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COMMUNITY RECORDER

Tim Cook of Tim’s Trains and Hobbies.

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Covington, Independence, Latonia, Ryland Heights, Taylor Mill E-mail: kynews@communitypress.com

W e b s i t e : N K Y. c o m

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Volume 14 Issue 32 © 2010 The Community Recorder ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

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Arlinghaus wins Republican primary Faces independent candidate in fall By Regan Coomer rcoomer@nky.com

Top of her class

Ellen Burns, a senior at Beechwood High School, recently had a secret. The student received word she won a prestigious National Merit Scholarship, but was asked not to tell anyone until officials gave the OK. Read about Burns’ accomplishment and how she was able to keep the secret. SCHOOLS, A6

Vote for Sportsman of the year

Our readers created the ballot and now it’s time to vote for the 2010 Kenton County Sportsman and Sportswoman of the Year. In just the first day of voting, readers cast more than 20,000 ballots. Let’s keep it going! Go online to www.nky.com/ preps and find the yellow and green Community Recorder Sportsman of the Year icon on the right-hand side of the page. Find your ballot by newspaper and vote as often as you like through June 10. Top vote-getter wins. On the ballot for the Sportsman of the Year: Ryan Anderson, St. Henry; Jerry Arlinghaus, Holy Cross; Anthony (A.J.) Berk, Scott; Blake Bryan, Villa Madonna; Shane Coltharp, Beechwood; Ricardo Johnson, Holmes; Matt Klein, Covington Catholic; Pierce Kohls, Calvary Christian; Jibril-Iman McCaster, Lloyd; Dylan McGuire, Lloyd; Joshua Raleigh, Dixie Heights; Jimmy Roebker, Covington Catholic; Miles Simpson, Simon Kenton; Wes Smith, Dixie Heights; Zack Sowder, Scott; Jacob Wells, Holmes; Ryan Wilson, Dixie Heights Sportswoman of the Year candidates are: Krissie Brandenburg, Beechwood; Abby Felthaus, St. Henry; Ali Ponzer, Simon Kenton; Kim Schroer, Villa Madonna; Courtney Turner, Ludlow; Ellen Williamson, Notre Dame Academy; Samantha Victor, Calvary Christian.

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The hard fought race for the Republican judge-executive candidate has narrowed down to one. Republican Steve Arlinghaus will face Independent candidate Alyssa Dara McDowell for the office of judge-executive this November in the general election. Arlinghaus won with 48 percent of almost 6,000 votes. His nearest opponent, Scott Kimmich, garnered 40.9 percent of the vote. Opponent Dan Moening ended the night with 11 percent of voters. Arlinghaus, a Villa Hills resident, celebrated his win at home with friends and family the night of the primary on Tuesday, May 18. “I think it’s a great opportunity and a new day for Kenton County and I Kimmich really really plan on doing a very good job representing the people of Kenton County,” he said. If Arlinghaus prevails in the general election Moening this fall, replacing now JudgeExecutive Ralph Drees who did not seek re-election, he plans to focus on consolidating 911 dispatch services in addition to improving county relations with city officials. “I will do all I can to restore working relationships between the city and county. Those things are vital to all of us,” he said. The former county commis-

“He had the Republican machine behind him and all the money behind him. Arlinghaus But we had the family roots tied to Kenton County that made a big difference.”

Steve Arlinghaus Kenton County Judge-Executive candidate

sioner who was elected to that office in 1993 credited his friends and family for his win over his opponents. “He outspent us three or four to one,” Arlinghaus said of Kimmich. “He had the Republican machine behind him and all the money behind him. But we had the family roots tied to Kenton County that made a big difference.” Kimmich said he was “disappointed” at his loss. “I had a plan I was convinced would move Kenton County forward in a very positive and fiscally responsible manner. I wish I would have had the opportunity to implement that plan,” he said. The former deputy judge-executive was unsure about what his next step will be. “I want to take a few days off and catch my breath. Politics are in my blood. You never know what the next race might be,” he said. As for Moening, the Independence resident said if he couldn’t win, at least his choice did: “If it wasn’t me that won, I’m glad Mr. Arlinghaus won,” he said.

REGAN COOMER/STAFF

Kenton County Judge-executive Ralph Drees cast his vote on the new E-SCAN machine at the Crescent Springs/ Villa Hills Fire Department firehouse May 18. The winner of the Republican primary could fill Drees’ seat this January.

Draud takes commissioner primary

Will face Elfers in November election By Jason Brubaker jbrubaker@nky.com

After winning the Republican primary election, former education commissioner and state representative Jon Draud will face Democrat Tom Elfers in the fall for a seat on the Kenton County Fiscal Court. Draud, an Edgewood resident, defeated first-term incumbent Sara Reeder Voelker and challenger Pat Von Lehman Dressman in the

Draud Dressman May 18 primary for the 2nd District seat, receiving 44 percent of the total vote. “I’m very proud to be the Republican nomination, and I’m looking forward to a tough campaign in the fall,” he said. “I felt confident throughout this campaign, and I’m very pleased with how things turned out.” Draud said he expects many of the same issues that surfaced dur-

ing the primary to still be around during the general election, including a potential smoking ban, economic development, and more Reeder Voelker collaboration between the cities and the county. “One of the biggest things I hear when I talk to mayors is that there’s not enough cooperation, and that’s something that needs to be addressed,” he said. “ That will definitely be one of my highest priorities.” Dressman, who previously worked as the director of Campbell County human services, said she felt good about her campaign,

despite not winning the seat. She also congratulated both Draud and Voelker for running clean races. “There was no slander or any of that kind of thing in this race, and I’m very proud to be able to say that,” she said. “I think we ran a good campaign, and seeing my name on the ballot really gave me a sense of pride.” As for the possibility of running again, Dressman, an Independence resident, left it open. “You never know what could happen,” she offered. “Right now, I’m just proud of the effort we put in on this campaign, and we’ll see what happens in the future.” Voelker, who resides in Taylor Mill, could not be reached for comment immediately after the primary.

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Kenton Recorder

News

May 20, 2010

‘Lost’ finale party at Florence Hilton Community Recorder The island of mysteries is coming to a close, and fans can get together to celebrate. Cliff and Stephanie Ravenscraft, hosts of the “Lost” Podcast, are hosting the “Lost” series finale party at 5 p.m. Sunday, May 23, in the Bistro 737 restaurant at the Airport Hilton, Cincinnati Airport. The final episode will be watched on HDTV’s set up in the Hilton restaurant.

“We know that more people, especially locally, are going to sign up within the final two weeks. But there is still room for “Lost” fans,” Cliff said. Separately, a Hilton restaurant buffet dinner will be available including tax and gratuity at 6 p.m. for $40 per person. The Ravenscrafts can be heard discussing the show weekly at lostpodcast.com. For information about the event or to reserve a spot, visit gspn.tv/LostParty.

Vote in the machine

Enrolling now for July!

Johnnie Stinson of Independence scans in her vote in the new voting machine at the Independence Fire House.

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Summe wins clerk race

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Regional Motorcoach Tours Mackinac Holiday June 14-18 Put-In-Bay Sept 13-15 Bridles & Bourbon Aug 17 Greenbrier Resort & Casino Dec 6-8

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Boston & Cape Cod 4th of July July 1-8 Boston, Cape Cod, Hyannis, sightseeing, fireworks, Boston Pops and more!

Fall Mediterranean Cruise Hosted by Gary Burbank October 2-11 “Voyager of the Seas” Naples, Rome, Florence & French Riviera including Barcelona overnight.

Reds vs. Cubs at Wrigley Field July 1-3 Downtown hotel, meals & motorcoach Eastern U.S. Baseball Roadtrip July 5-10 New York City, Philadelphia & Hershey siteseeing Reds vs. National League Champion Phillies July 9-11 Weekend getaway to Philadelphia & Atlantic City

New England Fall Foliage Tour October 8-16 Enjoy beautiful autumn colors and fabulous sightseeing traveling by motorcoach, rail and boat to New York, Massachusetts, New Hampshire & Vermont

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In an upset, Republican Gabrielle Summe will take the reins as county clerk in 2011. Summe beat out four-year incumbent Rodney Eldridge with close to 56 percent of votes. With no Democrat or Independent challenger, Summe will assume office in January. The Fort Wright resident has been an assistant county attorney for nine years and been with the county attorney’s office since 1994. “I’m very excited,” she said. “I have a fabulous family. I have excellent friends. I feel like I really did the work to get the win.” Summe believes walking door to

Kenton County

door connecting with voters made the difference in the primary election. “I visited over 50,000 households and literally knocked on every door that I could. I asked for their vote, gave them the information about me so they knew what they were getting and they made their choice,” she said. Summe’s first act as clerk will be educating herself “on every aspect of the office.” “When I tell people I’m going to cross-train employees, the first person who’s going to be cross-trained is myself,” she said. While declining to elaborate on specific changes to the office before she gets to know the inner workings of the clerk’s office, Summe did say she plans to better access to county clerk services whether “that’s through

108 of 108 precincts reporting

United States Senator - R

108 of 108 Precincts Reporting Rand Paul .................... 7,959 .......60.9% C.M. “Trey” Grayson ...... 4,892 .......37.4% John Stephenson ......... 108 ............0.8% Bill Johnson ................. 41...............0.3% Jon J. Scribner .............. 39...............0.3% Gurley L. Martin ............ 35...............0.3%

Kenton County Clerk - R

108 of 108 Precincts Reporting Gabrielle Summe........... 6,955 .......56.0% Rodney Eldridge ............ 5,471 .......44.0%

Kenton County Sheriff - R

108 of 108 Precincts Reporting Chuck Korzenborn ......... 9,009 .......77.4% Marc Chapman - (Withdrawn).2,636.............. 22.6%

State Representative 69th District - R

Kenton County Jailer - R

Judge-Executive - R

Kenton County Commissioner 2nd District - R

23 of 23 Precincts Reporting Adam Koenig ................ 1,542 .......71.8% Brett Gaspard ............... 606 ..........28.2% 108 of 108 Precincts Reporting Steve Arlinghaus............ 5,967 .......48.1% Scott Kimmich............... 5,079 .......40.9% Dan Moening................. 1,359 .......11.0%

Kenton County Attorney - R

technology, extended hours or creative scheduling,” she said. In other races decided by the Republican primary, incumbents Garry Edmondson and Terry Carl prevailed respectively as county attorney and jailer. “I’m very gratified,” Edmondson said. “When you look across Northern Kentucky and the Commonwealth, incumbents did not do well. I received a solid endorsement from the voters in spite of that.” Edmondson, who has been attorney for the past 17 years, said the vote has encourage him and his office “to keep up the work and efforts, which we certainly will do.” When contacted on the night of the primary, Eldridge said he had no comment. Carl was also unavailable for comment.

108 of 108 Precincts Reporting Garry Edmondson.......... 7,010 .......57.6% Donald Nageleisen ........ 5,167 .......42.4%

108 of 108 Precincts Reporting Terry Carl....................... 6,906 .......58.7% Larry S. Shelton............. 4,855 .......41.3% 108 of 108 Precincts Reporting Jon E. Draud.................. 5,132 .......43.4% Sara Reeder Voelker ...... 3,613 .......30.6% Pat Von Lehman Dressman .3,067.......... 26.0%

Constable 2nd District - R

35 of 35 Precincts Reporting Timothy W. Saylor........... 2,809 .......62.7% Charles K. Steger........... 1,668 .......37.3%

United States Senator - D

108 of 108 Precincts Reporting Jack Conway ................. 2,926 .......43.2% Daniel Mongiardo ......... 2,627 .......38.8% Darlene F. Price ............. 674 ............9.9% Maurice M. Sweeney ..... 280 ............4.1% James Buckmaster ....... 269 ............4.0%

Covington City Commission NP - 8 advance

27 of 27 Precincts Reporting Sherry Carran................ 1,854 .......14.3% Shawn Masters.............. 1,311 .......10.1% Mildred Rains ................ 1,108 .........8.5% Ray Murphy ................... 1,049 .........8.1% Steve Frank ................... 1,002 .........7.7% Paul Wright .................... 977 ............7.5% Steve Casper ................. 919 ............7.1% Damian Sells................. 911 ............7.0% Fritz Kuhlmann .............. 895 ............6.9% Rick Trulley .................... 884 ............6.8% Tom Schadler ................ 649 ............5.0% John Prescott................. 457 ............3.5% Joe Mardis..................... 426 ............3.3% Jim Titus ........................ 399 ............3.1% Michael Wallace Connett 156 ............1.2%

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News

Kenton Recorder

May 20, 2010

A3

Bridge history focus at festival By Regan Coomer

Included in the block party portion of the festival are a petting zoo, tricycle and Segway races for adults, a moon bounce, a corn-hole tourney, face painting, dunking booth and a farmers market. While Shinkle is confident the event will be a fun time for all, she hopes visitors will take a chance to get acquainted with the suspension bridge. “The bridge is unique. It served as the prototype for the Brooklyn Bridge and was a different and new idea for bridge construction

rcoomer@nky.com

Tom Schenidau and Mike Jobert compete in the tennis doubles at Five Seasons Sports Club on May 11. The doubles were part of the 2010 Senior Games, being held in venues across Northern Kentucky all week.

Kenton library’s ‘novel’ approach nabs top spot By Regan Coomer rcoomer@nky.com

It’s one thing for the Kenton County Public Library to be No. 1 in the state once, or even twice. But three times in a row? “We are humbled, and thrilled, with this ranking,” said Dave Schroeder, executive director of the KCPL. The library was just ranked No. 1 for the third year in a row according to a national survey, the Hennen’s American Public Library Ratings (HAPLR). The HAPLR compares libraries throughout the country using their annual report data. Kenton County was top out of 114 Kentucky libraries evaluated with a score of 803, nearly 100 points higher than the second-ranking library in McCracken County. “I think it’s a real testa-

ment to the work of the staff and the board,” Schroeder said. “Everyone really does their best to serve our patrons as well as we can. I think that comes through. It’s a nice recognition of our efforts.” The HAPLR evaluates 15 factors to determine its rankings, including a library’s circulation, staffing, materials, reference service and funding levels. Schroeder said the KCPL’s focus on its collection, the quality of staff, number of visitors, technology and circulation significantly impacted the ranking. “This past fiscal year (2008-2009) was our busiest year yet. So far, the first nine months of this fiscal year are breaking last year’s records,” Schroeder said. Another factor in the rankings was the amount of residents with library cards.

Out of 156,000 residents, 128,000 of them carry a Kenton County library card, Schroeder said. But like any operation, there’s room, and determination, to improve. “We’re trying to make people more aware of the library and get more people to use the library. It belongs to everyone in Kenton County and we want to make sure we’re reaching as many people as possible,” Schroeder said. The library’s major goal for next year is the expansion and renovation of the Covington branch, which has seen a 15 percent increase in circulation just this year. “When you re-do a building on this scale, you have increased circulation and attendance and we’re looking forward to that happening in Covington,” he said.

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Celebrate one of Covington’s most recognizable landmarks at the Sixth Annual Roeblingfest from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Saturday June 12. The festival commemorates the history, design and engineering of the John A. Roebling Suspension Bridge and provides an opportunity for neighborhood fun. While the festival is dedicated to enjoyment of the historic landmark, proceeds will go toward re-lighting the bridge after the current painting project is complete. “Our purpose is to promote awareness of the bridge, but also to obtain funding to provide and maintain the beautiful necklace of lights that decorate the bridge,” said Karen Shinkle, a member of the Covington Suspension Bridge Committee, which hosts the festival each year. The festival will include tours of the bridge itself as well as the Roebling floodwall murals and the statues along Riverside Drive as well as an appearance by a John Roebling re-enactor. New to the festival this year is a partnership with the Roebling Point Business Association to make the RPBA’s annual block party a part of Roeblingfest. “We wanted to bring the residential part of our neighborhood and the business district part together,” said RPBA President Dan Cronican. “It was a natural fit for us to have our block party and the Roeblingfest together.”

at the time,” she said. “I think it’s amazing the bridge has stood as long as it has with only minor repairs.” For more information about Roeblingfest, visit roeblingbridge.org.

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A4

Kenton Recorder

News

May 20, 2010

A magic evening for SK

Students from Simon Kenton High School in Independence gathered at Receptions in Erlanger on Friday, May 14 for their senior prom. The evening included food, music, dancing, and memories.

Photos by Patricia Scheyer/ contributor

Paula Fryman, 16, and Loni Trame, 17, at the Simon Kenton High School prom held at Receptions in Erlanger on Friday, May 14.

James Collins, 19. and Gabby Decker, 16, at Simon Kenton High School’s prom at Reception in Erlanger on Friday, May 14.

Jake Krummen, 17, junior class king, and Amber Naegle, 17, junior class queen, at the Simon Kenton High School prom held at Receptions in Erlanger on Friday, May 14.

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News

May 20, 2010

Kenton Recorder

A5

Students celebrated end of testing with sock hop By Regan Coomer rcoomer@nky.com

After a hard week of core content testing, sometimes you just gotta hop around in your socks. Fort Wright Elementary threw a celebratory sock hop for students after a week of state testing: students did the chicken dance in their socks, drank blue slushies and munched on freshly-popped popcorn.

“We had an awesome test week,” said Principal Barb Juengling, who said this was the first sock hop ever. “We wanted to be sure the kids knew that we appreciate their hard work,” she explained. To encourage students leading up to testing, teachers instituted a baseball theme, with students named “all stars” for their good attendance, best efforts and preparation, Juengling said. All Stars students were given T-shirts, hats, keychains and more.

REGAN COOMER/STAFF

Fourth-grader William Jackson showed off his breakdancing skills at Fort Wright Elementary’s Sock Hop Celebration May 14. Jackson and his fellow students earned a party after a successful week of state testing.

REGAN COOMER/STAFF

Fort Wright Elementary celebrated the end of six days of state and district testing with a Sock Hop Celebration May 14. Students let off the steam of test week by dancing to "The Chicken Dance" and Miley Cyrus while slurping on slushies and munching on popcorn – all in socks. CE-0000401311

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SCHOOLS A6

Kenton Recorder

May 20, 2010

ACHIEVEMENTS

Editor Brian Mains | bmains@nky.com | 578-1062

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NEWS

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ACTIVITIES

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HONORS

N K Y. c o m

COMMUNITY RECORDER

Beechwood’s Burns wins National Merit Scholarship

By Jason Brubaker jbrubaker@nky.com

Beechwood senior Ellen Burns has proven she knows how to play the waiting game. Burns recently received word that she was selected as a National Merit Scholarship winner, a little over two months after being notified she was a finalist for her scores on the Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test (PSAT/NMSQT). Of the approximately 1.5 million students across the country who take the test, only 2,500 eventually become scholarship winners. “Once you become a finalist, there’s really nothing you can do but wait and hope for the best, so there’s definitely some anxiety” said Burns. “So when I got a letter and saw that I had been selected as a win-

ner, I was just really excited.” As a scholarship winner, Burns will receive $2,500 for each of her four years at the University of Kentucky, where she plans to study biology as she works toward attending medical school. Burns is one of only two scholarship winners in the Greater Cincinnati area, according to Principal Ginger Webb. “This is a great reflection on our school, but more importantly, on Ellen and the work she has put in,” said Webb. “She’s a great kid, and she’s going to be incredibly successful in whatever she decides to do.” In addition to earning the scholarship, Burns is also a member of the National Honor Society, the Academic Club and the French Club, as well as being on the Speech and Drama teams. She also received the Gover-

nor’s Scholar Award, and the “I Dare You” National Leadership Award this year. “She’s just a terrific student and a great role model,” said Webb. “This is certainly a big honor for her, and it’s a very prestigious scholarship, but she’s very deserving of it.” Because she was actually notified before the official announcements were released from the National Merit Scholarship Corporation, she said she had to keep it a secret for a few weeks, even from some of her classmates. “That was kind of hard, just because I was pretty excited and wanted to tell everyone,” she admitted. “But I’m just really thrilled to have been selected as a winner, and I’m looking forward to starting at UK in the fall.” For more Beechwood news, visit www.beechwood.k12.ky.us.

JASON BRUBAKER/STAFF

Beechwood senior Ellen Burns is one of only 2,500 students across the country to receive the National Merit Scholarship. She will attend the University of Kentucky in the fall.

Calvary Christian to get new head administrator By Regan Coomer

As superintendent, Ed Ryan plans to maintain Calvary’s successes, steer the school through an accreditation renewal

rcoomer@nky.com

Educator Ed Ryan will become Calvary Christian School’s first superintendent June 1. Current head of the Covington school, Administrator Don James, is leaving his position after 24 years at Calvary. James will begin at a Christian school in Florida this July. “I am excited about a new challenge and opportunity,” he said. “Change is good. It’s good for me individually and good for the school.” James said he is thankful for the dedication of teachers and staff he has hired over the past 24 years. James is also proud of graduates who go on to be successful adults and eventually bring their own children to Calvary.

REGAN COOMER/STAFF

Calvary Christian School will have a new superintendent after 24 years of service by current administrator Dr. Don James. Ed Ryan, who has been administrator of Granger Christian School in Indiana for the past five years, will take over for James June 1. “Nothing jazzes me more than seeing graduates turn around and enroll their children to receive the same education they received,” he said.

Ryan, who has spent the last five years as administrator at Granger Christian School in Indiana, feels like he is ready for his new role.

“There was really no reason to move. We were happy in the area, but we just knew God was calling us to a different place,” Ryan said. Once Ryan made his first trip to Kentucky, he said he felt immediately “connected” to the school. “We want to continue what is being down here. With every administration change, there’s always change that will occur. But change is a good thing,” he said. However, Ryan said he is opposed to change for the sake of change at Calvary. For right now, he’s watching, learning and asking questions.

“I told the staff a couple of weeks ago that I have a lot to learn, and they’re the ones I need to learn from.” As superintendent, Ryan plans to maintain Calvary’s successes, steer the school through an accreditation renewal next year and focus on bettering the schools’ athletics and arts programs. “We need to make sure every student that comes in here has the opportunity to be involved in some extracurricular activities. Those who will not play athletics need to have that fine arts opportunity,” he said. Ryan’s overarching goal as superintendent is preparing students for the “race of life.” “Once they walk across that stage they’re young adults and they have to be prepared academically, spiritually and with their character,” he said.

Miles’ first art show is success By Jason Brubaker jbrubaker@nky.com

PROVIDED

Reading together

Kenton County Board President, Karen Collins and first-grader, Maria Motz are all smiles at Kenton Elementary last week. Collins serves as Maria's One-to-One reading coach each week.

REUNION The Simon Kenton High School class of 1945 will be celebrating their 65th class reunion Wednesday, May 26 at 11:30 a.m. at Twin Oaks Golf and Plantation

Club, 450 E. 43rd St., Latonia. All graduates are welcome For more information contact Don McMillan at 859-485-4585 or 859-630-3029.

Thanks to Scott Fairchild, the hallways and classrooms of Miles Elementary were transformed into a distinguished art gallery for an evening. Fairchild, the art teacher at both Miles and Lindeman, organized an art show on May 10, showcasing student artwork. Each student contributed at least one project to the show, with some students using more than one, to create a show with more than 600 total pieces. “Mr. Fairchild definitely went all out to make this big, and he did a terrific job,” said Principal Bryant Gillis. “I think the kids really enjoyed it.” Indeed, Fairchild said he felt the kids had a good time during the planning process. He said he saved all of the students’ work throughout the year, and allowed them to select their best project or projects to display during the show. The projects on display included drawings, paintings, sculptures and collages, all done entirely by the Miles student body. The Parent Teacher Organization was also on hand, serving refreshments throughout the night. “The students are learning to be artists, and part of that is being able to judge their work,” he said. “I wanted them to really understand this whole process, and I

JASON BRUBAKER/STAFF

Miles Elementary second-graders Brinley Burris, Tommy Alexander and Paige Hoffman show off some of the artwork that was on display during the school's art show on May 10. The school displayed over 600 pieces of art for the show, with each student in the school contributing at least one project. think they did a terrific job.” To add flair to the show, Fairchild organized the art by themes throughout the building, such as having tribal music playing in the library, where paper mache masks adorned the walls. Parents were invited to read a fable written by their child before trying to select the mask that was inspired by the story. “That was something the parents really had fun with,” said Gillis. “It was just a good evening overall.” Second-grader Tommy Alexander agreed.

“It was cool to see my work on the wall and see everyone walking through and looking at it,” he said. “It was fun.” Next year, Fairchild said he plans to make the art show night even bigger, and has entertained the idea of bringing in a string quartet to play for the guests. “I think this year was definitely a success, and next year we’ll try to keep making it better,” he said. “But the biggest thing is for the kids to learn something and to be proud of themselves for their hard work.”


Schools

Kenton Recorder

May 20, 2010

A7

NKY SUMMER CAMPS M O N D A Y, M A Y 2 4

SUMMER CAMP - YMCA

R.C. Durr YMCA Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. School’s Finally Out. Daily through May 28. R.C. Durr YMCA, 5874 Veterans Way, Themed weeks. Scholarships and care available. State child care assistance accepted. Ages 5-11. $170, $125 members. Registration required. 534-5700. Burlington. R.C. Durr YMCA Preschool Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-noon Part-day. At the Beach. Daily through May 28. R.C. Durr YMCA, 5874 Veterans Way, Themed weeks. Scholarship and daycare available. State child care assistance accepted. Ages 3-5. $170, $125 members; part-day: $105, $75 members. Registration required. 534-5700. Burlington. R.C. Durr YMCA Teen Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through May 28. R.C. Durr YMCA, 5874 Veterans Way, Themed weeks. Scholarships available. State child care assistance accepted. Ages 11-15. $175, $130 members. Registration required. 5345700. Burlington. R.C. Durr YMCA Summer Camp Leadership in Training Program, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through May 28. R.C. Durr YMCA, 5874 Veterans Way, Assist staff wit activities. Participants are selected through an interview process. Ages 13-16. $60, $30 members. Registration required. 534-5700; www.myy.org. Burlington. R.C. Durr YMCA Summer Day Camp, 6:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Daily through May 28. R.C. Durr YMCA, 5874 Veterans Way, Camp Outback. Campers develop healthy spirits, minds and bodies through variety of sports and activities. Ages 3-15. $125-$175 per week. Registration required. 534-5700; www.myy.org. Burlington. T U E S D A Y, J U N E 1

SUMMER CAMP - YMCA

R.C. Durr YMCA Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Prorated super Sports Fan. Daily through June 4. R.C. Durr YMCA, $170, $125 members. Registration required. 5345700. Burlington. R.C. Durr YMCA Preschool Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-noon Part-day. Prorated Wild, Wild West. Daily through June 4. R.C. Durr YMCA, $170, $125 members; part-day: $105, $75 members. Registration required. 534-5700. Burlington. R.C. Durr YMCA Teen Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through June 4. R.C. Durr YMCA, $175, $130 members. Registration required. 534-5700. Burlington. Kenton County YMCA Traditional Day Camp, 8:45 a.m.-4 p.m. Schools Out. Daily through June 4. Kenton County YMCA, 10987 Marshall Road, Weekly-themed activities. Scholarship assistance available. Ages 5-11. $120, $100 members; registration fee: $40 family, $25 child. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County YMCA. 781-1814. Independence. Advanced Camping Experience Camp, 8:45 p.m.-4 p.m. Daily through June 4. Kenton County YMCA, 10987 Marshall Road, Learn about leadership development, cultural awareness and self-worth. Scholarship assistance available. Ages 13-16. $120, $100 members; registration fee: $40 family, $25 child. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County YMCA. 356-3178. Independence. Traditional Day Camp, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. School’s Out. Daily through June 4. Campbell County YMCA, 1437 S. Fort Thomas Ave. Swimming, environmental education, arts and crafts, service learning, science, literature, free time and more. Extended hours available. Financial assistance available. Ages 5-10. $140, $110 members. Registration required. 781-1814; www.myy.org. Fort Thomas. Campbell County YMCA Adventure Camp, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through June 4. Campbell County YMCA, 1437 S. Fort Thomas Ave. Teen Camping. Themes, activities, swimming and fun traditional day camp. Ages 11-12. $140, $110 members. Registration required. 572-3063. Fort Thomas. Campbell County YMCA A.C.E.S. Camp, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through June 4. Campbell County YMCA, 1437 S. Fort Thomas Ave. Work on learning projects in surrounding communities and participate in several team building experiences. Financial assistance

available. Ages 13-16. $140, $110 members. Registration required. 572-3063. Fort Thomas. Campbell County YMCA Pre and post Camp, 6:30 a.m.-8:45 a.m. Pre-camp care. Daily through June 4. Campbell County YMCA, 1437 S. Fort Thomas Ave. Extended care for any family available. Ages 5-16. Pre: $35, $25 members; post: $30, $20 members. Registration required. 781-1814; www.myy.org. Fort Thomas. R.C. Durr YMCA Summer Camp Leadership in Training Program, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through June 4. R.C. Durr YMCA, $60, $30 members. Registration required. 5345700; www.myy.org. Burlington. R.C. Durr YMCA Summer Day Camp, 6:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Daily through June 4. R.C. Durr YMCA, $125-$175 per week. Registration required. 534-5700; www.myy.org. Burlington. M O N D A Y, J U N E 7

SUMMER CAMP - ARTS

Newport Central Catholic Summer Drama Program, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Grades 5-8. Monday-Friday. Continues through June 24. Performances at 7:30 p.m. on June 25-26. $200. Newport Central Catholic High School, 13 Carothers Road, Black Box Theatre. Lunch, acting, dancing and music. With drama coach and assistants. Each session limited to 30 students. Registration required. 292-0001; www.ncchs.com. Newport. Camp Claymation, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through June 11. Behringer-Crawford Museum, 1600 Montague Road, Ages 8-12. Work in teams to create clay figures, make visual story boards and create story to bring clay figures to life. $230 future members, $175 members. 491-4003. Covington.

SUMMER CAMP - HORSES

Little Britain Stables Horse Camp, 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Daily through June 11. Little Britain Stables, 5309 Idlewild Road, Horse care, riding instruction, leading, lunging, ground driving, driving and riding. Ages 7-16. $300. Registration required. 586-7990; ww.LittleBritainStable.com. Burlington.

SUMMER CAMP MISCELLANEOUS

Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Summer Program, 6:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Daily through June 11. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Highland Heights, 2907 Alexandria Pike, Hands-on activities, arts and craft projects, visits from community resources, field trips and more. Additional weekly summer fees for optional activities may apply. Ages 2-10. $130-$180 depending on age of child. Registration required by June 1. 581-6166. Highland Heights. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Summer Program, 6:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Daily through June 11. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Taylor Mill, 710 Valley Square Drive, Handson activities, arts and craft projects, visits from community resources, field trips and more. Additional weekly summer fees for optional activities may apply. Ages 2-10. $130-$180 depending on age of child. Registration required by June 1. 581-6166. Taylor Mill. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Summer Program, 6:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Daily through June 11. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Florence, 2012 Terrace Court, Hands-on activities, arts and craft projects, visits from community resources, field trips and more. Additional weekly summer fees for optional activities may apply. Ages 2-10. $130-$180 depending on age of child. Registration required by June 1. 581-6166. Florence. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Summer Program, 6:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Daily through June 11. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center, 11293 Grand National Blvd. Hands-on activities, arts and craft projects, visits from community resources, field trips and more. Additional weekly summer fees for optional activities may apply. Ages 2-10. $130-$180 depending on age of child. Registration required by June 1. 581-6166. Richwood. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Summer Program, 6:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Daily through June 11. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Fort Thomas, 29 Churchhill Dr. Hands-on activities, arts and craft projects, visits from community resources, field trips and more. Additional weekly summer fees for optional

activities may apply. Ages 2-10. $130-$180 depending on age of child. Registration required by June 1. 581-6166. Fort Thomas. Skidaddles Summer Camp, 7 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Skidaddles Inc. 8660 Bankers St. Explore wonders of nature, walk on the wild side, sports week, snacks, hands-on projects and more. Ages -1-5. $170 for five days, $140 for four days, $115 for three days. Registration required. 647-7529; www.skidaddles.com. Florence.

R.C. Durr YMCA Summer Camp Leadership in Training Program, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through June 11. R.C. Durr YMCA, $60, $30 members. Registration required. 534-5700; www.myy.org. Burlington. R.C. Durr YMCA Summer Day Camp, 6:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Daily through June 11. R.C. Durr YMCA, $125-$175 per week. Registration required. 534-5700; www.myy.org. Burlington. T U E S D A Y, J U N E 8

SUMMER CAMP - NATURE SUMMER CAMP Young Stewards of the Earth, 8 a.m.-noon, MISCELLANEOUS Northern Kentucky Montessori Center, 2625 Anderson Road, Montessori-based camp. Learn to recycle, compost and reduce waste; importance of local farming and the origins of the food we eat; and importance of nutritious food and sustainable packaging. Twoweek sessions culminate with field trip including Turner Farms, the Cincinnati Zoo and Gorman Heritage Farm. Children may attend any number of weeks. Ages -3-7. $150-$180 per week. Registration required. 331-3725. Crescent Springs.

SUMMER CAMP - SPORTS

NewCath Hoops Camp, 9 a.m.-noon Girls’ Sessions. Grades 5-8. Daily through June 10. Newport Central Catholic High School, 13 Carothers Road, Emphasis on fundamentals, camp T-shirt, snack and soft drink daily, guest speakers, contests and door prizes. Family discounts available. $65 after May 15; $55 advance. Registration required by May 15. 292-0656. Newport. Big Baseball Giveback: Kenton County Summer Camp, 8:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m. Daily through June 9. Ages 6-9. Villa Madonna Academy, 2500 Amsterdam Road, Brandon Berger presents baseball fundamentals. $99. Registration required. Presented by At The Yard Baseball Training Center. 6477400. Villa Hills.

SUMMER CAMP - YMCA

R.C. Durr YMCA Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Back to the Future. Daily through June 11. R.C. Durr YMCA, $170, $125 members. Registration required. 534-5700. Burlington. R.C. Durr YMCA Preschool Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Part-day. Journey to Space. Daily through June 11. R.C. Durr YMCA, $170, $125 members; part-day: $105, $75 members. Registration required. 534-5700. Burlington. R.C. Durr YMCA Teen Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through June 11. R.C. Durr YMCA, $175, $130 members. Registration required. 534-5700. Burlington. Kenton County YMCA Traditional Day Camp, 8:45 a.m.-4 p.m. Wild Wild West. Daily through June 11. Kenton County YMCA, $120, $100 members; registration fee: $40 family, $25 child. Registration required. 781-1814. Independence. Advanced Camping Experience Camp, 8:30 p.m.-4 p.m. Daily through June 18. Kenton County YMCA, $120, $100 members; registration fee: $40 family, $25 child. Registration required. 356-3178. Independence. Traditional Day Camp, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Wild Wild West. Daily through June 11. Campbell County YMCA, $140, $110 members. Registration required. 781-1814; www.myy.org. Fort Thomas. Preschool Camp, 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Daily through June 11. Campbell County YMCA, 1437 S. Fort Thomas Ave. Scholarships and financial assistance available. Ages 3-5. $85, $65 members. Registration required. 7811814; www.myy.org. Fort Thomas. Campbell County YMCA Adventure Camp, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through June 11. Campbell County YMCA, $140, $110 members. Registration required. 572-3063. Fort Thomas. Campbell County YMCA A.C.E.S. Camp, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through June 11. Campbell County YMCA, $140, $110 members. Registration required. 572-3063. Fort Thomas. Campbell County YMCA Pre and post Camp, 6:30 a.m.-8:45 a.m. Pre-camp care. Daily through June 11. Campbell County YMCA, Pre: $35, $25 members; post: $30, $20 members. Registration required. 7811814; www.myy.org. Fort Thomas.

Skidaddles Summer Camp, 7 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Skidaddles Inc. $170 for five days, $140 for four days, $115 for three days. Registration required. 647-7529; www.skidaddles.com. Florence. W E D N E S D A Y, J U N E 9

SUMMER CAMP YMCA

Teen Adventure Trips, 8 a.m. COED Parent/Teen Team. Little Miami Bike Canoe. $395 per pair. Teens entering grades 6-9. Three days and two nights. Daily through June 11. Camp Ernst, 7615 Camp Ernst Road, Exploring Little Miami Scenic Bike Trail. Swimming, canoeing and camping. Registration required. 586-6181; www.myycamp.org. Burlington. T H U R S D A Y, J U N E 1 0

SUMMER CAMP MISCELLANEOUS

Skidaddles Summer Camp, 7 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Skidaddles Inc. $170 for five days, $140 for four days, $115 for three days. Registration required. 647-7529; www.skidaddles.com. Florence. S U N D A Y, J U N E 1 3

SUMMER CAMP - YMCA Teen Adventure Trips, 8 a.m. COED Teen Trips: Greenbrier River West Virginia Bike. Biking, whitewater rafting and mountain biking. $820; teens entering grades 8-10. Six days and five nights. Daily through June 18. Camp Ernst, Registration required. 5866181; www.myycamp.org. Burlington. M O N D A Y, J U N E 1 4

SUMMER CAMP - HORSES Little Britain Stables Horse Camp, 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Daily through June 18. Little Britain Stables, $300. Registration required. 586-7990; ww.LittleBritainStable.com. Burlington. SUMMER CAMP MISCELLANEOUS

Miss Julia’s Camp for Young Ladies, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Daily through June 18. Dinsmore Homestead, 5656 Burlington Pike, Heritage activities and etiquette for girls. Includes embroidery, dancing, tea party, etiquette lessons, and more. Snacks and water provided. Lunch not included. For Ages 11 and up. $100, $85 members. Registration required. 586-6117; www.dinsmorefarm.org. Burlington. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Summer Program, 6:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Daily through June 18. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Highland Heights, $130-$180 depending on age of child. Registration required by June 1. 581-6166. Highland Heights. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Summer Program, 6:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Daily through June 18. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Taylor Mill, $130-$180 depending on age of child. Registration required by June 1. 5816166. Taylor Mill. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Summer Program, 6:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Daily through June 18. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Florence, $130-$180 depending on age of child. Registration required by June 1. 5816166. Florence. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Summer Program, 6:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Daily through June 18. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center, $130-$180 depending on age of child. Reg-

istration required by June 1. 581-6166. Richwood. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Summer Program, 6:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Daily through June 18. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Fort Thomas, $130-$180 depending on age of child. Registration required by June 1. 581-6166. Fort Thomas. Skidaddles Summer Camp, 7 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Skidaddles Inc. $170 for five days, $140 for four days, $115 for three days. Registration required. 647-7529; www.skidaddles.com. Florence.

SUMMER CAMP - NATURE Sunrock Farm Nature Camp, 8:30 a.m.5:30 p.m. Daily through June 18. Sunrock Farm, 103 Gibson Lane, Hands-on activities with farm animals, creek exploration, woodland adventures, gardening, crafts and games. Campers bring own lunch. Ages 415. $195 per week. Registration required. 781-5502. Wilder. Young Stewards of the Earth, 8 a.m.-noon, Northern Kentucky Montessori Center, $150$180 per week. Registration required. 3313725. Crescent Springs.

SUMMER CAMP - SPORTS

NewCath Hoops Camp, 9 a.m.-noon Boys’ Sessions. Grades 5-8. Daily through June 17. Newport Central Catholic High School, $65 after May 15; $55 advance. Registration required by May 15. 292-0656. Newport. Big Baseball Giveback: Boone County Summer Camp, 8:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m. Daily through June 16. Ages 6-9. EnglandIdlewild Park, Idlewild Road, Brandon Berger presents baseball fundamentals. $99. Registration required. Presented by At The Yard Baseball Training Center. 647-7400. Burlington.

SUMMER CAMP - YMCA

R.C. Durr YMCA Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Get a Clue. Daily through June 18. R.C. Durr YMCA, $170, $125 members. Registration required. 534-5700. Burlington. R.C. Durr YMCA Preschool Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-noon Part-day. Under the Sea. Daily through June 18. R.C. Durr YMCA, $170, $125 members; part-day: $105, $75 members. Registration required. 534-5700. Burlington. R.C. Durr YMCA Teen Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through June 18. R.C. Durr YMCA, $175, $130 members. Registration required. 534-5700. Burlington. Kenton County YMCA Traditional Day Camp, 8:45 a.m.-4 p.m. Games Galore. Daily through June 18. Kenton County YMCA, $120, $100 members; registration fee: $40 family, $25 child. Registration required. 781-1814. Independence. Advanced Camping Experience Camp, 8:30 p.m.-4 p.m. Daily through June 25. Kenton County YMCA, $120, $100 members; registration fee: $40 family, $25 child. Registration required. 356-3178. Independence. Traditional Day Camp, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Games

Galore. Daily through June 18. Campbell County YMCA, $140, $110 members. Registration required. 781-1814; www.myy.org. Fort Thomas. Campbell County YMCA Adventure Camp, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through June 18. Campbell County YMCA, $140, $110 members. Registration required. 572-3063. Fort Thomas. Campbell County YMCA A.C.E.S. Camp, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through June 18. Campbell County YMCA, $140, $110 members. Registration required. 572-3063. Fort Thomas. Campbell County YMCA Pre and post Camp, 6:30 a.m.-8:45 a.m. Pre-camp care. Daily through June 18. Campbell County YMCA, Pre: $35, $25 members; post: $30, $20 members. Registration required. 7811814; www.myy.org. Fort Thomas. R.C. Durr YMCA Summer Camp Leadership in Training Program, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through June 18. R.C. Durr YMCA, $60, $30 members. Registration required. 534-5700; www.myy.org. Burlington. R.C. Durr YMCA Sports and Specialty Camps, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Terry nelson’s Basketball Camp. Art Camp: For the love Art. Daily through June 18. R.C. Durr YMCA, 5874 Veterans Way, $175, $130 members. 534-5700; www.myy.org. Burlington. R.C. Durr YMCA Summer Day Camp, 6:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Daily through June 18. R.C. Durr YMCA, $125-$175 per week. Registration required. 534-5700; www.myy.org. Burlington. T U E S D A Y, J U N E 1 5

SUMMER CAMP MISCELLANEOUS

Skidaddles Summer Camp, 7 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Skidaddles Inc. $170 for five days, $140 for four days, $115 for three days. Registration required. 647-7529; www.skidaddles.com. Florence.

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Bookmark

PROVIDED

Gateway Community and Technical College Student Grace Whitley, center, recently won a bookmark design contest sponsored by the college library. Her bookmark was judged best at interpreting the "Books Are Magic" theme for the library's observance of National Library Week in April. Whitley presented the bookmarks to (from left) Gloria Stanford, Savannah Borchers, Ricquan Jackson and Hunter McGill, students at Covington's Sixth District Elementary School. All students received a copy.

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SPORTS

A8

Kenton Recorder

BRIEFLY

This week in baseball

• Holy Cross beat Lloyd 13-3 in five innings, May 14. Holy Cross’ Andy Roenker was the winning pitcher, and was 2-4 with a double and three RBI. • Scott beat Louisville Male 1-0, May 14. Scott’s Zach Sowder was the winning pitcher, and George Sparks was 2-3 and hit two doubles. • Calvary Christian beat Villa Madonna 6-0, May 14. Calvary’s Chris Looy pitched 7 strikeouts, and John Moran was 2-4 and hit a double. • Beechwood beat Holmes 12-1, May 15. • Cooper beat Ludlow 122, May 14. Ludlow’s Chuck Penick hit a double.

This week in track

• Holy Cross boys finished fifth in the KTCCCA Area 5 All-Elite Championships, May 13. Dixie Heights finished sixth. Holmes finished ninth. Holy Cross’ Smith won the 200 meter. • Dixie Heights girls finished third in the KTCCCA Area 5 All-Elite Championships, May 13. Scott finished fifth. Holmes finished ninth. Dixie Heights’ Ochs won the 300 meter in 1:01.74; Wehage won the 800 meter in 2:33. 85; Jamison won the high jump at 5 feet; Edgett won the 300 meter hurdles in 50.15; Dixie won the 4x400 meter relay in 4:14.26, and the 4x800 meter relay in 10:37.38. Scott’s Lehkamp won the shot put at 34 feet, 1.5 inches.

This week in softball

• Holy Cross beat Campbell County 12-1 in five innings, May 10. Holy Cross’ Brooke Crail was the winning pitcher, and Kristin Stanley was 2-3 and scored a homerun. • Scott beat Mason County 6-1, May 10. Scott’s Sam Kraft was the winning pitcher, and Roma Maloney was 2-4 and hit a triple. • Simon Kenton beat Dixie Heights 15-0, May 11. Simon’s Courtney Morgan was the winning pitcher, and KristinTurner was 3-3 and had three RBI. • Highlands beat Scott 73, May 11. Scott’s Amanda Bruemmer was 2-3 with a double. • Holy Cross beat Scott 10-9, May 14. Holy Cross’ Brooke Crail was the winning pitcher, and Katelyn Stanley was 2-4 and hit a double and a triple. Scott’s Amanda Bruemmer was 2-4. • Simon Kenton beat Bell County 5-3, May 15. Simon’s Courtney Morgan was the winning pitcher, and Turner had two RBI. • St. Henry beat Ludlow 11-1 in five innings, May 15.

May 20, 2010

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | Editor Melanie Laughman | mlaughman@nky.com | 513-248-7573

RECREATIONAL

twitter.com/crkysports

COMMUNITY RECORDER

Bulldogs look for baseball improvement

By James Weber jweber@nky.com

The Holmes High School baseball team may not have a great record, but head coach Chase Runyan said the team is improving for the postseason. Holmes is 7-15 entering a key 35th District seeding game with Beechwood, tentatively scheduled for Friday, May 14. Holmes owns wins over Scott and Campbell County. “We’ve had some really tough losses,” Runyan said. “Four of our last five losses have been by one run, two of them in the bottom of the seventh. We’re better than our record reflects. We have a good group of guys.”

The Bulldogs are trying to shake off a rough decade. They have not won a game in the 35th District Tournament or played in the Ninth Region tourney since 2001. They have only won 10 games in a season once since then. Junior Jesse Jensen is one of the team’s most versatile players. He leads the team in hitting (.395) and is one of Northern Kentucky’s leaders in doubles. Pitching ace Tommy Courtney is 3-4 with a 3.53 ERA. He ranks in the top five in Northern Kentucky with 49 strikeouts. He also bats .365 with two home runs and a team-high 20 RBI. Junior Dustin Poe is

another top starting pitcher and has two wins on the season. Seniors Nick Fuller, Jacob Wells, and Tyler Gregory have been doing an excellent job of leadership this year, Runyan said. Wells is the second-leading hitter on the team at .385. Gregory bats .323 and is another key pitcher. The seeds are up in the air for the 35th District as of May 17. Whoever Holmes plays, Runyan said the Bulldogs plan to be ready. “We just have to work on defending against small ball: bunt defense, holding runners on, getting signs correct,” Runyan said. “I think we have the ability to beat anybody.”

ERNEST COLEMAN/STAFF

Tommy Courtney is the ace of the Holmes pitching staff.

Spring postseason begins this week By James Weber jweber@nky.com

The spring sports postseason begins in earnest this week with the tennis regionals. Here is a look at the schedule:

Baseball

District tournaments begin May 24. Sites are 32nd (Walton-Verona), 33rd (Boone), 34th (St. Henry), 35th (Meinken Field), 36th (Bellevue), 37th (Morscher Park). Carroll County will host the Region 8 tourney starting May 31, the Ninth will be at Champion Window Field in Florence, the 10th will be at Harrison County. The state tourney format has changed this year. The site is still Applebee’s Park

in Lexington, the home of the minor league Lexington Legends. The change is that this year all 16 regional champions will advance to play in Lexington. The tourney begins Monday, June 14, and runs all week. Firstround games are June 1415, quarterfinals June 16, semifinals June 18 and the final Saturday, June 19. Region 8 plays Region 12 at 6 p.m. Monday, June 14. Region 9 plays Region 6 at 8:30 p.m. Monday, June 14. Region 10 plays Region 13 at 8:30 p.m. Tuesday, June 15.

Softball

The 32nd District starts May 24 at Grant County. The 33rd is at Boone. The 34th is at Villa Madon-

na, the 35th at NKU, 36th also at NKU and 37th at Scott. The regional tournaments begin May 31. The state tournament remains at Jack Fisher Park in Owensboro June 11-12.

Track

The regional track and field meets will be Saturday, May 29. Class 1A, Region 4 will be at Walton-Verona. Field events start at 8 a.m. and track events at 10 a.m. Class 2A, Region 4 will be at Harrison County, beginning at 11 a.m. Class 3A, Region 5 will be at Ryle starting at 10 a.m. The state track meet will be at the University of Louisville for the third

straight year. The Class 2A meet will be Thursday, June 3, starting at 3 p.m. with the throws. Running and field events begin at 4:45 at the U of L track. 1A begins at 8 a.m. Saturday, June 5, with running and field events starting at 9:30 a.m. Class 3A starts at 3 p.m./4:30 p.m.

Tennis

The girls Ninth Region (Boone and Kenton county schools) will remain at Lloyd Memorial High School beginning May 17. The boys’ tourney remains at Boone Woods in Burlington. Region 10 (all Campbell County schools) will stay at Georgetown College.

Each region sends four singles and four doubles teams to the state tournament. The team champion gets half those slots. If one of their representatives fail to make the semifinals, they replace one of the semifinal losers, who would have an extra playoff match to award the state berth. The state tourney is May 27-29 in Lexington. On Thursday, May 27, the boys’ tourney will be the University of Kentucky, while the girls’ play at the Sayre High School athletic complex. The final two days, all action will be at UK. Next year, the state team title will be awarded in a separate tournament. The existing format will remain to crown singles and doubles champions.

Holmes names 2010 state champ as head coach By James Weber jweber@nky.com

This week in tennis

• Calvary Christian girls beat Dixie Heights 3-2, May 11. Calvary’s Liz Myers beat Shultz 6-2, 6-0; Paige Thoerner beat Starskiak 6-4, 6-4; Hackman and Allie Myers beat Stowers and Walsh 5-7, 6-1, 6-1. Dixie’s Schoutker beat Ashley Dugger 6-4, 7-6(7-4); Schuck and O’Brien beat Lauren Webster and J. Webster 64, 6-4. Calvary advances to 11-6 with the win. • Villa Madonna boys beat Simon Kenton 4-1, May 12. Simon’s Garrett Daniels beat VanMelle 6-3, 6-1. Simon falls to 7-10 with the loss. • Campbell County boys beat Scott 4-1, May 13. Scott’s Corey Thompson beat Humbert 5-7, 7-5, 6-0, May 13. • Conner girls beat Calvary Christian 5-0, May 13. Calvary falls to 11-7 with the loss.

N K Y. c o m

TONY TRIBBLE/CONTRIBUTOR

Oh what a night!

Simon Kenton’s Lindsey Bridges steals second base in front of Scott’s April Henso during a softball game at Simon Kenton High School, Monday, May 17. SK won the game 6-2 in the first night game at SK’s refurbished softball field.

The 2010 state champion coach has moved to the 2009 state champion team, and his plan is for more titles starting in 2011. Jason Booher was named as the head boys’ basketball coach at Holmes this week and met the team May 18. Booher led Shelby Valley to the Sweet 16 state title last March, upsetting Ballard in the finals. SV had also won the All “A” Classic state title in January. Shelby Valley, out of Pikeville in the mountains of eastern Kentucky, is a small “A” school. The school had this year’s Mr. Basketball in guard Elisha Justice. “We expect to win the whole thing every year,” Booher said of his new team. “That has been my goal every year, not just to get to Rupp Arena. The team that gets to Rupp from the Ninth usually has a chance to win the whole thing.” Booher replaces David Henley, who is leaving Holmes to take the same job at North Oldham. Henley led Holmes to the 2009 state title, the first by a Northern Kentucky team in 28 years. Booher, 35, a 1992 grad-

uate of North Hardin High School in Radcliff, had coached at North Hardin and Belfry before moving to Shelby Valley. He spent six years at Shelby Valley, where he directed an uptempo, full-court pressure game. SV averaged 77 points per game last year, which would have led the Ninth Region, which is known for more physical, defensive play. “I’m excited about coming here,” Booher said. “Holmes has a rich tradition. I often said the fastpaced game we’ve played and the quickness Holmes has is a good fit. It’s an exciting style of play. We’re looking to get after it defensively. We have a lot of resources here.” Holmes Athletic Director Ron Madrick said Booher’s experience is a key for the program. “His record of success as a coach and the fact he has a background that has exposed him to a lot of different socioeconomic backgrounds,” Madrick said. “He’s coached the kids in the mountains and the rural areas to the kids in the city. We feel that is an advantage. He has a lot of enthusiasm and positive energy.”


Sports & recreation

May 20, 2010

Kenton Recorder

A9

Track season nears homestretch Robin Hood (Beechwood), 400: Carly Kane (Cooper), 800: Kelsey Gregory (Cooper), 1,600: Paige Volpenheim (Boone), 3.200: Paige Volpenheim (Boone), 100 hurdles: Leighanne Schmoll (Cooper), 300 hurdles: Kasey Weinfurtner (Cooper), 4x100: Lloyd (Carly Wood, Jessica Crabtree, Jasmine Vance, Tati Jouett), 4x200: Boone (Alyssa Howard, Ashley Jutzi, Alexis Funke, Jill Moulton), 4x400: Boone (Kaitlyn Abdon, Alexis Funke, Alyssa Howard, Ashley Jutzi), 4x800: Boone (Lena Hameidan, Paige Volpenheim, Katie Holpp, Katie Persons), High jump: Robin Hood (Beechwood), Long jump: Brandy Deaton (Cooper), Triple jump: Jill Moulton (Boone), Shot put: Brianna McCarthy (Beechwood), Discus: Brianna McCarthy (Beechwood).

By James Weber jweber@nky.com

Here are results from some track and field meets last week. The Area 5 championships May 13 are in a separate story.:

Dixie Heights Invitational Girls

GREG LORING/CONTRIBUTOR

Bulldogs fall to Rebels

Holmes pitcher Melisa Marshall delivers the ball during Boone County’s 2-1 win May 15.

Team: Ryle 161, Dixie Heights 136, Simon Kenton 89, Beechwood 74.5, Villa Madonna 72, WaltonVerona 70, Scott 57.5, Newport 20. 4x800: Dixie (Wehage, Moore, Tekulve, Hutchison), 100 hurdles: McKenna Edgett (Dixie), 100: Allison Ponzer (SK), 4x200: Dixie (Turner, Walz, Ochs, Perdue), 1,600: Gabby Gonzales (Ryle), 4x100: Dixie (Edgett, Ochs, Perdue, Jamison), 400: Christina Cook (SK), 300 hurdles: McKenna Edgett (Dixie), 800: Lyndsay Wehage (Dixie), 200: Christina Cook (SK), 3,200: Gabby Gonzales (Ryle), 4x400: Dixie (Ochs, Wehage, Walz, Jamison), Shot put: Jenna Lehkamp (Scott), Discus: Brianna McCarthy (Beechwood), Long jump: Allison Ponzer (SK), Triple jump: Allison Ponzer (SK), High jump: Kelsi Pickens (VMA), Pole vault: Paige Turner (Dixie).

Boys

PROVIDED

Signing on

Simon Kenton High School senior Kathryn Smith signs a letter of intent to play volleyball for Georgetown College next season, while her parents, Sharon and Bob, support her. Smith is a 5-11 outside hitter who garnered First Team accolades from the Northern Kentucky Volleyball Coaches Association, 34th District All-Tournament Team, Ninth Region All-Tournament Team along with being named Simon Kenton’s offensive MVP from 2007-2009. She has spent this club season as a member of NKYVC.

Team: Simon Kenton 156.5, Dixie Heights 119.5, Newport 99, NewCath 96, Walton-Verona 93, Villa Madonna 55, Highlands 42. 4x800: SK (Palladino, Hutchins, Strange, Fisk), 110 hurdles: Rob Washington (Newport), 100: Branden Carter (Newport), 4x200: W-V (Arrendondo, Schmitt, Hoseus, Brockman), 1,600: Matt Reekers (Dixie), 4x100: Newport (McDay, Foster, Washington, Carter), 400: Branden Carter (Newport), 300 hurdles: Zach MacAdams (W-V), 800: Ryan Smith (Dixie), 200: Branden Carter (Newport), 3,200: Ryan Smith (Dixie), 4x400: Dixie ,Shot put: Jordon Hansel (SK), Discus: Jordon Hansel (SK), Long jump: DaMarkco Foster (Newport), Triple jump: Sage Powell (SK), High jump: Brandon Brockman (W-V), Pole vault: Sam Schaefer (NCC).

Girls

Walton-Verona

Team: 1. Brossart 77.33, Beechwood 72.33. 100: 2. Cathy Holt (VMA), 3. Courtney Ledonne (Brossart). 200: 2. Robin Hood (Beechwood), 3. Olivia Mueller (Holy Cross). 400: 1. Demi Welte (W-V), 2. Alex Keller (Beechwood). 800: 1. Lily Rodgers (Cov. Latin), 2. Olivia Mueller (HC). 1,600: 1. Lily Rodgers (C. Latin), 2. Nicole Schowalter (Dayton).

JOSEPH FUQUA II/STAFF

Holy Cross High School junior Tyler Bergman jumps in the boys’ 110 meter hurdles at the KTCCCA Area 5 track meet May 13 in Hebron. 3,200: 1. Gabrielle Bergman (HC), 2. Shannon Donnelly (Brossart). 100 hurdles: 2. Nicole Ridder (Brossart), 3. Melanie Fleissner (Brossart). 300 hurdles: 1. Brittany Bohn (Bellevue), 3. Danielle Swope (Bellevue). 4x100: 1. W-V, 2. Beechwood. 4x200: 1. Beechwood, 2. Brossart. 4x400: 1. W-V, 2. Brossart. 4x800: 2. VMA, 3. HC. High jump: 1. Kelsi Pickens (VMA), 2. Brittany Bohn (Bellevue). Long jump: 1. Shelby Mullikan (WV), 2. Hillary Miniard (Beechwood). Triple jump: 2. Mindi Reynolds (Bellevue), 3. Courtney Turner (Ludlow). Shot put: 1. Brianna McCarthy (Beechwood), 2. Felicity Britt (Brossart). Discus: 1. Brianna McCarthy (Beechwood), 2. Felicity Britt (Brossart).

Boys

Team: 1. Walton-Verona 110, 2. Holy Cross 108. 100: 1. Brayson Smith (HC), 3. Matt Stover (Brossart). 200: 1. Brayson Smith (HC), 2. Brandon Brockman (W-V). 400: 1. Ben Hoseus (W-V), 2. Jake Schubert (VMA). 800: 1. Trevin Petersen (W-V), 2. Zach Holtkamp (Brossart). 1,600: 1. Jacob McIntyre (W-V), 2. Zach Holtkamp (Brossart). 3,200: 1. Trevin Petersen (W-V), 2. Pete Miller (VMA). 110 hurdles: 1. Zach MacAdams (W-V), 2. Clay Elam (Brossart). 300 hurdles: 2. Zach MacAdams (W-V), 3. Taylor Bergman (HC). 4x100: 1. HC, 3. Brossart. 4x200: 2. HC, 3. Brossart. 4x400: 1. W-V, 2. HC. 4x800: 1. HC, 2. Brossart. High jump: 1. Brandon Brockman

BRIEFLY Martial arts tournament

Excitement builds as martial arts students of all ages prepare for the annual Maududo Federation Grand Champion Tournament. On May 22, students and instructors will gather at Campbell County Middle School to view the Opening Ceremony and Demo Team Competition. Next, participating individuals from all six Martial Arts America schools compete in any of the ten rings of activity ranging from Forms, Weapons, Board Breaking and Sparring. In addition to individual competition, the schools will compete against each other for the coveted Ultimate Grand Champion Trophy for the Teen/Adult Black Belt competitions. This is a family-friendly event. Kids under 12 can attend for free; adults can purchase tickets at the door. For Tournament tickets and information, contact any Martial Arts America studio or visit www.maududo.com.

and Marcus Lea beat Sam Benner and Eric Schadler 3-6, 6-1, 7-6 (7-1); Graham and Xavier Hassert beat Nick Kentrup and Darryl Brown 8-6. Holy Cross advances to 9-4 with the win. • Calvary Christian girls beat Newport Central Catholic 5-0, May 10. Calvary’s Liz Myers beat Strickley 6-1, 6-1; Ashley Dugger beat Grothaus 6-3, 6-2; Lauren Webster beat Lenz 6-0, 61; Hackman and Paige Thoerner beat Steffen and Pillar 6-2, 6-4; Allie Myers and J. Webster beat Youtsey and Howard 6-2, 6-0. Calvary advances to 10-6 with the win. • Holy Cross girls beat Dixie Heights 3-2, May 10. Holy Cross’ Reynolds beat Schultz 6-2, 6-2; Guenther beat Warden 1-6, 6-4; Groneck and Butts beat Elliot and

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• Beechwood beat Dixie Heights 4-1, May 10. Dixie’s Murray and Schoettker beat Tim Barry and Logan Burns 64, 6-7, 6-1. Dixie falls to 9-5 with the loss. • Holy Cross beat Simon Kenton 5-0, May 10. Holy Cross’ Tony Wiseman beat Garrett Daniels 7-5, 6-7 (5-7), 6-3; Evan Sullivan beat Tyler Smith 6-4, 6-1; Drew Schaffer beat Tyler Stephens 7-6 (7-5), 5-2, Retired; Jared Andrews

Cooper Gold Medal Meet

Team: 1. Boone 128, 2. Cooper 117. 100: Jeff Tetteh (Boone), 200: Nick Ballinger (Cooper), 400: Mason Hutchinson (Cooper), 800: Mason Replogle (Cooper), 1,600: Ryan Smith (Dixie), 3,200: Ryan Smith (Dixie), 110 hurdles: Austin Howell (Boone), 300 hurdles: Jon Suthoff (Cooper), 4x100: Dixie, 4x200: Cooper, 4x400: Cooper, 4x800: Cooper, High jump: Jon McGarr (Boone), Long jump: Jon McGarr (Boone), Triple jump: Nick Stoller (Boone), Shot put: Ryan Arey (Boone), Discus: Stephen Zumdick (Dixie).

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Schoettker 4-6, 6-4, 6-1. Dixie Heights’ Starscial beat Zarhusen 6-4, 6-4; Stowers and Walsh beat Wehrman and Kunzelman 7-5, 7-5. Holy Cross advances to 6-6 with the win; Dixie falls to 4-9. • Notre Dame girls beat Simon Kenton 4-1, May 10. Simon Kenton’s Kelsie Peckham and Katherine Hahnel beat Grace Thoeny and Jennifer Lestingi 6-0, 6-1. • Covington Catholic boys beat Dixie Heights 4-1, May 11. Dixie’s Comley and Jackson beat Pauly and Riedinger 6-4, forfeit. Dixie Heights falls to 11-5 with the loss. • Beechwood boys beat Simon Kenton 4-1, May 11. Simon’s Sam Benner and Eric Schadler beat Kyle Nienaber and Matthew Craig 7-6(7-3), 6-2. Beechwood advances to 11-7 with the win. Simon falls to 7-8.

(W-V), 6. Ryan Hill (W-V). Long jump: 2. Matt Stover (Brossart), 3. Jordan Norris (HC). Triple jump: 2. Eric Brinkman (HC), 3. Jordan Horris (HC). Shot put: 2. Andy Merritt (HC), 3. Drew Rice (Ludlow). Discus: 4. Jay Nellis (Dayton), 5. Drew Rice (Ludlow).

Boys

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VIEWPOINTS

A10

Kenton Recorder

May 20, 2010

EDITORIALS

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LETTERS

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COLUMNS

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COMMUNITY RECORDER

CH@TROOM

N K Y. c o m

Editor Brian Mains | bmains@nky.com | 578-1062

CHATROOM

Last week’s question:

What are your memories of your high school prom?

Job well done

“Not very pleasant. I was a skinny kid from a poor family in a small town, in a small parochial high school, and I wasn’t a jock, nor was I particularly good with girls. So I didn’t really plan to go to the prom. “However, the nun in charge of these things decided that she was going to assemble all the boys and girls who didn’t have prom dates in the gym, have them face each other, and pick a date. “It’s been too many years, so I can’t remember if we were just to pick the girl across from us or not, but I think that’s what it was. “My date is now a nun herself.” B.B. “I didn’t go – the whole formal dance concept just didn’t appeal to me. On the night of my senior prom I went to the movies with my boyfriend – who for the past 38 years has been my husband. “And we would still rather go to the movies than to a formal dinner or dance!” J.S.B. “I have very distinct memories of my high school prom because I took two different girls! It was a two-day event: The first day was the dance, and the next was a boat ride. Traditionally, the same girl went to both. “By the time prom came up, I had decided I wanted to date another girl I had met. I can chalk this up to high school immaturity, but I broke up with girlfriend No. 1 after taking her to the prom dance, and started dating girlfriend No. 2 by going on the boat ride the next day, never missing a beat. “I can remember how surprised and amazed all my friends were because nobody did that! “It was a terrible thing to do, but I was 17. Needless to say, I also broke up with girlfriend No. 2 and married someone totally different. “Many years later I still feel badly that I did what I did. Carol, if you’re out there, I am so sorry!” R.H. “Prom? Weird dress, painful shoes, no sleep, nice date.” L.A.D.

Next question Should a U.S. Supreme Court justice have prior judicial experience? Why or why not? Send your answer to “mshaw@nky.com” with Chatroom in the subject line.

River Ridge teacher Kevin Mayleben poses with students Jada Trenkamp (left) and Lauren Baehner after both students placed in the regional Special Olympics on April 24. Trenkamp finished second in both the 50-yard and 100-yard dash, while Baehner finished first in the 50-yard dash and second in the softball throw. JASON BRUBAKER/STAFF

Budget: Get the job done If we don’t have a state budget come July 1, Kentucky families and businesses across the commonwealth are going to suffer. As governor and elected leader of this state, I refuse to sit quietly and watch our families be deprived of the services and programs they need to survive this tumultuous economy and prepare themselves and their children for the future. That’s why I’m coming forward yet again to try to help the General Assembly resolve its differences and reach agreement on a budget that addresses a $1.5 billion shortfall while preserving as best we can our priorities. Ever since the legislative session came to a close on April 15 without a budget, I’ve been meeting privately with leadership in both the House and the Senate, urging them to reconcile the last few issues that seem to be preventing agreement. Recently they admitted they were stuck and suggested I come forward with a tangible plan that could break the impasse. So that’s what I’ve done. Let me be clear: My plan is not a new budget. We are not starting from scratch. This proposal is a reasonable compromise that represents my understanding of both the areas of general agreement between the House and the Senate and the major concerns that divide them. Those concerns, primarily, are levels of debt and funding levels for priority areas, chiefly the K-12 education programs funded by the formula known as SEEK. The proposal meets the basic needs of our people over the next two years, but it is predicated on

the understanding that the General Assembly is not willing to raise significant new recurring revenues at this time. The proposal: • Does not rely Gov. Steve on any new taxes, Beshear which neither our families nor our Community businesses could Recorder handle. guest • Cuts most agency columnist state budgets as the Senate proposed by 3.5 percent in Fiscal Year 2011 and 4.5 percent in Fiscal Year 2012, as compared to Fiscal Year 2010. But it makes much smaller cuts to priority areas such as education, health care for our most vulnerable and public safety. • Funds the House-proposed SEEK per pupil guarantee of $3,845 in Fiscal Year 2011 and $3,881 in Fiscal Year 2012. • Maintains the required classroom instructional days at 177 for both years of the biennium. Two of those days were in question. Under this proposal, the state would fund one of those days and the local school districts the other. • Limits debt by bonding for a limited number of projects to honor prior commitments, address critical needs and create jobs. The proposed $441 million in projects – including state equalization funding for 14 Category 5 school building projects – would be the lowest amount of General Fund-supported bonds in a biennial budget since 1996. • Is a biennial budget that gives agencies, schools and local gov-

ernments that rely on state funding the certainty they need to plan for those two years. • Continues efforts to shrink state government through efficiencies, contract spending cuts, reduction in non-merit personnel spending and other strategies. • Addresses the state’s skyrocketing Medicaid costs while including the significant cost containment measures in my original budget proposal. • Reduces our structural imbalance by about $400 million. • And carries forward $279 million from Fiscal Year 2011 to Fiscal Year 2012 to mitigate deeper cuts. Do I like this budget? No, I don’t. The budget I proposed last January was far better for the citizens of the Commonwealth because it used video lottery terminals at our racetracks to create significant new recurring revenues to better fund our priorities. Any budget that emerges from this process will be disappointing and difficult because of the $1.5 billion shortfall we must address … but an austere budget is better than no budget at all. And this proposal is a reasonable compromise on the remaining issues dividing the House and the Senate. I will be calling the General Assembly into special session on May 24 to pass a budget. The call will include the Executive Branch Budget, the Transportation Cabinet Budget, the Biennial and Six-Year Road Plans, and a revenue-related bill that both the House and Senate relied upon to balance the budget. I strongly urge the House and Senate to sit down immediately

About guest columns

We welcome guest columns on all sides of an issue; however, potential columnists should reserve space in advance with Editor Michelle Shaw by calling 578-1053. Include with your column your name, address, daytime telephone number, and a two-to-three line biography outlining your expertise related to this topic. Either include a color headshot of yourself, or make arrangements when you call to have your photo taken here. We reserve the right to edit for length, accuracy and clarity. Columns may be no more than 500 words. Deadline: Noon Monday for next Thursday’s issue. E-mail: bmains@nky.com Letters, columns and articles submitted to The Community Recorder may be published or distributed in print, electronic or other forms. and reach an agreement, either using this proposal or some variation of it, and be prepared to act on it by May 24. Let me stress that we must enact a budget by June 1 so we do not miss the opportunity to capture $113 million in debt service savings from restructuring bonds and other savings. I see no reason why the Special Session should last longer than five days, the minimum amount of time to pass a piece of legislation. The consequences of inaction – for Kentucky and for Kentuckians – are unacceptable, and I am doing everything in my power to avoid that scenario. However, in the end, only the House and Senate can pass a budget under the law. It is their responsibility to get the job done, and the citizens of Kentucky will neither forgive nor forget a failure to do so. Steve Beshear is governor of Kentucky.

Mid-May’s safe to plant everything in the garden Question: I’ve decided to try growing my own tomatoes this year, and maybe some peppers, beans and pumpkins. Is it safe to go ahead and get things planted? What type of fertilizer do I need? How far apart should I space plants? Answer: Yes, it’s time now to go ahead and plant everything in your garden. Now that we are past mid-May, we shouldn’t have to worry about any more killing frosts. However, sometimes peppers and tomatoes are damaged at 36 degrees, so listen to the forecast for a few days after planting. Now that soil temperatures are in the low 60s, it’s even safe to plant sweet potatoes.

It is easier to fertilize the entire garden before tilling or starting to plant. That way, the fertilizer can be mixed into the root zone. The type and amount of fertilizer applied should be based on soil test results. Soil testing is free at your local County Extension Service office. Bring at least 2 cups of air-dried soil, and allow 10-14 days to get results. Fresh livestock manure should not be applied to the vegetable garden in the spring. When planting tomatoes, select stocky transplants about 6 to 10 inches tall. If they are not yet “hardened off,” or if the plants are spindly, plant them deep, since they will quickly form roots all

along the buried stem. Starter fertilizer should be used around transplants. Since plants should be pruned and staked, space them 24 inches apart in rows 3 feet apart. In order to prevent tomato diseases, it is important to have the plants far enough apart so they do not touch each other when they reach full size. It is also important to keep them up off the ground by caging or staking. To protect the transplants from sunburn, which could bleach the leaves to a gray color, put an upside-down milk crate over the top of each plant, with a rock on top to help provide some shading for the plant during the first week

or two of establishment in your garden. Tomato plants benefit from additional fertilizer after fruit has set. When first fruits reach golf ball size, scatter 1 tablespoons ammonium nitrate (34-0-0) in a 6- to 10-inch circle around each plant. Water thoroughly and repeat about every two weeks. Staking makes the job of caring for tomatoes easier and aids in reducing fruit rots. Drive stakes in soil about 4 to 6 inches from plant, 1 foot deep, soon after transplants are set in the garden. Use sturdy wooden stakes at least 6 feet long and 11⁄2 to 2 inches wide. Attach heavy twine at 10-inch intervals to stakes. As tomatoes grow, pull

them up alongside stakes and tie loosely. Tomatoes may also be set along a fence Mike Klahr or trellis and tied there, or they Community may be grown Recorder inside a wire guest cage. Tomatoes columnist grow under a wide range of conditions with minimum effort. They require relatively little space for large yields. Each tomato plant, if properly cared for, can be expected to yield 10 to 15 pounds of fruit. Mike Klahr is the Boone County Extension Agent for Horticulture.

A publication of

COMMUNITY RECORDER

Kenton Community Recorder Editor .Brian Mains bmains@nky.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .578-1062

s

A WORLD OF DIFFERENT VOICES

Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Friday | See page A2 for additional contact information.

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COMMUNITY RECORDER

T h u r s d a y, M a y 2 0 , 2 0 1 0

PEOPLE

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IDEAS

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RECIPES

SMALL BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT

JASON BRUBAKER/STAFF

The annual Memorial Day Parade in Park Hills rolls down South Arlington before turning onto Dixie Highway. Despite a constant drizzle, residents still lined the streets to catch the parade last year.

REGAN COOMER/STAFF

Tim’s Trains and Hobbies in Latonia opened May 6. Owner Tim Cook has been a train lover since he took over his brother’s train set at the age of 6. In addition to trains, the shop also sells model cars and rockets, how-to books, paints and train sets as well as buildings and scenery products.

New hobby shop open By Regan Coomer rcoomer@nky.com

Planes, trains and automobiles are all in a day’s work at Tim’s Trains and Hobbies. The new hobby shop, which opened May 6, is located at 3439 Decoursey Avenue in Covington’s Latonia neighborhood. Tim’s Trains and Hobbies sells a wide variety of model trains, rocket and cars as well as paints, how-to books and accessories for train model dioramas. “I’ve been into trains since I was six years old,” said Tim Cook, owner of the shop. “I found my brother’s train set in the basement and set it up. It’s all been history from there.” The shop carries HO, N

and O-scale trains for the hobbyist. If a customer can’t find something they need in the store, Cook said he will order it for them. “They don’t pay shipping and handling. They can just pick it up at the store,” he said. Cook, who has a 36-foot long model train layout in his home, said trains are popular in Greater Cincinnati. “There’s really a lot of people in the area that do it,” he said. Tim’s Trains and Hobbies is open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday through Thursday, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Friday and 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday. Call 2614920 for more information or check out Tim’s Trains and Hobbies on facebook

THINGS TO DO

Being healthy on the go

Learn how to eat healthy on the go during Boone County Public Library’s class, “Healthy Eating on the Run,” 7 p.m. Tuesday, May 25. The class will discuss grab-and-go foods, how to cook quick healthy meals and what to eat at fast-food establishments. Registration is required to attend the class. To register, visit www.bcpl.org or call 859342-2665. The class will be held at the Florence Branch Library, 7425 U.S. 42.

Cincy Blues Challenge

Mansion Hill Tavern in Newport will host the Cincy Blues Challenge 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Thursday, May 27. Bands that perform well could be invited to play at the Cincy Blues Fest, Aug. 6-7 at Sawyer Point. Tickets are $7 and $5 for members of the Cincy Blues Society. For details, visit www.cincyblues.org or call 859-5810100. Mansion Hill Tavern is at 502 Washington Ave.

Parades, ceremonies highlight local Memorial Day events

By Jason Brubaker jbrubaker@nky.com

By Regan Coomer rcoomer@nky.com

Residents looking to show their patriotic pride this Memorial Day will have plenty of opportunities. Park Hills, Edgewood, Fort Mitchell and Independence are among those cities with special events planned for the holiday weekend, as they honor the men and women who served the country. All of the events, which will be held May 31, are free to attend, and open to the public. Here’s a closer look at each of the events.

Edgewood Senior Center

A light rain concluded the ceremony last year, but Edgewood Mayor John Link is optimistic this he weather will cooperate this year. “It’s always a nice ceremony, and hopefully we won’t have to worry about the clouds moving in this year,” he said. “But we do hope everyone can come out and show their support for all of our veterans.” The ceremony will begin at 10 a.m., and will include several speakers, as well as the raising of the American flag by the Kenton County Honor Guard, and the playing of Taps by Kenton County Sheriff Chuck Korzenborn. Boy Scout Troop 779 will also be on hand, demonstrating the proper way to dispose of tattered flags. For information about the ceremony, visit www.edgewoodky.gov., or call 331-5910.

Highland Cemetery

Lt. Col. Mike Wills, a former United States Marine, will be the featured

JASON BRUBAKER/STAFF

The American flag is raised by the Kenton County Honor Guard at the Memorial Day ceremony in Edgewood last year. The ceremony will again be held at the senior center this year. speaker at the annual Memorial Day service at Highland Cemetery in Fort Mitchell, which will begin at 10 a.m. The ceremony will include music from the Beechwood High School Band. “This is such a pretty service, and we’re glad we’re able to do this for all of our soldiers,” said Becky Haake, of Highland Cemetery. Following that, there will also be a brief ceremony at the Fort Mitchell city building, where the city will unveil the 2010 Wall of Honor selections. The wall serves as a way to remember former city officials, employees and volunteers who made a lasting impact on the city through their work. That service will begin at 11 a.m. For more information, contact the city building at 331-1212.

Cooking class

The annual Memorial Day Parade in Independence is scheduled to begin at 10:30 a.m. this year, starting at Delaware Crossing and ending at the Kenton County Courthouse, with stops at the St. Cecilia and Independence cemeteries for tributes. Each tribute will include a gun salute, and Mayor Chris Moriconi will conclude the parade with some remarks about the importance of Memorial Day. The parade, which typically includes close to 120 vehicles and floats, is sponsored by the American Legion. “Every veteran, whether they were drafted or volunteered, have served their time for our freedom,” said Legion Commander Wayne Lohmoeller. “This is a way of celebrating their memory.” For more information about the parade, visit www.cityofindependence.org.

Park Hills

The Argentine Bean Bistro and Wine Bar will host a Cork and Fork cooking class Saturday, May 22, at 2 p.m. This class features cooking demonstrations with wine pairings taught by chef Arthur Leech (pictured). The cost to attend is $20 and reservations are required. To reserve a spot, call 859426-1042. The Argentine Bean is at 2875 Town Center Blvd. in Crestview Hills.

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Independence

JASON BRUBAKER/STAFF

Sara Pollitt helps her son Dylan, 2, gather candy thrown by the participants in the 2009 Park Hills Memorial Day parade.

For residents still searching for more Memorial Day activities, the annual Park Hills parade will begin at 11:30 a.m., starting at the former Covington campus of Northern Kentucky University and winding its way through the city to get to Trolley Park. The parade typically has around 100 vehicles in it, and will conclude with a special flag-raising ceremony at the park. With supporters lining the route, even braving the rain last year, parade participants have also been known to toss candy along the way. “The parade is a very festive atmosphere,” confirmed Park Hills councilman Steve Ryan. “It’s definitely a big event for us, and it raises the profile of the city.” For more information about the parade, visit www.cityofparkhills.net.

LOL is ... Local bloggers writing from your perspective on cooking, wine, romance and more! Visit: Cincinnati.Com/LOL or search: living


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Kenton Recorder

May 20, 2010

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD F R I D A Y, M A Y 2 1

ART CENTERS & ART MUSEUMS

Impressions, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, 1028 Scott Blvd. Encompasses printmaking, sculpture, urban images and photography by local and regional artists: The Print Club of Northern Kentucky University, Dennis Maker, Ki Jong Do, Christian Schmit, Mary Gaynier and local photography students. Exhibit continues through June 25. Exhibit is free. 957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

FARMERS MARKET

Boone County Farmers Market, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Boone County Farmers Market, Ky. 18 and Camp Ernst Road, From apples to zucchini, and everything in between. With perennial plants, there are annuals and hanging baskets for all occasions. Presented by Boone County Cooperative Extension Service. 586-6101. Burlington.

FOOD & DRINK

Wine Tasting, 4 p.m.-8 p.m. Guest wine blogger Mike Rosenberg from The Naked Vine takes over the tasting table. D.E.P.’s Fine Wine & Spirits Covington, 670 W. Third St. Free. 291-2550; www.depsfinewine.com. Covington. Tickets Sports Cafe Fish Fry, 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Tickets Sports Cafe, 100 W. Sixth St. All-you-can-eat fried fish, fries and coleslaw. Mixed drinks, beer and soft drinks available. No sharing and no carryout. $7.95. 431-1839; www.tickets sportscafe.com. Covington.

MUSEUMS

History Unearthed: Archaeology Speaks, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Behringer-Crawford Museum, 1600 Montague Road, Exhibit explores world of archaeology through photography, dig-site information and hands-on activities including actual staged indoor dig for all ages. Included with admission: $7, $6 ages 60 and up, $4 ages 3-17, free for members and ages 2 and under. 491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

MUSIC - ACOUSTIC

Bob Cushing, 10 p.m. Down Under Cafe, 126 Park Place, 261-9393. Riverfront.

MUSIC - BLUEGRASS

Lewis Brothers, 9 p.m. Southgate House, 24 E. Third St. Juney’s Lounge. Contemporary take on folk and bluegrass music. Ages 21 and up. Free. 431-2201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport.

MUSIC - CLASSIC ROCK

Rock Train, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Riverside Marina Bar and Grill, 145 Mary Ingles Highway (Ky. 8), Free. Presented by Riverside Marina. 4428111. Dayton, Ky.

MUSIC - CONCERTS

Easter Rising, 9 p.m. Doors open 8 p.m. Southgate House, 24 E. Third St. Parlour. Folk music. $8 ages 18-20, $5 ages 21 and up. 431-2201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport. The Flight Station CD Release, 7 p.m. Radiodown, 620 Scott Blvd. Free CD, redeem at show. $12, $10 advance. 513291-2233; www.cincyticket.com. Covington. N.A.R. — New Age Revolution, 8 p.m. With the Derived, and Ed & Pat. Hosted by World Famous DJ Brad. Doors open 7 p.m. Madison Theater, 730 Madison Ave. $10. 4912444; www.madisontheateronline.com. Covington.

MUSIC - JAZZ

New Sleepcat Band, 7:30 p.m. Dee Felice Cafe, 529 Main St. Directed by Bill Gemmer and features John Von Ohlen. 261-2365; www.deefelice.com. Covington.

MUSIC - POP

Shiny and the Spoon, 7 p.m. Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Free. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 342-2665; www.bcpl.org. Burlington.

MUSIC - R&B

Leroy Ellington and the E-Funk Band, 6 p.m.-10 p.m. Newport on the Levee, 1 Levee Way, R&B, funk and soul music from ‘70s. 291-0550. Newport.

MUSIC - ROCK

Weezy Jefferson, 10 p.m. Peecox, 635 Donaldson Highway, Formerly known as Motion Sick Love Slaves. 342-7000. Erlanger. Naked Karate Girls, 10 p.m. Jefferson Hall, 1 Levee Way, Suite 2118, 491-6200. Newport. CincyScene Band Battle, 7 p.m. With Calloused, Livid, Hydrashock, Art of Failure and others. Mad Hatter, 620 Scott St. $10. 2912233; www.cincyticket.com. Covington. The Broken Spurs, 9:30 p.m. Doors open 8:30 p.m. Southgate House, 24 E. Third St. Ballroom. With the Prohibitionists and the Best Revenge. $8 ages 18-20, $5 ages 21 and up. 431-2201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport.

MUSIC - WORLD

Alpen Echos, 9 p.m.-1:30 a.m. Hofbrauhaus, 200 E. Third St. 471-7200. Newport.

ON STAGE - THEATER

The Wedding Singer, 8 p.m. Stained Glass Theatre, 802 York St. Based on hit movie starring Adam Sandler and Drew Barrymore. $17. Presented by Footlighters Inc. Through May 22. 513-474-8711; www.footlighters.org. Newport. Spring Fling, 7:30 p.m. Shadowbox Cabaret, Newport on the Levee, Fresh sketch comedy and vibrant rock ‘n’ roll celebrate life, love and laughter. $20-$30. Through June 12. 957-7625; www.shadowboxcabaret.com. Newport. S A T U R D A Y, M A Y 2 2

ART CENTERS & ART MUSEUMS

Impressions, noon-3 p.m. Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, Exhibit is free. 9571940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

BARS/CLUBS

Team Trivia, 7 p.m.-9 p.m. Oakbrook Cafe, 6072 Limaburg Road, Free. Through Dec. 18. 282-8570. Burlington. Live Music Saturdays, 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m. The Avenue Lounge, 411 Madison Ave. 2616120. Covington.

COOKING CLASSES

Cork and Fork Cooking Class, 2 p.m. Argentine Bean Bistro and Wine Bar, 2875 Town Center Blvd. Cooking demonstrations with wine pairings. Family friendly. $20. Reservations required. 426-1042. Crestview Hills.

EXERCISE CLASSES

Zumba Class, 9 a.m.-10 a.m. Step-N-Out Studio, 721 Madison Road, Latin dance fitness party. First class free. Packages available. $10 drop-in, $5 class punch cards. 2912300. Covington.

FARMERS MARKET

Boone County Farmers Market, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Boone County Farmers Market, 5866101. Burlington.

FESTIVALS

Heaven and Hell 2010, 4 p.m.-2 a.m. Leapin Lizard Gallery, 726 Main St. Presented by Giant Robot Radio. All-day music festival with two floors of music and DJs. Ages 18 and up. $10 advance. Free drink ticket to first 100 sold with ID. 581-2728; www.heavenandhellcincy.com. Covington.

About calendar

To submit calendar items, go to “www.nky.com” and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to “life@communitypress.com” along with event information. Items are printed on a space-available basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to “www.nky.com” and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page.

FOOD & DRINK

Wine Tasting, 2 p.m.-6 p.m. French Whites ‚Äì Wines for warmer weather from Burgundy, The Loire and the South of France. D.E.P.’s Fine Wine & Spirits Covington, Free. 2912550; www.depsfinewine.com. Covington.

HISTORIC SITES

Dinsmore Homestead, 1 p.m.-5 p.m. Dinsmore Homestead, 5656 Burlington Pike, 1842 farmhouse and furnishings of the Dinsmore family. Tours begin on the hour; the last tour begins at 4 p.m. Includes gift shop. $5, $3 ages 60 and up, $2 ages 717, members and ages 6 and under free. 586-6117; www.dinsmorefarm.org. Burlington.

MUSEUMS

History Unearthed: Archaeology Speaks, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Behringer-Crawford Museum, Included with admission: $7, $6 ages 60 and up, $4 ages 3-17, free for members and ages 2 and under. 491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington. Old Time Weddings in Boone County, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Boone County Historical Society Museum, 2965 Gallatin St. Display of vintage bridal attire, decorations, photos, and memorabilia from before 1960. Includes punch and wedding cake and old time wedding music on the lawn. Wear your Sunday-GoTo-Meetin’ clothes and get your photo taken. Presented by Boone County Historical Society. 371-; www.boonecountyky.org/bchs/. Burlington.

MUSIC - ACOUSTIC

Raison D’Etre Trio Concert, noon-2 p.m. Kentucky Haus Artisan Center, 411 E. 10th St. Shaker, a cappella, traditional and swing music. Free. 261-4287; www.kentuckyhaus.com. Newport. Red Harvest Ramblers, 9 p.m. Southgate House, 24 E. Third St. Juney’s Lounge. Ages 21 and up. Free. 431-2201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport.

MUSIC - BLUES

Sonny’s Solo Blues, 9 p.m.-midnight, Claddagh Irish Pub Newport, One Levee Way, 581-8888; www.claddaghirishpubs.com. Newport.

MUSIC - CLASSIC ROCK

Solid Ground, 6 p.m.-10 p.m. Newport on the Levee, 1 Levee Way, 291-0550. Newport.

MUSIC - CONCERTS

Afroman, 8 p.m. Doors open 7 p.m. Madison Theater, 730 Madison Ave. Joseph Foreman, a rapper known for his singles “Because I Got High” and “Crazy Rap.”. $15. 491-2444; www.madisontheateronline.com. Covington.

MUSIC - ROCK

Jack Squat, 10 p.m. Peecox, 635 Donaldson Highway, 342-7000. Erlanger. 24-7, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Riverside Marina Bar and Grill, 145 Mary Ingles Highway (Ky. 8). 4428111. Dayton, Ky. Alberta Cross, 9:30 p.m. Doors open 8:30 p.m. Southgate House, 24 E. Third St. Ballroom. With 22-20’s. All ages. $10, $8 advance. 431-2201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport. The Coffee Project, 9:30 p.m. Doors open 8:30 p.m. Southgate House, 24 E. Third St. Parlour. With Greenland is Melting, Blacklist Royals and Billy Wallace & the Virginia Blues. $8 ages 18-20, $5 ages 21 and up. 4312201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport.

MUSIC - STUDENT PERFORMANCES

Campbell County High School Jazz Band, 2:30 p.m.-3:30 p.m. Newport on the Levee, 1 Levee Way, Free. Presented by Campbell County High School. 291-0550. Newport.

ON STAGE - THEATER

The Wedding Singer, 8 p.m. Stained Glass Theatre, $17. 513-474-8711; www.footlighters.org. Newport. Spring Fling, 7:30 p.m. Shadowbox Cabaret, $20-$30. 957-7625; www.shadowboxcabaret.com. Newport.

RECREATION

Omega Phi Tau Golf Outing, noon-7 p.m. Devou Park Golf Course, 1344 Audubon Road, Four-person, 18-hole scramble with shotgun start. Includes golfing, cart, door prizes, dinner and refreshments and photo of foursome. Split-the-pot. Benefits The Peggy Foster Memorial Fund. $65. Reservations required. 291-4830. Covington.

SPORTS

Equestrian Drill Team Competition, 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Alexandria Fairgrounds, 100 Fairgrounds Lane, Equestrian Drill Teams from across Midwest compete, performing intricate and daring maneuvers choreographed to music. Family friendly. Free. Presented by Northern Kentucky Horse Network. 512-5414; www.NKYHorseNetwork.com. Alexandria. S U N D A Y, M A Y 2 3

FARMERS MARKET

Boone County Farmers Market, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Boone County Farmers Market, 5866101. Burlington.

HISTORIC SITES

Dinsmore Homestead, 1 p.m.-5 p.m. Dinsmore Homestead, $5, $3 ages 60 and up, $2 ages 7-17, members and ages 6 and under free. 586-6117; www.dinsmorefarm.org. Burlington.

MUSEUMS

History Unearthed: Archaeology Speaks, 1 p.m.-5 p.m. Behringer-Crawford Museum, Included with admission: $7, $6 ages 60 and up, $4 ages 3-17, free for members and ages 2 and under. 491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

RECREATION

Texas Hold ‘Em Poker Night, 5 p.m. Shimmers, 1939 Dixie Highway, Includes prizes. Free. 426-0490. Fort Wright. Northern Kentucky Montessori Center 5K Run/Walk, 10:30 a.m.-noon, EnglandIdlewild Park, Idlewild Road, Scenic run/walk through paved, wooded nature trails. Includes T-shirt. All ages. Benefits Northern Kentucky Montessori Center. $25, $20 advance by May 19. Presented by Northern Kentucky Montessori Center. 803-9719; www.nkmc.org. Burlington. M O N D A Y, M A Y 2 4

ART CENTERS & ART MUSEUMS

Impressions, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, Exhibit is free. 9571940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

PROVIDED

James, Jaroden and Jayda Cornes enjoy the “History Unearthed: Archaeology Speaks” exhibit at the Behringer-Crawford Museum. The exhibit will continue through June 6. The museum is located at 1600 Montague Road in Covington. For more information, call 859-491-4003 visit www.bcmuseum.org. T U E S D A Y, M A Y 2 5

COMMUNITY DANCE Line Dancing, 7 p.m.-9 p.m. Lookout Heights Civic Club, 1661 Park Road, Holly and Bernie Ruschman, instructors. Beginners welcome. $6, $3 for first-timers. Presented by H & B Dance Co. 727-0904. Fort Wright. FARMERS MARKET

Boone County Farmers Market, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Boone County Farmers Market, 5866101. Burlington.

MUSEUMS

History Unearthed: Archaeology Speaks, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Behringer-Crawford Museum, Included with admission: $7, $6 ages 60 and up, $4 ages 3-17, free for members and ages 2 and under. 491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington. W E D N E S D A Y, M A Y 2 6

EXERCISE CLASSES Zumba Class, 7 p.m.-8 p.m. Step-N-Out Studio, $10 drop-in, $5 class punch cards. 291-2300. Covington. Spring Into Health: Zumba, 7 p.m. Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, With instructor from R.C. Durr YMCA. Ages 18 and up. Free. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 342-2665. Burlington. FARMERS MARKET

Boone County Farmers Market, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Boone County Farmers Market, 5866101. Burlington.

HISTORIC SITES

Dinsmore Homestead, 1 p.m.-5 p.m. Dinsmore Homestead, $5, $3 ages 60 and up, $2 ages 7-17, members and ages 6 and under free. 586-6117; www.dinsmorefarm.org. Burlington.

KARAOKE AND OPEN MUSEUMS

History Unearthed: Archaeology Speaks, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Behringer-Crawford Museum, Included with admission: $7, $6 ages 60 and up, $4 ages 3-17, free for members and ages 2 and under. 491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

MUSIC - BLUES

Ricky Nye, 7:30 p.m. Chez Nora, 530 Main St. Free. 491-8027. Covington.

Original Wed Blues Jam, 6 p.m.-1 a.m. Mahogany’s Coffee House and Bar, 3715 Winston Ave. Hosted by Dick and the Roadmasters award winning blues band. 2611029; www.mahoganyslive.com. Latonia.

NATURE

Wild Wednesday, 9:30 a.m. Middleton-Mills Park, 3415 Mills Road, Shelterhouse 2. Free, donations of nonperishable food and personal care items accepted. 525-7529; www.kentoncounty.org. Independence.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Running Word Wednesday, 7 p.m.-9 p.m. Bean Haus, 640 Main St. Share writing or monologue, or listen to readings by others. Free. 431-2326. Covington.

SENIOR CITIZENS

Senior Movie Day, 1 p.m.-3 p.m. Screening of classic film, theater style snacks and discussion. Erlanger Branch Library, 401 Kenton Lands Road, Free. 962-4002. Erlanger. T H U R S D A Y, M A Y 2 7

COMMUNITY DANCE

SwinGallery, 8 p.m.-11:30 p.m. Step-N-Out Studio, 721 Madison Road, All ages. No partner required. Free beginner East Coast Swing lesson 8-9 p.m. Dancing to music by DJ 9-11:30 p.m. Ages 18 and up. $5. Presented by SwinGallery. 513-290-9022; www.swingallery.com. Covington.

MUSIC - BLUES

Cincy Blues Challenge, 7 p.m.-10 p.m. Mansion Hill Tavern, 502 Washington Ave. Scheduled to appear: Bad Bob Logsdon and Larry Bloomfield, Bad Men On A Mission, Bob Dellaposta, Chris Yakopcic, David Sams, Eric Henry & Miss Lissa, Leo Clarke, T&T Blues Project, the Blues Guys and Wild Mountain Berries. Ages 21 and up. $7, $5 members. 581-0100; www.cincyblues.org. Newport.

MUSIC - CABARET

Don Fangman Sings Sinatra, 6:30 p.m.-9 p.m. Knotty Pine on the Bayou, 6720 Licking Pike, Songs also by Dean Martin, Michael Buble, Andrea Bocelli and Neal Diamond. Free. Reservations required. 781-2200; www.fangsingsfrank.com. Campbell County.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Spring Fling, 7:30 p.m. Shadowbox Cabaret, $20-$30. 957-7625; www.shadowboxcabaret.com. Newport.

BARS/CLUBS

Team Trivia, 7 p.m.-9 p.m. Oakbrook Cafe, 6072 Limaburg Road, Free. Through Dec. 27. 282-8570. Burlington.

EXERCISE CLASSES

Spring Into Health: Yoga, 6 p.m. Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Learn basic postures and flows. Bring yoga mat. Ages 18 and up. $25 monthly. Reservations required. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 342-2665. Burlington.

FARMERS MARKET

Boone County Farmers Market, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Boone County Farmers Market, 5866101. Burlington.

KARAOKE AND OPEN MIC

Karaoke with DJ Will Corson, 9:30 p.m.1:30 a.m. The Avenue Lounge, 411 Madison Ave. $5 wine and $10 domestic buckets. 261-6120. Covington.

MOM’S CLUBS

COURTESY TRAVEL CHANNEL

Famed Bengals linebacker Dhani Jones will be signing “Dhani Tackles The Globe: Season One” Saturday, May 22, at 1 p.m. at Joseph-Beth Booksellers, 2692 Madison Road, Norwood. He will only be signing; there will be no talk. He will only be signing copies of the “Dhani Tackles The Globe: Season One” DVD. No memorabilia. No posed photography will be allowed. Line tickets will be issued for this event. You must buy the DVD from Joseph-Beth Booksellers in order to get the line ticket. You must have the line ticket in hand to be admitted to the line. Those without line tickets will not be admitted. For more information, call 513-396-8960 or visit www.josephbeth.com.

Mothers of Preschoolers Meeting, 9:15 a.m.-11:30 a.m. First Church of Christ, 6080 Camp Ernst Road, For mothers with children from infancy through kindergarten. Family friendly. $23.95 registration per year. Reservations required. Presented by Mothers of Preschoolers (MOPS). 620-9191; www.freewebs.com/fccmops. Burlington.

MUSIC - CONCERTS

Tim Fite, 9 p.m. With the Wailing Wall. Doors open 8 p.m. Southgate House, 24 E. Third St. $10, $7 advance. 431-2201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport.

PROVIDED

The first national tour of “Legally Blonde The Musical” will run at the Aronoff Center, 650 Walnut St., downtown Cincinnati, through Sunday, May 23. It is the story of sorority girl Elle Woods, who attends Harvard Law after her boyfriend dumps her. Performances are: 8 p.m. Tuesday-Friday; 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. Saturday; 1 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. Sunday. Tickets are $22.50-$64.50. Visit www.BroadwayAcrossAmerica.com or call 800-982-2787.


Life

Kenton Recorder

May 20, 2010

B3

Envy is as common as love or anger was resentful of certain athletes and their well-developed bodies. He even rejoiced when they were injured or publicly embarrassed (schadenfreude in German, “taking pleasure in others’ misfortunes”). Usually the envied person does nothing to deserve the envy of another. He or she is not responsible for the envious person’s perceived lack of the envied quality. In fact, the envied person may possess the quality because they worked hard to achieve it. To try and understand our perplexing emotion of envy, we need to see how it stems from our human desire for fulfillment. In “Urgings Of The Heart,” authors Au and Cannon offer helpful insights: “Whenever we perceive something to be a good, we are attracted to it. We feel a desire to be close to it or possess it … Envy is intrinsically related to goodness. What we each come to value and desire as good is determined by our unique personality.

“What is desirable to one person may not be so to another. Envy enters our hearts when we despair of ever receiving the good things we desire… and our despair becomes fertile soil for envy, which flourishes whenever hope is lacking.” Looked at spiritually, envy represents a refusal to accept one’s humaness and limitations. By focusing enviously on what others have and we lack, we

betray ourselves by preferring the being of another to our own. The spiritual failure of envy lies in the fact that rejecting who we are carries with it a certain rejection of the God who created and fashions us. “In Christian tradition, Satan has been identified as the archetypal envier because he could not accept his rightful place in the order of creation,” writes Au

and Cannon. “That he was not God, creating a kingdom of his own where he could reign.” Envy must be replaced with gratitude. Father Lou Guntzelman is a Catholic priest of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati. Contact him at columns@ communitypress.com or P.O. Box 428541, Cincinnati, OH 45242.

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status that Envy is a little bacteria one does living within us. It can not have. remain small and cause Webminimal trouble or spread ster’s dicand poison the whole pertionary son. defines Envy and resentment envy as can even be a cause of t h e international or national Father Lou “painful or conflict. Poorer nations may Guntzelman r e s e n t f u l feel it toward wealthier ones, or one race or religion Perspectives awareness of an toward another. Psychoanalysts consider advantage enjoyed by envy in making their analy- another joined with a desire sis because it can be an to possess the same advanunderlying factor in rela- tage,” to which some psychologists tionship probadd, lems between Jealousy is often would “and often spouses, parents, siblings, mistaken for envy. the desire to destroy the and friends. They’re not the one perEnvy is a as difficult emosame. Jealousy is ceived possessing tion to identify mainly concerned that advanand integrate. “Envy is so about love. The tage.” What are shameful a passion that jealous person fears some examof we never dare losing someone they ples envy? acknowledge It is posit,” says La love to a rival. sible to Rochefouchurn with cauld. After decades of hearing envy when we perceive individuals’ confessions, I another as more successful, could count on one hand better-looking, more poputhe people who ever men- lar, wealthier, having a bettioned envy as a personal ter body or youthful age, having a very desirable sin of theirs. Jealousy is often mistak- spouse, an influential job, en for envy. They’re not the higher social status, or be same. Jealousy is mainly favored by a parent or boss, concerned about love. The and the beat goes on. A woman so envied her jealous person fears losing someone they love to a sister that the predominant motive in her life was not rival. Whereas envy is the pain doing what she really felt when another is per- enjoyed, but doing things to ceived as possessing some overtake her sister. A sports-minded man person, object, quality, or

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B4

Kenton Recorder

Life

May 20, 2010

This summer salad is a cornbread winner way, whether remembering a fallen veteran, family or friends. The cornbread salad recipe is one of my most requested for this holiday, so here it is, in plenty of time for you to put it on the menu.

Cornbread salad for Memorial Day

One that’s worth the calories. Don’t be put off by the long list of ingredients. It’s easy to make.

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I enjoy starting out Memorial Day with my family, going to Mass at St. Philomena church in Clermont County. It’s an outdoor mass, weather permitting. Afterwards, there’s a gun salute to the fallen veterans. We visit my parents’ graves and put vases of fresh flowers on them. The grandkids help me plant sprigs of Mom’s heirloom mint. It’s a meaningful tradition. I know many of you celebrate Memorial Day this

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1 package, 81⁄2 ounces, cornbread/muffin mix 1 can, 4 ounces, chopped green chilies, undrained or 1 to 2 jalapeños, chopped 1 teaspoon cumin 1 ⁄2 teaspoon oregano 1 cup each mayonnaise and sour cream 1 envelope ranch salad dressing mix 2 cans, 15 ounces each, Great Northern beans, drained 2 cans, 15 ounces each, whole kernel corn; drained or equivalent frozen corn, thawed 4 good-sized tomatoes, chopped 1 bell pepper, chopped 1 large bunch green onions, chopped 12 bacon strips, cooked and crumbled 3 cups shredded cheddar Prepare cornbread according to package directions but stir in chilies, cumin, oregano. Pour into sprayed 8-inch pan. Bake at 400 degrees for 20 to 25 minutes. Cool. Combine mayonnaise, sour cream and dressing mix; set aside. Crumble half the cornbread into a 13-by-9 pan. Layer with half of the rest of the ingredients and repeat layers, ending with cheese. Cover and refrigerate for two hours or more. Serves 10 to 12.

Alandra’s wasabi-mayo dip with asparagus

Alandra is my friend, Ruth Ann Parchman’s daughter-in-law. Alandra

shared this recipe in a family cookbook Ruth Ann published. Wasabi is Japanese horseradish.

2-3 pounds thin to medium asparagus, trimmed and blanched

Whisk together until sugar dissolves:

1 cup mayonnaise 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon soy sauce 11⁄2 teaspoons sugar 2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice 2 teaspoons wasabi paste Serve asparagus with dip. Also good with snap peas.

Roasted sweet rhubarb topping

I got enough rhubarb stalks from the garden to make my all-time favorite topping. Rhubarb is called “pie plant” because most folks make a rhubarb and strawberry pie with it. Rhubarb is good for our skeletal system. It contains anti-bacterial and anti-cancer properties, so it’s good to eat when in season. It’s really sour, though, so some sweetener is necessary. 1 pound rhubarb Zest and juice of an orange 1 ⁄3 to 1⁄2 generous cup sugar or equivalent Shake of cinnamon (optional but good) Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Cut rhubarb into chunks. Toss with zest, orange and sugar. Put in small baking dish, cover

with foil and roast 20 minutes. Remove foil and roast until the juices get a bit syrupy. Add cinnamon. Serve hot, warm, room temperature or chilled on scones, or as a topping for cake and ice cream. Tip from Rita: Only the stalks of rhubarb are edible, not the leaves.

Can you help?

Like Macaroni Grill’s chicken scaloppini. For Donna, a Kentucky reader. Like Manyet Bakery’s radio rolls. For Patti Dirr. “Rolled like phyllo dough wound in a coil. Sticky caramel glaze and chopped pecans with caramel icing and more pecans. It was flat, not risen.” Her husband used to drive from Crestview Hills to Newport on Saturday mornings just to buy these. Like Ruby Tuesday’s avocado ranch dressing. For Wendy McDonald, a Norwood reader. “They discontinued it and won’t share the recipe.”

Tips from readers

• Batavia reader Debbie Moffatt offers this tip for Rita’s oven-fried french fries. “We prepare them in a similar manner by parboiling the potatoes first. I want to pass on that I use my apple slicer to make the wedges and cut the ‘core’ circle in half lengthwise,” she said. • In response to Mrs. Ratterman’s request for darker sauerbraten gravy. Reader John Augustin

has a Dayton Art InstiRita tute cookHeikenfeld b o o k recipe that Rita’s kitchen uses gingersnaps for thickening and he says the gravy is dark. John has made it and declares it “delicious.” He’ll share if Mrs. Ratterman wants it. Reader Mary DeFoe suggests browning the flour in the skillet. “Takes about 20 minutes of careful watching and stirring.” Mount Lookout reader Tom Heitkamp says he tracked down a recipe from ifood.tv:

Sauerbraten gravy 1

⁄4 cup butter 1 tablespoon sugar 1 ⁄4 cup flour Approximately 1 sauerbraten marinade (left after cooking meat) 1 cup red wine In a large saucepan, heat the butter, add the sugar and enough flour to produce a thick roux. Stir constantly and let the flour darken as much as possible without burning. Slowly add the marinade, stirring. Add the wine and simmer, stirring, until the sauce has the thickness of heavy cream. Strain the mixture through a very fine sieve and keep warm. Rita Nader Heikenfeld is Macy’s certified culinary professional. Email columns@community press.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-2487130, ext. 356.

Cincinnati Rare Coin Galleries is happy to introduce our newest location and staff member. Florence Rare Coin will bring to Nothern Kentucky the same dedication to numismatic excellence our Ohio stores have for many, many years. Taylor Fraley, our newest partner, has over 20 years experience in the numismatic hobby. What began as a pastime with his Grandfather has evolved into a full-time profession today. Taylor is a graduate of the University of Cincinnati with a Bachelor’s Degree in Business Asministration, and his personal goal is to provide friendly, knowledgeable service to the Nothern Kentucky Community.

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Community RELIGION NOTES Bullittsville Christian

Bullittsville Christian Church is having a parking lot sale May 22 from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. At 2 p.m. there will be an auction. The highlight of the auction will be a white pearl 1999 Oldsmobile Aurora. Test drives are available May 21 from 12:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. For more information, contact the church by calling 859689-7215. Bullittsville Christian Church is located at 3094 Petersburg Rd. in Burlington.

Eastside Church of the Nazarene

Eastside Church of the Nazarene has recently announced its schedule. Sunday worship service will be at 10:45 a.m., Sunday school will begin at 9:45 a.m., Sunday night Bible study will take place at 6 p.m. and Friday celebrate recovery service will be at 7 p.m. For more information, contact the church by calling 859261-3845.

First Baptist

First Baptist Church of Highland Heights will host its Real Men’s Conference June 4 from 7 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. and June 5 from 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. The conference is being held to encourage men of all ages in their spiritual growth through teaching, fellowship and worship. Featured speakers and topics include “It’s Time To Step Up” by Mark Webb of FBC Highland Heights; “Winning With The Word” by Pete Coleman of I Won Today Ministries; “No More Dis-Connected” by Ronny Raines of FBC Cold Spring; and “A Call To Purity” by Bill Clark of Hickory Grove Baptist

Church. Worship leader is Chris Daniels and his band from Hickory Grove Baptist. For more information or to register for the event, call 859-441-7274 or email fbchh@fuse.net. The church is located at 2315 Alexandria Pike.

Gloria Dei Lutheran

Gloria Dei Lutheran Church in Crestview Hills will host a community blood drive May 24 from 1 p.m. to 7 p.m. The church has partnered with Hoxworth Blood Center, University of Cincinnati for the blood drive. Donors must be at least 17 years old (16 with a signed parental consent) and in good health to donate blood. They also must weigh at least 110 pounds and bring identification. It is recommended that donors eat a good meal and drink plenty of water within four hours before donating. To schedule an appointment: Sign up at the church or call 859-485-7600. Priority will be given to donors who have scheduled an appointment. Walk-in donors are welcome and will be seen as soon as possible. The Hoxworth donor bus will be parked at the church located at 2718 Dixie Hwy.

Trinity Episcopal

The choir of Trinity Episcopal Church will sing J.S. Bach’s “Cantata No. 79: God, the Lord, Is Sun and Shield” in conjuction with the service of Evensong May 23 at 7 p.m. For more information, call 859-431-1786. Trinity Episcopal Church is located at 326 Madison Avenue in Covington. Have an event at your church? Please send your information to akiefaber@nky.com.

May 20, 2010

Kenton Recorder

YMCA seeks local nominations For the 32nd year, the YMCA of Greater Cincinnati will be recognizing local professionals who are accomplished, caring and civic minded as 2010 YMCA Achievers. Honorees will be recognized at the 2010 Salute to YMCA Black & Latino Achievers Gala on November 5, 2010. Unique to this event, all honorees will also commit to a year of volunteer service toward the YMCA’s Teen Achievers college readiness program that inspires young people to pursue dreams. The YMCA Black & Latino Achievers (teen) Program has mentored over 5000 teens, awarded more than

$175,000 in scholarships, assisted with access to $3 million in college scholarships, and engaged more than 4000 adult volunteers through a network of corporate and community partners. The program includes college prep and leadership development activities focusing on study skills/time management, interviewing techniques, financial management, teambuilding, field trips, community service-learning projects, career assessment and more. It strongly incorporates the Abundant Assets – 40 critical factors for the successful growth and development of young people – and centers around

the relationships of adult professional mentors and teens. The 2010 to 2011 goal is to serve over 600 students in the Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky communities. Nomination sponsorships are being accepted through June 1, 2010. For nomination, sponsorship or gala information, the public should call Toni Miles, YMCA Black & Latino Achievers executive director, at 513-362YMCA (9622) or email her at tmiles@cincinnatiymca.org; or visit www.myy.org. The featured artist for the Gala will be world-renown Puerto Rican pianist, composer, and producer Adlan Cruz.

Kenton golf course offers up specials The Golf Courses of Kenton County, 3908 Richardson Road in Independence, extends a golf special promotion for Emergency Responders and Active Military for a limited time. The allotted time slot is Monday thru Friday between noon and 2 p.m. Starting times can be made up to ten days in advance online or by calling the golf-shop at 371-3200.

Emergency Responders should have identification available when requested. The following are the 18hole rates with golf cart for all three courses: 18-holes w/cart Pioneer$27 Willows$29 Fox Run$31 These rates are valid Monday through Friday for

Hydrant testing in Independence The Independence Fire District began biannual testing of fire hydrants within the boundaries of the fire district, beginning, Monday, May 3, and the testing will run through the next several weeks. Hydrant flow tests will be conducted Monday through Friday 8 a.m. till 4 p.m. Residents may find water to be discolored dur-

ing this time; this is due to stirring up the sediment in the water mains. The Independence Fire District apologizes for any inconvenience and recommend that if discolorization of water occurs, to run cold water for at least 15 minutes or until clear. For questions, please feel free to contact the department at 859-356-2011.

Emergency Responders making tee times between noon and 2 p.m. (excluding holidays). Promotional rates cannot be combined with any other offer, coupon, or G-Card. The Mission of The Golf Courses of Kenton County is to provide a complete golf facility with a reasonable fee, the best possible playing conditions and outstanding customer service.

To continuously improve the asset by operating within the budget and re-investing in facility improvements.

Locally grown fruits and vegetables are usually sold within 24 hours of being harvested. Produce picked and eaten at the height of ripeness has exceptional flavor and, when handled properly, is packed with nutrients.

NKY Farmers Market opens 8am-2pm May 8th and runs every Saturday until October 30th on the Sixth Street Promenade in Mainstrasse, Covington.

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B6

Kenton Recorder

Community

May 20, 2010

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WHATEVER YOUR BUSINESS OR SERVICE LIST IT IN THE NORTHERN KENTUCKY BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL SERVICE DIRECTORY! To advertise contact Brenda Krosnes at 859-578-5509, fax 859-578-5515 or bkrosnes@nky.com

Children in grades K-5 can enter the second annual Create Your Own Snappy Pizza Contest. Pick up an entry form through May 22 at any of the three locations and pick toppings. Ever dreamt of making a chocolate covered cherry pizza or one with gummy worms and hotdog chunks? Now is your chance. Be sure to turn the form by May 22. The winning creation will be served at that location's Summer Reading Club Kickoff Saturday, June 5. The winner will have a reserved table for their guests. Cheese and pepperoni pizzas will also be served at the kickoffs. Who: Everyone What: Summer Reading Club Kickoff, sponsored by Snappy Tomato Pizza When: Saturday, June 5 from 2-5 p.m. Where: Erlanger Branch Library - 401 Kenton Lands Road Kick off Summer Reading Club with pizza provided by Snappy Tomato Pizza. Enjoy a great family show with entertainer Zak Morgan at 3 p.m. Who: Everyone What: Summer Reading Club Kickoff, sponsored by Snappy Tomato Pizza When: Saturday, June 5 from 1-3 p.m. Where: Mary Ann Mongan Library -

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Boone, Campbell, Grant, and Kenton County landowners still have time to sign up for the Conservation Stewardship Program (CSP) at their local Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) office but the deadline for getting signed up for the second CSP ranking period is quickly approaching. According to NRCS District Conservationist Ed Thompson, now is the time for landowners and producers who have considered applying for CSP to get signed up and submit documentation. USDA has announced the national cutoff date for CSP is June 11, which requires landowners submit applications quickly. “If you’ve heard about the new CSP and talked with other local producers or read about others involved with it, now is the time to roll up your sleeves and get your conservation operation on the list of those recognized for a quality conservation commitment,” explains Thompson. “It’s important that you get

adopt additional practices on their operations. The program is popular for producers who go the extra mile with conservation and sustainable operations— whether they’ve accomplished goals on their own, with other conservation partners, or through USDA and NRCS programs. “CSP is the perfect program because it recognizes agricultural producers and landowners who do the right things and it moves them forward as they add new resource protection practices on their land,” Thompson adds. While CSP applications are accepted on a continuous basis, only applications received by the national cutoff date of June 11 will be considered for funding in fiscal year 2010. For more information about CSP, including eligibility requirements, visit your county USDA Service Center at 6028 Camp Ernst Road in Burlington, 859-586-7903, or 486 Helton Street in Williamstown, 859-8232291, Ed Thompson.

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502 Scott Boulevard, Covington Kickoff Summer Reading Club for children, teens and adults with pizza and The Space Painter. Everyone will enjoy the Space Painter's juggling, storytelling and comedy at 2 p.m. Who: Everyone What: Summer Reading Club Kickoff, sponsored by Snappy Tomato Pizza When: Saturday, June 5 from 2-4 p.m. Where: Durr Branch Library - 1992 Walton-Nicholson Road, Independence Kickoff Summer Reading Club with pizza provided by Snappy Tomato and a few tunes courtesy of Joel the Singing Librarian and his Library band.

The Kenton County Public Library Summer Reading Clubs have something to offer for adults, teen and children. The clubs run June 1-Aug. 31. Children should pick up a reading log at the children's desk. Adults can fill out raffle tickets at the reference desk for each book they read or program they attend. Teens can fill out raffle tickets at the reference desk for each book they read. Visit www.kentonlibrary.org/src for a full listing of programs. Visit www.kentonlibrary. org for details.

MARRIAGE LICENSES Kelly Albertson, 44, of Kentucky and Paul Armbrust, 55, of Ohio, issued May 4, 2010. Allison Jones, 26, and Douglas Gastright, 27, both of Covington, issued May 4, 2010. Rachel Nowak, 35, and Christopher Johnson, 30, both of Covington, issued May 5, 2010. Stephanie Eldon, 26, and Gregory Peterson, 27, both of Fort Wright, issued May 5, 2010. Andrea Porter, 24, and Andrew Shepherd, 22, both of Covington, issued May 6, 2010. Kellie Kitson, 25, and Tracey Slawnyk, 36, both of Covington, issued May 7, 2010. Rebekah Stroup, 27, of Kentucky and Benjamin Gullow, 29, of Indiana, issued May 7, 2010. Jeannine Hegge, 38, of Florence and Tsutomu Moguchi, 37, of Cincinnati, issued May 7, 2010. Sarah Rehamp, 26, of Covington and Jacob Nye, 28, of Cincinnati, issued May 7, 2010 Amanda Priestle, 30, and David McElroy, 34, both of Newport, issued May 7, 2010. Penny Bradfford, 53, and Kevin Hughes, 47, both of Covington, issued May 7, 2010. Ashley Dillion, 20, and Kim-Lee Graham, 21, both of Fort Mitchell, issued May 7, 2010. Joyce Lloyd, 44, and Jeffrey Lloyd, 47, both of Fort Mitchell, issued May 10, 2010. Hercillia Reyes, 29, and Erick Posadas, 23, both of Erlanger, issued May 11, 2010.

Summerfair names local exhibitors Organizers of Summerfair 2010 announced the lineup of local artists participating in the nationally recognized fine arts and crafts fair, which returns to historic Coney Island June 4-6. Forty-six artists from the Tristate were among the more than 300 selected to exhibit. Exhibitors from Northern Kentucky are: • Douglas Durkee, Burlington, 2D and 3D Mixed Media • Patrick Dougherty, Bellevue, ceramics • Janet Tobler, Covington, ceramics • Ray Bridewell, Bellevue, jewelry • Carol Freytag, Florence, jewelry • John Darlin, Walton, jewelry • Emily Howard, Covington, printmaking The selected Tristate artists were among the more than 800 artists from across the country and Canada that applied to exhibit their art at the fair in

categories like photography, painting, woodworking, ceramics, fibers, leather and jewelry. Many new artists also had the opportunity to submit their work with the launch of the new 2D/3D mixed media art category. A local jury of professional artists and art educators selected the fair’s lineup, which offers an exciting balance of new and returning artists. Sharon Strubbe, executive director for Summerfair Cincinnati – the year-round nonprofit organization that produces Summerfair – was excited to see the number of local artists who made the show. “We were very pleased to learn that so many of our local artists were selected for this year’s fair,” said Strubbe. “Cincinnati is nationally celebrated for its large, eclectic art scene, and the large number of local artists selected is a reflection

of the incredible talent we have in our area.” Summerfair 2010, which will be held 13 miles from downtown Cincinnati at historic Coney Island (just off I-275 at Kellogg Avenue), draws more than 20,000 people each year, with proceeds benefiting local visual and performing arts and arts organizations. Tickets can be purchased for $10 at the gate or in advance, online (children 12 and under are free). Advance one day or multiday tickets are available online at www.summerfair.org. Hours for the fair are 2 to 8 p.m. Friday; 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday; and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. Parking is free, courtesy of Summerfair Cincinnati. The fair will be held rain or shine. For more information, visit Summerfair online at www.summerfair.org.


Community

Kenton Recorder

May 20, 2010

B7

DEATHS Margaret Pulliam Beagle, 90, of Williamstown, formerly of Berry, died May 15, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Grant County, Williamstown. She was a homemaker and member of Colemansville Christian Church in Berry. Her husband, Hubert Earl Beagle, died in 1988; son, Thomas Glen Beagle, died in 2000; and two grandchildren died previously. Survivors include her sons, Jerry Lynn Beagle of Williamstown, Audrey Gene Beagle of Georgetown and Gary Lee Beagle of Covington; daughters, Rita Karen Beagle of Falmouth and Nita Sharon Wegford of Butler; 13 grandchildren; and 16 great-grandchildren. Burial was in Pythian Grove Cemetery, Berry.

John Collopy

John W. Collopy, 82, Edgewood, died May 12, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He was a captain and firefighter for 27 years with the city of Covington, a lieutenant at the Kenton County Jail, retired from the former Shillito's Department Store, member of St. Pius X Church in Edgewood, Independence American Legion and vice-president of the Retired Firefighters Union. Survivors include his wife, Jackie Collopy; daughters, Marianne Ruther of Brookville, Ind. and Christinia Capozza of Hebron; sons, John Collopy of Louisville and Bob Collopy of Edgewood and seven grandchildren. Burial was in Floral Hills Memorial Gardens, Taylor Mill. Memorials: American Heart Association, 5211 Madison Road,

Cincinnati, OH 45227; or St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, P.O. Box 1000, Memphis, TN 38148.

Joyce Cummins

Joyce Ann Cummins, 72, Covington, died May 13, 2010, at her home. She was a U.S. Bank personal banker. Survivors include her husband, Don Cummins; daughters, Teri Ruzinsky of Frankfurt, Germany; Cami Courtney of Covington; son, Brad Huff of Independence; sisters, Shirley Bishop of Dayton; Janell Ramsey and Vicki Rector, both of Ludlow; brother, Jim Vaughan of Covington; eight grandchildren and three great grandchildren. Burial was at Highland Cemetery, Fort Mitchell. Memorials: St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, 501 St. Jude Place, Memphis, TN 38105.

John DeFoor

John Wilburn DeFoor, 80, Covington, died May 9, 2010, at his home. He was a professor of jazz studies at Xavier University, member of St. Benedict Church in Covington and a Korean War Air Force veteran. Survivors include his wife, S. Sue Decker Brown-DeFoor; son, John Benjamin DeFoor of Lexington and four grandchildren. Connley Brothers Funeral Home, Latonia, handled the arrangements. Memorials: Xavier University, c/o Jazz Studies or Jazz Ensemble Programs, 3800 Victory Parkway Cincinnati, OH 45207.

Marvin Dryer

ington, died May 9, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Florence. He was a dock worker for P.I.E. Trucking Co. in Cincinnati, a Korean War Air Force veteran and member of St. John Church in Covington. His wife, Patricia Jane Darling Dryer, died in 2006. Survivors include his sons, Gary Dryer of Jacksonville, Fla., Brian Dryer of Georgetown, Richard Dryer of Butlerville, Ohio, Joseph and Eric Dryer, both of Bridgetown; daughters, Toni Wrightsman of Madison, W.Va., Linda Daniels of Sharonville and Katherine Dryer of Cincinnati; sister, Ann Dryer of Covington; 17 grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren. Burial was in St. John Cemetery, Fort Mitchell. Memorials: St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, 501 St. Jude Place, Memphis, TN 38105-1905.

Elizabeth Epperson

Elizabeth R. Cox Epperson, 83, Taylor Mill, died May 10, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. She was secretary for 22 years at Calvary Baptist Church in Latonia and a member of the church for 65 years. Her husband, Floyd T. Epperson Jr., died in 1975. Survivors include her sons, James Epperson of Taylor Mill and Thomas Epperson of Boone County; sister, Anna Egger of Taylor Mill; four grandchildren and six greatgrandchildren. Burial was in Floral Hills Memorial Gardens of Taylor Mill. Memorials: Calvary Baptist Church, Elizabeth Epperson memorial fund, 3711 Tibbatts Avenue, P.O. Box 15160, Covington, KY 41015.

Portsmouth, Ohio, formerly of Latonia, died May 14, 2010, at Southern Ohio Medical Center Hospice in Portsmouth, Ohio. She was a homemaker and a member of Calvary Baptist Church in Latonia. Her husband, Wayne E. Fleeman, died in 2006. Survivors include several nieces and nephews. Burial was in Floral Hills Memorial Gardens, Taylor Mill. Memorials: Calvary Baptist Church, 207 W. Southern Ave., Latonia, KY 41015.

Charles Hickey

Charles "Mel" Melvin Hickey, 73, Independence, died May 13, 2010, at Hospice of St. Elizabeth Healthcare, Edgewood. He was a letter carrier for the U.S. Postal Service, an Army veteran, member of Calvary Baptist Church, custodian for Calvary Christian School, coached Booster Baseball and a former member at Southside Baptist Church. Survivors include his wife, Arleen Osborne Hickey; daughter, Michele Martin; sons, Mike and Kevin Hickey, all of Independence; sisters, Marion McCord of Barnegat, N.J., Helen McNeese of Edgewood and Judy Hedrick of Kingland, Ga.; brothers, Curt Hickey of Nashville, Tenn. and Alvin Hickey of

Frank Huesing

Frank "Bud" Huesing, 87, Erlanger, died May 11, 2010, at Hospice of St. Elizabeth Healthcare, Edgewood. He was a service manager at Goodyear Tire in Cincinnati, a clerk at the U.S. Postal Service Airmail Facility at Cincinnati Northern Kentucky International Airport, a World War II Army veteran, member of the Disabled American Veterans and St. Henry Church in Elsmere. His wife, Audrey Huesing, died in 2003. Survivors include his daughters, Sandra Huesing of Erlanger, Arlene Trumble of Walton, Debra Eckstein of Carmel, Ind. and Renee Chaney of Florence; sister, JoAnn Reckers of Cincinnati; 18 grandchildren; 18 great-grandchildren and three great-

great-grandchildren. Entombment was in St. Mary Mausoleum, Fort Mitchell. Memorials: American Diabetes Association, 644 Linn St., Suite 304, Cincinnati, OH 45203; or St. Henry District High School, 3755 Scheben Drive, Erlanger, KY 41018.

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Louisville and seven grandchildren. Burial was at Floral Hills Memorial Gardens, Taylor Mill. Chambers & Grubbs Funeral Home handled the arrangements. Memorials: Calvary Baptist Church or Calvary Christian School, 3711 Tibbatts Ave., Latonia, KY 41015.

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B8

Kenton Recorder

Community

May 20, 2010

DEATHS From B7

Audrey Joslyn

Audrey May Joslyn, 92, Fort Thomas, died May 10, 2010, in Fort Thomas. She was a bank teller for First National Bank in Cincinnati, a volunteer at the Cincinnati Zoo, Hoxworth Blood Center and St. Luke Hospital in Fort Thomas for more than 50 years. Survivors include her niece, Bari Joslyn of Fort Mitchell; and nephews, Nicholas Joslyn of Fort Thomas and Christopher Joslyn of Myrtle Beach, S.C. Burial was in Evergreen Cemetery, Southgate. Memorials: Hospice of St. Elizabeth Healthcare, 483 South Loop Drive, Edgewood, KY 41017.

Brenda Kahrs

Brenda J. Maloney Kahrs, 56, Covington, died May 13, 2010, at Christ Hospital, Mt. Auburn. She was a sales clerk for Value City, Wal-Mart and attended St. Benedict Church in Covington. Her husband, Michael R. Kahrs, died in 2000. Survivors include her sons, Michael R. Kahrs Jr. of Dayton and David Kahrs of Covington; brother, Ronnie Maloney of Ryland Heights; and one grandchild. Burial was in St. Mary Cemetery, Fort Mitchell.

Marjorie Kidney

Marjorie Ann Kidney, 69, Alexandria, died Feb. 12, 2010, at Baptist Convalescent Center in Newport. Survivors include her daughters, Lisa Bartlett and Christy Wells, both

of Alexandria; son, Timothy Kidney of Alexandria; father, William Verax; sisters, Karen Schoulties of Alexandria, Patricia Krebs of Cold Spring and Victoria Kraemer of Independence; brother, William Verax of Falmouth and five grandchildren. Alexandria Funeral Home handled the arrangements. Memorials: Alois Alzheimer Center, 70 Damon Road, Cincinnati, OH 45218.

Kenneth King

Kenneth Edmond King, 93, of St. Petersburg, Fla., formerly of Newport, died May 8, 2010, in St. Petersburg. He was a WWII Marine veteran and retired after 62 years as a Union carpenter with Local No. 698, was a member of St. James United Methodist Church, St. Petersburg., and a lifetime member of VFW Post No. 5662, Newport. His first wife, Doris Adele King, died previously. Survivors include his wife, Sarah Kneiszl; son, Kenneth King of Austin, Texas; daughter, Elizabeth Smith of Largo, Fla.; sisters, Lois Logsdon of Erlanger, Frances Ducker of Florence and Elsie Lloyd of Ryland Heights and brother, Samuel King of Walton. Burial was in Floral Hills Memorial Gardens, Taylor Mill.

Lela Kropp

Lela Kropp, 86, Fort Thomas, died May 12, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. She was a homemaker; secretary for the Agricultural Extension Office in Elyria, Ohio and a media coordinator with the Pittsford New York schools, member of the First Pres-

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byterian Church of Fort Thomas and the "Circle of Martha" in the Presbyterian Church. Survivors include her husband of 63 years, Donald Kropp; sons, David Kropp of Watertown, N.Y., Daniel Kropp of Lees Summit, Mo. and Douglas Kropp of Covington; five grandchildren and two greatgrandchildren. Dobbling Funeral Home, Fort Thomas, handled the arrangements. Memorials: First Presbyterian Church of Fort Thomas, 220 S. Fort Thomas Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075.

Charles Laytart

Charles Thomas Laytart, 46, Corinth, died May 9, 2010, in Corinth. He was a farm laborer. Survivors include his mother, Barbara Richie of Corinth; and sisters, Judy Smallwood of Erlanger and Debby Laytart of Berry. McDaniel Funeral Home, Corinth, handled the arrangements.

Ellen Monson

Ellen Elizabeth Monson, 91, Independence, died May 8, 2010, at Rosedale Manor Nursing Home in Latonia. She was a homemaker, World War II Army Captain and nurse, member of Runyan Memorial Christian Church in Latonia and Northern Kentucky Homemakers. Her husband, Allen Monson, died in 1979. Survivors include her daughter, Carol Monson of Independence; sons, Barry Monson of Ryland Heights and Richard Monson of Independence and three granddaughters. Burial was in Floral Hills Memorial Gardens, Taylor Mill. Connley Brothers Funeral Home, Latonia, handled the arrangements. Memorials: Tri-State Habitat for Humanity, 990 Princeton-Glendale Road, Suite 216, Cincinnati, OH 45246.

Paul New

Paul Wayne New, 54, a Realtor, Crescent Springs, died May 10, 2010, at his home. Survivors include his parents, Paul and Annie Adams of Independence; sisters, Kathy New and Kim Taylor, both Burlington, and Cindy Mobley of Crittenden; brothers, Delbert New of Independence, William Barrett of Maysville and Michael Adams of Independence. Burial was in Independence Cemetery.

Memorials: Paul New Memorial Fund, c/o Chambers & Grubbs Funeral Home, 11382 Madison Pike, Independence, KY 41051.

Joseph Pence

Joseph C. Pence, 44, of Durham, N.C., formerly of Covington, died April 17, 2010, at his home. He was a chef and an Army veteran. Survivors include his mother, Betty McCoy of Covington; brothers, John Pence of Batavia, Jeff and Jim Pence, both of Covington; sister, Laura Beth McCoy of Bellefontaine, Ohio; stepfather, James McCoy of Covington; stepmother, Donna Pence of Batavia; and halfsisters, Barbara Thompson and Venita Milburn, both of Ohio. Serenity Funeral Care, Covington, handled the arrangements.

John Pohlman

John H. Pohlman, 87, of Crescent Springs, formerly of Ludlow, died May 11, 2010, at Hospice of St. Elizabeth Healthcare in Edgewood. He was property manager for Chelsea-Moore Co. in Cincinnati, served in the U.S. Navy in World War II South Pacific - five Naval combat engagements, Signalman Second Class, was a member of Ludlow Vets, former vice president of the Kenton County Democratic Club, was inducted into the Ludlow High School Hall of Fame and a columnist for Ludlow News Enterprise. His wife, Clarabell Hartke Pohlman, died in 2006. Survivors include his sons, John H. Pohlman II of Lebanon, Ohio, Jeffrey Pohlman of Alexandria and Gregory Pohlman of Erlanger; daughters, Mary Gill of Hixson, Tenn., Catherine Neff and Angela Wright, both of Crescent Springs; 14 grandchildren and nine greatgrandchildren. Burial was in Forest Lawn Memorial Park, Erlanger. Memorials: Hospice of St. Elizabeth Healthcare, 483 South Loop Road, Edgewood, KY 41017.

Brenda Sandel

Brenda Jo Cummins Sandel, 60, Erlanger, died May 12, 2010, at Hospice of St. Elizabeth Healthcare, Edgewood. She was a nurse for Woodcrest Manor, member of Taylor Mill Pentecostal Church, Loyal Order of Moose Lodge 1469 in Covington

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R.D. Scalf

R.D. Scalf, 80, Independence, died May 8, 2010, at his home. He was a superintendent for Kenton County Water Works, former president of the KY/TN Water Works Association, member of the American Water Works and a Mason. His grandson, David Kenneth Scalf, died previously. Survivors include his wife of 49 years, Emma L. Coleman Scalf; sons, Ronald Scalf of Odessa, Fla. and Danny Scalf of Lakeland, Fla.; daughters, Paula True and Linda Purvis, both of Independence; 15 grandchildren and 25 great-grandchildren. Burial was in Highland Cemetery. Memorials: Hospice of St. Elizabeth Healthcare, 483 South Loop Road, Edgewood, KY 41017.

William Schadler

William C. Schadler, 91, of Pueblo, Colo., formerly of Morning View, died May 3, 2010, at Centura Health Villa Pueblo Nursing Home. He was a World War II Army veteran who received the Purple Heart. His grandson, Tommy Schadler, died previously. Survivors include his wife of 42 years, Fay M. Schadler; son, Craig Schadler; daughter, Darleen Gibbs; sister, Mary Cheesman; five grandchildren and 18 great-grandchildren.

Rita Schoech

Rita Schoech, 85, a homemaker, Bellevue, died May 14, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. Her husband, Charles Schoech, died in 1991. Survivors include her daughters, Linda Middendorf of Southgate and Mary Bowles of Erlanger; son, Charles Schoech of Cincinnati; brother, Ed Lorenz of Cincinnati; sister, Adelaide Gough of Fort Thomas; seven grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren. Burial was in St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas. Memorials: Hospice of the Bluegrass Northern Kentucky, 7388 Turfway Road, Florence, KY 41042.

Harold Scholl Jr.

Harold "Dutch" Scholl Jr., 57, Newport, died May 8, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. He was owner/operator of the Cottage Bar in Southgate, a Vietnam Army veteran and a member of the University of Kentucky Alumni Association. Survivors include his companion, Donna McComas of Edgewood; father, Harold Scholl Sr. of Fort Thomas; sister, Paula Houliston of Fort Thomas; brothers, Mike Scholl of Fort Thomas, Scott Scholl of Southgate and Drew Scholl of Fort Thomas and godmother, Polly Palmer of Cold Spring. Memorials: American Cancer Society, 297 Buttermilk Pike, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017.

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and graduated from the Kenton County Citizens Police Academy on May 3. Survivors include her daughter, Jerri Branstutter of Independence; son, Greg Sandel Jr. of Independence; fiancĂŠ, Jeff Stamper of Erlanger and seven grandchildren. Burial was in Independence Cemetery. Memorials: Hospice of St. Elizabeth Healthcare, 483 South Loop Road, Edgewood, KY 41017.

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Daryl Lee Senger, 47, Erlanger, died May 6, 2010, at Hospice of St. Elizabeth Healthcare in Edgewood He worked in construction for Tab Corporation and was a member of the Christian Motorcycle Association. Survivors include his mother, Essie Senger White; step-daughters, Kim McGahee and Kelly Rutherford; sisters; Jacque Harris, Eulene Maiden, Lenoris Hayes, Kyle Rieheman and Kim Swinford and five grandchildren. Don Catchen and Son Funeral Home, Elsmere, handled the

arrangements. His body was donated to University Body Donation Program. Memorials: Christ Chapel Bikers' Church, c/o Pastor Al Abrams, 3819 Turfway Road, Erlanger, KY 41018, or Hospice of St. Elizabeth Healthcare, 483 South Loop Road, Edgewood, KY 41017.

Lillian Simpson

Lillian Simpson, 72, Covington, a cook, died May 11, 2010, at Hospice of St. Elizabeth Healthcare, Edgewood. Her son, Otis Anthony Simpson, died previously. Survivors include her daughter, Katherine Simpson of Florence; sons, David Simpson of Elsmere, James Darrell and Sherman Simpson, both of Los Angeles, Calif.; 14 grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. Burial was in Walnut Hills Cemetery.

Robert Stamper

Robert Stamper, 72, Owenton, died May 8, 2010, at his home. He was a mechanic for Texaco in Covington. His wife, Emma Hearne Stamper; son, Jackie Stamper and grandson, J.R. Stamper, died previously. Survivors include his son, Gerald Stamper of Owenton; daughters, Charlene Stamper of Warsaw and Joyce Heron of Latonia; brothers, Broadus Stamper of Latonia and Bill Stamper of Montgomery, Ohio; sister, Teresa Osborne of Jonesville; seven grandchildren and seven great grandchildren. McDonald & New Funeral Home, Owenton, handled the arrangements. Memorials: Robert Stamper Family, c/o McDonald & New Funeral Home, 202 N. Main St., Owenton, KY 40359.

Ruth Stapleton

Ruth Audrey Stapleton, 87, Fort Thomas, died May 11, 2010, at Carmel Manor, Fort Thomas. She worked in retail for Colonial Stores for more than 25 years, was a member of the Shriners and numerous camping clubs. Her husband, James Stapleton, died previously. Her brother, Clyde Nelson of Taylor Mill, two nieces and five nephews survive. Entombment was in Floral Hills Memorial Gardens, Taylor Mill. Memorials: St. John United Church of Christ, 415 Park Ave., Newport, KY 41071.

Edward Wartmann

Edward C. Wartmann, 89, of Dearborn, Mich., formerly of Erlanger, died Feb. 11, 2010, at Tendercare of Taylor in Taylor, Mich. He was an assistant manager in banking, a World War II Army veteran and member of Erlanger Lions Club. His wife, Malva Wartmann, died in 2005. Survivors include his daughter, Deborah Chamberland of Elk Grove Village, Ill.; son, Eric Wartmann of Dearborn, Mich. and two grandchildren. Burial was in Mother of God Cemetery, Fort Wright. Memorials: Erlanger Lions Club, P.O. Box 18486, Erlanger, KY 41018.

Thomas Whittle Jr.

Thomas A. Whittle Jr., 78, Covington, died May 13, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He worked for Kraus-Hine Co. in Florence, was a Korean War Army veteran and member of Mother of God Church in Covington. Survivors include his wife, Marlene Current Whittle; daughters, Cathleen Krekeler of Independence, Victoria Armstrong of Cold Spring, Theresa Bostater of Covington and Karen Wells of Walton; brother, James Whittle of Taylor Mill; nine grandchildren and 24 great-grandchildren. Ronald B. Jones Funeral Home, Ludlow, handled the arrangements. Memorials: Kidney Foundation of Greater Cincinnati, 2200 Victory Parkway, Suite 510, Cincinnati, OH 45206.


THE RECORD

May 20, 2010

ON

COVINGTON

Arrests/citations

Destinee N. Antoun, 407 W. Southern Ave., no. 2, first degree possession of a controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia at 525 5th St., May 6. John T. Leslie III, 3061 Balsam Ct., first degree possession of a controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia at 525 5th St., May 6. Jessy W. Mccalister, 609 Patton St., Apt. 1, fourth degree assault, third degree terroristic threatening at 609 Patton St., Apt. 1, May 7. Dennis W. Manning III, 4535 Amber Dr., menacing, resisting arrest, second degree disorderly conduct at 4535 Amber Dr., May 7. Melissa A. Moore, 4535 Amber Dr., serving bench warrant for court at 4535 Amber Dr., May 7. Marcus L. Crosby, 327 E. 13th St., fourth degree assault at 327 E. 13th St., May 8. Raymond W. Klette, 910 Baker St., third degree assault, fourth degree assault, resisting arrest at 438 W. Pike St., May 8. Jessie T. Sayers, 338 Bush St., no. 2, fourth degree assault at 338 Bush St., no. 2, May 8. Summer R. Baxter, 448 Commonwealth Ave., Apt. 1, first degree possession of a controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia, endangering the welfare of a minor at 520 W. 5th St., May 8. Momoh S. Sammie, 1546 Greenup St., no. 3, failure to or improper signal, no operators-moped license, possession of marijuana at 100 E. 12th St., , May 8.

CE-0000402002

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DEATHS

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POLICE

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REAL

B9

COMMUNITY RECORDER

ESTATE

N K Y. c o m

Editor Brian Mains | bmains@nky.com | 578-1062

Theresa S. Mcmeans, 2322 Alden Ct., first degree criminal trespassing at 710 Greer St., no. 6, May 8. Bridgett G. Morgan, 4600 Winston Ave., no. 11, first degree criminal trespassing at 710 Greer St., no. 6, May 8. Bobby G. Roland, 5054 Taylor Mill Rd., first degree assault at 111 E. 41st St., May 8. Angel M. Tackett, 16 W. 36Th St., Apt. 3, possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia, third degree possession of a controlled substance, endangering the welfare of a minor at 16 W. 36th St., Apt. 3, May 8. Elmer C. Scholl Jr., 844 Youngs Lane Apt. 3, possession of drug paraphernalia at 1500 James Simpson Way, May 9. Kristina L. Scholl, 844 Youngs Lane Apt. 3, possession of drug paraphernalia, prescription for a controlled substance not in proper container at 1500 James Simpson Way, May 9. Michael W. Faehr, No Address Given, alcohol intoxication in a public place, second degree disorderly conduct, resisting arrest at 2710 Rogers St., May 5. Keona M. Poole, 3589 Van Antwerp Pl., second degree disorderly conduct, resisting arrest at 411 Madison Ave., May 6. Lionel Ulmer, 122 W. 5th St. Apt. no. 2, fourth degree assault, operating motor vehicle under the influence of alcohol/drugs at Zieglers Way, May 6. Darryl W. Johnson, No Address Given, fourth degree assault, third degree possession of a controlled substance at 1316 Madison Ave.,

Kenton Recorder

POLICE REPORTS May 7. Kayla S. Belser, 12748 Decoursey Ave., possession of burglary tools at 314 E. 42nd St., May 7. Michael G. Mcculley, 2240 Harrison Ave., second degree assault at 301 W. 7th St., no. 3, May 6. Elizabeth N. Clement, 651 W. Pike St., no. 3, third degree possession of a controlled substance, theft at 608 Main St., May 5. Curtis L. Strayhorn, 2744 Powell Dr., possession of marijuana at 3980 Madison Pike, May 5. Gary W. Brown, 30 Indiana Dr., disregarding traffic control device, operating a motor vehicle under the influence of alcohol/drugs, first degree possession of a controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia at 2600 Madison Pike, May 5. Mack R. Jackson, 1415 Maryland Ave., alcohol intoxication in a public place, possession of marijuana at 1402 Greenup St., May 3. William J. Wanamaker, 157 Riva Ridge Ct., alcohol intoxication in a public place, prescription for a controlled substance not in proper container at Scott St., May 3.

Incidents/investigations Arson A vehicle was set on fire at 1722 Madison Ave., May 3.

Assault

A woman was struck in the head at 2235 Hanser Dr., May 4. One man struck another at 808 W. 33rd St., May 4. A woman reported being assaulted at 188 Alexandria Dr., May 5. A woman was punched in the face at 338 Bush St., no. 4, May 9. Several people had a fight at 411

Madison Ave., May 8. A woman was hit and bit at 2718 Alexandria Ave., May 9. A woman reported being kicked and choked at 923 Cherry St., May 8.

Assault, unlawful imprisonment, theft

A woman was choked, kept from leaving a residence, and had $260 taken from her at 23 Hideaway Dr., May 6.

Burglary

A cell phone was stolen at 3107 Clifford Ave., May 5. A game system was stolen at 2232 Hanser Dr., no. 7, May 3. Copper plumbing was stolen at 11 W. 18th St., May 3. Prescription medication was stolen at 707 Pike St., May 5. $500 in cash was stolen from a residence at 22 E. Robbins St., May 4. A man forced his way into a residence at 1706 Eastern Ave., May 8. A washing machine was stolen at 424 Patton St., May 7. Two game systems and games were stolen at 2613 White Ct., May 7. A firearm was stolen at 106 Idlewood Dr., May 9. Two boxes of tools were stolen at 13 E. 10th St., May 8.

Burglary, criminal mischief

Someone entered and remained unlawfully in a residence at 1113 Madison Ave., May 5. A residence was entered unlawfully at 508 Prague St., May 8.

Criminal mischief

A pinball machine was broken at 1605 Madison Ave., May 6. A copper water spicket was damaged in an attempted to steal it at 1017 Highway Ave., May 3.

The passenger side window of a vehicle was broken at 502 Main St., May 3. Two mail boxes were damaged at 1389 Hands Pike, May 4. The window of a vehicle was broken at 2219 Roling Hills Dr., May 5. A window glass and screen were damaged at 220 Greenup St., no. 112, May 9. Two glass plate sections of entry door were kicked in at 100 Riverside Plaza, May 9. Doors were damaged at 1132 Lee St., May 8. A vehicle's hood was dented by a child's ball at 1015A John St., May 7. Graffiti was written on a vehicle at 1505 Banklick St., May 7. A vehicle's transmission and top were damaged at 1703 Garrard St., May 7. Four tires of a vehicle were slashed at 4293 Winston Ave., May 6. The wire to approximately 20 junction boxes were cut at 902 Tree Line Dr., May 6. A door was kicked and damaged at 22 Swain Ct., May 7.

Criminal possession of a forged instrument

A counterfeit $20 bill was passed at 424 W. 6th St., May 3. A sheet of counterfeit dollar bills was discovered at 122 E. 33rd St., May 7. Someone attempted to pass a counterfeit $20 bill at 613 W. 4th St., May 7.

Harassment

A woman reported being harassed at 1315 Maryland Ave., May 3. A woman reported being harassed at 2002 Greenup St., May 5.

A woman reported being harassed at 120 Martin St., May 7.

Robbery

A man had $59.99 taken from him at gunpoint at 1230 Fisk St., May 4. $25 in cash was stolen at 117 Brent Spence Square, Apt. 622, May 4.

Terroristic threatening

Two people threatened each other with physical injury at 808 W. 33rd St., May 4. A woman reported being harassed and threatened at 1505 St. Clair St., May 5. A man threatened to shoot a woman's house at 212 Byrd St., May 9.

Theft

Music players, keys, and CDs were stolen from a vehicle at 167 Squirrel Ct, May 4. A wallet was stolen and a credit card used to make several purchases at Main St., May 3. A bicycle was stolen at 407 E. 17th St., May 3. A wallet was stolen at 141 W. Pike St., May 3. A bicycle was stolen at 1515 St. Clair St., May 3. A necklace was stolen at 1540 Nancy St., May 3. An air conditioning unit was stolen at 309 Garrard St., May 3. Two sets of tow dollys were stolen at 322 W. Southern Ave., May 3. An air conditioning unit was stolen at 1016 Lee St., May 5. A MP3 player and a watch were stolen from a vehicle at Pine St., May 4. A GPS unit and CDs were stolen from a vehicle at 179 Tando Way, May 4.

Police | Continued B10


B10

Kenton Recorder

From B9 A welder was stolen from a vehicle at 121 Indian Creek Dr., May 4. A jug holding approximately $1000 in change was stolen at 18 W. 28th St., May 5. $2,700 was stolen at 257 W. 7th St., May 5. A cell phone was stolen at 3903 Winston Ave., May 5. Gas was taken from a vehicle at 1032 Madison Ave., May 5. Three rose bushes were stolen at 603 E. 17th St., May 8. A vehicle was stolen at 10 Rivercenter Blvd., May 8. Computer equipment was stolen at 1132 Banklick St., May 8. Several pieces of furniture was stolen at 3708 Decoursey Ave., May 8. A package was stolen at 518 Watkins St., May 7. A purse was stolen at 4323 Winston Ave., May 7. Several pieces of furniture was stolen at 1415 Scott St., May 7. A firearm was stolen at 404 E. 16th St., May 7. A camera was stolen at 479 Farrell St., May 6.

A woman's driver's license and credit card were stolen from her purse at 11 E. 5th St., May 6. A purse was stolen at 407 Madison Ave., May 6. 30 pieces of steel pipe were stolen at 600 Farrell St., May 6. A cell phone was stolen at 617 Philadelphia St., May 9. A computer, GPS unit, and gym bag were stolen from a vehicle at 303 W. 20th St., May 9.

Theft by deception

$1,041.44 was stolen at 126 Parkway, May 4. A fraudulent check was written at 231 Scott St., May 7.

Theft of a controlled substance

Prescription medication was stolen at 3212 W. Latonia Ave., May 8. Prescription medication was stolen at 3212 Latonia Ave., May 7. Prescription medication was stolen at 4004 Decoursey Ave., May 6.

Theft of identity

The social security number of another was used at 111 W. 33rd St., May 6. A man used another man's identity at 303 Court St., May 7. Utility services were obtained using the identity of another at 637 Main St., May 6.

Theft, criminal mischief

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BED AND BREAKFAST

Several panties and bras were taken and a vehicle tire was flattened at 23 Edwin Dr., May 4. Gift cards and a purse was stolen from a vehicle at 3980 Madison Pike, May 5. Several appliances were stolen and a residence vandalized at 219 E. 20th St., May 5. A GPS unit was stolen at 110 Winding Way, Apt. C., May 7. A refigerator was stolen at 3708 Decoursey Ave., May 7. A rock was thrown through the rear window of a vehicle at Martin St at Madison Ave., May 7.

Unauthorized use of a motor vehicle A vehicle was taken at 1500 Jefferson Ave., May 7.

Wanton endangerment

A man put a gun to another man's head in a robbery attempt at 1400 Madison Ave., May 4. A round of a handgun was fired into the direction of a residence at 1526 Eastern Ave., no. 2, May 8.

CRESCENT SPRINGS/ ERLANGER Arrests/citations

Jonathan L Byrd, 21, 5700 Kiefer Court, possession of marijuana at Stevenson Road, May 13. Christine M Kohus, 26, 328 Deer Trace Drive, trafficking marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia at Houston Road, May 1.

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Police reports

May 20, 2010

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Leslie Collins, 18, 27 Chad Lane, trafficking marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia at Houston Road, May 1.

Theft by deception

Reported at 3417 Cintonya Drive, May 13. Reported at 559 Sycamore Street, April 20.

Theft

Incidents/investigations Assault

Burglary

$2,000 worth of computer hardware reported stolen at 53 Carriage Hill Drive, May 12. $90 worth of household goods reported stolen at 722 Euclid Drive, May 10. Reported at 569 Walnut Street, May 5. Reported at 725 Meadowod Drive, May 3. $300 worth of drugs/narcotics reported stolen at 452 Commonwealth Avenue, May 4. $2,000 worth of jewelry reported stolen at 530 Greenfield Lane, May 11. $5,000 reported stolen at 510 Commonwealth Avenue, May 9.

Criminal mischief

Reported at 472 Erlanger Road, May 9. $600 worth of vehicle damage reported at 312 Bartlett Avenue, May 3. $50 worth of damage to structure reported at 2500 High Street Road, May 10. $499 worth of vehicle damage reported at 594 Clock Tower Way, May 9. Reported at 113 Stevenson Road, May 4. Reported at 670 Cypress Court, May 6. $300 worth of damage to structure reported at 301 Kenton Lands Road, May 4. Reported at 645 Houston Road, May 3. $300 worth of vehicle damage reported at 43 Carriage Hill Drive, May 3. $400 worth of damage to structure reported at 537 Greenfield Lane, April 29. $300 worth of vehicle damage reported at 519 Enterprise Drive, May 10.

Criminal mischief, terroristic threatening

$300 worth of vehicle damage reported at 3522 Jacqueline Drive, May 7.

Criminal possession of forged instrument

Reported at 3421 Dixie Highway, May 12. $250 worth of negotiable instruments counterfeited at 246 Anderson Road, May 10.

$6,709 worth of household goods reported stolen at 520 Clock Tower Way, May 12. $1,162.99 reported stolen at 3510 Cowie Avenue, May 1.

Reported at 136 Center Street, May 12. $2,000 worth of computer hardware reported stolen at 3512 Misty Creek Drive, May 12. Reported at 401 Kenton Lands Road, May 12. $14.99 worth of clothes reported stolen at 4350 Dixie Highway, May 10. $33.98 worth of merchandise reported stolen at 3158 Dixie Highway, May 9. $8,00 vehicle reported stolen at 2513 Hazelwood Drive, May 7. Reported at 3831 Lori Drive, May 7. $260 worth of tools reported stolen at 2447 Anderson Road, May 5. Reported at 421 Stevenson Road, May 8. Reported at 3220 Meadow Lane, May 5. $161.42 worth of consumable goods reported stolen at 3158 Dixie Highway, May 3. $28.38 worth of consumable goods reported stolen at 3158 Dixie Highway, May 3. $120 reported stolen at 3171 Dixie Highway, April 30. Reported at 510 Commonwealth Avenue, April 30. Reported at 3447 Bottomwood Drive, May 2. Reported at 537 Rosary Court, April 29. Reported at 4055 Heartwood Drive, May 11.

Theft, criminal mischief

$200 worth of vehicle damage reported at 3113 Spring Valley Drive, May 12. $200 worth of vehicle damage reported at 3314 Mary Street, May 6. $200 worth of vehicle damage reported at 3906 Lori Drive, May 7. $100 worth of merchandise reported stolen at 3409 Cintonya Drive, May 6. $100 worth of computer hardware reported stolen at 2310 Buttermilk Crossing, May 11.

Theft of controlled substance

$810 worth of drugs/narcotics seized at 625 Debbie Lane, May 6.

Disorderly conduct

FORT MITCHELL

Fraudulent use of credit card

Timmy Turner, 50, 410 Fairfield Avenue, careless driving, driving under the influence, May 1. Heather D Miley, 29, 7789 Arrowwood Drive, careless driving, driving under the influence, May 6. Robert C Rehmet, 25, 148 Grace Court, alcohol intoxication, May 7. Justin M Lewis, 19, 843 Rogers Road, driving under the influence, May 8.

Reported at Mary Street, May 2.

Reportedat 4012 Narrows Road, April 29.

No operator's license

Reported at Baker Street, May 1.

Possession of marijuana

$20 worth of drugs/narcotics seized at Riggs Avenue, May 8.

Resisting arrest, disorderly conduct

Reportedat 307 Erlanger Road, May 2.

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Arrests/citations

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Panpilo W Sotte, 30, 32 Mcarthur Street, possession of drug paraphernalia, May 6. Previn L Warren, 35, 4016 Pointer Court, Kenton County warrant, May 9. Jeffrey T Erpenbeck, 18, 551 Trevino Ridge, driving under the influence, leaving scene of accident, May 9. Josh W Tobergte, 31, 425 East Chelsea Drive, warrant, May 9. Anthony S Russell, 29, 16 Huckleberry Hill , alcohol intoxication, disorderly conduct, resisting arrest, May 11. Alexander M Lockwood, 21, 10970 Putnam Court, Kenton County warrant, May 11. Harrison B Bigney, 18, 1868 Mount Vernon Drive, reckless driving, May 12. Shamika Simpson, 20, 3452 Harvey Avenue, no operator's license, failure to maintain insurance, May 13. Carry D Frazier, 34, 4906 Maryland Avenue, warrant, May 10.

Plaza Parkway, May 2. Eugene F. Wolpert, 26, 4340 Georgetown Road, execution of bench warrant for probation violation at 2001 Dixie Highway, May 11. Kelley S. Lee, 30, 845 Stephens Road, alcohol intoxication in a public place at Lakeview Drive at Madison Pike, May 7. Pamela T. Mcintosh, 22, 216 Park Avenue no. 3, shoplifting at 3450 Valley Plaza Parkway, May 7. Chad A. Hogan, 32, 2718 Rockford Lane no. 6, improper turning, operating on suspended/revoked license, execution of warrant for possession of a forged instrument at 3410 Madison Pike, May 12. Ronald D. Gaylor II, 31, 12770 Kline Road, operating on suspended/revoked license at Highland Avenue, May 11.

Reported at 43 Huckleberry Hill Drive, May 8.

Reported at Orphanage Road, May 11.

Incidents/investigations Assault

Possession of controlled substance

$10 worth of drugs/narcotics seized at 43 Sunnymeade Drive, May 9.

Possession of drug paraphernalia $20 worth of drug/narcotic equipment seized at 2100 Dixie Highway, May 6.

Theft

$530 worth of jewelry reported stolen at 127 Cookbook Lane, May 1. Reported at 512 West Chelsea Circle, May 2. $16 worth of drugs/narcotics reported stolen at 2271 Mercury Avenue, May 5. $150 worth of vehicle aprts reported stolen at 86 Burdsall Avenue, May 7. $300 worth of vehicle parts reported stolen at 2477 Royal Drive, May 9.

FORT WRIGHT

Arrests/citations

John R. Carrara, 22, 19 Lakeview Drive, criminal possession of a forged instrument at 3450 Valley Plaza Parkway, May 3. Karen A. Wise, 30, 431 Buckner Street, shoplifting at 3450 Valley Plaza Parkway, May 10. Anna B. Dorsey, 22, 488 Fredericka Road, shoplifting, execution of Boone County warrant for possession at 3450 Valley Plaza Parkway, May 11. Shawn L. Cambron, 31, 4701 Taylor Blvd., execution of warrant for shoplifting at 3450 Valley Plaza Parkway, May 2. Tosha N. Darghty, 21, 610 Orchard Street, shoplifting at 3450 Valley Plaza Parkway, May 3. Lisa L. Osborne, 43, 12 Holmesdale Court, operating on suspended/revoked license at I75, May 5. Charles R. Garr V, 21, 2527 Warren Streeet, failure to wear seat belts, operating on suspended/revoked license at Madison Pike, May 10. Donovan R. Wayland, 21, 584 Garner Drive, shoplifting at 3450 Valley Plaza Parkway, May 1. Heather L. Owen, 20, 10977 Hamer Road, shoplifting at 3450 Valley Plaza Parkway, May 1. Michael A. Carr, 24, 3731 Glenmore Avenue, execution of warrant for fta at 3450 Valley Plaza Parkway, May 4. Aramando Sacuj, 42, 1015 Scott Street no. 2, operating on suspended/revoked license, careless driving at Kyles Lane and East Crittenden, May 1. Shrenda S. Ashcraft, 21, 407 Elm Street, Theft at 3450 Valley Plaza Parkway, May 1. Brittany L. Haywood, 19, 106 Promontory Drive unit F, shoplifting, Kenton County warrant for assault at 3450 Valley Plaza Parkway, May 5. Brandy N. Covey, 22, 420 General Drive, burglary at 3450 Valley Plaza Parkway, May 6. Amy L. Roberts, 23, 2593 Ivan Court, shoplifting at 3450 Valley Plaza Parkway, May 6. Christopher L. Mcgovney 3, 22, 210 Bluegrass Ave. no. 145 F, execution of warrant for leaving scene of the accident at Madison PIke at I275 EB, May 6. Joshua W. Farrell, 33, 12 Walnut, no registration plates, operating on suspended/revoked license at 1881 Dixie Highway, May 5. Shana N. Thoms, 31, 5866 Monassas Run, execution of warrant for FTA at Medical Village Drive, May 7. Sally K. Moore, 21, 226 Pleasant Street no. 2, shoplifting at 3450 Valley Plaza Parkway, May 2. Lisa R. Koch, 39, 402 Ohio Street, DUI- alcohol at Dudley Road/Madison, May 9. Steven J. Overstreet, 44, 2213 Busse Street, DUI-alcohol at 3450 Valley Plaza Parkway, May 10. Shawn L. Cambron, 31, 4701 Taylor Blvd, shoplifting at 3450 Valley

Incidents/investigations Burglary, shoplifting

Reported at 3450 Valley Plaza Parkway, May 6.

Criminal mischief, theft from auto

Criminal possession of a forged instrument

Conterfeit money at 3450 Valley Plaza Parkway, May 3.

Fraudulent use of credit cards

Reported at 3450 Valley Plaza Parkway, May 9. Reported at 3450 Valley Plaza Parkway, May 6.

Shoplifting

Reported at 3450 Valley Plaza Parkway, May 1. Reported at 3450 Valley Plaza Parkway, May 1. Reported at 3450 Valley Plaza Parkway, May 2. Reported at 3450 Valley Plaza Parkway, May 2. Reported at 3450 Valley Plaza Parkway, May 3. Reported at 3450 Valley Plaza Parkway, May 7. Reported at 3450 Valley Plaza Parkway, May 10. Reported at 3450 Valley Plaza Parkway, May 11. Reported at 3450 Valley Plaza Parkway, May 11.

Shoplifting, served bench warrant Reported at 3450 Valley Plaza Parkway, May 5.

Theft

Two wooden street signs stolen at Wrights Point Drive, May 4. Reported at Sleepy Hollow Road, May 11. Four air conditioners at 1945 Highland Pike, May 4. Money $680 at 3395 Madison Pike, May 4. Money $100 at 3450 Valley Plaza Parkway, May 10. Reported at 3450 Valley Plaza Parkway, May 9.

Theft of controlled substance under $300

Reported at 448 General Drive, May 5.

INDEPENDENCE

Arrests/citations

Sergio Aguillar, 35, 5663 Neptune Drive, giving officer false name or address, execution of bench warrant for contempt of court libel at 5663 Neptune Drive, May 8. Geogia L. Mitchell, 38, 5663 Neptune Drive, possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia at 5663 Neptune Drive, May 8. Eric Wilkymacky, 31, 234 Sycamore Circle, speeding 5 mph over limit, operating on suspended/revoked license at Cody Road, May 7. Jonathan C. Thompson, 18, 10168 Decoursey Pike, speending 11 mph over limit, no operators moped license at Regal Ridge Drive, May 12.

Incidents/investigations Burglary, criminal mischief

Reported at 732 Timber Lane, May 12.

Criminal mischief

Reported at Steves Trail, May 10.

Criminal mischief, theft of mail matter

Reported at Regal Ridge Road, May 12.

Criminal possession of a forged instrument

Reported at 2055 Centennial Blvd, May 8.

Fraudulent use of credit cards

Reported at 1872 Bridle Path, May 10.

Shoplifting

Reported at 3960 Turkeyfoot Road, May 7.

Theft

Reported at 10947 Griststone Circle, May 10.

Theft from an auto, criminal mischief

Reported at 3910 Hunters Green Drive, May 12. Reported at 3912 Archer Court, May 12. Reported at 3910 Gunstock Court, May 12.

Theft by unlawful taking from auto

Reported at 1258 Victory Lane, May 8. Reported at 9883 Potomac Court, May 12.

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