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Your Community Press newspaper serving Blue Ash, Montgomery, Sycamore Township, Symmes Township E-mail: nesuburban@communitypress.com We d n e s d a y, A p r i l 1 4 , 2 0 1 0

Robert Clopton Jr. with Loveland Symmes firefighters and paramedics

Volume 47 Number 8 © 2010 The Community Press ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Arboretum manager advocates conifers

Chris Daeger isn’t interested in the trendy or the fantastical. He doesn’t really care what this year’s “it” plant is. The manager of the Rowe Arboretum in Indian Hill, Daeger has had an almost lifelong love affair with conifers. This year he’ll share the love with visitors to the 2010 Cincinnati Flower Show with a conifer exhibit within the show’s Grand Marquee tent. FULL STORY, B1

Council approves design rules

Montgomery City Council has approved new rules designed to create a sharperlooking Montgomery Road hospital corridor by requiring natural materials and muted colors. Although Bethesda North Hospital is the most highprofile business in the area, the hospital itself is not in the corridor stretching between Pfeiffer and Weller roads because it is situated some distance off Montgomery Road. FULL STORY, A2

Blue Ash sets budget priorities

Blue Ash has spent $28,000 on consultants to help it set priorities in its budget and is dispatching them everywhere for public input. FULL STORY, A3

AD running for state board

The director of athletics at Sycamore High School is campaigning for one of two teacher representative seats on the board of the State Teachers Retirement System of Ohio. James Stoll has two opponents in the race for the four-year terms on the Retirement Board that begin Sept. 1. They are Mark Hill and Dale Price, both math teachers, with the Worthington City Schools and the Toledo Public Schools, respectively. FULL STORY, A3

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Tree City a growth opportunity? By Jeanne Houck

Montgomery hosts 2010 program

jhouck@communitypress.com

Montgomery’s commitment to trees has led to the city being chosen to host the 2010 Tree City USA Program and Luncheon Friday, April 23. Some 165 representatives from as many as 40 southwest Ohio communities will meet at the Montgomery Inn on Montgomery Road, where the Arbor Day Foundation and the Ohio Department of Natural Resources will present Tree City USA awards. Tree City USA is a program that assists and recognizes community forestry programs. It’s sponsored by the Arbor Day Foundation with the cooperation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Forest Service and the National Association of State Foresters. Montgomery has been a Tree City for 14 years. In 2009, based on 10 years of accomplishments as of 2008, the city was awarded Sterling Tree City USA status. “Trees in our city increase property values, enhance the economic vitality of business areas and beautify our community,” said Bob Nikula, Montgomery’s public works director. “Montgomery believes trees are important enough to include a reference to this in our Vision Statement and we have worked diligently to earn 11 growth awards – 10 are needed to earn Sterling Tree City USA status. Between 2000 and 2008, only 211 communities nationwide – about 23 communities per year – earned the sterling award and Montgomery was one of those 211 communities,” Nikula said. To qualify as a Tree City USA, a city or town must have a tree board or department, a tree-care ordinance, a community forestry program with an annual budget of at least $2 per capita and an Arbor Day observance and proclamation. Higher levels of tree care lead to more awards. Montgomery has a city arborist, Terry Willenbrink, who also is the city’s street maintenance supervisor. He makes $65,666 a year. Nikula said Montgomery plants trees on public properties every year and currently is adding 30 more to the seven-acre Johnson Nature Preserve on Deerfield Road, where a tornado in April 1999 destroyed more than 90 percent of the preserve’s mature trees. In 2009, Montgomery established a street tree program to give property owners $50 to offset the costs of planting a tree on public property in front of their homes. Blue Ash is not a Tree City USA, nor does it employ a city arborist.

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Montgomery has a city arborist – Terry Willenbrink, seen here checking a tree for cicada damage – who also serves as street maintenance supervisor.

Tr e e C i t y U S A

Blue Ash Deer Park Evendale Glendale Loveland Madeira Montgomery Sharonville Springdale Sycamore Symmes Wyoming

Population

Tree City

Arborist

13,000 5,982 3,100 2,300 12,600 9,000 10,200 13,000 10,500 20,433 14,900 8,300

No No No Yes No No Yes No Yes No No Yes

No No No Matt Dickman No No *Terry Willenbrink No Darrell Perkins No No David Shaw

Cost per capita

58 6 9 15

*Also serves as street maintenance supervisor. “However, we have several grounds staffers who are extremely knowledgeable about trees,” said Sue Bennett, Blue Ash’s public information officer. “In terms of city-owned property, we annually plant new or replacement trees as needed. In terms of private property, for many years the city has had a residential tree program which subsidizes the cost for new trees on residential properties. The trees must be planted in a publicly visible location,” Bennett said. “The maximum is two trees per residence, and the discount is 50 percent of the cost of the tree – including its planting – up to a maximum of $150 per tree.” Bennett said the maintenance

of green space is important to Blue Ash. “Having healthy trees is not only important from an aesthetic viewpoint, but also from a safety standpoint – especially for visitors and patrons of our parks area, including the golf course,” she said. “Though our budget for the residential tree program has been slightly reduced this year, we do not anticipate having to turn down requests. The city’s expected expenditures related to trees on public properties is not expected to vary from past years’ expenses.” Blue Ash has budgeted about $15,000 for its residential tree program and about $10,000 to plant trees in parks, city grounds and golf areas.

To be or not to be a Tree City

Symmes Township and Sycamore Township do not have the Tree City designation. Symmes Township administrator Gerald Beckman said he is unsure what the title “Tree City” could do to help the township. “My question is: What’s the advantage?” Beckman said. He said he would not recommend something to the board of trustees simply for the publicity. He also said he was not sure of the benefit of adding an arborist to the township payroll when the township already has a small staff. Sycamore Township does not have the designation of Tree City USA, but township Administrator Rob Molloy said tree planting is a part of most of the road projects in the township. He said trees will be planted on the north side of East Galbraith Road between the curb and the sidewalk after the widening project is complete. He said the maintenance department also will be planting trees at the new Schuler Athletic Complex to provide shade around the park and to block out some of the noise from Interstate 275. Sycamore Township does offer a Memorial Tree Planting Program where residents can plant a 2-foot tree with a 3-by-5 inch bronze engraved plaque in one of the township parks for $250. For more information and a list of tree choices, contact Sycamore Township maintenance department at 792-7257.

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News

Northeast Suburban Life April 14, 2010

Council approves new design rules By Jeanne Houck jhouck@communitypress.com

Montgomery City Council has approved new rules designed to create a sharper-looking Montgomery Road hospital corridor by requiring natural materials and muted colors. Although Bethesda North Hospital is the most highprofile business in the area, the hospital itself is not in the corridor stretching between Pfeiffer and Weller roads because it is situated

some distance off Montgomery Road. The hospital does owns three office buildings that front Montgomery Road, and those are subject to the building design changes encapsulated in zoning code amendments sent to city council for action by the Montgomery Planning Commission. The recommended changes are the result of consultations with McBride Dale Clarion of Fairfax and public meetings last fall. The changes approved

last week apply to property cleared of buildings and redeveloped, building expansions resulting in more than a 25-percent increase in the area of exterior walls and building renovations where the entire exterior facade material is replaced. The design rules do not apply to residential structures such as apartment complexes in the area. Bethesda officials originally had problems with a number of proposed design changes. The planning commission made some adjustments based on the concerns but disagreements remained on the percentage of a wall that can use accent material. Bethesda officials wanted Montgomery to allow

Rules outlined

accent materials on buildings to comprise up to 45 percent of a facade and to allow metal and pre-cast panels to qualify as accent materials. The planning commission settled upon 30 percent for accent materials, but exempted energy-efficient panels from the calculations. “The (design) guidelines will establish limited, reasonable standards that will govern future redevelopment of properties fronting Montgomery Road between Pfeiffer and Weller,” said Frank Davis, Montgomery’s community development director. “The guidelines will insure the continued quality architecture, design and materials that Bethesda

Here are some of the new building design rules adopted by Montgomery City Council for the Montgomery Road hospital corridor: • Fifty percent of each visible facade of a building must be covered in brick, stone or wood. The city may approve materials made to look like brick, stone or wood. • Up to 30 percent of each visible facade of a building may be covered in an accent material such as decorative concrete, stucco and non-reflective metal panels.

• Facade colors should be the natural color of the material or another muted color. • Facade materials may not be made of vinyl, aluminum siding, standard concrete masonry units, corrugated steel and highly reflective materials such as mirrored glass and chrome. • Parking is restricted to the rear or side of a building and not the front unless the lot is too narrow to provide access to the rear. • Equipment on rooftops must be screened from sight. Reported by Jeanne Houck

North Hospital and other owners have used in recent years,” Davis said. Hospital officials said they were happy to participate in the design initiative. “Bethesda North supports the city in its efforts to develop and maintain archi-

tectural standards which reflect the uniqueness of the Montgomery community,” said Jerry Oliphant, executive vice president and chief operating officer for TriHealth, the partnership of Bethesda North and Good Samaritan Hospitals.

Trustees recommend liquor license for theater By Amanda Hopkins

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The Sycamore Township Board of Trustees will sign their names to a letter recommending approval by the state for a TREX transfer of liquor license to the new Kenwood Theater. A TREX transfer allows a liquor license to be brought into a taxing district that may be at the maximum allowed number of liquor

licenses for that taxing district. Planning and zoning administrator Greg Bickford said before the transfer is approved, the township trustees had to sign a letter of approval. Gary Goldman, president of Theater Management Group, which will manage the new Kenwood Theater at Kenwood Place, said he is requesting a liquor license that will allow him to serve beer, wine and liquor in the theater before or during movies. Goldman also manages the Esquire Theater in Clifton and Mariemont Theater in Mariemont Square.

“It’s a trend across the country (to serve alcohol in a theater),” Goldman said. He said several theaters in Greater Cincinnati serve alcohol. A few residents attended the public hearing on April 1 before the regular meeting to voice their disapproval of a liquor license. “I don’t see (why) you need it,” said resident Charlie Myers. Myers lives on Duneden Avenue directly behind the proposed theater site and is opposed to the entire idea of the theater. Township resident William Smith said approving a liquor license would just promote trouble.

John Silverman from Midland Atlantic Development said he did receive a letter from one resident in support of the liquor license. He also said alcohol sales would be for alcohol consumed only on the theater premises. Goldman said the alcohol will be just a small portion at the concession stand which will feature theater classics like popcorn and pretzels, but will also serve specialty foods including desserts and sushi. No date is set for when the state will decide whether to grant the TREX transfer to the Kenwood Theater.

BRIEFLY Shred old documents

Find news and information from your community on the Web Blue Ash – cincinnati.com/blueash Hamilton County – cincinnati.com/hamiltoncounty Montgomery – cincinnati.com/montgomery Sycamore Township – cincinnati.com/sycamoretownship Symmes Township – cincinnati.com/symmestownship

I

News Dick Maloney | Editor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248-7134 | rmaloney@communitypress.com Rob Dowdy | Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248-7574 | rdowdy@communitypress.com Jeanne Houck | Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248-7129 | jhouck@communitypress.com Melanie Laughman | Sports Editor. . . . . . 248-7573 | mlaughman@communitypress.com Mark Chalifoux | Sports Reporter . . . . . . 576-8255 | mchalifoux@communitypress.com Advertising Mark Lamar | Territory Sales Manager. . . . 687-8173 | mlamar@enquirer.com Angela Paollelo-Marcotte Account Relationship Specialist . . . . . . . . . 936-4715 | amarcotte@communitypress.com Kimtica Jarman Account Relationship Specialist . . . . . . . . . . 936-4707 | kjarman@communitypress.com Delivery For customer service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 576-8240 Ann Leonard | District manager . . . . . . . . . 248-7131 | amleonar@communitypress.com Stephen Barraco | Circulation Manager . . 248-7110 | sbarraco@communitypress.com Classified To place a Classified ad . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242-4000 | www.communityclassified.com To place an ad in Community Classified, call 242-4000.

Sycamore Township will offer residents a chance to shred old documents Saturday, April 17. From 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., residents can bring old documents to shred at the township administration building, 8540 Kenwood Road. Residents will be required to show proof of residency. For more information, contact the administration office at 791-8447.

Index

Calendar ......................................B2 Classifieds.....................................C Life...............................................B1 Police...........................................B7 Real estate ..................................B7 Schools........................................A5 Sports ..........................................A6 Viewpoints ..................................A8

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News

April 14, 2010 Northeast Suburban Life

A3

Traffic, parking looking better for this year’s Flower Show By Amanda Hopkins and Jeanne Houck ahopkins@communitypress.com, jhouck@communitypress.com

If the weather cooperates, Symmes Township Administrator Gerald Beckman said parking will be much easier for this year’s Cincinnati Flower Show at Symmes Township Park. Beckman said there is lots of field space to park at the Rozzi property across the street from Symmes Park on Lebanon Road that can be used in dry weather. “If we get lucky and have good weather, we have plenty of parking,” Beckman said. Beckman said there also will be some temporary parking in the back of the Rozzi property and several area churches will offer parking and shuttle rides for a fee.

This is the Cincinnati Flower Show’s 21st year and the second year at Symmes Park. Beckman said some traffic issues from last year’s show have been addressed and a loop that was installed around the Rozzi property should ease congestion along Lebanon Road. Buses will use the north entrance to the Rozzi property and have a drop-off point at the end of the loop. Beckman said tour and school buses stopped in front of the Symmes Park entrance and caused a lot of traffic back-up at last year’s flower show. “We’re trying to use the Rozzi property as much as we can,” Beckman said. “We want to get people off the road and find parking.” He said once the park plans are complete it may be

What to know for the Flower Show Show hours Friday, April 16, Opening Night Gala, 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday, April 17 through Saturday, Apr. 24, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Sunday, April 25, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Special Events Friday, April 16 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. – Opening Night Gala benefiting the Taft Museum’s 2011 exhibition, American Impressionists in the Garden Saturday, April 17 through Sunday, April 18 – Cincinnati Fine Food Show Saturday, April 24 through Sunday April 25 – Small Wonders Weekend Tickets To order tickets for the Cincinnati Flower or for any of the special events at the show, visit www.cincyflowershow.com. possible for all flower show patrons to park at the Rozzi property. Hamilton County sheriff deputies will help direct pedestrians across Lebanon Road. Meanwhile, Loveland officials are optimistic the

AMANDA HOPKINS/STAFF

Woodward High School students plant flowers around some of the tents at Symmes Park in preparation for the Cincinnati Flower Show.

“I replaced my windows — and it was no big to-do!"

parking and litter problems associated with last year’s Cincinnati Flower Show will be avoided. “Our police department will be blocking off Lindenhall Drive from Lebanon to Heidelberg,” said Loveland city council member Brent Zuch. “Residents there and on North Lebanon will get parking permits so they can more easily be able to get to their homes and have parking. After the show, we will be evaluating how it went.” Zuch praised Symmes Township for holding a meeting in February about the show and welcomed plans for hundreds of additional parking spaces and more ways for vehicles to enter and leave the Rozzi property on Lebanon Road. “These factors should ease congestion some,” Zuch said. Zuch said Symmes Township also has agreed to place some temporary trash receptacles along Lebanon Road to reduce litter.

AMANDA HOPKINS/STAFF

Woodward High School juniors, from left, Antonia Cunningham, Diona Rioui and Lawynter Bailey planted flowers at Symmes Park April 6 to get the park ready for the Cincinnati Flower Show.

AMANDA HOPKINS/STAFF

Workers April 6 put together one of the exhibits for the Cincinnati Flower Show at Symmes Park.

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Northeast Suburban Life

April 14, 2010

SCHOOLS

ACHIEVEMENTS | NEWS | Editor Dick Maloney | rmaloney@communitypress.com | 248-7134

ACTIVITIES

| HONORS communitypress.com

National Merit finalists

PROVIDED.

Seven Hills School eighth graders are learning the challenges of jungle living as part of their study on the novel “Lord of the Flies.” From left, Jeff Maggio of Hyde Park, Tess Renusch of Anderson Township and Hannah Silverman of Montgomery create tools by binding stones to sticks.

Seven Hills students study ‘Lord of the Flies’ through jungle challenges As part of their study of the novel “Lord of the Flies”, the Seven Hills School eighth graders of English teacher Linda Maupin recently got a taste of the challenges of jungle living. Small teams of students completed survival skills in a limited amount of time, including: building a hut (or reasonable facsimile)

to sleep two people; peeling and equally dividing a kiwi, using just their fingers; and creating a usable tool or weapon by binding a stone to a stick. The eighth graders’ study of “Lord of the Flies” will be further enhanced as art students gradually transform Maupin’s classroom into a jungle over the upcoming

weeks. “We will also be taking a hard and difficult look at the issue of bullying through the lens of Golding’s novel, as well as the eyepiece of photographs and art, and finally through the clear-sightedness of students’ experiences,” said Maupin, who is from Indian Hill.

APEC winners

PROVIDED

Three Mount Notre Dame High School seniors have been named National Merit Finalists. From left, Kayla Walters of Symmes Township, Kelsey Ryan of Pleasant Ridge and Katie Markgraf of Madeira are among the top 16,000 students nation-wide who have met all the requirements to make it to the finals. Scholarship winners will be notified later this month.

SCHOOL NOTES Student of the month

John Whiting of Sycamore High School, a junior in the Construction Framing and Finishing program at Scarlet Oaks, was named a student of the month at Scarlet Oaks. “John’s goal is to make carpentry his profession, and plans to pursue a degree in construction management,” said instructor Gary Youmans, who nominated Whiting.

Educators career fair

The Cincinnati Independent Schools Consortium – including The Seven Hills School, The Summit Country Day School, Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy, St. Ursula Academy and St. Xavier High School – will present its second annual Educators of Color Career Fair from noon to 2 p.m. Saturday, April 17. The fair will take place in the high school lobby of Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy, 11525 Snider Road in Symmes Township. “We believe that everyone benefits from being a part of a diverse learning environment in all of our schools,” said Michelle Alexander, committee chair and Seven Hills’ director of diversity and community outreach. “As our world becomes more diverse, it is important that our faculty and staff reflect the demo-

graphics of the society in which we live. We are seeking diverse candidates for various administrative, faculty and staff positions in our schools.” To register or for more information about the Educators of Color Career Fair, contact Michelle Alexander at 527-1318 or michelle.alexander@7hills.org.

Academic all-stars named

Coaches in two of the leagues that will be represented in the April 24 Southwest Regional of the 2010 Ohio Academic Competition at Cincinnati State Community College have selected students for the equivalent of All-Star honors. Julia Tasset from Ursuline Academy was selected for the GCAL All-Academic First Team. Andrew Philip of Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy was selected for the CAL AllAcademic First Team. In sessions similar to television game show quizzes, students on these academic teams compete to see who can answer questions fastest and most accurately. The questions asked of the students range from history, literature and science to spelling, mythology and mathematics.

PROVIDED

The Summit Country Day Upper School had 14 students compete in the Annual Model Asian-Pacific Economic Conference (APEC) March 6 and 7. For the third consecutive year, Summit won. Students who participated are, from left: front row, Nick Paccitti of Loveland, Andre Rouillard of Loveland, Nico Posada of Blue Ash, Dehba Amatya of Anderson Township and Evan Albertson of Newtown; back row, Joe Olding of Burnett Woods, Brian Rouillard of Loveland, Tennant Argyres of Clifton, Hayden Klei of Anderson Township, Alex Sharp of Mason, John Franklin of Anderson Township, Katie Ann Sallada of Hyde Park, Ben McBride of Villa Hills, Ky., and Barrett Albrecht of Anderson Township.

Math really does count

PROVIDED

Sycamore Junior High’s MathCounts team came in third place at the MathCounts State Competition March 13 in Columbus. Team members are, from left; sponsor Kelly Abbas, Jonathan Weng, Sarah Li, Bryan Waterhouse, Nick Hershey and Brian Hu. Not pictured, Sky Wong and Ruochen Tang.

Lighting up the classroom

PROVIDED

St. Vincent Ferrer kindergarten students from right Courtney Ellis, Sara Carter and Matthew Powers explore the wonders of electricity as St. Vincent students spent the day March 23 with Crystal Clear Science for Do It Yourself Science Day. This all-day program gave students an opportunity to explore and learn about science in their everyday lives. Michele White is the founder of Crystal Clear Science.

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Schools

April 14, 2010

Northeast Suburban Life

A5

HONOR ROLLS Sycamore Jr. High School

The following students have earned honors for the second quarter of 2009-2010.

Seventh grade

Honor roll – Charlotte Aguilar, Samuel Allison, Paul Attebery, Andrew Bemmes, MacKenzie Boyd, Junn Elijah Cabrera, Elizabeth Clark, Alison Clements, Patrich Co, Benjamin Cohen, Courtney Cron, Alexis Davis, Emma Enderle, Taylor Evans, Christian Fernandez, Emily Fishman, Lorna Fletcher, Marie Fort, Taylor Gardner, Evelyn Garrett, Elizabeth Gibson, Jacob Gibson, Anna Groom, Nishtha Gupta, Hannah Guth, Isaac Harmon, John Heldman, Hunter Henderson, Paige Henry, Hunter Hersko-Fugitt, Yuya Ito, Esther Kaplan, Jack Kelsch, Athena Kennedy, Rachel Kleindorfer, Stephanie Knechtly, Nathaniel LeRoy, Allie Levine, Elliot Levy, Adam Lucken, Spencer

Mandell, Dilkash Mastoi, Stephen Mills, Delaney Morris, Jessica Mullikin, Ysaith Orellana Ascencio, Greg Ota, Anthony Popenoe, Benjamin Proudfoot, Jacie Ray, Hebeh Refaei, Megan Rogge, Anupama Roy-Chaudhury, Abbagail Sanders, Alexandra Schlie, Annie Schoen, William Schrantz, Jordyn Schuster, Brennon Shanks, Philip Silverman, Raymond Stoneberger, Kelsey Tepe, Shannon Thomas, Alexander Toney, Peter Tosh, Natasha Mara Victa, Nikolaus Vonderheide, Jennifer Weber, Steven Wessinger and Allan Zou. Principal honors – Jennifer Adamec, Jeremy Aguilon, Aysha Ahmad, Joseph Ahn, Katherine Amster, Yusuke Baba, Talia Bailes, Maria Beaucage, Ethan Beck, Abigail Belcher, Daria Beniash, Reed Bie, Benjamin Boughton, Madison Bovard, Blair Braxton, Eva Brod, Leah Brod, Hannah Brown, Joanna Brown, Rebecca Bruner, Jor-

dyn Bryant, Charlie Byers, Won (Michael) Choi, Clara Chuey, Samantha Ciricillo, Benjamin E. Cohen, Nicholas D’Angelo, Lauren Davis, Lauren De Marks, Amanda Del Toro Figueredo, Salima Diushebaeva, Atiya Dosani, Michidmaa Enkhbaatar, Lucy Farr, Jeffery Ferrell, Brenna Finlay, Stephanie Fleites, Nicholas Frankowski, Samuel Fredette, Melody Freeland, John Fry, Devin Galinari, Catarina Gandara-Clode, Ryan Gantzer, Francesca Garnica, Anna Garrett, Molly Gearin, Andrea Goldstein, Isaac Goldstein, Matthew Green, Bobbi Gregory, Shoyo Hakozaki, Mark Hancher, Emily Hart, Stephen Hartkemeier, Tyler Hegyesi, Grace Hertlein, Drake Heuerman, Jessica Hobart, William Hobart, Douglas Hoffmeister, Gloria Hu, Jie Huang, Nanci Hunter, Deepak Indrakanti, Megan Jiang, Andrea Jimenez, Michelle Johnson, Katherine Jones, Kyoko

Kato, Jamie Kolthoff, Sameer Kulkarni, Michelle Leshchinsky, Madeline Locke, Jonathan Lucken, Caleb Main, Kashif Malik, Shazia Malik, Morgan Malof, John Maloney, Maria Marshall, Ellen Martinson, Julia Mattis, Rose Menyhert, Samuel Meyers, Abigail Miller, Alyssa Miller, Natalie Miller, Audrey Moeller, Joseph Moreno, Brittany Murphy, David Muskal, Ryo Nakahata, Satoko Nakajima, Nakul Narendran, Pavan Nimmagadda, Rick Niu, Cara Norris, Allison Oh, Katherine Oh, Emily Orabella, Allison Overholt, Taylor Overholt, Jose Palacios, Jamie Pescovitz, Noah Pittinger, Ivan Porollo, Monica Prell, Sneha Rajagopal, Alma Rechnitzer, Jacqueline Regruth, Allison Rogge, Jonathan Rollins, Kristen Russell, Brendon Sabetta, Lauren Saxon, Austin Schafer, Lisa Schold, Megan Schroeder, Max Schwarzer, Matthew Sharpe, Eliza-

Dreams come true for MND dance team The Mount Notre Dame varsity dance team learned first-hand that dreams do come true at Disney World. After many months of practices, regional competitions and performances, the team headed to sunny Orlando, Fla., for the Universal Dance Association’s National Competition. This is the 10th consecutive year that the dancing Cougars have qualified for and competed in this national competition. This year’s competition proved to be challenging as the MND Cougars had to compete in preliminaries in order to make it to the semifinals and finals in the large Varsity Pom category. In the end, the countless hours of hard work and practice paid off as the Cougars were awarded seventh place in the nation

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beth Sheetz, Brenda Shen, Amie Slattery, Lydia Sloan, Victoria Smith, Melissa Sodi, Kaitlyn Soellner, Andrew Son, Rachel Spohr, Neha Srivatsa, Katherine Steinberg, Megan Sulfsted, Kathryn Tenbarge, Ashley Thiss, Benjamin Thiss, Hunter Tumulty, Gian (John) Valli, Joseph Vaz, Jorge Vinales Ranzola, Naveen Viswanath, Noah Wagers, Jennifer Welch, Olivia Wells, Jonathan Weng, Ryan Wessinger, Cheniece Wilson, Alexander Wittenbaum, Alex Wright, Allison Yan, Jintao Zhang, Yuan (Mike) Zhang and Meredith Zukor.

Eighth grade

Honor roll – Hannah Abrahamson, Olivia Bell, Sarah Birckhead, Dominique Bookwalter, Zachary Burke, John Carroll, Jenna Celek, Brian Cleary, Hannah Coletts, Nun Cung Bik, Jordan Elder, Stefan Fakoukakis, Zachary Farquhar, Jordan Gause, Dan Ginsburg,

Gabriela Godinez-Feregrino, Azante Griffith, Leah Grinshpun, Matthew Groene, Sarah Grout, Gavin Gundler, Caitlin Guy, Ross Hamilton, Meredith Hayden, Emily Hayes, Mitchell Hill, Rupali Jain, Noah Koehne, Christopher Koellhoffer, Leila Kooshesh, Trent Langland, Todd Lewis, Alec Leyendecker, Noah Loftspring, Alexander Malone, Hannah Melvin, Giulia Mezzabotta, Jessica Miller, Nolan Morrow, Shyam Parikh, James Ponticos, Grant Price, Alora Reiff, Paola Reyes, Elizabeth Rosenberg, Kathryn Roth, Aditya RoyChaudhury, Jordan Schneider, Gianina (Gina) Schwegmann, Adam Simha, Andrew Size, Madeline Smith, David Sorger, Elizabeth Swofford, Nikita Tandon, Jacob Thorn, Liza Truncellito, Aditi Varshneya, Benjamin Vasunia, Megan Vorpe, Helen (Ellie) Wessinger, Kristen Wessinger, Joseph Wislocki and Jack Yang.

Just’n Time

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The Mount Notre Dame varsity dance team competed in the Universal Dance Association’s National Competition in Orlando, Fla. Team members are, from left: first row, Alli Kelsey of Loveland, Kaitlin Kinman of Sharonville, Sarah Bitter of Loveland, Andrea Morrison of West Chester Township, Liz Alt of Loveland, Alix Malinoff of Kenwood; second row, assistant coach Jenn Ackerman, Amy McMahan of Springfield Township, Katie Riordan of Reading, McKenzie Barron of Loveland, Kaitlyn Corrigan of Loveland, Katie Storer of Landen, Alex Schraer of Loveland and head Coach melissa Kidd; third row, Ashley Poland of Loveland, Maddie Haubner of Liberty Township, Caitlin Dunkley of Kenwood, Allie Lang of Mason, Ashley Peter of Kenwood, Jenn Foppe of Mason, Megan Hupp of Loveland and Cassidy Layman of Loveland. among a larger-than-ever field of fierce competition. In the high kick category, the team executed a nearly perfect routine, placing fourth. “The girls have worked so hard this year and have had a record-breaking season coming home with three grand championships

throughout the season and then placing fourth and seventh in Orlando,” varsity head coach and dance program director Melissa Kidd said. “I’m really proud of them. They represent MND so well on and off the dance floor. They truly are a remarkable group of girls.” Kidd is assisted by Jen

Ackerman, a 2007 graduate of Mount Notre Dame who was a member of MND’s award-winning dance team while a student at MND. Tryouts for the 20102011 varsity and junior teams will be at Mount Notre Dame April 26 through April 28. E-mail Kidd at mkidd@mndhs.org.

Advance Tickets Must Be Purchased By April 22 Pay by credit card at www.ohavshalom.org or send check payable to Ohav Shalom to: Stephany Schechtman 9440 Mapletop Ln, Loveland OH 45140

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A6

Northeast Suburban Life

April 14, 2010

SPORTS BRIEFLY

Social to aid athletics

On May 8, the Sycamore Athletic Boosters is having its Spring Social from 7-11 p.m. in the clubhouse at Great Traditions on Montgomery Road. Event tickets, which include appetizers and soft drinks, are $20 until April 16, $25 from April 17 until May 7, and $30 at the door. The event will also include live music, door prizes, a raffle, silent auction, a magician and “Fly By Poker.” Ticket order forms are available at www.sycamoreschools.org, under “Athletics” and then under “Athletic Boosters.” Proceeds from the event benefit athletic programs at Sycamore High School and Sycamore Junior High School. During the past decade, the Sycamore Athletic Boosters have provided nearly $1 million for the advancement and success of Sycamore sports.

This week in baseball

• Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy beat North College Hill 10-0 in five innings, April 2. CHCA’s Matt Blankenship pitched 12 strikeouts. CHCA’s Matt Williams went 2-2 and scored four runs with three RBIs; Jacob Schomaker had three basehits with two RBIs; John Lloyd had two basehits; Cameron Armstrong had three basehits and two RBIs; Ted Andrews had two basehits and two RBIs. CHCA advances to 2-1 with the win. • CHCA beat Milford 10-9, April 3. CHCA’s Avery was the winning pitcher. CHCA’s Matt Williams went 2-3 with two basehits, two RBIs and three homeruns; Jacob Schomaker went 2-3; Ben Lewis went 2-3 with two basehits; Ted Andrews had three basehits and two RBIs. CHCA advances to 4-1 with the win.

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | Editor Melanie Laughman | mlaughman@communitypress.com | 248-7573

UA track defending first GGCL title since 1997 By Anthony Amorini aamorini@communitypress.com

A quartet of school record holders return for fourth-year head coach Lindsey Eckstein as the Ursuline Lions look to defend its Girls’ Greater Catholic League Scarlet Division title on the track this spring. Ursuline won its first GGCL title since 1997 last spring while besting second-place St. Ursula by 16 points, 158-142. Senior Molly Basch (pole vault) and juniors Pam Showman (high jump) and Marisol Mason (100-meter hurdles, 300 hurdles) are all returning league champions

The track and field season is officially under way for high school teams across the state of Ohio. The season culminates with the state championships at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium at Ohio State University June 4-5, as countless local athletes hope to vie for a state title. Here’s a look at the local teams:

Moeller

This week in softball

Cincinnati Country Day

TM sets records

The Thomas More College baseball team set two school records April 2, with 32 runs and 30 hits in its 32-0 win over Geneva College in a Presidents' Athletic Conference (PAC) game at Thomas More Field. Freshman Eric Smith, a Moeller High School grad, went 2-2 with a double.

FILE PHOTO

Ursuline's Kelly Davidson, now a Lion junior, sprints down the track while competing in the 100-meter dash during the 2009 Coaches' Classic last spring. for Ursuline. “I expect our team to set high goals and go after them,” Eckstein said. “This

season we are trying to prepare the team for districts, regionals and hopefully state. “I know we have the talent to do great things this year and hopefully we can stay healthy and put it together on the right day,” Eckstein added. In addition to winning league, Showman also qualified to state in the high jump while setting a new Ursuline record in the event last season. Showman won her GGCL title with a 5-foot-2 leap and finished seventh at the Division I State Championships as a sophomore. “Pam matched her outdoor (personal record) during her indoor season and is on pace for another trip to Columbus with improved marks,” Eckstein said. Alongside Basch, senior Mackenzie Harrell will also

be a key leader for the Lions, Eckstein said. Harrell aims to break Ursuline’s record in the 300 hurdles this spring, Eckstein said of the fourth-year varsity starter. “Their devotion to the team, the sport, coaches and improving themselves is excellent. They constantly set a positive example of how to achieve great things through hard work,” Eckstein said of Basch and Harrell. Though Basch managed to win a conference title in 2009, the GGCL finals was the first outdoor meet of the season for the standout last spring because of injury, Eckstein said. Basch owns the Ursuline record in the pole vault with Showman housing the high jump record and Mason claiming the long jump record.

FILE PHOTO

Ursuline senior Molly Basch, seen here showing her school spirit during a Lion volleyball match in the winter, will be a leader for the Lions’ track program this spring. Khara Walker, an Ursuline sophomore, returns with a school record in the 200. Sophomore Sydney Bell, a middle-distance runner specializing in races ranging from the 200 to the 800, will also be a key contributor.

Local teams get back on track – and field

• Mariemont boys beat Moeller 8-7, April 7. Moeller’s Rogan scored two goals, Fuller scored three and Polak and Collision each scored one goal. • Ursuline Academy girls beat McAuley 17-6, April 8. Ursuline’s Hannah Besl, Josie Male, Annie Hauser and Sara Wiener scored one goal each; Caroline Tobin and Diana Campbell scored two goals each; and Megan Schnicke, Kara Strasser and Maggie Egan scored three goals each. Ursuline advances to 21 with the win.

• Middletown beat Sycamore 11-10, April 5. Sycamore’s Carrie Tveita went 3-5 with two RBI; Megan Stoy went 2-5 and Kat Pember went 3-4. Sycamore falls to 1-3 with the loss. • Sycamore beat Western Hills 18-0 in five innings, April 6. Sycamore’s Becca Melvin pitched seven strikeouts; Michelle McDonald went 2-2 with two basehits and four runs; Kat Pember went 2-3 with three runs; Carrie Tveita went 2-3 with four RBI; Megan Stoy had three RBI; and Caitlin Hauff went 2-3. Sycamore advances to 2-3 with the win. • Hamilton beat Sycamore 8-3, April 7. Sycamore’s Carrie Tveita went 2-4. Sycamore falls to 2-4 with the loss.

communitypress.com

Lions ready to hit the ground running

The Moeller track team should be one of the better area teams, and the Crusaders have a number of talented athletes, including Tom Tussey in the 1,600meter run and freshman Zach Hoffman, who finished seventh in the 800-meter run in the prelims of the Coaches Classic at Mason. Patrick McCarty is another threat for Moeller and finished fifth in the prelims of the 3,200-meter run. Kyle Walker finished third in the 110-meter hurdles. Moeller coaches could not be reached before press deadlines for further comment.

This week in lacrosse

RECREATIONAL

Regional qualifier Kyle Kistinger and district champions Alanah Hall and Erica Armstead lead CCD back to the track this season with high expectations for the returning standouts. Kistinger, a sophomore co-captain, is a distance runner with a 4:37 time in the mile to his credit. Armstead, also a CCD sophomore, won district titles in the long jump and also as a part of the 4X100meter relay in 2010. Hall, a CCD junior, won district titles in the 3,200 and also as a part of the Indians’ 4x800 relay. “We have talent and depth at every position,” CCD girls head coach Steve Conner said. “If we stay healthy and keep a strong attitude, we should have a very good season.” Nichole Lowe (sprints) is the only returning senior for the CCD girls. Additional key contributors for the CCD girls will include juniors Alexis Victor (high jump, hurdles) and Claire Heinichen (pole vault,

sprints). The leaders for the CCD boys will include Kistinger, senior Will Fritz (sprints), senior Rob Klug (high jump) and Sebastian Koochaki. Kistinger is closing in on school records in both the 1,600 and 3,200, boys head coach Howard Brownstein said. “Most of our team is young, as 20-of-24 are (freshmen) and sophomores,” Brownstein said. “We are looking for Kistinger and Fritz to have good years and progress in the postseason.”

CHCA

Julie Dietrich, who has nearly a decade of coaching experience in track, enters her first year as head coach of the Eagles. The girls’ team, which last won a league title in 2006, will be led by junior Sarah Atallah (high jump and long jump), sophomore Vicky Lantz (pole vault) and freshmen Kelsey Vice (shot put and discus) and Jessica Holiday (400 and 800). Other contributors include Sara Wilson, Rachel Talaber, Elizabeth Lyle, Emily Walton, Lauren Hayes, Anna Love, Heather Morrison, Hannah Russell, Melissa Smith and Christiana Tait. The boys’ team, which last won a league title in 2008, will be led by seniors Andrew Wallace (400, 800 and 1600, among others), Andrew Perkins (110 hurdles, sprint relays and long jump), Javon Campbell (sprints and relays) and Nate Flint (400), as well as sophomore Logan Lally (pole vault). Wallace, who will also appear in the 4x400 and possibly the 4x800, is garnering interest from Butler University. Other contributors include Sean Lally, Evan Machan, Chris Taylor, Hayes Dollar, Isaiah Bell, Brian Taylor, Josh Thiel, Charlie Hall, Austin Hinners, Patrick Lyle, Connor Staarmann and Matthew Tan. The Eagles are participating in several upcoming invitationals, including

BRANDON SEVERN/ CONTRIBUTOR

Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy senior Andrew Wallace returns for the Eagles this season. ones at Reading (April 17) and Miford (April 22-23), and will also host the CHCA Relays (April 20) and an invitational of their own (May 4-5). The Miami Valley Conference Championship will be May 11-12 at Lockland. “Both teams want to work hard and earn back our league titles,” Dietrich said.

Indian Hill

The Indian Hill track team got off to a fast start at the Coaches Classic as the Braves sent several individuals and relays from both the girls’ team and the boys’ team to the finals. “It’s early but I’m really pleased with what I’ve seen so far,” head coach Susan Savage said. “We sent a few more on to the finals than we did last year so that’s a good sign.” The girls are coming off a Cincinnati Hills League championship in cross country in the fall, and Savage said the Braves should be in contention with Wyoming for a CHL title this spring in track and field. The boys should be a top three team, according to Savage. Savage said John Angus has done well in his first season as he qualified for the finals in three events, including the 300-hurdles in his first attempt at the event. “He has some natural ability and some speed and strength, so the sky is the limit for him,” Savage said. Vincent Fuggetta is another senior in track for the first time but he’s made a splash as a sprinter, especially on the relay teams. Junior Jackson Kirk is

another standout contributor on the relay teams and qualified for the finals in the 1600-meter run. Thomas Ernst is an 800-meter runner who could be very good, Savage said. Matt Littman is one of the team captains, along with Logan McConnell and Deniz Aydogan. The girls have a talented group, led by sophomore distance runner Elizabeth Heinbach. She finished No. 4 in the state in cross country in the fall and went to state for the 3,200-meter run last spring. She hasn’t competed yet this season as the coaches are working her in slowly to avoid any injury troubles. Junior Natalie Sommerville is another returning standout, as she went to state last spring in the 300-meter hurdles. Senior Aubrey Rogers is a threat in the 200-meter dash and is also a talented member of the relays. Sarah Rosenblum and Katie Hallahan are two talented runners in the 400meter and will also be factors in some of the relay teams, along with Susan Plunkett. Indian Hill is also led by captains Elizabeth Daun, Deena Rahman and Chrissy Metcalf. Newcomer Kasey Schumacher will be a factor on several of the relays and thrower Jade Lac is an athlete to watch as well.

MND

The Cougars return just one first-team all-league performer – junior long jumper Erin Murphy, who was also second-team allleague in the 400-meter relay with sophomore Asia Hill and junior Cami Jackson. Other contributors include sprinters Dominique Davis, Keasha Munson, Kelsey Gault and Allison Weaver, who also runs the mile; distance runners Elizabeth Deutsch and Tina Verrilli; and hurdlers Lauren Paasch and Vanessa Hope. In the field, meanwhile, are Carla Becker (shot put), Natalie Wynn (shot put and discus), Tory Alexander (discus) and Rachel Frank (pole vault).

MND is coached by Aaron Gnagy The Girls’ Greater Cincinnati League Scarlet division Championships will be held at La Salle with preliminaries May 12 and finals May 14.

Sycamore

The Sycamore track teams, coached by Liz Gonda, returns a number of starters, including senior hurdler Emily Elsbrock and senior mid-distance runners Danielle Fleming, Allison Setser and Kelsey Pauly. Juniors sprinter Alix Davis and jumper Maddie Keyes are two more key returning athletes, along with sophomore thrower Gika Okonji. Senior pole vaulter Catherine Farist and junior vaulter Becca Roessler give the Aves depth in the field events. The team has a promising young distance runner in Samantha Siler and freshmen Bianca Rodenbaugh, Angela Harris, Nicole Brown and Hailey Bell could be promising contributors for the Aviators. “The leadership of our seniors and potential of our underclasswomen will put us in a great position to be one of the city’s top teams,” Gonda said in an e-mail. The boys’ team, coached by Hank Ray, has a younger squad but has several standouts. Senior Nick Fry is a talented distance runner and junior Darius Hillary is a standout sprinter, along with D.C. Smith. Junior thrower Justin Murray is poised for success, along with Ben Rader and sophomore Ben Wulker will be one of the team’s top jumpers. Sophomore Nick Alson is another standout sprinter. Michael Bemmes is a newcomer that will help in mid-distance races and freshman distance runner Tallin Forshey will help add depth to the team. Junior mid-distance runner Adam Kapuscinski is another athlete to keep on eye on for the Aves. “We will be very young this year and will learn a lot building up to the month of May,” Ray said. Reported by Anthony Amorini, Mark Chalifoux and Tony Meale


Sports & recreation

April 14, 2010

Northeast Suburban Life

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TERRENCE HUGE/CONTRIBUTOR

CHCA pitcher Matt Blankenship throws a pitch in the first inning of an April 2 game against North College Hill High School. CHCA won 10-0 at home. CHCA also beat the Trojans 39-0 the day earlier at NCH.

One-hit shutout

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• Sycamore High School boys placed third with a score of 82 in the Coaches Classic, April 7. Justin Murray won the shot put. • Moeller High School boys placed fifth with a score of 59.5 in the Coaches Classic, April 7. Moeller’s Kassem won the shot put. • Ursuline Academy placed second with a score of 136.5 in the Coaches Classic, April 7. Sycamore placed third with a score of 94.5. Ursuline’s Ali Backscheider won the 800 meter in 2:28.63, and the 1600 meter in 5:28.61; Pam Showman won the high jump; and Molly Basch won the pole vault.

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• Moeller lost 6-4 to Noblesville, but won 8-6 against Strongsville, April 3. Against Noblesville, Moeller’s Robby Sunderman went 2-4 with two basehits; Alex Barlow went 2-3; Kevin Thamann had three basehits and three RBIs. Against Stongsville, Moeller’s Kevin Brennan was the winning pitcher; Alex Barlow went 2-4; Kevin Brinkman went 2-3; Kevin Thaman went 3-4; Hooper had two basehits; Ryan Logan had three basehits. Moeller advances to 3-1 with the win. • CHCA beat Wyoming 76, April 3. CHCA’s Matt Williams was the winning pitcher. Williams went 2-3 with three basehits and a homerun; Blake Avery went 23 with two basehits; John Lloyd went 2-3 with a homerun. CHCA advances to 3-1 with the win. • Moeller beat La Salle 75, April 5. Moeller’s Robby Sunderman was the winning pitcher. Sunderman also went 2-3 with two basehits, four RBIs and a homerun; Tyler Hutchinson went 2-4; Alex Barlow went 2-3 with two basehits. Moeller advances to 4-1 with the win. • Sycamore lost to Mason 5-0, April 5. Sycamore falls to 2-4 with the loss. • Moeller beat Grosse Pointe 17-1 in five innings, April 6. Moeller’s Jake Madsen was the winning pitcher;

Alex Barlow went 3-3 with three runs, two basehits and four RBI; Kyle Robinett went 2-2; Jones had two basehits; Eric Stiene went 3-4 with three basehits and two RBI; Marc Gallenstein went 2-3 with two RBIs; Max Belza had two RBIs. Moeller advances to 5-1 with the win. • Moeller beat Elder 9-1, April 6. Moeller’s winning pitcher was David Whitehead with six strikeouts; Tyler Hutchinson went 2-4 with two basehits and three RBIs; Alex Barlow had three basehits; Kevin Brinkman went 2-4; Kevin Thamann went 2-3; Josh Hooper had three RBIs. Moeller advances to 6-1 with the win. • Moeller beat Brentwood Academy 5-4, April 7. Moeller’s Andrew Steine was the winning pitcher; Moeller’s Tyler Hutchinson had two base hits and two RBIs; Alex Barlow went 2-2; Jake Madsen went 3-4 with two basehits and a homerun and Tyler Grau had two base hits. Moeller advances to 7-1 with the win. • Sycamore beat Oak Hills 11-5, April 7. Sycamore’s Kevin Clark was the winning pitcher; Wes Yengo went 2-3 with two base hits; Jake Michalak went 2-4 with two base hits and four RBIs; Alec Diersing went 3-5 with two base hits; Kyle Hart went 3-4 with two base hits and four RBIs. Sycamore advances to 2-5 with the win.

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Becca Melvin, freshman pitcher for the Sycamore Lady Aves, lets fly a strike against Western Hills April 6. The Aviators won 18-0 on a one-hit shutout. Melvin pitched four of the five innings to gain the victory. Playing shortstop behind her is Carrie Tveita, a junior, who leads the team with a .600 batting average.

JOSEPH FUQUA II/STAFF

More in baseball

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A8

Northeast Suburban Life

April 14, 2010

VIEWPOINTS

EDITORIALS

LETTERS

|

COLUMNS

Editor Dick Maloney | rmaloney@communitypress.com | 248-7134

The law may not protect against sports violence The lacrosse teams of the Ohio State University and Ashland University were locked in a very contentious game. Towards the end, an Ohio State player intercepted a pass and fired the ball in for a goal. At this time he was “bodychecked” from behind by Ashland defender William Kynast, who then stood over the downed player while taunting him. An Ohio State teammate, Brian Hanson, grabbed Kynast from behind in a bear hug. Kynast instantly flipped Hanson over his back, causing him to fall headfirst, resulting in quadriplegia. Brain Hanson’s lawyers brought a lawsuit against Ashland University. They argued the coaches’ failure to properly supervise the players, which led to this tragedy. The Supreme Court of Ohio reversed a lower appeals court ruling. They held Hanson assumed the risk of injury when he grabbed Kynast, in protection of his teammate. The highest legal authority in our state ruled that body-contact sports such as lacrosse are inherently combative, and those who participate assume the risk of rough play. The justices went on to remark that it is difficult to distinguish when a player crosses that thin, perhaps invisible, line which sep-

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arates assault from permissible sport aggressiveness. As catastrophic as Hanson’s injury was, the court e l i e v e d Thomas bKynast’s intenGelwicks tion was not to Community injure and that Press guest his actions were and columnist “reflexive instinctive.” Student athletes strive to make the team and, beyond that, win play time and perhaps school glory. Overpowering others is the essence of what they work to accomplish on the field. At the same time, each is charged with following the rules as well as those vague ideals we characterize as “sportsmanship.” We expect a lot of youths by assuming that, in the heat of battle, they will make split-second decisions in properly conducting themselves. They are expected to demonstrate behaviors that will place them in that narrow, uncertain zone between “stick up for yourself” and “conduct yourself with decency.” Evaluating intent and determining a proper response are jobs we usually entrust to authority figures.

About guest columns

We welcome guest columns on all sides of an issue. Include with your column your name, address, daytime telephone number, and a two-to-three line biography outlining your expertise related to this topic, and a color headshot of yourself. We reserve the right to edit for length, accuracy and clarity. Columns may be no more than 500 words. Deadline: Noon Friday for next Wednesday’s issue. E-mail: nesuburban@ communitypress.com Letters, columns and articles submitted to The Northeast Suburban Life may be published or distributed in print, electronic or other forms.

It’s often complex, despite Justice Holmes’ jocular observation that even a dog knows the difference between being kicked and being stumbled over. Congress may debate for weeks the wisdom of a military response. Judges have the luxury of time and settled law in considering situations such as Kynast’s belligerence. Adults engaged in the daily competition to earn a living must tread an ever-moving line in navigating the written and unwritten rules of their workplace. We are expected to be very ambitious – but not too ambitious. A youth playing sports must expect varying degrees of violence. It is up to them to abruptly determine whether to respond and, if so, precisely how. It may be an unreasonable burden, but it is the way of sports and the way of the law. Thomas Gelwicks is an attorney. He lives in Blue Ash.

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CH@TROOM

communitypress.com

Transient vendors spring up when warm weather nears Spring is here, the snow is gone, trees are budding and flowers are popping up out of the ground. Spring brings with it many things to look Chris Wallace forward to. Community Unfortunately, Press guest spring also sigcolumnist nals the annual return of transient criminal groups. They are already in our area and are most active from now until late spring. The groups usually take up residence in local hotels for the period of time they are here, and then move on. These transient criminals groups engage in numerous theft scams from shoplifting to home burglary (usually through unlocked doors), to construction scams. Every year Blue Ash residents are victims of home improvement frauds. Driveway blacktopping and roof repair are the most common of these crimes. These crimes are even more serious due to the fact that these criminals tend to prey on the elderly. Typically the vendor will indicate they have blacktop left over from a “job down the road,” and say they will blacktop your driveway for a reduced price. Another popular scam is the individual who “just happens to be driving down your street and

CH@TROOM Last week’s question:

Do you agree with President Obama’s decision to open more coastal waters to oil and gas exploration? Why or why not? “Obama made that decision about offshore drilling purely to help his sagging poll numbers. He knows that exploring and drilling for oil and gas is very popular with the American people. “But he also knows that his administration has many loopholes that can be used down the road to prevent drilling in those very same areas. “This is very deceptive, but something I have come to expect from him. And, in a related action, which did not get nearly the same amount of press, he put other areas off limits for exploration. “Our continued national decision to ignore much of our oil and gas reserves and to fail to produce more nuclear energy is tragic. “It will produce higher energy costs, higher unemployment, and higher inflation, but far worse, it may cost American lives if we ever get into a war where our overseas energy sources are denied us. This is the definition of insanity.” T.H. “The U.S. Is critically dependent on foreign oil and gets jerked around by petro-rich countries because of it. We have untapped oil resources in our coastal waters that could reduce our dependence. “What’s not to like, as long as the exploration is done in an environmentally responsible way? How can we let ourselves starve to death in the middle of a buffet line?” F.S.D.

“If President Obama actually did open more coastal waters for oil and gas exploration that’s good news. However, I heard claims that while he gave more with one hand he reduced even more with the other. “American companies have the know-how to safely recover oil from the ocean depths without harming the environment. They can also do the same in the Alaskan wilderness.” R.V. “The only valid reason is that he is placating the Republicans in Congress. While I personally am not against legitimate drilling in known preserves, the amount of oil is negligible to the total we use. This may take some of the focus off greater efficiencies and renewable alternatives.” J.Z. “I think, unfortunately, that this is a politically motivated decision, in Obama’s effort to bring all together. Studies by the Petroleum Institute and other organizations show that with current and forecast usage rates of petroleum, we will run out sometime in the next twenty years. “The reserves in Alaska, and in the coastal areas on the continental shelf are predicted by knowledgeable geologists to provide a very small amount of reserves needed compared to oil from shale, South America, and Russian imports as alternatives to the Middle East, which are quickly disappearing. “I visit Santa Barbara, Calif., occasionally, and always notice the offshore drilling rigs and the

notices you have serious roof or gutter problems.” The work is almost always of inferior quality, often unnecessary, and the victim is usually presented with a bill much higher than the original estimate. Victims, particularly the elderly are often intimidated into paying this inflated bill. If you have an elderly neighbor or relative be observant, and help educate them about these crimes. Transient vendors and home solicitation sales are regulated by both state law and city of Blue Ash ordinances. These ordinances include bonding of the vendor, and specific requirements for contract language. These laws also provide for a three-day right of cancelation, also referred to as a “cooling off period.” Violation of these ordinances is a crime. The Blue Ash Police Department recommends residents deal with established contractors with a verifiable local area business address. Be very cautious when dealing with contractors who engage in unsolicited door to door sales. If you have any questions concerning home improvement vendors call the Blue Ash Police Department. If you are approached by a vendor engaging in door to door home improvement sales or suspect a transient vendor is working your neighborhood, call the Blue Ash Police Department at 7458555. Chris Wallace is Blue Ash chief of police.

Next question

oily debris on the public beach of one of America’s most exclusive and beautiful cities. There is always a significant danger when off-shore drilling of storms or other catastrophic events causing widespread environmental damage of a great magnitude. “While much of us are enthusiastic about wind and solar power, it will take 10 to 20 years for us to see real viability in that area. “Meanwhile, to meet our increasing power demands in America, we need to go with a new generation of nuclear power, that provides great design and operational efficacy as well as security and fuel recycling. “All of Canada’s nuclear power stations are absolutely identical, use the same reactors and controls, so once operators and maintenance personnel are trained, they can go anywhere in the country and not experience a new learning curve. “They also use a lower enrichment level of uranium, so that they can refuel online, and reduce refueling expenses.” Dr. W.S.W. “I never thought I would find myself agreeing with any decision made by Mr. Obama, but in this case, I do. We must not overlook any potential source of energy at this point in time, and if this can be done with minimal impact on the environment, I’m all for it.” Bill B. “I agree wholeheartedly! But only if all drilling operations, contracts and – most importantly – employees are issued to companies and people in the United States.

“Minimizing our dependence on foreign oil suppliers should be a very high priority for us until we can begin developing alternate sources of energy. “When plans were made to open huge wind-powered energy fields out west, I was horrified to learn the U.S. companies issued these enormous contracts farmed most of the work building the giant windmills to overseas companies and their (cheaper?) employees. No large contracts for this sort of project should be issued without strict regulations guaranteeing that all work – development, manufacturing, assembly and installation – will be done by U.S. companies and U.S. employees.” M.M. “We must not allow our coastal waters to be polluted any more. Exploration takes time, money, and resources with no guarantee of a payoff ever or even the possibility of a payoff in the near future as it takes at least eight years before production would start. “Then there’s always the possibility of an oil spill. A better solution is to install wind turbines offshore now and generate clean energy from a renewable source.” A.B. “It is hard to understand why we as a nation haven’t paid more attention to the role of oil imports in our current economic woes. If you know what has happened with oil leases in the past, you know that the industry doesn’t get too excited about these massive new leases because they

A publication of Northeast Suburban Life Editor .Dick Maloney rmaloney@communitypress.com . . . . . .248-7134

What’s your opinion of Chad Ochocinco’s non-football activities, like “Dancing with the Stars”? Every week The Northeast Suburban Life asks readers a questions that they can reply to via email. Send your answers to clermont@communitypress.com with “chatroom” in the subject line. already know there isn’t much left out there. “We need to raise fuel efficiency to 55 mpg because that was economically justified when gasoline rose over $2/gallon. We need to accelerate the development of electric cars because there are renewable electric generation technologies, and we’re past the peak ability to produce liquid biofuels. “We need a lot of other things, to reduce our oil addiction. Not all of them will become possible to see until we have taken some of the steps we should have taken in 1978. It’s not like we didn’t see this coming.” N.F. “I think this decision is long overdue. We need to use our own natural resources to combate the oil and gas crisis. Our President has overlooked making this decision for too long a time. “The ridiculous health care program took to much of his time promoting and making deals to achieve passage. This is a perect example that our current administration cannot handle multiple situations. “In listing the areas involved with this authorization, its interesting he did not include Alaska (I wonder why). E.S.

s

A WORLD OF DIFFERENT VOICES

Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Friday | See page A2 for additional contact information. 248-8600 | 394 Wards Corner Road, Loveland, Ohio 45140 | e-mail nesuburban@communitypress.com | Web site: www.communitypress.com


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Your Community Press newspaper serving Blue Ash, Montgomery, Sycamore Township, Symmes Township E-mail: nesuburban@communitypress.com We d n e s d a y, A p r i l 1 4 , 2 0 1 0

Robert Clopton Jr. with Loveland Symmes firefighters and paramedics

Volume 47 Number 8 © 2010 The Community Press ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Arboretum manager advocates conifers

Chris Daeger isn’t interested in the trendy or the fantastical. He doesn’t really care what this year’s “it” plant is. The manager of the Rowe Arboretum in Indian Hill, Daeger has had an almost lifelong love affair with conifers. This year he’ll share the love with visitors to the 2010 Cincinnati Flower Show with a conifer exhibit within the show’s Grand Marquee tent. FULL STORY, B1

Council approves design rules

Montgomery City Council has approved new rules designed to create a sharperlooking Montgomery Road hospital corridor by requiring natural materials and muted colors. Although Bethesda North Hospital is the most highprofile business in the area, the hospital itself is not in the corridor stretching between Pfeiffer and Weller roads because it is situated some distance off Montgomery Road. FULL STORY, A2

Blue Ash sets budget priorities

Blue Ash has spent $28,000 on consultants to help it set priorities in its budget and is dispatching them everywhere for public input. FULL STORY, A3

AD running for state board

The director of athletics at Sycamore High School is campaigning for one of two teacher representative seats on the board of the State Teachers Retirement System of Ohio. James Stoll has two opponents in the race for the four-year terms on the Retirement Board that begin Sept. 1. They are Mark Hill and Dale Price, both math teachers, with the Worthington City Schools and the Toledo Public Schools, respectively. FULL STORY, A3

To place an ad, call 242-4000.

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Tree City a growth opportunity? By Jeanne Houck

Montgomery hosts 2010 program

jhouck@communitypress.com

Montgomery’s commitment to trees has led to the city being chosen to host the 2010 Tree City USA Program and Luncheon Friday, April 23. Some 165 representatives from as many as 40 southwest Ohio communities will meet at the Montgomery Inn on Montgomery Road, where the Arbor Day Foundation and the Ohio Department of Natural Resources will present Tree City USA awards. Tree City USA is a program that assists and recognizes community forestry programs. It’s sponsored by the Arbor Day Foundation with the cooperation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Forest Service and the National Association of State Foresters. Montgomery has been a Tree City for 14 years. In 2009, based on 10 years of accomplishments as of 2008, the city was awarded Sterling Tree City USA status. “Trees in our city increase property values, enhance the economic vitality of business areas and beautify our community,” said Bob Nikula, Montgomery’s public works director. “Montgomery believes trees are important enough to include a reference to this in our Vision Statement and we have worked diligently to earn 11 growth awards – 10 are needed to earn Sterling Tree City USA status. Between 2000 and 2008, only 211 communities nationwide – about 23 communities per year – earned the sterling award and Montgomery was one of those 211 communities,” Nikula said. To qualify as a Tree City USA, a city or town must have a tree board or department, a tree-care ordinance, a community forestry program with an annual budget of at least $2 per capita and an Arbor Day observance and proclamation. Higher levels of tree care lead to more awards. Montgomery has a city arborist, Terry Willenbrink, who also is the city’s street maintenance supervisor. He makes $65,666 a year. Nikula said Montgomery plants trees on public properties every year and currently is adding 30 more to the seven-acre Johnson Nature Preserve on Deerfield Road, where a tornado in April 1999 destroyed more than 90 percent of the preserve’s mature trees. In 2009, Montgomery established a street tree program to give property owners $50 to offset the costs of planting a tree on public property in front of their homes. Blue Ash is not a Tree City USA, nor does it employ a city arborist.

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Montgomery has a city arborist – Terry Willenbrink, seen here checking a tree for cicada damage – who also serves as street maintenance supervisor.

Tr e e C i t y U S A

Blue Ash Deer Park Evendale Glendale Loveland Madeira Montgomery Sharonville Springdale Sycamore Symmes Wyoming

Population

Tree City

Arborist

13,000 5,982 3,100 2,300 12,600 9,000 10,200 13,000 10,500 20,433 14,900 8,300

No No No Yes No No Yes No Yes No No Yes

No No No Matt Dickman No No *Terry Willenbrink No Darrell Perkins No No David Shaw

Cost per capita

58 6 9 15

*Also serves as street maintenance supervisor. “However, we have several grounds staffers who are extremely knowledgeable about trees,” said Sue Bennett, Blue Ash’s public information officer. “In terms of city-owned property, we annually plant new or replacement trees as needed. In terms of private property, for many years the city has had a residential tree program which subsidizes the cost for new trees on residential properties. The trees must be planted in a publicly visible location,” Bennett said. “The maximum is two trees per residence, and the discount is 50 percent of the cost of the tree – including its planting – up to a maximum of $150 per tree.” Bennett said the maintenance

of green space is important to Blue Ash. “Having healthy trees is not only important from an aesthetic viewpoint, but also from a safety standpoint – especially for visitors and patrons of our parks area, including the golf course,” she said. “Though our budget for the residential tree program has been slightly reduced this year, we do not anticipate having to turn down requests. The city’s expected expenditures related to trees on public properties is not expected to vary from past years’ expenses.” Blue Ash has budgeted about $15,000 for its residential tree program and about $10,000 to plant trees in parks, city grounds and golf areas.

To be or not to be a Tree City

Symmes Township and Sycamore Township do not have the Tree City designation. Symmes Township administrator Gerald Beckman said he is unsure what the title “Tree City” could do to help the township. “My question is: What’s the advantage?” Beckman said. He said he would not recommend something to the board of trustees simply for the publicity. He also said he was not sure of the benefit of adding an arborist to the township payroll when the township already has a small staff. Sycamore Township does not have the designation of Tree City USA, but township Administrator Rob Molloy said tree planting is a part of most of the road projects in the township. He said trees will be planted on the north side of East Galbraith Road between the curb and the sidewalk after the widening project is complete. He said the maintenance department also will be planting trees at the new Schuler Athletic Complex to provide shade around the park and to block out some of the noise from Interstate 275. Sycamore Township does offer a Memorial Tree Planting Program where residents can plant a 2-foot tree with a 3-by-5 inch bronze engraved plaque in one of the township parks for $250. For more information and a list of tree choices, contact Sycamore Township maintenance department at 792-7257.

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News

Northeast Suburban Life April 14, 2010

Council approves new design rules By Jeanne Houck jhouck@communitypress.com

Montgomery City Council has approved new rules designed to create a sharper-looking Montgomery Road hospital corridor by requiring natural materials and muted colors. Although Bethesda North Hospital is the most highprofile business in the area, the hospital itself is not in the corridor stretching between Pfeiffer and Weller roads because it is situated

some distance off Montgomery Road. The hospital does owns three office buildings that front Montgomery Road, and those are subject to the building design changes encapsulated in zoning code amendments sent to city council for action by the Montgomery Planning Commission. The recommended changes are the result of consultations with McBride Dale Clarion of Fairfax and public meetings last fall. The changes approved

last week apply to property cleared of buildings and redeveloped, building expansions resulting in more than a 25-percent increase in the area of exterior walls and building renovations where the entire exterior facade material is replaced. The design rules do not apply to residential structures such as apartment complexes in the area. Bethesda officials originally had problems with a number of proposed design changes. The planning commission made some adjustments based on the concerns but disagreements remained on the percentage of a wall that can use accent material. Bethesda officials wanted Montgomery to allow

Rules outlined

accent materials on buildings to comprise up to 45 percent of a facade and to allow metal and pre-cast panels to qualify as accent materials. The planning commission settled upon 30 percent for accent materials, but exempted energy-efficient panels from the calculations. “The (design) guidelines will establish limited, reasonable standards that will govern future redevelopment of properties fronting Montgomery Road between Pfeiffer and Weller,” said Frank Davis, Montgomery’s community development director. “The guidelines will insure the continued quality architecture, design and materials that Bethesda

Here are some of the new building design rules adopted by Montgomery City Council for the Montgomery Road hospital corridor: • Fifty percent of each visible facade of a building must be covered in brick, stone or wood. The city may approve materials made to look like brick, stone or wood. • Up to 30 percent of each visible facade of a building may be covered in an accent material such as decorative concrete, stucco and non-reflective metal panels.

• Facade colors should be the natural color of the material or another muted color. • Facade materials may not be made of vinyl, aluminum siding, standard concrete masonry units, corrugated steel and highly reflective materials such as mirrored glass and chrome. • Parking is restricted to the rear or side of a building and not the front unless the lot is too narrow to provide access to the rear. • Equipment on rooftops must be screened from sight. Reported by Jeanne Houck

North Hospital and other owners have used in recent years,” Davis said. Hospital officials said they were happy to participate in the design initiative. “Bethesda North supports the city in its efforts to develop and maintain archi-

tectural standards which reflect the uniqueness of the Montgomery community,” said Jerry Oliphant, executive vice president and chief operating officer for TriHealth, the partnership of Bethesda North and Good Samaritan Hospitals.

Trustees recommend liquor license for theater By Amanda Hopkins

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The Sycamore Township Board of Trustees will sign their names to a letter recommending approval by the state for a TREX transfer of liquor license to the new Kenwood Theater. A TREX transfer allows a liquor license to be brought into a taxing district that may be at the maximum allowed number of liquor

licenses for that taxing district. Planning and zoning administrator Greg Bickford said before the transfer is approved, the township trustees had to sign a letter of approval. Gary Goldman, president of Theater Management Group, which will manage the new Kenwood Theater at Kenwood Place, said he is requesting a liquor license that will allow him to serve beer, wine and liquor in the theater before or during movies. Goldman also manages the Esquire Theater in Clifton and Mariemont Theater in Mariemont Square.

“It’s a trend across the country (to serve alcohol in a theater),” Goldman said. He said several theaters in Greater Cincinnati serve alcohol. A few residents attended the public hearing on April 1 before the regular meeting to voice their disapproval of a liquor license. “I don’t see (why) you need it,” said resident Charlie Myers. Myers lives on Duneden Avenue directly behind the proposed theater site and is opposed to the entire idea of the theater. Township resident William Smith said approving a liquor license would just promote trouble.

John Silverman from Midland Atlantic Development said he did receive a letter from one resident in support of the liquor license. He also said alcohol sales would be for alcohol consumed only on the theater premises. Goldman said the alcohol will be just a small portion at the concession stand which will feature theater classics like popcorn and pretzels, but will also serve specialty foods including desserts and sushi. No date is set for when the state will decide whether to grant the TREX transfer to the Kenwood Theater.

BRIEFLY Shred old documents

Find news and information from your community on the Web Blue Ash – cincinnati.com/blueash Hamilton County – cincinnati.com/hamiltoncounty Montgomery – cincinnati.com/montgomery Sycamore Township – cincinnati.com/sycamoretownship Symmes Township – cincinnati.com/symmestownship

I

News Dick Maloney | Editor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248-7134 | rmaloney@communitypress.com Rob Dowdy | Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248-7574 | rdowdy@communitypress.com Jeanne Houck | Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248-7129 | jhouck@communitypress.com Melanie Laughman | Sports Editor. . . . . . 248-7573 | mlaughman@communitypress.com Mark Chalifoux | Sports Reporter . . . . . . 576-8255 | mchalifoux@communitypress.com Advertising Mark Lamar | Territory Sales Manager. . . . 687-8173 | mlamar@enquirer.com Angela Paollelo-Marcotte Account Relationship Specialist . . . . . . . . . 936-4715 | amarcotte@communitypress.com Kimtica Jarman Account Relationship Specialist . . . . . . . . . . 936-4707 | kjarman@communitypress.com Delivery For customer service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 576-8240 Ann Leonard | District manager . . . . . . . . . 248-7131 | amleonar@communitypress.com Stephen Barraco | Circulation Manager . . 248-7110 | sbarraco@communitypress.com Classified To place a Classified ad . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242-4000 | www.communityclassified.com To place an ad in Community Classified, call 242-4000.

Sycamore Township will offer residents a chance to shred old documents Saturday, April 17. From 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., residents can bring old documents to shred at the township administration building, 8540 Kenwood Road. Residents will be required to show proof of residency. For more information, contact the administration office at 791-8447.

Index

Calendar ......................................B2 Classifieds.....................................C Life...............................................B1 Police...........................................B7 Real estate ..................................B7 Schools........................................A5 Sports ..........................................A6 Viewpoints ..................................A8

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April 14, 2010 Northeast Suburban Life

A3

Traffic, parking looking better for this year’s Flower Show By Amanda Hopkins and Jeanne Houck ahopkins@communitypress.com, jhouck@communitypress.com

If the weather cooperates, Symmes Township Administrator Gerald Beckman said parking will be much easier for this year’s Cincinnati Flower Show at Symmes Township Park. Beckman said there is lots of field space to park at the Rozzi property across the street from Symmes Park on Lebanon Road that can be used in dry weather. “If we get lucky and have good weather, we have plenty of parking,” Beckman said. Beckman said there also will be some temporary parking in the back of the Rozzi property and several area churches will offer parking and shuttle rides for a fee.

This is the Cincinnati Flower Show’s 21st year and the second year at Symmes Park. Beckman said some traffic issues from last year’s show have been addressed and a loop that was installed around the Rozzi property should ease congestion along Lebanon Road. Buses will use the north entrance to the Rozzi property and have a drop-off point at the end of the loop. Beckman said tour and school buses stopped in front of the Symmes Park entrance and caused a lot of traffic back-up at last year’s flower show. “We’re trying to use the Rozzi property as much as we can,” Beckman said. “We want to get people off the road and find parking.” He said once the park plans are complete it may be

What to know for the Flower Show Show hours Friday, April 16, Opening Night Gala, 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday, April 17 through Saturday, Apr. 24, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Sunday, April 25, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Special Events Friday, April 16 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. – Opening Night Gala benefiting the Taft Museum’s 2011 exhibition, American Impressionists in the Garden Saturday, April 17 through Sunday, April 18 – Cincinnati Fine Food Show Saturday, April 24 through Sunday April 25 – Small Wonders Weekend Tickets To order tickets for the Cincinnati Flower or for any of the special events at the show, visit www.cincyflowershow.com. possible for all flower show patrons to park at the Rozzi property. Hamilton County sheriff deputies will help direct pedestrians across Lebanon Road. Meanwhile, Loveland officials are optimistic the

AMANDA HOPKINS/STAFF

Woodward High School students plant flowers around some of the tents at Symmes Park in preparation for the Cincinnati Flower Show.

“I replaced my windows — and it was no big to-do!"

parking and litter problems associated with last year’s Cincinnati Flower Show will be avoided. “Our police department will be blocking off Lindenhall Drive from Lebanon to Heidelberg,” said Loveland city council member Brent Zuch. “Residents there and on North Lebanon will get parking permits so they can more easily be able to get to their homes and have parking. After the show, we will be evaluating how it went.” Zuch praised Symmes Township for holding a meeting in February about the show and welcomed plans for hundreds of additional parking spaces and more ways for vehicles to enter and leave the Rozzi property on Lebanon Road. “These factors should ease congestion some,” Zuch said. Zuch said Symmes Township also has agreed to place some temporary trash receptacles along Lebanon Road to reduce litter.

AMANDA HOPKINS/STAFF

Woodward High School juniors, from left, Antonia Cunningham, Diona Rioui and Lawynter Bailey planted flowers at Symmes Park April 6 to get the park ready for the Cincinnati Flower Show.

AMANDA HOPKINS/STAFF

Workers April 6 put together one of the exhibits for the Cincinnati Flower Show at Symmes Park.

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A4

Northeast Suburban Life

April 14, 2010

SCHOOLS

ACHIEVEMENTS | NEWS | Editor Dick Maloney | rmaloney@communitypress.com | 248-7134

ACTIVITIES

| HONORS communitypress.com

National Merit finalists

PROVIDED.

Seven Hills School eighth graders are learning the challenges of jungle living as part of their study on the novel “Lord of the Flies.” From left, Jeff Maggio of Hyde Park, Tess Renusch of Anderson Township and Hannah Silverman of Montgomery create tools by binding stones to sticks.

Seven Hills students study ‘Lord of the Flies’ through jungle challenges As part of their study of the novel “Lord of the Flies”, the Seven Hills School eighth graders of English teacher Linda Maupin recently got a taste of the challenges of jungle living. Small teams of students completed survival skills in a limited amount of time, including: building a hut (or reasonable facsimile)

to sleep two people; peeling and equally dividing a kiwi, using just their fingers; and creating a usable tool or weapon by binding a stone to a stick. The eighth graders’ study of “Lord of the Flies” will be further enhanced as art students gradually transform Maupin’s classroom into a jungle over the upcoming

weeks. “We will also be taking a hard and difficult look at the issue of bullying through the lens of Golding’s novel, as well as the eyepiece of photographs and art, and finally through the clear-sightedness of students’ experiences,” said Maupin, who is from Indian Hill.

APEC winners

PROVIDED

Three Mount Notre Dame High School seniors have been named National Merit Finalists. From left, Kayla Walters of Symmes Township, Kelsey Ryan of Pleasant Ridge and Katie Markgraf of Madeira are among the top 16,000 students nation-wide who have met all the requirements to make it to the finals. Scholarship winners will be notified later this month.

SCHOOL NOTES Student of the month

John Whiting of Sycamore High School, a junior in the Construction Framing and Finishing program at Scarlet Oaks, was named a student of the month at Scarlet Oaks. “John’s goal is to make carpentry his profession, and plans to pursue a degree in construction management,” said instructor Gary Youmans, who nominated Whiting.

Educators career fair

The Cincinnati Independent Schools Consortium – including The Seven Hills School, The Summit Country Day School, Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy, St. Ursula Academy and St. Xavier High School – will present its second annual Educators of Color Career Fair from noon to 2 p.m. Saturday, April 17. The fair will take place in the high school lobby of Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy, 11525 Snider Road in Symmes Township. “We believe that everyone benefits from being a part of a diverse learning environment in all of our schools,” said Michelle Alexander, committee chair and Seven Hills’ director of diversity and community outreach. “As our world becomes more diverse, it is important that our faculty and staff reflect the demo-

graphics of the society in which we live. We are seeking diverse candidates for various administrative, faculty and staff positions in our schools.” To register or for more information about the Educators of Color Career Fair, contact Michelle Alexander at 527-1318 or michelle.alexander@7hills.org.

Academic all-stars named

Coaches in two of the leagues that will be represented in the April 24 Southwest Regional of the 2010 Ohio Academic Competition at Cincinnati State Community College have selected students for the equivalent of All-Star honors. Julia Tasset from Ursuline Academy was selected for the GCAL All-Academic First Team. Andrew Philip of Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy was selected for the CAL AllAcademic First Team. In sessions similar to television game show quizzes, students on these academic teams compete to see who can answer questions fastest and most accurately. The questions asked of the students range from history, literature and science to spelling, mythology and mathematics.

PROVIDED

The Summit Country Day Upper School had 14 students compete in the Annual Model Asian-Pacific Economic Conference (APEC) March 6 and 7. For the third consecutive year, Summit won. Students who participated are, from left: front row, Nick Paccitti of Loveland, Andre Rouillard of Loveland, Nico Posada of Blue Ash, Dehba Amatya of Anderson Township and Evan Albertson of Newtown; back row, Joe Olding of Burnett Woods, Brian Rouillard of Loveland, Tennant Argyres of Clifton, Hayden Klei of Anderson Township, Alex Sharp of Mason, John Franklin of Anderson Township, Katie Ann Sallada of Hyde Park, Ben McBride of Villa Hills, Ky., and Barrett Albrecht of Anderson Township.

Math really does count

PROVIDED

Sycamore Junior High’s MathCounts team came in third place at the MathCounts State Competition March 13 in Columbus. Team members are, from left; sponsor Kelly Abbas, Jonathan Weng, Sarah Li, Bryan Waterhouse, Nick Hershey and Brian Hu. Not pictured, Sky Wong and Ruochen Tang.

Lighting up the classroom

PROVIDED

St. Vincent Ferrer kindergarten students from right Courtney Ellis, Sara Carter and Matthew Powers explore the wonders of electricity as St. Vincent students spent the day March 23 with Crystal Clear Science for Do It Yourself Science Day. This all-day program gave students an opportunity to explore and learn about science in their everyday lives. Michele White is the founder of Crystal Clear Science.

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Schools

April 14, 2010

Northeast Suburban Life

A5

HONOR ROLLS Sycamore Jr. High School

The following students have earned honors for the second quarter of 2009-2010.

Seventh grade

Honor roll – Charlotte Aguilar, Samuel Allison, Paul Attebery, Andrew Bemmes, MacKenzie Boyd, Junn Elijah Cabrera, Elizabeth Clark, Alison Clements, Patrich Co, Benjamin Cohen, Courtney Cron, Alexis Davis, Emma Enderle, Taylor Evans, Christian Fernandez, Emily Fishman, Lorna Fletcher, Marie Fort, Taylor Gardner, Evelyn Garrett, Elizabeth Gibson, Jacob Gibson, Anna Groom, Nishtha Gupta, Hannah Guth, Isaac Harmon, John Heldman, Hunter Henderson, Paige Henry, Hunter Hersko-Fugitt, Yuya Ito, Esther Kaplan, Jack Kelsch, Athena Kennedy, Rachel Kleindorfer, Stephanie Knechtly, Nathaniel LeRoy, Allie Levine, Elliot Levy, Adam Lucken, Spencer

Mandell, Dilkash Mastoi, Stephen Mills, Delaney Morris, Jessica Mullikin, Ysaith Orellana Ascencio, Greg Ota, Anthony Popenoe, Benjamin Proudfoot, Jacie Ray, Hebeh Refaei, Megan Rogge, Anupama Roy-Chaudhury, Abbagail Sanders, Alexandra Schlie, Annie Schoen, William Schrantz, Jordyn Schuster, Brennon Shanks, Philip Silverman, Raymond Stoneberger, Kelsey Tepe, Shannon Thomas, Alexander Toney, Peter Tosh, Natasha Mara Victa, Nikolaus Vonderheide, Jennifer Weber, Steven Wessinger and Allan Zou. Principal honors – Jennifer Adamec, Jeremy Aguilon, Aysha Ahmad, Joseph Ahn, Katherine Amster, Yusuke Baba, Talia Bailes, Maria Beaucage, Ethan Beck, Abigail Belcher, Daria Beniash, Reed Bie, Benjamin Boughton, Madison Bovard, Blair Braxton, Eva Brod, Leah Brod, Hannah Brown, Joanna Brown, Rebecca Bruner, Jor-

dyn Bryant, Charlie Byers, Won (Michael) Choi, Clara Chuey, Samantha Ciricillo, Benjamin E. Cohen, Nicholas D’Angelo, Lauren Davis, Lauren De Marks, Amanda Del Toro Figueredo, Salima Diushebaeva, Atiya Dosani, Michidmaa Enkhbaatar, Lucy Farr, Jeffery Ferrell, Brenna Finlay, Stephanie Fleites, Nicholas Frankowski, Samuel Fredette, Melody Freeland, John Fry, Devin Galinari, Catarina Gandara-Clode, Ryan Gantzer, Francesca Garnica, Anna Garrett, Molly Gearin, Andrea Goldstein, Isaac Goldstein, Matthew Green, Bobbi Gregory, Shoyo Hakozaki, Mark Hancher, Emily Hart, Stephen Hartkemeier, Tyler Hegyesi, Grace Hertlein, Drake Heuerman, Jessica Hobart, William Hobart, Douglas Hoffmeister, Gloria Hu, Jie Huang, Nanci Hunter, Deepak Indrakanti, Megan Jiang, Andrea Jimenez, Michelle Johnson, Katherine Jones, Kyoko

Kato, Jamie Kolthoff, Sameer Kulkarni, Michelle Leshchinsky, Madeline Locke, Jonathan Lucken, Caleb Main, Kashif Malik, Shazia Malik, Morgan Malof, John Maloney, Maria Marshall, Ellen Martinson, Julia Mattis, Rose Menyhert, Samuel Meyers, Abigail Miller, Alyssa Miller, Natalie Miller, Audrey Moeller, Joseph Moreno, Brittany Murphy, David Muskal, Ryo Nakahata, Satoko Nakajima, Nakul Narendran, Pavan Nimmagadda, Rick Niu, Cara Norris, Allison Oh, Katherine Oh, Emily Orabella, Allison Overholt, Taylor Overholt, Jose Palacios, Jamie Pescovitz, Noah Pittinger, Ivan Porollo, Monica Prell, Sneha Rajagopal, Alma Rechnitzer, Jacqueline Regruth, Allison Rogge, Jonathan Rollins, Kristen Russell, Brendon Sabetta, Lauren Saxon, Austin Schafer, Lisa Schold, Megan Schroeder, Max Schwarzer, Matthew Sharpe, Eliza-

Dreams come true for MND dance team The Mount Notre Dame varsity dance team learned first-hand that dreams do come true at Disney World. After many months of practices, regional competitions and performances, the team headed to sunny Orlando, Fla., for the Universal Dance Association’s National Competition. This is the 10th consecutive year that the dancing Cougars have qualified for and competed in this national competition. This year’s competition proved to be challenging as the MND Cougars had to compete in preliminaries in order to make it to the semifinals and finals in the large Varsity Pom category. In the end, the countless hours of hard work and practice paid off as the Cougars were awarded seventh place in the nation

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Eighth grade

Honor roll – Hannah Abrahamson, Olivia Bell, Sarah Birckhead, Dominique Bookwalter, Zachary Burke, John Carroll, Jenna Celek, Brian Cleary, Hannah Coletts, Nun Cung Bik, Jordan Elder, Stefan Fakoukakis, Zachary Farquhar, Jordan Gause, Dan Ginsburg,

Gabriela Godinez-Feregrino, Azante Griffith, Leah Grinshpun, Matthew Groene, Sarah Grout, Gavin Gundler, Caitlin Guy, Ross Hamilton, Meredith Hayden, Emily Hayes, Mitchell Hill, Rupali Jain, Noah Koehne, Christopher Koellhoffer, Leila Kooshesh, Trent Langland, Todd Lewis, Alec Leyendecker, Noah Loftspring, Alexander Malone, Hannah Melvin, Giulia Mezzabotta, Jessica Miller, Nolan Morrow, Shyam Parikh, James Ponticos, Grant Price, Alora Reiff, Paola Reyes, Elizabeth Rosenberg, Kathryn Roth, Aditya RoyChaudhury, Jordan Schneider, Gianina (Gina) Schwegmann, Adam Simha, Andrew Size, Madeline Smith, David Sorger, Elizabeth Swofford, Nikita Tandon, Jacob Thorn, Liza Truncellito, Aditi Varshneya, Benjamin Vasunia, Megan Vorpe, Helen (Ellie) Wessinger, Kristen Wessinger, Joseph Wislocki and Jack Yang.

Just’n Time

Tunes & Tales by Justin Miller Sunday April 25, 7:00pm Performance Ohav Shalom Synagogue 8100 Cornell Road Silent Auction & Cash Wine Bar (6:15-) Delectable Desserts (8:30-)

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The Mount Notre Dame varsity dance team competed in the Universal Dance Association’s National Competition in Orlando, Fla. Team members are, from left: first row, Alli Kelsey of Loveland, Kaitlin Kinman of Sharonville, Sarah Bitter of Loveland, Andrea Morrison of West Chester Township, Liz Alt of Loveland, Alix Malinoff of Kenwood; second row, assistant coach Jenn Ackerman, Amy McMahan of Springfield Township, Katie Riordan of Reading, McKenzie Barron of Loveland, Kaitlyn Corrigan of Loveland, Katie Storer of Landen, Alex Schraer of Loveland and head Coach melissa Kidd; third row, Ashley Poland of Loveland, Maddie Haubner of Liberty Township, Caitlin Dunkley of Kenwood, Allie Lang of Mason, Ashley Peter of Kenwood, Jenn Foppe of Mason, Megan Hupp of Loveland and Cassidy Layman of Loveland. among a larger-than-ever field of fierce competition. In the high kick category, the team executed a nearly perfect routine, placing fourth. “The girls have worked so hard this year and have had a record-breaking season coming home with three grand championships

throughout the season and then placing fourth and seventh in Orlando,” varsity head coach and dance program director Melissa Kidd said. “I’m really proud of them. They represent MND so well on and off the dance floor. They truly are a remarkable group of girls.” Kidd is assisted by Jen

Ackerman, a 2007 graduate of Mount Notre Dame who was a member of MND’s award-winning dance team while a student at MND. Tryouts for the 20102011 varsity and junior teams will be at Mount Notre Dame April 26 through April 28. E-mail Kidd at mkidd@mndhs.org.

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A6

Northeast Suburban Life

April 14, 2010

SPORTS BRIEFLY

Social to aid athletics

On May 8, the Sycamore Athletic Boosters is having its Spring Social from 7-11 p.m. in the clubhouse at Great Traditions on Montgomery Road. Event tickets, which include appetizers and soft drinks, are $20 until April 16, $25 from April 17 until May 7, and $30 at the door. The event will also include live music, door prizes, a raffle, silent auction, a magician and “Fly By Poker.” Ticket order forms are available at www.sycamoreschools.org, under “Athletics” and then under “Athletic Boosters.” Proceeds from the event benefit athletic programs at Sycamore High School and Sycamore Junior High School. During the past decade, the Sycamore Athletic Boosters have provided nearly $1 million for the advancement and success of Sycamore sports.

This week in baseball

• Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy beat North College Hill 10-0 in five innings, April 2. CHCA’s Matt Blankenship pitched 12 strikeouts. CHCA’s Matt Williams went 2-2 and scored four runs with three RBIs; Jacob Schomaker had three basehits with two RBIs; John Lloyd had two basehits; Cameron Armstrong had three basehits and two RBIs; Ted Andrews had two basehits and two RBIs. CHCA advances to 2-1 with the win. • CHCA beat Milford 10-9, April 3. CHCA’s Avery was the winning pitcher. CHCA’s Matt Williams went 2-3 with two basehits, two RBIs and three homeruns; Jacob Schomaker went 2-3; Ben Lewis went 2-3 with two basehits; Ted Andrews had three basehits and two RBIs. CHCA advances to 4-1 with the win.

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | Editor Melanie Laughman | mlaughman@communitypress.com | 248-7573

UA track defending first GGCL title since 1997 By Anthony Amorini aamorini@communitypress.com

A quartet of school record holders return for fourth-year head coach Lindsey Eckstein as the Ursuline Lions look to defend its Girls’ Greater Catholic League Scarlet Division title on the track this spring. Ursuline won its first GGCL title since 1997 last spring while besting second-place St. Ursula by 16 points, 158-142. Senior Molly Basch (pole vault) and juniors Pam Showman (high jump) and Marisol Mason (100-meter hurdles, 300 hurdles) are all returning league champions

The track and field season is officially under way for high school teams across the state of Ohio. The season culminates with the state championships at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium at Ohio State University June 4-5, as countless local athletes hope to vie for a state title. Here’s a look at the local teams:

Moeller

This week in softball

Cincinnati Country Day

TM sets records

The Thomas More College baseball team set two school records April 2, with 32 runs and 30 hits in its 32-0 win over Geneva College in a Presidents' Athletic Conference (PAC) game at Thomas More Field. Freshman Eric Smith, a Moeller High School grad, went 2-2 with a double.

FILE PHOTO

Ursuline's Kelly Davidson, now a Lion junior, sprints down the track while competing in the 100-meter dash during the 2009 Coaches' Classic last spring. for Ursuline. “I expect our team to set high goals and go after them,” Eckstein said. “This

season we are trying to prepare the team for districts, regionals and hopefully state. “I know we have the talent to do great things this year and hopefully we can stay healthy and put it together on the right day,” Eckstein added. In addition to winning league, Showman also qualified to state in the high jump while setting a new Ursuline record in the event last season. Showman won her GGCL title with a 5-foot-2 leap and finished seventh at the Division I State Championships as a sophomore. “Pam matched her outdoor (personal record) during her indoor season and is on pace for another trip to Columbus with improved marks,” Eckstein said. Alongside Basch, senior Mackenzie Harrell will also

be a key leader for the Lions, Eckstein said. Harrell aims to break Ursuline’s record in the 300 hurdles this spring, Eckstein said of the fourth-year varsity starter. “Their devotion to the team, the sport, coaches and improving themselves is excellent. They constantly set a positive example of how to achieve great things through hard work,” Eckstein said of Basch and Harrell. Though Basch managed to win a conference title in 2009, the GGCL finals was the first outdoor meet of the season for the standout last spring because of injury, Eckstein said. Basch owns the Ursuline record in the pole vault with Showman housing the high jump record and Mason claiming the long jump record.

FILE PHOTO

Ursuline senior Molly Basch, seen here showing her school spirit during a Lion volleyball match in the winter, will be a leader for the Lions’ track program this spring. Khara Walker, an Ursuline sophomore, returns with a school record in the 200. Sophomore Sydney Bell, a middle-distance runner specializing in races ranging from the 200 to the 800, will also be a key contributor.

Local teams get back on track – and field

• Mariemont boys beat Moeller 8-7, April 7. Moeller’s Rogan scored two goals, Fuller scored three and Polak and Collision each scored one goal. • Ursuline Academy girls beat McAuley 17-6, April 8. Ursuline’s Hannah Besl, Josie Male, Annie Hauser and Sara Wiener scored one goal each; Caroline Tobin and Diana Campbell scored two goals each; and Megan Schnicke, Kara Strasser and Maggie Egan scored three goals each. Ursuline advances to 21 with the win.

• Middletown beat Sycamore 11-10, April 5. Sycamore’s Carrie Tveita went 3-5 with two RBI; Megan Stoy went 2-5 and Kat Pember went 3-4. Sycamore falls to 1-3 with the loss. • Sycamore beat Western Hills 18-0 in five innings, April 6. Sycamore’s Becca Melvin pitched seven strikeouts; Michelle McDonald went 2-2 with two basehits and four runs; Kat Pember went 2-3 with three runs; Carrie Tveita went 2-3 with four RBI; Megan Stoy had three RBI; and Caitlin Hauff went 2-3. Sycamore advances to 2-3 with the win. • Hamilton beat Sycamore 8-3, April 7. Sycamore’s Carrie Tveita went 2-4. Sycamore falls to 2-4 with the loss.

communitypress.com

Lions ready to hit the ground running

The Moeller track team should be one of the better area teams, and the Crusaders have a number of talented athletes, including Tom Tussey in the 1,600meter run and freshman Zach Hoffman, who finished seventh in the 800-meter run in the prelims of the Coaches Classic at Mason. Patrick McCarty is another threat for Moeller and finished fifth in the prelims of the 3,200-meter run. Kyle Walker finished third in the 110-meter hurdles. Moeller coaches could not be reached before press deadlines for further comment.

This week in lacrosse

RECREATIONAL

Regional qualifier Kyle Kistinger and district champions Alanah Hall and Erica Armstead lead CCD back to the track this season with high expectations for the returning standouts. Kistinger, a sophomore co-captain, is a distance runner with a 4:37 time in the mile to his credit. Armstead, also a CCD sophomore, won district titles in the long jump and also as a part of the 4X100meter relay in 2010. Hall, a CCD junior, won district titles in the 3,200 and also as a part of the Indians’ 4x800 relay. “We have talent and depth at every position,” CCD girls head coach Steve Conner said. “If we stay healthy and keep a strong attitude, we should have a very good season.” Nichole Lowe (sprints) is the only returning senior for the CCD girls. Additional key contributors for the CCD girls will include juniors Alexis Victor (high jump, hurdles) and Claire Heinichen (pole vault,

sprints). The leaders for the CCD boys will include Kistinger, senior Will Fritz (sprints), senior Rob Klug (high jump) and Sebastian Koochaki. Kistinger is closing in on school records in both the 1,600 and 3,200, boys head coach Howard Brownstein said. “Most of our team is young, as 20-of-24 are (freshmen) and sophomores,” Brownstein said. “We are looking for Kistinger and Fritz to have good years and progress in the postseason.”

CHCA

Julie Dietrich, who has nearly a decade of coaching experience in track, enters her first year as head coach of the Eagles. The girls’ team, which last won a league title in 2006, will be led by junior Sarah Atallah (high jump and long jump), sophomore Vicky Lantz (pole vault) and freshmen Kelsey Vice (shot put and discus) and Jessica Holiday (400 and 800). Other contributors include Sara Wilson, Rachel Talaber, Elizabeth Lyle, Emily Walton, Lauren Hayes, Anna Love, Heather Morrison, Hannah Russell, Melissa Smith and Christiana Tait. The boys’ team, which last won a league title in 2008, will be led by seniors Andrew Wallace (400, 800 and 1600, among others), Andrew Perkins (110 hurdles, sprint relays and long jump), Javon Campbell (sprints and relays) and Nate Flint (400), as well as sophomore Logan Lally (pole vault). Wallace, who will also appear in the 4x400 and possibly the 4x800, is garnering interest from Butler University. Other contributors include Sean Lally, Evan Machan, Chris Taylor, Hayes Dollar, Isaiah Bell, Brian Taylor, Josh Thiel, Charlie Hall, Austin Hinners, Patrick Lyle, Connor Staarmann and Matthew Tan. The Eagles are participating in several upcoming invitationals, including

BRANDON SEVERN/ CONTRIBUTOR

Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy senior Andrew Wallace returns for the Eagles this season. ones at Reading (April 17) and Miford (April 22-23), and will also host the CHCA Relays (April 20) and an invitational of their own (May 4-5). The Miami Valley Conference Championship will be May 11-12 at Lockland. “Both teams want to work hard and earn back our league titles,” Dietrich said.

Indian Hill

The Indian Hill track team got off to a fast start at the Coaches Classic as the Braves sent several individuals and relays from both the girls’ team and the boys’ team to the finals. “It’s early but I’m really pleased with what I’ve seen so far,” head coach Susan Savage said. “We sent a few more on to the finals than we did last year so that’s a good sign.” The girls are coming off a Cincinnati Hills League championship in cross country in the fall, and Savage said the Braves should be in contention with Wyoming for a CHL title this spring in track and field. The boys should be a top three team, according to Savage. Savage said John Angus has done well in his first season as he qualified for the finals in three events, including the 300-hurdles in his first attempt at the event. “He has some natural ability and some speed and strength, so the sky is the limit for him,” Savage said. Vincent Fuggetta is another senior in track for the first time but he’s made a splash as a sprinter, especially on the relay teams. Junior Jackson Kirk is

another standout contributor on the relay teams and qualified for the finals in the 1600-meter run. Thomas Ernst is an 800-meter runner who could be very good, Savage said. Matt Littman is one of the team captains, along with Logan McConnell and Deniz Aydogan. The girls have a talented group, led by sophomore distance runner Elizabeth Heinbach. She finished No. 4 in the state in cross country in the fall and went to state for the 3,200-meter run last spring. She hasn’t competed yet this season as the coaches are working her in slowly to avoid any injury troubles. Junior Natalie Sommerville is another returning standout, as she went to state last spring in the 300-meter hurdles. Senior Aubrey Rogers is a threat in the 200-meter dash and is also a talented member of the relays. Sarah Rosenblum and Katie Hallahan are two talented runners in the 400meter and will also be factors in some of the relay teams, along with Susan Plunkett. Indian Hill is also led by captains Elizabeth Daun, Deena Rahman and Chrissy Metcalf. Newcomer Kasey Schumacher will be a factor on several of the relays and thrower Jade Lac is an athlete to watch as well.

MND

The Cougars return just one first-team all-league performer – junior long jumper Erin Murphy, who was also second-team allleague in the 400-meter relay with sophomore Asia Hill and junior Cami Jackson. Other contributors include sprinters Dominique Davis, Keasha Munson, Kelsey Gault and Allison Weaver, who also runs the mile; distance runners Elizabeth Deutsch and Tina Verrilli; and hurdlers Lauren Paasch and Vanessa Hope. In the field, meanwhile, are Carla Becker (shot put), Natalie Wynn (shot put and discus), Tory Alexander (discus) and Rachel Frank (pole vault).

MND is coached by Aaron Gnagy The Girls’ Greater Cincinnati League Scarlet division Championships will be held at La Salle with preliminaries May 12 and finals May 14.

Sycamore

The Sycamore track teams, coached by Liz Gonda, returns a number of starters, including senior hurdler Emily Elsbrock and senior mid-distance runners Danielle Fleming, Allison Setser and Kelsey Pauly. Juniors sprinter Alix Davis and jumper Maddie Keyes are two more key returning athletes, along with sophomore thrower Gika Okonji. Senior pole vaulter Catherine Farist and junior vaulter Becca Roessler give the Aves depth in the field events. The team has a promising young distance runner in Samantha Siler and freshmen Bianca Rodenbaugh, Angela Harris, Nicole Brown and Hailey Bell could be promising contributors for the Aviators. “The leadership of our seniors and potential of our underclasswomen will put us in a great position to be one of the city’s top teams,” Gonda said in an e-mail. The boys’ team, coached by Hank Ray, has a younger squad but has several standouts. Senior Nick Fry is a talented distance runner and junior Darius Hillary is a standout sprinter, along with D.C. Smith. Junior thrower Justin Murray is poised for success, along with Ben Rader and sophomore Ben Wulker will be one of the team’s top jumpers. Sophomore Nick Alson is another standout sprinter. Michael Bemmes is a newcomer that will help in mid-distance races and freshman distance runner Tallin Forshey will help add depth to the team. Junior mid-distance runner Adam Kapuscinski is another athlete to keep on eye on for the Aves. “We will be very young this year and will learn a lot building up to the month of May,” Ray said. Reported by Anthony Amorini, Mark Chalifoux and Tony Meale


Sports & recreation

April 14, 2010

Northeast Suburban Life

A7

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TERRENCE HUGE/CONTRIBUTOR

CHCA pitcher Matt Blankenship throws a pitch in the first inning of an April 2 game against North College Hill High School. CHCA won 10-0 at home. CHCA also beat the Trojans 39-0 the day earlier at NCH.

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• Sycamore High School boys placed third with a score of 82 in the Coaches Classic, April 7. Justin Murray won the shot put. • Moeller High School boys placed fifth with a score of 59.5 in the Coaches Classic, April 7. Moeller’s Kassem won the shot put. • Ursuline Academy placed second with a score of 136.5 in the Coaches Classic, April 7. Sycamore placed third with a score of 94.5. Ursuline’s Ali Backscheider won the 800 meter in 2:28.63, and the 1600 meter in 5:28.61; Pam Showman won the high jump; and Molly Basch won the pole vault.

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• Moeller lost 6-4 to Noblesville, but won 8-6 against Strongsville, April 3. Against Noblesville, Moeller’s Robby Sunderman went 2-4 with two basehits; Alex Barlow went 2-3; Kevin Thamann had three basehits and three RBIs. Against Stongsville, Moeller’s Kevin Brennan was the winning pitcher; Alex Barlow went 2-4; Kevin Brinkman went 2-3; Kevin Thaman went 3-4; Hooper had two basehits; Ryan Logan had three basehits. Moeller advances to 3-1 with the win. • CHCA beat Wyoming 76, April 3. CHCA’s Matt Williams was the winning pitcher. Williams went 2-3 with three basehits and a homerun; Blake Avery went 23 with two basehits; John Lloyd went 2-3 with a homerun. CHCA advances to 3-1 with the win. • Moeller beat La Salle 75, April 5. Moeller’s Robby Sunderman was the winning pitcher. Sunderman also went 2-3 with two basehits, four RBIs and a homerun; Tyler Hutchinson went 2-4; Alex Barlow went 2-3 with two basehits. Moeller advances to 4-1 with the win. • Sycamore lost to Mason 5-0, April 5. Sycamore falls to 2-4 with the loss. • Moeller beat Grosse Pointe 17-1 in five innings, April 6. Moeller’s Jake Madsen was the winning pitcher;

Alex Barlow went 3-3 with three runs, two basehits and four RBI; Kyle Robinett went 2-2; Jones had two basehits; Eric Stiene went 3-4 with three basehits and two RBI; Marc Gallenstein went 2-3 with two RBIs; Max Belza had two RBIs. Moeller advances to 5-1 with the win. • Moeller beat Elder 9-1, April 6. Moeller’s winning pitcher was David Whitehead with six strikeouts; Tyler Hutchinson went 2-4 with two basehits and three RBIs; Alex Barlow had three basehits; Kevin Brinkman went 2-4; Kevin Thamann went 2-3; Josh Hooper had three RBIs. Moeller advances to 6-1 with the win. • Moeller beat Brentwood Academy 5-4, April 7. Moeller’s Andrew Steine was the winning pitcher; Moeller’s Tyler Hutchinson had two base hits and two RBIs; Alex Barlow went 2-2; Jake Madsen went 3-4 with two basehits and a homerun and Tyler Grau had two base hits. Moeller advances to 7-1 with the win. • Sycamore beat Oak Hills 11-5, April 7. Sycamore’s Kevin Clark was the winning pitcher; Wes Yengo went 2-3 with two base hits; Jake Michalak went 2-4 with two base hits and four RBIs; Alec Diersing went 3-5 with two base hits; Kyle Hart went 3-4 with two base hits and four RBIs. Sycamore advances to 2-5 with the win.

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cincinnati.com/community

Becca Melvin, freshman pitcher for the Sycamore Lady Aves, lets fly a strike against Western Hills April 6. The Aviators won 18-0 on a one-hit shutout. Melvin pitched four of the five innings to gain the victory. Playing shortstop behind her is Carrie Tveita, a junior, who leads the team with a .600 batting average.

JOSEPH FUQUA II/STAFF

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Northeast Suburban Life

April 14, 2010

VIEWPOINTS

EDITORIALS

LETTERS

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COLUMNS

Editor Dick Maloney | rmaloney@communitypress.com | 248-7134

The law may not protect against sports violence The lacrosse teams of the Ohio State University and Ashland University were locked in a very contentious game. Towards the end, an Ohio State player intercepted a pass and fired the ball in for a goal. At this time he was “bodychecked” from behind by Ashland defender William Kynast, who then stood over the downed player while taunting him. An Ohio State teammate, Brian Hanson, grabbed Kynast from behind in a bear hug. Kynast instantly flipped Hanson over his back, causing him to fall headfirst, resulting in quadriplegia. Brain Hanson’s lawyers brought a lawsuit against Ashland University. They argued the coaches’ failure to properly supervise the players, which led to this tragedy. The Supreme Court of Ohio reversed a lower appeals court ruling. They held Hanson assumed the risk of injury when he grabbed Kynast, in protection of his teammate. The highest legal authority in our state ruled that body-contact sports such as lacrosse are inherently combative, and those who participate assume the risk of rough play. The justices went on to remark that it is difficult to distinguish when a player crosses that thin, perhaps invisible, line which sep-

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arates assault from permissible sport aggressiveness. As catastrophic as Hanson’s injury was, the court e l i e v e d Thomas bKynast’s intenGelwicks tion was not to Community injure and that Press guest his actions were and columnist “reflexive instinctive.” Student athletes strive to make the team and, beyond that, win play time and perhaps school glory. Overpowering others is the essence of what they work to accomplish on the field. At the same time, each is charged with following the rules as well as those vague ideals we characterize as “sportsmanship.” We expect a lot of youths by assuming that, in the heat of battle, they will make split-second decisions in properly conducting themselves. They are expected to demonstrate behaviors that will place them in that narrow, uncertain zone between “stick up for yourself” and “conduct yourself with decency.” Evaluating intent and determining a proper response are jobs we usually entrust to authority figures.

About guest columns

We welcome guest columns on all sides of an issue. Include with your column your name, address, daytime telephone number, and a two-to-three line biography outlining your expertise related to this topic, and a color headshot of yourself. We reserve the right to edit for length, accuracy and clarity. Columns may be no more than 500 words. Deadline: Noon Friday for next Wednesday’s issue. E-mail: nesuburban@ communitypress.com Letters, columns and articles submitted to The Northeast Suburban Life may be published or distributed in print, electronic or other forms.

It’s often complex, despite Justice Holmes’ jocular observation that even a dog knows the difference between being kicked and being stumbled over. Congress may debate for weeks the wisdom of a military response. Judges have the luxury of time and settled law in considering situations such as Kynast’s belligerence. Adults engaged in the daily competition to earn a living must tread an ever-moving line in navigating the written and unwritten rules of their workplace. We are expected to be very ambitious – but not too ambitious. A youth playing sports must expect varying degrees of violence. It is up to them to abruptly determine whether to respond and, if so, precisely how. It may be an unreasonable burden, but it is the way of sports and the way of the law. Thomas Gelwicks is an attorney. He lives in Blue Ash.

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CH@TROOM

communitypress.com

Transient vendors spring up when warm weather nears Spring is here, the snow is gone, trees are budding and flowers are popping up out of the ground. Spring brings with it many things to look Chris Wallace forward to. Community Unfortunately, Press guest spring also sigcolumnist nals the annual return of transient criminal groups. They are already in our area and are most active from now until late spring. The groups usually take up residence in local hotels for the period of time they are here, and then move on. These transient criminals groups engage in numerous theft scams from shoplifting to home burglary (usually through unlocked doors), to construction scams. Every year Blue Ash residents are victims of home improvement frauds. Driveway blacktopping and roof repair are the most common of these crimes. These crimes are even more serious due to the fact that these criminals tend to prey on the elderly. Typically the vendor will indicate they have blacktop left over from a “job down the road,” and say they will blacktop your driveway for a reduced price. Another popular scam is the individual who “just happens to be driving down your street and

CH@TROOM Last week’s question:

Do you agree with President Obama’s decision to open more coastal waters to oil and gas exploration? Why or why not? “Obama made that decision about offshore drilling purely to help his sagging poll numbers. He knows that exploring and drilling for oil and gas is very popular with the American people. “But he also knows that his administration has many loopholes that can be used down the road to prevent drilling in those very same areas. “This is very deceptive, but something I have come to expect from him. And, in a related action, which did not get nearly the same amount of press, he put other areas off limits for exploration. “Our continued national decision to ignore much of our oil and gas reserves and to fail to produce more nuclear energy is tragic. “It will produce higher energy costs, higher unemployment, and higher inflation, but far worse, it may cost American lives if we ever get into a war where our overseas energy sources are denied us. This is the definition of insanity.” T.H. “The U.S. Is critically dependent on foreign oil and gets jerked around by petro-rich countries because of it. We have untapped oil resources in our coastal waters that could reduce our dependence. “What’s not to like, as long as the exploration is done in an environmentally responsible way? How can we let ourselves starve to death in the middle of a buffet line?” F.S.D.

“If President Obama actually did open more coastal waters for oil and gas exploration that’s good news. However, I heard claims that while he gave more with one hand he reduced even more with the other. “American companies have the know-how to safely recover oil from the ocean depths without harming the environment. They can also do the same in the Alaskan wilderness.” R.V. “The only valid reason is that he is placating the Republicans in Congress. While I personally am not against legitimate drilling in known preserves, the amount of oil is negligible to the total we use. This may take some of the focus off greater efficiencies and renewable alternatives.” J.Z. “I think, unfortunately, that this is a politically motivated decision, in Obama’s effort to bring all together. Studies by the Petroleum Institute and other organizations show that with current and forecast usage rates of petroleum, we will run out sometime in the next twenty years. “The reserves in Alaska, and in the coastal areas on the continental shelf are predicted by knowledgeable geologists to provide a very small amount of reserves needed compared to oil from shale, South America, and Russian imports as alternatives to the Middle East, which are quickly disappearing. “I visit Santa Barbara, Calif., occasionally, and always notice the offshore drilling rigs and the

notices you have serious roof or gutter problems.” The work is almost always of inferior quality, often unnecessary, and the victim is usually presented with a bill much higher than the original estimate. Victims, particularly the elderly are often intimidated into paying this inflated bill. If you have an elderly neighbor or relative be observant, and help educate them about these crimes. Transient vendors and home solicitation sales are regulated by both state law and city of Blue Ash ordinances. These ordinances include bonding of the vendor, and specific requirements for contract language. These laws also provide for a three-day right of cancelation, also referred to as a “cooling off period.” Violation of these ordinances is a crime. The Blue Ash Police Department recommends residents deal with established contractors with a verifiable local area business address. Be very cautious when dealing with contractors who engage in unsolicited door to door sales. If you have any questions concerning home improvement vendors call the Blue Ash Police Department. If you are approached by a vendor engaging in door to door home improvement sales or suspect a transient vendor is working your neighborhood, call the Blue Ash Police Department at 7458555. Chris Wallace is Blue Ash chief of police.

Next question

oily debris on the public beach of one of America’s most exclusive and beautiful cities. There is always a significant danger when off-shore drilling of storms or other catastrophic events causing widespread environmental damage of a great magnitude. “While much of us are enthusiastic about wind and solar power, it will take 10 to 20 years for us to see real viability in that area. “Meanwhile, to meet our increasing power demands in America, we need to go with a new generation of nuclear power, that provides great design and operational efficacy as well as security and fuel recycling. “All of Canada’s nuclear power stations are absolutely identical, use the same reactors and controls, so once operators and maintenance personnel are trained, they can go anywhere in the country and not experience a new learning curve. “They also use a lower enrichment level of uranium, so that they can refuel online, and reduce refueling expenses.” Dr. W.S.W. “I never thought I would find myself agreeing with any decision made by Mr. Obama, but in this case, I do. We must not overlook any potential source of energy at this point in time, and if this can be done with minimal impact on the environment, I’m all for it.” Bill B. “I agree wholeheartedly! But only if all drilling operations, contracts and – most importantly – employees are issued to companies and people in the United States.

“Minimizing our dependence on foreign oil suppliers should be a very high priority for us until we can begin developing alternate sources of energy. “When plans were made to open huge wind-powered energy fields out west, I was horrified to learn the U.S. companies issued these enormous contracts farmed most of the work building the giant windmills to overseas companies and their (cheaper?) employees. No large contracts for this sort of project should be issued without strict regulations guaranteeing that all work – development, manufacturing, assembly and installation – will be done by U.S. companies and U.S. employees.” M.M. “We must not allow our coastal waters to be polluted any more. Exploration takes time, money, and resources with no guarantee of a payoff ever or even the possibility of a payoff in the near future as it takes at least eight years before production would start. “Then there’s always the possibility of an oil spill. A better solution is to install wind turbines offshore now and generate clean energy from a renewable source.” A.B. “It is hard to understand why we as a nation haven’t paid more attention to the role of oil imports in our current economic woes. If you know what has happened with oil leases in the past, you know that the industry doesn’t get too excited about these massive new leases because they

A publication of Northeast Suburban Life Editor .Dick Maloney rmaloney@communitypress.com . . . . . .248-7134

What’s your opinion of Chad Ochocinco’s non-football activities, like “Dancing with the Stars”? Every week The Northeast Suburban Life asks readers a questions that they can reply to via email. Send your answers to clermont@communitypress.com with “chatroom” in the subject line. already know there isn’t much left out there. “We need to raise fuel efficiency to 55 mpg because that was economically justified when gasoline rose over $2/gallon. We need to accelerate the development of electric cars because there are renewable electric generation technologies, and we’re past the peak ability to produce liquid biofuels. “We need a lot of other things, to reduce our oil addiction. Not all of them will become possible to see until we have taken some of the steps we should have taken in 1978. It’s not like we didn’t see this coming.” N.F. “I think this decision is long overdue. We need to use our own natural resources to combate the oil and gas crisis. Our President has overlooked making this decision for too long a time. “The ridiculous health care program took to much of his time promoting and making deals to achieve passage. This is a perect example that our current administration cannot handle multiple situations. “In listing the areas involved with this authorization, its interesting he did not include Alaska (I wonder why). E.S.

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A WORLD OF DIFFERENT VOICES

Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Friday | See page A2 for additional contact information. 248-8600 | 394 Wards Corner Road, Loveland, Ohio 45140 | e-mail nesuburban@communitypress.com | Web site: www.communitypress.com


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PEOPLE

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IDEAS

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RECIPES

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PROVIDED

Geoff Egbers of Florence, Ky., owner of Egbers Land Design, Inc., 2009 winner of the Symmes Township Trustee Award and former Royal Horticultural Society Silver Flora medal winner, Dr. Frank Welsh of Montgomery/Indian Hill, Cincinnati Horticultural Society Board of Trustees Secretary, Kate Haumesser of Hyde Park, graphic designer, and Gerry Beckman of Symmes Township, Symmes Township administrator

PROVIDED

Robert Clopton, Jr. thanked Loveland Symmes firefighters and paramedics for their response after he was hit by a truck in April 2008 on the second anniversary of the accident. From left, Lieutenant Steve Money, Firefighter Paramedic Clay Morton, Firefighter Paramedic Rick Dunn, Robert Clopton, Jr., Firefighter Paramedic Andy Huber and Deputy Chief Brian Dowers. Not pictured, but on the call, Chief Otto Huber, District Chief Harold Gregory, Assistant Chief Tom Turner, Deputy Chief Billy Goldfeder, Firefighter Paramedic Wes Dendler, Firefighter EMT Jim Polce and Firefighter Paramedic Brian Dutlinger.

Flower show poster unveiled The 2010 Cincinnati Flower Show poster was unveiled to the public at historic Meade House, in Symmes Township, just a stone’s throw away from Symmes Township Park, the

Patient thanks paramedics By Amanda Hopkins ahopkins@communitypress.com

Deputy Chief Brian Dowers with the Loveland Symmes Fire Department said one of the most rewarding parts of his job is being able to see how patients he treated have recovered. He got the chance when Robert Clopton, Jr., a man who was struck by a truck while accepting a delivery at a Symmes Township business April 1, 2008, came in to thank Dowers and other emergency responders on the second anniversary of the accident for their hand in getting him to the emergency room within a half hour of the call. “I wanted to thank them all,” Clopton said. “They go unrecognized a lot.”

Clopton, who lives in Mt. Washington, had very serious injuries resulting from the accident. He said his recovery is still a “work in progress,” but he has many family members and friends who have come together to support him. He said a few friends even organized a fundraiser for him. “You see the good in people when you’re hurt,” Clopton said. Dowers, who has been a part of the Symmes Loveland Fire Department for 21 years, said it’s not often that he can meet a trauma patient that he helped. “It makes (the department) feel good to see that support he received. He came out a winner,” Dowers said. “We do our part for the little bit of time we’re with them.”

THINGS TO DO School open house

The Art Institute of OhioCincinnati is hosting an open house at 10:30 a.m. Saturday, April 17, at The Art Institute of Ohio - Cincinnati, 8845 Governor’s Hill Drive, Suite 100, Symmes Township. Attendees are invited to learn more about school’s programs, discuss educational goals, tour facilities and learn about tuition scholarship opportunities. The event is free. Call 8332430 or visit www.artinstitutes.edu/cincinnati.

Learn about weather

Hamilton County Park District is hosting the program “Severe Weather in Ohio” at 2 p.m. Saturday, April 17, in Sharon Centre at Sharon Woods, 11450 Lebanon Road, Sharonville. It is a naturalist-led program all about severe weather events in Ohio and the science behind them. The event is free, a vehicle permit is required. Call 521-7275 or visit www.greatparks.org.

Collectors’ convention

Alpha Records & Music is hosting the Cincinnati Music Collectors’ Convention from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday, April 18, at Crowne Plaza Hotel Blue Ash, 5901 Pfeiffer

Road, Blue Ash. It is a music show and sale that includes phonograph records, CDs, DVDs, tapes and music related items. Admission is $3, free ages 11 under with adult. Call 317882-3378.

Poetry workshop

Grailville Education and Retreat Center is hosting “Giving Your Poems Roots and Wings” at 2 p.m. Sunday, April 18, at Grailville Education and Retreat Center, 932 O’Bannonville Road, Loveland. It is a panel discussion with poets Richard Hague, Leah Maines, Robert and Elizabeth Murphy, Lynn Robbins and Valerie Chronis Bickett. The poetry workshop, by donation, begins at 3:30 p.m. Bring five copies on up to three poems. The cost is $15. Registration is required. Call 683-2340 or visit www.grailville.org.

Share your events Go to communitypress.com and click on Share! to get your event into the Northeast Suburban Life.

PROVIDED

The 2010 Cincinnati Flower Show poster designed by Kate Haumesser of Hyde Park.

2010 show venue. The poster was designed by Kate Haumesser, a Hyde Park-based freelance graphic designer and recent University of Dayton graduate, and is sure to start popping up in store windows and on bulletin boards throughout the Tristate region. Haumesser found inspiration for the graphic elements in Cincinnati’s

architecture and the city’s strong art deco influence. Concerning the rich color palette of blues, pinks and purples, she says the prevalence of the combination as seen on spring’s fashion runways was a jumping off point. The 2010 Cincinnati Flower Show will run April 17-25 at Symmes Township Park. For more information, visit www.cincyflowershow.com.

PROVIDED

Cincinnati Horticultural Society President Mary Margaret Rochford of Batavia, Chairwoman of the Board of Trustees Marie Huenefeld of Mariemont and graphic designer Kate Haumesser of Hyde Park at the unveiling.

Arboretum manager to advocate for conifers Others may concoct lavish exhibits that are described as dream-like and ethereal, whimsical and imaginative. Or maybe they demonstrate all the hottest new plants, gadgets and trends taking garden centers and landscapers by storm. Chris Daeger, however, isn’t interested in the trendy or the fantastical. He doesn’t really care what this year’s “it” plant is. He is true to himself and his passion. The manager of the Rowe Arboretum in Indian Hill, Daeger, from Batavia, has had an almost life-long love affair with conifers. In fact, he discovered, registered and named his own variety, the Pinus bungeana “Rowe Arboretum.” This year he’ll share the love with visitors to the 2010 Cincinnati Flower Show with a conifer exhibit within the show’s Grand Marquee tent. Daeger’s exhibit will include troughs, bonsais, containers and topi-

aries. His trees will be displayed in four growth rate categories established by the American Conifer Society: miniature, dwarf, intermediate and large. The focus on educating consumers on growth rates comes from Daeger’s disbelief in the conventional wisdom that plants only grow to a particular size. “My philosophy,” he said, “is that plants don’t read books and they do keep growing; if they stop -- they’re dead! Time for the chainsaw!” This unabashed conifer fan and expert also describes conifers as the “bones of the garden” -- there are literally thousands to choose from, many require little or no maintenance or pruning and they’re great yearround plants, Daeger said. In addition to stopping by and visiting him at the Flower Show, Daeger also invites visitors to the Rowe Arboretum (4600 Muchmore Road, Indian Hill).

PROVIDED

Arboretum manager Chris Daeger looks to a crystal ball-like cycad for answers to all your conifer questions. Daeger lives in Batavia, works for the Rowe Arboretum in Indian Hill and will be a Grand Marquee exhibitor at the 2010 Cincinnati Flower Show in Symmes Township. “The Rowe is a great place to view more than 1,000 different conifers, it’s free, and it whets the appetites of gardeners before they shop for their favorites.” The 21st annual Cincinnati Flower Show will be April 17-25 at Symmes Township Park. For more information, visit www.cincyflowershow.com.

Gardening expert’s tour includes Symmes Twp. show Nationally known gardening expert, TV host and author Melinda Myers begins her 2010 spring flower show tour this month. The Cincinnati Flower Show in Symmes Park will be the final stop on her tour, Sunday, April 20. Myers will share tips on how to create big impact in the garden without spending a lot of money, growing your own food and insuring a bountiful harvest while being kind to the environment. “The tour enables me to meet and reach large groups of gardeners from all over the country,” Myers said. “My hope is that I can inspire every level of gardener and help them be successful in the garden, save money and have fun!” Myers will be presenting a wide range of topics throughout the tour,

including “Affordable Eco-Friendly Landscape Makeovers,” “Grow your Favorite Recipe – Tips on Producing Beautiful and Delicious Produce,” “Year Round Garden-tainment,” “Simple Makeovers for Every Small Space in your Landscape,” “Planning & Plants for a Small Space Garden,” “Creative Containers,” “Small Space Gardens – Creating a Private Space” and more. Myers, best known for her practical, gardener-friendly approach to gardening, has more than 30 years of horticultural experience in both hands-on and instructional settings. She has a master’s degree in horticulture, is a certified arborist, and was a horticulture instructor with tenure. Myers shares her expertise through a variety of media outlets. She is the author of numerous gardening books,

including “Can’t Miss Small Space Gardening.” She hosts “Melinda’s Garden Moments,” which air on 50 network television stations throughout the country and “Great Lakes Gardener,” seen on PBS stations throughout the United States. She also appears regularly as a guest expert on various national and local television and radio shows. She writes the twice monthly “Gardeners’ Questions” newspaper column and is a contributing editor and columnist for Birds & Blooms magazine. In addition, she has written articles for Better Homes and Gardens and Fine Gardening. Myers also hosted “The Plant Doctor” radio program for more than 20 years. Myers’ Web site is www.melindamyers.com.


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Northeast Suburban Life

April 14, 2010

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD T H U R S D A Y, A P R I L 1 5

CIVIC

Haiti Earthquake Relief Fund, 8:30 a.m.4:30 p.m. American Red Cross Blue Ash Chapter, 10870 Kenwood Road. Bring monetary donations only in the form of check, money order or credit card. Presented by American Red Cross Cincinnati Area Chapter. 792-4000; www.cincinnatiredcross.org. Blue Ash.

FARMERS MARKET

Turner Farm, 8:30 a.m.-8:30 p.m. Turner Farm, 7400 Given Road. Market includes naturally-raised meat and eggs and certified organic seasonal produce and flowers. Closes at dusk. 561-7400; www.turnerfarm.org. Indian Hill.

HEALTH / WELLNESS

Nutrition and Fitness 101, 1:30 p.m.-3:30 p.m. TriHealth Fitness and Health Pavilion, 6200 Pfeiffer Road. Learn upto-date dietary and exercise guidelines from registered dietitian and personal trainer. Discover ways to jump start fitness plan and incorporate healthier choices to meal plan. $20. Registration required. 985-6732; www.trihealthpavilion.com. Montgomery.

LITERARY - BOOK CLUBS

Turner Farm Book Club, 7 p.m. “Walden” by Thoreau. Turner Farm, 7400 Given Road. Read and discuss literature. 561-7400; www.turnerfarm.org. Indian Hill.

LITERARY BOOKSTORES

Educator Appreciation Reception, 4:30 p.m. Barnes & Noble Kenwood, 7800 Montgomery Road. Learn about bookfair program and what the bookstore can do for schools. Raffles available. Free. 794-9440. Kenwood.

ON STAGE - STUDENT THEATER

Tell Me a Story, 6 p.m.-7 p.m. Mayerson JCC, 8485 Ridge Road. JCC Center Stage Musical Theater Company youth performers present show written by Marlene Foreman Shmalo. Paul L. Rogers, musical director; Courtney Cummings, choreographer. Family friendly. $5. 761-7500; www.JointheJ.org. Amberley Village. 42nd Street, 7 p.m. Madeira High School, 7465 Loannes Drive. $9, $7 students. Through April 17. 891-8222. Madeira. F R I D A Y, A P R I L 1 6

EDUCATION

What Parents Should Know about Reading and Comprehension Development, 9:30 a.m.-11 a.m. Langsford Learning Acceleration Center, 9402 Towne Square Ave. Presentation series for parents and caregivers on reading, comprehension development and current research. Family friendly. Free. Registration required. 531-7400. Blue Ash.

FARMERS MARKET

Turner Farm, 8:30 a.m.-8:30 p.m. Turner Farm, 561-7400; www.turnerfarm.org. Indian Hill.

GARDEN SHOWS

Cincinnati Flower Show, 6 p.m.-10 p.m. Opening Night Gala. Symmes Township Park, 11600 Lebanon Road. World-class horticultural event with hundreds of landscapers, growers, floral designers and artists. $25 two-day pass; $20, $15 advance; $2 ages 3-15. Parking: $8 valet, $4. Presented by Cincinnati Horticultural Society. 683-6644; www.cincyflowershow.com. Symmes Township.

HEALTH / WELLNESS

Health Screenings, 9 a.m.-noon, Owens Chiropractic and Rehabilitation Center, 7319 Montgomery Road. Blood pressure, weight, foot and spinal screenings. Walk-ins welcome. Free. Appointment requested. 7840084; www.owenschiroandrehabcenter.com. Silverton.

MUSIC - ACOUSTIC

Acoustik Buca, 7:30 p.m. deSha’s American Tavern, 11320 Montgomery Road. 2479933; www.deshas.com. Montgomery. Right Turn Clyde, 8 p.m.-midnight, Cindy’s Friendly Tavern, 125 Karl Brown Way. 5835469. Loveland.

MUSIC - ROCK

Laika Band, 9:30 p.m. Bar Seventy-One, 8850 Governors Hill Drive. $5. 774-9697. Symmes Township.

ON STAGE - STUDENT THEATER

42nd Street, 7:30 p.m. Madeira High School, $9, $7 students. 891-8222. Madeira.

ON STAGE - THEATER

25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee, 8 p.m. Madisonville Arts Center, $18, $16 seniors. 981-7888; www.showbizplayers.com. Madisonville.

SENIOR CITIZENS

Spring Fling Party, 1 p.m.-3 p.m. Humana Guidance Center, 11316 Montgomery Road. Provident Travel presents on travel options for seniors, free blood pressure checks and Right Source Pharmacist presents on “Spring Cleaning Your Medicine Cabinet.” Includes light refreshments. Ages 50 and up. Free. 247-2100. Symmes Township.

SUPPORT GROUPS

Women’s Separation/Divorce Support, 9:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m. Comprehensive Counseling Services Inc. 10999 Reed Hartman Hwy, For women. Open to any age, if you are thinking about divorce, divorcing or already divorced. With licensed facilitator. $35 per week. Registration required. 543-4144. Blue Ash. S A T U R D A Y, A P R I L 1 7

EXERCISE CLASSES

A Laughter Yoga Experience, 9 a.m.-10:30 a.m. TriHealth Fitness and Health Pavilion, 6200 Pfeiffer Road. Combines laughter exercises and yoga breathing to give health benefits of hearty laughter. $10. Registration required. 985-6732; www.trihealthpavilion.com. Montgomery.

FARMERS MARKET

Turner Farm, 8:30 a.m.-8:30 p.m. Turner Farm, 561-7400; www.turnerfarm.org. Indian Hill.

FESTIVALS

A.J. Cohen Memorial Baseball Tournament and Kidsfest, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Summit Country Day School Athletic Complex, 5580 Ehrling Road. Fire safety and awareness, family games, raffles, conditioning and training sessions from Parisi Speed School, autographed items from celebrities, arts and crafts. Family friendly. Free. Presented by A.J. Cohen Scholarship Fund. 207-3260; www.ajcohenmemorial.org. Hyde Park. Celebrating Wool, 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Turner Farm, 7400 Given Road. Sheep shearing, raw wool washing, spinning, Knitting and needle-felting demonstrations and agricultural woodwork demonstrations. puppet plays by students 10 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. Free. Presented by Cincinnati Waldorf School. 561-7400; www.turnerfarm.org or www.cincinnatiwaldorfschool.org. Indian Hill.

FOOD & DRINK

Wine Bar Tasting, 2 p.m.-6 p.m. The Wine Store, Fifty cents per taste. 984-9463; www.theewinestore.com. Montgomery.

For more about Greater Cincinnati’s dining, music, events, movies and more, go to Metromix.com.

GARDEN SHOWS

Cincinnati Flower Show, 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Opening weekend pass: $25, $18 advance. Symmes Township Park, $25 twoday pass; $20, $15 advance; $2 ages 3-15. Parking: $8 valet, $4. 683-6644; www.cincyflowershow.com. Symmes Township.

HEALTH / WELLNESS

Meditation Workshop, 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. TriHealth Fitness and Health Pavilion, 6200 Pfeiffer Road. Learn to connect your mind and body and meditation techniques from certified meditation and yoga instructor. $45. Reservations required. 985-6742; www.trihealthpavilion.com. Montgomery.

LITERARY - SIGNINGS

Fred McGavran, 2 p.m. Barnes & Noble Kenwood, 7800 Montgomery Road. Author discusses and signs “The Butterfly Collector.” 794-9440. Kenwood.

MUSIC - CLASSICAL

Music at Ascension Chamber Concert Series, 7 p.m. “An Evening of American Music.” Katherine Bergmann, dramatic soprano; Jason Carlson, piano. Ascension Lutheran Church, 7333 Pfeiffer Road. Free, donations accepted. 793-3288; 237-3636. Montgomery.

MUSIC - CONCERTS

The Rusty Griswolds, 9:30 p.m. Bar SeventyOne, 8850 Governors Hill Drive. Ages 21 and up. $10. 774-9697. Symmes Township.

MUSIC - OLDIES

John Fox, 8 p.m.-midnight, InCahoots, 4110 Hunt Road. Rock and folk music from the 50s, 60s and 70s. Requests taken. 7932600. Blue Ash.

ON STAGE - STUDENT THEATER

42nd Street, 7:30 p.m. Madeira High School, $9, $7 students. 891-8222. Madeira.

ON STAGE - THEATER

The Garden of Rikki-Tikki-Tavi, 3 p.m. Silverton Paideia Academy, 6829 Stewart Road. Featuring Playhouse’s Touring Company. Free-flowing adaptation of the Kipling classic, a comedy about sharing and cooperation. Part of Playhouse Off the Hill Series. Ages 4 and up. $5. Presented by Playhouse in the Park. 688-8400. Silverton.

SCHOOLS

Open House, 10:30 a.m. The Art Institute of Ohio - Cincinnati, 8845 Governor’s Hill Drive. Suite 100, Attendees invited to learn more about school’s programs, discuss educational goals, tour facilities and learn about tuition scholarship opportunities. Free. Presented by The Art Institute of Ohio-Cincinnati. Through May 22. 833-2430; www.artinstitutes.edu/cincinnati. Symmes Township. S U N D A Y, A P R I L 1 8

ART EXHIBITS

Broad Strokes, 1 p.m.-4 p.m. Woman’s Art Club Cultural Center, 793-0308; www.womansartclub.com. Mariemont.

PROVIDED.

Cincinnati Horticultural Society is presenting the Cincinnati Flower Show Opening Night Gala from 6 to 10 p.m. Friday, April 16, at Symmes Township Park, 11600 Lebanon Road, Symmes Township. The flower show, from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. April 1725, is a horticultural event with hundreds of landscapers, growers, floral designers and artists. The cost is: $25 two-day pass; $20, $15 advance; $2 ages 3-15. Parking: $8 valet, $4. Call 683-6644 or visit www.cincyflowershow.com.

EDUCATION

Giving Your Poems Roots and Wings, 2 p.m. Poetry Workshop, by donation, begins at 3:30 p.m. Bring five copies on up to three poems. Grailville Education and Retreat Center, 932 O’Bannonville Road. Panel discussion with poets Richard Hague, Leah Maines, Robert and Elizabeth Murphy, Lynn Robbins and Valerie Chronis Bickett. $15. Registration required. 683-2340; www.grailville.org. Loveland.

GARDEN SHOWS

Cincinnati Flower Show, 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Opening weekend pass: $25, $18 advance. Symmes Township Park, $25 two-day pass; $20, $15 advance; $2 ages 3-15. Parking: $8 valet, $4. 683-6644; www.cincyflowershow.com. Symmes Township.

SHOPPING

Cincinnati Music Collectors’ Convention, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Crowne Plaza Hotel Blue Ash, 5901 Pfeiffer Road. Music show and sale. Phonograph records, CDs, DVDs, tapes and music related items. $3, free ages 11 under with adult. Presented by Alpha Records & Music. 317-882-3378. Blue Ash. M O N D A Y, A P R I L 1 9

ART & CRAFT CLASSES

Scrapbooking: Faithbooking, 5:30 p.m.8:30 p.m. Good Shepherd Lutheran Church Kenwood, 7701 Kenwood Road. Work on your own projects and explore “Faithbooking”, a way to convey your faith through your photo albums. Group meets third Monday of each month until July 19. Childcare is provided. Registration required. 891-1700; www.goodshepherd.com. Kenwood.

EDUCATION

CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS

A Tribute to our Veterans, 4 p.m. Little Red Schoolhouse-Indian Hill, 8100 Given Road. Village residents share memories of their military experiences. Includes dinner. Presented by Indian Hill Historical Society. 8911873; www.indianhill.org. Indian Hill.

JCC hosts iSPACE: Fun with Science Series for kids (grades 4 - 6), 4:30 p.m.-6 p.m. Mayerson JCC, 8485 Ridge Road. April 19: RXC Mindstorm Robots; April 26: Art of Lego; Also offered May 3 & May 10; May 3: Fun with Fizz; May 10: Paper Rockets Contact: Mayerson JCC, 513.761.7500 or www.jointhej.org. Open to the public. Ages 4-6. $110. Registration required. 513.761.7500. Amberley Village.

About calendar

To submit calendar items, go to “www.cincinnati.com” and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to “life@communitypress.com” along with event information. Items are printed on a space-available basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to “www.cincinnati.com” and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page. T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 2 0

W E D N E S D A Y, A P R I L 2 1

ART OPENINGS Faculty Show, 5 p.m.-7 p.m. The Art Institute of Ohio - Cincinnati, 8845 Governor’s Hill Drive. Suite 100, Gallery. Exhibit continues through July 9. 833-2400; www.artinstitutes.edu/cincinnati. Symmes Township.

EXERCISE CLASSES

EDUCATION

FOOD & DRINK

What Parents Should Know about Reading and Comprehension Development, 4:30 p.m.-6 p.m. Langsford Learning Acceleration Center, Free. Registration required. 531-7400. Blue Ash.

EXERCISE CLASSES

Zumba, 6:30 p.m.-7:30 p.m. Cincy Dance Studio, 8143 Camargo Road. Suite B, $10. Registration required. 859-630-7040; www.cincydance.com. Madeira.

GARDEN SHOWS

Cincinnati Flower Show, 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Symmes Township Park, $25 two-day pass; $20, $15 advance; $2 ages 3-15. Parking: $8 valet, $4. 683-6644; www.cincyflowershow.com. Symmes Township.

HEALTH / WELLNESS

Cholesterol and Glucose Screenings, 8 a.m.-11 a.m. TriHealth Fitness and Health Pavilion, 6200 Pfeiffer Road. Fasting for 12 hours recommended. Results available in 10 minutes. $15. 985-6732; www.trihealthpavilion.com. Montgomery.

MOM’S CLUBS

Northeast Cincinnati Mothers of Twins Club, 6:30 p.m.-8:30 p.m. Swaim Park, Zig Zag and Cooper roads, Monthly meeting for mothers of multiple birth children. Meets at Swaim Lodge. Free. www.nemotmc.com. Montgomery.

Tai Chi Class, 1 p.m.-2 p.m. Humana Guidance Center, 11316 Montgomery Road. Instructed Tai Chi for beginners with Jennifer. Free. Reservations required. 247-2100. Symmes Township. Wine Tasting, 6:30 p.m.-9 p.m. Greenacres Arts Center, 8400 Blome Road. Includes food and wine pairings, silent auction and a docent-led tour of the English Norman-style mansion. Benefits Oyler School in Lower Price Hill. $100. Reservations required. Presented by Hyde Park Gourmet Food and Wine. winedownwednesday-oyler@gmail.com; www.hydeparkgourmet.com. Indian Hill.

GARDEN SHOWS

Cincinnati Flower Show, 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Symmes Township Park, $25 two-day pass; $20, $15 advance; $2 ages 3-15. Parking: $8 valet, $4. 683-6644; www.cincyflowershow.com. Symmes Township.

HEALTH / WELLNESS

Avoiding the Back Pain Epidemic, noon-1 p.m. TriHealth Fitness and Health Pavilion, 6200 Pfeiffer Road. Dr. Ron Fudala and Brian Riesenberg discuss common causes of pain and sciatica and demonstrate appropriate integration of practical preventative measures into everyday life. $15. Reservations required. 985-6732; www.trihealthpavilion.com. Montgomery.

FARMERS MARKET

Turner Farm, 8:30 a.m.-8:45 p.m. Turner Farm, 561-7400; www.turnerfarm.org. Indian Hill.

FASHION SHOWS

Sprinkle of Spring Fashions, 10 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Kenwood Country Club, 6501 Kenwood Road. Boutique opens at 10 a.m. Fashion show starts at 11:30 a.m. Lunch at 12:30 p.m. Fashions by Dillard’s. Benefits The Salvation Army Camp SWONEKY. $40. Reservations required. Presented by Salvation Army. 248-0033; www.salvationarmycincinnati.org. Madeira.

FESTIVALS

PROVIDED

Kings Island opens for the season on Saturday, April 17, with its newest attraction, Planet Snoopy. The collection of “Peanuts”themed rides for all ages include four children’s roller coasters, a live stage show and Peanuts’ characters’ meet and greets. Pictured is the “Race for Your Life Charlie Brown” ride. The park has another new ride, Boo Blasters on Boo Hill, an interactive family attraction. Hours for Saturday, April 17, are 10 a.m. to 10 p.m., with the park closed Sunday. The park re-opens Friday, April 23 for weekend operation. Daily operation begins May 21. Go to www.visitkingsisland.com. for ticket prices.

Yom Ha’Atzmaut Celebration, 5 p.m.-8:30 p.m. Mayerson JCC, 8485 Ridge Road. Jewish folk and contemporary Israeli music by Dganit Daddo, international singing star. Includes Israeli market with 20 Israeli artists, Israeli food and children’s activities. Free. Presented by Jewish Federation of Cincinnati. 985-1539; www.jewishcincinnati.org. Amberley Village.

PROVIDED

See Elmo, Zoe and Big Bird sing and dance during Sesame Street Live’s touring production of “Elmo’s Green Thumb,” an adventure and lesson about the ecosystem. It is at 7 p.m. Friday, April 16; 10:30 a.m., 2 p.m. and 5:30 p.m. Saturday, April 17; and 1 p.m. and 4:30 p.m. Sunday, April 18, at the Bank of Kentucky Center. Tickets are $12-$27, plus a $2 facility fee. Opening night tickets are $12, plus a $2 facility fee. For information, call 859-442-2652; visit www.sesamestreetlive.com. For tickets, call 800-745-3000 or visit www.ticketmaster.com.


Life

April 14, 2010

Northeast Suburban Life

B3

A twist on the ‘Ten Commandments of Marriage’

The Rev. Ed Young, senior pastor of Second Baptist Church in Houston, Texas, wrote a book titled “The Ten Commandments of Marriage.” I never read the Rev. Young’s book but I enjoyed his commandment titles. I expand on them with my own reflections. 1. Thou shalt not be a selfish pig. The worst enemy in any relationship is our selfishness – that my feelings count and yours don’t; that you are here to serve me and make me happy; that if anything goes wrong, it’s your fault, not mine. The opposite of selfishness is love. A good indication that love is present is when the welfare and satisfaction of another person comes to mean as much to me as my own. 2. Though shalt cut the apron stings. When a wedding takes place in a church, another ceremony takes place right below in the couples psychic basement. The groom unconsciously transfers to his bride the qualities and

faults of his mother – and expects to find them hereafter in his bride. The bride, transfers over to the groom the qualities and faults of Father Lou her dad. The Guntzelman u n c o n s c i o u s cerePerspectives basement mony is not ideal. The most ideal situation happens when each spouse recognizes these parental transferences, cuts loose from them, and works to come to know the uniqueness of their own spouse. 3. Thou shalt continually communicate. The average married couple actively communicate about 27 minutes a week. Yet, “Unless we are fully known, we cannot be fully loved.” And how else do we become authentically known unless we let the other know of our fears, hopes, dreams, anxieties, insufficiencies, etc.?

We’re usually afraid because we expect rejection. That’s a possibility. But the risk is worth taking to finally come to be loved for who and what we are. 4. Thou shalt make conflict thy ally. Disagreements are not catastrophes. They are to be expected occasionally when two separate and unique persons form a relationship. Differences are opportunities to communicate, understand, compromise and solidify the relationship. The absence of conflict demonstrates that either the relationship isn’t important enough or that both individuals are too insecure to risk disagreement. 5. Though shalt avoid the quicksand of debt. Money, especially in our culture, can become a bone of contention, an instrument of power, a constant worry, an expression of selfishness, and a destroyer of more important realities. Prudent spending flows from a responsible maturity on the part of both spouses.

6. Thou shalt flee sexual temptations – online and otherwise. Sexual pleasure is wonderful, but it speaks of spiritual and personal realities far more profound than feeling good. To seek sexual pleasure independently of my spouse and my sense of commitment to her/him, is more an adolescent trait than that of an adult. The interpenetration of hearts and souls requires lifelong fidelity. 7. Thou shalt forgive your mate 490-plus times. The 490 number comes from the biblical admonition to forgive not only seven times, but seventy times seven. One of marriages primary purposes is to teach us how to forgive. It is a manifestation of love. 8. Thou shalt keep the home fires burning. Building a good marriage and a good log fire are similar. At first, the paper and kindling make a brilliantly burning blaze. Then the first blaze dies down and you wonder if the fire will fizzle out and leave you in the

dark. You blow on it and fan it for all you’re worth. Sometimes the smoke billows out and almost chokes you or brings tears to your eyes. But if the materials are good and you invest enough time and energy and interest, the solid logs catch and the fire continues. 9. Thou shalt begin again and again. Nothing in this world that is worthwhile occurs suddenly. If a solid love relationship is really desired and valued, we are willing to go for it again and again. 10. Thou shalt build a winning team. It takes two to build a successful marriage, but only one to destroy it. All of the above are seen as teamwork issues by both spouses. And a good team reaches the goal. Father Lou Guntzelman is a Catholic priest of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati. Contact him at columns@community press.com or P.O. Box 428541, Cincinnati, OH 45242.

Know how to protect yourself before buying home

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ing. In addition, the builder has agreed to re-grade the backyard and has now scrubbed the brick so the white substance has been removed. To make sure the new house you’re considering was built properly, I suggest you hire a home inspector certified by the American Society of Home Inspectors. Hire an ASHI Certified home inspector for a new home just as you would before buying an existing home. The inspector needs to check for problems and, and depending on the severity of what’s found, you may

decide to set aside some money in an escrow account at the closing. The builder will only get that money when he makes the repairs. If he fails to make the corrections within a specified time, the money should go to you so you can get the repairs made. Finally, whenever you buy or sell a house I always recommend you get your own lawyer to protect you. Howard Ain answers consumer complaints weekdays on WKRC-TV Local 12. Write to him at 12 WKRC-TV, 1906 Highland Ave., Cincinnati 45219.

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due to the grade of the yard, I have a swamp out here for at least a week at a time,” said Frisby. “It became a problem and I let them know. They came out, looked at it, and told me the grade works. Basically, they’re going to keep it how it is,” he said. Frisby told the builder he contacted me and said now the builder is much more cooperative. The company has agreed to hire an engineer to assess the driveway and sidewalk problem. The company will now rely on the engineer to come up with a proposal to keep the concrete from collaps-

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trucks and just regular cars. Gravity is going to collapse it.” he said. Frisby complained, “The builder just plans to shovel gravel underneath my driveway and that’s how they’re going to fix it. I’m not happy with that at all.” He said that gravel needs to be compacted in order to properly support the concrete. Another concern is a white chalk-like substance that’s appeared in many areas on the brick around the house. Frisby wants to know what that substance is, what’s caused it, and how to get rid of it for good. Yet another issue concerns the grading of the backyard. When it rains, water pools in the yard and doesn’t drain away. “After any rain or snow,

,

making it very difficult for me, which is why I c a l l e d you,” he said. Howard Ain m Oa j no er Hey Howard! p r o b l e m pointed out by his father, Dave, and others, has to do with the concrete driveway and sidewalk – they’re suspended in air in several places. “We’re 8 feet straight out this way and there’s absolutely nothing underneath holding it up. There should be compacted gravel underneath the concrete,” said Frisby’s father. “It’s just a matter of time before all this just collapses from the weight of vehicles,

ar tis ts

The warm weather is bringing out homebuyers and new home sales are expected to be up this year. But, if you’re in the market for a new house you need to know how to protect yourself before you buy. Josh Frisby bought a brand new house in Morrow and moved in last December. Although he loves the house, he says the builder has been reluctant to correct problems he’s found. “The house is great, but obviously there are some issues that need to be dealt with. I’m trying to give the builder the benefit of the doubt to take care of these issues,” said Frisby. “Some things they are taking care of, and some things they’re giving me the runaround on. They’re

Enquirer Media is proud to support the Fine Arts Fund.


B4

Northeast Suburban Life

Life

April 14, 2010

Roll out a tasty teatime with asparagus

I was right in the middle of making bean soup from leftover Easter ham when I got the call from friends Butch and Char Castle. “We’re going morel hunting – want us to pick you up?� Within five minutes, I was waiting at the edge of the driveway with my favorite morel-hunting basket in hand. (Yes, I did turn off the bean soup). Now I can’t tell you where we looked, since it’s as secret as knowing where to find ginseng, but I will tell you it was one vigorous workout, climbing up to the crest of the wooded hill. We found everything BUT morels: wild flowers in abundance: spring beauties, bloodroot, trilliums, violets, phlox, Dutchmen’s breaches, and wild edibles like garlic mustard, onions, and ramps (wild leeks). It was just the mental spring tonic I needed. (And we will go back – we morel

hunters never give up). When I got home, I found a bonus near the fencerow: wild asparagus. I added that to what I picked out of our asparagus patch and plan to make these yummy asparagus rolls.

Promont Museum’s asparagus rolls

Just looking at the photo will have you running to the kitchen to make these. Mary Ann Benoski, tea coordinator at the Milford, Ohio, museum, shared this recipe. “One of my favorite sandwich recipes this time of year,� she said. Mary Ann and staff have afternoon teas at Promont House and volunteers prepare the food. Beautifully presented on fine china, their afternoon tea is not to be missed. They provide a docent guided tour included in the price of the tea ($20; luncheon $25). Mary Ann said

tea cuisine “includes something chocolate, something crunchy and something gooey.� You’ll have a memorable time taking tea at this Victorian mansion once occupied by Ohio Gov. John Pattison and family, and the profits from the teas help the upkeep of the museum. To make reservations, call 513248-0324 or log onto www.milfordhistory.net. 14 asparagus spears steamed tender-crisp in salted water, set aside on paper towels. 5 oz. extra sharp Cheddar, grated coarse 5 oz. Pepper Jack, grated coarse 3 ⠄4 cup mayonnaise 1 ⠄4 cup finely diced bottled roasted red pepper, and reserve enough 2-inch slices for garnish on sandwich folds. (Rinse and pat dry all first) Combine everything but asparagus in a mixing bowl

with hand held mixer set on medium-low speed.

Assembly:

14 slices Pepperidge Farm white bread (crust removed) Place slices of bread between sheets of waxed paper and flatten slightly with rolling pin. Spread each slice with a rounded tablespoon of cheese mixture, top with asparagus spear (trimmed the length of bread slice from corner to corner). Fold opposite corners together over spear overlapping and garnish with two strips of roasted red peppers making an “X,� sealing down corners of bread slice. If necessary use tooth pick to secure until serving and cover all sandwiches with moist paper towels until served. Chilling helps to tighten the flattened rolls.

From readers’ kitchens

Kudos for Ruth Lyons coffee cake: Dave Weller, a

Villa Hills, Ky., reader, said he’s made the Ruth Lyons coffee cake. “If you like a moist cinnamon coffee cake, that would be your cake. The cake is easy to make. It has become a favorite at my in-laws for Easter brunch.�

Panini with mozzarella, prosciutto and peppers

Never one to throw leftovers away, I made these grilled sandwiches from leftover Ciabiatta bread, some prosciutto I had left from an antipasto tray, and the last of the roasted red peppers from the freezer. Feel free to augment these with more filling, or use whatever cheese, meat, etc. you have on hand. You can hardly go wrong! Thin slices of crusty Italian bread Prosciutto (or other ham) Roasted red pepper strips

Mozzarella slices Thinly sliced red onion

Rita Heikenfeld Rita’s kitchen

Preheat grill pan or griddle over medium high. Make sandwiches: 2 to 3 slices prosciutto topped with an even layer of pepper, mozzarella, and onion, then top with another slice of bread. Brush with olive oil. Place that side face down on griddle and brush top with olive oil. Weight sandwiches down with heavy skillet (or not, if you use a panini press) and brown a few minutes on each side. Rita Nader Heikenfeld is Macy’s certified culinary professional. E-mail columns@community press.com with “Rita’s kitchen� in the subject line. Call 513-2487130, ext. 356.

Blue Ash YMCA to host free wellness fair April 17 The Blue Ash YMCA is inviting families to come play while learning about important health and safety information at YMCA Healthy Kids Day. The free event will be held from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday, April 17. The Blue Ash Fire Department, American

Lung Association, Areawide Wellness, Owens Chiropractor, Dream Dinners and Vineyard Community Church are among the community partners who will be represented. There will also be finger painting and other fun games. YMCA Healthy Kids Day will be celebrated across the

country at more than 1,500 YMCAs. It’s part of the YMCA’s national Activate America initiative that encourages people of all ages to lead healthy lifestyles. The Blue Ash YMCA is at 5000 YMCA Drive in Blue Ash. For more information, call 791-5000.

For the one day, the YMCA will waive the entire initiation fee for all new members who enroll on Saturday, April 17. As the area’s largest youth and family-focused not-for-profit, the YMCA reinforces character values through assets-based programs and services to more than 151,000 individuals, kids and families annually. Adult mentors encourage young people to be caring,

responsible, respectful, and honest through sports, summer camps, structured child and afterschool care, and leadership building programs. Branches offer quality time for families, resources for parents, and a variety of opportunities for seniors to be active. The Membership for All sliding scale fee structure means everyone, no matter their ability to pay, can

YMCA Healthy Kids Day will be celebrated across the country at more than 1,500 YMCAs. always benefit from the YMCA. Last year alone nearly 20,000 families and individuals enjoyed healthier and happier lives because generous partners helped the YMCA in its vision to be accessible to all.

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Community

April 14, 2010

Northeast Suburban Life

B5

The Wellness Community ‘uncorks’ new benefit

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one of the key ingredients for starting s e e d s indoors. Placed a w a y from the Ron Wilson seedlings, In the garden it provides constant air movement around the plants, which helps reduce disease and rotting, and it also helps to promote stockier plants. And here’s the most important thing to remember: Read the back of the seed packs for additional germinating information (do the seeds need to be covered, spacing, soil temps – generally 70-75 degrees during the day, etc.?), as well as how long it takes for seed germination and growing time before transplanting outdoors. Count backwards from our frost free date (May 15 or so), and that’s when you should start those seeds indoors. For tomatoes it takes about six weeks (peppers eight weeks), which means starting time would be right around late March/early April. Remember, it’s always better to start your seeds a little late, rather than way too early. Talk to you next time, in the garden. Ron Wilson is marketing manager for Natorp’s Inc. Garden Stores and is the garden expert for 55KRC-AM and Local 12. You can reach him at columns@ communitypress.com

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If you’re thinking about starting seeds indoors this winter, good for you! Here are a few tips to help make you a bit more successful with your seed starting adventure. First of all, you’ll need the right seed starting supplies: 1) Use a soil-less potting mix or seed starting mix. This mix is extremely important as it actually helps to hold moisture for the new seedlings yet is airy and allows them to dry properly with less chance of dampening off, or rotting. Some mixes may include a slow release fertilizer to help feed the seedlings very slowly and gently as they grow. Be sure to pre-moisten your potting mix before planting the seeds. 2) Something to grow your seedlings in – small clay or plastic pots, Jiffy Cubes, peat pots, Cow Pots, or trays with cell packs are wonderful for starting your seeds. 3) Some type of shop light with regular fluorescent tubes will be needed to help supplement the much-needed sunlight to keep your seedlings from stretching. Remember to keep the lights within 3 inches of the tops of the new seedlings. You may need to keep the lights on 12-14 hours a day, even in sunnier windows. 4) A misting bottle. This is one of the best ways to water your new seedlings, especially when they’re very young. Misting the soil is not so invasive and is easier to control the water flow. 5) A small inexpensive fan, and trust me, this fan is

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treatment, through longterm survivorship, or advanced stages), as well as loved ones and caregivers. There is never a fee to attend or participate, thanks to the generous support of individuals, businesses, foundations, bequests and the profits of Legacies, the fine home furnishings resale shop in Hyde Park Plaza dedicated to providing funding for TWC. In Greater Cincinnati, approximately 150 programs are offered each month across several sites including TWC’s Lynn Stern Center in Blue Ash and a Northern Kentucky facility in Fort Wright, as well as offsite outreach locations in Avondale, Clifton, downtown and Western Hills. For more information, call 7914060 or 859-331-5568, or visit www.thewellnesscommunity.org/cincinnati.

CE-0000393535.

He’s a rock star among sommeliers and wine aficionados and a heroic inspiration to people facing cancer. On April 30, Justin Baldwin, owner/operator of Justin Vineyards and Winery in Paso Robles, Calif., will share his love of life and love of wine with friends and supporters of The Wellness Community of Greater Cincinnati to PROVIDED. benefit the non-profit’s free Uncorking Hope co-chairs (rear, from left) Kathy Maxwell of Indian Hill and Bill Krul of Dayton, Ohio, preview the Justin wine cancer support programs. and Domaine de la Rive venue for the event with committee members (front, from left) Linda Green of Indian Hill, Gregg Uncorking Hope: An Pancero of Indian Hill and Lucy Ward of Hyde Park. Not pictured: J. Kampinga and Gordy Rich. Inspirational Evening with Justin Baldwin and Justin Kampinga, Gregg Pancero making region and for their involved with The Wellness Wines Presented by PNC of Indian Hill, Gordy Rich leadership in providing sup- Community and became cowill take place in Covington and Lucy Ward of Hyde port for people affected by founders of The Wellness cancer. In September 2003, Community – California beginning at 7 p.m. in the Park. Many Justin Wines, both Baldwin and his wife, Central Coast, helping to intimate atmosphere of a Domaine de la Rive pent- including their acclaimed Debby, were diagnosed with bring TWC’s professional house residence. In addition proprietary blends – Isosce- cancer within minutes of support groups, educational workshops and stress manto spectacular views of les, Isosceles Reserve, each other. At the time, there was agement classes to people in downtown Cincinnati, gour- Savant, Justification and met dinner stations, and Obtuse – as well as other very little community sup- their area with cancer, careexquisite Justin wine pair- blends and varietals, are port available in the Paso givers, and cancer surings, guests will also enjoy routinely spotlighted with Robles area, but they perse- vivors. Now cancer-free, the the rare opportunity to 90+ ratings in leading wine vered through months of Baldwins remain active interact with one of Califor- publications including Wine cancer treatment and recov- supporters of The Wellness nia’s leading winemakers Enthusiast, Wine Spectator, ery with the help of family Community, both locally and hear the inspirational Decanter, and Robert Park- and friends. Committed to and across the nation. The Wellness Communistory of his winery’s suc- er’s The Wine Advocate. In the idea that no one should cess and the Baldwins’ tri- 2009, Justin Isosceles was have to face cancer alone, ty is part of the Cancer Supawarded a gold medal at the the Baldwins later got port Community, the largest umph over cancer. Exciting auction items San Francisco Chronicle will also be available for Wine Competition (2005) bidding. A special private and was named “Best in wine tasting with Justin Class” at the Los Angeles Baldwin will kick off the International Wine and evening, beginning at 5:30 Spirits Competition (2006). p.m. Tickets for this exclu- The 2005 Isosceles was also AS SEEN ON TV sive evening are $500 per named the Top USA Borcouple for the main event, deaux Blend at the 2008 LOWEST PRICES World Wine or $1,500 per couple for the Decanter LOCAL COMPANY private tasting, and may be Awards, one of the most prestigious wine competiONE DAY INSTALL reserved by calling The Wellness Community at tions in the world, and was recognized as the best wine 791-4060. Uncorking Hope is being of all the USA Gold Medal CE-0000394719.INDD organized by co-chairs Bill winners. In addition to producing Krul and Kathy Maxwell of award winning wines, the Indian Hill, along with committee members Linda Baldwins are also known Green of Indian Hill, J. for their civic involvement in the Paso Robles wine-


B6

Northeast Suburban Life

Community

April 14, 2010

RELIGION

COINS?

If you have an important collection of coins for sale and were smart enough not to take them to some motel room for a low offer, we hold a Rare Coin Auction every year in connection with the Greater Cincinnati Numismatic Expo, held in June at Sharonville Convention Center, and now in its 27th year. For a consultation please call Paul Padget at

(513) 821-2143 CE-0000392247.INDD

Blue Ash Presbyterian Church The Fine Arts Fund is presenting the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra string quartet at 7:30 p.m. Friday, April 23. It is a concert for all ages. There will be an interactive question- and answer-session led by the musicians themselves. Child care is not provided. The church is at 4309 Cooper Road, Blue Ash; 791-1153.

Worship times are: Contemporary worship at 5 p.m. Saturdays, contemporary worship at 9 a.m. Sundays and traditional worship at 10:30 a.m. Sundays. The church is at 6635 LovelandMiamiville Road, Loveland; 6779866.

Brecon United Methodist Church

Sunday Worship Services are 8:30 and 10:45 a.m. with Adult Sunday School at 9:30 a.m. Children’s Church is during the 10:45 a.m. hour. All guests are welcome. The church is at 7388 East Kemper Road, Sycamore Township; 4897021.

Congregation Ohav Shalom

Congregation Ohav Shalom is hosting “Just’n Time…Tunes and Tales by Justin Miller” Sunday, April 25. The guitarist and mandolin player will perform a variety of music accompanied by a bass player and a percussionist. The concert starts at 7 p.m., but a cash wine bar and silent auction begin at 6:15 p.m. After Miller’s performance, guests will be treated to an elegant dessert and coffee buffet. General admission is

Epiphany United Methodist Church

Good Shepherd Lutheran Church

The church is hosting Scrapbooking from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. nearly every third Monday. Free child care is provided. You must register by 5 p.m. Friday before the Monday event. The dates are: April 19, May 17, June 7, July 19 and Aug. 16. The church is at 7701 Kenwood Road, Kenwood; 891-1700.

Hartzell United Methodist

Sunday Worship Services are 9 and 10:30 a.m. with Adult Sunday School at 9:30 a.m. Children’s School is during the 10:45 a.m. hour. All guests and visitors are welcome. Youth Groups, Bible Studies weekly; Childcare and Transportation provided. The church is at 8999 Applewood Drive, Blue Ash; 891-8527.

Kenwood Fellowship Church

LUTHERAN

UNITED METHODIST

MONTGOMERY ASSEMBLY OF GOD

PRINCE OF PEACE LUTHERAN CHURCH (ELCA)

Sharonville United Methodist

9:30 am Sunday School 10:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 6:30 pm Sunday Eve Service 7:00 pm Wednesday Family Night

www.montgomeryag.org

EPISCOPAL ST. ANNE, WEST CHESTER 6461 Tylersville Road (1/2 mile W. of Cin-Day) 513-779-1139

Sundays 7:30, 9:00 & 10:45am Nursery Sun 9:00am-noon Church School Classes for All Ages, 9:45am www.saintanne-wc.org

101 South Lebanon Rd. Loveland, OH 45140 683-4244 Lead Pastor Jonathan Eilert Pastor Grant Eckhart Saturday Service 5:00pm Sunday Services 8:00, 9:30 & 11:00am Sunday School 9:30am http://www.princeofpeaceelca.org

UNITED METHODIST CHURCH OF THE SAVIOUR 8005 Pfeiffer Rd Montgmry 791-3142 www.cos-umc.org "Because He Lives: Freedom"

Traditional Worship 8:20am & 11:00am Contemporary Worship 9:40am Sunday School (All ages) 9:40 & 11am

8:15 & 11am Traditional Service & Kingdom Kids 9:30am Contemporary Worship & Sunday School 7:00pm Wednesday, Small Groups for all ages Infant care available for all services

3751 Creek Rd.

HARTZELL UMC

513-563-0117

www.sharonville-umc.org

NON-DENOMINATIONAL FAITH BIBLE CHURCH 8130 East Kemper Rd. (1 mile west of Montgomery Rd) Services & Sunday School: 9:00am & 10:45am Nursery Available

683-2525

www.LPCUSA.org

www.faithchurch.net

ASCENSION LUTHERAN CHURCH

513.891.1700

(across from Kenwood Towne Centre) Saturday night at 5:00 and Sunday morning at 8:00, 9:00, 9:30 & 11:00am Pastors: Larry Donner, Pat Badkey, Jesse Abbott

Do O ors 5:00pen pm

PROGRESSIVE GAME $15,000 & GROWING

aries Prelimin 5 Start 6:4

RINKS BINGO Non-Smoking

Bingo Computer Purchase Guaranteed Fri & Sat Nights

513-931-4441 • 513-931-0259

www.RinksBingo.com

Save the Animals Foundation BINGO

11330 Williamson Rd. off Cornell, in Blue Ash TUESDAY & FRIDAY Evenings - Doors Open 6pm

Preliminary Games 7:00pm - Reg Games 7:30pm OVER 25 DIFFERENT INSTANTS

Religion news is published at no charge on a spaceavailable basis. Items must be to our office no later than 4 p.m. Wednesday, for possible consideration in the following edition. E-mail announcements to nesuburban@communitypress. com, with “Religion” in the subject line. Fax to 248-1938. Call 248-8600. Mail to: Northeast Suburban Life, Attention: Teasha O’Connell, Religion news, 394 Wards Corner Road, Suite 170, Loveland, OH 45140. as a mentor mom. Call 583-0371. The church is at 6300 Price Road, Loveland; 677-7600.

St. Paul Community United Methodist Church

The church is continuing the series “Meeting Jesus Along the Way.” On April 18, the sermon “Meeting Jesus Along the Way in 3-D-Jesus and Peter!” will be based on the scripture reading John 21:1-19. St. Paul Church services are 8:45 a.m. and 11 a.m. for Traditional Worship and 9:30 a.m. for Contemporary Worship with Praise Band. Sunday School and childcare is provided for all services. The church is at 8221 Miami Road, Madeira; 891-8181; www.stpaulcommunityumc.org.

Sycamore Christian Church

Sunday Worship Service is at 10:30 a.m. Bible Study is at 9 a.m. every Sunday. The church is hosting Ladies WOW Study Group (Women on Wednesdays) at 7 p.m. the second Wednesday of every month. The event includes light refreshments and a study of Beth Moore’s “Stepping Up.” The church hosts Adult and Youth Bible Studies at 7 p.m. every Wednesday. The church is at 6555 Cooper Road, Sycamore Township; 891-7891, www.sycamorechristianchurch.

Temple Sholom

Call Cathy at 513-494-1391 to get on mailing list for monthly specials.CE-1001548364-01.I

Sunday April 25 8:00 a.m.

$20 early registration fee includes t-shirt. $15 early registration, no shirt. $20 race day registration, no shirt. Waffle Breakfast FREE to registered 5K participants. Guests $5.00 each.

St. Joseph Home of Cincinnati 10722 Wyscarver Road, off Glendale-Milford Road in Sharonville Visit www.saintjosephhome.com or call (513) 563-2520, ext. 124 for more information. Register online at www.racedmc.com CE-0000394338.INDD

The temple is hosting an Interfaith Shabbat Program at 10 a.m. Sunday, April 25. This program is designed to provide education about the Shabbat service and Shabbat traditions for interfaith families. Call the office at 791-1330 or e-mail office@templesholom.net to RSVP. The temple is at 3100 Longmeadow Lane, Amberley Village; 791-1330.

BUSINESS UPDATE Germain hired

Wood, Herron & Evans hired Ken Germain to its Intellectual Property law practice. Germain has more than 35 years of varied experience in the trademark/ unfair competition field. He focuses his practice on trademark counseling, consulting and litigation. Germain received an A.B. degree, magna cum laude, from Rutgers College in 1966 and a Juris Doctor degree from the New York University School of Law, where he served on the NYU Law Review, in 1969. He lives in Symmes Township.

SAT 4/17 SUN 4/18 FREE REFRESHMENTS

LARGE Selection of Perennials & Herbs 18 Greenhouses Filled with Annuals, Vegetables • Trees • Shrubs • Roses • Mulch • Soil • Seeds • Hanging Baskets • Ertl Toys • Garden Tools • Bedding Plants 80,000 Square Feet Under Roof To Shop!

MADEIRA SILVERWOOD PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH Mason United Methodist Church 6315 S. Mason-Montgomery Rd. (near Tylersville Rd. intersection) 513-398-4741 8:30 & 11:00 AM Traditional Worship 9:45 AM Contemporary Worship 1:30 PM Esperanza Viva, Hispanic Worship 9:40 & 11:00 AM Sunday School Childcare available www.masonumc.org

www.madeirachurch.org 8000 Miami Ave. 791-4470 Contemporary Worship 9:00 am

Church School for Everyone 10:10 am

Traditional Worship 11:15 am Child Care available at all times

2115 St. Rt. 131, Batavia, OH

Montgomery Presbyterian Church 9994 Zig Zag Road Mongtomery, Ohio 45242

Worship Service 10:30am Nursery Care Available website: www.MPChurch.net

(on the corner of Ohio 131 and Bass Rd. 7 miles east of Milford on St. Rt. 131) 1001461211-01

7701 Kenwood Rd.

711 East Columbia • Reading

SmokeFree Bingo

4309 Cooper Rd. At Reed Hartman Hwy 791-1153 • www.bapcweb.net Rev. Michael Brewer, Pastor • 9:00 AM Sunday School for all ages • 10:30 AM Worship Nursery Care Provided Fellowship Hour following Worship Service

LUTHERAN

www.goodshepherd.com

River Hills Christian Church

Thriving Moms is a group for moms of infants through high school students; meets weekly to receive encouragement and instruction, make friends and have fun; held 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m.; child care provided. There is a Christian counselor as the parent coach, as well

About religion

BLUE ASH PRESBYTERIAN

Take I-275 to exit 57 toward Milford, Right on McClelland, Right on Price, church soon on Right

Good Shepherd (E LCA)

LPCUSA@fuse.net

PRESBYTERIAN

Services 8:00 am, 9:15 am & 11:00am Steve Lovellette, Senior Pastor Nursery proivided at all services

7333 Pfeiffer Road, Montgomery (East of I-71 on Pfeiffer Rd) Worship Schedule 8:30 & 11:00 a.m. Worship and Holy Communion 9:45 a.m. Sunday School and Adult Forum Pastor: Josh Miller Baby sitter provided Visit our website at: http://ascensionlutheranchurch.com

PRESBYTERIAN (USA)

Fellowship/Coffee Hour after Worship Nursery Provided/Youth Group Activities 360 Robin Ave. (off Oak St.), Loveland OH

5910 Price Road, Milford 831-3770

The church conducts worship at 10:30 a.m., Sundays and Divine Providence Study Group the first four Sundays of the month from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. The church is located at 9035 E. Kemper Road, Montgomery; 489-9572.

Known for its challenging course-end hill and amazing finish line cheering section, this USATF certified run/walk features a Waffle House breakfast. Benefits the residents of St. Joseph Home in Sharonville, a home for non-ambulatory infants, children and adults who have severe/profound mental and physical disabilities. Race Day Registration begins at 7:00 a.m. Race starts at 8:00 a.m.

LOVELAND PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH A Loving, Praying, Caring Church Join us for Sunday Services Worship Service........................10:00am Church School............................11:15am CONNECT Youth Service.............6-8pm

EVANGELICAL FREE

New Church of Montgomery

Register online at www.racedmc.com

Sunday School & Worship 9 AM & 10:30 AM

932-7691 Holy Eucharist 10:30am Sunday School 10:30am Nursery Care Provided 5 min. from K-71 via Rt. 48

series of parent informational meetings. The classes will be offered at the church from 7 to 9 p.m. each Tuesday evening April 20 and 27. The focus of the classes will be on children between the ages of birth and 6 years old, examining the ways young children learn and explore materials that support their learning and discuss the role of adults in nurturing the child’s development. Classes will be led by Crystal Dahlmeier, Madeira-Silverwood director of children’s ministries. Dahlmeier has taught Montesorri classes both locally and internationally for more than 25 years. She was the lead teacher and principal of the Xavier University Montesorri Lab School, where she also taught graduate and undergraduate classes in early childhood and Montesorri education. She also directs a Montesorri teacher education program in Northern Kentucky. The church is at 8000 Miami Ave., Madeira; 791-4470.

MT. NOTRE DAME H.S. - EVERY TUESDAY EVE.

Sunday 9:00 & 10:30 a.m. Loveland High School, off of Rich Rd. 683-1556 www.northstarvineyard.org

hartzell-umc@fuse.net

232 E. Main St (corner of East & Main) Rev. Jacqueline E. Matisse, Pastor

Madeira-Silverwood Presbyterian Church

Community Church

(off Larchview, off Plainfield at Cross County Hwy.)

ST. PATRICK’S-LEBANON

The new service times are 8:30 to 9:20 a.m. for the Traditional Service, 9:40 to 10:40 a.m. for the Contemporary Service and Sunday School and 11 a.m. to noon for the Blended Service and Sunday School. Join the United Methodist Women from 9:45 a.m. to 11 a.m. the first Thursday morning of each month for UMW, a time of fellowship, devotion and ministry at LUMC. The purpose of the UMW is “to know God and to experience freedom as whole persons through Jesus Christ; to develop a creative, supportive fellowship; and to expand concepts of mission through participation in the global ministries of the church.” The church is at 10975 S. Lebanon Road, Loveland; 683-1738.

NorthStar Vineyard

8999 Applewood Dr Blue Ash 891 8527

Child Care provided 10:30AM Rev. Robert Roberts, Pastor

Loveland United Methodist Church

www.fbccincy.or 513-489-1114

Nursery Care Provided

Dr. Cathy Johns, Senior Pastor Rev. Doug Johns, Senior Pastor

Loveland Presbyterian Church

All youth groups now meet at 6 p.m. every Sunday night beginning with supper, a short worship service and group sessions. The church is at 360 Robin Ave., Loveland; 683-2525; www.LPCUSA.org.

The church is hosting “Nurturing the Spiritual Development of the Child Using the Montessori Method,” a

The church has a new contemporary

ASSEMBLIES OF GOD 7950 Pfeiffer Rd. 793-6169

worship service from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Saturdays. The services will feature contemporary worship music in a relaxed atmosphere with biblical teaching that will resonate with the fast-paced lifestyles that many of us find ourselves in today. The church is at 7205 Kenwood Road; 891-9768.

CE-1001548382-01.INDD

The church is hosting the “Music at Ascension” chamber concert series at 7 p.m. Saturday, April 17, featuring Katherine Bergmann, soprano. Bergmann, a Chicago native, will present “An Evening of American Music.” For further information, contact David Bezona at 237-3636. The concert is free.

$25 when purchased in advance, and $30 at the door. To order tickets, send your check to Stephany Schechtman, 9440 Mapletop Lane, Loveland, OH 45140, or pay by credit card at www.ohavshalom.org. The synagogue is at 8100 Cornell Road, Montgomery; 489-3399.

CE-1001548467-01.INDD

Ascension Lutheran Church

A karate demonstration will highlight the Father-Son Evening Sunday, April 18. The dinner begins at 5 p.m. and the karate program follows. The community is invited. The last day for reservations is Wednesday, April 14. The cost for ages 511 is $4; for 12 and up it is $8. The church is at 7333 Pfeiffer Road, Montgomery; 793-3288.

We Accept Visa, MasterCard & Discover

FREE GIFT

TO FIRST 50 CUSTOMERS WHO SPENDS $50 OR MORE! 1025 Lila Ave, Milford, OH

513-625-5100

513-248-4531

5552 Bucktown Road, Williamsburg, OH

(Take 50 E. from 275 13 miles to Bucktown Rd., turn left) CE-0000392983.INDD

513-625-9441


RECORD

BIRTHS | DEATHS | POLICE | Editor Dick Maloney | rmaloney@communitypress.com | 248-7134

POLICE REPORTS

BLUE ASH

Arrests/citations

Ronald Jason Thigpen, 37, 4897 Destination Drive., Apt. 2, drug possession and possession of drug paraphernalia at 5001 Cornell Road, March 29. David R. Gonzalez, 18, 11217 Grandin Ridge Circle, drug possession at 3785 Fox Run Drive, March 31. Daniel Ryan Arszman, 21, 3771 E. Kemper Road, Apt. 6, criminal trespass at 3632 Cooper Road, March 29.

Incidents/investigations Burglary

Residence entered, 9746 Highland Ave., April 5. Residence entered and golf clubs taken, 4884 Hunt Road, Apt. 110, April 5. Residence entered at 4892 Hunt Road, Apt. 109, April 2.

Criminal mischief

Equipment was tampered with, Blue Ash Equipment Rental, 8970 Blue Ash Road, April 5.

Dog running loose

At 4941 Fairview Ave., April 2.

Domestic violence

5000 block of Myers Lane, April 1.

General information

Man became enraged, 4243 Hunt Road, April 1. Petty theft Cell phone taken, 11257 Reed Hartman Highway, Apt. B., April 1.

Theft

Washer and dryer taken, 9408 Hunters Creek Drive, March 31. Trees taken, 10131 Crosier Lane, March 22.

SYCAMORE TOWNSHIP

Arrests/citations

Rodney Stewart, 35, 2301 Sherwood Lane, drug possession at 8109 Reading Road, March 25. Katheren Bell, 22, 8430 Meadowlark Court, theft, resisting arrest at I71, March 28. Beni Pavlovski, 47, 6747 Sampson

Lane, disorderly conduct at 7799 Montgomery Road, March 28. Ricky Barrett, 29, 312 East 43rd, theft at 7913 Montgomery Road, March 17. R. Chris Goldschmidt, 51, 3866 Mantell Ave., operating motor vehicle intoxicated at Larchview Drive and Blossom Drive, March 20. Juvenile Female, 17, theft at 7875 Montgomery Road, March 21. Juvenile Female, 14, theft at 7875 Montgomery Road, March 21.

Incidents/investigations Assault, criminal damaging

victim struck and window and door damaged at 7501 School Road, March 16.

Breaking and entering

Property entered and vehicle windows broken at 3900 E. Galbraith Road, March 26.

Burglary

Residence entered at 11100 Kuertzmill Drive, March 22. Residence entered and bike valued at $500 removed at 8076 Queens Ave., March 18. Residence entered and ring and basket valued at $180 removed at 12152 Third Ave., March 25. Residence entered and lockbox and currency valued at $7,500 removed at 3854 Larchview Drive, March 23. Residence entered and tools of unknown value removed at 10853 Lakehurst Court, March 20.

Criminal damaging

Machine damaged at 5901 E. Galbraith Road, March 19.

Theft

Purse and contents of unknown value removed at 8589 Wexford Ave., March 21. Tractor valued at $2,200 removed’ at 12192 5th Ave., March 20. Catalytic converter removed from vehicle at 7875 Montgomery Road, March 23. Insulin pump of unknown value removed at 4777 E. Galbraith Road, March 26. Medication of unknown value removed at 11917 Fifth Ave., March 28.

About police reports

The Community Press publishes the names of all adults charged with offenses. The information is a matter of public record and does not imply guilt or innocence. To contact your local police department: Blue Ash, Chief Chris Wallace, 745-8573. Montgomery, Chief Don Simpson, 985-1600. Sycamore Township, 7927254. Symmes Township, Lt. Dan Reid 683-3444. $200 removed from purse at 12100 Reed Hartman Highway, March 26. Copper valued at $3,500 removed at 4514 E. Galbraith Road, March 23. Rings valued at $550 removed at 12100 Reed Hartman Highway, March 24.

SYMMES TOWNSHIP Arrests/citations

Nathan Claseens, 19, 372 Cambridge, theft at 11390 US 22, March 25. Robert Young, 22, 1785 Ohio 28, drug paraphernalia at 9011 Fields Ertel Road, March 21. Christina Conley, 27, 8762 Birchbark, domestic violence at 8762 Birch Bark Drive, March 24. Steven Hall, 24, 5051 Meyers Lane, attempted theft at 9390 Loveland Madeira Road, March 19.

Incidents/investigations Assault

Victim struck at 12131 Sycamore Terrace, March 17.

Breaking and entering

Business entered and TV and computer system valued at $9,000 removed at 11161 Montgomery Road, March 22.

Burglary

Criminal damaging

On the Web

Vehicle headlight damaged at 8892 Glendale Milford Road, March 29.

Criminal simulation

Counterfeit currency passed at 10650 Loveland Madeira Road, March 22.

Theft

Credit cards valued at $3,650 removed from purse at 9065 Union Cemetery Road, March 19.

REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS BLUE ASH

8905 Summit Ave.: Cox Paul to Gmac Mortgage LLC; $89,250. 9600 Monroe Ave.: Eagle Financial Services Inc. to Haglund Catherine R.; $60,500. 9689 Sycamore Trace Court: Cohen Leon & Tamara to Hao Jiukuan; $270,000.

MONTGOMERY

10251 Buxton Lane: Mangano Matthew & Gerald to Mangano Summer; $253,000. 10420 Storybook Drive: Mms Investments LLC to Lambert Rebecca L.; $243,000. 7976 Jolain Drive: Hornbach-Torres Terri Tr to Algers John; $330,000. 8804 Castleford Lane: Maas Mildred Anne to Le Quy Dinh; $240,000.

SYCAMORE TOWNSHIP

11946 Second Ave.: Wells Fargo Bank Minnesota N.A. to Warner Neil E.; $25,000. 5531 Firethorn Court: Drake Jack E. Tr to Whitehouse William L. III; $325,000. 7138 Glenellyn Drive: Ammons Bridget D. to Beck Colin L.; $205,000.

NOTICE OF SYMMES TOWNSHIP ZONING COMMISSION Notice is hereby given that the Zoning Commission of Symmes Township, Hamilton County, Ohio, has continued its review of Symmes #96-04, Decor Lighting, to its meeting scheduled for April 22, 2010 at 6:30 p.m. This meeting will be held at the Township Safety Center, 8871 Weekly Lane. Information is on file and open for public inspection. Carol A. Sims Zoning Secretary 1266562/1551044

Information is provided as a public service by the office of Hamilton County Auditor Dusty Rhodes. Neighborhood designations are approximate.

B7

ESTATE

communitypress.com

Ronald E. Craig

Ronald E. Craig, 68, of Blue Ash died April 1. Survived by children, David, Stephen and Jeffrey (Amy) Craig; grandchildren, Justin, Alexandria, Evan, Adam and Katherine; brother, David R. (Kerri) Craig; brother-in-law, Norton A. Newcomb; and special friend, Jan Myers. Preceded in death by wife, Roberta (nee Newcomb) Craig. Services were April 5 at St. John the Evangelist Church.

Lester J. Geier

Lester J. Geier, 88, of Blue Ash

died March 23. Survived by sons, Gary (Mary Amy) Geier of Liberty Township and Dr. Larry (Kim) Geier of Overland Park, Kan.; 11 grandchildren and one great-grandchild; and nieces and nephew. Preceded in death by father, Joseph Geier; mother, Alam Trub; five siblings; and son, Thomas Geier. The family requested private services.

Betty Lou Rineair

Betty Lou Rineair, 76, of Montgomery and formerly of Milford died April 4. Survived by children, Debbie Brooks, Pamela Flach, David,

About obituaries

Basic obituary information and a color photograph of your loved one is published without charge. Call 248-7134 for a submission form. To publish a larger memorial tribute, call 242-4000 for pricing details. Stephen, Anthony, Danny and Tom Rineair; grandchild, Aiden Rineair; and brothers, Harold and Ron Garner. Preceded in death by husband, Clifford P. Rineair; and grandchild, Blake Rineair. Services were April 7 at Gate of Heaven Cemetery. Memorials to: Hospice of Cincinnati, P.O. Box 633597, Cincinnati, OH 45263-3597.

FIRE/EMS RUNS Sycamore Township Fire Department 911 calls March 3 to March 20:

March 16, Dearwester, medical emergency March 17, Blue Ash, open burn March 17, Reading, alarm activation March 17, Happiness Way, OB March 17, Montgomery, lift assist March 17, Keller, medical emergency March 17, First, medical emergency March 17, Bayberry, medical emergency March 17, Galbraith, leg pain March 17, Britesilk, fall March 17, Dearwester, medical emergency March 17, Blossom, fall March 17, Dearwester, medical emergency March 17, Montgomery, medical emergency March 17, Plainfield @ Myrtle, fall March 17, Montgomery, medical emergency March 17, Montgomery, medical emergency March 18, Montgomery, medical emergency March 18, Plainfield, medical emergency March 18, Galbraith, medical emergency March 18, Galbraith, fall March 18, Kugler Mill, good intent March 18, Trotterstrail, alarm activation March 19, Montgomery, fall March 19, Buckland, good intent March 19, Northlake, good intent March 19, Dearwester, medical emergency March 19, Galbraith, fall March 19, First, medical emergency March 19, Pine, alarm activation

• Certified Master Pet Groomers • Award Winning Animal Trainers • Vet Recommended • Behavior Modification • Over 25 Years Combined Experience

About real estate

8061 Paddington Lane: Hamm James L. Tr & Mary B. Tr to Swillinger Rhea F. Tr; $300,000. 8677 Sturbridge Drive: Tristate Holdings Inc. to Ahy Capital Group LLC; $229,900. 8677 Sturbridge Drive: Mckisic Patricia F. to Tristate Holdings Inc.; $217,500.

Northeast Suburban Life

DEATHS

Residence entered at 16063 Timberlake Drive, March 22.

Our interactive CinciNavigator map allows you to pinpoint the loction of police reports in your neighborhood. Visit: Cincinnati.com/blueash Cincinnati.com/montgomery Cincinnati.com/sycamoretownship Cincinnati.com/symmestownship

REAL

11551 Deerfield Rd, Cincinnati OH 45242

513.891.9851

March 19, Sampson, smoke scare March 19, Cornell, alarm activation March 19, Galbraith, alarm activation March 19, Galbraith, alarm activation

March 19, Montgomery, smoke scare March 20, Montgomery mulch fire March 20, Montgomery, alarm activation March 20, St. Johns, cancelled call

We Treat Your Pet Like Family

Pets Welcome ~ We Speak Dog!

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7725 Laurel Ave. Inside

ANDERSON TOWNSHIP

6666 Clough Pike

George Meyer Hardware

(Next to the Pub & Beacon Food Mart between Newtown & Corbly Rds.)

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New Cincinnati Location Visit Us At Our New Location Rt 28 Milford Exit Off of I-275 Next to CARSTAR

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April 14, 2010

Dodds Can Reproduce Any Picture or Artwork on Your Monument

DAYTON • CALVARY DAYTON CEMETERY • MILFORD SPRINGFIELD • MIDDLETOWN • LEBANON

FREE FIBROMYALGIA SEMINAR to be held Saturday April 17th at Healing Touch Wellness on West Loveland Ave.

Back by popular demand, Dr. Daren Mazzone will give a free lecture on fibromyalgia at 1:00pm. Saturday April 17th at the Healing Touch Wellness Center located at W Loveland Ave in Loveland. The seminar is targeted at fibromyalgia sufferers and people who suspect they may have the disease. The informative and upto-date workshop is sponsored by The Foundation for Wellness Professionals. Mazzone said the information is new, invaluable and unlike anything he has seen in 17 yrs of practice. Attendees will be receiving a free 10 minute relief test which may reduce or eliminate the symptoms for up to several days. Mazzone states that he is one of only a few doctors in the United States trained in this procedure and

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treatment. Attendees of previous seminar have been very pleased with their experiences. “I’ve tried everything else and I really didn’t think this would work for me. I thought it would only be another disappointment, but this really works!” I’ve suffered with fibromyalgia for 12 years, but I am now sleeping through the night and I am able to snap my fingers for the first time I can remember” - Jeannette V “This is a free community service, and we have gotten a tremendous response” Mazzone DC said of the seminar, adding that seating is very limited and fills up fast. Attendees must call 513-382-1628.

Grief to Peace Monthly Gatherings Please join us for refreshments and a time set aside for YOU.

This will give you an opportunity to learn more about Grief and steps to take towards Peace. These gatherings will also allow you to spend time with others who understand what it means to lose an loved one. There are three convenient gatherings each month. If possible, please RSVP. We look forward to seeing you.

Gwen Mooney Funeral Home Reception Center

(located on the grounds of Spring Grove Cemetery)

4389 Spring Grove Avenue Cincinnati, OH 45223 www.springgrove.org

RSVP (513) 853-3720

Sponsored by the Spring Grove Family Gwen Mooney Funeral Home Oak Hill Cemetery Spring Grove Cemetery

Family Honors

SM

The Spring Grove Family CE-0000393505.INDD


B8

Northeast Suburban Life

Community

April 14, 2010

Scheck to speak at lecture series

Area dems host candidates forum The Silverton and the Blue Ash Northeast Democratic Clubs present the Mid-term Democratic Candidates Forum Wednesday, April 21, at Meier’s Wine Cellars, 6955 Plainfield Road, Silverton. Free to the public, offering hors d’oeuvres and a cash bar, area Democrats are excited to present Ohio candidates running in both the May 4 Primary and Nov. 2 General Election. Doors will open at 5:30 p.m. and the event will begin promptly at 6 p.m. City of Silverton Mayor John Smith will emcee the evening’s presentations. “I am thrilled at the depth of this year’s Democratic candidates,” said Smith. “During the May

An attorney, DNA expert, and co-founder of The Innocence Project, Barry Scheck is a frequently sought after expert by many federal agencies, including the FBI. He has served as counsel in a variety of civil and criminal cases including one

primary, voters are faced with multiple Democratic candidates. Comparing candidate’s platforms, inperson, is an excellent method for making an educated decision.” The Mid-term Democratic Candidates Forum guests also will have the opportunity to mingle among the candidates and elected officials during the social portions of the evening. At that time candidates and elected officials will be available for individual questions. It is recommended for guests to arrive at Meier’s Wine Cellars by 5:45 p.m. Seating is expected to be at capacity. For further information contact Shirley A. Jason at Sajason@fuse.net.

of the first cases to bring the issue of battered women to the nation’s attention – and a noted sexual assault case, which has become a lightening rod for the issue of police brutality. Scheck, best known as the DNA expert on the defense team of the O.J.

Simpson trial, will speak at three lectures of the Montgomery Woman’s Club Town Hall Lecture Series at 11 a.m. Wednesday, April 21, and Thursday, April 22, at Montgomery Assembly of God, 7950 Pfeiffer Road; and at 8 p.m. Wednesday, April 21, at Sycamore Junior

High School, 5757 Cooper Road, Blue Ash. For indi- Scheck vidual or series ticket information, visit www.montgomerywomansclub.org or call 684-1632.

Temple hosts Interfaith Shabbat program Temple Sholom has set interfaith outreach as a major priority. As part of its inclusiveness efforts, the synagogue is striving to create an atmosphere of open discussion and mutual support for those who are living every day with issues related to families in interfaith situations and to welcome interfaith family members into its community. As part of its commitment to interfaith outreach, Temple Sholom is sponsoring a series of interfaith workshops and programs. These are open to the community and are especially

cincinnati.com/community

for anyone who is part of an interfaith family where at least one member is Jewish, including partners, spouses, children or any other family member. These programs are meant to provide opportunities to discuss interfaith issues, learn about Judaism and Jewish traditions, share experiences and have some fun. The next program is an Interfaith Shabbat Program at 10 a.m. Sunday, April 25, at Temple Sholom, 3100 Longmeadow Lane, Amberley Village. This program has been designed to provide education about the Shabbat serv-

ice and Shabbat traditions for interfaith families. Call the office at 7911330 or e-mail office@templesholom.net to RSVP. “I have been working with interfaith couples for almost 30 years,” stated Rabbi Rick Shapiro, interim Rabbi of Temple Sholom, who is facilitating this program. “The Reform Jewish Movement has made outreach to interfaith families a major priority, one that I wholeheartedly endorse. We have a successful track record of helping to create an open and welcoming environment for these fami-

lies to explore and experiment with Jewish life. The members of Temple Sholom hope to accomplish the same thing here in Cincinnati.” Temple Sholom has also scheduled additional interfaith events and workshops during the rest of this year. These include an interfaith program on Israel, Sunday, May 16; an Interfaith Picnic, Sunday, July 18; and an Interfaith High Holy Days Workshop, Sunday, Aug. 29. Check the calendar at www.templesholom.net or call the office at 791-1330 for more details.

Travel & Resort TENN

E ESSE

Directory 513.768.8285 or travelads@enquirer.com

BED AND BREAKFAST

BED AND BREAKFAST

SOUTH CAROLINA

Bed & Breakfast Feature of the Week

The Doolin House Bed & Breakfast

Hilton Head Island Vacation Resort. Choose 1 or 2 bdrm condos. Oceanfront, ocean view or near ocean. Great locations & rates. www.hhi-vr.com. 877-807-3828

Somerset, Kentucky’s Premiere Inn Located Just Minutes from Lake Cumberland

FLORIDA

Beautiful Seagrove Beach Rent & Relax. Nr Destin, between famous Seaside & Rosemary Beach. Cozy Cottages to Gulf Front Condos. Web Specials. 1-800-537-5387 www.garrettbeachrentals.com

CLEARWATER - Indian Rocks Beach 2br, 2ba Gulf Front condo. Heated pool, balcony. Many up grades. 513-771-1373, 260-3208 www.go-qca.com/condo

CLEARWATER TO ST. PETE BEACHES Gulf front & bay side condos. All prices & sizes! Florida Lifestyle VAC. 1-800-487-8953. Jan. 2011, Monthly Discounts • www.ourcondo.com

DESTIN. 2 great condos , 2 br, 2 ba golf, pools, dazzling Gulf view . Check our website for availability & rates. Local owner, 513-561-4683 Visit arieldunes.us or twcondo.us

DESTIN. Local owner, 1 or 2 luxury condos. 2 BR, 2 BA overlooking gulf, sugar white beaches. Heated pool, hot tubs & more. 937-767-8449,or visit www.majesticsunindestin.com

There is a joke among friends here, “It’s a Phoenix that has risen from the ashes. ”When Charles and Allison Hahn Sobieck purchased the property at 502 North Main Street (in Somerset, Kentucky), there was a lot of work to be done, to say the least. With the vision of a B & B and a home in ruins, there were little choices. The dilapidated structure was removed, then reconstructed as it had been in the 1850’s. It’s a brand new home. A bit of an unusual concept for a bed and breakfast. “We reconstructed the home from scratch. This gave us the benefit of designing every amenity possible along the way, ”said Allison Sobieck, owner. Every room is equipped with many amenities you don’t often find in a traditional bed and breakfast, but rather a fine hotel. Every room has a full sized closet with a pair of micro-fiber robes hanging in them, 400- count Egyptian cotton sheets, cable TV with DVD players, queen sized beds, and a host of other things. For instance, 2 rooms have gas fireplaces and 3 rooms have whirlpool tubs. We even offer many add on amenities such as massage, dinner, flowers, etc…

Hilton Head Island, SC

The rooms are only half of the reason to come to The Doolin House. Owners Charles and Allison just happen to both be chefs. Some of the breakfast specialties include Caramel Banana French Toast and Southern Eggs Benedict (2 fried green tomatoes topped with 2 slices of smoked bacon, 2 eggs over easy and Hollandaise). Chuck is usually in charge of breakfast and tries to do new and different things every day. Chef Chuck pointed out, “It’s fun to experiment with breakfast. It’s the one meal that encompasses all foods. It’s perfectly acceptable to see smoked salmon or a pork cutlet at the breakfast table. ”For those in no rush to rise and shine, breakfast in bed is served at no additional charge. When you need a weekend get away that’s not too far from home or you are planning your summer vacation to beautiful Lake Cumberland, remember that The Doolin House Bed and Breakfast is only a phone call away.

FLORIDA

FLORIDA

DESTIN. Luxury 2 BR, 2 BA oceanfront condos. Heated pool, spas, kids pool & tennis. Sleeps 6. Local owner. www.us-foam.com/destin. D 513-528-9800, E 513-752-1735

PANAMA CITY BEACH The Summerhouse 2B/2B Family Condos. Beach side pools, tennis, WiFi & More. r 800/354-1122 THE BEST BEACH VACATION VALUE! www.SummerhousePC.com

NEW YORK

ORLANDO. Nr Disney. 4br 3ba townhouse in gated resort. Sleeps 10. Available year round. From $80/night + tax. Locally owned. 859-609-0712 www.orlandoguesthouse.com

Our beach is free. Specials available for golf, tennis, dining, more. Visit our

site or call toll free: 800-845-0077.

HILTON HEAD Sea Pines Upgraded & very nicely appointed 3 BR, 3½ BA townhome on golf course & near beach. Reduced rates. Rented only by the owners. 513-874-5927 N. MYRTLE BEACH Coastal Condos, Inc. 1-4 bdrm oceanfront & ocean view units. Call 1-800-951-4880 or visit www.coastalcondos.com

MANHATTAN--NYC HOTEL $129/2 persons. Singles $124. Suites $139-$159. Lincoln Ctr area, Hudson River views, 18 flrs, kitchenette, 5 mins to midtown, safe, quiet, luxury area. RIVERSIDE TOWER, Riverside & 80th St. Call 1-800-724-3136 or visit: www.riversidetowerhotel.com

PROVIDED

Kroger makes donation

As a result of St. Vincent de Paul’s 2009 Food From The Heart Campaign, an annual event in partnership with The Kroger Co. and the local community, more than $27,000 and 77,525 pounds of food were collected at Greater Cincinnati Kroger stores. The collected nonperishable food items and monetary collection will help St. Vincent de Paul provide food to families in need in our local neighborhoods. From left, Geoff Covert, president of Kroger’s Cincinnati/Dayton KMA and a resident of Montgomery, presents a check to Liz Carter, executive director of The Society of St. Vincent de Paul, resident of Mount Washington.

NEWSMAKERS

For more information, Visit the website at: www.doolinhouse.com or call 606-678-9494

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EAST COAST, NEW SMYRNA BEACH Luxurious oceanfront condos & vacation homes. Closest & best beach to Disney. Ocean Properties Vacation Rentals 800-728-0513 www.oceanprops.com

Visit www.hhisland.info and plan a getaway with Seashore Vacations.

NORTH MYRTLE BEACH. Oceanfront condos. 1, 2 & 3 bedroom units with pools, spas & tennis. Hi-speed Internet, kiddie waterslide. 800-345-5617 www.oceancreek.net SEABROOK EXCLUSIVES Villas & Private Homes. Ocean, golf, tennis, equestrian. Pet friendly rentals. Free brochure. Book online! 888-718-7949. www.seabrookexclusives.com

TENNESSEE 1-7 Affordable, Deluxe Chalets & Cabin Rentals. Pigeon Forge in the Smokies. Vacation/Dollywood Specials. Free brochure. Call 1-800-833-9987. www.firesidechalets.com

NORTH CAROLINA

A Beautiful Cabin Getaway Gatlinburg/Pigeon Forge. Hot tub, jacuzzi, fireplace, gas grill. $85/nt, 5 nt special $375. 800-793-8699. smokymtncrossrdrentals.com

EMERALD ISLE. Ocean Front luxury vacation homes with community pool. Call for free brochure. 1-252-354-5555 Spinnaker’s Reach Realty www.SpinnakersReach.com

GATLINBURG. Affordable rates. Fully furnished. 1-8 bdrms. Chalets, Cabins, Privacy, Views, Hot Tubs, Jacuzzis, Fireplaces. 1-800-235-2661 www.alpinechaletrentals.com

Opera appoints local board members

At its recent monthly meeting, Cincinnati Opera appointed six new members to its Board of Trustees for the 2010 fiscal year. Local new members are: Frank Caliguri of Oakley/Hyde Park is a longtime subscriber of and donor to Cincinnati Opera. The owner of Hi-Tech Printing and Graphics, Caliguri has served on numerous nonprofit boards, including the Friends of CCM, Cincinnati Ballet, and the Carnegie Visual + Performing Arts Center. He also served as an executive of the Regional Cultural Planning Committee and was elected to Leadership Cincinnati. A native of Cincinnati, Caliguri has been a sponsor and host of Cincinnati Opera’s LGBT Night since its

inception in 2007. Cynthia Goodman of Amberley Village has been a life-long fan of Cincinnati Opera. A curator, author, former museum director, and champion of new media in museum exhibits who received both her B.A. and Ph.D. in art history, Goodman has been affiliated with numerous institutions worldwide, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York) and the Centre Georges Pompidou (Paris). She also served as the interim director of the Contemporary Arts Center in Cincinnati in 2007. She is currently a member of the Amberley Village Beautification Committee and has served on the boards of WGUC and the Drake Center. For information, visit www.cincinnatiopera.org.


We d n e s d a y, A p r i l 1 4 , 2 0 1 0

PEOPLE

|

IDEAS

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RECIPES

CATCH A STAR

PROVIDED

Geoff Egbers of Florence, Ky., owner of Egbers Land Design, Inc., 2009 winner of the Symmes Township Trustee Award and former Royal Horticultural Society Silver Flora medal winner, Dr. Frank Welsh of Montgomery/Indian Hill, Cincinnati Horticultural Society Board of Trustees Secretary, Kate Haumesser of Hyde Park, graphic designer, and Gerry Beckman of Symmes Township, Symmes Township administrator

PROVIDED

Robert Clopton, Jr. thanked Loveland Symmes firefighters and paramedics for their response after he was hit by a truck in April 2008 on the second anniversary of the accident. From left, Lieutenant Steve Money, Firefighter Paramedic Clay Morton, Firefighter Paramedic Rick Dunn, Robert Clopton, Jr., Firefighter Paramedic Andy Huber and Deputy Chief Brian Dowers. Not pictured, but on the call, Chief Otto Huber, District Chief Harold Gregory, Assistant Chief Tom Turner, Deputy Chief Billy Goldfeder, Firefighter Paramedic Wes Dendler, Firefighter EMT Jim Polce and Firefighter Paramedic Brian Dutlinger.

Flower show poster unveiled The 2010 Cincinnati Flower Show poster was unveiled to the public at historic Meade House, in Symmes Township, just a stone’s throw away from Symmes Township Park, the

Patient thanks paramedics By Amanda Hopkins ahopkins@communitypress.com

Deputy Chief Brian Dowers with the Loveland Symmes Fire Department said one of the most rewarding parts of his job is being able to see how patients he treated have recovered. He got the chance when Robert Clopton, Jr., a man who was struck by a truck while accepting a delivery at a Symmes Township business April 1, 2008, came in to thank Dowers and other emergency responders on the second anniversary of the accident for their hand in getting him to the emergency room within a half hour of the call. “I wanted to thank them all,” Clopton said. “They go unrecognized a lot.”

Clopton, who lives in Mt. Washington, had very serious injuries resulting from the accident. He said his recovery is still a “work in progress,” but he has many family members and friends who have come together to support him. He said a few friends even organized a fundraiser for him. “You see the good in people when you’re hurt,” Clopton said. Dowers, who has been a part of the Symmes Loveland Fire Department for 21 years, said it’s not often that he can meet a trauma patient that he helped. “It makes (the department) feel good to see that support he received. He came out a winner,” Dowers said. “We do our part for the little bit of time we’re with them.”

THINGS TO DO School open house

The Art Institute of OhioCincinnati is hosting an open house at 10:30 a.m. Saturday, April 17, at The Art Institute of Ohio - Cincinnati, 8845 Governor’s Hill Drive, Suite 100, Symmes Township. Attendees are invited to learn more about school’s programs, discuss educational goals, tour facilities and learn about tuition scholarship opportunities. The event is free. Call 8332430 or visit www.artinstitutes.edu/cincinnati.

Learn about weather

Hamilton County Park District is hosting the program “Severe Weather in Ohio” at 2 p.m. Saturday, April 17, in Sharon Centre at Sharon Woods, 11450 Lebanon Road, Sharonville. It is a naturalist-led program all about severe weather events in Ohio and the science behind them. The event is free, a vehicle permit is required. Call 521-7275 or visit www.greatparks.org.

Collectors’ convention

Alpha Records & Music is hosting the Cincinnati Music Collectors’ Convention from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday, April 18, at Crowne Plaza Hotel Blue Ash, 5901 Pfeiffer

Road, Blue Ash. It is a music show and sale that includes phonograph records, CDs, DVDs, tapes and music related items. Admission is $3, free ages 11 under with adult. Call 317882-3378.

Poetry workshop

Grailville Education and Retreat Center is hosting “Giving Your Poems Roots and Wings” at 2 p.m. Sunday, April 18, at Grailville Education and Retreat Center, 932 O’Bannonville Road, Loveland. It is a panel discussion with poets Richard Hague, Leah Maines, Robert and Elizabeth Murphy, Lynn Robbins and Valerie Chronis Bickett. The poetry workshop, by donation, begins at 3:30 p.m. Bring five copies on up to three poems. The cost is $15. Registration is required. Call 683-2340 or visit www.grailville.org.

Share your events Go to communitypress.com and click on Share! to get your event into the Northeast Suburban Life.

PROVIDED

The 2010 Cincinnati Flower Show poster designed by Kate Haumesser of Hyde Park.

2010 show venue. The poster was designed by Kate Haumesser, a Hyde Park-based freelance graphic designer and recent University of Dayton graduate, and is sure to start popping up in store windows and on bulletin boards throughout the Tristate region. Haumesser found inspiration for the graphic elements in Cincinnati’s

architecture and the city’s strong art deco influence. Concerning the rich color palette of blues, pinks and purples, she says the prevalence of the combination as seen on spring’s fashion runways was a jumping off point. The 2010 Cincinnati Flower Show will run April 17-25 at Symmes Township Park. For more information, visit www.cincyflowershow.com.

PROVIDED

Cincinnati Horticultural Society President Mary Margaret Rochford of Batavia, Chairwoman of the Board of Trustees Marie Huenefeld of Mariemont and graphic designer Kate Haumesser of Hyde Park at the unveiling.

Arboretum manager to advocate for conifers Others may concoct lavish exhibits that are described as dream-like and ethereal, whimsical and imaginative. Or maybe they demonstrate all the hottest new plants, gadgets and trends taking garden centers and landscapers by storm. Chris Daeger, however, isn’t interested in the trendy or the fantastical. He doesn’t really care what this year’s “it” plant is. He is true to himself and his passion. The manager of the Rowe Arboretum in Indian Hill, Daeger, from Batavia, has had an almost life-long love affair with conifers. In fact, he discovered, registered and named his own variety, the Pinus bungeana “Rowe Arboretum.” This year he’ll share the love with visitors to the 2010 Cincinnati Flower Show with a conifer exhibit within the show’s Grand Marquee tent. Daeger’s exhibit will include troughs, bonsais, containers and topi-

aries. His trees will be displayed in four growth rate categories established by the American Conifer Society: miniature, dwarf, intermediate and large. The focus on educating consumers on growth rates comes from Daeger’s disbelief in the conventional wisdom that plants only grow to a particular size. “My philosophy,” he said, “is that plants don’t read books and they do keep growing; if they stop -- they’re dead! Time for the chainsaw!” This unabashed conifer fan and expert also describes conifers as the “bones of the garden” -- there are literally thousands to choose from, many require little or no maintenance or pruning and they’re great yearround plants, Daeger said. In addition to stopping by and visiting him at the Flower Show, Daeger also invites visitors to the Rowe Arboretum (4600 Muchmore Road, Indian Hill).

PROVIDED

Arboretum manager Chris Daeger looks to a crystal ball-like cycad for answers to all your conifer questions. Daeger lives in Batavia, works for the Rowe Arboretum in Indian Hill and will be a Grand Marquee exhibitor at the 2010 Cincinnati Flower Show in Symmes Township. “The Rowe is a great place to view more than 1,000 different conifers, it’s free, and it whets the appetites of gardeners before they shop for their favorites.” The 21st annual Cincinnati Flower Show will be April 17-25 at Symmes Township Park. For more information, visit www.cincyflowershow.com.

Gardening expert’s tour includes Symmes Twp. show Nationally known gardening expert, TV host and author Melinda Myers begins her 2010 spring flower show tour this month. The Cincinnati Flower Show in Symmes Park will be the final stop on her tour, Sunday, April 20. Myers will share tips on how to create big impact in the garden without spending a lot of money, growing your own food and insuring a bountiful harvest while being kind to the environment. “The tour enables me to meet and reach large groups of gardeners from all over the country,” Myers said. “My hope is that I can inspire every level of gardener and help them be successful in the garden, save money and have fun!” Myers will be presenting a wide range of topics throughout the tour,

including “Affordable Eco-Friendly Landscape Makeovers,” “Grow your Favorite Recipe – Tips on Producing Beautiful and Delicious Produce,” “Year Round Garden-tainment,” “Simple Makeovers for Every Small Space in your Landscape,” “Planning & Plants for a Small Space Garden,” “Creative Containers,” “Small Space Gardens – Creating a Private Space” and more. Myers, best known for her practical, gardener-friendly approach to gardening, has more than 30 years of horticultural experience in both hands-on and instructional settings. She has a master’s degree in horticulture, is a certified arborist, and was a horticulture instructor with tenure. Myers shares her expertise through a variety of media outlets. She is the author of numerous gardening books,

including “Can’t Miss Small Space Gardening.” She hosts “Melinda’s Garden Moments,” which air on 50 network television stations throughout the country and “Great Lakes Gardener,” seen on PBS stations throughout the United States. She also appears regularly as a guest expert on various national and local television and radio shows. She writes the twice monthly “Gardeners’ Questions” newspaper column and is a contributing editor and columnist for Birds & Blooms magazine. In addition, she has written articles for Better Homes and Gardens and Fine Gardening. Myers also hosted “The Plant Doctor” radio program for more than 20 years. Myers’ Web site is www.melindamyers.com.


B2

Northeast Suburban Life

April 14, 2010

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD T H U R S D A Y, A P R I L 1 5

CIVIC

Haiti Earthquake Relief Fund, 8:30 a.m.4:30 p.m. American Red Cross Blue Ash Chapter, 10870 Kenwood Road. Bring monetary donations only in the form of check, money order or credit card. Presented by American Red Cross Cincinnati Area Chapter. 792-4000; www.cincinnatiredcross.org. Blue Ash.

FARMERS MARKET

Turner Farm, 8:30 a.m.-8:30 p.m. Turner Farm, 7400 Given Road. Market includes naturally-raised meat and eggs and certified organic seasonal produce and flowers. Closes at dusk. 561-7400; www.turnerfarm.org. Indian Hill.

HEALTH / WELLNESS

Nutrition and Fitness 101, 1:30 p.m.-3:30 p.m. TriHealth Fitness and Health Pavilion, 6200 Pfeiffer Road. Learn upto-date dietary and exercise guidelines from registered dietitian and personal trainer. Discover ways to jump start fitness plan and incorporate healthier choices to meal plan. $20. Registration required. 985-6732; www.trihealthpavilion.com. Montgomery.

LITERARY - BOOK CLUBS

Turner Farm Book Club, 7 p.m. “Walden” by Thoreau. Turner Farm, 7400 Given Road. Read and discuss literature. 561-7400; www.turnerfarm.org. Indian Hill.

LITERARY BOOKSTORES

Educator Appreciation Reception, 4:30 p.m. Barnes & Noble Kenwood, 7800 Montgomery Road. Learn about bookfair program and what the bookstore can do for schools. Raffles available. Free. 794-9440. Kenwood.

ON STAGE - STUDENT THEATER

Tell Me a Story, 6 p.m.-7 p.m. Mayerson JCC, 8485 Ridge Road. JCC Center Stage Musical Theater Company youth performers present show written by Marlene Foreman Shmalo. Paul L. Rogers, musical director; Courtney Cummings, choreographer. Family friendly. $5. 761-7500; www.JointheJ.org. Amberley Village. 42nd Street, 7 p.m. Madeira High School, 7465 Loannes Drive. $9, $7 students. Through April 17. 891-8222. Madeira. F R I D A Y, A P R I L 1 6

EDUCATION

What Parents Should Know about Reading and Comprehension Development, 9:30 a.m.-11 a.m. Langsford Learning Acceleration Center, 9402 Towne Square Ave. Presentation series for parents and caregivers on reading, comprehension development and current research. Family friendly. Free. Registration required. 531-7400. Blue Ash.

FARMERS MARKET

Turner Farm, 8:30 a.m.-8:30 p.m. Turner Farm, 561-7400; www.turnerfarm.org. Indian Hill.

GARDEN SHOWS

Cincinnati Flower Show, 6 p.m.-10 p.m. Opening Night Gala. Symmes Township Park, 11600 Lebanon Road. World-class horticultural event with hundreds of landscapers, growers, floral designers and artists. $25 two-day pass; $20, $15 advance; $2 ages 3-15. Parking: $8 valet, $4. Presented by Cincinnati Horticultural Society. 683-6644; www.cincyflowershow.com. Symmes Township.

HEALTH / WELLNESS

Health Screenings, 9 a.m.-noon, Owens Chiropractic and Rehabilitation Center, 7319 Montgomery Road. Blood pressure, weight, foot and spinal screenings. Walk-ins welcome. Free. Appointment requested. 7840084; www.owenschiroandrehabcenter.com. Silverton.

MUSIC - ACOUSTIC

Acoustik Buca, 7:30 p.m. deSha’s American Tavern, 11320 Montgomery Road. 2479933; www.deshas.com. Montgomery. Right Turn Clyde, 8 p.m.-midnight, Cindy’s Friendly Tavern, 125 Karl Brown Way. 5835469. Loveland.

MUSIC - ROCK

Laika Band, 9:30 p.m. Bar Seventy-One, 8850 Governors Hill Drive. $5. 774-9697. Symmes Township.

ON STAGE - STUDENT THEATER

42nd Street, 7:30 p.m. Madeira High School, $9, $7 students. 891-8222. Madeira.

ON STAGE - THEATER

25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee, 8 p.m. Madisonville Arts Center, $18, $16 seniors. 981-7888; www.showbizplayers.com. Madisonville.

SENIOR CITIZENS

Spring Fling Party, 1 p.m.-3 p.m. Humana Guidance Center, 11316 Montgomery Road. Provident Travel presents on travel options for seniors, free blood pressure checks and Right Source Pharmacist presents on “Spring Cleaning Your Medicine Cabinet.” Includes light refreshments. Ages 50 and up. Free. 247-2100. Symmes Township.

SUPPORT GROUPS

Women’s Separation/Divorce Support, 9:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m. Comprehensive Counseling Services Inc. 10999 Reed Hartman Hwy, For women. Open to any age, if you are thinking about divorce, divorcing or already divorced. With licensed facilitator. $35 per week. Registration required. 543-4144. Blue Ash. S A T U R D A Y, A P R I L 1 7

EXERCISE CLASSES

A Laughter Yoga Experience, 9 a.m.-10:30 a.m. TriHealth Fitness and Health Pavilion, 6200 Pfeiffer Road. Combines laughter exercises and yoga breathing to give health benefits of hearty laughter. $10. Registration required. 985-6732; www.trihealthpavilion.com. Montgomery.

FARMERS MARKET

Turner Farm, 8:30 a.m.-8:30 p.m. Turner Farm, 561-7400; www.turnerfarm.org. Indian Hill.

FESTIVALS

A.J. Cohen Memorial Baseball Tournament and Kidsfest, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Summit Country Day School Athletic Complex, 5580 Ehrling Road. Fire safety and awareness, family games, raffles, conditioning and training sessions from Parisi Speed School, autographed items from celebrities, arts and crafts. Family friendly. Free. Presented by A.J. Cohen Scholarship Fund. 207-3260; www.ajcohenmemorial.org. Hyde Park. Celebrating Wool, 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Turner Farm, 7400 Given Road. Sheep shearing, raw wool washing, spinning, Knitting and needle-felting demonstrations and agricultural woodwork demonstrations. puppet plays by students 10 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. Free. Presented by Cincinnati Waldorf School. 561-7400; www.turnerfarm.org or www.cincinnatiwaldorfschool.org. Indian Hill.

FOOD & DRINK

Wine Bar Tasting, 2 p.m.-6 p.m. The Wine Store, Fifty cents per taste. 984-9463; www.theewinestore.com. Montgomery.

For more about Greater Cincinnati’s dining, music, events, movies and more, go to Metromix.com.

GARDEN SHOWS

Cincinnati Flower Show, 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Opening weekend pass: $25, $18 advance. Symmes Township Park, $25 twoday pass; $20, $15 advance; $2 ages 3-15. Parking: $8 valet, $4. 683-6644; www.cincyflowershow.com. Symmes Township.

HEALTH / WELLNESS

Meditation Workshop, 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. TriHealth Fitness and Health Pavilion, 6200 Pfeiffer Road. Learn to connect your mind and body and meditation techniques from certified meditation and yoga instructor. $45. Reservations required. 985-6742; www.trihealthpavilion.com. Montgomery.

LITERARY - SIGNINGS

Fred McGavran, 2 p.m. Barnes & Noble Kenwood, 7800 Montgomery Road. Author discusses and signs “The Butterfly Collector.” 794-9440. Kenwood.

MUSIC - CLASSICAL

Music at Ascension Chamber Concert Series, 7 p.m. “An Evening of American Music.” Katherine Bergmann, dramatic soprano; Jason Carlson, piano. Ascension Lutheran Church, 7333 Pfeiffer Road. Free, donations accepted. 793-3288; 237-3636. Montgomery.

MUSIC - CONCERTS

The Rusty Griswolds, 9:30 p.m. Bar SeventyOne, 8850 Governors Hill Drive. Ages 21 and up. $10. 774-9697. Symmes Township.

MUSIC - OLDIES

John Fox, 8 p.m.-midnight, InCahoots, 4110 Hunt Road. Rock and folk music from the 50s, 60s and 70s. Requests taken. 7932600. Blue Ash.

ON STAGE - STUDENT THEATER

42nd Street, 7:30 p.m. Madeira High School, $9, $7 students. 891-8222. Madeira.

ON STAGE - THEATER

The Garden of Rikki-Tikki-Tavi, 3 p.m. Silverton Paideia Academy, 6829 Stewart Road. Featuring Playhouse’s Touring Company. Free-flowing adaptation of the Kipling classic, a comedy about sharing and cooperation. Part of Playhouse Off the Hill Series. Ages 4 and up. $5. Presented by Playhouse in the Park. 688-8400. Silverton.

SCHOOLS

Open House, 10:30 a.m. The Art Institute of Ohio - Cincinnati, 8845 Governor’s Hill Drive. Suite 100, Attendees invited to learn more about school’s programs, discuss educational goals, tour facilities and learn about tuition scholarship opportunities. Free. Presented by The Art Institute of Ohio-Cincinnati. Through May 22. 833-2430; www.artinstitutes.edu/cincinnati. Symmes Township. S U N D A Y, A P R I L 1 8

ART EXHIBITS

Broad Strokes, 1 p.m.-4 p.m. Woman’s Art Club Cultural Center, 793-0308; www.womansartclub.com. Mariemont.

PROVIDED.

Cincinnati Horticultural Society is presenting the Cincinnati Flower Show Opening Night Gala from 6 to 10 p.m. Friday, April 16, at Symmes Township Park, 11600 Lebanon Road, Symmes Township. The flower show, from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. April 1725, is a horticultural event with hundreds of landscapers, growers, floral designers and artists. The cost is: $25 two-day pass; $20, $15 advance; $2 ages 3-15. Parking: $8 valet, $4. Call 683-6644 or visit www.cincyflowershow.com.

EDUCATION

Giving Your Poems Roots and Wings, 2 p.m. Poetry Workshop, by donation, begins at 3:30 p.m. Bring five copies on up to three poems. Grailville Education and Retreat Center, 932 O’Bannonville Road. Panel discussion with poets Richard Hague, Leah Maines, Robert and Elizabeth Murphy, Lynn Robbins and Valerie Chronis Bickett. $15. Registration required. 683-2340; www.grailville.org. Loveland.

GARDEN SHOWS

Cincinnati Flower Show, 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Opening weekend pass: $25, $18 advance. Symmes Township Park, $25 two-day pass; $20, $15 advance; $2 ages 3-15. Parking: $8 valet, $4. 683-6644; www.cincyflowershow.com. Symmes Township.

SHOPPING

Cincinnati Music Collectors’ Convention, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Crowne Plaza Hotel Blue Ash, 5901 Pfeiffer Road. Music show and sale. Phonograph records, CDs, DVDs, tapes and music related items. $3, free ages 11 under with adult. Presented by Alpha Records & Music. 317-882-3378. Blue Ash. M O N D A Y, A P R I L 1 9

ART & CRAFT CLASSES

Scrapbooking: Faithbooking, 5:30 p.m.8:30 p.m. Good Shepherd Lutheran Church Kenwood, 7701 Kenwood Road. Work on your own projects and explore “Faithbooking”, a way to convey your faith through your photo albums. Group meets third Monday of each month until July 19. Childcare is provided. Registration required. 891-1700; www.goodshepherd.com. Kenwood.

EDUCATION

CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS

A Tribute to our Veterans, 4 p.m. Little Red Schoolhouse-Indian Hill, 8100 Given Road. Village residents share memories of their military experiences. Includes dinner. Presented by Indian Hill Historical Society. 8911873; www.indianhill.org. Indian Hill.

JCC hosts iSPACE: Fun with Science Series for kids (grades 4 - 6), 4:30 p.m.-6 p.m. Mayerson JCC, 8485 Ridge Road. April 19: RXC Mindstorm Robots; April 26: Art of Lego; Also offered May 3 & May 10; May 3: Fun with Fizz; May 10: Paper Rockets Contact: Mayerson JCC, 513.761.7500 or www.jointhej.org. Open to the public. Ages 4-6. $110. Registration required. 513.761.7500. Amberley Village.

About calendar

To submit calendar items, go to “www.cincinnati.com” and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to “life@communitypress.com” along with event information. Items are printed on a space-available basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to “www.cincinnati.com” and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page. T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 2 0

W E D N E S D A Y, A P R I L 2 1

ART OPENINGS Faculty Show, 5 p.m.-7 p.m. The Art Institute of Ohio - Cincinnati, 8845 Governor’s Hill Drive. Suite 100, Gallery. Exhibit continues through July 9. 833-2400; www.artinstitutes.edu/cincinnati. Symmes Township.

EXERCISE CLASSES

EDUCATION

FOOD & DRINK

What Parents Should Know about Reading and Comprehension Development, 4:30 p.m.-6 p.m. Langsford Learning Acceleration Center, Free. Registration required. 531-7400. Blue Ash.

EXERCISE CLASSES

Zumba, 6:30 p.m.-7:30 p.m. Cincy Dance Studio, 8143 Camargo Road. Suite B, $10. Registration required. 859-630-7040; www.cincydance.com. Madeira.

GARDEN SHOWS

Cincinnati Flower Show, 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Symmes Township Park, $25 two-day pass; $20, $15 advance; $2 ages 3-15. Parking: $8 valet, $4. 683-6644; www.cincyflowershow.com. Symmes Township.

HEALTH / WELLNESS

Cholesterol and Glucose Screenings, 8 a.m.-11 a.m. TriHealth Fitness and Health Pavilion, 6200 Pfeiffer Road. Fasting for 12 hours recommended. Results available in 10 minutes. $15. 985-6732; www.trihealthpavilion.com. Montgomery.

MOM’S CLUBS

Northeast Cincinnati Mothers of Twins Club, 6:30 p.m.-8:30 p.m. Swaim Park, Zig Zag and Cooper roads, Monthly meeting for mothers of multiple birth children. Meets at Swaim Lodge. Free. www.nemotmc.com. Montgomery.

Tai Chi Class, 1 p.m.-2 p.m. Humana Guidance Center, 11316 Montgomery Road. Instructed Tai Chi for beginners with Jennifer. Free. Reservations required. 247-2100. Symmes Township. Wine Tasting, 6:30 p.m.-9 p.m. Greenacres Arts Center, 8400 Blome Road. Includes food and wine pairings, silent auction and a docent-led tour of the English Norman-style mansion. Benefits Oyler School in Lower Price Hill. $100. Reservations required. Presented by Hyde Park Gourmet Food and Wine. winedownwednesday-oyler@gmail.com; www.hydeparkgourmet.com. Indian Hill.

GARDEN SHOWS

Cincinnati Flower Show, 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Symmes Township Park, $25 two-day pass; $20, $15 advance; $2 ages 3-15. Parking: $8 valet, $4. 683-6644; www.cincyflowershow.com. Symmes Township.

HEALTH / WELLNESS

Avoiding the Back Pain Epidemic, noon-1 p.m. TriHealth Fitness and Health Pavilion, 6200 Pfeiffer Road. Dr. Ron Fudala and Brian Riesenberg discuss common causes of pain and sciatica and demonstrate appropriate integration of practical preventative measures into everyday life. $15. Reservations required. 985-6732; www.trihealthpavilion.com. Montgomery.

FARMERS MARKET

Turner Farm, 8:30 a.m.-8:45 p.m. Turner Farm, 561-7400; www.turnerfarm.org. Indian Hill.

FASHION SHOWS

Sprinkle of Spring Fashions, 10 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Kenwood Country Club, 6501 Kenwood Road. Boutique opens at 10 a.m. Fashion show starts at 11:30 a.m. Lunch at 12:30 p.m. Fashions by Dillard’s. Benefits The Salvation Army Camp SWONEKY. $40. Reservations required. Presented by Salvation Army. 248-0033; www.salvationarmycincinnati.org. Madeira.

FESTIVALS

PROVIDED

Kings Island opens for the season on Saturday, April 17, with its newest attraction, Planet Snoopy. The collection of “Peanuts”themed rides for all ages include four children’s roller coasters, a live stage show and Peanuts’ characters’ meet and greets. Pictured is the “Race for Your Life Charlie Brown” ride. The park has another new ride, Boo Blasters on Boo Hill, an interactive family attraction. Hours for Saturday, April 17, are 10 a.m. to 10 p.m., with the park closed Sunday. The park re-opens Friday, April 23 for weekend operation. Daily operation begins May 21. Go to www.visitkingsisland.com. for ticket prices.

Yom Ha’Atzmaut Celebration, 5 p.m.-8:30 p.m. Mayerson JCC, 8485 Ridge Road. Jewish folk and contemporary Israeli music by Dganit Daddo, international singing star. Includes Israeli market with 20 Israeli artists, Israeli food and children’s activities. Free. Presented by Jewish Federation of Cincinnati. 985-1539; www.jewishcincinnati.org. Amberley Village.

PROVIDED

See Elmo, Zoe and Big Bird sing and dance during Sesame Street Live’s touring production of “Elmo’s Green Thumb,” an adventure and lesson about the ecosystem. It is at 7 p.m. Friday, April 16; 10:30 a.m., 2 p.m. and 5:30 p.m. Saturday, April 17; and 1 p.m. and 4:30 p.m. Sunday, April 18, at the Bank of Kentucky Center. Tickets are $12-$27, plus a $2 facility fee. Opening night tickets are $12, plus a $2 facility fee. For information, call 859-442-2652; visit www.sesamestreetlive.com. For tickets, call 800-745-3000 or visit www.ticketmaster.com.


Life

April 14, 2010

Northeast Suburban Life

B3

A twist on the ‘Ten Commandments of Marriage’ The Rev. Ed Young, senior pastor of Second Baptist Church in Houston, Texas, wrote a book titled “The Ten Commandments of Marriage.” I never read the Rev. Young’s book but I enjoyed his commandment titles. I expand on them with my own reflections. 1. Thou shalt not be a selfish pig. The worst enemy in any relationship is our selfishness – that my feelings count and yours don’t; that you are here to serve me and make me happy; that if anything goes wrong, it’s your fault, not mine. The opposite of selfishness is love. A good indication that love is present is when the welfare and satisfaction of another person comes to mean as much to me as my own. 2. Though shalt cut the apron stings. When a wedding takes place in a church, another ceremony takes place right below in the couples psychic basement. The groom unconsciously transfers to his bride the qualities and

faults of his mother – and expects to find them hereafter in his bride. The bride, transfers over to the groom the qualities and faults of Father Lou her dad. The Guntzelman u n c o n s c i o u s cerePerspectives basement mony is not ideal. The most ideal situation happens when each spouse recognizes these parental transferences, cuts loose from them, and works to come to know the uniqueness of their own spouse. 3. Thou shalt continually communicate. The average married couple actively communicate about 27 minutes a week. Yet, “Unless we are fully known, we cannot be fully loved.” And how else do we become authentically known unless we let the other know of our fears, hopes, dreams, anxieties, insufficiencies, etc.?

We’re usually afraid because we expect rejection. That’s a possibility. But the risk is worth taking to finally come to be loved for who and what we are. 4. Thou shalt make conflict thy ally. Disagreements are not catastrophes. They are to be expected occasionally when two separate and unique persons form a relationship. Differences are opportunities to communicate, understand, compromise and solidify the relationship. The absence of conflict demonstrates that either the relationship isn’t important enough or that both individuals are too insecure to risk disagreement. 5. Though shalt avoid the quicksand of debt. Money, especially in our culture, can become a bone of contention, an instrument of power, a constant worry, an expression of selfishness, and a destroyer of more important realities. Prudent spending flows from a responsible maturity on the part of both spouses.

6. Thou shalt flee sexual temptations – online and otherwise. Sexual pleasure is wonderful, but it speaks of spiritual and personal realities far more profound than feeling good. To seek sexual pleasure independently of my spouse and my sense of commitment to her/him, is more an adolescent trait than that of an adult. The interpenetration of hearts and souls requires lifelong fidelity. 7. Thou shalt forgive your mate 490-plus times. The 490 number comes from the biblical admonition to forgive not only seven times, but seventy times seven. One of marriages primary purposes is to teach us how to forgive. It is a manifestation of love. 8. Thou shalt keep the home fires burning. Building a good marriage and a good log fire are similar. At first, the paper and kindling make a brilliantly burning blaze. Then the first blaze dies down and you wonder if the fire will fizzle out and leave you in the

dark. You blow on it and fan it for all you’re worth. Sometimes the smoke billows out and almost chokes you or brings tears to your eyes. But if the materials are good and you invest enough time and energy and interest, the solid logs catch and the fire continues. 9. Thou shalt begin again and again. Nothing in this world that is worthwhile occurs suddenly. If a solid love relationship is really desired and valued, we are willing to go for it again and again. 10. Thou shalt build a winning team. It takes two to build a successful marriage, but only one to destroy it. All of the above are seen as teamwork issues by both spouses. And a good team reaches the goal. Father Lou Guntzelman is a Catholic priest of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati. Contact him at columns@community press.com or P.O. Box 428541, Cincinnati, OH 45242.

Know how to protect yourself before buying home

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ing. In addition, the builder has agreed to re-grade the backyard and has now scrubbed the brick so the white substance has been removed. To make sure the new house you’re considering was built properly, I suggest you hire a home inspector certified by the American Society of Home Inspectors. Hire an ASHI Certified home inspector for a new home just as you would before buying an existing home. The inspector needs to check for problems and, and depending on the severity of what’s found, you may

decide to set aside some money in an escrow account at the closing. The builder will only get that money when he makes the repairs. If he fails to make the corrections within a specified time, the money should go to you so you can get the repairs made. Finally, whenever you buy or sell a house I always recommend you get your own lawyer to protect you. Howard Ain answers consumer complaints weekdays on WKRC-TV Local 12. Write to him at 12 WKRC-TV, 1906 Highland Ave., Cincinnati 45219.

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due to the grade of the yard, I have a swamp out here for at least a week at a time,” said Frisby. “It became a problem and I let them know. They came out, looked at it, and told me the grade works. Basically, they’re going to keep it how it is,” he said. Frisby told the builder he contacted me and said now the builder is much more cooperative. The company has agreed to hire an engineer to assess the driveway and sidewalk problem. The company will now rely on the engineer to come up with a proposal to keep the concrete from collaps-

d

trucks and just regular cars. Gravity is going to collapse it.” he said. Frisby complained, “The builder just plans to shovel gravel underneath my driveway and that’s how they’re going to fix it. I’m not happy with that at all.” He said that gravel needs to be compacted in order to properly support the concrete. Another concern is a white chalk-like substance that’s appeared in many areas on the brick around the house. Frisby wants to know what that substance is, what’s caused it, and how to get rid of it for good. Yet another issue concerns the grading of the backyard. When it rains, water pools in the yard and doesn’t drain away. “After any rain or snow,

,

making it very difficult for me, which is why I c a l l e d you,” he said. Howard Ain m Oa j no er Hey Howard! p r o b l e m pointed out by his father, Dave, and others, has to do with the concrete driveway and sidewalk – they’re suspended in air in several places. “We’re 8 feet straight out this way and there’s absolutely nothing underneath holding it up. There should be compacted gravel underneath the concrete,” said Frisby’s father. “It’s just a matter of time before all this just collapses from the weight of vehicles,

ar tis ts

The warm weather is bringing out homebuyers and new home sales are expected to be up this year. But, if you’re in the market for a new house you need to know how to protect yourself before you buy. Josh Frisby bought a brand new house in Morrow and moved in last December. Although he loves the house, he says the builder has been reluctant to correct problems he’s found. “The house is great, but obviously there are some issues that need to be dealt with. I’m trying to give the builder the benefit of the doubt to take care of these issues,” said Frisby. “Some things they are taking care of, and some things they’re giving me the runaround on. They’re

Enquirer Media is proud to support the Fine Arts Fund.


B4

Northeast Suburban Life

Life

April 14, 2010

Roll out a tasty teatime with asparagus

I was right in the middle of making bean soup from leftover Easter ham when I got the call from friends Butch and Char Castle. “We’re going morel hunting – want us to pick you up?� Within five minutes, I was waiting at the edge of the driveway with my favorite morel-hunting basket in hand. (Yes, I did turn off the bean soup). Now I can’t tell you where we looked, since it’s as secret as knowing where to find ginseng, but I will tell you it was one vigorous workout, climbing up to the crest of the wooded hill. We found everything BUT morels: wild flowers in abundance: spring beauties, bloodroot, trilliums, violets, phlox, Dutchmen’s breaches, and wild edibles like garlic mustard, onions, and ramps (wild leeks). It was just the mental spring tonic I needed. (And we will go back – we morel

hunters never give up). When I got home, I found a bonus near the fencerow: wild asparagus. I added that to what I picked out of our asparagus patch and plan to make these yummy asparagus rolls.

Promont Museum’s asparagus rolls

Just looking at the photo will have you running to the kitchen to make these. Mary Ann Benoski, tea coordinator at the Milford, Ohio, museum, shared this recipe. “One of my favorite sandwich recipes this time of year,� she said. Mary Ann and staff have afternoon teas at Promont House and volunteers prepare the food. Beautifully presented on fine china, their afternoon tea is not to be missed. They provide a docent guided tour included in the price of the tea ($20; luncheon $25). Mary Ann said

tea cuisine “includes something chocolate, something crunchy and something gooey.� You’ll have a memorable time taking tea at this Victorian mansion once occupied by Ohio Gov. John Pattison and family, and the profits from the teas help the upkeep of the museum. To make reservations, call 513248-0324 or log onto www.milfordhistory.net. 14 asparagus spears steamed tender-crisp in salted water, set aside on paper towels. 5 oz. extra sharp Cheddar, grated coarse 5 oz. Pepper Jack, grated coarse 3 ⠄4 cup mayonnaise 1 ⠄4 cup finely diced bottled roasted red pepper, and reserve enough 2-inch slices for garnish on sandwich folds. (Rinse and pat dry all first) Combine everything but asparagus in a mixing bowl

with hand held mixer set on medium-low speed.

Assembly:

14 slices Pepperidge Farm white bread (crust removed) Place slices of bread between sheets of waxed paper and flatten slightly with rolling pin. Spread each slice with a rounded tablespoon of cheese mixture, top with asparagus spear (trimmed the length of bread slice from corner to corner). Fold opposite corners together over spear overlapping and garnish with two strips of roasted red peppers making an “X,� sealing down corners of bread slice. If necessary use tooth pick to secure until serving and cover all sandwiches with moist paper towels until served. Chilling helps to tighten the flattened rolls.

From readers’ kitchens

Kudos for Ruth Lyons coffee cake: Dave Weller, a

Villa Hills, Ky., reader, said he’s made the Ruth Lyons coffee cake. “If you like a moist cinnamon coffee cake, that would be your cake. The cake is easy to make. It has become a favorite at my in-laws for Easter brunch.�

Panini with mozzarella, prosciutto and peppers

Never one to throw leftovers away, I made these grilled sandwiches from leftover Ciabiatta bread, some prosciutto I had left from an antipasto tray, and the last of the roasted red peppers from the freezer. Feel free to augment these with more filling, or use whatever cheese, meat, etc. you have on hand. You can hardly go wrong! Thin slices of crusty Italian bread Prosciutto (or other ham) Roasted red pepper strips

Mozzarella slices Thinly sliced red onion

Rita Heikenfeld Rita’s kitchen

Preheat grill pan or griddle over medium high. Make sandwiches: 2 to 3 slices prosciutto topped with an even layer of pepper, mozzarella, and onion, then top with another slice of bread. Brush with olive oil. Place that side face down on griddle and brush top with olive oil. Weight sandwiches down with heavy skillet (or not, if you use a panini press) and brown a few minutes on each side. Rita Nader Heikenfeld is Macy’s certified culinary professional. E-mail columns@community press.com with “Rita’s kitchen� in the subject line. Call 513-2487130, ext. 356.

Blue Ash YMCA to host free wellness fair April 17 The Blue Ash YMCA is inviting families to come play while learning about important health and safety information at YMCA Healthy Kids Day. The free event will be held from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday, April 17. The Blue Ash Fire Department, American

Lung Association, Areawide Wellness, Owens Chiropractor, Dream Dinners and Vineyard Community Church are among the community partners who will be represented. There will also be finger painting and other fun games. YMCA Healthy Kids Day will be celebrated across the

country at more than 1,500 YMCAs. It’s part of the YMCA’s national Activate America initiative that encourages people of all ages to lead healthy lifestyles. The Blue Ash YMCA is at 5000 YMCA Drive in Blue Ash. For more information, call 791-5000.

For the one day, the YMCA will waive the entire initiation fee for all new members who enroll on Saturday, April 17. As the area’s largest youth and family-focused not-for-profit, the YMCA reinforces character values through assets-based programs and services to more than 151,000 individuals, kids and families annually. Adult mentors encourage young people to be caring,

responsible, respectful, and honest through sports, summer camps, structured child and afterschool care, and leadership building programs. Branches offer quality time for families, resources for parents, and a variety of opportunities for seniors to be active. The Membership for All sliding scale fee structure means everyone, no matter their ability to pay, can

YMCA Healthy Kids Day will be celebrated across the country at more than 1,500 YMCAs. always benefit from the YMCA. Last year alone nearly 20,000 families and individuals enjoyed healthier and happier lives because generous partners helped the YMCA in its vision to be accessible to all.

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Community

April 14, 2010

Northeast Suburban Life

B5

The Wellness Community ‘uncorks’ new benefit

TROUBLE BATHING? NEW WALK-IN

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one of the key ingredients for starting s e e d s indoors. Placed a w a y from the Ron Wilson seedlings, In the garden it provides constant air movement around the plants, which helps reduce disease and rotting, and it also helps to promote stockier plants. And here’s the most important thing to remember: Read the back of the seed packs for additional germinating information (do the seeds need to be covered, spacing, soil temps – generally 70-75 degrees during the day, etc.?), as well as how long it takes for seed germination and growing time before transplanting outdoors. Count backwards from our frost free date (May 15 or so), and that’s when you should start those seeds indoors. For tomatoes it takes about six weeks (peppers eight weeks), which means starting time would be right around late March/early April. Remember, it’s always better to start your seeds a little late, rather than way too early. Talk to you next time, in the garden. Ron Wilson is marketing manager for Natorp’s Inc. Garden Stores and is the garden expert for 55KRC-AM and Local 12. You can reach him at columns@ communitypress.com

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If you’re thinking about starting seeds indoors this winter, good for you! Here are a few tips to help make you a bit more successful with your seed starting adventure. First of all, you’ll need the right seed starting supplies: 1) Use a soil-less potting mix or seed starting mix. This mix is extremely important as it actually helps to hold moisture for the new seedlings yet is airy and allows them to dry properly with less chance of dampening off, or rotting. Some mixes may include a slow release fertilizer to help feed the seedlings very slowly and gently as they grow. Be sure to pre-moisten your potting mix before planting the seeds. 2) Something to grow your seedlings in – small clay or plastic pots, Jiffy Cubes, peat pots, Cow Pots, or trays with cell packs are wonderful for starting your seeds. 3) Some type of shop light with regular fluorescent tubes will be needed to help supplement the much-needed sunlight to keep your seedlings from stretching. Remember to keep the lights within 3 inches of the tops of the new seedlings. You may need to keep the lights on 12-14 hours a day, even in sunnier windows. 4) A misting bottle. This is one of the best ways to water your new seedlings, especially when they’re very young. Misting the soil is not so invasive and is easier to control the water flow. 5) A small inexpensive fan, and trust me, this fan is

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treatment, through longterm survivorship, or advanced stages), as well as loved ones and caregivers. There is never a fee to attend or participate, thanks to the generous support of individuals, businesses, foundations, bequests and the profits of Legacies, the fine home furnishings resale shop in Hyde Park Plaza dedicated to providing funding for TWC. In Greater Cincinnati, approximately 150 programs are offered each month across several sites including TWC’s Lynn Stern Center in Blue Ash and a Northern Kentucky facility in Fort Wright, as well as offsite outreach locations in Avondale, Clifton, downtown and Western Hills. For more information, call 7914060 or 859-331-5568, or visit www.thewellnesscommunity.org/cincinnati.

CE-0000393535.

He’s a rock star among sommeliers and wine aficionados and a heroic inspiration to people facing cancer. On April 30, Justin Baldwin, owner/operator of Justin Vineyards and Winery in Paso Robles, Calif., will share his love of life and love of wine with friends and supporters of The Wellness Community of Greater Cincinnati to PROVIDED. benefit the non-profit’s free Uncorking Hope co-chairs (rear, from left) Kathy Maxwell of Indian Hill and Bill Krul of Dayton, Ohio, preview the Justin wine cancer support programs. and Domaine de la Rive venue for the event with committee members (front, from left) Linda Green of Indian Hill, Gregg Uncorking Hope: An Pancero of Indian Hill and Lucy Ward of Hyde Park. Not pictured: J. Kampinga and Gordy Rich. Inspirational Evening with Justin Baldwin and Justin Kampinga, Gregg Pancero making region and for their involved with The Wellness Wines Presented by PNC of Indian Hill, Gordy Rich leadership in providing sup- Community and became cowill take place in Covington and Lucy Ward of Hyde port for people affected by founders of The Wellness cancer. In September 2003, Community – California beginning at 7 p.m. in the Park. Many Justin Wines, both Baldwin and his wife, Central Coast, helping to intimate atmosphere of a Domaine de la Rive pent- including their acclaimed Debby, were diagnosed with bring TWC’s professional house residence. In addition proprietary blends – Isosce- cancer within minutes of support groups, educational workshops and stress manto spectacular views of les, Isosceles Reserve, each other. At the time, there was agement classes to people in downtown Cincinnati, gour- Savant, Justification and met dinner stations, and Obtuse – as well as other very little community sup- their area with cancer, careexquisite Justin wine pair- blends and varietals, are port available in the Paso givers, and cancer surings, guests will also enjoy routinely spotlighted with Robles area, but they perse- vivors. Now cancer-free, the the rare opportunity to 90+ ratings in leading wine vered through months of Baldwins remain active interact with one of Califor- publications including Wine cancer treatment and recov- supporters of The Wellness nia’s leading winemakers Enthusiast, Wine Spectator, ery with the help of family Community, both locally and hear the inspirational Decanter, and Robert Park- and friends. Committed to and across the nation. The Wellness Communistory of his winery’s suc- er’s The Wine Advocate. In the idea that no one should cess and the Baldwins’ tri- 2009, Justin Isosceles was have to face cancer alone, ty is part of the Cancer Supawarded a gold medal at the the Baldwins later got port Community, the largest umph over cancer. Exciting auction items San Francisco Chronicle will also be available for Wine Competition (2005) bidding. A special private and was named “Best in wine tasting with Justin Class” at the Los Angeles Baldwin will kick off the International Wine and evening, beginning at 5:30 Spirits Competition (2006). p.m. Tickets for this exclu- The 2005 Isosceles was also AS SEEN ON TV sive evening are $500 per named the Top USA Borcouple for the main event, deaux Blend at the 2008 LOWEST PRICES World Wine or $1,500 per couple for the Decanter LOCAL COMPANY private tasting, and may be Awards, one of the most prestigious wine competiONE DAY INSTALL reserved by calling The Wellness Community at tions in the world, and was recognized as the best wine 791-4060. Uncorking Hope is being of all the USA Gold Medal CE-0000394719.INDD organized by co-chairs Bill winners. In addition to producing Krul and Kathy Maxwell of award winning wines, the Indian Hill, along with committee members Linda Baldwins are also known Green of Indian Hill, J. for their civic involvement in the Paso Robles wine-


B6

Northeast Suburban Life

Community

April 14, 2010

RELIGION

COINS?

If you have an important collection of coins for sale and were smart enough not to take them to some motel room for a low offer, we hold a Rare Coin Auction every year in connection with the Greater Cincinnati Numismatic Expo, held in June at Sharonville Convention Center, and now in its 27th year. For a consultation please call Paul Padget at

(513) 821-2143 CE-0000392247.INDD

Blue Ash Presbyterian Church The Fine Arts Fund is presenting the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra string quartet at 7:30 p.m. Friday, April 23. It is a concert for all ages. There will be an interactive question- and answer-session led by the musicians themselves. Child care is not provided. The church is at 4309 Cooper Road, Blue Ash; 791-1153.

Worship times are: Contemporary worship at 5 p.m. Saturdays, contemporary worship at 9 a.m. Sundays and traditional worship at 10:30 a.m. Sundays. The church is at 6635 LovelandMiamiville Road, Loveland; 6779866.

All youth groups now meet at 6 p.m. every Sunday night beginning with supper, a short worship service and group sessions. The church is at 360 Robin Ave., Loveland; 683-2525; www.LPCUSA.org.

Good Shepherd Lutheran Church

The new service times are 8:30 to 9:20 a.m. for the Traditional Service, 9:40 to 10:40 a.m. for the Contemporary Service and Sunday School and 11 a.m. to noon for the Blended Service and Sunday School. Join the United Methodist Women from 9:45 a.m. to 11 a.m. the first Thursday morning of each month for UMW, a time of fellowship, devotion and ministry at LUMC. The purpose of the UMW is “to know God and to experience freedom as whole persons through Jesus Christ; to develop a creative, supportive fellowship; and to expand concepts of mission through participation in the global ministries of the church.” The church is at 10975 S. Lebanon Road, Loveland; 683-1738.

Brecon United Methodist Church

Sunday Worship Services are 8:30 and 10:45 a.m. with Adult Sunday School at 9:30 a.m. Children’s Church is during the 10:45 a.m. hour. All guests are welcome. The church is at 7388 East Kemper Road, Sycamore Township; 4897021.

Congregation Ohav Shalom

Congregation Ohav Shalom is hosting “Just’n Time…Tunes and Tales by Justin Miller” Sunday, April 25. The guitarist and mandolin player will perform a variety of music accompanied by a bass player and a percussionist. The concert starts at 7 p.m., but a cash wine bar and silent auction begin at 6:15 p.m. After Miller’s performance, guests will be treated to an elegant dessert and coffee buffet. General admission is

Epiphany United Methodist Church

The church is hosting Scrapbooking from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. nearly every third Monday. Free child care is provided. You must register by 5 p.m. Friday before the Monday event. The dates are: April 19, May 17, June 7, July 19 and Aug. 16. The church is at 7701 Kenwood Road, Kenwood; 891-1700.

Hartzell United Methodist

Sunday Worship Services are 9 and 10:30 a.m. with Adult Sunday School at 9:30 a.m. Children’s School is during the 10:45 a.m. hour. All guests and visitors are welcome. Youth Groups, Bible Studies weekly; Childcare and Transportation provided. The church is at 8999 Applewood Drive, Blue Ash; 891-8527.

Kenwood Fellowship Church

LUTHERAN

UNITED METHODIST

MONTGOMERY ASSEMBLY OF GOD

PRINCE OF PEACE LUTHERAN CHURCH (ELCA)

Sharonville United Methodist

9:30 am Sunday School 10:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 6:30 pm Sunday Eve Service 7:00 pm Wednesday Family Night

www.montgomeryag.org

EPISCOPAL ST. ANNE, WEST CHESTER 6461 Tylersville Road (1/2 mile W. of Cin-Day) 513-779-1139

Sundays 7:30, 9:00 & 10:45am Nursery Sun 9:00am-noon Church School Classes for All Ages, 9:45am www.saintanne-wc.org

101 South Lebanon Rd. Loveland, OH 45140 683-4244 Lead Pastor Jonathan Eilert Pastor Grant Eckhart Saturday Service 5:00pm Sunday Services 8:00, 9:30 & 11:00am Sunday School 9:30am http://www.princeofpeaceelca.org

UNITED METHODIST CHURCH OF THE SAVIOUR 8005 Pfeiffer Rd Montgmry 791-3142 www.cos-umc.org "Because He Lives: Freedom"

Traditional Worship 8:20am & 11:00am Contemporary Worship 9:40am Sunday School (All ages) 9:40 & 11am

8:15 & 11am Traditional Service & Kingdom Kids 9:30am Contemporary Worship & Sunday School 7:00pm Wednesday, Small Groups for all ages Infant care available for all services

3751 Creek Rd.

HARTZELL UMC

513-563-0117

www.sharonville-umc.org

NON-DENOMINATIONAL FAITH BIBLE CHURCH 8130 East Kemper Rd. (1 mile west of Montgomery Rd) Services & Sunday School: 9:00am & 10:45am Nursery Available

683-2525

www.LPCUSA.org

www.faithchurch.net

ASCENSION LUTHERAN CHURCH

513.891.1700

(across from Kenwood Towne Centre) Saturday night at 5:00 and Sunday morning at 8:00, 9:00, 9:30 & 11:00am Pastors: Larry Donner, Pat Badkey, Jesse Abbott

513-931-4441 • 513-931-0259

www.RinksBingo.com

Save the Animals Foundation BINGO

11330 Williamson Rd. off Cornell, in Blue Ash TUESDAY & FRIDAY Evenings - Doors Open 6pm

Preliminary Games 7:00pm - Reg Games 7:30pm OVER 25 DIFFERENT INSTANTS

Sunday April 25 8:00 a.m.

$20 early registration fee includes t-shirt. $15 early registration, no shirt. $20 race day registration, no shirt. Waffle Breakfast FREE to registered 5K participants. Guests $5.00 each.

St. Joseph Home of Cincinnati 10722 Wyscarver Road, off Glendale-Milford Road in Sharonville Visit www.saintjosephhome.com or call (513) 563-2520, ext. 124 for more information. Register online at www.racedmc.com CE-0000394338.INDD

as a mentor mom. Call 583-0371. The church is at 6300 Price Road, Loveland; 677-7600.

St. Paul Community United Methodist Church

The church is continuing the series “Meeting Jesus Along the Way.” On April 18, the sermon “Meeting Jesus Along the Way in 3-D-Jesus and Peter!” will be based on the scripture reading John 21:1-19. St. Paul Church services are 8:45 a.m. and 11 a.m. for Traditional Worship and 9:30 a.m. for Contemporary Worship with Praise Band. Sunday School and childcare is provided for all services. The church is at 8221 Miami Road, Madeira; 891-8181; www.stpaulcommunityumc.org.

Sycamore Christian Church

Sunday Worship Service is at 10:30 a.m. Bible Study is at 9 a.m. every Sunday. The church is hosting Ladies WOW Study Group (Women on Wednesdays) at 7 p.m. the second Wednesday of every month. The event includes light refreshments and a study of Beth Moore’s “Stepping Up.” The church hosts Adult and Youth Bible Studies at 7 p.m. every Wednesday. The church is at 6555 Cooper Road, Sycamore Township; 891-7891, www.sycamorechristianchurch. The temple is hosting an Interfaith Shabbat Program at 10 a.m. Sunday, April 25. This program is designed to provide education about the Shabbat service and Shabbat traditions for interfaith families. Call the office at 791-1330 or e-mail office@templesholom.net to RSVP. The temple is at 3100 Longmeadow Lane, Amberley Village; 791-1330.

BUSINESS UPDATE Germain hired

Wood, Herron & Evans hired Ken Germain to its Intellectual Property law practice. Germain has more than 35 years of varied experience in the trademark/ unfair competition field. He focuses his practice on trademark counseling, consulting and litigation. Germain received an A.B. degree, magna cum laude, from Rutgers College in 1966 and a Juris Doctor degree from the New York University School of Law, where he served on the NYU Law Review, in 1969. He lives in Symmes Township.

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LARGE Selection of Perennials & Herbs 18 Greenhouses Filled with Annuals, Vegetables • Trees • Shrubs • Roses • Mulch • Soil • Seeds • Hanging Baskets • Ertl Toys • Garden Tools • Bedding Plants 80,000 Square Feet Under Roof To Shop!

MADEIRA SILVERWOOD PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH Mason United Methodist Church 6315 S. Mason-Montgomery Rd. (near Tylersville Rd. intersection) 513-398-4741 8:30 & 11:00 AM Traditional Worship 9:45 AM Contemporary Worship 1:30 PM Esperanza Viva, Hispanic Worship 9:40 & 11:00 AM Sunday School Childcare available www.masonumc.org

www.madeirachurch.org 8000 Miami Ave. 791-4470 Contemporary Worship 9:00 am

Church School for Everyone 10:10 am

Traditional Worship 11:15 am Child Care available at all times

2115 St. Rt. 131, Batavia, OH

Montgomery Presbyterian Church 9994 Zig Zag Road Mongtomery, Ohio 45242

Worship Service 10:30am Nursery Care Available website: www.MPChurch.net

(on the corner of Ohio 131 and Bass Rd. 7 miles east of Milford on St. Rt. 131) 1001461211-01

7701 Kenwood Rd.

Bingo Computer Purchase Guaranteed Fri & Sat Nights

4309 Cooper Rd. At Reed Hartman Hwy 791-1153 • www.bapcweb.net Rev. Michael Brewer, Pastor • 9:00 AM Sunday School for all ages • 10:30 AM Worship Nursery Care Provided Fellowship Hour following Worship Service

LUTHERAN

www.goodshepherd.com

Non-Smoking

Religion news is published at no charge on a spaceavailable basis. Items must be to our office no later than 4 p.m. Wednesday, for possible consideration in the following edition. E-mail announcements to nesuburban@communitypress. com, with “Religion” in the subject line. Fax to 248-1938. Call 248-8600. Mail to: Northeast Suburban Life, Attention: Teasha O’Connell, Religion news, 394 Wards Corner Road, Suite 170, Loveland, OH 45140.

BLUE ASH PRESBYTERIAN

Take I-275 to exit 57 toward Milford, Right on McClelland, Right on Price, church soon on Right

Good Shepherd (E LCA)

LPCUSA@fuse.net

PRESBYTERIAN

Services 8:00 am, 9:15 am & 11:00am Steve Lovellette, Senior Pastor Nursery proivided at all services

7333 Pfeiffer Road, Montgomery (East of I-71 on Pfeiffer Rd) Worship Schedule 8:30 & 11:00 a.m. Worship and Holy Communion 9:45 a.m. Sunday School and Adult Forum Pastor: Josh Miller Baby sitter provided Visit our website at: http://ascensionlutheranchurch.com

PRESBYTERIAN (USA)

Fellowship/Coffee Hour after Worship Nursery Provided/Youth Group Activities 360 Robin Ave. (off Oak St.), Loveland OH

5910 Price Road, Milford 831-3770

Call Cathy at 513-494-1391 to get on mailing list for monthly specials.CE-1001548364-01.I

RINKS BINGO

About religion

Temple Sholom

Known for its challenging course-end hill and amazing finish line cheering section, this USATF certified run/walk features a Waffle House breakfast. Benefits the residents of St. Joseph Home in Sharonville, a home for non-ambulatory infants, children and adults who have severe/profound mental and physical disabilities. Race Day Registration begins at 7:00 a.m. Race starts at 8:00 a.m.

LOVELAND PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH A Loving, Praying, Caring Church Join us for Sunday Services Worship Service........................10:00am Church School............................11:15am CONNECT Youth Service.............6-8pm

EVANGELICAL FREE

Do O ors 5:00pen pm

aries Prelimin 5 Start 6:4

Register online at www.racedmc.com

Sunday School & Worship 9 AM & 10:30 AM

932-7691 Holy Eucharist 10:30am Sunday School 10:30am Nursery Care Provided 5 min. from K-71 via Rt. 48

River Hills Christian Church

Thriving Moms is a group for moms of infants through high school students; meets weekly to receive encouragement and instruction, make friends and have fun; held 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m.; child care provided. There is a Christian counselor as the parent coach, as well

PROGRESSIVE GAME $15,000 & GROWING

Sunday 9:00 & 10:30 a.m. Loveland High School, off of Rich Rd. 683-1556 www.northstarvineyard.org

hartzell-umc@fuse.net

232 E. Main St (corner of East & Main) Rev. Jacqueline E. Matisse, Pastor

The church conducts worship at 10:30 a.m., Sundays and Divine Providence Study Group the first four Sundays of the month from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. The church is located at 9035 E. Kemper Road, Montgomery; 489-9572.

711 East Columbia • Reading

SmokeFree Bingo

Community Church

(off Larchview, off Plainfield at Cross County Hwy.)

ST. PATRICK’S-LEBANON

New Church of Montgomery

MT. NOTRE DAME H.S. - EVERY TUESDAY EVE.

NorthStar Vineyard

8999 Applewood Dr Blue Ash 891 8527

Child Care provided 10:30AM Rev. Robert Roberts, Pastor

Madeira-Silverwood Presbyterian Church

www.fbccincy.or 513-489-1114

Nursery Care Provided

Dr. Cathy Johns, Senior Pastor Rev. Doug Johns, Senior Pastor

Loveland United Methodist Church

The church is hosting “Nurturing the Spiritual Development of the Child Using the Montessori Method,” a

The church has a new contemporary

ASSEMBLIES OF GOD 7950 Pfeiffer Rd. 793-6169

Loveland Presbyterian Church

series of parent informational meetings. The classes will be offered at the church from 7 to 9 p.m. each Tuesday evening April 20 and 27. The focus of the classes will be on children between the ages of birth and 6 years old, examining the ways young children learn and explore materials that support their learning and discuss the role of adults in nurturing the child’s development. Classes will be led by Crystal Dahlmeier, Madeira-Silverwood director of children’s ministries. Dahlmeier has taught Montesorri classes both locally and internationally for more than 25 years. She was the lead teacher and principal of the Xavier University Montesorri Lab School, where she also taught graduate and undergraduate classes in early childhood and Montesorri education. She also directs a Montesorri teacher education program in Northern Kentucky. The church is at 8000 Miami Ave., Madeira; 791-4470.

CE-1001548382-01.INDD

The church is hosting the “Music at Ascension” chamber concert series at 7 p.m. Saturday, April 17, featuring Katherine Bergmann, soprano. Bergmann, a Chicago native, will present “An Evening of American Music.” For further information, contact David Bezona at 237-3636. The concert is free.

$25 when purchased in advance, and $30 at the door. To order tickets, send your check to Stephany Schechtman, 9440 Mapletop Lane, Loveland, OH 45140, or pay by credit card at www.ohavshalom.org. The synagogue is at 8100 Cornell Road, Montgomery; 489-3399.

CE-1001548467-01.INDD

Ascension Lutheran Church

worship service from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Saturdays. The services will feature contemporary worship music in a relaxed atmosphere with biblical teaching that will resonate with the fast-paced lifestyles that many of us find ourselves in today. The church is at 7205 Kenwood Road; 891-9768.

A karate demonstration will highlight the Father-Son Evening Sunday, April 18. The dinner begins at 5 p.m. and the karate program follows. The community is invited. The last day for reservations is Wednesday, April 14. The cost for ages 511 is $4; for 12 and up it is $8. The church is at 7333 Pfeiffer Road, Montgomery; 793-3288.

We Accept Visa, MasterCard & Discover

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TO FIRST 50 CUSTOMERS WHO SPENDS $50 OR MORE! 1025 Lila Ave, Milford, OH

513-625-5100

513-248-4531

5552 Bucktown Road, Williamsburg, OH

(Take 50 E. from 275 13 miles to Bucktown Rd., turn left) CE-0000392983.INDD

513-625-9441


RECORD

BIRTHS | DEATHS | POLICE | Editor Dick Maloney | rmaloney@communitypress.com | 248-7134

POLICE REPORTS

BLUE ASH

Arrests/citations

Ronald Jason Thigpen, 37, 4897 Destination Drive., Apt. 2, drug possession and possession of drug paraphernalia at 5001 Cornell Road, March 29. David R. Gonzalez, 18, 11217 Grandin Ridge Circle, drug possession at 3785 Fox Run Drive, March 31. Daniel Ryan Arszman, 21, 3771 E. Kemper Road, Apt. 6, criminal trespass at 3632 Cooper Road, March 29.

Incidents/investigations Burglary

Residence entered, 9746 Highland Ave., April 5. Residence entered and golf clubs taken, 4884 Hunt Road, Apt. 110, April 5. Residence entered at 4892 Hunt Road, Apt. 109, April 2.

Criminal mischief

Equipment was tampered with, Blue Ash Equipment Rental, 8970 Blue Ash Road, April 5.

Dog running loose

At 4941 Fairview Ave., April 2.

Domestic violence

5000 block of Myers Lane, April 1.

General information

Man became enraged, 4243 Hunt Road, April 1. Petty theft Cell phone taken, 11257 Reed Hartman Highway, Apt. B., April 1.

Theft

Washer and dryer taken, 9408 Hunters Creek Drive, March 31. Trees taken, 10131 Crosier Lane, March 22.

SYCAMORE TOWNSHIP

Arrests/citations

Rodney Stewart, 35, 2301 Sherwood Lane, drug possession at 8109 Reading Road, March 25. Katheren Bell, 22, 8430 Meadowlark Court, theft, resisting arrest at I71, March 28. Beni Pavlovski, 47, 6747 Sampson

Lane, disorderly conduct at 7799 Montgomery Road, March 28. Ricky Barrett, 29, 312 East 43rd, theft at 7913 Montgomery Road, March 17. R. Chris Goldschmidt, 51, 3866 Mantell Ave., operating motor vehicle intoxicated at Larchview Drive and Blossom Drive, March 20. Juvenile Female, 17, theft at 7875 Montgomery Road, March 21. Juvenile Female, 14, theft at 7875 Montgomery Road, March 21.

Incidents/investigations Assault, criminal damaging

victim struck and window and door damaged at 7501 School Road, March 16.

Breaking and entering

Property entered and vehicle windows broken at 3900 E. Galbraith Road, March 26.

Burglary

Residence entered at 11100 Kuertzmill Drive, March 22. Residence entered and bike valued at $500 removed at 8076 Queens Ave., March 18. Residence entered and ring and basket valued at $180 removed at 12152 Third Ave., March 25. Residence entered and lockbox and currency valued at $7,500 removed at 3854 Larchview Drive, March 23. Residence entered and tools of unknown value removed at 10853 Lakehurst Court, March 20.

Criminal damaging

Machine damaged at 5901 E. Galbraith Road, March 19.

Theft

Purse and contents of unknown value removed at 8589 Wexford Ave., March 21. Tractor valued at $2,200 removed’ at 12192 5th Ave., March 20. Catalytic converter removed from vehicle at 7875 Montgomery Road, March 23. Insulin pump of unknown value removed at 4777 E. Galbraith Road, March 26. Medication of unknown value removed at 11917 Fifth Ave., March 28.

About police reports

The Community Press publishes the names of all adults charged with offenses. The information is a matter of public record and does not imply guilt or innocence. To contact your local police department: Blue Ash, Chief Chris Wallace, 745-8573. Montgomery, Chief Don Simpson, 985-1600. Sycamore Township, 7927254. Symmes Township, Lt. Dan Reid 683-3444. $200 removed from purse at 12100 Reed Hartman Highway, March 26. Copper valued at $3,500 removed at 4514 E. Galbraith Road, March 23. Rings valued at $550 removed at 12100 Reed Hartman Highway, March 24.

SYMMES TOWNSHIP Arrests/citations

Nathan Claseens, 19, 372 Cambridge, theft at 11390 US 22, March 25. Robert Young, 22, 1785 Ohio 28, drug paraphernalia at 9011 Fields Ertel Road, March 21. Christina Conley, 27, 8762 Birchbark, domestic violence at 8762 Birch Bark Drive, March 24. Steven Hall, 24, 5051 Meyers Lane, attempted theft at 9390 Loveland Madeira Road, March 19.

Incidents/investigations Assault

Victim struck at 12131 Sycamore Terrace, March 17.

Breaking and entering

Business entered and TV and computer system valued at $9,000 removed at 11161 Montgomery Road, March 22.

Burglary

Criminal damaging

On the Web

Vehicle headlight damaged at 8892 Glendale Milford Road, March 29.

Criminal simulation

Counterfeit currency passed at 10650 Loveland Madeira Road, March 22.

Theft

Credit cards valued at $3,650 removed from purse at 9065 Union Cemetery Road, March 19.

REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS BLUE ASH

8905 Summit Ave.: Cox Paul to Gmac Mortgage LLC; $89,250. 9600 Monroe Ave.: Eagle Financial Services Inc. to Haglund Catherine R.; $60,500. 9689 Sycamore Trace Court: Cohen Leon & Tamara to Hao Jiukuan; $270,000.

MONTGOMERY

10251 Buxton Lane: Mangano Matthew & Gerald to Mangano Summer; $253,000. 10420 Storybook Drive: Mms Investments LLC to Lambert Rebecca L.; $243,000. 7976 Jolain Drive: Hornbach-Torres Terri Tr to Algers John; $330,000. 8804 Castleford Lane: Maas Mildred Anne to Le Quy Dinh; $240,000.

SYCAMORE TOWNSHIP

11946 Second Ave.: Wells Fargo Bank Minnesota N.A. to Warner Neil E.; $25,000. 5531 Firethorn Court: Drake Jack E. Tr to Whitehouse William L. III; $325,000. 7138 Glenellyn Drive: Ammons Bridget D. to Beck Colin L.; $205,000.

NOTICE OF SYMMES TOWNSHIP ZONING COMMISSION Notice is hereby given that the Zoning Commission of Symmes Township, Hamilton County, Ohio, has continued its review of Symmes #96-04, Decor Lighting, to its meeting scheduled for April 22, 2010 at 6:30 p.m. This meeting will be held at the Township Safety Center, 8871 Weekly Lane. Information is on file and open for public inspection. Carol A. Sims Zoning Secretary 1266562/1551044

Information is provided as a public service by the office of Hamilton County Auditor Dusty Rhodes. Neighborhood designations are approximate.

B7

ESTATE

communitypress.com

Ronald E. Craig

Ronald E. Craig, 68, of Blue Ash died April 1. Survived by children, David, Stephen and Jeffrey (Amy) Craig; grandchildren, Justin, Alexandria, Evan, Adam and Katherine; brother, David R. (Kerri) Craig; brother-in-law, Norton A. Newcomb; and special friend, Jan Myers. Preceded in death by wife, Roberta (nee Newcomb) Craig. Services were April 5 at St. John the Evangelist Church.

Lester J. Geier

Lester J. Geier, 88, of Blue Ash

died March 23. Survived by sons, Gary (Mary Amy) Geier of Liberty Township and Dr. Larry (Kim) Geier of Overland Park, Kan.; 11 grandchildren and one great-grandchild; and nieces and nephew. Preceded in death by father, Joseph Geier; mother, Alam Trub; five siblings; and son, Thomas Geier. The family requested private services.

Betty Lou Rineair

Betty Lou Rineair, 76, of Montgomery and formerly of Milford died April 4. Survived by children, Debbie Brooks, Pamela Flach, David,

About obituaries

Basic obituary information and a color photograph of your loved one is published without charge. Call 248-7134 for a submission form. To publish a larger memorial tribute, call 242-4000 for pricing details. Stephen, Anthony, Danny and Tom Rineair; grandchild, Aiden Rineair; and brothers, Harold and Ron Garner. Preceded in death by husband, Clifford P. Rineair; and grandchild, Blake Rineair. Services were April 7 at Gate of Heaven Cemetery. Memorials to: Hospice of Cincinnati, P.O. Box 633597, Cincinnati, OH 45263-3597.

FIRE/EMS RUNS Sycamore Township Fire Department 911 calls March 3 to March 20:

March 16, Dearwester, medical emergency March 17, Blue Ash, open burn March 17, Reading, alarm activation March 17, Happiness Way, OB March 17, Montgomery, lift assist March 17, Keller, medical emergency March 17, First, medical emergency March 17, Bayberry, medical emergency March 17, Galbraith, leg pain March 17, Britesilk, fall March 17, Dearwester, medical emergency March 17, Blossom, fall March 17, Dearwester, medical emergency March 17, Montgomery, medical emergency March 17, Plainfield @ Myrtle, fall March 17, Montgomery, medical emergency March 17, Montgomery, medical emergency March 18, Montgomery, medical emergency March 18, Plainfield, medical emergency March 18, Galbraith, medical emergency March 18, Galbraith, fall March 18, Kugler Mill, good intent March 18, Trotterstrail, alarm activation March 19, Montgomery, fall March 19, Buckland, good intent March 19, Northlake, good intent March 19, Dearwester, medical emergency March 19, Galbraith, fall March 19, First, medical emergency March 19, Pine, alarm activation

• Certified Master Pet Groomers • Award Winning Animal Trainers • Vet Recommended • Behavior Modification • Over 25 Years Combined Experience

About real estate

8061 Paddington Lane: Hamm James L. Tr & Mary B. Tr to Swillinger Rhea F. Tr; $300,000. 8677 Sturbridge Drive: Tristate Holdings Inc. to Ahy Capital Group LLC; $229,900. 8677 Sturbridge Drive: Mckisic Patricia F. to Tristate Holdings Inc.; $217,500.

Northeast Suburban Life

DEATHS

Residence entered at 16063 Timberlake Drive, March 22.

Our interactive CinciNavigator map allows you to pinpoint the loction of police reports in your neighborhood. Visit: Cincinnati.com/blueash Cincinnati.com/montgomery Cincinnati.com/sycamoretownship Cincinnati.com/symmestownship

REAL

11551 Deerfield Rd, Cincinnati OH 45242

513.891.9851

March 19, Sampson, smoke scare March 19, Cornell, alarm activation March 19, Galbraith, alarm activation March 19, Galbraith, alarm activation

March 19, Montgomery, smoke scare March 20, Montgomery mulch fire March 20, Montgomery, alarm activation March 20, St. Johns, cancelled call

We Treat Your Pet Like Family

Pets Welcome ~ We Speak Dog!

• The city’s most extensive selection of USA-made dog food, treats, supplies & wild bird feeders • Unique dog training & behavioral Pet solutions Problems? • All major brands of holistic dog foods We Have at minimum pricing Solutions! • Boarding for your dog while you travel TWO LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU! MADEIRA

7725 Laurel Ave. Inside

ANDERSON TOWNSHIP

6666 Clough Pike

George Meyer Hardware

(Next to the Pub & Beacon Food Mart between Newtown & Corbly Rds.)

M-F 8-7; Sat. 9-5; Sun. 12-4

M-F 8-7; Sat. 9-5; Sun. 12-4

(513) 271-DOGS (3647) (513) 231-PETS (7387) GROOMING, TRAINING & DOGGY DAY CARE AVAILABLE AT ANDERSON LOCATION ONLY CE-0000394752.INDD

Since 1864

DODDS MONUMENTS

www.doddsmonuments.com 1-800-77-DODDS Historic Home Office in Downtown Xenia

New Cincinnati Location Visit Us At Our New Location Rt 28 Milford Exit Off of I-275 Next to CARSTAR

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ON

April 14, 2010

Dodds Can Reproduce Any Picture or Artwork on Your Monument

DAYTON • CALVARY DAYTON CEMETERY • MILFORD SPRINGFIELD • MIDDLETOWN • LEBANON

FREE FIBROMYALGIA SEMINAR to be held Saturday April 17th at Healing Touch Wellness on West Loveland Ave.

Back by popular demand, Dr. Daren Mazzone will give a free lecture on fibromyalgia at 1:00pm. Saturday April 17th at the Healing Touch Wellness Center located at W Loveland Ave in Loveland. The seminar is targeted at fibromyalgia sufferers and people who suspect they may have the disease. The informative and upto-date workshop is sponsored by The Foundation for Wellness Professionals. Mazzone said the information is new, invaluable and unlike anything he has seen in 17 yrs of practice. Attendees will be receiving a free 10 minute relief test which may reduce or eliminate the symptoms for up to several days. Mazzone states that he is one of only a few doctors in the United States trained in this procedure and

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treatment. Attendees of previous seminar have been very pleased with their experiences. “I’ve tried everything else and I really didn’t think this would work for me. I thought it would only be another disappointment, but this really works!” I’ve suffered with fibromyalgia for 12 years, but I am now sleeping through the night and I am able to snap my fingers for the first time I can remember” - Jeannette V “This is a free community service, and we have gotten a tremendous response” Mazzone DC said of the seminar, adding that seating is very limited and fills up fast. Attendees must call 513-382-1628.

Grief to Peace Monthly Gatherings Please join us for refreshments and a time set aside for YOU.

This will give you an opportunity to learn more about Grief and steps to take towards Peace. These gatherings will also allow you to spend time with others who understand what it means to lose an loved one. There are three convenient gatherings each month. If possible, please RSVP. We look forward to seeing you.

Gwen Mooney Funeral Home Reception Center

(located on the grounds of Spring Grove Cemetery)

4389 Spring Grove Avenue Cincinnati, OH 45223 www.springgrove.org

RSVP (513) 853-3720

Sponsored by the Spring Grove Family Gwen Mooney Funeral Home Oak Hill Cemetery Spring Grove Cemetery

Family Honors

SM

The Spring Grove Family CE-0000393505.INDD


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Northeast Suburban Life

Community

April 14, 2010

Scheck to speak at lecture series

Area dems host candidates forum The Silverton and the Blue Ash Northeast Democratic Clubs present the Mid-term Democratic Candidates Forum Wednesday, April 21, at Meier’s Wine Cellars, 6955 Plainfield Road, Silverton. Free to the public, offering hors d’oeuvres and a cash bar, area Democrats are excited to present Ohio candidates running in both the May 4 Primary and Nov. 2 General Election. Doors will open at 5:30 p.m. and the event will begin promptly at 6 p.m. City of Silverton Mayor John Smith will emcee the evening’s presentations. “I am thrilled at the depth of this year’s Democratic candidates,” said Smith. “During the May

An attorney, DNA expert, and co-founder of The Innocence Project, Barry Scheck is a frequently sought after expert by many federal agencies, including the FBI. He has served as counsel in a variety of civil and criminal cases including one

primary, voters are faced with multiple Democratic candidates. Comparing candidate’s platforms, inperson, is an excellent method for making an educated decision.” The Mid-term Democratic Candidates Forum guests also will have the opportunity to mingle among the candidates and elected officials during the social portions of the evening. At that time candidates and elected officials will be available for individual questions. It is recommended for guests to arrive at Meier’s Wine Cellars by 5:45 p.m. Seating is expected to be at capacity. For further information contact Shirley A. Jason at Sajason@fuse.net.

of the first cases to bring the issue of battered women to the nation’s attention – and a noted sexual assault case, which has become a lightening rod for the issue of police brutality. Scheck, best known as the DNA expert on the defense team of the O.J.

Simpson trial, will speak at three lectures of the Montgomery Woman’s Club Town Hall Lecture Series at 11 a.m. Wednesday, April 21, and Thursday, April 22, at Montgomery Assembly of God, 7950 Pfeiffer Road; and at 8 p.m. Wednesday, April 21, at Sycamore Junior

High School, 5757 Cooper Road, Blue Ash. For indi- Scheck vidual or series ticket information, visit www.montgomerywomansclub.org or call 684-1632.

Temple hosts Interfaith Shabbat program Temple Sholom has set interfaith outreach as a major priority. As part of its inclusiveness efforts, the synagogue is striving to create an atmosphere of open discussion and mutual support for those who are living every day with issues related to families in interfaith situations and to welcome interfaith family members into its community. As part of its commitment to interfaith outreach, Temple Sholom is sponsoring a series of interfaith workshops and programs. These are open to the community and are especially

cincinnati.com/community

for anyone who is part of an interfaith family where at least one member is Jewish, including partners, spouses, children or any other family member. These programs are meant to provide opportunities to discuss interfaith issues, learn about Judaism and Jewish traditions, share experiences and have some fun. The next program is an Interfaith Shabbat Program at 10 a.m. Sunday, April 25, at Temple Sholom, 3100 Longmeadow Lane, Amberley Village. This program has been designed to provide education about the Shabbat serv-

ice and Shabbat traditions for interfaith families. Call the office at 7911330 or e-mail office@templesholom.net to RSVP. “I have been working with interfaith couples for almost 30 years,” stated Rabbi Rick Shapiro, interim Rabbi of Temple Sholom, who is facilitating this program. “The Reform Jewish Movement has made outreach to interfaith families a major priority, one that I wholeheartedly endorse. We have a successful track record of helping to create an open and welcoming environment for these fami-

lies to explore and experiment with Jewish life. The members of Temple Sholom hope to accomplish the same thing here in Cincinnati.” Temple Sholom has also scheduled additional interfaith events and workshops during the rest of this year. These include an interfaith program on Israel, Sunday, May 16; an Interfaith Picnic, Sunday, July 18; and an Interfaith High Holy Days Workshop, Sunday, Aug. 29. Check the calendar at www.templesholom.net or call the office at 791-1330 for more details.

Travel & Resort TENN

E ESSE

Directory 513.768.8285 or travelads@enquirer.com

BED AND BREAKFAST

BED AND BREAKFAST

SOUTH CAROLINA

Bed & Breakfast Feature of the Week

The Doolin House Bed & Breakfast

Hilton Head Island Vacation Resort. Choose 1 or 2 bdrm condos. Oceanfront, ocean view or near ocean. Great locations & rates. www.hhi-vr.com. 877-807-3828

Somerset, Kentucky’s Premiere Inn Located Just Minutes from Lake Cumberland

FLORIDA

Beautiful Seagrove Beach Rent & Relax. Nr Destin, between famous Seaside & Rosemary Beach. Cozy Cottages to Gulf Front Condos. Web Specials. 1-800-537-5387 www.garrettbeachrentals.com

CLEARWATER - Indian Rocks Beach 2br, 2ba Gulf Front condo. Heated pool, balcony. Many up grades. 513-771-1373, 260-3208 www.go-qca.com/condo

CLEARWATER TO ST. PETE BEACHES Gulf front & bay side condos. All prices & sizes! Florida Lifestyle VAC. 1-800-487-8953. Jan. 2011, Monthly Discounts • www.ourcondo.com

DESTIN. 2 great condos , 2 br, 2 ba golf, pools, dazzling Gulf view . Check our website for availability & rates. Local owner, 513-561-4683 Visit arieldunes.us or twcondo.us

DESTIN. Local owner, 1 or 2 luxury condos. 2 BR, 2 BA overlooking gulf, sugar white beaches. Heated pool, hot tubs & more. 937-767-8449,or visit www.majesticsunindestin.com

There is a joke among friends here, “It’s a Phoenix that has risen from the ashes. ”When Charles and Allison Hahn Sobieck purchased the property at 502 North Main Street (in Somerset, Kentucky), there was a lot of work to be done, to say the least. With the vision of a B & B and a home in ruins, there were little choices. The dilapidated structure was removed, then reconstructed as it had been in the 1850’s. It’s a brand new home. A bit of an unusual concept for a bed and breakfast. “We reconstructed the home from scratch. This gave us the benefit of designing every amenity possible along the way, ”said Allison Sobieck, owner. Every room is equipped with many amenities you don’t often find in a traditional bed and breakfast, but rather a fine hotel. Every room has a full sized closet with a pair of micro-fiber robes hanging in them, 400- count Egyptian cotton sheets, cable TV with DVD players, queen sized beds, and a host of other things. For instance, 2 rooms have gas fireplaces and 3 rooms have whirlpool tubs. We even offer many add on amenities such as massage, dinner, flowers, etc…

Hilton Head Island, SC

The rooms are only half of the reason to come to The Doolin House. Owners Charles and Allison just happen to both be chefs. Some of the breakfast specialties include Caramel Banana French Toast and Southern Eggs Benedict (2 fried green tomatoes topped with 2 slices of smoked bacon, 2 eggs over easy and Hollandaise). Chuck is usually in charge of breakfast and tries to do new and different things every day. Chef Chuck pointed out, “It’s fun to experiment with breakfast. It’s the one meal that encompasses all foods. It’s perfectly acceptable to see smoked salmon or a pork cutlet at the breakfast table. ”For those in no rush to rise and shine, breakfast in bed is served at no additional charge. When you need a weekend get away that’s not too far from home or you are planning your summer vacation to beautiful Lake Cumberland, remember that The Doolin House Bed and Breakfast is only a phone call away.

FLORIDA

FLORIDA

DESTIN. Luxury 2 BR, 2 BA oceanfront condos. Heated pool, spas, kids pool & tennis. Sleeps 6. Local owner. www.us-foam.com/destin. D 513-528-9800, E 513-752-1735

PANAMA CITY BEACH The Summerhouse 2B/2B Family Condos. Beach side pools, tennis, WiFi & More. r 800/354-1122 THE BEST BEACH VACATION VALUE! www.SummerhousePC.com

NEW YORK

ORLANDO. Nr Disney. 4br 3ba townhouse in gated resort. Sleeps 10. Available year round. From $80/night + tax. Locally owned. 859-609-0712 www.orlandoguesthouse.com

Our beach is free. Specials available for golf, tennis, dining, more. Visit our

site or call toll free: 800-845-0077.

HILTON HEAD Sea Pines Upgraded & very nicely appointed 3 BR, 3½ BA townhome on golf course & near beach. Reduced rates. Rented only by the owners. 513-874-5927 N. MYRTLE BEACH Coastal Condos, Inc. 1-4 bdrm oceanfront & ocean view units. Call 1-800-951-4880 or visit www.coastalcondos.com

MANHATTAN--NYC HOTEL $129/2 persons. Singles $124. Suites $139-$159. Lincoln Ctr area, Hudson River views, 18 flrs, kitchenette, 5 mins to midtown, safe, quiet, luxury area. RIVERSIDE TOWER, Riverside & 80th St. Call 1-800-724-3136 or visit: www.riversidetowerhotel.com

PROVIDED

Kroger makes donation

As a result of St. Vincent de Paul’s 2009 Food From The Heart Campaign, an annual event in partnership with The Kroger Co. and the local community, more than $27,000 and 77,525 pounds of food were collected at Greater Cincinnati Kroger stores. The collected nonperishable food items and monetary collection will help St. Vincent de Paul provide food to families in need in our local neighborhoods. From left, Geoff Covert, president of Kroger’s Cincinnati/Dayton KMA and a resident of Montgomery, presents a check to Liz Carter, executive director of The Society of St. Vincent de Paul, resident of Mount Washington.

NEWSMAKERS

For more information, Visit the website at: www.doolinhouse.com or call 606-678-9494

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EAST COAST, NEW SMYRNA BEACH Luxurious oceanfront condos & vacation homes. Closest & best beach to Disney. Ocean Properties Vacation Rentals 800-728-0513 www.oceanprops.com

Visit www.hhisland.info and plan a getaway with Seashore Vacations.

NORTH MYRTLE BEACH. Oceanfront condos. 1, 2 & 3 bedroom units with pools, spas & tennis. Hi-speed Internet, kiddie waterslide. 800-345-5617 www.oceancreek.net SEABROOK EXCLUSIVES Villas & Private Homes. Ocean, golf, tennis, equestrian. Pet friendly rentals. Free brochure. Book online! 888-718-7949. www.seabrookexclusives.com

TENNESSEE 1-7 Affordable, Deluxe Chalets & Cabin Rentals. Pigeon Forge in the Smokies. Vacation/Dollywood Specials. Free brochure. Call 1-800-833-9987. www.firesidechalets.com

NORTH CAROLINA

A Beautiful Cabin Getaway Gatlinburg/Pigeon Forge. Hot tub, jacuzzi, fireplace, gas grill. $85/nt, 5 nt special $375. 800-793-8699. smokymtncrossrdrentals.com

EMERALD ISLE. Ocean Front luxury vacation homes with community pool. Call for free brochure. 1-252-354-5555 Spinnaker’s Reach Realty www.SpinnakersReach.com

GATLINBURG. Affordable rates. Fully furnished. 1-8 bdrms. Chalets, Cabins, Privacy, Views, Hot Tubs, Jacuzzis, Fireplaces. 1-800-235-2661 www.alpinechaletrentals.com

Opera appoints local board members

At its recent monthly meeting, Cincinnati Opera appointed six new members to its Board of Trustees for the 2010 fiscal year. Local new members are: Frank Caliguri of Oakley/Hyde Park is a longtime subscriber of and donor to Cincinnati Opera. The owner of Hi-Tech Printing and Graphics, Caliguri has served on numerous nonprofit boards, including the Friends of CCM, Cincinnati Ballet, and the Carnegie Visual + Performing Arts Center. He also served as an executive of the Regional Cultural Planning Committee and was elected to Leadership Cincinnati. A native of Cincinnati, Caliguri has been a sponsor and host of Cincinnati Opera’s LGBT Night since its

inception in 2007. Cynthia Goodman of Amberley Village has been a life-long fan of Cincinnati Opera. A curator, author, former museum director, and champion of new media in museum exhibits who received both her B.A. and Ph.D. in art history, Goodman has been affiliated with numerous institutions worldwide, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York) and the Centre Georges Pompidou (Paris). She also served as the interim director of the Contemporary Arts Center in Cincinnati in 2007. She is currently a member of the Amberley Village Beautification Committee and has served on the boards of WGUC and the Drake Center. For information, visit www.cincinnatiopera.org.


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