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BUSINESS SPOTLIGHTB1

COMMUNITY RECORDER

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Covington, Independence, Latonia, Ryland Heights, Taylor Mill E-mail: kynews@communitypress.com

Dr. Benjamin Gosnell and Dr. Joseph Gormley

Volume 14 Issue 28 © 2010 The Community Recorder ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Walk for a cause

Taylor Mill resident Allison Hughes recently went to Washington, D.C. to walk for a cause. The 12-year-old joined others who deal with epilepsy. More than 20,000 made the march to raise awareness. The Turkey Foot Middle School seventh-grader also got to see much of the nation’s capital. SCHOOLS, A7

Election deadline

The deadline for all letters or guest column submissions concerning the May 18 primary is noon Thursday, May 6. The limit for letters is 200 words; for guest columns, 500 words. Guest columns must include a color head shot. E-mail letters and columns to bmains@nky.com, or mail to Community Recorder, 228 Grandview Drive, Fort Mitchell, KY, 41017. E-mail is preferred. We will post all letters and columns that we can confirm at Cincinnati.com, and print as many as space allows in the Community Recorder.

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W e b s i t e : N K Y. c o m B E C A U S E C O M M U N I T Y M AT T E R S

School mourns student’s loss

By Regan Coomer rcoomer@nky.com

Notre Dame Academy student Maria Schaffstein, 17, touched many during her short life, school officials said. Schaffstein, a resident of Park Hills, was killed and seven other students were injured when their vehicle crashed in Alabama April 16. The girls, all students at NDA, were on their Maria Schaffstein way home from a spring break trip in Florida. “I think Maria will be smiling down at us,” said student council co-president Amy Beischel at a press conference held April 19 at the school. “She lived a good life. She found love early in life with her boyfriend Peter (Thomas). She touched on everything most people touch on in their whole lives in 17 years.” State troopers said driver Katherine Russo, 18, of Park Hills, tried to pass a tractor-trailer when her vehicle ran off the edge of the road. Russo then lost control of the vehicle when she over-corrected. Schaffstein was pronounced dead at the scene. The other seven were hurt, with injuries ranging from minor to critical. “We’re very grateful for the support the community has given us through this whole tragedy,” said NDA President Sister Mary Shauna Bankemper April 19.

REGAN COOMER/STAFF

Notre Dame Academy President Sister Mary Shauna Bankemper addressed the press Monday, April 19 about the vehicle crash that killed one student and injured seven others. Five students are home while two are still recovering in an Alabama hospital. Bankemper said Katherine Russo, Megan E. Berberich, 18, of Fort Wright, Catherine Ammerman, 17, of Florence, Megan Downing, 18, of Fort Mitchell and Jordan Zumdick, 18, of Fort Wright, returned home April 18. Student Krista Noll, 18, of Fort

REGAN COOMER/STAFF

Notre Dame Academy students wrote messages of hope and remembrance on the school's sidewalk to fellow student Maria Schaffstein, who died in a car wreck Friday, April 16.

Park season

As temperatures continue to warm and students enter the final few weeks of school, the Kenton County Parks and Recreation department is gearing up for their busiest season. Read about upcoming programs, and what is new this year. LIFE, B1

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Mitchell, is still in serious condition along with student Jessica Russo, 17, who was in critical condition as of The Kenton Community Recorder’s print deadline. “The family – they’re so grateful for the life of Maria. She touched so many people in her short 17 years,” Bankemper said. Counselor Tessa Taylor said roses have been placed at the desk of each girl in remembrance. “They’re still in our hearts even though they’re not here with us,” she said. Bankemper went on to say alcohol and drugs were not involved in the accident, adding it was just that: an accident. “The accident has nothing to do with spring break and everything to do with an accident. Accidents happen in life.” Schaffstein was full of life, said student council co-president Emily Cooney. “We’re a really tight class. We’re all coming together as a

class. We’re going to get through this.” A visitation will be held for Schaffstein at 9:30 a.m. Thursday, April 22, at St. Agnes Church in Fort Wright, followed by a Mass of Christian Burial at 11:30 a.m. Burial will be in Mother of God Cemetery in Latonia. Schaffstein is survived by her parents, John and Eileen Schaffstein, of Park Hills; Her sister, Anna Schaffstein, of Park Hills; her brother, Johnny Schaffstein, of Park Hills; her maternal grandparents, Bob and Carol Fitzpatrick of Villa Hills; and her paternal grandparents, Bob and Carole Schaffstein, of Evansville, Ind. Memorials can be made to Notre Dame Academy, c/o Maria Schaffstein Scholarship Fund, 1699 Hilton Drive, Park Hills, KY 41011 Online condolences can be made at www.middendorf-funeralhome.com.

Latonia study’s hosts first public meeting By Regan Coomer rcoomer@nky.com

Latonia residents are invited to the first public meeting of the Latonia Area Study. The meeting will be held at 6 p.m. Thursday, April 29, in Holy Cross High School’s cafeteria, 3617 Church St. Northern Kentucky Area Planning Commission representatives will present the existing conditions report of Latonia, made up of a building structure survey, key person interviews and online survey results at the meeting, said

Project Manager James Fausz. Fausz hopes to break up residents into small groups to facilitate discussion on the accuracy of the report. “It gives us more information if we’ve missed anything. Maybe an issue we think is really important, the residents will be like, ‘That’s not an issue,’ so that will give us a chance to focus what our attention will be in making the plan,” he explained. NKAPC planner Keith Logsdon agreed, saying the meeting will “fill in” residents on what planners have found so far.

“If there’s things we’ve missed they can let us know what that is and elaborate on things we don’t know that much about.” After the meeting, Fausz said the NKAPC will take all the information gathered and begin to formulate a plan to better Latonia throughout the next 20 to 30 years. Once the plan is complete, it will go back to the public, Covington City Commission and the Kenton County Planning Commission for approval before being adopted into the Kenton County Comprehensive Plan.

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Some issues that have already come to the fore in the report is the need for playgrounds, absentee landlords, green infrastructure and wayfinding throughout the neighborhood, Fausz said. “We’ll be taking those issues we’ve heard about and we and the public feel are big issues and working towards trying to find a solution to address those and make Latonia a better place,” Fausz said. The second public meeting will be scheduled in late summer. For more information on the Latonia Area Study, visit nkapc.org.


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Kenton Recorder

News

April 22, 2010

REGAN COOMER/STAFF

About 200 Tristate residents showed up to the Northern Kentucky Tea Party's Tax Relief Rally April 15 in Covington's Goebel Park. Left to right: Erlanger resident Mark Frans and Florence residents Larry Braden and Linda Holbrook got the antitax word out at the rally.

REGAN COOMER/STAFF

A crowd showed up to The Northern Kentucky Tea Party’s Tax Relief Rally April 15 bearing signs, dressed up as the founding fathers and listening to guest speakers attorney Eric Deters and businessman Dave Hatter.

REGAN COOMER/STAFF

Vince Whitlatch of Fort Thomas wore an American flag on his back emblazoned with a rattlesnake and the words, “Don’t Tread on Me,” at the Northern Kentucky Tea Party Tax Relief Rally April 15.

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Tax relief rally attracted crowd to Goebel Park By Regan Coomer

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About 200 people attended the Tax Relief Rally held in Covington’s Goebel Park April 15. The Northern Kentucky Tea Party hosted the rally, which ended in a march around the Covington IRS building. Tea party members led a pledge of allegiance, a singing of the National Anthem and introduced guest speakers Dave Hatter, a local businessman and Fort Wright council member as well as attorney Eric Deters. Many members of the crowd held signs reading “Taxed Enough Already” and “I’ll Keep the Constitution - You Keep Your Change.” “Where are all the people

REGAN COOMER/STAFF

Florence resident Alex Blaine celebrated after the singing of the National Anthem at the Tax Relief Rally in Covington. the press told us were going to be here?” asked Hatter, who said there were no racists or “haters” in the crowd. “You’re just a bunch of regular people like me tired of being told how to live.” Deters denounced

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BRIEFLY Weather ready

Kenton County Homeland Security & Emergency Management will host Severe Weather Spotting training Thursday April 29. The program, presented by the National Weather Service, will start at 7 p.m. and will be held at the Taylor Mill Senior & Community Center, 5614 Taylor Mill Road. The training is free and open to the public, who can learn to recognize severe

weather conditions and report them to the National Weather Service. To register, call 392-1481.

Genetic testing

Check Your Genes, a local non-profit foundation that promotes genetic testing, will hold a fundraiser on May 7 at The Syndicate in Newport. Check Your Genes was started by Edgewood residents Nancy West Romer and her brother James West after

Index When you’re part of a family of banks that has been around for 63 years, you learn how to weather a lagging economy. And thanks to the stability of the Central Money Market Account, we can help you through this one. To get started, call (859) 647-0222 or visit us online at centralbank.com.

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Calendar ......................................B2 Classifieds.....................................C Food.............................................B4 Obituaries....................................B9

Police.........................................B11 Schools........................................A7 Sports ..........................................A8 Viewpoints ................................A11

COMMUNITY RECORDER

News

Member FDIC * Rates are subject to change without prior notice. Stated rate for personal accounts only. Annual Percentage Yield (APY) accurate as of 3/31/2010. $2,500 minimum opening balance required. Fees may reduce earnings. Offer may be discontinued without notice. The account will allow up to six transfers/withdrawals per statement period. FDIC insurance temporarily increased from $100,000 to $250,000 per depositor through 12/31/2013.

Nancy was diagnosed with ovarian cancer in 2001. The foundation encourages genetic testing for individuals with a history of breast cancer or ovarian cancer in their family to identify risks and have access to early detection treatments. Nancy passed away in December 2009, and the May 7 event will be held in her memory. It will include a cash bar, appetizers, silent and live auctions, and a band, as well as acoustic guitarist Ben Walz. The event will begin at 7 p.m., and tickets are $60 in advance, or $75 at the door. Sponsorship opportunities are also available. For more information, or to purchase tickets, visit www.checkyourgenes.org.

Hill study

Find news and information from your community on the Web Covington – nky.com/covington Independence – nky.com/independence Taylor Mill – nky.com/taylormill

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unneeded federal departments, including the Department of Education. “There comes a time when taxes become too much. You and I pay enough taxes, do we not?” Deters asked.

Brian Mains | Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1062 | bmains@nky.com Jason Brubaker | Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1060 | jbrubaker@nky.com Regan Coomer | Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1061 | rcoomer@nky.com Melanie Laughman | Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . 513-248-7573 | mlaughman@nky.com James Weber | Sports Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1054 | jweber@nky.com Advertising Debbie Maggard | Advertising Manager. . . . . . 578-5501 | dmaggard@nky.com Deb Kaya | Account Rep . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-5507 | dkaya@nky.com Josh Bishop | Account Rep. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-5506 | jbishop@nky.com Delivery For customer service. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 781-4421 Sharon Schachleiter | Circulation Manager . . 442-3464 | sschachleiter@nky.com Melissa Lemming | District Manager. . . . . . . . . 442-3462 | mlemming@nky.com Classified To place a Classified ad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283-7290 | www.communityclassified.com To place an ad in Community Classified, call 283-7290.

The Northern Kentucky Area Planning Commission will be hosting the second public forum about Kenton County’s hillsides at 6 p.m. May 4 at Lakeside Christian Church, 195 Buttermilk Pike. Residents will have a chance to voice opinions and ask questions of a panel of professionals. For more information, contact the NKAPC at 331-8980 or thehills@nkapc.org. If residents wish to leave comments prior to the public forum or cannot make the event, visit our online discussion forum at www.nkapc.org/HillsProject.h tml.


News

Kenton Recorder

April 22, 2010

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Edmondson, Nageleisen face off again in May By Regan Coomer rcoomer@nky.com

Kenton County’s prosecuting attorney will be determined by the May 18 primary, in which incumbent Garry Edmondson will again run against Don Nageleisen, his challenger in the 2006 election. Independence resident Nageleisen, 49, ran as a Democrat in 2006 and said he didn’t get running for office “out of his system.” Nageleisen, who has 20 years of law experience, said he is very “dissatisfied” with the job Edmondson is doing. “I think he’s cost the taxpayers millions upon millions of dollars. I didn’t approve of the way he lied to the people of Independence and Covington and Elsmere in regard to where the jail was going to be placed.”

Nageleisen said Edmondson knew where the jail was going to be before the election and “kept it a secret and mis-led all of those votes.” Edmondson If elected, Nageleisen wants to take a more active role as county attorney. “Going to court 10 times in 16 years to me is not doing your job for Nageleisen the tax payers of Kenton County,” he said. Nageleisen also plans to “tighten things up” in the county attorney’s office, saying Edmondson has no need of his office’s public information officer.

“While my opponent may call her by a different term, the bottom line is all this person is hired to do is try to make my opponent look good to the public,” he said. “I definitely will not have a PR person on the payroll whose sole purpose is to try and make me look good.” As county attorney, Nageleisen hopes to deter young people from using drugs. “We have to deter them early on before experimentation becomes an everyday problem,” Nageleisen said. “You can assign them community service. You can have them start cleaning up Kenton County.” Edmondson, 63, is a Fort Wright resident who has held his office as Kenton County Attorney since 1993. “I believe that the county attor-

ney’s office is running very well, smoothly and effectively and I want to continue that. I enjoy the work very much,” he said. Edmondson said he is proud of the $13 million collected in child support and a 98 percent DUI prosecution success rate as well as the success of the Why I Love America Calendar Contest and the Kenton County Government Academy. “I’m looking forward to the new judge executive who will be tackling some long-standing issues. My 38 years now of experience in local government will be a big help to that,” Edmondson said. Edmondson denied Nageleisen’s statement that he knew about the jail’s location before the 2006 election. “The truth of it is nobody knew

but Judge (Ralph) Drees. I didn’t know nor would I lie about it,” he said. Drees confirmed what Edmondson said; adding “My recollection would be that Garry would not have known anything about it. I didn’t want the story out that I was trying to buy it because people would have raised their prices. He wouldn’t have got it from me, that’s for sure.” Edmondson also stated that Nageleisen has won two cases in Kenton County District Court in 17 years, citing statistics kept by his office. Nageleisen said Edmondson “has no idea what he’s talking about.” “I try cases in as far away as Louisville and Lexington, not to mention all the other counties in between,” he said.

Kenton County judge-exec debate air out issues By Regan Coomer rcoomer@nky.com

Terse voices and some laughs rang out at the judge-executive debate at the Erlanger library April 14. The debate was sponsored by The Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce, LEGACY and The Kentucky Enquirer/ NKY.com. The evening opened with commissioner candidates engaging in a brief Q&A and closed with a three-way debate between Republican judge-executive candidates Scott Kimmich, Dan Moening and Steve Arlinghaus.

The winner of the primary will face Independent candidate Alyssa Dara McDowell in November. Arlinghaus and Moening agreed that the county has not been fiscally responsible in the last few years, citing the purchase of land in Independence for a jail site that was never used, and is still owned, by the county. “Absolutely not,” Arlinghaus said. “That particular land was valued at $350,000. This administration paid $750,000, more than double the value of it. Why?” Kimmich replied that he is “tired about hearing about how everyone else is

mismanaging money,” adding Arlinghaus said he was “rushed” into voting for a $850,000 settlement of a lawsuit during his time on the fiscal court. “I’ll never be rushed into spending $850,000 of your money by attorneys or anyone else,” Kimmich said. Moening and Arlinghaus also agreed on allowing the fiscal court, and not just the judge-executive, to vote on Sanitation District No. 1 fees. “Right now the judgeexecutive can rubber stamp anything,” Moening said. “That needs to change. It takes one corrupt person to lead to a lot of bad things happening in our county.”

“I replaced my windows — and it was no big to-do!"

Moening and Arlinghaus also agreed on allowing the fiscal court, and not just the judge-executive, to vote on Sanitation District No. 1 fees. Kimmich, however, said he’s “prepared to be the watchdog of the citizens in handling the sanitation district and other specific districts existing out there.” Kimmich also said he is “not opposed” to holding public hearings as to whether the sewer district should receive rate increases. The candidates also touched on the relationship between the county and its cities.

“There has never been such a disconnect between the cities and counties,” Arlinghaus said. “You got to have people at the table you can trust, that want to work together and that have the ability to work together and currently we don’t have that.” Kimmich replied that he has now been endorsed by five Kenton County mayors, later revealing them to be the mayors of Park Hills,

Villa Hills, Fairview, Ryland Heights and Elsmere. Candidates did agree on one issue: no smoking ban. Kimmich called the agreement a “miracle.” All three felt it should be the choice of the business owner, not government. In closing remarks, Arlinghaus urged voters to look at the experience of each candidate, “good or bad,” Moening said he is not accepting campaign funding and promised no political thank yous and Kimmich said he will explore ways to “reduce the size, cost and scope of county government.”

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Kenton Recorder

News

April 22, 2010

Elsmere Senior Center to get new roof TMC offers health care reform roundtable April 28 By Jason Brubaker jbrubaker@nky.com

The Elsmere Senior Center project continues to get bigger...and better. Councilman Marty Lenhof said that because the project has continued to come in under what the city had originally planned, they’ve has been able to add several change orders to the project, including a new water heater and a new roof, as well as a new sign to replace the wooden one on the front of the building. The project, which is being funded through a federal grant, was originally budgeted by the city to cost approximately $215,000. “Things are really coming along nicely there, and

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JASON BRUBAKER/STAFF

The elevator shaft on the side of the Elsmere Senior Center is nearly completed, as are the bottom floor renovations. The new-look center is expected to be fully completed by the beginning of June. it’s looking good,” said Lenhof at the April 13 council meeting. “We’re just glad we’ve been able to get more done than what we thought.”

Carol Cope, the center director, said that she’s excited with the progress made on the building so far. She said the new elevator shaft on the side of the building is nearly complete, as are the renovations of the bottom floor, which includes a new kitchen area. The new kitchen includes cabinets salvaged from the upstairs kitchen (which will also be redone), as well as new countertops and appliances. “Oh, I just love this new kitchen!” said Cope, smiling. “There used to be a lot of wasted space down here, but this is so much better,

and it’s really a benefit to everyone who uses the center.” Work on the top floor of the center is continuing, Cope said, and is expected to be completed soon. In addition to the new upstairs kitchen, there will be a new lobby area near the elevator entrance, as well as three smaller rooms for recreational use that are being redone. Additionally, she said all of the new rooms will have new flooring and new paint. And although some equipment and supplies have had to be temporarily moved from the center to the public works building to make room for the construction, Cope said that the distractions have been fairly minimal to the center’s users. “For the most part, we’ve tried to keep it to business as usual,” she said. “There’s been a few changes in programs or activities, but we’ve tried our best to keep everything going, and it’s worked out pretty well.” For more information about the senior center, call 727-2306.

Thomas More College’s Center for Regional Health Care Sciences and Management is hosting a panel discussion on the Impact of the New Health Care Bill in Greater Cincinnati on Wednesday, April 28 at 7 p.m. at Steigerwald Hall at Thomas More College, 333 Thomas More Parkway, Crestview Hills, KY 4101. This event is free and open to the public. What jobs will be in demand, how accessible health care will be, and how health care costs will be impacted are some of the questions that will be addressed. Moderated by Pat Crowley, host of ICN-6 Northern Kentucky Magazine, panelists include John Dubis, Chief Operating Officer of St. Elizabeth Healthcare; Gary Beatrice, President of Business Benefits and Chairman of the Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce; and Rebeca Tacy, Professor of Nursing of Thomas More College. Ques-

tioners include Thomas More faculty: Catherine Sherron, Professor of Philosophy, John D. Rudnick, Jr., Professor of Business Administration; and John R. Hageman, Professor of Biology. Thomas More College’s Center for Regional Health Care Sciences and Management was created in 2009 to positively impact the regional capacity to produce graduates; increase the number of college graduates in the Commonwealth; create more skilled and qualified workers as a means of attracting more capital investment to the region resulting in a higher standard of living for all residents of Northern Kentucky and the region; serve as a stimulator for small business development; and provide programs of study that emphasize liberal arts within the context of ethical concern and social responsibility. For more information, contact Eric Rabe at eric.rabe@thomasmore.edu or 859-344-3337.

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News

Kenton Recorder

April 22, 2010

A5

School to host 5K race If you go

Cornerstone Classical Christian Academy will host a 5K Run/Walk at 9 a.m. Saturday, May 8. Prior to the day of the race, cost to participate is $15 without a shirt and $25 with a shirt. Day of, cost is $20 without a shirt and $30 with a shirt. To register for the 5K online, visit runningtime.net. For more information, e-mail Hollyf1974@yahoo.com.

By Regan Coomer rcoomer@nky.com

Race to the finish for Cornerstone Classical Christian Academy Saturday May 8. The Lakeside Park school is hosting its first-ever 5K Walk/Run starting at 9 a.m. May 8 at Lakeside Presbyterian Church. Race coordinator and parent Holly Fennell said the walk is meant to promote health and wellness in

REGAN COOMER/STAFF

Cornerstone Classical Christian Academy students set an example for the community prior to the first ever Cornerstone Classic 5K Run/Walk May 8. The race begins at 7:30 a.m. at Lakeside Presbyterian Church. For more information, call 816-4062. All proceeds will benefit the school.

the community as well as raise money for the school’s scholarship program. “The school is promoting the service of others,thinking about others and using their lives to honor the Lord,” she said. The route will begin at Lakeside Presbyterian and cotinue through the city of Lakeside Park. Cornerstone Classical’s 25 students will be helping out race day - passing out water bottles and handing out food, Fennell said. “We think it will be a great way to come out and get some exercise, learn more about the school and allow the community to get to know the school and the school to get to know the community,” she said. School founder John Davis said every donation is helpful to Cornerstone, a not-for-profit entity in its third year. “It’s certainly helpful to not only meet expenses, but

REGAN COOMER/STAFF

Cornerstone Classical Christian Academy will host its first 5K Run/Walk May 8, the Cornerstone Classic 5K. The race begins at 7:30 a.m. at Lakeside Presbyterian Church. For more information, call 816-4062. All proceeds will benefit the school. to allow the school to do things it might not otherwise be able to do,” he said. Davis hopes to use funds raised at the race to help families in need offset the cost of tuition. “The race is going to be a fun time, but it’s also going to be very helpful to provid-

Rotary seeks to raise playground funds The Rotary Club of Covington is presenting “An Evening of Jazz for John G.” to raise $10,000 needed to build a playground for the children attending John G. Carlisle Elementary School in Covington. Currently, these students do not have a useable playground. The Covington Rotary Club wants to create a safe and secure playground so the students and their families have a quality place for recreation. The fundraising event takes place May 22 from 6 p.m. until 10 p.m. at the Atrium of the Marriott RiverCenter in Covington. Tickets are $50 each and include two wine or beer beverages, dinner (four food stations) and dancing.

Student performers from the University of Cincinnati College Conservatory of Music will present jazz performances throughout the evening. There will be both a live auction and a silent auction. Sponsorship opportunities are available. The title sponsor opportunity is $1,000, and sponsorships are available at lesser amounts. To make reservations to attend and to discuss sponsorship opportunities, please contact Mr. Kinny McQuade at 513-961-2254 Members of Rotary Club of Covington actively volunteer as character coaches, tutors, lunch buddies, computer trainers and celebrity

ing needed assistance to families who might not otherwise be able to afford paying the full tuition at Cornerstone,” Davis said. In the past few years, Cornerstone has offered reduced tuition to about seven students, Davis said. Tuition is $3,900 each year

for kindergarten and $5,900 for first grade and up. For more information about the race or Cornerstone Classical Christian Academy, visit cornerstoneclassical.org.

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readers at John G. Carlisle Elementary School. Rotarians are professional men and women who work as volunteers to improve the quality of life in their home and world communities. Club membership represents a cross-section of local business and professional leaders. The world's Rotary clubs meet weekly, are non-political,

OUT OF THE COUNTY OR PHYSICALLY UNABLE TO GET TO THE POLLS ON ELECTION DAY MAY 18TH, 2010? CALL YOUR COUNTY CLERK’S OFFICE TO SEE IF YOU QUALIFY FOR AN ABSENTEE BALLOT BEFORE MAY 7TH, 2010. BOONE CO. 334-2130, CAMPBELL CO. 292-3885, KENTON CO. 392-1620

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Kenton Recorder

April 22, 2010

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SCHOOLS

April 22, 2010

ACHIEVEMENTS

Editor Brian Mains | bmains@nky.com | 578-1062

|

NEWS

|

ACTIVITIES

|

HONORS

N K Y. c o m

Kenton Recorder

A7

COMMUNITY RECORDER

Taylor Mill student preached purple at walk

By Regan Coomer rcoomer@nky.com

Taylor Mill 12-year-old Allison Hughes recently walked toward the Washington Monument in a sea of purple (shirts). “The cool thing about it was I saw people in purple shirts, which meant they had epilepsy like me. I thought that was really cool - I could relate to that,” Hughes said. Hughes and 20,000 other participants walked in the 2010 National Walk for Epilepsy held in Washington D.C. March 27 at the National Mall. “When you looked out all you could see was a whole bunch of purple shirts,” Hughes said. Hughes and 14 Camp Dream Catcher alums were chosen to go to

the walk. Camp Dream Catcher is a camp for students with epilepsy sponsored by the Epilepsy Foundation of Greater Cincinnati. Hughes got to visit Arlington National Cemetery, the Library of Congress and of course, the Washington Monument, Hughes’ favorite. “I liked it a lot because it was really pretty with a whole bunch of kites around it, like 1,000 kites. I was like, ‘Oh my gosh!’” Hughes said. Hughes hopes the walk raised awareness about epilepsy as well as camps like Camp Dream Catcher, which had a profound effect on the Turkey Foot Middle School seventh grader. “It’s really fun because only people with epilepsy can go there,” Hughes said. “I just want other people to know

because I want them to have the experience I had throughout the camp - to have fun and not feel like they can’t do anything.” Hughes’ mom Lisa agreed, adding “She’s been to every single one since she started going. It’s her favorite place on the planet.” This isn’t the first time Hughes has worked to raise epilepsy awareness; in the past she has raised more than $3,000 creating and selling bookmarks to help fund other kids’ stays at Camp Dream Catcher. “I’d recommend going there. It’s fun and they get to meet new kids that are just like them,” she said. For more information about Camp Dream Catcher, visit cincinnatiepilepsy.com/camp.

PROVIDED

Taylor Mill resident Allison Hughes (second from right) recently participated in the National Walk for Epilepsy in Washington, D.C. March 27. Hughes, who has epilepsy, has raised more than $3,000 in donations to Camp Dreamcatcher, a camp for children with epilepsy run by the Cincinnati chapter of the National Epilepsy Foundation.

Glitz and glamour

Students at Holmes Senior High School in Covington gathered at The Madison in Covington Saturday, April 17 for a night of glitz, glamour, music and memories. Here is a slice of memories made that evening.

PHOTOS BY PATRICIA SCHEYER/CONTRIBUTOR

Courtney Luke and Damien Oden at Holmes High School’s prom.

Samantha Trenkamp, 17, and Stefany Floyd, 18, dance the night away.

Brandi Taylor, 18, and Shamikia Smith, 17, dance at Holmes High School's prom.

Jennifer Griffin, 17, and Steven Sims, 19, toast Holmes High School's prom.

Prom king and queen, Aaron Gullett and Raven Pennington, at Holmes High School prom. Myranda Hensley, 18, Paige Leister, 18, Idreess Marshall, 17, and Sarah Long 15.


A8

Kenton Recorder

Schools

April 22, 2010

TOM MILLER/CONTRIBUTOR

Ryan Schroth and Karissa Pickens pose for a photograph at Villa Madonna's prom on Friday, April 16.

TOM MILLER/STAFF

Chloe Nemann puts on a pair of sunglasses at Villa Madonna's prom on Friday, April 16.

A night to remember PHOTOS BY TOM MILLS/STAFF

Students at Villa Madonna Academy gathered to celebrate prom Friday, April 16, for a night of high fashion, late-night dancing and fun.

TOM MILLER/STAFF

Sophomore Katie Gross, Senior Jake Cardis and Sophomore Haley Duggan pose for a photograph at Villa Madonna's prom on Friday, April 16.

;OL LUK VM SPML WYLZLU[Z ZWLJPHS JOHSSLUNLZ MVY H [LYTPUHSS` PSS WH[PLU[ HUK OPZ VY OLY MHTPS` TOM MILLER/STAFF

Junior Michael Kresge poses for a photograph wearing a pair of Hulk gloves at Villa Modanna's prom on Friday, April 16.

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SPORTS

Kenton Recorder

April 22, 2010

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | Editor Melanie Laughman | mlaughman@nky.com | 513-248-7573

Young Indians learn to win in Doc tourney By James Weber

RECREATIONAL

N K Y. c o m

A9

COMMUNITY RECORDER

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

Holy Cross freshman Conner Callery tags out Covington Catholic’s Austin Taylor at home plate for the final out in Holy Cross’s 6-5 win in the Doc Morris tourney final April 18 at Dixie Heights.

jweber@nky.com

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

Holy Cross freshman Blake Tiberi throws out a Ludlow runner April 17 during HC’s 1-0 win in the Doc Morris tournament at Morscher Park.

The Holy Cross High School baseball team graduated a deep senior group that led the team to the All “A” Classic state tournament last year. A younger Indians team got a new taste of tournament theatrics this year as they won the “Doc” Morris Scholarship Tournament for the first time in the tourney’s 21-year history. The Indians beat Covington Catholic 6-5 in the tourney final April 18 at Dixie Heights. The game ended when Cov Cath’s Austin Taylor tried to advance home with

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

In another key out in the Doc Morris tourney, Holy Cross sophomore Jeff Guidugli waits for the call after tagging out a Ludlow runner early in HC’s 1-0 win in the Doc Morris quarterfinals. the tying run on a fly ball to short center field. HC sophomore Justin Kohake caught the ball on

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

Holy Cross players celebrate the win in the Doc Morris final.

the run and fired a one-hopper to freshman catcher Conner Callery for the final out. “I just caught the ball, winged it as hard as I could and Conner came up with a great catch, dove and made a great tag,” Kohake said. Callery and Kohake each had late base hits during a four-run fifth inning that gave the Indians a 6-1 lead. Cov Cath came back with two runs in the fifth and two in the seventh before the final double play. Holy Cross beat Cooper 6-0, Ludlow 1-0 and Simon Kenton 3-1 before meeting Cov Cath in the finals of the 16-team tournament. HC improved to 12-6 on the

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

Holy Cross sophomore Kyle Fuller pitches against Ludlow April 17. year. “Anything we can do is a great learning experience for this team,” said head coach Mike Holtz. “To play tournament baseball again: You lose and you’re done, the finality of that is a great experience for a young team like this.” Blake Tiberi shut out Cooper April 17, then Kyle Fuller did the same against Ludlow later that day. Rob Broering pitched a complete game against SK, and Tyler Johnson was the starting pitcher against the Colonels. “We knew we had a fairly deep pitching staff and that has helped us,” Holtz said. “Tyler had his longest

outing of the year. He really shut them down until the very end. To end the game on a really good throw like that is characteristic of how we’ve been winning games. We score just enough runs to win and our pitching and defense has held us in there.” Kohake said a lot of players made plays during the weekend. “Great pitching, hard work, team effort,” he said. “Everybody chipped in. Our defense played great the entire tournament. We have great senior leadership.” Seniors are Drew Schneider, Ben Bolton, Keith Egan and Andy Roenker.

Calvary improving on tennis court By James Weber jweber@nky.com

Pierce Kohls has made a name for the Calvary Christian boys’ tennis team in recent years. Head coach Mike Kohls, Pierce’s father, hopes the Cougars can make an even deeper impact in the state this year. In early April, the Cougars played in the King of the Bluegrass Tournament for the third straight year. Calvary finished 11th out of 16 teams in the tourney, which invited some of the top

teams from Kentucky and surrounding states. Calvary went 2-2 in that tournament and lost its first Northern Kentucky match, 3-2 to St. Henry April 13. Pierce Kohls, Ninth Region boys’ singles runner-up the past three years, made the quarterfinals of the state tournament last year. Coach Kohls hopes Pierce gets company in the state tourney this year. Pierce will miss some matches this season after joining the Calvary baseball team. Having

committed to play tennis for Northern Kentucky University, Pierce is rounding out his prep sports career. “He really loves the team sports,” Coach Kohls said. “He hasn’t played baseball since fifth grade and he wanted to give it a try.” Senior Steve Leichter, Calvary’s No. 1 singles player when Kohls is out, has a chance to qualify for the state tourney, the coach said. “He’s a pretty good player,” Kohls said. “I think he has a decent chance to get seeded in the

region and maybe go to state if the draw works out for him. That would be super to get two from Calvary.” Another senior Cougar is surging in singles of late. Ryan Grinstead won his fourth match in a row against St. Henry, pulling out a three-set win over senior Dominic Palazzo. “He is on cloud nine,” Kohls said. “He has won four in a row. I don’t think he has won more than one in a row before. His confidence is building day by day.” The rest of the Cougar team is

sophomores and younger. Calvary will have a challenging week, playing three of the area’s top teams in Highlands (April 22), Ryle (April 23) and Covington Catholic (April 26). The first two are on the road, the third at Summit Hills Country Club in Crestview Hills. The CovCath match will feature Pierce Kohls against CovCath senior Jimmy Roebker, the 2009 state champ and victor over Kohls in the past three regional finals.

BRIEFLY This week in baseball

• Campbell County beat Simon Kenton 6-4, April 12. Simon’s Vic Newberry had three basehits. • Brossart beat Calvary Christian 12-1 in five innings, April 12. Calvary’s Andrew Moran was 2-3 and scored a homerun. • Highlands beat Scott 97, April 13. Scott’s George Sparks was 2-3 with two RBI. • Holy Cross beat Newport 11-6 in the Ninth Region All “A” Classic, April 13. Holy Cross’ Blake Tiberi was the winning pitcher; Keith Egan was 3-4 with three base hits and three RBI.

beat Becker and Seimer 6-3, 6-0; Frantz and Niehaus beat Smith and Schleyer 6-4, 7-5. Holy Cross advances to 3-0 with the win. • St. Henry beat Calvary Christian 3-2, April 13. Calvary’s Steve Leichter beat Bungenstock 6-1, 6-2; Ryan Grinstead beat Palazzo 3-6, 7-5, 7-5. • Holy Cross beat Newport Central Catholic 3-2, April 14. Holy Cross’ Evan Sullivan beat Brennan 6-0, 6-0; Brian Scheper beat Hogie 6-1, 6-2; and Marcus Lea and Jared Andrews beat Guthier and Gearding 6-3, 6-0. Holy Cross advances to 4-0 with the win.

This week in tennis

This week in softball

• Holy Cross boys beat Covington Latin 4-1, April 12. Holy Cross’ Mark Tewes beat Stephen 2-6, 6-2, 6-1; Seth Graham beat Matchinga 6-1, 6-4; Drew Schaffer and Aerni

• Newport Catholic beat Scott 6-0, April 12. • Simon Kenton beat Notre Dame 16-1, April 12. Simon’s Courtney Morgan was the winning pitcher, and Kayla

Beetem had two RBI. • Bishop Brossart beat Calvary Christian 13-0 in five innings, April 12. • Holy Cross beat Villa Madonna 12-2, April 13. Holy Cross’ Brooke Crail was the winning pitcher, and Allison Mueller had two base hits. • Holmes beat Beechwood 17-5 in six innings, April 13. Holmes’ Ashley Gregory was the winning pitcher, and Megan Bohman was 3-4 with four RBIs. • Bellevue beat Calvary Christian 23-6, April 13. Calvary’s Francis had two base hits. • Grant County beat Simon Kenton 5-4, April 13. Simon’s Lindsey Bridges was 3-4. • Scott beat Beechwood 15-0 in four innings, April 14. Scott’s winning pitcher was Amanda Bruemmer, and Tara Wells was 4-4 with six base hits and three RBI.

Time to jump

ERNEST COLEMAN/STAFF

Holmes High School long jumper David Stephens take his jump Tuesday, April 13 at the Colerain Invitational in Cincinnati.


Kenton Recorder

SIDELINES

Sisters on, off the field

Few openings on women’s softball team

Kenton County Parks and Recreation still has a few openings left for its Friday women’s league beginning play at Pioneer Park on Friday, April 30. Fees for a 10-game season, plus a single-elimination tournament are $250 per team. One dozen USSSAapproved softballs are included in the league fee. Umpire fees are $15 per team and are not included in your league fee. Each team will pay the Umpire directly before each game. Games will begin at 6:15 p.m. and 7:15 p.m. with an allowance for a 15minute grace period for the start of the 6:15 p.m. game. Players will compete for a league champion team trophy, T-shirts, and tournament seeding, and then a winning team trophy and T-shirts in the tournament. No games will be scheduled for the holiday weekends of Memorial Day, Independence Day, or Labor Day. A single-elimination tournament will begin on Fridays at the end of the season for as many nights as it takes. Recreational softball for is also available for women, 16 years of age and older. Call Steve Trauger at 525-PLAY or e-mail him at steve.trauger@kentoncounty.org.

Sports & recreation

April 22, 2010

FILE PHOTO

Notre Dame Academy seniors Krista Noll (center) and Catie Ammerman (right) were two of eight students involved in the automobile accident April 16 in northern Alabama. Most of the eight students, including Maria Schaffstein, who died in the accident, were involved in athletics. Ammerman has committed to play basketball for NCAA Division III DePauw in Greencastle, Ind. Noll was on the tennis team this spring. Senior Lesley Drees is at left.

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Three of the eight Notre Dame senior athletes in this picture were in the car accident April 16 in Alabama. Twin sisters Katie Russo (front row, first from left) and Jessie Russo (back row, third from left) both signed to play soccer for Lincoln Memorial University. Megan Berberich (front row, second from left) has signed to play soccer for the University of Louisville. April 19, the day Notre Dame Academy had a press conference about the car accident, the school was originally going to have a signing celebration for these eight students plus three others, including Catie Ammerman (DePauw).

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• Calvary Christian beat Silver Grove 16-2 in five innings, April 13. Calvary’s Mitchell Davenport was the winning pitcher, and Chris Looy was 3-4 with two basehits and two RBIs. • Covington Catholic beat Holmes 7-1, April 14. Holmes Tommy Courtney had two basehits. • Boone County beat Simon Kenton 6-2, April 14. Simon’s Chad Lawrence had two basehits. • Campbell County beat Scott 9-6, April 14. Scott’s Joe Adkins was 2-4. • Beechwood beat Ludlow 9-5, April 14. Ludlow’s Chuck Penick was 3-4. • Dixie Heights beat Cooper 4-0, April 14. Dixie’s Brice Smallwood pitched nine strikeouts, and Brad Popham had two basehits. •Holy Cross beat Newport 14-6, April 16. Holy Cross’ Keith Egan was the winning pitcher, and Nick Ritter was 2-

2, scored a homerun and had two RBIs. • Simon Kenton beat Bellevue 2-1, April 17. Simon’s Ryan Mullin was the winning pitcher, and Winkler had two basehits. • Simon Kenton beat Scott 4-1, April 17. Simon’s Josh Berger was the winning pitcher, was 2-3, had two basehits and two RBIs. Scott’s Andrew Laughlin had two basehits. • Scott beat Conner 2-1, April 17. Scott’s George Sparks was the winning pitcher, and Bezold was 2-3. • Dixie Heights beat Holmes 8-1, April 17, in the Doc Morris Tournament. Dixie’s Keegan Burney pitched 10 strikeouts, and George Paskal was 2-3, scored a homerun and had three RBIs. • Dixie Heights beat Boone County 9-3, April 17, in the Doc Morris Tournament. Dixie’s Brett Stansberry pitched eight strikeouts, and Corey Klei had three basehits.

• Holy Cross beat Cooper 6-0, April 17, in the Doc Morris Tournament. Holy Cross’ Blake Tiberi was the winning pitcher, and was 2-3 with two basehits. • Holy Cross beat Ludlow 1-0 in the Doc Morris Tournament, April 17. Holly Cross’ Kyle Fuller was the winning pitcher, and Jeff Guidugli had two basehits. Ludlow’s Penick had two basehits. • Ludlow beat Newport Central Catholic 6-3, April 17, in the Doc Morris Tournament. Ludlow’s Camarena was the winning pitcher, and was 2-4 with two basehits and two RBIs.

More in softball

• Simon Kenton beat Holmes 6-0, April 14. Simon’s Courtney Morgan pitched 13 strikeouts, and Jamie Draud was 2-4 with three RBIs. • Scott beat Boone County 4-1, April 16. Scott’s Audrey Williamson was the winning

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pitcher, and Tara Wells had two basehits.

Sportsmanship award winner

Simon Kenton High School senior Weston Ott is the Region 8 winner of the Forcht Group of Kentucky/Kentucky National Insurance/KHSAA Regional Sportsmanship award. KHSAA member schools each select one boys and one girl as the local school sportsmanship winner. School winners are then eligible to be selected as the regional winner. From the 32 regional winners, one boy and one girl will be selected as the state winner and receive a one-time $3,000 scholarship courtesy of Forcht Group of Kentucky and Kentucky National Insurance. Each regional winner receives a plaque, a mantle clock and a $200 book scholarship.


VIEWPOINTS

Kenton Recorder

April 22, 2010

EDITORIALS

|

LETTERS

|

COLUMNS

|

A11

COMMUNITY RECORDER

CH@TROOM

N K Y. c o m

Editor Brian Mains | bmains@nky.com | 578-1062

Kentucky’s budget stalemate disappointing, could be worse The General Assembly adjourned the 2010 General Assembly Session without finalizing a budget. It is a matter that has caused much frustration and even anger. No was more disappointed than myself. As I stated in my last column, the fact of the matter is that the Senate would not agree to a fiscally unsound budget proposed by the House that raised more than $280 million in taxes and bonded more than $1 billion in projects that we cannot afford. That being said, I would rather have no budget than a bad budg-

State Sen. John Schickel Community Recorder guest columnist et. The media like to focus on the cost of a special session, but that cost compared to the money saved by a special session is miniscule. It is estimated that a special session would cost around $60,000 a day. Just the interest on the $1 billion worth of borrowed money that the House proposed would be $1.2

million a day. While the need for a special session is disappointing, it is a good investment when comparing the other options. We cannot continue to tax and spend and borrow. We must provide financial stability to our citizens so they know we have our financial house in order. The state must make the same hard choices that our families are making and have been making for a long time. This will help Kentucky live within our means and prepare us for a better day. After a cooling off period, I am sure that talks will continue between the Senate and the House.

After having little involvement during the session, the governor announced that he would call the General Assembly back into session in May. It would be a mistake to call us back without a prior written agreement. We in the Senate are standing firm against higher debt and higher taxes. If you agree, please call toll-free 1-800-3727181 or TTY 1-800-896-0305 and let your representative know that you support a responsible two-year budget that includes no job-killing taxes on Kentucky employers and stops our spiral into unsustainable indebtedness.

Now for some good news: I had a good session legislatively. Only three senators sponsored more successful legislation than myself during this session. These bills will make Kentucky government more efficient and responsive. We will review these bills in the next column. State Sen, John Schickel, R-Union, represents the 11th Senate District, which includes Boone and Gallatin Counties and part of Kenton County. He welcomes your concerns or comments toll-free at 1-800-372-7181 or online at http://www.lrc.ky.gov/Mailform/S011.htm

CHATROOM What’s your opinion of Chad Ochocinco’s non-football activities, like “Dancing with the Stars”? “To me, these athletes should have to purchase a high quantity of injury insurance to cover their franchise in case of injury. You can not limit them for what they can do, but you can make them think twice about their safety, the franchise and their fans.” D.J. “Chad is a breath of fresh air.” J.Z. “I have no interest in dancing when professionals do it so I seldom watch ‘Dancing With The Stars.’ Just the same I have seen some of Chad’s performances and think he should concentrate more on football.” R.V. “Good for him! He is pretty good at dancing, and if he enjoys it, more power to him. I’m a little jealous of his talent; he is a real entertainer in many ways. I hope this makes him happy.” B.B.

PROVIDED

Cookie math

“He seems to dance better and more consistently than playing football. Maybe he missed his true calling.” R.L.H.

St. Henry students Jake Jonaes, Cameron Bier, Maddie Winters, Whit Hammond are seen here baking cookies for a class project in fractions. As a final test the fourth-graders put their use of fractions into every day life experiences by using measurements to bake their cookies.

“Who cares? When Chad (whatever his last name du jour is) becomes a great, consistent player on the football field, then maybe what he does off the field will take on some interest.” M.M.

Asparagus needs good root system

“I think it’s good for his image and the image of the Bengals.” K.A.P. “Go Chad go ... just tone down some of your comments!” S.W. “I hope Chad gets his ego adequately stroked by his TV programs; his body in good shape from the dancing rigor and then focuses on being a great football player. I hope it all works together for good.” G.G.

Next questions How did you spend, or how do you plan, to spend your tax refund? Was it more or less than last year? Send your response to kynews@communitypress.com with “chatroom” in the subject line.

Question : I planted some asparagus in my garden last spring, and I want to plant more now. Some spears are coming up, but they are very thin. Did I do something wrong? Answer: You will need a sunny location. You should not harvest the first year. And don’t harvest spears if they are less than pencil diameter. Just let them grow up into ferns. Also, be sure to fertilize each year in the spring. Here are some general guidelines for successful asparagus production. Asparagus is a perennial vegetable that, once established, may live for 15 to 30 years. Locate asparagus to one side of the garden where it will not be disturbed. It is one of the most valuable early vegetables and is well adapted to freezer storage. The spears develop daily in early spring with the rate of emergence increasing as temperatures increase. You can start asparagus from seed, although starting from 1- to 2-year-old crowns set in early March is recommended. You could still do this now. The crowns are actually a com-

bination of rhizomes, fleshy roots and fibrous roots. The fleshy roots, which may spread laterally under the soil several feet from the rhizomes, Mike Klahr store food reserves that help Community develop the tenRecorder der shoots the columnist next spring. Soil type determines the depth to plant crowns. Usually they are planted in a trench 12 to 15 inches wide and 6 to 8 inches deep. Plant at the shallower depth if the soil is heavy clay. Incorporate rotted manure or compost, plus fertilizer, into the soil before setting the crowns because little organic matter can be added later. When planting asparagus, set plants 15 to 18 inches apart in rows 30 inches apart. Place the crown on a small amount of soil in the trench, allowing it to be slightly higher than the roots. Spread the roots out and cover the crown with 2 to 3 inches of soil. Firm

ABOUT LETTERS & COLUMNS We welcome your comments on editorials, columns, stories or other topics important to you in the Recorder. Include your name, address and phone number(s) so we may verify your letter. Letters of 200 or fewer words and columns of 500 or fewer words have the best chance of being published. All submissions may be edited for length, accuracy and clarity. Deadline: Noon Monday E-mail: kynews@communitypress.com Fax: 859-283-7285U.S. mail: See box below Letters, columns and articles submitted to Recorder may be published or distributed in print, electronic or other forms. down well. As plants begin to grow, continue to put soil around and over the crowns until the trench is filled. Asparagus shoots or spears should not be harvested the first year after crowns are set. Limit harvests the second year after planting to three to four weeks, then let the ferns grow. This procedure is necessary so that the root system will develop from its limited size and will store food reserves to produce growth the next year. Plants harvested too heavily too early after setting may become weakened and spindly. After the third year, harvests can be continued for eight to 10

weeks. Harvest spears daily when they are 5 to 7 inches tall. Break them off at the soil level instead of cutting below the soil surface. Cutting can easily injure the crown buds which produce the next spears. Harvest in early morning and use or refrigerate immediately. Each year in the early spring, sidedress asparagus with 1 pound of 5-10-10 fertilizer per 100 square feet. Following freezing weather in the fall, remove the asparagus tops to decrease disease problems.

A publication of

COMMUNITY RECORDER

Kenton Community Recorder Editor .Brian Mains bmains@nky.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .578-1062

Mike Klahr is the Boone County Extension Agent for Horticulture.

s

A WORLD OF DIFFERENT VOICES

Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Friday | See page A2 for additional contact information.

283-0404 | 228 Grandview Drive, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017 | 654 Highland Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075 | e-mail kynews@nky.com | Web site: www.nky.com


A12

Kenton Recorder

April 22, 2010

HOUSEHOLD WASTE COLLECTION DAY Residents of Boone, Kenton and Campbell Counties

Saturday, April 24, 2010 9:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m. LOCATION:

TOYOTA 25 Atlantic Avenue, Erlanger, KY

DIRECTIONS:

Take I-275 to the Mineola Pike Exit (Exit 2) Go south on Mineola Pike and follow signs to event

COLLECTION DETAILS AND RESTRICTIONS AEROSOL CANS: ANTIFREEZE:

All aerosol cans, including spray paint, will be accepted. Antifreeze only - NO mixtures will be accepted.

APPLIANCES:

Working and non-working appliances will be accepted, including: washers, dryers, refrigerators, dish washers, microwaves, etc.

BATTERIES:

All batteries will be accepted, including: Alkaline, Ni Cad, Lithium, Lead Acid, etc.

BULBS:

CFL bulbs, 4 ft. tubes and 8 ft. tubes will be accepted.

CORROSIVES/ FLAMMABLES:

NO ammunition, gun powder, explosives or radioactive items will be accepted. Fuel and kerosene will be accepted.

DRUGS:

Prescription and over-the-counter drugs will be accepted, both liquid and solid form.

ELECTRONICS:

E-Scraps such as TVs, PCs, laptops, cables, cell phones, cameras and VCRs will be accepted.

INK/TONER CARTRIDGES:

Any ink or toner cartridge that comes out of a printer, copier or fax machine will be accepted.

OIL:

Used motor oil, hydraulic fluid, transmission fluid and brake fluid will be accepted.

PAINT:

All types of paint will be accepted.

PESTICIDES:

Pesticides are limited to 2 gallons or 2 pounds per vehicle.

PROPANE TANKS:

ONLY 20 lbs. propane tanks will be accepted.

WE WILL NOT BE ACCEPTING FERTILIZER, TIRES OR MERCURY CONTAINING DEVICES. WE ALSO HAVE THE RIGHT TO REJECT ANY ITEM THAT YOU BRING. HAVE QUESTIONS OR NEED MORE INFORMATION? CALL: 859-334-3151 before April 24th

Special thanks to:

CE-0000395249

Battery Solutions Bavarian Bluegrass Recycling Blue Rhino Close the Loop Covington Reuse Center CSI EEI GES Green Metals

No. Ky. Drug Strike Force No. Ky. HazMat/WMD Response Team No. Ky. Household Hazardous Waste Action Coalition No. Ky. Solid Waste Management Rumpke Sanitation District 1 of Northern Kentucky Toyota Treehouse Environmental United Waste Water Services


COMMUNITY RECORDER

T h u r s d a y, A p r i l 2 2 , 2 0 1 0

BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT

PEOPLE

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IDEAS

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RECIPES

Plenty fun to be had in Kenton County parks By Regan Coomer rcoomer@nky.com

PATRICIA A. SCHEYER/CONTRIBUTOR

Dr. Benjamin Gosnell and Dr. Joseph Gormley relax for a moment in their offices on U.S. 42.

Family dentist stresses wellness By Patricia A. Scheyer Community Recorder Contributor

Dr. Joseph Gormley has been fixing the teeth of Florence residents since 1974, when he opened his office on U.S. 42. His associate, Dr. Benjamin Gosnell, joined him last October and has freed Gormley to explore new avenues, such as mini dental implants and appliances to relieve sleep apnea. “The new mini dental implants would require less of a surgical procedure than regular implants, which we do on a regular basis already,” Gormley explained. “Mini implants would take the place of regular ones in cases like anchoring lower dentures.” Sleep apnea is a condition that affects many peo-

ple. If the apnea is not very severe, patients can get some relief from a dental appliance which pulls the jaw forward, thus opening the throat. “The C-PAP machine is generally prescribed for sleep apnea patients, and it works very well,” said Gormley. “However, it is cumbersome, and takes some time to get used to. The dental appliance provides an option, and has been shown to be of value to those patients who just can’t do the C-PAP machine.” Gormley is a family dentist, and he stresses wellness, appearance, function and comfort for an improved quality of life. “We don’t concentrate on volume,” he said. “We work on the whole picture.”

THINGS TO DO It’s a Pet aFair

The sixth annual It’s a Pet aFair is scheduled to take place at Gil Lynn Park in Dayton April 24 from 11 a.m. until 4 p.m. The event will include a pet costume parade with Grand Marshals Sheree Palello of WLWT and Cyndee O’Quinn of WCPO. The cost for entry into the parade is $5 a pet. Proceeds will go to the Stray Animal Adoption Program. For more information, visit www.adoptastray.com or call 391-1234. Gil Lynn Park is located at 201 Green Devil Lane.

Spring Bling

The Northern Kentucky Convention Center will be transformed into a secret garden as it hosts Spring Bling Glammin in the Garden April 24 from 10:30 a.m. until 2:30 p.m. The event will feature emcee Pat Reilly, entertainment by Leslie Hitch and author Mary Beth Hall. There will also be vendor tables, Bling Bling jewelry exchange, Garden Glam raffle and more.

The event will benefit the I Have Wings Breast Cancer Foundation. For more information, visit www.ihavewings.org or call 331-7013.

Kenton County Parks and Recreation is asking families to head outside this summer. County parks will offer an extensive lineup of events from May to August to help residents and their kids do just that. “You don’t have to go somewhere far away like the zoo or Kentucky Down Under or Sunrock Farm. You don’t have to go that distance to pay entry fees. Just come to our parks and you get a mini experience for free and in a lot of cases, free lunch,” said Kenton County Parks Programs Coordinator Steve Trauger. This is the 11th season of Trauger’s successful brainchild Wild Wednesdays, which brings a little taste of the local outdoors at 10 a.m. almost every Wednesday throughout the summer, starting May 5 this year. Returning to Wild Wednesdays after missing a few summers is a program about beekeeping in Appalachia and new to the program is Raptor, Inc. of Ohio. Almost every Wild Wednesdays also features free lunch for everyone paid for by local sponsors such as Snappy Tomato’s, the Cherokee Grill and more, Trauger said. Another popular summer parks program, (Almost) Every Other Thursday Science, debuts this year May 13 and will feature new guests including Bob Stewart, who will discuss Kentucky after the Ice Age May 20, and Dendrochronology: Nature’s Time Machines June 3, in which an expert will teach kids how to use trees to learn about the past. Trauger said he is excited about the Second Annual Go Outside (And Don’t Come Home ‘Til the Street Lights Come On) May 15 at Doe Run Lake. The event will feature 25 outdoors vendors and the Northern Kentucky Bluegrass Band, sponsored by Dominach’s Taekwondo. “People will learn about things that they probably didn’t know about or didn’t know was this close,” Trauger explained. “It should just be a heck of a lot of fun.” Local organizations will be on-hand to give out information, demonstrations and allow residents to try out the activity themselves right then and there, Trauger said.

FILE PHOTO

Kenton County Parks & Recreation hosted COSI on Wheels at last year’s Wild Wednesdays. The popular program will debut this year May 5 with the Raptor Rehabilitation of Kentucky.

Almost every Wild Wednesdays also features free lunch for everyone paid for by local sponsors such as Snappy Tomato’s, the Cherokee Grill and more. The Third Annual Skittles Championship of the World will spin into being this summer at Pioneer Park June 19. The championship is open to spinners and all ages to play the game, which Trauger called a “Kentucky thing.”

It’s something anyone can do, Trauger said, explaining a player wraps a string around a wooden top and gives it a pool to knock down as many bowling pins as possible. “We set up seven different tables to represent the continents so you get one pull at North America, Europe, Asia and so one and then you total your seven scores. Whoever has the highest total is champion of the world,” Trauger said. For a full listing of events in Kenton County Parks this summer, visit kentoncounty.org or call 525-PLAY (7529).

Spring into health

Learn about the benefits of organic food at the Boone County Main Library in Burlington April 27 at 7 p.m. The event includes sample dishes, recipes and a take home organic goody bag from Whole Foods Market. Registration is required and the class costs $5. For more information, call 342-2665. The library is located at 1786 Burlington Pike.

Share your events Go to nky.com and click on Share! to get your event into the Kenton Recorder.

FILE PHOTO

FILE PHOTO

Emma Holtkamp, 4, of Ryland Heights, hung onto a frog handed her by Michael Strohm, in the character of wildlife artist John James Audubon, during a program at Middleton-Mills Park last summer. The program, part of the Kenton County Parks’ “Wild Wednesdays” series, featured Strohm and Howard McDaniel portraying George Lehman, a botanical artist who accompanied Audubon in the 1830s.

FREE Open Houses iPhone App Find open houses and homes for sale near you…on the go! Visit www.homefinder.com/mobile/info for more information

Bernice Odegaard from Villa Hills got the top score of 680 points making her the new Skittles Champion of the World at Pioneer Park where the Kenton County Parks & Recreation presented the Skittles Championship of the World in 2009.


B2

Kenton Recorder

April 22, 2010

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD F R I D A Y, A P R I L 2 3

LITERARY - CRAFTS

Cincinnati Treasures: Rookwood Pottery, 6 p.m. Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Riley Humler discusses history of Rookwood Pottery and appraises family treasures. Ages 18 and up. Free. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 3422665; www.bcpl.org. Burlington.

MUSEUMS

History Unearthed: Archaeology Speaks, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Behringer-Crawford Museum, 1600 Montague Road, Exhibit explores world of archaeology through photography, dig-site information and hands-on activities including actual staged indoor dig for all ages. Included with admission: $7, $6 ages 60 and up, $4 ages 3-17, free for members and ages 2 and under. 491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

MUSIC - BLUEGRASS

Bluegrass Jam, 6 p.m.-9 p.m. Willis Music Store Performance Hall, 7567 Mall Road, All ages and skill levels welcome. Family friendly. Free. Presented by Willis Music. 5256050. Florence.

MUSIC - BLUES

Sonny Moorman, 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m. Sidebar, 322 Greenup St. Free. 431-3456. Covington.

MUSIC - CLASSIC ROCK Flight Station, 9:30 p.m.-1:30 p.m. $5. KJ’s Pub, 2379 Buttermilk Crossing, 344-1413. Crescent Springs.

MUSIC - COUNTRY

Quintana, 10 p.m. Peecox II, 12200 Madison Pike, 356-1440. Independence.

MUSIC - JAZZ

New Sleepcat Band, 7:30 p.m. Dee Felice Cafe, 529 Main St. Directed by Bill Gemmer and features John Von Ohlen. 261-2365; www.deefelice.com. Covington.

MUSIC - ROCK

Daniel Orlando, 7:30 p.m. York St. Cafe, 738 York St. 261-9675; www.danorlandomusic.com. Newport.

ON STAGE - COMEDY

Jo Koy, 8 p.m. Dinner available. $17. Funny Bone Comedy Club, Newport on the Levee, Comedian. 957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

ON STAGE - STUDENT THEATER

Guys and Dolls, 7:30 p.m. Ryle High School, 10379 U.S. 42, Theater. Classical musical comedy. $8, $5 seniors and students, $3 children. Through May 1. 384-5000, ext. 133; www.showtix4u.com. Union. All Shook Up, 7:30 p.m.-10 p.m. Newport Central Catholic High School, 13 Carothers Road, Auditorium. $8. Through April 25. 2920001; www.ncchs.com. Newport.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Bury the Dead, 7:30 p.m. Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, 1028 Scott Blvd. Six slain soldiers arise from graves and refuse to be buried, inciting international intrigue. With the UC College-Conservatory of Music Department of Drama. Talkback session follows performance. $18, $16 members, $14 students. Through April 24. 957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington. Bye Bye Birdie, 8 p.m. NKU Corbett Auditorium, Nunn Drive, Tony Award-winning musical comedy tells story of rock and roll singer who is about to be inducted into the army. $12, $11 NKU faculty, staff, alumni, $10 ages 60 and up, $8 student. Presented by Northern Kentucky University Theatre and Dance. Through April 25. 572-5464; www.nku.edu/~theatre. Highland Heights.

S A T U R D A Y, A P R I L 2 4

BENEFITS Spring Bling Glammin in the Garden, 10:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Northern Kentucky Convention Center, 1 W. RiverCenter Blvd. NKY Convention Center transformed into a secret garden. Pat Reilly, emcee. Entertainment by Leslie Hitch. Meet author of, “Lessons of a Bald Chick,” Mary Beth Hall. Includes vendor tables, Bling Bling jewelry exchange, Garden Glam raffle and more. Benefits I Have Wings Breast Cancer Foundation. $40. Reservations required. Presented by I Have Wings Breast Cancer Foundation. 331-7013; www.ihavewings.org. Covington. HOLIDAY - EARTH DAY

Earth Fair, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Fort Thomas Clock Tower Plaza, 30 N. Fort Thomas Ave. Earth Day celebration with eco-friendly exhibitors, farmer’s market, live music, free trees, raffles and activities for children. Recycling bins available for purchase. Attendees can drop off eye wear, batteries and cell phones for recycling. Free. Presented by City of Fort Thomas. 441-2661. Fort Thomas.

MUSEUMS

History Unearthed: Archaeology Speaks, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Behringer-Crawford Museum, Included with admission: $7, $6 ages 60 and up, $4 ages 3-17, free for members and ages 2 and under. 491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

SCHOOLS

Entrance Exam, 8:45 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Covington Latin School, 21 E. Eleventh St. Covington Latin School entrance exam for above-average students who have just completed 5th, 6th or 7th grade. $50. Registration required. 291-7044; www.covingtonlatin.org. Covington.

MUSIC - BLUES

Chuck Brisbin & the Tuna Project, 10 p.m. Mansion Hill Tavern, 502 Washington Ave. Free. 581-0100. Newport. Sonny Moorman, 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m. Sidebar, Free. 431-3456. Covington. Surf & Blues Winterfest, 6 p.m.-1 a.m. Mahogany’s Coffee House and Bar, 3715 Winston Ave. Music by the Maladroits, the AmpFibians, the Surfer Tiki Bandits and the Southgate Boys. Includes beach drink specials. Dinner available 6 p.m. Family friendly. 261-1029. Latonia.

MUSIC - COUNTRY

Quintana, 10 p.m. Peecox II, 356-1440. Independence.

MUSIC - JAZZ

New Sleepcat Band, 7 p.m. Dee Felice Cafe, 261-2365; www.deefelice.com. Covington.

MUSIC - ROCK

24/7, 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m. $5. KJ’s Pub, 2379 Buttermilk Crossing, 344-1413. Crescent Springs.

ON STAGE - COMEDY

Jo Koy, 7:30 p.m. Dinner available. $17. Funny Bone Comedy Club, 957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

ON STAGE - STUDENT THEATER

All Shook Up, 7:30 p.m.-10 p.m. Newport Central Catholic High School, $8. 292-0001; www.ncchs.com. Newport.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Bury the Dead, 7:30 p.m. Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, $18, $16 members, $14 students. 957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

For more about Greater Cincinnati’s dining, music, events, movies and more, go to Metromix.com. Bye Bye Birdie, 8 p.m. NKU Corbett Auditorium, $12, $11 NKU faculty, staff, alumni, $10 ages 60 and up, $8 student. 572-5464; www.nku.edu/~theatre. Highland Heights.

SPECIAL EVENTS

Tony Valentine’s Girls Night Out, 8:30 p.m. Doors open at 7 p.m. Madison Theater, 730 Madison Ave. Male exotic dance revue formerly of Chippendales. Ages 18 and up. VIP: $25, $20 advance; $20, $15 advance. 4912444; www.madisontheateronline.com. Covington.

VOLUNTEER EVENTS

Great American Cleanup Covington, 9 a.m.-noon, Center for Great Neighborhoods of Covington, 1650 Russell St. Help beautify and clean more than 30 sites needing support. Pizza party follows and all volunteer receive T-shirt. Family friendly. Free. Registration required. 547-5542; www.greatneighborhoods.org. Covington. Give Back Cincinnati Blazing Trails, 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Devou Park, 1344 Audubon Road, Help Give Back Cincinnati and Cincinnati Off Road Alliance build trails. Ages 18 and up. Free. Registration required. Presented by Give Back Cincinnati. 292-2151; www.givebackcincinnati.org. Covington. Great American Cleanup, 8:30 a.m.-noon, Rabbit Hash General Store, 10021 Lower River Road, National day of service with nearly two and a half million volunteers throughout the country cleaning up their communities. Volunteers pick up litter as well as improve neighborhoods by planting flowers and trees, cleaning riverbanks, collecting tires, painting facades, fences and fire hydrants, landscaping, street-sweeping, power washing windows, distributing recycling bins and removing gum and graffiti. Free. Presented by Keep Cincinnati Beautiful. 513-3524380; keepcincinnatibeautiful.org. Boone County. S U N D A Y, A P R I L 2 5

MUSEUMS

History Unearthed: Archaeology Speaks, 1 p.m.-5 p.m. Behringer-Crawford Museum, Included with admission: $7, $6 ages 60 and up, $4 ages 3-17, free for members and ages 2 and under. 491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

MUSIC - BENEFITS

Play It Forward Goes Country, 2 p.m.-7 p.m. Bobby Mackey’s Music World, 44 Licking Pike, Country music by Danny Frazier Band, Dallas Moore Band, Scotty Anderson, Laura Hazelbaker and the BuckeyeRoos, Jenn Harris, Terry Johnson and the Coal Train Band. Includes performance by Gary Burbank, with guest appearances by Earl Pitts and the Right Reverend Deuteronomy Skaggs. Ages 18 and up. Benefits Play It Forward. $15, $12 advance. Presented by Play It Forward. 8594315588; www.pifcincy.org. Wilder.

MUSIC - JAZZ

Sunday Jazz in the Afternoon, 4:30 p.m. The Phil DeGreg Trio. Dee Felice Cafe, 529 Main St. 261-2365; www.deefelice.com. Covington.

PROVIDED

Nick Horn and his dad Dave Horn, of Independence, help clean up Doe Run Lake in Covington as part of the Great American Cleanup last year. This year, people can help clean up Northern Kentucky Saturday, April 24, at various locations. For specific times and locations, see “Volunteer Events” under April 24. For more information, visit www.kab.org.

ON STAGE - COMEDY

Jo Koy, 7:30 p.m. Dinner available. $15. Funny Bone Comedy Club, 957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

About calendar

ON STAGE - STUDENT THEATER

All Shook Up, 7:30 p.m.-10 p.m. Newport Central Catholic High School, $8. 292-0001; www.ncchs.com. Newport.

To submit calendar items, go to “www.NKY.com” and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to “life@communitypress.com” along with event information. Items are printed on a space-available basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to “www.NKY.com” and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page.

ON STAGE - THEATER

W E D N E S D A Y, A P R I L 2 8

Bye Bye Birdie, 3 p.m. NKU Corbett Auditorium, $12, $11 NKU faculty, staff, alumni, $10 ages 60 and up, $8 student. 572-5464; www.nku.edu/~theatre. Highland Heights.

RECREATION

Texas Hold ‘Em Poker Night, 5 p.m. Shimmers, 1939 Dixie Highway, Includes Shimmers gift certificate prizes. Free. 426-0490. Fort Wright. M O N D A Y, A P R I L 2 6

HEALTH / WELLNESS Mobile Mammography Unit, 7 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Crestview Hills Town Center, 2929 Dixie Highway, Fifteen-minute screenings. Cost varies per insurance plan. Financial assistance available for qualified applicants. Appointments required. Presented by Jewish Hospital. 513-686-3300. Crestview Hills. LITERARY LIBRARIES

Wii Sports for Adults, 1 p.m. Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Free. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 342-2665; www.bcpl.org. Burlington. Writers Group, 7 p.m. Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Join local writing enthusiasts. Share work, and get feedback. Ages 18 and up. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 342-2665; www.bcpl.org. Burlington. T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 2 7

KARAOKE AND OPEN MIC Karaoke, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Shimmers, 426-0490. Fort Wright.

MUSIC ACOUSTIC

Cory Moore, 5:30 p.m.-8:30 p.m. KJ’s Pub, 2379 Buttermilk Crossing, 344-1413. Crescent Springs.

MUSIC - BLUES

Ricky Nye, 7:30 p.m. Chez Nora, 530 Main St. Free. 491-8027. Covington. Original Wed Blues Jam, 6 p.m.-1 a.m. Mahogany’s Coffee House and Bar, 3715 Winston Ave. 261-1029; www.mahoganyslive.com. Latonia.

MUSIC - CONCERTS

Minus the Bear, 8 p.m. Doors open at 7 p.m. Madison Theater, 730 Madison Ave. Indie rock band from Seattle. $16. 491-2444; www.madisontheateronline.com. Covington.

MUSIC - WORLD

Los Campesinos, 7:30 p.m. With Cymbals Eat Guitars. Mad Hatter, 620 Scott St. Welsh septet band. $15. 291-2233; www.madhatterclub.com. Covington.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Running Word Wednesday, 7 p.m.-9 p.m. Bean Haus, 640 Main St. Share writing or monologue, or listen to readings by others. Free. 431-2326. Covington.

T H U R S D A Y, A P R I L 2 9

ART EXHIBITS The London Police Ride Again, 1 p.m.-6 p.m. The BLDG, Free. 491-4228; www.bldgrefuge.com. Covington. COMMUNITY DANCE

SwinGallery, 8 p.m.-11:30 p.m. Step-N-Out Studio, 721 Madison Road, All ages. No partner required. Free beginner East Coast Swing lesson 8-9 p.m. Dancing to music by DJ 9-11:30 p.m. Ages 18 and up. $5. Presented by SwinGallery. Through Dec. 16. 513-290-9022; www.swingallery.com. Covington.

EDUCATION

Home Cleaning Products: Safe, Healthy and Green, 10 a.m.-noon, Boone County Cooperative Extension Service, 6028 Camp Ernst Road, Learn how to evaluate and make best choices from growing number of green products. Ages 21 and up. Free. 586-6101; ces.ca.uky.edu/boone. Burlington.

KARAOKE AND OPEN MIC

Karaoke, 9 p.m. Peecox II, 12200 Madison Pike, 356-1440. Independence. Karaoke, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Shimmers, 426-0490. Fort Wright.

ART EXHIBITS

The London Police Ride Again, 1 p.m.-6 p.m. The BLDG, Free. 491-4228; www.bldgrefuge.com. Covington.

COMMUNITY DANCE

Line Dancing, 7 p.m.-9 p.m. Lookout Heights Civic Club, 1661 Park Road, Holly and Bernie Ruschman, instructors. Beginners welcome. $6, $3 for first-timers. Presented by H & B Dance Co. Through Dec. 28. 727-0904. Fort Wright.

KARAOKE AND OPEN MIC

Karaoke, 8:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. Shimmers, 1939 Dixie Highway, 426-0490. Fort Wright.

MOM’S CLUBS

MOMS Club of Independence Open House, 10 a.m.-noon, Kenton County Cooperative Extension Service, 10990 Marshall Road, Refreshments and door prizes. Children welcome. Free. Presented by MOMS Club of Independence. 356-1634; http://momsclub41051.com or www.momsclub.org. Covington. PROVIDED

The American Girl Fashion Show will be Friday-Sunday, April 23-25, at Music Hall. For girls 4-13, their families and dolls, the event provides a light meal and presentation of contemporary and historical fashions by local girls. The weekend is in support of the Aubrey Rose Foundation, which helps critically ill children. Shows are 7 p.m. Friday; 9:30 a.m., 1:30 p.m. and 5:30 p.m. Saturday; and 11 a.m., 3 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. Sunday. Admission is $35 per person. Purchase tickets at www.aubreyrose.org. Pictured is model Nicole Sweet from Mount Washington showcasing Cincinnati’s very own American Girl Doll Kit Kittredge on the runway last year.

MUSEUMS

History Unearthed: Archaeology Speaks, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Behringer-Crawford Museum, Included with admission: $7, $6 ages 60 and up, $4 ages 3-17, free for members and ages 2 and under. 491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

PROVIDED

The Cincinnati Flower Show blooms in Symmes Township Park, 11600 Lebanon Road, Symmes Township, Ohio, through Sunday, April 25. The show offers hundreds of landscapers, growers, floral designers and artists, fine and casual dining and teas. From 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Friday-Sunday, April 23-25, is Small Wonders Children’s Weekend, an international celebration exploring crafts, foods and holidays. Saturday is Fairies and Frogs Day, with costumes encouraged. Hours are: 10 a.m.-7 p.m. through Saturday; 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Sunday. Cost is $20, $15 advance; $2 ages 3-15, free ages 2 and under. Parking: $8 valet, $4. Visit www.cincyflowershow.com.


Life

April 22, 2010

Kenton Recorder

B3

The diminishing supply of trust vows their spouses make, etc. Almost every sector of society seems to have more than its ordinary supply of untrustworthy members. An atmosphere of distrust or betrayal breeds more. If so many people are untrustworthy and if it’s “just the way human nature is,” then we’re tempted to ask, “Why should I be any different, I’m not as bad as they are?” Eventually we find it more and more difficult to trust anyone: “In God we trust, all others pay cash!” Psychological professionals, such as Erik Erickson, consider the development of trust as extremely important. Erickson placed basic trust first on his famous list of necessary components for developing a healthy personality. We do not grow well unless we receive it from others, and we are

Life’s a pit of insecurity and paranoia without trust. A sense of trust is crucial for both every healthy person and for every thriving society. Yet, bearing in mind the information each day’s news brings, does it not seem trust is eroding? Who do we trust today? There are some athletes who drug-up or fail their spouses, fans, and falsify their records; financial advisors who milk their investors in Ponzi schemes; banks that go down through greed or mismanagement; churches have some pedophile clergy in their ranks or authorities worried about institutional image rather than God’s little ones. There are also government officials and politicians whose chief goal is self-aggrandizement rather than the common good; celebrities who can’t trust in the marriage

not grown up unless we can give it to others. Trust is an act of faith. It engenders a firm belief and confidence in the honesty, integrity, reliability and justice of another person. In a relationship, trusting the other means we believe we can be open, unguarded and undefended before them. When we trust another we believe in the truth of what that person says and does. We believe he or she would never purposely hurt us, gossip about us, nor reject us when we’re down and vulnerable. “You can count on me!” states their coat-of-arms. The opposite of trust is betrayal, and we know how much betrayal can hurt. After a serious or series of betrayals, we distrust the betrayer and often others as well. We don’t want to experience the pain of betrayal over again.

One man recalled often how he felt the day his mother walked away from him forever. Though later he married a wonderful woman deeply devoted to him, he could never quite trust his wife. He saw in the smallest evidences imagined signs of a coming betrayal. Eventually, he drove his wife away and alienated his children by his suspicions – and then used their going as examples of why no one is trustworthy. Distrust can distort our hearts and minds. Trust is not a fixed or unchanging entity any more than life is. It can be given, taken back, diminished or lost – or it can be rebuilt anew. Time is usually involved in building or losing trust. Trust keeps asking something from us long after it begins. It’s an ongoing process, not a one-time payment.

At times there Father Lou can be so many lies, so many Guntzelman cruelties, so Perspectives much uncaring, that the wisest thing to do is to stop trusting another. The other person has proven him or herself totally untrustworthy. To still maintain trust would be disrespecting ourselves. At other times we must move on in our efforts to rebuild trust. Doing so requires risk and courage. It also increases mental and emotional health, as well as our soul’s desire to love and be loved. Father Lou Guntzelman is a Catholic priest of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati. Contact him at columns@community press.com or P.O. Box 428541, Cincinnati, OH 45242.

IN THE SERVICE Romanowski

completed a variety of training which included classroom study and practical instruction on naval customs, first aid, firefighting, water safety and survival, and shipboard and aircraft safety. An emphasis was also placed on physical fitness. The capstone event of

Navy Seaman Recruit Seth A. Romanowski, son of Sherri L. Romanowski of Covington and Brent A. Romanowski recently completed U.S. Navy basic training at Recruit Training Command, Great Lakes, Ill. During the eight-week program, Romanowski

boot camp is “Battle Stations”. This exercise gives recruits the skills and confidence they need to succeed in the fleet. “Battle Stations” is designed to galvanize the basic warrior attributes. Romanowski is a 2007 graduate of Milford High School.

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Kenton Recorder

Life

April 22, 2010

Everything’s coming up violets this spring

One good turn deserves another. You’ve heard that time and again. But this week it’s really true in my little corner of the world. Frank, my husband, plowed several of our neighbors’ gardens, including the Caudills’ garden. A few days later some of the Caudill kids stopped me as I was walking past their home with grandson, Jack. They ran out to the road and gifted me with several packed baggies of violets, completely stemmed. Now, I don’t know if they did that in reciprocation for Frank plowing their garden, but regardless, their effort far outweighed Frank’s. If you’ve ever

plucked tiny violets from a thick carpet of s p r i n g grass you k n o w what I Rita mean. Heikenfeld TomorRita’s kitchen r o w they’re coming over to make violet jams, jellies and vinegars. If we have time, we’ll pick redbud flowers from the trees and make jelly from those, as well. Redbud jelly doesn’t have the beautiful color that violet does, but it’s a delicious jelly. Redbud flowers

make a beautiful garnish on salads and desserts. You can also eat the seed pods that form. I like to pick them when they’re real slender and young and sauté in a bit of garlic and butter. Just make sure the edible flowers, etc., you ingest have not been sprayed.

Check at 1 hour to see where you’re at here. Let stand about 10 minutes before slicing.

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Wild violet jam made by Rita and her neighbors’ kids. 2 cups, loosely packed violet blossoms, without stems Juice of 1 fresh lemon 3 ⁄4 cup water 21⁄2 cups sugar 3 ⁄4 cup water (a second time) 1 pkg. Sure-Jell pectin

Jim Long’s violet jam

Jim is a famous herbalist and proprietor of Long Creek Herb Farm. Check out his Web page, jimlongsgarden.blogspot.com, for just the most fun information, from gardening, to cooking, to health and wellness. (And he’s already found morels …)

Directions: Put 3⁄4 cup water and the violet blossoms in a blender and blend well. Add the lemon juice and notice how the violet paste turns a richer purple as soon as the lemon juice hits the dull purple paste. Add the sugar and blend again to dissolve. Next, stir the package of pectin into the second 3⁄4 cup water in a saucepan and bring it to a boil, continuing to boil hard for 1 minute. Pour the hot pectin into the blender with the violet paste. Blend again and pour into jars or small storage containers. Let cool, then cover with lids and store in the freezer. The jam will turn a deeper purple as it sets up. You can dip out the jam whenever you want some. Check out our Web version at www.communitypress.com for violet jelly and vinegar recipes.

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Violet vinegar made by Rita from Nancy Bentley’s recipe.

Tuscan pork roast

When pork is on sale at the store, I stock up. Pork can be healthy meat when rubbed with a flavorful garlic, rosemary and olive oil combination. The aroma of this roasting in the oven will tempt everybody to the table. It’s a nice Sunday dinner sans the fuss. 6-8 garlic cloves 1 tablespoon dried rosemary or couple tablespoons fresh Olive oil, start with a couple tablespoons Salt and pepper to taste 3-4 pounds whole pork loin roast In a food processor, combine garlic, rosemary, olive oil and salt and process to a paste. You can do this by hand, too. Rub all over roast, cover and let stand 30 minutes. Roast, uncovered, at 350 about an hour and 20 minutes, or until meat thermometer registers 160 degrees.

It didn’t take long for readers to respond to Ruthann Hein’s request. From a reader who said, “I believe I have the recipe for the cottage cheese pie that your reader was requesting. I grew up in the 1950s and it was a special treat when my mom made it. I still make it, however I use fat- free cottage cheese and Splenda to reduce the fat and calorie content.” 1 pound cottage cheese 1 cup sugar 2 eggs 1 ⁄2 cup milk 1 tablespoon vanilla Combine all ingredients in a blender. Pour in a graham cracker pie shell, sprinkle with cinnamon, and bake at 350 degrees for about 30 minutes. More cottage cheese pie recipes: Bev Beckman’s cottage cheese pies are in Web version of this column, as well as Kathy Baier’s, Helen Braun’s and one from Sarah DeMoss. The recipes they are sharing are heirloom ones. Thanks a bunch! Visit www.communitypress.com or call 513-591-6163. Rita Nader Heikenfeld is Macy’s certified culinary professional. Email columns@community press.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-2487130, ext. 356.

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Community

April 22, 2010

5K raises money for STARS’ kids For 15 years, the STARS program has provided free grief support services for hundreds of local children who have lost loved ones. On April 24, participants in the Strides for STARS 5K Walk and Run can get in a little exercise and a lot of fun, while raising muchneeded funds to support the STARS program. The event starts at 9 a.m. that Saturday at Dixie Heights High School in Edgewood and is open to both team and individual participants. All proceeds from the event will go to support the STARS program. The free service, facilitated by the St. Elizabeth Healthcare Hospice, helps children and their caregivers understand and deal with the grief they feel after someone they love dies.

Registration for the walk day-of begins at 8:15 a.m. with race start set for 9 a.m. The 5K course begins and ends at Dixie Heights High Schools, 3010 Dixie Highway in Edgewood. The cost for the race preregistration is $20 for individuals; $175 for a team of 10; and $60 for a family of four. Registration for the day of the race is $25 for individuals; $225 for a team of 10; and $75 for a family of four. Age-group awards for men and women in both running and walking divisions, as well as awards for teams with the most walkers and the most dollars raised will be given. Participants can register online at http://getmeregistered.com/StridesForStars.

When appropriately prescribed and monitored, medications can help improve the ability to function and enhance quality of life. We all have a responsibility to be actively involved in decisions about our medical care and treatment. One way to do this is to take charge of prescription medications. Here are some pointers to help you manage your medications: • Listen carefully when your health care provider prescribes medication. Health care providers include doctors, nurses, nurse practitioners, dentists

PROVIDED

Building together

Twenty-three students and four faculty from Thomas More College spent their Spring Break volunteering for Habitat for Humanity in Fort Walton Beach, Fla. Students standing from left to right: Andrea Carr (education), Alexandria; Jenna Kramer (business administration), Cincinnati; Florida-based volunteer; Lucy Van Melle (communications) of Fort Mitchell

and pharmacists. Ask questions to learn the name of the drug, its purpose and any potential side effects. • Inform your health care providers of all medicines that you take, including prescription medicines, over the counter remedies, vitamins and herbal supplements. • Always follow your doctor or pharmacist’s instructions and any instructions printed on the medication label. • Pay attention to how often a medication should be taken and if it should or should not be taken with

food or milk products. • Do not stop taking prescription medication until you speak to your doctor, even if you feel better. • Once a year, bring all medications to your doctor or pharmacist. They can help make sure that all your medicines are compatible and weed out anything that has expired. • Try to fill all of your prescription at the same pharmacy so that the pharmacist can check for drug interactions. One in every two Americans takes at least one prescription medicine. If you

are one of them, it is important to know how to use your medication safely and appropriately to get the maximum health benefit.

Amber Hester, 23, and Donald Adams, 27, both of Florence, issued April 5, 2010. Margaret Masucci, 41, and Michael Schuh, 43, both of Edgewood, issued April 6, 2010. Mary Windows, 63, and Edward Hascher, 67, both of Elsmere, issued April 6, 2010. Amie Cook, 38, and Jeremiah Yocum, 34, both of Fort Wright, issued April 7, 2010. Andrea Bartels, 28, of Kentucky and Michael Earls Jr., 27, of Ohio, issued April 7, 2010. Amy Reeves, 23, of Villa Hills and Andrew Dickinson, 26, of Indiana, issued April 7, 2010. Julia Bahar, 28, of Kentucky and Chadwick Schenk, 30, of Indiana, issued April 7, 2010. Tabitha Thorton, 29, and Jordan Byrd, 25, both of Walton, issued April 7, 2010. Kimberly Cockerel, 27, of Kentucky and Robert Maute Jr., 28, of New York, issued April 8, 2010. Rebecca Huber, 39, and Justin Jehn, 43, both of Fort Mitchell, issued April 8, 2010. Stephanie Roberts, 24, of Cincinnati and Mark Longwell, 42, of Burlington, issued April 9, 2010. Tobi Robinson, 38, and Matthew Karasick, 36, both of Erlanger, issued April 9, 2010. Jacqueline King, 25, of Walton and Reggie Pitts, 34, of Covington, issued April 9, 2010.

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B5

MARRIAGE LICENSES

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B6

Kenton Recorder

Community

April 22, 2010

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WHATEVER YOUR BUSINESS OR SERVICE LIST IT IN THE NORTHERN KENTUCKY BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL SERVICE DIRECTORY! To advertise contact Brenda Krosnes at 859-578-5509, fax 859-578-5515 or bkrosnes@nky.com

R.C. Durr YMCA Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Prorated super Sports Fan. Daily through June 4. R.C. Durr YMCA, $170, $125 members. Registration required. 5345700. Burlington. R.C. Durr YMCA Preschool Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-noon Part-day. Prorated Wild, Wild West. Daily through June 4. R.C. Durr YMCA, $170, $125 members; part-day: $105, $75 members. Registration required. 534-5700. Burlington. R.C. Durr YMCA Teen Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through June 4. R.C. Durr YMCA, $175, $130 members. Registration required. 534-5700. Burlington. Kenton County YMCA Traditional Day Camp, 8:45 a.m.-4 p.m. Schools Out. Daily through June 4. Kenton County YMCA, 10987 Marshall Road, Weekly-themed activities. Scholarship assistance available. Ages 5-11. $120, $100 members; registration fee: $40 family, $25 child. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County YMCA. 781-1814. Independence. Advanced Camping Experience Camp, 8:45 p.m.-4 p.m. Daily through June 4. Kenton County YMCA, 10987 Marshall Road, Learn about leadership development, cultural awareness and self-worth. Scholarship assistance available. Ages 13-16. $120, $100 members; registration fee: $40 family, $25 child. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County YMCA. 356-3178. Independence. Traditional Day Camp, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. School’s Out. Daily through June 4. Campbell County YMCA, 1437 S. Fort Thomas Ave. Swimming, environmental education, arts and crafts, service learning, science, literature, free time and more. Extended hours available. Financial assistance available. Ages 5-10. $140, $110 members. Registration required. 781-1814; www.myy.org. Fort Thomas. Campbell County YMCA Adventure Camp, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through June 4. Campbell County YMCA, 1437 S. Fort Thomas Ave. Teen Camping. Themes, activities, swimming and fun traditional day camp. Ages 11-12. $140, $110 members. Registration required. 572-3063. Fort Thomas. Campbell County YMCA A.C.E.S. Camp, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through June 4. Campbell County YMCA, 1437 S. Fort Thomas Ave. Work on learning projects in surrounding communities and participate in several team building experiences. Financial assistance available. Ages 13-16. $140, $110 members. Registration required. 572-3063. Fort Thomas. Campbell County YMCA Pre and post Camp, 6:30 a.m.-8:45 a.m. Pre-camp care. Daily through June 4. Campbell County YMCA, 1437 S. Fort Thomas Ave. Extended care for any family available. Ages 5-16. Pre: $35, $25 members; post: $30, $20 members. Registration required. 781-1814; www.myy.org. Fort Thomas. R.C. Durr YMCA Summer Camp Leadership in Training Program, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through June 4. R.C. Durr YMCA, $60, $30 members. Registration required. 5345700; www.myy.org. Burlington. R.C. Durr YMCA Summer Day Camp, 6:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Daily through June 4. R.C. Durr YMCA, $125-$175 per week. Registration required. 534-5700; www.myy.org. Burlington.

M O N D A Y, J U N E 7

SUMMER CAMP - ARTS

Newport Central Catholic Summer Drama Program, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Grades 5-8. Monday-Friday. Continues through June 24. Performances at 7:30 p.m. on June 25-26. $200. Newport Central Catholic High School, 13 Carothers Road, Black Box Theatre. Lunch, acting, dancing and music. With drama coach and assistants. Each session limited to 30 students. Registration required. 292-0001; www.ncchs.com. Newport. Camp Claymation, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through June 11. Behringer-Crawford Museum, 1600 Montague Road, Ages 8-12. Work in teams to create clay figures, make visual story boards and create story to bring clay figures to life. $230 future members, $175 members. 491-4003. Covington.

SUMMER CAMP HORSES

Little Britain Stables Horse Camp, 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Daily through June 11. Little Britain Stables, 5309 Idlewild Road, Horse care, riding instruction, leading, lunging, ground driving, driving and riding. Ages 7-16. $300. Registration required. 586-7990; ww.LittleBritainStable.com. Burlington.

SUMMER CAMP MISCELLANEOUS

Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Summer Program, 6:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Daily through June 11. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Highland Heights, 2907 Alexandria Pike, Hands-on activities, arts and craft projects, visits from community resources, field trips and more. Additional weekly summer fees for optional activities may apply. Ages 2-10. $130-$180 depending on age of child. Registration required by June 1. 581-6166. Highland Heights. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Summer Program, 6:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Daily through June 11. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Taylor Mill, 710 Valley Square Drive, Handson activities, arts and craft projects, visits from community resources, field trips and more. Additional weekly summer fees for optional activities may apply. Ages 2-10. $130-$180 depending on age of child. Registration required by June 1. 581-6166. Taylor Mill. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Summer Program, 6:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Daily through June 11. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Florence, 2012 Terrace Court, Hands-on activities, arts and craft projects, visits from community resources, field trips and more. Additional weekly summer fees for optional activities may apply. Ages 2-10. $130-$180 depending on age of child. Registration required by June 1. 581-6166. Florence. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Summer Program, 6:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Daily through June 11. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center, 11293 Grand National Blvd. Hands-on activities, arts and craft projects, visits from community resources, field trips and more. Additional weekly summer fees for optional activities may apply. Ages 2-10. $130-$180 depending on age of child. Registration required by June 1. 581-6166. Richwood. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Summer Program, 6:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Daily through June 11. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Fort Thomas, 29 Churchhill Dr. Hands-on activities, arts and craft projects, visits from community resources, field trips and more. Additional weekly summer fees for optional activities may apply. Ages 2-10. $130-$180 depending on age of child. Registration required by June 1. 581-6166. Fort Thomas. Skidaddles Summer Camp, 7 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Skidaddles Inc. 8660 Bankers St. Explore wonders of nature, walk on the wild side, sports week, snacks, hands-on projects and more. Ages -1-5. $170 for five days, $140 for four days, $115 for three days. Registration required. 647-7529; www.skidaddles.com. Florence.

SUMMER CAMP NATURE

Young Stewards of the Earth, 8 a.m.-noon, Northern Kentucky Montessori Center, 2625 Anderson Road, Montessori-based camp. Learn to recycle, compost and reduce waste; importance of local farming and the origins of the food we eat; and importance of nutritious food and sustainable packaging. Twoweek sessions culminate with field trip including Turner Farms, the Cincinnati Zoo and Gorman Heritage Farm. Children may attend any number of weeks. Ages -1-0. $150-$180 per week. Registration required. 331-3725. Crescent Springs.

SUMMER CAMP SPORTS

NewCath Hoops Camp, 9 a.m.-noon Girls’ Sessions. Grades 5-8. Daily through June 10. Newport Central Catholic High School, 13 Carothers Road, Emphasis on fundamentals, camp T-shirt, snack and soft drink daily, guest speakers, contests and door prizes. Family discounts available. $65 after May 15; $55 advance. Registration required by May 15. 292-0656. Newport.

SUMMER CAMP YMCA

R.C. Durr YMCA Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Back to the Future. Daily through June 11. R.C. Durr YMCA, $170, $125 members. Registration required. 534-5700. Burlington. R.C. Durr YMCA Preschool Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Part-day. Journey to Space. Daily through June 11. R.C. Durr YMCA, $170, $125 members; part-day: $105, $75 members. Registration required.

534-5700. Burlington. R.C. Durr YMCA Teen Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through June 11. R.C. Durr YMCA, $175, $130 members. Registration required. 534-5700. Burlington. Kenton County YMCA Traditional Day Camp, 8:45 a.m.-4 p.m. Wild Wild West. Daily through June 11. Kenton County YMCA, $120, $100 members; registration fee: $40 family, $25 child. Registration required. 781-1814. Independence. Advanced Camping Experience Camp, 8:30 p.m.-4 p.m. Daily through June 18. Kenton County YMCA, $120, $100 members; registration fee: $40 family, $25 child. Registration required. 356-3178. Independence. Traditional Day Camp, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Wild Wild West. Daily through June 11. Campbell County YMCA, $140, $110 members. Registration required. 781-1814; www.myy.org. Fort Thomas. Preschool Camp, 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Daily through June 11. Campbell County YMCA, 1437 S. Fort Thomas Ave. Scholarships and financial assistance available. Ages 3-5. $85, $65 members. Registration required. 7811814; www.myy.org. Fort Thomas. Campbell County YMCA Adventure Camp, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through June 11. Campbell County YMCA, $140, $110 members. Registration required. 572-3063. Fort Thomas. Campbell County YMCA A.C.E.S. Camp, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through June 11. Campbell County YMCA, $140, $110 members. Registration required. 572-3063. Fort Thomas. Campbell County YMCA Pre and post Camp, 6:30 a.m.-8:45 a.m. Pre-camp care. Daily through June 11. Campbell County YMCA, Pre: $35, $25 members; post: $30, $20 members. Registration required. 7811814; www.myy.org. Fort Thomas. R.C. Durr YMCA Summer Camp Leadership in Training Program, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through June 11. R.C. Durr YMCA, $60, $30 members. Registration required. 534-5700; www.myy.org. Burlington.

T U E S D AY, J U N E 8

SUMMER CAMP MISCELLANEOUS

Skidaddles Summer Camp, 7 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Skidaddles Inc. $170 for five days, $140 for four days, $115 for three days. Registration required. 647-7529; www.skidaddles.com. Florence. W E D N E S D A Y, J U N E 9

SUMMER CAMP YMCA

Teen Adventure Trips, 8 a.m. COED Parent/Teen Team. Little Miami Bike Canoe. $395 per pair. Teens entering grades 6-9. Three days and two nights. Daily through June 11. Camp Ernst, 7615 Camp Ernst Road, Exploring Little Miami Scenic Bike Trail. Swimming, canoeing and camping. Registration required. 586-6181; www.myycamp.org. Burlington. T H U R S D A Y, J U N E 1 0

SUMMER CAMP MISCELLANEOUS

Skidaddles Summer Camp, 7 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Skidaddles Inc. $170 for five days, $140 for four days, $115 for three days. Registration required. 647-7529; www.skidaddles.com. Florence. S U N D A Y, J U N E 1 3

SUMMER CAMP YMCA

Teen Adventure Trips, 8 a.m. COED Teen Trips: Greenbrier River West Virginia Bike. Biking, whitewater rafting and mountain biking. $820; teens entering grades 8-10. Six days and five nights. Daily through June 18. Camp Ernst, Registration required. 5866181; www.myycamp.org. Burlington. M O N D A Y, J U N E 1 4

SUMMER CAMP HORSES

Little Britain Stables Horse Camp, 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Daily through June 18. Little Britain Stables, $300. Registration required. 586-7990; ww.LittleBritainStable.com. Burlington.

SUMMER CAMP MISCELLANEOUS

Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Summer Program, 6:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Daily through June 18. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Highland Heights, $130-$180 depending on age of child. Registration required by June 1. 581-6166. Highland Heights. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Summer Program, 6:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Daily through June 18. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Taylor Mill, $130-$180 depending on age of child. Registration required by June 1. 5816166. Taylor Mill. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Summer Program, 6:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Daily through June 18. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Florence, $130-$180 depending on age of child. Registration required by June 1. 5816166. Florence. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Summer Program, 6:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Daily through June 18. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center, $130-$180 depending on age of child. Registration required by June 1. 581-6166. Richwood.


April 22, 2010

Kenton Recorder

ONE OF AMERICA’S TOP 100 HOSPITALS

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L E A R N M O R E AT S T E L I Z A B E T H . C O M Being one of Thomson Reuters’ Top 100 Hospitals means more than outstanding medical care. It means shorter stays, fewer complications, and higher rates of recovery. It’s an incredible honor, and it speaks to the dedication, professionalism, and talent of the entire St. Elizabeth family. Because you don’t get to be a top 100 hospital alone. You get there by working together. St. Elizabeth. Better Together.

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St. Mary

St. Mary of the Assumption Parish will host a free evening out for parents April 24. There will be a dinner and fellowship from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. followed by discussion and dessert until 9 p.m. Reservations are required. For more information, call 635-4188. The parish is located at 8246 East Main Street in Alexandria.

Bling

The Point/Arc of Northern Kentucky will host a Books & Bling event at 6 p.m. Thursday, April 29, at The Point Pavilion, 620 Scott St. The night will include several local vendors and artisans selling their wares and appearances by five local authors who will conduct a book signing.

Union Presbyterian

The Florence Community Chorus will be presenting a musical variety show, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sing Out for Kidsâ&#x20AC;? April 23 at 7 p.m. at the Union Presbyterian Church. The program will feature a variety of music from the early 1900s to the present. The Union Learning Center students will also be joining in the show. Admission is free. For more information, email florchorus@gmail.com Union Presbyterian Church is located at 10259 U.S. 42. Have an event at your church? Please send your information to akiefaber@nky.com.

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With joyful hearts, Rev. & Mrs. Stephen Alford announce the marriage of their daughter, Stephanie Carol Alford of Burlington, to Phillip Christopher Brunner of Alexandria, son of Mr. & Mrs. Virgil Brunner. The couple married on April 17, 2010, 2:30 PM at Main Street Baptist Church of Alexandria, KY. Stephanie is an ER nurse with St. Elizabeth hospital, and Phillip is a Worship Pastor at Main Street Baptist Church.

Mr. & Mrs. John Krift are pleased to announce the engagement of their daughter, Miss Ashley Krift, to Mr. Kip Mason Jr., son of Mr. & Mrs. Kip Mason. They are planned to wed on May 8th at St. Therese Parish in Southgate, Ky at 6:30.

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Deaths Shirley Ann Dunagin Bradford, 63, of Florence, formerly of Covington, died April 13, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. She was a homemaker and attended Twenty Twenty Christian Church in Dry Ridge. Her husband, George P. Bradford Sr., died in 2007; son, William Lee Bradford, died in 2006; and one grandchild died previously. Survivors include her daughters, Paula Knipp of Florence, Lorna Bradford of Covington, Penny Manning of Glencoe and Holly Bradford of Louisville; son, George Bradford Jr. of Taylor Mill; sister, Sheila Moore of Sparta; 24 grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren. Burial was in Highland Cemetery, Fort Mitchell. Memorials: American Cancer Society, 297 Buttermilk Pike, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017; or American Heart Association, 5211 Madison Road, Cincinnati, OH 45227.

Louis Brown

Louis “JR” Brown, 73, formerly of Covington, died March 4, 2010, at his home in Sun Lakes, Ariz. He was a furniture salesman, sang Southern Gospel music with various groups including the Southernaires of Dayton, Ohio and the Spokesmen of Arizona; and was a Charter member of the Oasis of Grace Assembly of God Church in Sun Lakes, Ariz. Survivors include his wife of 51 years Shirley Tice Brown; daughter, Luanne Stroke; son, Jay Brown; brothers, Don Brown of Irvine, Ky; sisters, Betty Stamper, Pauline Ingram, Joanne Williamson and Patty Mossman, all of Covington; two grandchildren and two greatgrandchildren. Tempe Mortuary in Tempe, Ariz., handled the arrangements. Memorials: Hospice of the Valley, 1510 E. Flower St., Phoenix, AZ 85014.

Keith Cameron

Keith Allen Cameron, 41, Covington, died April 10, 2010, at his home. He was commercial painter. Survivors include his father, David Cameron of Cincinnati; brothers, Steve Cameron of Cincinnati and Brett Cameron of Florida. Burial was in St. Mary’s Cemetery, Fort Mitchell.

Cydney Day

Cydney Day, 61, of Cincinnati, formerly of Covington, died April 11, 2010, at Hospice of Cincinnati, Anderson Township, Ohio. She was an associate manager for Wal-mart. Survivors include her husband, Ron Day; mother, Eleanor Windburn; brothers, Chris, Tim and Randy Wooley; and sisters, Joan Honkey and Jenny Lumis. Don Catchen and Son Funeral Home, Elsmere, handled the arrangements.

Wilfred Depperschmidt

Wilfred Jacob Depperschmidt, 82, Alexandria, died April 13, 2010, at Hospice of St. Elizabeth Healthcare, Edgewood. He was a member of St. Mary’s Catholic Church in Alexandria, Local 20 Operation Engineers and Veterans of Foreign Wars Post in Alexandria. His daughter, Teresa Keeton, died in 1975. Survivors include his wife, Mary Depperschmidt; sons, Roger Dep-

perschmidt of Somerset and Bernard Depperschmidt of Maysville; daughters, Elizabeth Barnes of Burlington and Gemma Depperschmidt, both of Alexandria; nine grandchildren and 11 greatgrandchildren. Burial was in St. Mary’s Cemetery, Alexandria. Cooper Funeral Home, Alexandria, handled the arrangements. Memorials: St. Jude’s Children Research Fund, Attention Memorial Fund Department, P.O. Box 1000Dept 142, Memphis, TN 38148.

Betty Doyle

Betty Ann Doyle, 51, Covington, died April 16, 2010, at Hospice of St. Elizabeth Health Care in Edgewood. Survivors include her daughter, Chelsey Taylor; brothers, Robert McGee, James McGee, Ronald McGee and Fred Jones; sisters, Marilyn Slusher, Carol Sickenger, Linda Duncan and Lynn McGeeByrd.

Sister Dolores Finke

Sister Dolores Finke, Order of St. Benedict, 89, Villa Hills, died April 12, 2010, at St. Walburg Monastery, Villa Hills. She was a teacher and principal. Survivors include her brothers, Jerry, Tom and Dan Finke, all of Erlanger; sisters, Lucille Montgomery of Edgewood, Carol Montgomery of Crescent Springs and Marlene Winters of Cincinnati. Burial was in St. Walburg Monastery Cemetery. Linnemann Funeral Home handled the arrangements. Memorials: St. Walburg Monastery, 2500 Amsterdam Road, Villa Hills, KY 41017.

Mary Finn

Mary Lewis Finn, 78, Erlanger, died April 10, 2010, at Hospice of St. Elizabeth Healthcare, Edgewood. She worked in data control for St. Elizabeth Hospital for 10 years. Survivors include her husband, Edwin Finn Sr.; sons, Edwin Finn Jr. of Florence, Michael Finn of Verona and Patrick Finn of Ludlow; daughter, Kathy Berger of Crescent Springs; sister, Sara Young of Easton, Pa; six grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. Burial was in Kentucky Veterans Cemetery North, Williamstown. Memorials: Hospice of St. Elizabeth Healthcare, 483 South Loop Road, Edgewood KY 41017.

Ryanne Fossett

Ryanne Eliza Fossett, newborn, Cold Spring, died April 12, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. Survivors include her mother, Vanessa Willoughby; father, Brian Fossett of Cold Spring; brothers, Peyton, Jace and Jackson Fossett, all of Cold Spring; sisters, Paige and Hayley Fossett of Cold Spring; grandparents, Nina and Dave Brossart of Cold Spring, Jim and Peggy Willoughby of Fort Thomas, Debbie and Calvin Sickles of Dayton; great-grandmothers, Lee Willoughby of Fort Thomas and Jill Thomas of Covington. Burial was in St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas.

Angela Gamble

Angela Faye Gamble, 25, Erlanger, a homemaker, died April 13, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Florence. Survivors include her son, Carter Scothorn of Petersburg; daughter, Harley Scothorn of Petersburg;

mother, Janet Gamble of Erlanger; brother, Timothy Gamble Jr. of Falmouth; grandparents, Gerald and Lois Biedenbender of Erlanger and Caroll Gamble of Falmouth. Burial was in St. Mary’s Cemetery, Fort Mitchell. Don Catchen & Son Funeral Home, Elsmere, handled the arrangements.

Sandra Graff

Sandra Ellen Graff, 48, Villa Hills, died April 9, 2010, at her home. She was the president of SulliGraff Air Freight Company. Survivors include her husband, Lance Graff; sons, Dayne and Dylan Graff; and sisters, Kimberly O’Toole and Michelle Sullivan. Memorials: Susan G. Komen for the Cure, 522 Cincinnati Mills Drive, Suite B248, Cincinnati, OH 45240.

Ruth Hill

Ruth E. Hill, 90, of Covington, formerly of Bellevue, died April 16, 2010, at Providence Pavilion in Covington. She was a secretary with the Louis G. Freeman Co. of Erlanger and the president of the Speer’s Court Club of Dayton, Ky. She also was a member of First Baptist Church of Dayton and the BellevueDayton Women’s Church Group. In the mid-1980’s she and her sister, Shirley, started the tradition of “Tuesday Night Dinners,” cooking for as many as 25-30 family members and friends. The tradition continued through 2008. Her husband, William N. Hill Sr. died in 2000. Her daughter, Judy Spencer, grandson, Sammy Spencer, and great grandson, Layton Young, also died previously. Survivors include her son, William N. Hill Jr. of Florence; daughters, Kay Harris of Bellevue, Linda G. Dragan of Cincinnati, Beverly Markwell of Dayton and Joyce Downs of Elsmere; sisters, Shirley Rouse of Dayton and Bonnie Zeitvogel of Pensacola, Fla.; 22 grandchildren; 34 great grandchildren; and two great-great grandchildren. Burial was in Grandview Cemetery, Mentor, Ky. Memorials: American Cancer Society, 297 Buttermilk Pike, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017; Down Syndrome Association of Greater Cincinnati, 644 Linn St., Suite 1128, Cincinnati, OH 45203; or First Baptist Church of Dayton, P.O. Box 76, 501 Dayton Ave., Dayton, KY 41074.

Mary Homan

Mary V. Homan, 72, Covington, died April 14, 2010, at Rosedale Manor Nursing Home. Her body has been donated to medical science. A memorial service will be held at the convenience of the family. Memorials: Rosedale Manor Nursing Home, 4250 Glenn Ave., Latonia, KY 41015.

Emmett Hon

Emmett Wayne Hon, 45, Erlanger, died April 13, 2010, in Elliston, Ky. He was a member of the Ten Mile Baptist Church and the Sons of the American Legion, Post No. 20, Elsmere. Survivors include his brothers, Charles Hon and Ronnie Hon, both of Erlanger, Danny Hon of Sparta and Tony Hon, of New Liberty, Ky. Burial was in the Napoleon I.O.O.F. Cemetery, Gallatin County. Memorials: Emmett Wayne Hon Memorial Fund, c/o Hamilton-Stanley Funeral Home, P.O. Box 67,

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Harold Hoppe

Harold G. Hoppe, 84, Edgewood, died April 9, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He was a sales representative for 38 years with W.R. Grace Co. and a Navy veteran. Survivors include his wife, Zandra Hoppe; daughters, Julie Vandermeys of Bowie, Md., Susan Barker of Independence, Christine HoppeRash of Florence and two grandchildren. Burial was in Highland Cemetery, Fort Mitchell. Linnemann Funeral Home and Cremation Center, Erlanger, handled the arrangements. Memorials: Animal Care Donation c/o Kenton County Animal Shelter, 1020 Mary Laidley Drive, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017; or Sharcot Marie Tooth Association, 2700 Chestnut St., Chester, PA 19103.

Ruth Huff

Ruth M. Middendorf Huff, 76, Covington, died April 16, 2010, at Hospice of St. Elizabeth Health Care in Edgewood. She was a housekeeper with St. Elizabeth Medical Center in Covington since 1985; a member of St. Benedict Church, St. Mary’s Ladies Society, St. Benedict Holy Name Society, St. John’s Ladies Auxiliary, St. Benedict Church usher, and a Kentucky Colonel. She was preceded in death by her husband, Bill Huff, and a son, Steven T. Huff. Survivors include daughters Judy Dornbusch of Fort Mitchell, and Barb Clark of Alexandria; two sisters, Betty Schreder of Latonia and Pat Brossart of Highland Heights; 19 grandchildren and 10 greatgrandchildren. Burial was in Floral Hills Memorial Gardens, Taylor Mill.

She was an executive secretary at Steinhauser Packaging. Survivors include her father, William Huffaker Jr. of Ryland Heights; sisters, Laura Clark of Covington and Robin Hornsby of Ryland Heights. Burial was in Floral Hills Memorial Gardens, Taylor Mill. Memorials: Humane Society of Northern Kentucky, 22 Commonwealth, Erlanger, KY 41018.

Clyde Jacob

Clyde A. Jacob, 83, Crestview Hills, died April 12, 2010, at his home. He was a World War II Navy veteran, owner of the Brothers III Restaurants and Dixie Terminal Food Shops in Cincinnati and Bond Hill. Survivors include his wife, Loraine Jacob; sister, Annette Jacob of Madeira; and brothers, Anthony Jacob of Edgewood and Paul Jacob of Loveland. Burial was in Gate of Heaven Cemetery, Cincinnati. Linnemann Funeral Homes and Cremation Center handled the arrangements.

Charles Jeffries Jr.

Charles Edward Jeffries Jr., 85, Independence, died April 15, 2010, at his home. He was an electrical technician with the Bendix Company for over 30 years. His wife, Marcella Jeffries, died previously. Survivors include his son, Doug Jeffries of Independence; daughters, Cynthia Jeffries of Independence and Cheryl Rarrick of Fort Wright; brother, Clyde Jeffries of Folsom,

Calif.; sister, Florence Frazier of Louisville; six grandchildren and five great-grandchildren. Linnemann Family Funeral Homes and Cremation Center handled the arrangements. Memorials: Hospice of St. Elizabeth Health Care, 483 South Loop Road, Edgewood, KY 41017.

Phillip Johnston

Phillip Edward Johnston, 50, Florence, died April 1, 2010, at Bethesda Medical Center, Lebanon, Ohio. He was a painter working in the construction field. Survivors include his daughter Samantha Hudson of Florence; sisters, Connie Lucas of Florence,

Deaths | Continued B10

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Mary Virginia “Ginny” Huffaker, 47, Fort Thomas, died April 12, 2010, at her home.

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B10

Kenton Recorder

From B9 Cindy Johnston of Erlanger, Kathy Anderson of Falmouth; brother, Charles Johnston of Hebron; and two grandchildren.

Ralph Jones

Ralph Jones, 54, died April 14, 2010, at his home. He was a self-employed construction worker. Survivors include his wife, Patsy J. Lee Jones; daughter, Lisa Johnson of Independence; son, Ralph Jones of Walton; sisters, Sharon Evans of Alexandria and Reda Powers of Crestview and seven grandchildren. Burial was in Burlington Cemetery. Memorials: The Jones Family, c/o Chambers & Grubbs, P.O. Box 55, Walton, KY 41094.

Joseph Jump Sr.

Joseph “Eddie” Jump Sr., 69, Burlington, died April 15, 2010, at his home. He was a truck driver for K&B Transporting Company. His son, James Jump, died in 2008. Survivors include his wife, Shelly Jump of Burlington; daughters, Amy Jump of Burlington and Mary Bentley of Brunswick, Ga.; son, Joseph E. Jump Jr. of Monticello, Ga.; sister, Ruth Ann Smith of Fort Wright; stepbrother, Donnie Smith of Sparta, Ky.; and 10 grandchildren. Burial was in St. Mary Cemetery. Memorials: The Joseph “Eddie” Jump Sr. Fund, 3312 Madison Pike, Fort Wright, 41017.

Edward McDonald

Edward M. McDonald, 68, Ludlow, died April 16, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He was a clerk at the Internal Revenue Service in Covington, and a veteran of the U.S. Army. He is survived by his wife, Marilyn Perrine McDonald of Ludlow; a son, Douglas E. McDonald of Ludlow; daughter Deborah J. Short of Latonia; three sisters, Cathy Hamblen of Loveland, Judith Hardin of Fort Wright, and Cynthia McCoy of Bromley; one brother, Gary McDonald of Cumberland, KY; and two grandchildren. Memorials: Salvation Army, 1806 Scott Blvd., Covington, KY 41014.

Dr. Terry Miley

Dr. Terry Lee Miley, Ph.D, 54, of Florence, formerly of Ludlow, died April 15, 2010, at his home. A U.S. Army veteran, he was the owner of TLM Enterprises, LLC of Florence and attended Florence Baptist Church. His brother, Joseph Wayne Miley, died previously. Survivors include daughter, Heather Miley of Florence; his son, Jason Miley of Dry Ridge; sisters, Lynda White and Janet MileyMoore, both of Florence, and Jayne Stoeckle of Fort Mitchell; brothers, Robert E. Miley and David Miley, both of Orlando, Fla., and Stephen Miley and Todd Miley, both of Ludlow; stepmother, Bonnie Miley of

CE-0000396448

Deaths

April 22, 2010 Ludlow; and six grandchildren. Burial was in Highland Cemetery, Fort Mitchell. Memorials: American Diabetes Association, P.O. Box 11454, Alexandria, VA 22312; or Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnett Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45229.

Charles Miller

Charles R. Miller, 64, Latonia, died April 11, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Florence. He was a deputy jailer for Kenton County Jail in Covington and an assembler for Litton Industries in Florence. Survivors include his wife, Bonnie Baker Miller; sister, Sharon Meyer of Latonia; brothers, Robert Miller of Huntsville, Ala., Harry Miller of Cheviot and William Miller of Loveland; stepsons, Danny Barker of Clarksville and Chris Barker serving with the Navy in Poland; seven stepgrandchildren and one greatgranddaughter. Burial was in Highland Cemetery, Fort Mitchell.

Dennis Moore

Dennis Ray Moore, 55, Erlanger, died April 13, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He was a guard for Campbell Regional Juvenile Detention Center. Survivors include his son, Allen Moore of Erlanger; mother, Barbara Moore of Union; brother, Darryl Moore of Union; sisters, Diane Owens of Maysville, Darlene Vandenburg of Nashville, Tenn., Donna Ramsey of Walton, Debbie Pratt of Florence and Dawn Elliott of Jonesville, Ky. Don Catchen and Son Funeral Home, Elsmere, handled the arrangements.

Anna Newton

Anna Lee Newton, 64, Newport, died April 16, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. She was an administrator at Duro Bag and a member of the Highland Avenue Baptist Tabernacle. She is survived by her husband, John Newton of Newport; two daughters, Bev Rogg of Dayton and Melinda Lucas of Independence; a brother, Donald Baker of Glendale, KY; four sisters, Regina Delmonaco of Canton, Ohio, Linda Howard of Tampa, Fla., Denise Harrison of Hammersville, Ohio and Chris Mayes of Grants Lick; three grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. Burial was at Forest Lawn Cemetery in Erlanger.

Patrick O’Brien

Patrick Allen O’Brien, 56, Fort Wright, died April 9, 2010, at his home. He was a sheet metal worker. Don Catchen & Son Funeral Home, Elsmere, is handled the arrangements. Burial was in Highland Cemetery.

Alice O’Dowd

Alice Mercer O’Dowd, 82, Covington, died April 16, 2010, at home.

She was an accounts payable clerk with J.H. Shillito Company, an accounting clerk with Rohlman’s Department Store, and a member of Latonia Baptist Church in Latonia. Her husband, Joseph Michael O’Dowd, preceded her in death. She is survived by a sister, Betty Mercer Cox, of Florence; two sisters-in-law and several nieces and nephews. Memorials: American Cancer Society, 297 Buttermilk Pike, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017.

Myrtle Platter

Myrtle Lou Brock Platter, 82, of Independence, formerly of Stoney Fork, died April 7, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. Her husband, William Andrew Platter, died previously. Survivors include her daughters, Pamela Houp, Jeanne Stacy and Rebecca Kimberlin; sons, Herman, Timothy and William Platter Jr.; sisters, Velma and Betty Brock; brothers, Elmer, Cecil, Marvin, Carl and Glen Brock; eight grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren. Burial was in Brock Family Cemetery, Stony Fork. Arnett and Steele Funeral Home, Pineville, handled the arrangements.

Mary Rhodes

Mary Stringer Rhodes, 88, Erlanger, died April 15, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. She was a public school teacher in North Carolina and Virginia. Survivors include her husband, Lewis C. Rhodes of Erlanger; son, Carlton Rhodes of Erlanger; daughter, Diana Smith of Newport News, Va. and four grandchildren. Memorials: Pension Fund of the Christian Church; Disciples of Christ, 130 E. Washington St., Indianapolis, IN 46204-3659 or Lexington Theological Seminary, 631 South Limestone St., Lexington, KY 405083221.

Mary Roberts

Mary Margaret Roberts, 73, a homemaker, Newport, died April 6, 2010, at Hospice of the Bluegrass Care Center, Fort Thomas. Her husband, Samuel Roberts, died previously. Survivors include her sons, Edward Sammons of Erlanger and James Sammons, both of Dayton, Ky.; daughters, Alice Roberts of Dayton, Ky., Mary Roberts of Brooksville, Ky. and Rosanne Brown of Atescado, Calif.; sister, Alice Courtney of Nevada; nine grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren. Dobbling, Muehlenkamp & Erschell Funeral Home, Bellevue, handled the arrangements.

Regina Schroder

Regina E. Schroder, 100, Covington, died April 11, 2010, at the home of her great-niece in Edgewood. She was an executive secretary for Michael’s Art in Bronze and was a member of St. Augustine Church in Covington. Survivors include her sister, Ruth Bornhorst of Edgewood and two nephews.

Burial was in Mother of God Cemetery, Fort Wright. MiddendorfBullock Funeral Home, Covington, handled the arrangements.

Richard Skinner

Richard Arnold Skinner, 74, Independence, died April 10, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Florence. He was a manager of central communications for American Airlines and an Army veteran. His wife, Sharlene Goodwin Skinner, died in 2006. Survivors include his son, Richard Skinner Jr. of Burlington; daughter, Kelly Ruebusch of Gallatin County, and five grandchildren. Middendorf-Bullock Funeral Home, Erlanger, handled the arrangements. Memorials: UK Alumni Association, King Alumni House, 400 Rose St., Lexington, KY 40506.

Barbara Spencer

Barbara Ann Crum Spencer, 64, Indpendence, died on April 13, 2010, at Hospice of St. Elizabeth Healthcare, Edgewood. She was a teacher for Taylor Mill Elementary School. Survivors include her husband, Manuel Ray Spencer; daughter, Jennifer Kelly of Independence; mother, Adabelle Crum; brothers, Michael and Timothy Crum, both of LaGrange; four grandchildren and one great-grandchild. Entombment was in Floral Hills Memorial Gardens Mausoleum, Taylor Mill.

Charles Stulz

Charles E. Stulz, 85, Elsmere, died April 14, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He worked for 38 years with Wiedemann Brewery, Kenton County Golf Course, member of St. Henry Church in Elsmere and former member of Knights of Columbus. His wife, Mary Frances Stulz, died in 2005. Survivors include his daughter, Dianna Bowling of Elsmere; sons, David Stulz of Carrollton, Don Stulz of Burlington, Ron Stulz of Covington and Charles Stulz-Lassandro of Elsmere; seven grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. Entombment was Forest Lawn Memorial Park, Erlanger. Memorials: Memorial and Honor Donation Program - American Diabetes Association, P. O. Box 11454, Alexandria, VA 22312.

Connie Tackett

Connie Louise Tackett, 64, Demossville, died April 13, 2010, at the St. Elizabeth Edgewood. Survivors include her sons, Daniel Tackett of Demossville, Rodney and Scott Tackett, both of Jackson County; daughter, Tara Tackett of Jackson County; sisters, Betty Burke of Falmouth, Gail Burke of Louisville and Linda Tackett of Independence; brother, Grady Estepp of Ohio; 11 grandchildren and one great-grandchild.

Russell Tanner

Russell C. Tanner, 75, Covington, died April 16, 2010, at Baptist Con-

valescent Center in Newport. He was a draftsman for Cincinnati Gas & Electric for over 37 years and a U.S. Army veteran. Survivors include cousins, Crystal Flick of Fort Wright, Wanda Jenkins of Falmouth, Charles Poor of Spring Hill, Fla. and Elwood Moore of Butler in Pendleton County. Burial was in Williamstown Cemetery. Memorials: Gum Lick Cemetery, c/o Jerry Galloway, 131 Austin Drive, Crittenden, KY 41030.

Robert Trout

Robert D. Trout, 78, Taylor Mill, died April 11, 2010, St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He worked for Cincinnati Gas & Electric Co. as an inspector and at Remke’s Market in Taylor Mill. He was an Army veteran, member of Runyan Memorial Christian Church in Latonia, Clown Town Irregulars and Cincinnati Red Noses and the Barber Shop Harmony Society (formerly the SPEBSQSA). His wife, Billie Taylor Trout, died in 2007. He was an Army Veteran. Survivors include his daughter, Bethany Rusch of Latonia; brother, Donald Trout of Amelia, Ohio and four grandchildren. Burial was in Floral Hills Memorial Gardens, Taylor Mill. Memorials: Parkinson’s Foundation, 151 W. Galbraith Road, Cincinnati, OH 45216.

Donald Wagoner

Donald Wayne Wagoner, 39, Burlington, died April 15, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Florence. He is survived by his wife, Tracy E. Brumfield Wagoner of Burlington; two daughters, Mary Christina Adkins of Greenup County, KY and Emily Grace Wagoner of Burlington; son Bradley Donald Wayne Wagoner of Burlington; his mother, Carol Wagoner Turner of Barbourville; three sisters, Vera Fryman and Tina Turner of Florence and Teresa Bargo of Barbourville; four brothers, Kenneth Wagoner of Ludlow, Allen Mains and David Wagoner, both of Barbourville, and Mike Turner of Cold Spring; and one granddaughter. Burial was at Burlington Cemetery. Memorials: Wagoner Family, c/o Chambers and Grubbs, 11382 Madison Pike, Independence, KY 41051.

Lester Wallace

Lester Philip Wallace, 64, Independence, died April 14, 2010, at Christ Hospital, Mt. Auburn. He was a heating, ventilating and air conditioning technician for Perfection Service in Cincinnati. Survivors include his wife, Barbara Scott Wallace; sons, Scott Wallace of Amelia and Albert Wallace of Austin, Texas; daughters, Jackie Deemer, Amy Uecker and Tracy Chandler, all of Cincinnati; stepdaughter, Amanda Mullins of Independence; stepson, David Mullins of Independence and 10 grandchildren. Memorials: Christ Hospital, MICU/4 West Oncology, 2139 Auburn Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45219.

Frances Wilson

Frances Louise Heringer Wilson, 87, of Villa Hills, formerly of California, Ky., died April 11, 2010, at Madonna Manor, Villa Hills. She worked for the former Lakeside Place Nursing Home in Highland Heights. Her husband, William Patterson Wilson, died in 1969. Survivors include her daughters, Pamela Jennings of Alexandria, Patricia Huber of Covington and Paula Baker of Covington; sons, William Wilson of Crescent Springs and David Wilson of Cincinnati; sisters, Mary Gosney of Rising Sun, Ind. and Ruth Bowling of Butler; brothers, Joe Heringer of Corbin, Jacob Heringer of Indianapolis, Ind. and Alfred Heringer of South Lebanon, Ohio; 11 grandchildren and 13 great-grandchildren. Burial was in Riverside Cemetery, Falmouth. Memorials: New Perceptions Inc., 1 Sperti Drive, Edgewood, KY 41017; or Madonna Manor, 2344 Amsterdam Road, Villa Hills, KY 41017.

Adeline Wind

Adeline Mary “Addie” Federle Wind, 86, Edgewood, died April 16, 2010, at Hospice of St. Elizabeth, Edgewood. She was an office clerk with the Internal Revenue Service in Covington, and a member of St. Agnes Church of Fort Wright. She was preceded in death by her husband, Frank R. Wind, in 1991. Survivors include two sons, Tom Wind of Cincinnati and Robert Wind of Fort Mitchell; three daughters, Sue Arlinghaus of Burlington, Joan Rakel of West Chester, and Denise “Dee” Beers of Park Hills; a brother, Vincent Federle of Cincinnati; 14 grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. Burial was in St. John Cemetery, Fort Mitchell. Memorials: National Shrine of Our Lady of the Snows, 442 South De Mazenod Drive, Bellevue, Illinois, 62223-1023.

Daniel Woodward

Daniel “Porky” Woodward, 50, Covington, died April 15, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He worked in the parts department at Rockcastle Cadillac and was a Dixie Heights athletic booster. Survivors include his wife, Colleen Woodward of Covington; son, Jordan T. Woodward of Covington; daughter, Rachel Woodward of Covington; parents, Robert Orville Woodward and Margaret Ann Woodward of Florence; brother, Rick Woodward of Independence; sister, Tammy Sue Corman of Ludlow; and one granddaughter. Burial was in Floral Hills Cemetery, Taylor Mill. Memorials: Colleen Woodward in honor of Jordan & Rachel Woodward, C/O Don Catchen and Son Funeral Home, 3525 Dixie Highway, Elsmere, KY 41018.


Police reports COVINGTON

Arrests/citations

Timothy D. Collins, 117 Brent Spence Square, no. 623, first degree possession of a controlled substance, possession of a controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia at 2 W. 30th St., April 6. Brian K. Deutscher, 3455 Meadow Lark Dr., possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia at 613 4th St., April 5. Donald R. Scroggins III, 1304 Pater Ave., alcohol intoxication in a public place, possession of marijuana, carrying a concealed weapon at 6th St. and Johnson St., April 5. Stephen J. Edwards, 4012 Decoursey Ave., alcohol intoxication in a public place, first degree possession of a controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia at 4012 Decoursey Ave., April 5. William C. Mccrary Jr., 3513 Rivercrest Dr., possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia at 668 W. 5th St., April 7. Robert J. Laten, 4880 Winton Rd., possession of marijuana, alcohol intoxication in a public place at 207 W. 4th St., April 8. Tim H. Dickey, No Address Given, assault, assault, alcohol vaporizing device illegal actions at 301 4th St., April 7. Jeffrey M. Harper, 174 Alexandria Dr., disorderly conduct, fleeing or evading police, resisting arrest at Alexandria Dr., April 7. Annette L. Riggs, 2814 Harrison Ave., hindering prosecution or apprehension at Alexandria Dr., April 7. Martin D. Sebree, 622 Skyline Dr., first degree possession of a controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia, failure to or improper signal at 1000 block of Madison Ave., April 7. Phyllis A. Schrode, 3930 Decoursey Ave., first degree possession of a controlled substance (cocaine), at 900 Philadelphia St., April 7. Donna R. Thompson, 8639 Susanview Ln., first degree possession of a controlled substace (heroin), possession of drug paraphernalia at 900 Philadelphia St., April 7. Joseph G. Turck, 2756 Willard Ave., operating motor vehicle under the influence at 1300 Madison Ave., April 10. Timothy L. Kennedy, 312 Hawthorne St., no. 1, first degree possession of a controlled substance (heroin), possession of drug paraphernalia at 312 Hawthorne St., no. 1, April 10. Angela M. Perkins, 936 Philadelphia St., alcohol intoxication in a public place, first degree possession of a controlled substance at 303 Court St., April 10.

Rory S. Sorrell, 412 Van Voast Ave., possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia at Welsh Dr., April 11. Christopher L. Johnson, 7637 E. Covered Bridge Dr., careless driving, operating on a suspended or revoked driver's license, possession of marijuana at W. 4th St., April 10. Anthony M. Bailes, 721 Scott St., no. 1, possession of marijuana at 721 Scott St., April 10. Nichole R. Hensley, 937 Regal Ridge Dr., criminal possession of a forged instrument, fleeing or evading polic at 1713 Madison Ave., April 9. Rachael T. Copeland, 916 Main St., First Floor Apartment, possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia at 916 Main St., April 9. Charles Clark Jr., 833 Bakewell St., assault at 2 E. 30th St., April 9. John W. Olin, 21 Wallace Ave., no. 3, assault at 21 Wallace Ave., no. 3, April 8. Shelley Allender, 520 7th St., theft at 4303 Winston Ave., April 8. James E. Ewing, 1540 Greenup St., disorderly conduct at 1600 Greenup St., April 8. Harold D. Lewis, 4311 Mckee St., possession of marijuana at 1600 Greenup St., April 8. Jeffrey C. Sams III, 10 Andres Circle, alcohol intoxication in a public place, disorderly conduct at 500 Muse Dr., April 6. Leslie M. Ohmer, 1204 Alberta Circle, first degree criminal trespass, serving bench warrant for court at 1558 Madison Ave., April 11. James A. Johnson, 12 E.16th St., no. 2, first degree criminal trespass at 1558 Madison Ave., April 11. Tonya T. Teasley, 12 E. 16th St., no. 2, first degree criminal trespass at 1558 Madison Ave., April 11. Shaun C. Russell, 816 Crescent Ave., assault at 820 Crescent Ave., April 11. Robert E. Russell Jr., 816 Crescent Ave., assault at 820 Crescent Ave., April 11. Charles C. Coomer, 8094 Trailwood Ct., failure to or improper signal, possession of marijuana at 700 Monte Ln., April 11.

Incidents/investigations Assault

A woman was pushed and choked at 121 Promontory Dr., Apt. H, April 11. A man was struck in the face several times at 4303 Winston Ave., April 8. A woman was hit and bit at Watkins St., April 11. Two people were assaulted at Main St., April 9.

BED AND BREAKFAST

BED AND BREAKFAST

Bed & Breakfast

A woman was pushed down a flight of stairs at 114 Daniels St., April 9. A woman was assaulted at 2023 Garrard St., April 8. A woman was knocked to the ground at 217 Levassor Ave., April 8. A man was slapped at 3920 Gilbert Ave., April 10.

Assault, criminal mischief

A man choked a woman and broke out the windows of a business at 400 Greenup St., April 8.

Burglary

A dining wear set was stolen at 507 Prague St., no. 2, April 10. Change and a handgun were stolen at 107 Park Pl., April 6. Copper pipe was stolen from a residence at 957 John St., April 6. A washer, dryer, refrigerator, and china dishes were stolen at 602 E. 38th St., April 5. A computer, two watches, and several credit cards were stolen at 305 Western Ave., April 5. A mitre saw was stolen at 102 W. 34th St., April 6. $170 in cash was stolen at 39 Indiana Dr., April 8. A TV was stolen at 310 E. 15th St., April 11. A welder was stolen at 112 Byrd Alley, April 9. A TV, clothing, and pictures were stolen at 2025 Russell St., April 9.

Criminal mischief

A window was broken at 611 Main St., April 11. A cell phone was damaged at 700 block of Greer, April 5. The front window of a business was shattered at 1234 Madison Ave., April 5. A brick was thrown through the window of a vehicle at 210 W. Pike St., no. 2, April 5. Parts were stolen from a vehicle at 1820 Holman Ave., April 7. The window of a business was broken out at 836 Main St., April 7. A brick was thrown through the front windshield of a vehicle at Madison Ave., April 7. Graffiti was spray painted on the side of a building at 44 W. 5th St., April 7. A man cracked a vehicle's windshield at 3903 Winston Ave., April 10. A mirror was broken off of a vehicle at 641 Main St., April 10. A vehicle was keyed at 1213 Pike St., April 10. A rock was thrown through the front window of a residence at 661 Clover Dr., April 8.

Criminal possession of a forged instrument Someone passed a counterfeit $20

FLORIDA

April 22, 2010

Someone drove recklessly though a crowded area at 1328 Greenup St., April 10.

St., April 10. $35 was taken at 316 Philadephia St., April 10. A TV was stolen at 1552 Eastern Ave., April 9. A bicycle was stolen at 332 Greenup St., April 9. A debit card was stolen and charges were made at 729 Scott St., April 9. An MP3 player was stolen from a vehicle at 322 Greenup St., April 9. A checkbook and prescription medication was stolen at 103 E. 35th St., April 8. A vehicle was stolen at 103 E. 12th St., April 8. A purse was taken at 617 Crescent Ave., April 8. An air conditioning unit was stolen at 624 Russell St., April 8. The coil was stolen from an air conditioning unit at 20 W. 11th St., April 6. A wallet was taken at 502 Scott St., April 5. A trash can was stolen at 811 Willard St., April 11. A cell phone was stolen at 660 W. 5th St., April 10. $150 in cash, two credit cards, an ID card, and prescription medication was stolen at Patton Dr., April 9. A credit card and a TV were stolen at 2355 Rolling Hills Dr., April 5.

Robbery

Theft of a controlled substance

bill at 1831 Madison Ave., April 8.

Criminal trespassing

Someone entered a home in a burglary attempt at 372 Altamont Rd., April 8.

Forgery

A bad check was written to purchase goods at 301 W. 4th St., April 8. Four checks were stolen and cashed at 2145 Donaldson Ave., April 5.

Fraudulent use of a credit card

Purchases and ATM withdrawals were made using a credit card without the owners consent at 4000 Winston Ave., April 5. Money was taken from an ATM using a stolen debit card at 600 Madison Ave., April 9.

Harassment

A woman reported being harassed at Indiana Dr., April 7.

Menacing

A man was threatened with a handgun at 2198 Gribble Dr., April 5.

Reckless driving, disorderly conduct

A woman was assaulted and robbed at 1400 Scott St., April 10. $90-$95 in cash and a can of cola was stolen at 222 Pike St., April 10. $420 in cash was stolen at 3300 Graff St., April 10.

Robbery, theft of a controlled substance

A purse and prescription medication was stolen at 200 E. 17th St., April 8.

Theft

Four cartons of cigarettes were stolen at 410 Philadephia St., April 5. Five rings were stolen at 4063 Old KY 17 Spur, April 5. A pair of shorts were stolen at 1010 Greenup St., April 5. A cell phone was stolen at 413 W. 19th St., April 7. Two bicycles were stolen at 1221 Holman Ave., April 6. A lawnmower was stolen at 2109 Oakland Ave., April 6. A catalytic converter was stolen from a vehicle at 300 Bakewell St., April 8. A backpack was stolen at 601 Russell St., April 8. A refrigerator was stolen at 105 E. 43rd St., April 7. Two rings were stolen at 400 Farrell

FLORIDA

A prescription was picked up by someone without permission at 4303 Winston Ave., April 7. Prescription medication was stolen at 3328 Latonia Ave., April 10.

Theft of mail matter

Mail was stolen at 1331 Garrard St., April 10.

Theft of motor vehicle registration plate, criminal mischief

The window of a vehicle was broken and license plate was stolen at 1423 Neave St., April 9.

Theft, criminal mischief

A car stereo was stolen and a vehicle was damaged at 600 block of Muse Dr., April 6. A vehicle was damaged and a purse was stolen from it at Pike St., April 10. A stereo was stolen at 701 Bakewell St., April 7. A GPS unit was stolen from a vehicle at 108 Wrights Point Dr., April 11.

Theft, theft of a controlled substance

A purse, bracelet, computer, and prescription medications were stolen at 1246 Hermes St., April 11.

SOUTH CAROLINA

The B&B consists of a log building constructed of logs dating back to 1788, yet is complete with modern amenities. There are 3 rooms available, each with a queen bed and private bath. The Rooster’s Nest is a perfect place to relax and enjoy a break from busy routines. Walk on the 25 acres of woodlands, fish in the 1.25 acre stocked pond, curl up with a book or sit outside by the campfire. Breakfast is served in the spacious gathering room overlooking the pond while birds and squirrels entertain at the feeders. Innkeepers Sally & Dave White promise to tantalize your taste buds with scrumptious dishes like Rooster Egg Bake, Rhode Island Red Stuffed French Toast, Chanticleer Bananas & Ice Cream or Banty Fruit Parfait along with freshly baked breads, juice and coffee. The Inn’s convenient location allows guests to experience all that Adams County has to offer. There are many Amish shops with baked goods, furniture and cheese. If you are hunting for unique items for

Clearwater/Indian Rocks Beach GULF BEACH’S BEST VALUE! Beach condo with 2BR, 2BA, pool. 513-875-4155. Rent weekly, May rates. www.bodincondo.com

DESTIN. Local owner, 1 or 2 luxury condos. 2 BR, 2 BA overlooking gulf, sugar white beaches. Heated pool, hot tubs & more. 937-767-8449,or visit www.majesticsunindestin.com

Hilton Head Island Vacation Resort. Choose 1 or 2 bdrm condos. Oceanfront, ocean view or near ocean. Great locations & rates. www.hhi-vr.com. 877-807-3828 Hilton Head Island, SC

yourself or someone special, you can check out the antique shops and art gallery. For outdoorsy adventures within a short drive you will find Adams Lake Nature Walk, Chaparral Prairie, Edge of Appalachia, Lynx Prairie, Buzzards’ Roost and Serpent Mound. An oasis of sophistication, The Rooster’s Nest offers a memorable winter retreat, a romantic get-away or a mid-week respite. It is a perfect location for smaller business meetings or weddings and receptions or for a Mom’s scrap-booking weekend. Gift Certificates are available.

Visit www.hhisland.info and plan a getaway with Seashore Vacations. CLEARWATER TO ST. PETE BEACHES Gulf front & bay side condos. All prices & sizes! Florida Lifestyle VAC. 1-800-487-8953. Jan. 2011, Monthly Discounts • www.ourcondo.com

DAYTONA BEACH ∂ Beautiful oceanfront & oceanview condos. Two efficiencies & one 1BR condo (each sleeps 4-6). Call NOW for Great Summer Rates! 859-356-5874

The Rooster’s Nest B&B Winchester, Ohio 877-386-3302 www.roostersnest.net

CE-1001545196-01.INDD

BED AND BREAKFAST

FLORIDA

THE DOOLIN HOUSE INN. Premier Inn. Gourmet breakfast. Minutes from Lake Cumberland. Join us for a romantic weekend/women’s retreat. 606-678-9494 doolinhouse.com

Beautiful Seagrove Beach Rent & Relax. Nr Destin, between famous Seaside & Rosemary Beach. Cozy Cottages to Gulf Front Condos. Web Specials. 1-800-537-5387 www.garrettbeachrentals.com

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Unauthorized use of a motor vehicle

A vehicle was stolen at 131 Daniels St., April 8.

Wanton endangerment, criminal mischief

Several shots were fired and a vehicle was damaged at Second row of Ashland Dr., April 7.

ERLANGER/CRESCENT SPRINGS Incidents/investigations Assault

Reported at 3516 Kimberly Drive, April 13. Reported at 3385 Apple Tree Lane, April 9.

Criminal mischief

$500 worth of damage to structure reported at 3319 Crescent Avenue, April 12. $500 worth of vehicle damage reported at 630 Perimeter Drive, April 9. Reported at 30 Kenton Lands Road, April 12. Reported at 735 Overlook Drive, April 9. Reported at 4106 Rankin Drive, April 8. $50 worth of damage to structure reported at 102 Division Street, April 8.

Failure to wear seat belt, failure to notify address change, possession of marijuana $30 worth of drugs/narcotics seized at 3305 Cintonya Drive, April 7.

Fraudulent use of credit card

$778 reported stolen at 3369 Appomattox Drive, April 12.

Possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia

$12 worth of drugs/narcotics seized at Turkey Foot Road, April 13.

Theft

Reported at 2304 Woodhill Court, April 14. $80 worth of vehicle parts reported stolen at 438 Graves Avenue, April 10.

Theft, alcohol intoxication

$13.62 worth of alcohol reported stolen at 3158 Dixie Highway, April 9.

Theft of property, fraudulent use of credit card Reported at 3158 Dixie Highway, April 8.

TENNESSEE 1-7 Affordable, Deluxe Chalets & Cabin Rentals. Pigeon Forge in the Smokies. Vacation/Dollywood Specials. Free brochure. Call 1-800-833-9987. www.firesidechalets.com

Feature of the Week

The Rooster’s Nest is a unique B&B located in Winchester, OH in Adams County, off St. Rt. 32 about an hour east of Cincinnati.

Kenton Recorder

EAST COAST, NEW SMYRNA BEACH Luxurious oceanfront condos & vacation homes. Closest & best beach to Disney. Ocean Properties Vacation Rentals 800-728-0513 www.oceanprops.com

PANAMA CITY BEACH The Summerhouse 2B/2B Family Condos. Beach side pools, tennis, WiFi & More. r 800/354-1122 THE BEST BEACH VACATION VALUE! www.SummerhousePC.com

DESTIN. 2 great condos , 2 br, 2 ba golf, pools, dazzling Gulf view . Check our website for availability & rates. Local owner, 513-561-4683 Visit arieldunes.us or twcondo.us

NORTH CAROLINA DESTIN. Luxury 2 BR, 2 BA oceanfront condos. Heated pool, spas, kids pool & tennis. Sleeps 6. Local owner. www.us-foam.com/destin. D 513-528-9800, E 513-752-1735

EMERALD ISLE. Ocean Front luxury vacation homes with community pool. Call for free brochure. 1-252-354-5555 Spinnaker’s Reach Realty www.SpinnakersReach.com

GATLINBURG. Affordable rates. Fully furnished. 1-8 bdrms. Chalets, Cabins, Privacy, Views, Hot Tubs, Jacuzzis, Fireplaces. 1-800-235-2661 www.alpinechaletrentals.com

Our beach is free. Specials available for golf, tennis, dining, more. Visit our

site or call toll free: 800-845-0077.

HILTON HEAD Sea Pines Upgraded & very nicely appointed 3 BR, 3½ BA townhome on golf course & near beach. Reduced rates. Rented only by the owners. 513-874-5927 N. MYRTLE BEACH Coastal Condos, Inc. 1-4 bdrm oceanfront & ocean view units. Call 1-800-951-4880 or visit www.coastalcondos.com

NEW YORK MANHATTAN--NYC HOTEL $129/2 persons. Singles $124. Suites $139-$159. Lincoln Ctr area, Hudson River views, 18 flrs, kitchenette, 5 mins to midtown, safe, quiet, luxury area. RIVERSIDE TOWER, Riverside & 80th St. Call 1-800-724-3136 or visit: www.riversidetowerhotel.com

A Beautiful Cabin Getaway Gatlinburg/Pigeon Forge. Hot tub, jacuzzi, fireplace, gas grill. $85/nt, 5 nt special $375. 800-793-8699. smokymtncrossrdrentals.com

NORTH MYRTLE BEACH. Oceanfront condos. 1, 2 & 3 bedroom units with pools, spas & tennis. Hi-speed Internet, kiddie waterslide. 800-345-5617 www.oceancreek.net SEABROOK EXCLUSIVES Villas & Private Homes. Ocean, golf, tennis, equestrian. Pet friendly rentals. Free brochure. Book online! 888-718-7949. www.seabrookexclusives.com

GATLINBURG. Choose a 2 or 3 BR chalet, conveniently located, richly appointed and meticulously main tained. Pet friendly. 877-215-3335 or visit www.marysescape.com

Norris Lake ∂ Indian River Marina Floating houses, rental houses and pontoon boats. Call for summer specials, 877-302-8987 www.indianrivermarina.net.


B12

Kenton Recorder

April 22, 2010

Spring Fling 25% Savings on All Major

Vitamin and Supplement Lines! Now through April 30th.

7570 Burlington Pike (Kentucky 18) • Florence 1/4 mile east of I-75 on the north side of the street

859-282-5888

Monday–Friday 10 am–8 pm • Saturday 10 am–6 pm • Sunday 12 pm–5 pm CE-0000395989

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Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Covington, Independence, Latonia, Ryland Heights, Taylor Mill As temperatures continue to warm and...