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906 UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST 18th green of the Lassing Pointe Golf Course. He donated land for the Bethel Baptist Church on Frogtown Rd. By the early 1800s, much of the land that now lies in Union was owned by the Fowler family. Fowler’s son was Benjamin Piatt Fowler, who built a Federal style stone house on his land around 1817. The Fowler house, in later years sometimes called the Smith house, has walls that are 22 inches or more thick. It was built of limestone quarried from a nearby creek. In 1863 Gen. John Hunt Morgan spent some time at the Fowler home, after escaping from the penitentiary at Columbus, Ohio, with the assistance of W. P. Corbin. Morgan spent the night at Corbin’s home, accompanied by Capt. Thomas H. Hines, during his escape through Big Bone Lick back to Confederate forces in Tennessee. It has been recorded that Union was established as early as 1833, but existing documentation shows that Union was officially incorporated as a city in 1838. One source claims that Union was incorporated in 1871 but that the charter lapsed and was reactivated around 1976. The Kentucky secretary of state has 1854 as the date of incorporation. The community may have been named Union because it was a connection point between the city of Florence and Big Bone Lick. Or perhaps the name Union was chosen because of the junction of Old Louisville Rd. with Visalia–Big Bone Rd. Various sources disagree on the origin of the name. Salt was manufactured at Big Bone Lick during the early 1800s and brought to Union for distribution to other area settlements. Union was designated as a U.S. post office in 1830, and as early as 1850, Union had one store, two churches, a doctor, and a population of 50. The local Lake atlas of 1883, which was published from actual surveys under the direction of B. N. Griffi ng, lists these business references: one attorney, a blacksmith, a magistrate, three school teachers, one painter, one dealer in general merchandise, one dealer in dry goods, groceries, and a livestock dealer. A bank was built at Union in 1905, and a large, two-story general store was located on the corner of Mount Zion Rd. and what later became U.S. 42. Across the street from the general store was a drugstore; the village blacksmith was around the corner from the bank, and nearby was a flourishing creamery. One of the oldest organizations in Union is Boone Union Lodge No. 304, which was organized on September 1, 1854. According to the lodge’s charter, the first master was W. H. Riley. However, according to the records of the lodge, William Wilkie was its first master. It is believed that Riley helped organize the lodge and served as master for a time, and Wilkie fi nished out the year. V. Dickerson was the first senior warden, while A. Stansifer served as junior warden that first year. The lodge suffered much from the effects of the Civil War, since at the time it was still trying to become established. There were three years during the war when no report was listed with the Grand Lodge and no master was elected in 1861, 1862, or 1864. In the late 1930s, the Boone Lodge consolidated with the Hamilton Lodge No. 354. The Hamilton Lodge

was struggling to survive, and its only chance was the consolidation. Active today, the Boone Lodge has a membership of around 170. One of the few arboretums in the commonwealth of Kentucky is located at Central Park in Union. The Boone Co. Arboretum has the distinction of being the nation’s first arboretum within an active recreational park setting. It is open daily from dawn to dusk year round and contains more than 2,700 trees and shrubs. One can see specialized arrangements of plant families and observe selections rarely seen by the public. To ensure that the plants thrive in even the worst of droughts, there is a 41,000-linear-foot computerized irrigation system. The arboretum encompasses 121 acres and has more than two miles of paved walking trails, winding through the various plant collections, woodland settings, and athletic fields. Three informational kiosks containing horticultural information are located at the main trail entrances. Special attractions at the arboretum include the children’s garden, a wildlife viewing area in the Native Kentucky Prairie, and a woodland walking trail. Throughout the year, various classes and programs are offered for all age groups, and many of the county extension horticulture classes are taught at the arboretum. Union is also home to Big Bone Lick State Park, a 547-acre park. During the early 1900s, Union was unable to field a slate of officers to serve as a legislative body, and the official corporation lapsed. In 1969 a group of citizens felt that the time was right to reincorporate, and the modern City of Union was born. In 2005 Union moved up from a fift h- to a fourthclass city. In 1970 the official population figure for the city was 233; a 1990 census showed a population of 1,001; and by 2000 it had increased to 2,893, making Union the second-largest incorporated city in Boone Co. The current population is predominantly between the ages of 18 and 64 and almost equally divided between male and female. An Atlas of Boone, Kenton, and Campbell Counties, Kentucky. Philadelphia: D. J. Lake, 1883. U.S. Census Bureau. “American Fact Finder. Data Set. Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF1) 100-Percent Data. Custom Table.” www.census.gov (accessed July 28, 2006). Warner, Jennifer S. Boone County: From Mastodons to the Millennium. Burlington, Ky.: Boone Co. Bicentennial Book Committee, 1998.

German Protestant immigrants to Northern Kentucky were typically Lutherans or Reformed. Th is was a consequence of some important historical events in what is present-day Germany. In 1648 the Peace of Westphalia, ending the Thirty Years War, recognized three religious groups: Roman Catholics, Lutherans (Evangelical), and Reformed (Calvinists). In 1817 the northern German kingdom of Prussia, home to many German Protestants, forced the union of the Lutheran and Reformed churches. German Protestant immigrants to Northern Kentucky were therefore accustomed to a mixture of Evangelical and Reformed traditions and often formed congregations together. This is evidenced by the history of a number of German immigrant congregations in Northern Kentucky that eventually aligned themselves with the United Church of Christ: St. John United Church of Christ in Newport, founded in 1847 as the First German Protestant Evangelical Church; St. Paul Christian Church, Fort Wright (withdrew from the UCC in 1998; now Disciples of Christ), organized in 1847 as St. Paul German Evangelical Church; St. Paul’s United Church of Christ, Alexandria, opened in 1850 as an evangelical congregation; Grace United Church of Christ, Covington, established in 1862 as the Evangelical Reformed Church of Covington, Kentucky; St. Paul United Church of Christ, Dayton, conceived in 1863 as an evangelical congregation; St. John’s Community Church, Wilder, begun in 1876 as St. John’s Evangelical Protestant Church (withdrew from the UCC in May 1975); St. John United Church of Christ, Bellevue, founded in 1887 as the St. John Evangelical Protestant Church of Bellevue; and Immanuel United Church of Christ, Bromley, established in 1894 as the German Reformed Church of Bromley, Ky. Many of these churches are still operating, as well as other United Church of Christ congregations such as St. Mark in the Latonia neighborhood of Covington, Christ Church in Fort Thomas, and St. Paul in Fort Thomas. Gunnemann, Louis H. The Shaping of the United Church of Christ: An Essay in the History of American Christianity. New York: United Church Press, 1977. United Church of Christ. www.ucc.org (accessed June 3, 2007).

Paul A. Tenkotte

Bruce Ferguson and Gail Chastang

UNITED MINISTRIES OF NORTHERN KENTUCKY. The United Ministries of Northern

UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST. The United Church of Christ is a popular Christian denomination in the urban areas of Covington and Newport, primarily owing to the large number of German immigrants who settled there. Nationwide, the United Church of Christ resulted from the 1957 merger of two denominations, the Evangelical and Reformed Church and the Congregational Christian Church. The Evangelical and Reformed Church, which was well represented in Northern Kentucky before 1957, was itself the outcome of a 1934 merger of the Reformed Church in the United States and the Evangelical Synod of North America.

Kentucky, formerly Erlanger-Elsmere United Ministries, is a nonprofit social ser vice agency staffed by nearly 70 volunteers that provides emergency aid to local residents in need. The agency currently serves up to 300 families each month. A local ministerial association opened the agency in 1983 as a food pantry, and its ser vices have expanded over time to include help with rent and utilities. During the holidays, many families count on United Ministries for Thanksgiving dinners, Christmas dinners, and Christmas gifts for children. On-site literacy and family support programs, along with GED classes and budgeting/mortgage workshops,

Chapter U of the Encyclopedia of Northern Kentucky  

The Encylopedia of Northern Kentucky in partnership with NKY.com. Edited by Paul A. Tenkotte and James C. Claypool, The University Press of...

Chapter U of the Encyclopedia of Northern Kentucky  

The Encylopedia of Northern Kentucky in partnership with NKY.com. Edited by Paul A. Tenkotte and James C. Claypool, The University Press of...