave., theft at 9040 Colerain Ave., Dec. 23. Shane Ulm, 21, 324 N. Jefferson, assault, disorderly conduct while intoxicated at 7954 Harrison Ave., Jan. 3. Bryant Wilson, 41, 2428 Bluffcrest Lane, assault at 3737 Stonecreek Blvd., Dec. 31. Rachel I. Vaught, 24, 6725 Kentford Court, drug paraphernalia at 6583 Glenway Ave., Jan. 11. Ronald Hodges, 34, 3101 Illinois, attempted theft and possessing criminal tools at 6251 Glenway Ave., Jan. 11. Ralph E. Collins II, 33, 2232 Roosevelt, complicity to theft at 6251 Glenway Ave., Jan. 11. Michael J. Roach, 27, 466 Greenwell Ave., operating vehicle under the influence, vandalism, leaving the scene and resisting arrest at 7229 Taylor Road, Jan. 11. Mary A. Feucht, 45, 3959 Delhi Pike, theft at 5071 Glencrossing Way, Jan. 12. Tyleen Moores, 50, 3955 Grace Ave., theft at 6550 Harrison Ave., Jan. 13. Sarah M. Green, 20, 3440 Eyrich Road, falsification at 6303 Harrison Ave., Jan. 13. Timothy A. Janson, 21, 6994 Hearne Road, obstructing official business and driving under suspension at 6303 Harrison Ave., Jan. 13. Juvenile, 15, theft at 3211 Dickinson Road, Jan. 14. James A. Brown, 24, 3130 Westwood Northern Blvd., carrying concealed weapons and having weapons under disability at North Bend Road and Boomer Road, Jan. 16. Daryl W. Strunk, 23, 2621 Montana Ave. No. 1, criminal damaging and disorderly conduct at 4419 Andreas Ave., Jan. 13. Joseph Reynolds, 30, 4258 Simca Lane, criminal damaging at 4258 Simca Lane, Jan. 17. James E. Durham, 60, 5623 Jessup Road, domestic violence at 5623 Jessup Road, Jan. 17. Tommy V. Helms Jr., 38, 5427 Bluesky Drive, robbery at 7060 state Route 128, Jan. 17. Brandon S. Goff, 25, 7054 State Route 128, complicity at 7060 state Route 128, Jan. 17. James A. Sizer, 47, 4090 Valley Drive, possession of drug abuse instruments at 6150 Harrison Ave., Jan. 16. Vicky Rigney, 48, 7760 Southern Wood Drive, disorderly conduct at 2980 North Bend Road, Jan. 15. Juvenile, disorderly conduct at 6375 Harrison Ave., Jan. 15. Shawn M. Byrne, 32, 2630 Maryland Ave., drug possession at 5200 North Bend Road, Jan. 18. Mary Leesman, 49, 5778 Breezewood, possession of marijuana at Bridgetown Road and Weirman, Jan. 16. Juvenile male, 15, , domestic violence at 8323 Coghill Lane, Dec. 30. Juvenile male, 17, assault at 7954 Harrison Ave., Jan. 3. Juvenile female, 14, , aggravated menacing at 9960 Arborwood , Dec. 19.

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About police reports

Fluids drained from vehicle at 2383 Hidden Meadows Drive, Dec. 19.

On Shadymist Lane, Jan. 8. Theft 2654 W. North Bend Road, Jan. 11. 5206 Colerain Ave., Jan. 8. 5730 Colerain Ave., Jan. 12.

Juvenile male, 16, , obstructing official business at 3775 Alexis Road, Dec. 24. Juvenile female, 17, , domestic violence at 10867 Pippin Road, Jan. 2.

Reports/Incidents Aggravated robbery

Victim threatened and unknown amount of currency removed at 3385 Springdale Road, Dec. 31. Victim threatened with gun and $899 removed from register at 9490 Colerain Ave., Dec. 30. Two suspects armed with handguns robbed Payless Shoe Source of an undetermined amount of money at 6560 Harrison Ave., Jan. 11. Victim robbed of money and a cell phone at gunpoint at 6563 Hearne Road No. 1601, Jan. 15.

Breaking and entering

Business entered at 8371 Colerain Ave., Dec. 24. Property entered and copper of unknown value removed at 2942 Banning Road, Dec. 24. Building entered and items valued at $1,300 removed at 10160 Arborwood Drive, Dec. 29. Copper wire stolen from tool box at construction site at 6302 Harrison Ave., Jan. 11. Leaf blower and chainsaw stolen from home’s shed at 5511 West Fork Road, Jan. 11. Several power tools and aluminum ladders and scaffolding equipment stolen from storage unit at Attic Storage at 5492 Muddy Creek, Jan. 12. Microwave, oven and vanity cabinet stolen from three homes under construction at 7512 Bridgepoint Pass, 7154 and 7126 Tressel Wood Drive, Jan. 13. Hunting equipment stolen from one vehicle, two CDs and money stolen from second vehicle, and car stereo, 15 CDs, MP3 player and amplifier stolen from third vehicle at 6572 Wesselman Road, Jan. 14. Front glass window broken during break in attempt at Ameristop at 3670 Muddy Creek, Jan. 18.

Burglary

Residence entered and jewelry box and contents, laptop and gifts of unknown value removed at 8406 Pippin Road, Dec. 20. Residence entered at 5619 Desertgold Drive, Dec. 26. Residence entered and TV, jewelry, coins of unknown value removed at 3247 Donnybrook Lane, Jan. 7. Attempt made at 6614 Cheviot Road, Dec. 24. Residence entered and TV, Wii valued at $1,200 removed at 3596 Poole Road, Dec. 29. Residence entered at 10153 Pippin Meadows Drive, Dec. 30. Residence entered and personal information and jewelry of unknown value removed at 2563 Adams Road, Dec. 28. Three firearms, money, two check books and two MP3 players stolen from home at 6211 Cheviot Road No. 11, Jan. 16.

Child endangering

Juvenile stated he was hit with a stick by a teacher at 2941 W. Galbraith Road, Dec. 30.

Criminal damaging

Vehicle scratched at 11508 Colerain Ave., Jan. 1. Vehicle window broken out at 9757 Gibraltar Drive, Jan. 10. Eggs thrown at residence at 9962 Arborwood Drive, Dec. 18. Window shattered with rock at 3312 W. Galbraith Road, Jan. 11. Vehicle signal level broken at 3414 Oakmeadow Lane, Jan. 11. Property damaged by vehicle at 8682 Cheviot Road, Jan. 9. Vehicle door and window damaged at 8373 Firshade Drive, Jan. 11. Siding of unknown value removed at 7306 Harrison Ave., Jan. 11. Vehicle entered and signal lever broken at 3414 Oakmeadow Lane, Jan. 11. Vehicle window damaged at 8021 Vegas Drive, Jan. 9. Truck spray painted at 10132 Pottinger Road, Dec. 23. Vehicle spray painted at 3109 Regal Lane, Dec. 27. Gate and garage door damaged at 3988 W. Kemper Road, Dec. 27. Windows damaged at 9924 Loralinda Drive, Dec. 29. Eggs thrown on vehicle causing damage to paint at 5270 Lakefront Drive, Jan. 12. Two vehicles shot with paintballs at 4242 Westwood Northern Blvd., Jan. 12. Flower pot broken on driveway at 5546 Silverpoint Drive, Jan. 15. Mailbox spray-painted with graffiti at 4118 School Section Road, Jan. 14. Two windows broken on vehicle at 3471 Hader Ave., Jan. 16. Rear window broken on vehicle at 4212 Victorian Green Drive No. 15, Jan. 17.

Criminal damaging, theft

CD player and saw valued at $365 removed at 3341 Grovewood Drive, Dec. 24.

Victim reported at 2890 Banning Road, Dec. 23.

Identity theft

Victim reported at 11952 Wincanton Drive, Jan. 5.

Menacing

Victim threatened at 4776 Springdale Road, Dec. 21.

Misuse of credit card

Victim reported at 2420 Garrison Drive, Jan. 11.

Robbery

Victim threatened at 3118 Springdale Road, Dec. 23.

Safecracking

Reported at 3112 Springdale Road, Dec. 28.

Sexual imposition

Victim reported on Springdale Road, Dec. 31.

Tampering with coin machines Reported at 11939 Hamilton Ave., Dec. 28.

Theft

Wallet and contents of unknown value removed from purse at 3564 Springdale Road, Dec. 30. Vehicle damaged and stereo and garage opener of unknown value removed at 9893 Loralinda, Dec. 24. Game systems and games valued at $220 removed at 3375 Alexis Road, Dec. 21. Victim reported at 2498 Greens Rings Court, Jan. 1. Vehicle entered and GPS valued at $200 removed at 7270 Locustview Lane, Dec. 24. Wheels and tires valued at $2,000 removed at 9101 Colerain Ave., Dec. 28. Attempt made at 9582 Colerain Ave., Dec. 28. Wallet and contents of unknown value removed at 9501 Colerain Ave., Dec. 29. Vehicle removed at 9406 Pippin Road, Dec. 29. Vehicle entered and tools valued at $270 removed at 8430 Ash Hollow Drive, Jan. 11. Wallet removed from shopping cart at 8451 Colerain Ave., Jan. 10. Vehicle removed at 3235 Nandale Drive, Jan. 8. Vehicle entered and $50 removed at 2799 W. Galbraith Road, Jan. 10. Mail removed from mailbox at 3131 Preserve Lane, Dec. 23. Variety of tools and medication of unknown value removed at 10360 Scull Road, Dec. 23. Vehicle entered and medication of unknown value removed at 3385 Springdale Road, Dec. 27. $25.14 in gas pumped and not paid for at 2691 Springdale Road, Dec. 25. Wallet and contents of unknwon value removed from vehicle at 9189 Colerain Ave., Dec. 30. Cameras valued at $820 removed at 8452 Sunlight Drive, Dec. 27.

Unauthorized use of motor vehicle

Vehicle not returned to owner at 8371 Livingston Road, Jan. 9.

Violation of court order: truancy Reported at 10761 Pippin Road, Dec. 17.

GREEN TOWNSHIP Arrests/Citations

Rachel I. Vaught, 24, 6725 Kentford Court, drug paraphernalia at 6583 Glenway Ave., Jan. 11. Ronald Hodges, 34, 3101 Illinois, attempted theft and possessing criminal tools at 6251 Glenway Ave., Jan. 11. Ralph E. Collins II, 33, 2232 Roosevelt, complicity to theft at 6251 Glenway Ave., Jan. 11. Michael J. Roach, 27, 466 Greenwell Ave., operating vehicle under the influence, vandalism, leaving the scene and resisting arrest at 7229 Taylor Road, Jan. 11. Mary A. Feucht, 45, 3959 Delhi Pike, theft at 5071 Glencrossing Way, Jan. 12. Tyleen Moores, 50, 3955 Grace Ave., theft at 6550 Harrison Ave., Jan. 13. Sarah M. Green, 20, 3440 Eyrich Road, falsification at 6303 Harrison Ave., Jan. 13. Timothy A. Janson, 21, 6994 Hearne Road, obstructing official business and driving under suspension at 6303 Harrison Ave., Jan. 13. Juvenile, 15, theft at 3211 Dickinson Road, Jan. 14. James A. Brown, 24, 3130 Westwood Northern Blvd., carrying concealed weapons and having weapons under disability at North Bend Road and Boomer Road, Jan. 16. Daryl W. Strunk, 23, 2621 Montana Ave. No. 1, criminal damaging and disorderly conduct at 4419 Andreas Ave., Jan. 13. Joseph Reynolds, 30, 4258 Simca Lane, criminal damaging at 4258 Simca Lane, Jan. 17. James E. Durham, 60, 5623 Jessup Road, domestic violence at 5623 Jessup Road, Jan. 17. Tommy V. Helms Jr., 38, 5427 Bluesky Drive, robbery at 7060 state Route 128, Jan. 17. Brandon S. Goff, 25, 7054 State Route 128, complicity at 7060 state Route 128, Jan. 17. James A. Sizer, 47, 4090 Valley Drive, possession of drug abuse instruments

The Community Press publishes the names of all adults charged with offenses. The information is a matter of public record and does not imply guilt or innocence. To contact your local police department: • Colerain Township: Chief Daniel P. Meloy, 245-6600. • Green Township: Chief Bart West, 574-0007; vandalism hotline 574-5323. • Hamilton County: Sheriff Simon Leis, 825-1500. • Springfield Township: Chief David Heimpold, 7291300. at 6150 Harrison Ave., Jan. 16. Vicky Rigney, 48, 7760 Southern Wood Drive, disorderly conduct at 2980 North Bend Road, Jan. 15. Juvenile, disorderly conduct at 6375 Harrison Ave., Jan. 15. Shawn M. Byrne, 32, 2630 Maryland Ave., drug possession at 5200 North Bend Road, Jan. 18. Mary Leesman, 49, 5778 Breezewood, possession of marijuana at Bridgetown Road and Weirman, Jan. 16.

Reports/Incidents Aggravated robbery

Two suspects armed with handguns robbed Payless Shoe Source of an undetermined amount of money at 6560 Harrison Ave., Jan. 11. Victim robbed of money and a cell phone at gunpoint at 6563 Hearne Road No. 1601, Jan. 15.

Breaking and entering

Copper wire stolen from tool box at construction site at 6302 Harrison Ave., Jan. 11. Leaf blower and chainsaw stolen from home’s shed at 5511 West Fork Road, Jan. 11. Several power tools and aluminum ladders and scaffolding equipment stolen from storage unit at Attic Storage at 5492 Muddy Creek, Jan. 12. Microwave, oven and vanity cabinet stolen from three homes under construction at 7512 Bridgepoint Pass, 7154 and 7126 Tressel Wood Drive, Jan. 13. Hunting equipment stolen from one vehicle, two CDs and money stolen from second vehicle, and car stereo, 15 CDs, MP3 player and amplifier stolen from third vehicle at 6572 Wesselman Road, Jan. 14. Front glass window broken during break in attempt at Ameristop at 3670 Muddy Creek, Jan. 18.

Burglary

Three firearms, money, two check books and two MP3 players stolen from home at 6211 Cheviot Road No. 11, Jan. 16.

Criminal damaging

Eggs thrown on vehicle causing damage to paint at 5270 Lakefront Drive, Jan. 12. Two vehicles shot with paintballs at 4242 Westwood Northern Blvd., Jan. 12. Flower pot broken on driveway at 5546 Silverpoint Drive, Jan. 15. Mailbox spray-painted with graffiti at 4118 School Section Road, Jan. 14. Two windows broken on vehicle at 3471 Hader Ave., Jan. 16. Rear window broken on vehicle at 4212 Victorian Green Drive No. 15, Jan. 17.

Domestic dispute

Argument between family members at Starvue Drive, Jan. 12. Argument between parent and child at Autumn Lane, Jan. 13. Argument between man and woman at Lawrence Road, Jan. 15. Argument between spouses at Harrison Avenue, Jan. 16.

Passing bad checks

Check written on account with insufficient funds passed at Dean R. Bacovin Jewelers at 5833 Cheviot Road, Jan. 15.

Property damage

Vehicles driven through home’s yard at 5210 Spechtview Drive, Jan. 16.

Theft

GPS stolen from vehicle at 3871 Robinhill Drive, Dec. 29. Cell phone and bottle of wine stolen from vehicle at 3911 Robinhill Drive, Dec. 29. Vehicle registration stolen from car at 4408 Simca Lane, Dec. 29. Prescription medicine stolen from purse at 5423 San Rio Court, Jan. 1. Money stolen from lock box in home at 3676 Hubble Road, Jan. 1. Tool bag, two drills and a Sawzalll stolen from vehicle at 3028 Diehl Road, Jan. 1. Television stolen from room at Holiday Inn Express at 5505 Rybolt Road, Jan. 1. Video camera, digital camera, MP3 player, five car wheels, several pieces of jewelry and power tools stolen from home at 1869 Leona Drive, Jan. 2. Christmas decoration stolen from home’s yard at 7243 Pickway Drive, Jan. 2. Assorted children’s clothing stolen from Family Dollar at 5527 Bridgetown Road, Jan. 2.


Travel

January 27, 2010

Northwest Press

B9

Readers on vacation Marianne Adams took the Northwest Press along when she traveled to Mammoth Cave National Park with her granddaughters, Samantha Kerth and Sarah Eckhoff.

Carl and Rita Kuhn took the Northwest Press along on a 14-day cruise of the southern Caribbean. Stops included the Bahamas, Virgin Islands, St. Barts, Martinique, Barbados, Grenada, Bonaire, Aruba and Curacao. Five Colerain High School students participated in a 16-day Ohio Ambassadors of Music Tour of Europe during the past summer. The honor musicians performed concerts in London, England; Paris, France; Crans-Montana, Switzerland: Innsbruck, Austria; and Rothenburg, Germany. Pictured at the Matterhorn are Patience Estes, Morgan Ramey, Jacob Cain, Steven Funke and Benjamin Loyer.

Send your vacation photos to northwestpress@communitypress.com, subject line “Readers on vacation.”

Bucky and Judé Bucholtz of Colerain Township share the Northwest Press with 250,000 of their newest friends at the Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta, the largest hot air balloon event in the world.

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BED AND BREAKFAST

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Bed & Breakfast Feature of the Week

The Doolin House Bed & Breakfast

DESTIN. Local owner, 1 or 2 luxury condos. 2 BR, 2 BA overlooking gulf, sugar white beaches. Heated pool, hot tubs & more. 937-767-8449,or visit www.majesticsunindestin.com

Somerset, Kentucky’s Premiere Inn Located Just Minutes from Lake Cumberland

BED AND BREAKFAST THE DOOLIN HOUSE INN. Premier Inn. Gourmet breakfast. Minutes from Lake Cumberland. Join us for a romantic weekend/women’s retreat. 606-678-9494 doolinhouse.com

BUS TOURS

WASHINGTON, D.C. - Last Call!! Cherry Blossom Time, March 26-29. Only $425 pp. • NIAGARA FALLS & TORONTO - June 21-25, $499 pp. 513-245-9992, Cincy Group Travel, www.grouptrips.com/cincy

FLORIDA $99/nt*. Sanibel & Boca Grande Discover the charm & comfort of beachfront vaca tion homes, cozy cottages or spacious affordable condos. *Rates from. Grande Island Vacations. 800-962-3314 bocagrandevacations.com

Beautiful Seagrove Beach Rent & Relax. Nr Destin, between famous Seaside & Rosemary Beach. Cozy Cottages to Gulf Front Condos. Web Specials. 1-800-537-5387 www.garrettbeachrentals.com

There is a joke among friends here, “It’s a Phoenix that has risen from the ashes. ”When Charles and Allison Hahn Sobieck purchased the property at 502 North Main Street (in Somerset, Kentucky), there was a lot of work to be done, to say the least. With the vision of a B & B and a home in ruins, there were little choices. The dilapidated structure was removed, then reconstructed as it had been in the 1850’s. It’s a brand new home. A bit of an unusual concept for a bed and breakfast. “We reconstructed the home from scratch. This gave us the benefit of designing every amenity possible along the way, ”said Allison Sobieck, owner. Every room is equipped with many amenities you don’t often find in a traditional bed and breakfast, but rather a fine hotel. Every room has a full sized closet with a pair of micro-fiber robes hanging in them, 400- count Egyptian cotton sheets, cable TV with DVD players, queen sized beds, and a host of other things. For instance, 2 rooms have gas fireplaces and 3 rooms have whirlpool tubs. We even offer many add on amenities such as massage, dinner, flowers, etc…

The rooms are only half of the reason to come to The Doolin House. Owners Charles and Allison just happen to both be chefs. Some of the breakfast specialties include Caramel Banana French Toast and Southern Eggs Benedict (2 fried green tomatoes topped with 2 slices of smoked bacon, 2 eggs over easy and Hollandaise). Chuck is usually in charge of breakfast and tries to do new and different things every day. Chef Chuck pointed out, “It’s fun to experiment with breakfast. It’s the one meal that encompasses all foods. It’s perfectly acceptable to see smoked salmon or a pork cutlet at the breakfast table. ”For those in no rush to rise and shine, breakfast in bed is served at no additional charge. When you need a weekend get away that’s not too far from home or you are planning your summer vacation to beautiful Lake Cumberland, remember that The Doolin House Bed and Breakfast is only a phone call away.

DESTIN. Luxury 2 BR, 2 BA oceanfront condos. Heated pool, spas, kids pool & tennis. Sleeps 6. Local owner. www.us-foam.com/destin. D 513-528-9800, E 513-752-1735 EAST COAST, NEW SMYRNA BEACH Luxurious oceanfront condos & vacation homes. Closest & best beach to Disney. Ocean Properties Vacation Rentals 800-728-0513 www.oceanprops.com

MADEIRA BEACH. Great studio units across from beach, 2 hrs to Dis ney. Heat’d pool, free WiFi, pets OK. $92/nt, $546/wk. 1-866-394-0751 www.Holiday-Isles.com

NEW YORK

SOUTH CAROLINA

MANHATTAN--NYC HOTEL $109/2 persons. Singles $104. Suites $119-$139. Lincoln Ctr area, Hudson River views, 18 flrs, kitchenette, 5 mins to midtown, safe, quiet, luxury area. RIVERSIDE TOWER, Riverside & 80th St. Call 1-800-724-3136 or visit: www.riversidetowerhotel.com

SEABROOK EXCLUSIVES Villas & Private Homes. Ocean, golf, tennis, equestrian. Pet friendly rentals. Free brochure. Book online! 888-718-7949. www.seabrookexclusives.com

NORTH CAROLINA EMERALD ISLE. Ocean Front luxury vacation homes with community pool. Call for free brochure. 1-252-354-5555 Spinnaker’s Reach Realty www.SpinnakersReach.com

SOUTH CAROLINA

HILTON HEAD • Mariott Five û Resort. PGA Heritage Golf Week. Ocean front, 2BR, 2BA, sleeps 8. Tennis & golf package. Discounted rate. Local owner. 513-324-8164 N. MYRTLE BEACH Coastal Condos, Inc. 1-4 bdrm oceanfront & ocean view units. Call 1-800-951-4880 or visit www.coastalcondos.com

For more information, Visit the website at: www.doolinhouse.com or call 606-678-9494

TENNESSEE 1-7 Affordable, Deluxe Chalets & Cabin Rentals. Pigeon Forge in the Smokies. Vacation/Dollywood Specials. Free brochure. Call 1-800-833-9987. www.firesidechalets.com

A Beautiful Cabin Getaway Gatlinburg/Pigeon Forge. Hot tub, jacuzzi, fireplace, gas grill. $85/nt, 5 nt special $375. 800-793-8699. smokymtncrossrdrentals.com

CHALET VILLAGE www.chaletvillage.com Cozy cabins to luxurious chalets Fully furnished, hot tubs, pool tables. Check SPECIALS, availability and book online 24/7, or call 1-800-722-9617

GATLINBURG. Affordable rates. Fully furnished. 1-8 bdrms. Chalets, Cabins, Privacy, Views, Hot Tubs, Jacuzzis, Fireplaces. 1-800-235-2661 www.alpinechaletrentals.com

1001523976-01

FLORIDA

FLORIDA

SIESTA KEY. Gulf front condo. Our gated complex on the World’s Best Rated Beaches! Bright and airy, nicely appointed. All amenities. Cinci owner, 513-232-4854

NORTH MYRTLE BEACH. Oceanfront condos. 1,2 & 3 bedroom units with pools, spas & tennis. Hi-speed Internet, kiddie waterslide. 800-345-5617 www.oceancreek.net

INDIANA Clearwater/Indian Rocks Beach GULF BEACH’S BEST VALUE! Beach front condo with 2 BR, 2 BA, pool. May rates. • 513-770-4243 www.bodincondo.com

CLEARWATER - Indian Rocks Beach 2br, 2ba Gulf Front condo. Heated pool, balcony. Many up grades. 513-771-1373, 260-3208 www.go-qca.com/condo

NASHVILLE • Melt Away Your Winter Blues in front a Welcoming Fireplace or enjoy our Heated Pool at the Comfort Inn, Brown County. 812-988-6118 ChoiceHotels.com

NORTH MYRTLE BEACH, SC Fantastic Specials Available!! 100’s of Oceanfront/view Homes & Condos

Call for free brochure 866-780-8334 www.northmyrtlebeachtravel.com

GATLINBURG. Choose a 2 or 3 BR chalet, conveniently located, richly appointed and meticulously main tained. Pet friendly. 877-215-3335 or visit www.marysescape.com

www.AUNTIEBELHAMS.com Gatlinburg-Pigeon Forge. Vacation in a beautiful log cabin or chalet with hot tub, Jacuzzi, views & pool tables. Call about specials! 800-436-6618


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January 27, 2010

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