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CARROLL CO.

piers (part of the project). However, because of construction delays on the Indiana side of the river, the bridge was not completed and ready to be dedicated until December 6, 1977; but there were problems even then, as a snowstorm closed the bridge before it could be opened, so its dedication ceremony was moved to the River Queen Restaurant at the Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport. Since that time, although this bridge has been a somewhat removed and silent link, it constitutes a very important part of the interstate system in Northern Kentucky. Carroll C. Cropper, who served as Boone Co. judge from the 1940s into the 1960s, died in 1976, before the bridge named for him was completed. Cincinnati-Transit.net. “Carroll C. Cropper Bridge.” www.cincinnati-transit.net (accessed October 31, 2006). Hicks, Jack. “Name the Bridge,” KP, May 18, 1999, 8K. Reis, Jim. “Gold and Silver Anniversaries,” KP, May 24, 1993, 4K.

CARROLL CHIMES BELL TOWER. Dedicated on September 8, 1979, the Carroll Chimes Bell Tower, located in the Main Strasse village area of Covington, was erected for the cultural benefit and enjoyment of the people of the region, in honor of Governor Julian M. Carroll (1975– 1979). The large, red-brick structure was designed to be the feature attraction of the new Main Strasse area, a German-style village of shops and eateries. Near the top of the tower are 43 bells, ranging in weight from 20 to 1,000 pounds, which play a variety of short melodies that begin every 15 minutes. Another feature is a mechanical puppet show added in 1980. Based on the famous German tale “The Pied Piper of Hamelin,” this tower’s version of the story is portrayed by various mechanical figures, including the piper, the mayor, weeping women, nine children, and nine rats. In fall 1995, a lightning strike halted the piper and silenced his music for nearly two years. At a cost of just over $30,000, the Verdin Company of Cincinnati repaired the metal marionettes, which were rededicated in August 1997. In 2004 the mechanism once again stopped working because of mechanical problems. A $245,000 renovation was completed and the chimes were rededicated in September 2007. “Chiming In,” KP, May 4, 1995, 1. “Going Up,” Col. Covington’s Chronicle, June 1978, 5. “Main Strasse Pipers Still Silent,” KP, November 4, 1996, 2K. “Main Strasse Schedule of Events,” Col. Covington’s Chronicle, September 1979, 12. “The Tale of the Tower,” KP, April 10, 1997, 6K.

Robert D. Webster

CARROLL CO. Carroll Co., with an area of 130 square miles, was established in 1838 as the 87th Kentucky county; it was formed from sections of Gallatin, Trimble, and Henry counties. Christopher Gist and James McBride were the first explorers to come to this area of Kentucky. Carroll Co. is named for Charles Carroll of Maryland, the last surviving signer of the Declaration of Inde-

pendence. Carrollton, the county seat, is situated along the Ohio River at the mouth of the Kentucky River, midway between Louisville and Cincinnati. Established in 1794, the town was originally named Port William when it was part of Gallatin Co. During the days of settlement, the Kentucky and Ohio rivers were routes of commerce for this small community. Gen. Charles Scott built a fortified blockhouse in the vicinity for defense against American Indians in 1789. There have been four courthouses in the history of the area, built in 1798 and 1808 at Port William in Gallatin Co. and in 1840 and 1884 at Carrollton in Carroll Co. River trade on both the Kentucky River and the Ohio River continued to nourish the growth of Carroll Co. well into the 19th century. The Hattie Brown, the Island Queen, the Carrollton, the Kentucky, the Delta Queen, and the Belle of Louisville were among the commercial and passenger boats familiar to the citizens of Carroll Co. Ferryboats (see Ferries) included the Leon, the Mary Jo, the Ohio, and the Martha A. Graham. A pictorial exhibit of these and other riverboats and ferries can be seen, along with early pictures of Carroll Co., at the Two Rivers Restaurant in the General Butler State Resort Park. U.S. 42 in the northern part of Carroll Co. passes through Ghent and the historic portion of Carrollton, following along the Ohio River. Lock No. 1 on the Kentucky River in Carroll Co., four miles above the river’s mouth, was completed in 1844. The lock was partially destroyed and disabled by Confederate guerrillas on August 29, 1864, during the Civil War, but was repaired and continues in operation. The fertile farmland known as the Ohio River Valley has a rich agricultural history that led to the growth of Carroll Co. The quantity of tobacco produced in the county, for a time, helped to make Carroll Co. the third-largest Burley tobacco market in the world. In 1867 the Louisville, Cincinnati, and Lexington Railroad, later the short-line division of the Louisville and Nashville Railroad (L&N), was built across the southern part of the county, which included Worthville, originally known as Coonskin. The town was renamed when the railroad was built, to honor Gen. William Worth. The railroad brought prosperity to the farmers and businesses of Carroll Co. by transporting farm produce, tobacco, whiskey, and coal. The Carrollton and Worthville Railroad operated a passenger train that ran from Worthville to Carrollton; the train was known by the nicknames “Careworn and Worthless” and “See and Wonder.” The railroad currently is used for the industry it serves along the Ohio River. Located on the west side of the confluence of the Kentucky and Ohio Rivers across from Carrollton is Prestonville, once a successful shipping port, named for Col. William Preston of Revolutionary War fame. From Prestonville, flatboats and keelboats shipped merchandise up the Kentucky River. Further upriver was a site of Underground Railroad activity, the Hunter’s Bottom Locust area, a stretch of nine miles along the Ohio River.

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English, established in the 1850s six miles southwest of Carrollton, was named for Capt. James Wharton English. The L&N runs through the middle of English, serving as a shipping point in Carroll Co. and for the surrounding counties, including Trimble and Henry counties. During the early 1800s, Sanders, located in Carroll Co. 10 miles east-southeast from Carrollton, had two passenger stagecoaches that made two round trips daily, carry ing mail and freight to Ghent and, by ferry, on to Vevay, Ind. As the railroad made its way through the heart of Sanders, this community too became known as a resort town and had two thriving hotels. Originally known as McCool’s Creek, the town of Ghent was laid out by Samuel Sanders in 1816, along the Ohio River eight miles above Carrollton. Lewis Sanders of Grass Hills received fame as a shorthorn cattle entrepreneur. Ghent is also known as the location of an important meeting on November 1843 that was organized by George N. Sanders. A resolution proposing the annexation of Texas, which had become independent of Mexico, was drafted on that occasion and then mailed to prospective candidates for president of the United States, including William O. Butler, Lewis Cass, Henry Clay, James K. Polk, and Martin Van Buren. Polk was the only candidate who replied to Sanders; Polk endorsed the proposition, campaigned on this issue, and won the election. Sanders called another meeting in November 1859 to discuss state’s rights. He then went to Frankfort, where the Kentucky legislature was in session, to try to persuade the legislators that it would be in the best interest of the Commonwealth of Kentucky to unite with the South. Carroll Co. was much divided during the Civil War; a skirmish took place on the Craig farm outside of Ghent on the Ohio River, and the soldiers who died there are buried on the farm. James Tandy Ellis, poet, columnist, and Kentucky’s adjutant general (1914– 1919), was known for creating the fictional character Uncle Rambo and for his newspaper column Tang of the South. Carroll Co.’s most prominent citizen is Gen. William Orlando Butler, the namesake of General Butler State Resort Park, located just outside of Carrollton. The park features the Butler-Turpin State Historic House, which belonged to the illustrious Butler family, known for their exploits in the Revolutionary War, the War of 1812, the Mexican War, and the Civil War. The park that bears Butler’s name offers lodging, a restaurant, camping, fishing, golfing, and other recreational activities and is home to the Carrollton Veterans Memorial. The Butler Family Cemetery is also located inside the park, on the west side near the Butler-Turpin State Historic House. Near Butler Lake is Camp KYSOC, a rustic recreational setting for children and adults who have physical and developmental disabilities. A variety of traditional activities, including camping, hiking, swimming, and crafts, in addition to other programs, are offered there throughout the year. In 2000 the population of Carroll Co. was 10,155; the county’s industry base includes Arkema

Chapter C of the Encyclopedia of Northern Kentucky  

The Encylopedia of Northern Kentucky in partnership with NKY.com. Edited by Paul A. Tenkotte and James C. Claypool, The University Press of...

Chapter C of the Encyclopedia of Northern Kentucky  

The Encylopedia of Northern Kentucky in partnership with NKY.com. Edited by Paul A. Tenkotte and James C. Claypool, The University Press of...