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COMMUNITY RECORDER

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Covington, Independence, Latonia, Ryland Heights, Taylor Mill E-mail: kynews@communitypress.com T h u r s d a y, J a n u a r y 2 7 , 2 0 1 1

Volume 15 Issue 15 © 2011 The Community Recorder ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Hanner’s heroes

A program began last school year in Kenton County District Schools has blossomed from a handful of high school students helping elementary students to hundreds of helping hands pulling each other up in school this year. Read about the increased involvement of older students into the lives of younger students, and other acts of volunteering taking place in the district. SCHOOLS, A6

Tibbs makes history

Lauren Tibbs made Scott High School history when she broke the career scoring record. The sweet irony of the situation was the record she broke belonged to her coach, Rhonda Klette. Read more about the record, and Tibbs career. SPORTS, A7

Troops honored

Troops supported by local communities returned home to a warm welcome last week, even in the midst of a snow storm. Read and see what soldiers did as they came to the area to give thanks for the support they received while overseas. LIFE, B1

Online community

Find your community’s Web site by visiting Cincinnati. com/local and looking for your community’s name in the “Kentucky communities” menu. You’ll find local news, sports, photos and events, tailored to where you live. You can even submit your own articles and photos using Share, our online submission tool.

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Church youths on a scrapbooking mission Regan Coomer rcoomer@nky.com

Stop, shop and crop at Scrapping for a Mission Feb. 26 at Nicholson Christian Church in Independence. The firstMore ever event will allow information dedicated Scrapping with scrapbooka Mission will be ers to stop held from 8 a.m. to by for a day 5 p.m. Feb. 26 at of working Nicholson Christian Church, 1970 on their Walton-Nicholson favorite craft Road. Admission is while being $25 and includes a treated to light breakfast, breakfast, lunch, door prizes, lunch, door vendor shopping, prizes, and a space to scrap and chance to more. shop with To register, visit local vennicholsonchristian.o dors. rg and pay online or Proceeds download the of the event registration form will go and mail to the church. Registration toward a required by Feb. 14. mission trip for the church’s fifth and sixth graders. The six kids and four adults will visit York, Penn. this July to go into the community and give back at day cares, nursing homes, and children’s homes. Event organizer Kim Kitchen hopes Scrapping for a Mission will revive the old-fashioned custom of women meeting for a quilting bee. “With women working as much as they do they don’t have the opportunity to do much fel-

PROVIDED

Nicholson Christian Church fifth and sixth graders will travel to Pennsylvania this summer for their first mission trip. The church is hosting an event, Scrapping with a Mission, to help raise money for the mission. Front row left to right: Jack Teegarden, Curtis Kinman and Harrison Kitchen. Back row left to right: Lilli Powers, Evan Rogers and Morgan Nagle. lowship and talking with other women out in the community,” she said. “This event will be wonderful to help our kids, but we’ll also be helping each other.” Kitchen, who has scrapbooked for more than 12 years, sees the hobby as a way to preserve family history. “I’ve done about 30 albums and I think there’s something to

be said about having at least one scrapbook page with somebody’s picture and their handwriting on it - that’s something to pass down,” she said. Scrappers who come to the event, also known as a “crop,” will get a chance to meet the children they’re helping out - they’ll be helping crafters unload and reload their vehicles and helping serve breakfast and lunch as well.

Group holds Valentine’s dance for police officers Regan Coomer rcoomer@nky.com

Celebrate Valentine’s Day early at the annual Independence Citizen’s Police Academy Alumni Association February dance. The Valentine’s Dance, to be held Feb. 5, will include a catered dinner, raffles and music. Proceeds will benefit the Independence Police Department. Alumni Association Secretary Kelly Cioffe said the dance allows her organization to provide needed materials for the city’s police

department, including bulletproof vests, tasers and rifles. “We support the police department by funding any equipment they need they they don’t receive a grant for,” Cioffe explained. Independence Police Captain Tony Lucas said the alumni association also funds each year’s Independence Citizens Police Academy, something that is invaluable to the department. “It’s one of the greatest things a police department could ever do,” he said. “It’s all about the partnership that you build with

the community, not only with the residents, but also the business owners.” The citizens’ police academy has allowed residents and officers to meet in a relaxed setting rather than at an accident or when they’ve been pulled over. “They truly become friends. That’s the biggest thing I can say about it. There are graduates now that go camping with the officers,” he said. While the dance supports a good cause, Cioffe said, it’s also just a fun night.

“It’s kind of cool they’re willing to work to go and work,” Kitchen laughed. Nicholson Church Children’s Director Mary Teegarden said the mission trip will help instill a philanthropic nature in the kids. “I really feel like it’s important for the kids to get a feel of having a servant’s heart, which is counter to what the normal culture is today,” she said.

More information

Tickets are still available for the Independence Citizen's Police Academy Alumni Association Valentine's Dance. The dance will be held from 7 a.m. to midnight Saturday, Feb. 5, at the St. Cecilia Church undercroft. Tickets are $20 per person prior to the event and at the door. The dance will include a catered dinner, beer and refreshments and music. Table reservations are available for parties of four or more. For more information or to purchase tickets, call Kelly Cioffe at 609-2151 or Randi Gerig at 2821985. “The music is great, the food is good and it’s got a great atmosphere,” she said. “It’s a great time for adults to get out and eliminate some of that cabin fever.”

Arlinghaus prepared to overturn smoking ban Regan Coomer rcoomer@nky.com

Should the Campbell County Fiscal Court vote to rescind its smoking ban in public places Feb. 16, Kenton County officials could soon do the same. The first reading of Campbell County’s repeal ordinance was Jan. 19. A second reading will take place mid-February in the county administration building in Newport.

At Kenton County's fiscal court’s meeting Jan. 25, Kenton County Judge-executive Steve Arlinghaus said that if Campbell County revokes the ban, a first reading repealing Kenton County's smoking ban will be on the agenda of the next regular meeting. The former fiscal court passed a compromise ban ordinance in December that exempted private clubs and 18-and-over establishments from smoking ban compliance.

“We will follow suit. It's important that all three counties, regardless of position, have the same policy in place,” Arlinghaus said. Arlinghaus said the fiscal court will invite public comment if the smoking ban is considered by commissioners. However, it’s possible Arlinghaus will face a tie vote on the fate of the smoking ban: only Commissioner Beth Sewell said she would be in favor of repealing the ban,

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explaining that it only makes “sense” to do so if Campbell County votes to overturn the ban. “I think it does put us at a disadvantage economically,” she said. Commissioners Jon Draud and Kris Knochelmann both used the word “comfortable” in regards to the smoking ban in place in Kenton County. “I have no problem with Kenton County being a leader,” Knochelmann said.


A2

Kenton Recorder

News

January 27, 2011

Duke to install new lines Jason Brubaker jbrubaker@nky.com

Duke Energy is set to begin a project around the Sherbourne subdivision that will allow the Eastern Kentucky Power Cooperative to have a tap-in to their system, thereby strengthening both systems. Rob Hall of Duke Energy spoke at a special meeting of the Erlanger city council on Jan. 18 about the project, saying they plan to begin within the next month. He said the project would involve the laying of more

lines in the ground, and would require some landscaping work upon completion. Once installed, the new lines will begin on Webster Road, cross over Richardson Road, then split and run up both sides of the nearby hill, cross over Sherbourne Drive and go down the backside of the hill. No timetable has been given for the duration of the project. “We’ll do our best to minimize the distractions throughout the process, and hopefully it will be something we can get done as

Index Classifieds.....................................C Food.............................................B4 Obituaries....................................B6

Schools........................................A6 Sports ..........................................A7 Viewpoints ..................................A8

quickly as possible,” Hall said. “It will be a real benefit to both companies and the customers to get this completed.” Although the project is Duke’s, Mayor Tom Rouse said the city has been in constant contact with Duke officials about it. “They’ve been very good about keeping us in the loop even though they’ve not been required to,” he said. “So we think this will end up being a positive for the city, and we look forward to it being done.” The next regularly scheduled meeting of the Erlanger city council will be Feb. 1 at 7 p.m.

COMMUNITY RECORDER

News

Brian Mains | Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1062 | bmains@nky.com Jason Brubaker | Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1060 | jbrubaker@nky.com Regan Coomer | Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1061 | rcoomer@nky.com Melanie Laughman | Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . 513-248-7573 | mlaughman@nky.com James Weber | Sports Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1054 | jweber@nky.com Advertising Debbie Maggard | Advertising Manager. . . . . . 578-5501 | dmaggard@nky.com Deb Kaya | Account Rep . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-5507 | dkaya@nky.com Mike Nail | Account Rep. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-5504 | mnail@nky.com Delivery For customer service. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 781-4421 Sharon Schachleiter | Circulation Manager . . 442-3464 | sschachleiter@nky.com Melissa Lemming | District Manager. . . . . . . . . 442-3462 | mlemming@nky.com Classified To place a Classified ad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283-7290 | www.communityclassified.com To place an ad in Community Classified, call 283-7290.

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The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet seeks information about unmarked graves on the KY 16 Taylor Mill Road Project (Item No. 6-344.21; FD04 C059 6471402 R) in Kenton County. A private cemetery at the corner of Taylor Mill and Hands Pike is impacted by the project. It is located behind the former JD’s Food Mart and Gold Star Chili. Anyone with information, please contact Right of Way Agent Jason Rankin by phone at (859) 341-2700 or by mail at 421 Buttermilk Pike, Covington, KY 41017.

bmains@nky.com

For the past four years, self-described “networking queen” Debbie Christy McCurry has helped women connect with other women in the workforce. While it started by accident (McCurry hosted a small get-together for business women that turned into 30 people packed in a small room), McCurry’s Women’s Idea Network (WIN) now operates five chapters in Greater Cincinnati, including the Northern Kentucky chapter, which was founded last year. “I really love helping people. With all the people I’ve connected all these years, I don’t get a commission or a paycheck,” McCurry said. “It’s truly just a good feeling that I’ve done

something nice for somebody else."’ W I N members meet monthly to learn McCurry how to “network with heart,” McCurry said. “It’s a soft approach to networking,” she explained. “Women connect with just other women - they speak the same language and connect on a different level than they do with a mixed group.” At the luncheon meetings, women are separated into different tables and given two minutes to talk about themselves and their business. Then the women discuss that month’s theme. Midway through lunch, women

switch tables and the process starts again, McCurry said. About half of WIN’s 150 members are either business owners or an employee at a business, McCurry said. “WIN is a special group of ladies. They are respectful, they are helpful and they genuinely care,” she said. Women shouldn’t be leery to join WIN if they’re unemployed at the moment or not the CEO of a company, McCurry said. “We welcome you whatever age you are and whatever career you’re in. We don’t discriminate in any way.” Northern Kentucky WIN Chapter member Libby Hodapp called WIN a “fabulous networking opportunity.” “You’re killing eight birds with one stone every time

More information

For more information about the Women's Idea Network (WIN) visit womensidea network.com. Luncheon meetings are held monthly at locations in Colerain, Eastgate, Northern Kentucky, Mason and West Chester. Member fees are $99 a year. you talk,” she said of the networking process. “It’s a perfect mix - you get networking, but it’s not extremely formal and business-like.” Hodapp said the Northern Kentucky chapter, which meets at the Grandview Tavern in Fort Mitchell, is still growing and has plenty of room for more would-be networking savvy women. “It’s getting bigger each time - even if it’s somebody you already know, something might have changed for them or your needs may have changed,” she said.

BRIEFLY Art show to debut at Covington gallery

Incident and Ornament: Baroque States of Mind will open Feb. 4 at Covington's Artisan Enterprise Center, 25 W Seventh Street. The show, which runs until March 11, will feature mixed media, installation and painting by Kim Krause, Jamie Markle, Jill Rowinski and

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Kenton County Attorney Garry Edmondson hands a more than $1,000 check to Hospice of the Bluegrass Director Carla Foster earlier this month after his staff voluntarily donated $2 each week in 2010. In exchange for the donation, staff wore denim on Fridays.

Business Network a win Brian Mains

Find news and information from your community on the Web Covington – nky.com/covington Independence – nky.com/independence Taylor Mill – nky.com/taylormill

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PROVIDED

Ryan Snow. The show's opening will take place from 6 to 10 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 4. Admission is free. For more information, visit www.covingtonarts.com or call 2922322.

Arlinghaus appointed to OKI council

Kenton County Judgeexecutive Steve Arlinglaus is now the Second Vice President of the Ohio-KentuckyIndiana (OKI) Regional Council of Governments. The OKI Board of Directors announced today the appointment of new officers who will lead transportation planning organization for 2011. The new OKI Board of Directors officers will serve a two-year term. New officers include Clermont County Commissioner Edwin Humphrey as president,

Find your community news at cincinnati.com/local

Hamilton County Commissioner Todd Portune as first vice-president, Kenton County Judge-executive Steve Arlinghaus as second vicepresident, Kenneth Reed as treasurer and Campbell County Judge-executive Steve Pendery as past president. OKI's board consists of 117 people, 80 of which are elected officials. OKI is federally mandated and funnels about $40 million in transportation funds to construction and planning projects throughout its eight-county, three-state region.

Holy Cross hosting alumni night

Holy Cross High School in Covington will host an Alumni Night on Saturday, Feb. 5. All Holy Cross High School alumni are invited to the Holy Cross vs. Dixie Heights basketball game. The JV game will begin at 6 p.m. and the varsity game at 7:30 p.m. Holy Cross alumni and a guest will be admitted free. Call 4311335 for more information.

Government academy spots open

Applications are still being accepted for the 2011 Kenton County Government Academy. Citizens are invited to take an inside look into the workings of their county and city government during a 14-week course starting Feb. 7. The class meets Mondays from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Dinner is provided with each class to make it easy for people to attend the meeting right after work. The classes will include formal discussions with city and county leaders as well as site visits to learn about operations from behind the scenes. Some places the government academy will visit this year include the animal shelter, public works, Kenton County Board of Education, the Fort Wright Fire Department and more. There are limited seats available. To sign up, contact the Kenton County Attorney's office at 859-815-1664.

PUBLIC COMMENT ON XAVIER UNIVERSITY REACCREDITATION REQUESTED Xavier Xavi ier University Uni nive vers rsitityy will will undergo und nder ergo go a comprehensive com ompr preh ehen ensi sive ve eevaluation valu va luat atio ionn vi visi visit sitt April Apririll 4-6, Ap 4-66, 2011 201 0111 by a team representing repr presenti entiting en tinng ng The Higher Central Colleges High Hi gher er Learning Lea earn rnin inng Commission Comm Co mmis issi sion on ooff th thee North Nort No rthh Ce Cent ntra rall Association Asso As soci ciat atio ionn of C olleges andd Schools. Schools. The Commission States that provides Co issi iis one of six ix accrediting diti agencies ie in the United Stat id iinstitutional tituti al accreditation. Xavier has been continuously accredited by the Commission since 1935. As part of the evaluation, the public is invited to submit comments regarding the University to the Commission. Comments must address substantive matters related to the quality of the institution or its academic programs. They should include the name, address and telephone number of the person providing the comments, and must be received by March 1, 2011. Comments are not treated as confidential.

SEND COMMENTS TO: Public Comment on Xavier University, The Higher Learning Commission, 230 S. LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, Ill. 60604. CE-0000443430


News

January 27, 2011

Kenton Recorder

A3

Villa Hills weighs part-time clerk option Jason Brubaker

expected at the Feb. 16 meeting, although it may have been amended by that point to include more details about the position. “With the commission, it’s going to take a little while to get someone in place,” said Martin, who will work with the commission to establish some guidelines and standards for the candidates. “So it’s important that we start this process as soon as possible.”

jbrubaker@nky.com

JASON BRUBAKER/STAFF

Justice Wil Schroeder swears in the new Villa Hills city council and Mayor Mike Martin at their Jan. 19 meeting. (L-R) George Bruns, Greg Kilburn, Scott Ringo, Mike Martin, Tim Sogar, Mike Pope and James Noll. would work 6-8 hours per week. He estimated the moves would save the city around $30,000 each year. Neither position would be eligible for benefits. “It would work out well, because we find a way to save money without cutting a position,” he said. However, a few council members expressed concern with the wording of Martin’s ordinance, and said

they’d like to explore more possibilities. “We’ve had a lot of instability at that position over the last couple years, and I just don’t know that bringing in a part-time person is the solution,” said Scott Ringo. “I just don’t see the parameters set in this ordinance that I’d like to see, and I’m just not comfortable with it right now.” However, despite the

concerns, the council agreed to a first reading of the ordinance in order to allow the civil service commission to begin their work. A second reading of the ordinance is

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A4

Kenton Recorder

January 27, 2011

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Kenton Recorder

January 27, 2011

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SCHOOLS A6

Kenton Recorder

January 27, 2011

ACHIEVEMENTS

Editor Brian Mains | bmains@nky.com | 578-1062

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ACTIVITIES

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St. Anthony touts tech

By Regan Coomer rcoomer@nky.com

St. Anthony School in Taylor Mill now has an interactive white board in every classroom. The recent addition of four Polyvision “eno” interactive white boards was made possible by an anonymous donation to the Alliance for Catholic Urban Education (ACUE), which supports six urban schools in the Diocese of Covington, including St. Anthony. “We’re hoping it will get kids

more involved in their lessons,” St. Anthony Principal Veronica Schweitzer said. “It will allow the students to come up and participate more actively.” This brings the school’s total to seven, including three pre-existing SMART Boards. The grant also provided for the purchase of four projectors and four laptops to be used in concert with the eno boards. Parents will get a chance to see the interactive white boards in action at the upcoming open house at 10 a.m. Jan. 30.

Celebrating volunteers

“You have to find novel ways to hook and engage kids,” said Carole Talbert, St. Anthony’s Media Center Specialist. “If you can’t do that, you lose them.” Talbert said St. Anthony’s teachers use the interactive white boards for every subject from math to art. “They’re a good way to keep students focused,” she said. Seventh-grade student Adam Hellmann summed up the allure of interactive white boards: “They’re not boring so you don’t fall asleep,” he laughed.

REGAN COOMER/STAFF

St. Anthony seventh grader Adam Hellmann uses the interactive white board in the school's Media Center. Thanks to an anonymous grant, The Alliance for Catholic Urban Education was able to buy each of its member schools, including St. Anthony, four cue boards and four laptops.

NKY.COM/SHARE

Celebrate Community volunteers from The Bank of Kentucky, Amber Peters, Erin Keyser, and Krystle Henning enjoy the breakfast hosted by Beechgrove Elementary in honor of The Kenton County Education Celebration.

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Pajamas and reading

Fourth Grade teachers at Beechgrove Elementary, Shannon Ramey and Sandra James, participate wth the students in Pajama Day to encourage and promote reading activities during The Kenton County Education Celebration.

Science fair

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Summit View Elementary hosted a Science Fair and Expo during Education Celebration Week. Families enjoyed participating in science experiments, viewing recyclable art and science projects. Braden Eastham (left) and his brother Kristian are all smiles because he received a second place ribbon in the Science Fair.

NKY.COM/SHARE

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Bradley Beiting, Nick Fouts, Tyler Bowman, and Anthony Mullen, fifth graders, particiate in pajama day at Beechgrove Elementary.

Alexis Lundgreen, Mackenzie Coleman, Sarah Stenger, and Cayenne Rose, fifth graders at Beechgrove, wear pajamas during The Kenton County Education Celebration.

Hanner’s Heroes grows Regan Coomer rcoomer@nky.com

Science Olympiads

NKY.COM/SHARE

Molly Franxman, Logan Brinkman, and Scott Farrell race to build a tower of cardboard tubes and eggs as a part of the one of the many events during the Taylor Mill Elementary Science Olympiad.

Two years ago, a handful of high school students in the Kenton County School District became reading coaches to elementary students. Today, 760 high school students are certified One-to-One Reading Coaches or Shining Star Mentors to one in six students in district elementary schools. Called Hanner’s Heroes after Kenton County School District Superintendent Tim Hanner, the group of high school students work with their elementary buddies each week to improve their reading or provide support in whatever way a particular student needs. It’s Hanner’s goal to make sure every elementary student has a mentor or reading coach, if needed. “I think every student can benefit from a well-meaning high school student in their lives each week,” he told Scott High School’s Hanner’s Heroes Jan. 19.

Hanner and other central office administrators meet with each high school monthly to discuss successes and barriers to progress. “I want to hear from you, so come in and be ready to share,” Hanner told students. Scott High School junior Rachael Moser is a first-time Oneto-One Reading Coach. “I needed help in elementary school and now I’m in all AP classes and I know she can do it too,” Moser said. While it takes a while to build a relationship with a young student, Moser said, she can already tell the one hour a week is making a difference. “It makes me feel like I’m doing my job right and I’m really going to make an impact on her,” she said. Scott junior Anthony Rinken is a Shining Star Mentor who wants to make sure his student gets all the help he needs to succeed. “I want to genuinely make this kid go from elementary school to an A student. I want him to be on the honor roll.”

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SPORTS

Kenton Recorder

January 27, 2011

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | Editor Melanie Laughman | mlaughman@nky.com | 513-248-7573

RECREATIONAL

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A7

COMMUNITY RECORDER

Pioneers pin hopes on travel experiences By Scott Springer

sspringer@communitypress.com

It should come as a surprise to no one in Northern Kentucky wrestling circles that Simon Kenton High School has a state wrestling title contender with a familiar last name. Much like the mid-90s TV show “Hangin’ with Mr. Cooper,” the Pioneers have been doing just that in recent years. From 20012006, a Cooper from Simon Kenton has brought home the state hardware. Brad (‘01,’02,’03), Craig (‘02), and Neil (‘05) are brothers. Kyle (‘04) and Austin (‘06) are cousins of Brad, Craig and Neil. Rounding out the family circle, current 135-pound sophomore Kevin is the little brother of Brad, Craig and Neil and the cousin of

Kyle and Austin. Got it? Needless to say, anyone named “Cooper” is warmly welcomed to coach Nathan Gilbert’s Simon Kenton wrestling mat. He’s even brought one back as an assistant coach. Brad Cooper now gets to witness his brother performing some of the same moves he used to. Fortunately, it’s a helpful relationship and not an awkward one. “Brad’s pretty cool-headed,” Gilbert said. “He and Kevin get along real well. He’s been there. He’s a three-time state champ, and his first time winning it was as a sophomore. That’s what Kevin’s shooting for now. He knows Brad has been there and done that.” Plus, you just can’t beat a healthy sibling rivalry or knock good bloodlines.

ERNEST COLEMAN/STAFF

Simon Kenton’s Kevin Cooper rolls over Scott High School Stehen Supe during their 130-pound weight class match Feb. 13, 2010, at Simon Kenton in the Region Six Kentucky wrestling tournament.

“He teaches him everything from moves, to what to do in a match, to practice, to how to cut weight and things like that,” said Gilbert. The lessons must be invaluable. Not for just Kevin, but for all of the SK wrestlers who benefit from having a Cooper in the room. “Brad’s in the room almost every day coaching,” Gilbert said. “Neil’s in the room (recent Louisville engineering grad) three days a week. (Cousin) Kyle coaches the Twenhofel Middle School program. Then two (Coopers) are still at U of L and another’s an engineer in Cincinnati.” While the Coopers have certainly grabbed their share of wrestling ink, another Pioneer is the spiritual leader of the team. At 140 pounds, senior Cody Herald has upped his game after narrowly missing state glory last season. Herald’s been ranked as high as fourth in Kentucky. “He’s a senior, and he’s really come into his own this year,” Gilbert said. “He just came with a new level of training and working. He was so close last year, so now he’s got to push as hard as he can. He’s come along and done well. He placed in some real big tournaments up in Dayton (OH) and in Tennessee.” Gilbert attributes Simon Kenton’s drive and determination during this grueling season to Herald. “I’ve been coaching tennis and wrestling both for

MATTHEW BECK/CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Kenton wrestler David Bergman looks to his coaches for advice while wrestling Bishop Brossart’s Jacob Baumann. six years. I’ve never seen a team want something this bad,” Gilbert said. “Every kid on the team is dedicated. They see the drive in Cody’s eyes. That’s what makes him such an outstanding leader for the team.” Not only are the kids dedicated, but it takes a special parent to have their son at practice at 6 a.m. and then again at 6 p.m. Some relatives have even chipped in and helped with the bus driving for Simon Kenton’s demanding schedule. “One of our wrestler’s granddad goes to every tournament anyway, so he’s willing to drive,” said Gilbert. “One wrestler’s mom drove us last year and

now she drives the bus for our middle school program.” That’s quite a commitment as Gilbert’s wrestlers have probably logged more miles than some commercial truck drivers. The Pioneers have “loaded up the wagons” for Oldham County, Wilmington (OH), VandaliaButler and Franklin (OH), Tates Creek in Lexington, Science Hill, Tennessee, New Richmond (OH), Western Brown (OH), and have trips to Parkersburg, West Virginia and Athens (OH) left on the menu. Then there’s that tournament in Frankfort looming Feb. 16. “Everything we do before February is practice,”

said Gilbert. “I think we have the hardest and best schedule in the state. The boys are feeling it.” Gilbert hopes the out-ofstate competition leads to some in-state honors when it’s all said and done. “(Kevin) Cooper, who should be a state champ this year, is finishing third in tournaments, like Tennessee (Fandetti-Richardson Brawl),” said Gilbert. “These are some of the best kids in the country. When they come back to Kentucky, all that’s going to pay off.” With nine of 10 state qualifiers back to give it another go, you’d have to think it will.

Tibbs breaks coach’s record at Scott By Adam Turer kysports@communitypress.com

On Jan. 15, Lauren Tibbs made Scott High School history. The 6’5” senior center broke the school’s career scoring record. To make it even sweeter, the record of 2,485 career points was held by Tibbs’s head coach, Rhonda Klette. The record stood for 29 years, but it became clear early on that Tibbs was determined to make it hers. “It has been pretty exciting to coach a player and person of her caliber,” Klette said. “When she started playing, breaking my record was one of her goals.” Tibbs scored 28 points in a 46-45 victory over Simon Kenton and finished the

game with 2,504 career points. The record was broken in front of a home crowd. “It’s an awesome feeling,” Tibbs said. “I’ve been working for that for a while.” “It’s cool that it was my coach’s record, since she’s coached me to be able to break it.” It has taken a team effort from the Eagles to get Tibbs the record and put themselves in position to contend for a district title. The Eagles are 7-10 overall through Jan. 21 but are two games behind Campbell County in the District 37 rankings. Tibbs could not have reached her milestone without help from her teammates. “I think it’s exciting for

my teammates. They get me the passes. All my teammates have played a big part,” said Tibbs. Said Klette, “Our opponents’ goal is to make someone else beat us. Lauren has been double- and triple-teamed. She has been fighting hard. She’s been a little more aggressive this year. We’ve had other girls step up.” Taylor Jackson has stepped up as the team’s defensive stopper. Jenna Trimpe has provided a spark off the bench. Landon Brefeld has emerged as a reliable point guard. Tibbs has committed to play at Marquette University for the next four years. She is thrilled to have earned a scholarship from a Division I school in

arguably the top college basketball conference. “The whole recruiting experience was incredible,” said Tibbs. “I said at the beginning that if nothing came of it, at least the experience was going to be awesome. All of the coaches and visits were awesome and fortunately it ended with an offer from a great school.” Her teammates also benefitted from the experience of big-time college coaches visiting Scott and scouts attending games. Tibbs brought a spotlight not just upon herself, but upon the Eagles basketball program. “It is exciting for the kids to go through the experience with her, especially for the younger kids to see how hard she works,” said

GARY LANDERS/STAFF

Scott High School’s Lauren Tibbs, left, blocks a shot by Highlands High School’s Jenna Trimpe during the first half of their girls basketball game in the Kenton County Classic tournament at Scott High School Dec. 21. Klette. “They see what opportunities are out there for them if they put in the work. Lauren has given the whole program a boost.” Tibbs hopes that she inspires future generations of Eagles players. Her work ethic, performance, and

leadership ensure that her impact on the program will be a lasting one. “Leaving a legacy behind is a huge thing for me,” Tibbs said. “I hope that younger girls look up to me and see that hard work does pay off.”

All ‘A’ time

EAMON QUEENEY/STAFF

Jake Burger (5) of the Holy Cross Indians passes down court during their game against Dayton High School Monday, Jan. 17. Holy Cross defeated Dayton 81-39 in the Ninth Region All “A” Classic boys basketball tournament.

The All “A” Ninth Region Tournament was Jan. 17-22 at Lloyd Memorial High School. Newport Central Catholic defeated Holy Cross 76-47 for the title. Holy Cross beat Dayton, Beechwood and Lloyd on it way to the finals. Ludlow lost to NewCath in the quarterfinals. All-Tournament Team: MVP-Brady Hightchew (NewCath), Jake Giesler (NewCath), Brian Doyle (NewCath), Jake Burger (Holy Cross), Jerry Arlinghaus (Holy Cross), Donnie Cheatum (Lloyd), Travis Jones (Newport), Conner McLaughlin (St. Henry), D.J. Slater (Bellevue), D.J. Walker (Dayton), Tyler Fangman (Beechwood), Karl Weickgenannt (Villa Madonna), Cory Hill (Heritage Academy).

EAMON QUEENEY/STAFF

Eric Walker (20), middle, leaps with John Williams (24), left, for a rebound during the Holy Cross and Dayton High School game, Monday, Jan. 17. Holy Cross defeated Dayton 81-39 in the Ninth Region All “A” Classic boys basketball tournament.

EAMON QUEENEY/STAFF

Holy Cross Indian Lamar Chames (12) jumps for a layup in the last few moments of the game against Dayton High School Monday, Jan. 17.

TONY TRIBBLE/CONTRIBUTOR

Newport Central Catholic’s Nathan Grosser shoots over Ludlow’s Chris Yates during the All “A” Classic Jan. 19. Ludlow lost to NewCath 80-38.


VIEWPOINTS

A8

Kenton Recorder

January 27, 2011

CH@TROOM

EDITORIALS

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COMMUNITY RECORDER

CH@TROOM

N K Y. c o m

Editor Brian Mains | bmains@nky.com | 578-1062

Next question

Last week’s question

Do you think political rhetoric caused the deadly shootings in Tucson, Ariz.? Why or why not? “The shootings in Tucson were caused by a mentally ill young man with a gun and too many bullets. “While I think that the Tea Party rhetoric and other political extremists fill the airwaves and Internet with outrageous ideas that could make an impression on someone with no critical thinking skills, I blame the gun laws in this country. “No way should that young man have had a gun in his possession, let alone the ability to fire so many shots from it. “Let's spend our time changing the gun laws, collecting the guns, melting them and creating new American sculpture, not more gravesites.” E.E.C. “Absolutely not! What caused the shootings to occur was the warped pysche of the kid that pulled the trigger, his very own actions. “When we as Americans start blaming everything that happens on something or someone other than the person responsible, we fall farther down the hill of personal responsibility, integrity and moral ground. “The result, it's harder to climb back up.” Mike in Anderson Township “You used the word ‘caused.’ Since a crime was committed we must consider legal causation. “Without knowing the motivation of the assailant, we really cannot determine what caused him to shoot the victims. If there was a direct legal causation then there would be others who would be directly responsible for the carnage. “So far there is no evidence that there were co-conspirators involved. There could well be a pathological issue for the crimes. If that is the case then it is doubtful that ‘political rhetoric’ would even be a contributing factor. “Any veiled threat of harm in a political venue is out of place. American culture is filled with political assassinations (and assassination attempts.) “Most Americans are ignorant of the fact that we have had four sitting presidents killed (Garfield, McKinley, Lincoln and Kennedy) while in office. More than another half dozen (Reagan, Truman, T. Roosevelt, F. Roosevelt, Nixon and Ford) were the targets of attempted

What grade would you give President Barack Obama for his first two years in office? Do you plan to vote for him in 2012?

Rising stars

Send your answer to “bmains@nky.com” with Chatroom in the subject line.

Fort Wright Elementary Physical Education Teacher, Ms. Vicki Phillips, and second grade student, Andrew Bauer, preparing for a dance demonstration during Shining Stars Night. This night allowed students the opportunity to show their families how they are living their dream each and every day.

assassinations. Gov. George Wallace was shot in a political setting. “This amount of extreme behavior has only been displayed in the United States. If you do not know history it is bound to be repeated, which it has been repeatedly. “It is just more ignorance in action.” J.S.D. “Do I think that political rhetoric caused the shootings in Tucson? Absolutely not. “From the available data broadcast by responsible media outlets, it is clear that the shooter was a wack-job. If you saw his video of the inside of his community college, and listened to his comments as he was walking through the school, and read the item about his social networking nonsense (including his image in a red thong), you would know that he is a nut. “We cannot protect ourselves from dingbats like him unless we identify them, and neutralize them, and that's not likely to happen in today's atmosphere. “When the Left started to indict conservative rhetoric for what happened they conveniently ignored a lot of the same (and worse) kind of talk from their own. “There isn't enough space to list specific examples, but they are easily found on the Internet.” Bill B. “I don't think so, this was a time bomb ready to explode regardless of the political target. Unfortunately, innocent people were victims of this ill-fated act.” O.H.R. “Oh puhleeze! In 1984 a man walked into a McDonald's restaurant in San Diego. He murdered 21 people and wounded 19 before the SWAT Team killed him. “While the Tucson man did actually target the Congresswoman, to say he did it in response to political rhetoric does not explain the murdering of several others including the little girl. “We have two incidents occurring 26 years apart that only prove crazy people haven't changed, but those placing blame have changed – for the worse.” R.V.

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We need to curb hidden federal rules that raise costs Every day, Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky families pay hidden costs of unfunded federal requirements, referred to as “mandates.” Here’s how it typically works. Years ago, Congress delegated some of its authority (and our voices) to unelected federal agencies. Federal agencies, which in most cases are just doing their jobs, issue regulations which require local service providers to spend more to comply. We then fund federal mandates through fee payments, often without knowing all the reasons why we pay what we pay. Unfortunately, federal regulations increase the cost of things we cannot afford to do without, such as water, sewer and power. They hit working families the hardest because they affect all rate payers, regardless of income. Our local utilities have no choice but to comply. Unfunded federal mandates for sewer and water in Northern Kentucky alone are estimated to cost over a billion dollars in the next decade – more than $10,000 per family. A recent water mandate highlights the problem. A federal agency decided that water providers in the nation need to reduce a by-product in their systems. The new mandate expands an old mandate to all testing sites within our extensive local water system. The federal agency estimated the rule would cost 72 million dollars annually for the country. However well-intended, they seem to have missed the mark.

Compliance costs for Northern Kentucky alone will eventually exceed 85 million dollars. Although it will be paid out over a period of Rob Hudson years, that’s an added cost of Community over $1,000 for Recorder every local guest ratepayer. To support columnist the new rule, the agency found that the health benefits would be uncertain. Based on the federal government’s statistics, the new rule won’t prevent a single annual death in Northern Kentucky. Nearly forty years after the Safe Drinking Water Act of 1972, the EPA has announced several new initiatives. There is no end in sight. This is a tough issue because the thought of drinking unsafe water terrifies us. We shouldn’t question the good faith of those who view these regulations as public protection. But we should be thinking about whether we can afford to pay for more regulations. We assess risks, costs and benefits because they are part of life, and we try to be reasonable about it. I know this is true because we keep driving every chance we get, even though we have serious motor vehicle accidents in our region about every day. Let’s face it – most regulations are so complex that only experts understand them. In response,

Congressman Davis’s REINS Act is finally getting the attention it deserves. The REINS Act would require Congressional approval of all new regulations before significant costs can be imposed. With the REINS Act, at least Congress would have to pass judgment on future regulations, and they might stop a few of the bad ones. Without change, a perfect storm will blow in on local ratepayers. We’re paying for aging infrastructure replacement and federal mandates, at the same time, in a down economy. The utility providers have direct mandates, but other federal energy and chemical mandates force their general costs to rise further. About 10 percent of the recent water rate increase covered a mere down-payment on a single new mandate. Some people are taking the approach of trying to vilify local agencies, partly because they’re the easy targets who mail out the utility bills. People challenge them over peanuts while a billion dollars of federal mandates remain unchecked. We should support Congressman Davis’s efforts and tackle the problem’s root cause. A chorus of intelligent voices, singing the same tune about costly federal mandates, would be better than having noisy local squabbles. Rob Hudson is a partner with Frost Brown Todd, LLC, in Florence, Kentucky, where his practice focuses on labor and government relations. He is a former Chair of the Northern Kentucky Chamber and the Covington Business Council.

Proposed meth lab bill is Ky. government overkill While the Kentucky Senate did pass meaningful legislation dealing with school choice, tax reform and state sovereignty during the first week of this year’s General Assembly session, there was still too much of business-as-usual activity in Frankfort. There’s no better example of this than a bill filed by Rep. Linda Belcher, D-Shepherdsville, which mirrors similar legislation filed by Sen. Tom Jensen, R-London, requiring prescriptions for cold medicines simply because some have ingredients used to make methamphetamine. Such sensational bills allows politicians to feign doing something meaningful while avoiding real action on tough issues such as the state’s $31 billion unfunded pension liability. But let’s face it – dealing with

complex and politically difficult pension issues doesn’t garner near as many warm fuzzies as, say, fighting a politically correct and popular, if losing, drug war. Meth is a big problem in Kentucky. In 2009, the commonwealth ranked third in the nation in the rate of meth-lab incidents behind Missouri and Indiana. More than 1,000 meth labs and dumpsites were found in 2010 and more than 4,000 have been discovered since 2000. It’s also dangerous, involving combustible ingredients that explode and destroy. These statistics and incidents get the lion’s share of attention. But what often goes unreported is the fact that most of the methmaking operations involve a relatively small number of people in concentrated areas.

The U.S. Department of Justice reports that nearly half of methmaking operations in Kentucky were concentrated in six counties while 14 counties accounted for more than 70 percent of reported sites. In fact, 44 counties reported no meth activity at all. Yet, Belcher wants to force all law-abiding citizens to ante up not only the money for a prescription, but a trip to the doctor’s office too – just to get a simple, useful and effective cold medicine. It’s not the first time that Kentucky has tried to legislate a solution to the meth problem. During the past decade, several laws and regulations have been enacted to deal with anhydrous ammonia, also a key meth ingredient. “We made that difficult to get – and that was going to stop the

manufacture of meth in Kentucky,” said Rep. Bill Farmer, RLexington, on a recent “Kentucky Tonight” show on the issue. “Well, it didn’t work.” Farmer also pointed out that past attempts to deal with other drug-making activity didn’t work either. When OxyContin became more difficult to get, there were pain clinics popping up all over the state. If Belcher’s bill passes, expect allergy “clinics” to suddenly appear – involving more individuals in the illegal drug trade and making addicted criminals more dangerous as they become increasingly determined to do whatever it takes to access ingredients. Belcher’s proposal is a perfect example of government overkill that not only fails to effectively

address the problem, but can make it worse. Making these prescription-only drugs Jim Waters would prohibit Community law-enforceRecorder ment from using guest the current tracking system, columnist which blocked sales of 10,000 grams of meth ingredients each month. Meth is certainly addictive and dangerous. But sometimes I wonder if we don’t have the equivalent in lawmaking – politicians addicted to the idea that government can control every single thing. That could be dangerous, too. Jim Waters is vice president of policy and communications for the Bluegrass Institute.

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T h u r s d a y, J a n u a r y 2 7 , 2 0 1 1

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JASON BRUBAKER/STAFF

Capt. Eli Ward, Jennifer Ward, 1st Sgt. Jonathan Brown and Sgt. 1st Class Alan Manley enjoyed a visit to St. Joseph School on Jan. 21. Wintry weather altered some of their plans, but they still managed to visit several local schools and businesses.

Troops honored by local cities Jason Brubaker jbrubaker@nky.com PROVIDED

Jacob Violand, 9, of Fort Thomas, shops for animal treats, food and toys at a store the week after Christmas.

Nine-year-old Fort Thomas boy gives Christmas money to shelter As the holiday season tailed off, 9-year-old Fort Thomas resident Jacob Violand came up with a “pawfect” way to spend Christmas money given to him by donating it to a nokill animal shelter. Violand donated $85 and four bags of items he purchased at a pet store including food, toys and treats with a $50 gift card to the The Pet Castle Animal Rescue in Florence the week after Christmas. “There wasn’t anything that I really wanted to buy, and I just love animals,” he said. Violand said he plans to donate money to help animals at least a few more times. “It really makes me feel good about myself, and I think I made a difference,” he said. The family has a yellow Labrador retriever, two cats, and a guinea pig, and all of them are from rescues, said Jacob’s mother Ellen Violand. Jacob talks about wanting to become a veterinari-

an, and he’s always asking to bring another one home, but they have enough, she said. He wasn’t prompted to donate the money, but his decision brought proud tears to her eyes, Ellen said. “I’m just absolutely blown away that he came up with this on his own and just completely proud of him,” she said Ellen said she even asked Jacob if he wanted to keep a small portion of the money for himself, and he declined, and said he wanted it all to go to animals. After talking it over, they decided to search for a nokill shelter, and when they took the money and four bags of donations to the Pet Castle, the staff talked to Jacob about how it will help prevent animals from being euthanized, she said. “I think because he’s always grown up with animals in our house that he’s just very attached to animals,” she said. He has a lot of compassion to animals, and he just wanted to help out.”

Shriners to recognize region’s firefighters

Syrian Shriners and Shriners Hospitals for Children are seeking nominations for the 10th annual Syrian Shrine Firefighters Awards. “For more than 40 years, Shriners have supported children who are injured by fire and this is our way of saying ‘thank you’ to all those firefighters who put their lives at risk to help others every day,” said Jim Zimpher, Syrian Shrine

Potentate. Awards are presented in three categories: Burn prevention, leadership and heroism. An awards ceremony will be held at Shriners Hospital for Children at 7 p.m. Wednesday, March 2. Deadline for nominations is Feb. 18. Nomination forms can be obtained by calling 513872-6000 or via e-mail at lhoelker@shrinenet.org.

Capt. Eli Ward couldn’t hold back his smile as he addressed the audience at the Villa Hills council meeting on Jan. 19. Capt. Eli Ward, Jennifer Ward, 1st Sgt. Jonathan Brown and Sgt. 1st Class Allen Manley visited St. Joseph School on Jan. 21. The three soldiers represented the 1/320th FAR, which has been adopted by Villa Hills, Crescent Springs, Lakeside Park and Erlanger. “We had some guys on outpost in Afghanistan on Christmas Day and that’s a pretty lonely feeling,” recalled Ward, the rear detachment commander of the 1/320th Field Artillery Regiment. “But some of the troops back in camp managed to gather up some of those care packages you all sent, and get them out to them that day. It made their day to know that the people here in Northern Kentucky were thinking of them, and words can’t express how much that helps a soldier.” Ward and his wife Jennifer, along with 1st Sgt. Jonathan Brown and Sgt. 1st Class Allen Manley visited the Northern Kentucky area in mid-January, thanking the residents for their support during their multiple overseas deployments. Batteries of the 1/320th FAR have been adopted by Villa Hills, Crescent Springs, Lakeside Park and Erlanger, with each city sending care packages, letters and cards to the soldiers regularly. “It’s been enjoyable to come here and be welcomed with open arms,” said Manley, who along with Brown received a Purple Heart after being wounded in Afghanistan. “To receive the support we’ve gotten is awesome.” While wintry weather altered some of their plans while in the area, the soldiers managed to still visit a several businesses and schools, enjoyed a couple meals at Pee Wee’s Restaurant and Gold Star Chili, and collected a

JASON BRUBAKER/STAFF

Villa Hills Mayor Mike Martin presents Capt. Eli Ward and his wife, Jennifer, with a plaque at the Jan. 19 city council meeting. The Wards also received plaques from Lakeside Park Mayor Dave Jansing, Crescent Springs Mayor Jim Collett and Erlanger Mayor Tom Rouse.

JASON BRUBAKER/STAFF

Capt. Eli Ward helps St. Joseph sixth-grader Gregory Cronin try on some official U.S. Army gear during a visit to the school on Jan. 21. armful of memories from the various cities. Ward and his wife were presented with special plaques and proclama-

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PROVIDED

Capt. Eli Ward (center), Sgt. 1st Class Alan Manley and 1st Sgt. Jonathan Brown (both seated) enjoy a dinner at Pee Wee’s Restaurant in Crescent Springs during their visit.

tions from each of the four mayors, and they also received a special “USA!” cheer while at St., Joseph School. “I’ve never been here before, but this is really a special area with some terrific people,” said Brown. “There’s a lot of patriotism here, and it’s been a great visit.” The trip was organized by the Adopt-A-Unit liaisons for each city. “It’s been an amazing three days,” said Jane Terrell, the liaison for Crescent Springs. “To meet these guys and hear their stories has been incredible, and we’re so grateful for what they do every day.” Julie Schuler, the liaison for Villa Hills, agreed. “It’s hard to express how great this has been,” she said. “They’ve really touched our hearts.” For more information about each city’s Adopt-A Troop program, including how to get involved and make donations, contact your city building.


B2

Kenton Recorder

January 27, 2011

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD F R I D A Y, J A N . 2 8

ART & CRAFT CLASSES

Painting Workshop and Wine Tasting, 6:30 p.m., Elk Creek Tasting Room in Crestview Hills Town Center, 2837 Town Center Boulevard, Elk Creek Winery. Create 16-inch by 20-inch acrylic painting in less than two hours. Includes all art supplies, wine tasting and more. $49.99. Reservations required. Presented by The Twisted Brush. 859-3310619; www.the-twisted-brush.com. Crestview Hills.

ART EXHIBITS

Filly Tracks Art Show, 11 a.m.-9 p.m., Art on the Levee Gallery, Newport on the Levee, Paintings, screen prints, photography and more from local artists. Benefits select horse rescues. Free. 859-261-5770; www.artonthelevee.com. Newport. Isolation & Togetherness, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, 1028 Scott Blvd., Works by Matthew Andrews, Dominic Sansone, Mallory Felktz, Marcia Alscher, Alan Grizzell, Patrick Meier, Sherman Cahal and Janie Marino. Free. Through Feb. 18. 859-957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Twelve Angry Men, 8 p.m., Monmouth Theatre, 636 Monmouth St., Play by Reginald Rose adapted by Shermen Sergel. Directed by Jim Waldfogle, produced by Dee Dunn. $12, $10 students and seniors. Presented by Wyoming Players. Through Feb. 5. 513588-4910; www.wyomingplayers.com. Newport. Blithe Spirit, 8 p.m., Stained Glass Theatre, 802 York St., Noel Coward classic. Newly married novelist takes part in seance in order to drum up new material for himself. But soon he is tormented by the ghost of his dead first wife. $20. Presented by Footlighters Inc.. Through Feb. 5. 513-4748711; www.footlighters.org. Newport. S A T U R D A Y, J A N . 2 9

ART EXHIBITS

Filly Tracks Art Show, 11 a.m.-9 p.m., Art on the Levee Gallery, Free. 859-261-5770; www.artonthelevee.com. Newport. Isolation & Togetherness, Noon-3 p.m., Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, Free. 859-957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

St. Elizabeth Cardio Mobile Health Unit, Noon-6 p.m., Bank of Kentucky Highland Heights, 2800 Alexandria Pike, CardioVascular Mobile Health Unit. Screenings for peripheral arterial disease, carotid artery and abdominal aortic aneurysm. $79 for all three screenings. Reservations required. Presented by St. Elizabeth Healthcare. 859-301-9355. Highland Heights. Eilen Jewell, 8 p.m., Molly Malone’s Irish Pub and Restaurant, 112 E. Fourth St., Doors open 7:30 p.m. $15, $13 advance. 859491-6659; www.ticketweb.com. Covington. Acoustic Show, 8-10 p.m., Duck Creek Country Club, 1942 Industrial Road, With vocalist Shannon Combs and guitarist James Combs. 859-442-7900. Cold Spring.

MUSIC - CONCERTS

Winter Blues Fest, 6 p.m., Southgate House, 24 E. Third St., Twenty-five bands perform on main and parlour stages and Juney’s Lounge. Scheduled to appear: Blues in the Schools Band, John Redell and Company, the Juice, Richie and the Students, the Blue Birds Big Band, Kayneevol, Electric Souls, the Leo Clarke Band, 46 Long, Blue Sacrifice, Balderdash, Tempted Souls Band and Them Bones. Open Blues Jam 12:30 a.m. each night. Ages 18 and up. Benefits Blues in the Schools program. $20, $15 members. Presented by Cincy Blues Society. 859-4312201; www.cincyblues.org or www.southgatehouse.com. Newport.

MUSIC - COUNTRY

Reckless, 10 p.m., Peecox II, 12200 Madison Pike, 859-356-1440. Independence. 500 Miles to Memphis, 10 p.m.-2 a.m., The Avenue Lounge, 411 Madison Ave., $10. 9 p.m. doors open. Cover starts at 8:30 p.m. 859-261-6120. Covington.

MUSIC - JAZZ

New Sleepcat Band, 7:30 p.m., Dee Felice Cafe, 529 Main St., Directed by Bill Gemmer and features John Von Ohlen. 859-2612365; www.deefelice.com. Covington.

MUSIC - ROCK

Session 9, 10 p.m., Peecox, 635 Donaldson Highway, 859-342-7000. Erlanger. Lt. Dan’s New Legs, 10 p.m., Jefferson Hall, 1 Levee Way, Suite 2118, 859-491-6200. Newport. DV8, 9 p.m., Turfway Park, 7500 Turfway Road, 859-371-0200. Florence.

ON STAGE - COMEDY

John Witherspoon, 8 p.m. and 10:30 p.m., Funny Bone Comedy Club, Newport on the Levee, $25. Ages 18 and up. 859-9572000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

ON STAGE - THEATER

The Odd Couple, 7:30 p.m., Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, Sign language interpreted and closed captioned. $15-$19. 859-957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington. Twelve Angry Men, 8 p.m., Monmouth Theatre, $12, $10 students and seniors. 513588-4910; www.wyomingplayers.com. Newport. Blithe Spirit, 8 p.m., Stained Glass Theatre, $20. 513-474-8711; www.footlighters.org. Newport. S U N D A Y, J A N . 3 0

FOOD & DRINK Wine Tasting, 1-6 p.m., StoneBrook Winery, $5. 859-635-0111; www.stonebrookwinery.com. Camp Springs.

HEALTH / WELLNESS

MUSIC - ACOUSTIC

For more about Greater Cincinnati’s dining, music, events, movies and more, go to Metromix.com.

MUSIC - JAZZ

Sunday Jazz in the Afternoon, 4:30 p.m., Dee Felice Cafe, 529 Main St., With the Phil DeGreg Trio. 859-261-2365; www.deefelicecafe.com. Covington.

FOOD & DRINK

Tea Leaf Readings and Tea Tastings, Noon2 p.m., Kentucky Haus Artisan Center, 411 E. 10th St., Also, sample a variety of Kentucky Proud food items. Free. 859-2614287. Newport.

LITERARY - LIBRARIES

A Midsummer Night’s Dream, 2-4 p.m., Erlanger Branch Library, 401 Kenton Lands Road, Behind-the-scenes look and select scenes by Cincinnati Ballet and Cincinnati Shakespeare Company. Suggested for ages 11 and up. Free. Registration required. 859962-4002; www.kentonlibrary.org/events. Erlanger.

MUSIC - BLUES

Surf & Blues Winterfest, 7 p.m.-12:30 a.m., Mahogany’s Coffee House and Bar, 3715 Winston Ave., Music by the Maladroits, the AmpFibians, the Surfer Tiki Bandits and the Southgate Boys. Includes beach drink specials. Dinner available 6 p.m. Family friendly. 859-261-1029. Latonia.

MUSIC - CONCERTS

ON STAGE - COMEDY

John Witherspoon, 7:30 p.m., Funny Bone Comedy Club, $22. Ages 21 and up. 859957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Twelve Angry Men, 2 p.m., Monmouth Theatre, $12, $10 students and seniors. 513588-4910; www.wyomingplayers.com. Newport. Blithe Spirit, 2 p.m., Stained Glass Theatre, $20. 513-474-8711; www.footlighters.org. Newport. M O N D A Y, J A N . 3 1

BUSINESS MEETINGS

Women’s Initiative: Business Women Connect Happy Hour, 4-7 p.m., Metropolitan Club, 50 E. RiverCenter Blvd., Invite friends and coworkers to mix, mingle and meet new friends while enjoying happy hour drinks and appetizers. Open to all area professional women. Ages 21 and up. Free. Presented by Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce. 859-578-8800; www.nkychamber.com. Covington.

Winter Blues Fest, 6 p.m., Southgate House, Scheduled to appear: Blues In the Schools Band, the Blues Merchants, Miss Lissa and Company, Chuck Brisbin and the Tuna Project, G. Miles and the Hitmen, Bad Men on a Mission, the Gear Shifts, B. Hatfield Blues Band, Blues Therapy Rx and others. $20, $15 members. 859-431-2201; www.cincyblues.org or www.southgatehouse.com. Newport.

MUSIC - JAZZ

New Sleepcat Band, 7 p.m., Dee Felice Cafe, 859-261-2365; www.deefelice.com. Covington.

MUSIC - ROCK

The Pole Cats, 10 p.m., Jefferson Hall, 1 Levee Way, Suite 2118, 859-491-6200; www.jeffersonhall.com. Newport. Unleashed, 10 p.m., Peecox, 635 Donaldson Highway, 859-342-7000; www.peecox.com. Erlanger.

ON STAGE - COMEDY

John Witherspoon, 7:30 p.m. and 10 p.m., Funny Bone Comedy Club, $25. Ages 21 and up. 859-957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

EXERCISE CLASSES

Beginner Yoga, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Lifepath Center of the Healing Arts, 734 Bromley-Crescent Springs Road, Upstairs, yoga studio. $10 (if 12 class pass is purchased). Registration required. 859-992-6300; www.lifepath-2001.com. Crescent Springs.

LITERARY - LIBRARIES

Adventure Club, 4 p.m., Fort Thomas-Carrico Branch Library, 1000 Highland Ave. Artreach presents: The Rockin’ Adventures of Peter Rabbit. Grades 1-5. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 859-781-6166; www.ccpl.org. Fort Thomas.

PROVIDED

Neil Simon’s “The Odd Couple” will play weekends Jan. 28-Feb. 13 at The Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, 1028 Scott Blvd., Covington. In theatre’s most celebrated buddy comedy, hilarity ensues as neurotic, neat freak Felix Ungar and slovenly sportswriter Oscar Madison, two divorced men, attempt to share a New York apartment. Directed by Drew Fracher. Performances are at 7:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays and 3 p.m. Sundays, Jan. 28-Feb. 13. Tickets are $15-$19. For more information or to purchase tickets call 859-957-1940 or visit www.thecarnegie.com. Pictured, from left, is Nick Rose as Oscar Madison, Don Volpenhein as Speed, Brandon Wentz as Roy, Reggie Willis as Murray and Mike Sherman as Vinnie. Not pictured is Brian Griffin as Felix Ungar.

LITERARY - STORY TIMES

Preschool Story Time, 10 a.m., Newport Branch Library, 901 E. Sixth St., Stories, songs and crafts. Ages 4-5. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 859-572-5035. Newport. Toddler Story Time, 10 a.m., Cold Spring Branch Library, 3920 Alexandria Pike, Stories, songs and activities. Ages 2-3. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 859-781-6166. Cold Spring. Pajama Story Time, 7 p.m., Fort Thomas-Carrico Branch Library, 1000 Highland Ave., Stories, songs and activities. Ages 3 and up. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 859-572-5033. Fort Thomas. Tot Time, 11 a.m., Cold Spring Branch Library, 3920 Alexandria Pike, Short stories, games, dancing and baby signing. Ages 18 months2 1/2 years. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 859-781-6166. Cold Spring.

About calendar

To submit calendar items, go to “www.NKY.com” and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to “life@communitypress.com” along with event information. Items are printed on a space-available basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to “www.NKY.com” and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page.

LITERARY - STORY TIMES

Toddler Story Time, 11 a.m., Fort ThomasCarrico Branch Library, Free. Registration required. 859-572-5033. Fort Thomas. Toddler Story Time, 11 a.m., Cold Spring Branch Library, Free. Registration required. 859-781-6166. Cold Spring.

BUSINESS CLASSES

CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS Triangle Toastmasters Meeting, 7-8:30 p.m., Campbell County Fiscal Court, 1098 Monmouth St., Become a confident, more effective speaker. Family friendly. Free. Presented by Triangle Toastmasters. 859-6523348. Newport.

COMMUNITY DANCE SwinGallery, 8-11:30 p.m., Step-N-Out Studio, 721 Madison Road, All ages. No partner required. Free beginner East Coast Swing lesson 8-9 p.m. Dancing to music by DJ 911:30 p.m. Family friendly. $5. Presented by SwinGallery. 513-290-9022. Covington. LITERARY - STORY TIMES

T U E S D A Y, F E B . 1 Northern Kentucky International Trade Association Trade Education, 8:30-10 a.m., Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce Center, 300 Buttermilk Pike, Suite 330, “Taxation, International Accounting and Financial Reporting Standards.” Learn to whom does Foreign Corrupt Practices Act apply, what do the FCPA Anti-Bribery Provisions prohibit, what are the Accounting and Record Keeping provisions required by FCPA, and procedures for making third party agreements. $25. Registration required. Presented by Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce. 859-578-8800; www.nkychamber.com/cwt/External/WCPage s/WCEvents/EventDetail.aspx?EventID=1119. Fort Mitchell.

T H U R S D A Y, F E B . 3

Lap Time, 9:30 a.m., Fort Thomas-Carrico Branch Library, 1000 Highland Ave., Quiet rhymes, bounces, lullabies and books with your baby. Ages birth to walkers. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 859-572-5033. Fort Thomas.

ON STAGE - COMEDY

Jo Koy, 8 p.m., Funny Bone Comedy Club, Newport on the Levee, Ages 18 and up. Special engagement. No coupons or passes accepted. $22. 859-957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Blithe Spirit, 8 p.m., Stained Glass Theatre, $20. 513-474-8711; www.footlighters.org. Newport.

Baby Time, 10 a.m., Fort Thomas-Carrico Branch Library, 1000 Highland Ave., Clap, sing and bounce with your child. Walkers to age 2. Free. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 859-572-5033. Fort Thomas.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Twelve Angry Men, 8 p.m., Monmouth Theatre, $12, $10 students and seniors. 513588-4910; www.wyomingplayers.com. Newport. Blithe Spirit, 8 p.m., Stained Glass Theatre, $20. 513-474-8711; www.footlighters.org. Newport.

RECREATION

Women’s Bridge, 10:30 a.m., Covington Art Club, 604 Greenup St., Kate Scudder House. Bring lunch; drinks provided. $2. Through Aug. 16. 859-431-2543. Covington. Dart Tournament, 8-10:30 p.m., Oakbrook Cafe, 6072 Limaburg Road, Free. 859-2828570; oakbrookcafe.com. Burlington.

HOLIDAY - BLACK HISTORY MONTH

Newport Branch Book Club Discusses Gloryland, 7 p.m., Newport Branch Library, 901 E. Sixth St. 859-572-5035; www.ccpl.org. Newport.

LITERARY - STORY TIMES

Toddler Story Time, 10 a.m., Fort ThomasCarrico Branch Library, 1000 Highland Ave., Stories, songs, finger plays and craft. Ages 2-3. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 859572-5033. Fort Thomas. Preschool Story Time, 1:30 p.m., Cold Spring Branch Library, 3920 Alexandria Pike, Ages 4-5. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 859781-6166. Cold Spring. Pajama Story Time, 7 p.m., Newport Branch Library, 901 E. Sixth St., Ages 3 and up. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 859-572-5035. Newport. W E D N E S D A Y, F E B . 2

HEALTH / WELLNESS

Weight Loss Class, 5:45-6:15 p.m., Lakeside Christian Church, 195 Buttermilk Pike, $30 per month, $20 per month with three month membership. First class free. Presented by Equipped Ministries. 859-802-8965. Lakeside Park.

PHOTO BY TONY BAILEY

The Cyclones Classic, inspired by the National Hockey League Winter Classic, comes to Fountain Square at noon Saturday, Jan. 29. The all-day youth pond hockey tournament, from noon to 5:30 p.m., is followed by a hockey skills clinic led by the Cincinnati Cyclones at 6 p.m. A free Cyclones exhibition game begins on the square at 7 p.m. The ice rink reopens for skating at 8:15 p.m. Visit www.myfountainsquare.com. Pictured are members of the Cincinnati Cyclones.

LITERARY - CRAFTS

Play Art, 4 p.m., Newport Branch Library, 901 E. Sixth St., Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 859-572-5035. Newport.

PROVIDED

The “World Famous” Lipizzaner Stallions come to The Bank of Kentucky Center at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. 28. The performance includes traditional movements and exercises, leaps and maneuvers. Tickets are $31.50, $26.50 and $24.50 for adults, $31.50, $14.25 and $13.25 for ages 60 and older and 2-12. Call 800745-3000 or visit www.bankofkentucky.com/Lipizzaner.asp.


Life

January 27, 2011

Kenton Recorder

B3

It’s understandable to doubt God’s love in our hard times Does he or doesn’t he? Does God really love us? Love me? We’re told in the scriptures that he does. And sometimes we think so, and sometimes we wonder. Our problem is we’re confused about all the aspects of real love and how they’re expressed. In our understanding of love, it’s not a “many splendored thing,” but rather specific. It’s always romantic, sensual, accompanied by music, roses, and dinners on the town. Hearing that God loves us leads us to expect we’ll soon be living on Easy Street. Televangelists imply that God will heal all sicknesses, give us twice as much money as we donate to them, and take all the problems out of our lives. Many a person’s spiritual life is made worse by this kind of thinking – that God’s love always goes easy on us.

Actually his grace wants to gradually transform us. A sculptor, operating on our premise, could never strike the Father Lou blows which out a Guntzelman bring beautiful statue Perspectives from a cold block of marble. The marble could complain the sculptor is being too uncaring and harsh – not knowing the final figure he has in mind. Parents, believing only in love’s comfortableness would: not have their child inoculated because it brings tears; enrolled in school because of homesickness; expect chores at home in order to earn money for video games. Good parents may seem harsh at times to their children. Their

genuine love for their child’s growth and well-being is only appreciated later on. God’s love is expressed in many ways. It can be playful, sacrificial, formative, giving, passionate, as well as demanding. Love is not meant only for stroking egos but for forming them. We accept the medicine because we trust in the love of the one who administers it. Why is it, then, when we look for signs of God’s love we expect them to always make us more comfortable? Sometimes they do. At other times they call forth more from us. They chip off pieces of our ego. An insightful prayer says: “I asked God to take away my sickness and give me health, but he permitted my illness to continue longer so I could learn compassion; I prayed for a better paying

job, and instead he gave me an appreciation for the one I have now; I prayed to be loved more intensely, and he taught me how to love others more.” It takes a long time and a lot of spiritual maturity to learn how to trust in a love that doesn’t always give us what we want. So human-like, St. Teresa of Avila chided God about this once: “No wonder you have such few friends, treating them the way you do.” There are always doubts and ambiguity about what God allows in our lives. “Why this? Why that?” we ask. Every adverse thing that happens we consider a disaster, a permitted evil, and a sign of an unloving God. Professor Belden Lane of St. Louis University, sees it differently. In his book, “The Solace of Fierce Landscapes,” he states his approach to the perceived evils in

his life: “I wouldn’t be satisfied with answers to the problem of evil if I had them. “What I desire most of all is the assurance of God’s love… that won’t let go. In struggling with God, none of us minds losing so long as we know ourselves to be loved.” Like a child lacking insight, we all struggle with God occasionally about what’s good for us and what’s not. We accuse God of being uncaring when he allows us to be roughed up by life at times. We think we know what’s best for us. Sometimes we do. But only perfect love knows perfectly. Father Lou Guntzelman is a Catholic priest of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati. Contact him at columns@ communitypress.com or P.O. Box 428541, Cincinnati, OH 45242.

Flu vaccine still available, cases peak in February The Health Department continues to offer flu shots by appointment at its county health centers in Boone, Campbell and Kenton counties.

Flu cases typically peak in February and can continue into March, said Dr. Lynne Saddler, district director of health with the Northern Kentucky Health Depart-

ment. The vaccine is $25, and Medicare and Medicaid are accepted. Locations and phone numbers are as follows:

• Boone County Health Center: 7505 Burlington Pike, Florence, 859-363-2060. • Campbell County Health Center: 1098 Monmouth St., New-

port, 859-431-1704. • Kenton County Health Center: 2002 Madison Ave., Covington, 859-431-3345.

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B4

Kenton Recorder

Life

January 27, 2011

It’s a free-for-all: dairy-free, gluten-free dishes I have been getting requests for dairy-free baked goods, and also other requests relating to gluten free substitutions for flour. So today I’m sharing some easy recipes that allow those on restricted diets to enjoy some “lovin’ from the oven.”

Dairy-free dinner rolls

These rolls are dairyfree, cholesterol-free and low-fat. Don’t be squeamish about the ingredients here. Powdered creamer is used by more than a few bakers to achieve a nice-tasting, dairy-free dinner roll. They taste as good as they look. The diabetic exchange is 11⁄2 starch, 1⁄2 fat for each roll. You can do this by hand or machine. 1 tablespoon rapid rise yeast plus a couple pinches sugar 21⁄4 cups warm water (110-115 degrees) 1 ⁄3 cup sugar 1 ⁄3 shortening 1 ⁄4 cup powdered nondairy creamer

CE-0000443733

21⁄4 teaspoons salt 5 - 6 cups bread flour

Preheat oven Rita 3 5 to0 Heikenfeld d e g r e e s . Rita’s kitchen D i s s o l v e yeast and pinches of sugar in warm water. In a mixing bowl, add sugar, shortening, creamer, salt and 5 cups flour. Add yeast and mix well on low speed. Turn to medium and beat until smooth. Add more flour if necessary to make a soft but sticky dough. Either knead it for six to eight minutes by machine or by hand. If doing by hand, turn out on floured surface. Knead until smooth, like a baby’s bottom. Place in bowl coated with cooking spray, turning once to coat top. Cover and let rise until doubled, about 1 hour. Punch down and turn out onto lightly floured sur-

fluffy. Add tofu and vanilla; beat for a minute. Mix flours, soda, salt and cinnamon together. Add to creamed mixture and mix lightly until blended. Fold in chips. Drop by rounded teaspoonfuls onto ungreased cookie sheet and bake eight to 10 minutes. Don’t overbake.

Dairy-free rolls are easy to make. face; divide into 18 to 24 pieces. Shape each piece into a roll. Place 2 inches apart on sprayed baking sheets. Cover and let rise until doubled, 30 to 45 minutes. Bake for 12 to 20 minutes or until golden brown.

Dairy-free cookies

These chocolate chip cookies are dairy-free and cholesterol free. OK, this has tofu in it but again, try it. You may surprise yourself. From Marian, who loves chocolate chip cookies with a healthy twist.

COURTESY RITA HEIKENFELD

1 cup unsalted margarine 1 cup unrefined cane sugar 2 tablespoons light molasses 1 ⁄4 cup light, firm tofu, puréed 1 teaspoon vanilla 13⁄4 cups unbleached flour 1 ⁄4 cup whole wheat flour 1 ⁄2 teaspoon baking soda 1 ⁄4 teaspoon salt 1 ⁄2 teaspoon cinnamon (opt.) 12 oz. chocolate chips Preheat oven to 350. Beat margarine, sugar and molasses until light and

Gluten-free flour mix

Store this in airtight jar and you’ll have plenty n hand when you need it. Use in place of flour for breading chops, coating meat or to thicken gravy and soup.

Mix together:

2 cups white rice flour 2 ⁄3 cup potato starch flour 1 ⁄3 cup tapioca flour

Easy lasagna for two

Carol Williams (no, not the Channel 9 news anchor), an Eastside reader needs recipes for two. So if you have some to share, please do. “We’re empty nesters and I have too many leftovers,” she said.

1 cup ricotta cheese 1 ⁄2 cup Parmesan 1 egg 14 oz. pasta sauce with meat 4 no-cook lasagna noodles 11⁄3 cups Mozzarella Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Combine ricotta, Parmesan and egg. Set aside. Spread 1⁄3 cup sauce in bottom of spayed loaf pan. Top with one noodle. Spread 1 ⁄3 cup sauce to edges. Top with 1⁄3 reserved cheese mixture and 1⁄3 cup Mozzarella. Repeat layers twice, topping with remaining noodle and sauce. Bake, covered, 25 minutes. Uncover and sprinkle with rest of Mozzarella. Bake about 10 minutes more. Let sit 10 minutes before cutting. Tips from Rita’s kitchen: Use regular lasagna noodles and boil just until tender, but not all the way done. Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator and author. E-mail columns@ communitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-248-7130, ext. 356.


Community

Kenton Recorder

January 27, 2011

B5

Hoffer receives Cov Latin award Bob Hoffer, of Fort Mitchell, was awarded the Outstanding Community Service Bonitatem Award from Covington Latin School. Hoffer, a 1972 alumnus of the school, was presented the award for his work in the community, including the Diocesan Catholic Children’s Home (DCCH) and for embodying the school motto “Teach me goodness, discipline and wisdom” (Bonitatem et Disciplinam et

PROVIDED/TIM IOTT

Capitol campout

Eight Boy Scouts and six leaders from Troop 1 chartered by Florence Christian Church participated in a weekend campout and visit to Frankfort. While there, the boys visited the Kentucky Vietnam Veterans Memorial, the Capitol Building, the Old Capitol Building and the Kentucky History Center in Frankfort. Youth participants were: Bradley Frost, Jake Anderson, Patrick Fales, Andrew Murton, Gary Deadmond, Ethan Harper, David Randall and Taylor Walker. Also pictured are Dustin Sexton and Rob Deadmond. Adults attending but not pictured were Steve Harper, Kevin Sweeney, Ron Coble and Tim Iott. Troop 1 meets every Tuesday at 7 p.m. at Florence Christian Church.

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MARRIAGE LICENSES

ArtsWave extends event over 75 venues all over the region. Sampler visitors can choose from a menu of options from Fairfield to Newport, Mason to Batavia, Pleasant Ridge to downtown and more. Another new feature this year will be the addition of Neighborhood Spotlights, highlighting several venues in one area with multiple programs on the same day. Each Sampler weekend also features one of Cincinnati's largest arts institutions. For a complete schedule and listing of events, visit www.theartswave.org/arts/ sampler The ArtsWave Sampler Weekend is a celebration of the rich depth of arts and culture in our community, and is the kickoff for the annual ArtsWave Campaign, when people all across our region come

together to support the fun things to do in greater Cincinnati. “The ArtsWave Sampler Weekend gives everyone a chance to share a wide variety of experiences together,” said Margy Waller, vice president. “We invite everyone, whether it’s your first Sampler Weekend or your 25th, to share the experience of these performances, exhibits, and special activities with family, friends and neighbors,” she said. Three successful events return to this year’s lineup, including the Get Smart About Art festival at the School for Creative and Performing Arts Saturday Feb. 26, the Gospel Sunday Brunch at Arts Innovation Movement Sunday, April 10, and Arte Latino at AMIS (Academy of Multilingual Immersion Studies) Saturday, April 23.

located outside of buildings. It includes smart grid technology, fiber optic systems, Power Line Carriers and cellular technology, as well as wireless systems and copper cable systems. A smart grid is an electricity network that uses digital technology to deliver power from suppliers to consumers via two-way digital communications. The technology saves energy, reduces costs and increases reliability and transparency. Students were required to build a smart grid system made of 10 kilometers of fiber optic cable with connectors and splices to mirror workplace conditions. The students then had to use meters to troubleshoot faults set up by the instructor. The outside plant technician certification course is an outgrowth of Gateway’s lineman-training program funded by a Department of Labor grant. “The smart grid installed

in our area enabled us to develop a new worker classification called the Outside Plant Technician, increasing the value we offer students and employers,” Collins said. “Support from our industry partners, including the Gateway Energy Committee, the Fiber Optic Associa-

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Gateway students become certified fiber technicians One hundred percent of the students enrolled in the outside plant technician course at Gateway Community and Technical College recently became Certified Fiber Outside Plant Technicians (CFospT) as a result of passing the internationally recognized CFospT test administered by the Fiber Optic Association. “We made history this past semester at Gateway by changing the way we deliver technical courses and labs to be accessible using different media and by offering a hands-on course that covers communication systems used by the energy industry,” said Thomas Collins, a professor at Gateway. Collins, a member of the Fiber Optics Association board for 10 years and an advisory board member for 15 years, explained that the Outside Plant Technician course teaches students how to install and operate communication systems

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Paul G. Adams

Paul G. Adams, 88, formerly of Walton, died Jan. 15, 2011, at Baptist Towers of Covington. He was a retired office manager for Reliable Casting Company, a member of Burlington First Church of Christ and a Kentucky Colonel. Survivors include his brother, Charles “Billy” Adams of Independence; niece, Glenna Lee Caffee of Dunedin, Fla.; and nephew, Ronald Adams of Rockledge, Fla.

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Ardella Ballinger

Ardella Ballinger, 72, of Covington, died Jan. 19, 2011. She was an employee at Walmart. Survivors include her husband, Donald Ballinger of Holly Hill, Fla.; son, Deron Ballinger of Covington; sisters, Barbara Back of Independence, Jane Johnson of Cincinnati and Glenda Canfield of Glencoe; four grandchildren; and five greatgrandchildren. Internment was at Kentucky Veterans Cemetery North, Williamstown.

Richard Bradford II

Richard “Richie” Bradford II, 41, of Covington, died Jan. 12, 2011, in Benton, Ark. Survivors include his parents, Richard and Toni Bradford; son Richard Bradford III; sister, Cindy Coldiron; and former wife, Peggy Hamilton-Bradford. Memorial service will be 10 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 29, at First 12 Mile Baptist Church, California. Memorials: Church or charity of choice.

Sandra E. Nelson Edwards, 50, of Covington died Jan. 11, 2011, at her home. She formerly worked in various school cafeterias. Her husband, John A. Edwards Sr.; father, Thomas Nelson; and a brother, David Nelson, died previously. Survivors include sons, John A. Edwards Jr., David R. Edwards and Robert A. Edwards, all of Covington; mother, Betty J. Puchta Nelson of Covington; and brothers, Carl Puchta, Steven Snell and Timothy Snell, all of Covington. Burial was at Highland Cemetery, Fort Mitchell.

Michael L. Fulmer

Michael L. Fulmer, 52, of Fort Pierce, Fla., formerly of Covington, died Jan. 21, 2011, in Fort Pierce, Fla. He was a diver with Mel Fisher Company and had attained a cap-

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tain’s license to operate a research vessel for Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute. He was a registered nurse and served in the U.S. Army, Navy and Marine Corps. His brother, Bob Fulmer, died previously. Survivors include his companion, Sheri Culbertson of Fort Pierce, Fla.; son, Chris Fulmer of Fort Pierce, Fla.; parents, Les and Mary Ann Fulmer of Covington; and sister, Terri Mueller of Taylor Mill. Interment was in Floral Hills Memorial Gardens, Taylor Mill. Memorials: American Heart Association.

Esther Stratman Ginn

Esther Mary Stratman Ginn, 85, of Elsmere, formerly of Covington, died Jan. 21, 2011, at Woodcrest Manor, Elsmere. She worked as a baker for Covington Independent Schools, first district, and was a member of St. John Catholic Church and Catholic Social Services. Her husband, Charles R. “Ciggie” Ginn, died previously. Survivors include sons, Thomas A. Ginn and Mark W. Ginn, both of Independence, and Charles R. “Roger” Ginn of Erlanger; brother, Howard Stratman of Covington; six grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren. Interment was at Mother of God Cemetery, Fort Wright. Memorials: Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation, 522 Cincinnati Mills Drive, Suite C281, Cincinnati, OH 45240.

Hazel Julia Hammond

Hazel Julia Redman Hammond, 94, of Morning View, died Jan. 18, 2011, at McCall House in Simpsonville, S.C. She was a member of Kenton Baptist Church and the Kenton Fire Department Ladies Auxiliary and a former member of the Visalia P.T.A. She enjoyed a good card game and staying busy. Her husband, Roy Hammond, died previously. Survivors include her son, Jerry Hammond of Florence; daughters, Jane Smith of Waddy and Joan Rapp of Simpsonville, S.C.; sisters, Helen Kloentrup of Morning View and Dixie Redman of Visalia; brother, John Redman of Morning View;

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and four grandchildren. Interment was at Independence Cemetery. Memorials: Demossville Baptist Church, 338 Demossville Road, Demossville, KY 41033.

Linda Darlyne Haynes

Linda Darlyne Haynes, 66, of Florence, died Jan. 14, 2011, at home. She was a customer service representative for Fidelity Investments and a member of Kenton Baptist Church. Her father, Roy Haynes, and brother, Donald “Pete” Haynes, died previously. Survivors include daughters, Shanda Gatio of Florence and Stacie Collins of Independence; son, Steven Hardert of Florence; mother, Pearl Haynes of Florence; sister, Vickie Smock of Verona; brothers, David Haynes of Aurora, Ind., and Dennis Haynes of Burlington; and six grandchildren. Memorials: American Cancer Society, 297 Buttermilk Pike, For Mitchell, KY 41017.

Ronald W. Jarman

Ronald W. Jarman, 71, of Independence, died Jan. 10, 2011, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He was a retired inspector for General Motors Corp., Cincinnati, a former real estate broker for Charles Sassin Reality and a member of Kingdom Hall of Jehovah’s Witnesses in Taylor Mill and the United Automobile Workers Local. Survivors include his wife, Eloise Painter Jarman; son, Terry Jarman of Moores Hill, Ind.; daughter, Kim Sebree of Florence; five grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren. Disposition was cremation.

Gola ‘Kenny’ Johnson

Gola “Kenny” Johnson, 53, of Ryland Heights, died Jan. 21, 2011, at University Hospital, Cincinnati. He was owner/operator of G.K. Johnson Heating & Air. His Father, Gola Johnson, died previously. Survivors include his wife, Annette Johnson; daughter, Sarah Johnson; sons, Ryan Johnson and Jessie Johnson; mother, Wilma Hanks Johnson; sisters, Kathy Stickels, Mary Dawn and Esther Cornilus; brothers, Paul Johnson and Jeff Johnson; and three grandchildren. Visitation will be 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 29, at Connley Brothers Funeral Home, Latonia. Service will follow. Private burial will be at the convenience of the family.

Thelma R. Kuntz

Thelma R. Kuntz, 87, of Southgate, died Jan. 22, 2011, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. She was a homemaker and a member of John R. Little VFW Post No. 3186 Women’s Auxiliary. Her husband, Carl Kuntz, and daughter, Julie Ann Wever, died previously. Survivors include sons, Kim Kuntz of Plano, Texas, and Karl Kuntz of Westerville, Ohio; brotherin-law, George Kuntz of Covington; six grandchildren; and six greatgrandchildren. Visitation will be 5-8 p.m. Thurs-

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day, Jan. 27, at Dobbling Funeral Home, Fort Thomas. Funeral Ceremony will be 10 a.m. Friday, Jan. 28, at St. Therese Church, Southgate. Burial will be in St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas. Memorials: St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, 501 St. Jude Place, Memphis, TN 38105 or St. Elizabeth Hospice, 483 S. Loop Drive, Edgewood, KY 41017.

James W. Newman

James W. Newman, 73, of Greensburg, Pa., died Jan. 18, 2011, at Excela Westmoreland Hospital. He was a former member of the National Street Rod Association and Kustom Kemps of America and was a member of Rollin’ Oldies Custom Classic Car Club and Pharaoh’s of Pittsburgh car club. He was owner/sole proprietor of Jim’s Plumbing & Heating and was a U.S. Army Korean War veteran. His brothers, Charles Newman and Howard Newman; and two sisters, Violet Shychuck and Ruth Medich, died previously. Survivors include his wife, Kathleen Newman; daughter, Tracy Aul of Greensburg, Pa.; sons, James J. Newman of Independence and Eric S. Newman of Pittsburgh; sister, Ella Boltich of Hutchison; and three grandchildren.

William Northcutt Sr.

William Swinford Northcutt Sr., 86, of Lexington, formerly of Cynthiana and Covington, died Jan. 19, 2011, at St. Joseph Hospital, Lexington. He was a member of Faith Baptist Church, Covington, retired employee of L&N Railroad and an honorably discharged Army veteran. His wife, Garnetta Tolle Northcutt, and a grandson, William S. Northcutt III, died previously. Survivors include his son, William S. Northcutt Jr. of Crittenden; and grandsons, Dennis Wayne and Christopher Ryan Northcutt. Internment was at Battle Grove Cemetery, Cynthiana.

Walter P. Parks

Walter P. Parks, 48, of Covington, died Jan. 17, 2011, at Emeritus of Edgewood. Survivors include his mother, Margaret Parks of Covington; and sister, Susan Parks of Montgomery, Ohio. Interment was at Highland Cemetery, Fort Mitchell. Memorials: St. Ann’s Catholic Church, 1274 Parkway Ave., Covington, KY 41011.

Judy Diane Parrett

Judy Diane Bruce Parrett, 61, of Huber Heights, Ohio, formerly of Independence, died Jan. 21, 2011, at Miami Valley Hospital, Dayton, Ohio. She was a retired vice president/video producer for AT&T and a member of Ginghamsburg United Methodist Church. She enjoyed photography, antiques, auctions, her pets, reading and coaching softball. Survivors include her daughters, Karrie Parrett and Angela Howell of Tipp City, Ohio; son, John Parrett of Independence; father and stepmother, Edward and Verna Lee Bruce of Corbin; sister, Lisa Smith of Cincinnati; brother, Gary Bruce of Erlanger; nine grandchildren; and best friend, Patty Williams of Huber Heights, Ohio. Interment was at Forest Hills Memorial Gardens, Tipp City, Ohio. Memorials: Hospice of Dayton, 324 Wilmington Ave., Dayton, OH 45420.

Frank A. Pedro

Frank A. Pedro, 84, of Taylor Mill, died Jan. 17, 2011, at his residence. He retired after 29 years of service as a draftsman for General Electric Company in Livermore, Calif., was a member of the Lutheran Church and enjoyed woodworking, furniture making, stainglass artistry and residential construction. He was a U.S. Navy World War II veteran. Survivors include his wife, Carolyn J. Pennignton Pedro; son, “Chip” Pedro of Taylor Mill; daughters, Karen L. Wagovich of Covington and Denise Pedro of Taylor Mill; sister, Antonette Browning of Union; four grandchildren; and three greatgrandchildren. Internment was at Floral Hills Memorial Gardens. Memorials: Hospice of St. Elizabeth Health Care, 483 S. Loop Drive, Edgewood, KY 41017.

Charles ‘Rick’ Powell

Charles “Rick” Richard Powell, 51, of Latonia, died Jan. 18, 2011, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He was a route driver for Rumpke of Ohio, former owner/operator of Powell Sanitation, owner/operator and D.J. of CRP Entertainment, owner and sponsor of Stock Cars Florence Speedway, Florence, and Go Cart Raceway, Maysville. His father, Charles Edward Powell, died previously. Survivors include his son, James Powell of Independence; daughter, Angel Powell of Newport; mother, Shirley Ayers Folkersen of Las Vegas; brothers, Terry Powell of Florence and Mark Powell of Latonia; sisters, Mildred Pyke of Dayton and Sherry Akemon of Latonia; and three grandchildren. Internment was at Evergreen Cemetery, Southgate. Memorials: American Diabetes Association, 644 Linn St., Suite 304, Cincinnati, OH 45203.

Mary Louise Robinson

Mary Louise Keller Robinson, 94, of Covington, died Jan. 17, 2011, at St. Charles Care Center, Covington. She was a retired assembler for Wadsworth Electric Company, Covington, and a member of St. Augustine Church, Covington. Her husband, Willard L. Robinson, died previously. Survivors include sisters, Marjorie Lucas of Georgetown and Betty Dawson of Richardson, Texas; niece, Clara Mulberry Brown of Crittenden; dear friends, Debbie and Paul Finke of Fort Wright; and six grandchildren. Internment was at Forest Lawn Memorial Park, Erlanger. Memorials: St. Charles Care Center.

George Winans

George Winans, 75, of Morning View, died Jan. 22, 2011, at Grant Manor Care Facility, Dry Ridge. He was retired from Butternut Bread Company and enjoyed farming and playing cards. Survivors include his wife, Jean Winans; daughters, Joyce Rouse of Fort Mitchell and Connie Grimes and Carol List, both of Demossville; stepsons, Robert Knochelman of Walton and Allen Knochelman and Steve Knochelman, both of Morning View; stepdaughter, Carol Ansari of Erlanger; 14 grandchildren; 10 great-grandchildren; and one greatgreat-grandchild. Interment was at Independence Cemetery. Memorials: St. Cecilia Church Building Fund, 5313 Madison Pike, Independence, KY 41051.

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On the record

January 27, 2011

Kenton Recorder

B7

POLICE REPORTS About police reports

Arrests/citations

Ronald A. Ciullo, 160 Herrington Dr., Apt. 12, alcohol intoxication in a public place, carrying a concealed weapon at 621 Main St., Jan. 16. Isaac E. Adams, no address given, serving bench warrant for court, possession of marijuana, first degree trafficking in a controlled substance (cocaine) at 1100 Greenup St., Jan. 16. Keith D. Kiffmeyer, 3299 Broadwell Ave., alcohol intoxication in a public place, second degree disorderly conduct, resisting arrest, possession of marijuana at 600 Main St., Jan. 16. Jason R. Tekulve, 3604 Glenn Ave., possession of marijuana at 3604 Glenn Ave., Jan. 14. Melissa A. Seitz, 8796 Locust Pike, theft at 4303 Winston Ave., Jan. 14. Benjamin F. Patterson III, 226 Pleasant St., robbery at Bush St. and Garrard St., Jan. 14. Gabrielle A. Hatton, 4055 Heartwood Ln., theft at 4303 Winston Ave., Jan. 14. Kevin D. Luckey, 316 W. 7Th St., possession of handgun by convicted felon, serving bench warrant for court at 316 W. 7th St., Jan. 14. Justin L. Egner, 547 Linden Ave., theft of services at 630 Main St., Jan. 14. Barry H. Hicks III, 310 Hawthorne St., theft at 1616 Madison Ave., Jan. 13. Charles B. Keene, 2016 Pearl St., failure to comply with sex offender registration, trafficking in a controlled substance within 1000 yards of a school, drug paraphernalia-buy/possess, first degree possession of a controlled substance at 2016 Pearl St., Jan. 13. Jeffrey S. Armstrong, 338 E. 41St St., fourth degree assault at 338 E. 41st St., Jan. 12. Aaron L. Lundy, 3141 Moosewood Ct., carrying a concealed weapon, receiving stolen property, possession of a hangun by convicted felon at 500 block of Russell St., Jan. 11. Phyllis A. Schrode, 32 Forest Ave., theft of identity of another without consent, serving bench warrant for court at Orchard St., Jan. 11. Caldwell M. Burnette Iii, 2751 Madison Pike, fourth degree assault at 2751 Madison Pike, Jan. 10. James S. Havens, No Address Given, fourth degree assault at 310 E. 15th St., Apt. 4, Jan. 10. Shane J. Ellman, 113 Promontory Dr., #E, fourth degree assault at 113 Promontory Dr., Jan. 10.

Incidents/investigations Assault

A man was bitten on the finger at 604 Main St., Jan. 16. A man was struck by a bottle at 1000 block of Madison Ave., Jan. 14. A woman was assaulted by another woman at 50 E. 11th St., Jan. 13. A man reported being assaulted at 9164 Hawks Ridge Dr., Jan. 12. Two men assaulted one another at 122 Martin St., Jan. 12. A woman reported being choked and shoved into a wall at 120 Promontory Dr., Jan. 12. A woman was choked at 1536 Holman Ave., Jan. 10. A man was burned with hot coffee at 1536 Holman Ave., Jan. 10.

Burglary

Several items were stolen from a residence at 2513 Alden Ct., Jan. 16. $380 in cash, a TV, cigarettes and an unknown amount of change from a juke box was stolen at 5966 Taylor Mill Rd, Jan. 16. A TV and a computer were stolen at 23 15th St., Jan. 16. Various items were stolen at 4441 Decoursey Ave., Jan. 15. Approximately $200 in cash and 200 blank checks were stolen at 117 W. 4th St., Jan. 14. A gift certificate and approximately $30 was stolen at 939 Spring St., Jan. 12. Copper piping was stolen from a residence at 2228 Busse St., Jan. 11. Several items were stolen from a building at 5971 Taylor Mill Rd., Jan. 11. Copper piping was stolen from a residence at 3825 Huntington Ave., Jan. 10. Two game systems and a TV were stolen at 3525 Church St., Jan. 10. Several electronic items, jewelry and $2,050 in cash was stolen at 20 E. 26th St., Jan. 10. The outside copper spouts of a resi-

The Community Recorder publishes the names of all adults charged with offenses. The information is a matter of public record and does not imply guilt or innocence. dence were cut off at 2719 Madison Pike, Jan. 10. Copper wiring and piping was stolen at 1515 Garrard St., Jan. 10.

Criminal mischief

forged at 22 Swain Ct., Jan. 13.

Theft of a controlled substance

Prescription medication was stolen at 2000 Russell St., Jan. 11.

Theft of identity of another without consent

A woman found that another person had a driver's license issued in her name at 1548 Nancy St., Jan. 13.

Theft of labor

Someone didn't pay for services at 555 W. Pike St., Jan. 14.

Theft of motor vehicle registration plate

A license plate was stolen at 1300 James Simpson Jr St., Jan. 14.

Theft, criminal mischief

Eric J Mitchell, 28, 217 Trevor Street, warrant, Jan. 11. Jeffrey A Thompson, 20, 7748 Ravenwood Drive, warrant, Jan. 12. Christopher D Robinson, 21, 7554 Hillcrest Drive, boone county warrant, Jan. 12. Karassa L Blackburn, 22, 2729 Alexandria Lane, operating on suspended license, Jan. 13. Arron Van Natter, 32, 12 Huckleberry , shoplifting, Jan. 15. Grace M Fields, 45, 2791 Madison Avenue, alcohol intoxication, disorderly conduct, Jan. 15. Thomas W Fulmer, 49, 2791 Madison Avenue, alcohol intoxication, disorderly conduct, Jan. 15. David L Steel, 39, 333 Washington Avenue, driving under the influence, Jan. 22.

Incidents/investigations Fraudulent use of credit card

reported stolen at 3700 Holly Lane, Jan. 10. $415 worth of tools reported stolen at 37 Kenton Lands Road, Jan. 13. $300, $170 worth of computer hardware reported stolen at 538 Rosary Drive, Jan. 13. Reported at 2517 Ritchie Avenue, Jan. 13. Reported at 3879 Jenny Lane, Jan. 14. $30 worth of household goods reported stolen at 421 Stevenson Road, Jan. 14. $250 worth of jewelry reported stolen at 1101 Pacific Avenue, Jan. 15.

Possession of marijuana

$20 worth of drugs/narcotics reported stolen at 1225 Mesa Drive, Jan. 13.

Rocks were thrown through two windows at 424 Patton St., Jan. 15. A street sign was knocked down at 1100 Madison Ave., Jan. 14. Someone broke the window of a warehouse at 101 W. 13th St., Jan. 13. The door to a pool was damaged at 1364 Parkway Ave., Jan. 10. Criminal possession of a forged instrument Someone passed a counterfeit $50 bill at 424 16th St., Jan. 10.

A GPS unit was stolen at 311 N. Garrard St., Jan. 15. The window of a vehicle was broken out at 500 W. 3rd St., Jan. 13.

A man discharged a firearm at 2603 Todd St., Jan. 11.

Second degree criminal mischief

A man entered a residence illegally at 1218 Highway Ave., Jan. 16. Fraudulent use of a credit card, forgery, theft An ATM card and payroll check were stolen at 1211 Hermes Ave., Jan. 12.

FORT MITCHELL

$8.60 worth of consumable goods reported stolen at 2501 Dixie Highway, Jan. 15. $500 worth of radios/TVs/VCRs

Criminal trespassing

Theft, theft of a controlled substance

A purse with medication and $100 in cash was stolen at 1405 Holman Ave., Jan. 11.

Wanton endangerment

Arrests/citations

Matthew Warden, 40, 2439 Reserve Drive, alcohol intoxication, Jan. 9.

Intimidating a participant in the legal process

Possession of a controlled substance, drug paraphernaliabuy/possess

Robbery

$200 in cash, a cell phone and a wallet was stolen at 2513 Alden Ct., Jan. 16. A man fired a gun into a cab after demanding money at Alexandria Dr., Jan. 15. A wallet was stolen at 1500 Scott St., Jan. 15. $100 in cash was stolen at 76 N. Indiana Dr., Jan. 15. Two cell phones, a wallet and a driver's license were taken at knifepoint at W. 9th St. and Madison Ave., Jan. 14.

Terroristic threatening

A woman was threatened at 25 E. 32nd St., Jan. 11.

Terroristic threatening, criminal mischief

A man threatened to shoot an officer at W. 4th St., Jan. 12.

Theft

Three video games were stolen at 103 Promontory Dr., F, Jan. 17. A purse was snatched at 730 Madison Ave., Jan. 15. A purse was stolen at 4250 Glenn Ave., Jan. 12. A game system was stolen at 2710 Madison Pike, Jan. 12. A revolver was stolen at 727 Bakewell St., #1, Jan. 12. A debit card was stolen at 2758 Dakota Ave., Jan. 11. A cell phone was stolen at 315 E. 15th St., Jan. 10. Several items were stolen from a vehicle at 932 Banklick St., Jan. 10. A GPS unit was stolen at 10 Rivercenter Blvd., Nov. 11.

Theft by deception

Several checks were stolen and

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$45 worth of drugs/narcotics seized at 121 Jefferson Davis Place, Jan. 16.

Reported at Pacific Avenue, Jan. 10.

Theft of controlled substance

Unauthorized use of motor vehicle $15,000 vehicle reported stolen at 815 Stevenson Road, Jan. 14.

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Reported at 645 Donaldson Road, Jan. 10.

Third degree burglary

FLORIDA

FLORIDA

Mrs. Virginia K. (Klopp) Leisure Mrs. Virginia K. (Klopp) Leisure, age 97, of Madison, Indiana, entered this life on September 28, 1913 in Petersburg, Kentucky. She was the daughter of the late, Frank & Etta Belle Hoffman Klopp. She was raised in Petersburg and was a graduate of the Petersburg High School. She was united in marriage in May 1941 to Ronald O. Leisure in New Washington, Indiana. This union was blessed with three sons and two daughters. She was a devoted wife, mother, grandmother and in her later years a caregiver. She enjoyed her grandchildren, gardening, cooking, her animals and being with family. She was a member of the Smyrna Monroe Presbyterian Church. Virginia died Monday, January 17, 2011 at 5:40 a.m. at the King’s Daughters’ Hospital in Madison, Indiana. : A LOVING FAMILY : Virginia will be missed by her loving sons: Ronald K. Leisure & his wife, Mary Lou of Kokomo, Indiana, Thomas G. Leisure & his wife, Jane of Scottsburg, Indiana, Robert L. Leisure & his wife, Mary of Rochester, Michigan; her loving daughters: Anna Belle Robinson & her husband, Cliff of Madison, Indiana, Nina Sonner & her husband, Alvin of Madison, Indiana; her grandchildren: Wendi, Steve, Susan, Brittany, Cameron, Kristen, Carrie, Jacob, Anne Marie, Jeremy, Michelle, & Melissa; her great grandchildren: Sydney, Savannah, Pierce, Tate, Mitch, Payton, Paisley, Megan, Courtney, Ellie, Forrest & Lacey; several nieces, nephews & other relatives. She was preceded in death by her parents, Frank J. & Etta Belle Hoffman Klopp; her husband, Ronald O. Leisure died, March 28, 1976; her granddaughter, Angela Christine Robinson died in 1976; her great grandson, Dustin Hopewell; her sisters, Ormel Pawlmore, Eloyse Schacklette, Marie Moore & Leola Carpenter; her brothers, Ruthford, Bill & Robert Klopp. : PRIVATE FUNERAL CEREMONY : Private funeral services was conducted Thursday, January 20, 2011 by the Rev. Richard McDole at the Morgan & Nay Funeral Centre, 325 Demaree Drive in Madison, Indiana.

: MEMORIAL EXPRESSIONS : Memorial contributions may be made to the Fairmount Cemetery. Cards are available at the funeral home.

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NORTH MYRTLE BEACH. Oceanfront condos. 1, 2 & 3 bedroom units with pools, spas & tennis. Hi-speed Internet, kiddie waterslide. 800-345-5617 www.oceancreek.net

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SEABROOK EXCLUSIVES Villas & Private Homes. Ocean, golf, tennis, equestrian. Pet friendly rentals. Free brochure. Book online! 888-718-7949. www.seabrookexclusives.com

TENNESSEE DESTIN. Local owner, 1 or 2 luxury condos. 2 BR, 2 BA overlooking gulf, sugar white beaches. Heated pool, hot tubs & more. 937-767-8449,or visit www.majesticsunindestin.com

DESTIN. Luxury 2 BR, 2 BA oceanfront condos. Heated pool, spas, kids pool & tennis. Sleeps 6. Local owner. www.us-foam.com/destin . D- 513-528-9800, E 513-752-1735

Happy Birthday SANIBEL ISLAND ∂ Lakefront 3BR, 2BA home with screened lanai & 2 car garage; 1000 ft. from Gulf of Mexico! Monthly rentals, available now. Local owner, 513-232-4634

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MANHATTAN--NYC HOTEL $109/2 persons. Singles $94. Suites $119-$139. Lincoln Ctr area, Hudson River views, 18 flrs, kitchenette, 5 mins to midtown, safe, quiet, luxury area. RIVERSIDE TOWER, Riverside & 80th St. Call 1-800-724-3136 or visit: www.riversidetowerhotel.com

NORTH CAROLINA

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$150 worth of vehicle damage reported at 2351 Royal Drive, Jan. 10. $20,000 worth of vehicle damage reported at 2347 Danbury, Jan. 10. $300 worth of computer hardware reported stolen at 552 Michelle Circle, Jan. 2.

Theft

In Memoriam

The witness to a legal process was threatened over the phone and computer at 1622 Scott St., Jan. 12.

An overdosed man was found to be in possession of heroin and a syringe at 317 Garrard St., first floor, Jan. 12. Possession of marijuana, drug paraphernalia-buy/possess A woman was found with marijuana and rolling papers at 100 block of E. 8th St., Jan. 13.

$486.54 worth of tools reported stolen at 500 Clock Tower Way, Jan. 13.

Third degree criminal mischief

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COVINGTON

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B8

Kenton Recorder

January 27, 2011

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NORTHERN KENTUCKY RIGHT TO LIFE

ASHLEY FINDLEY ALLISON FINDLEY MR & MRS JAMES FINKE JEFFREY E. FINKE MARIA C. FINKE THOMAS R. FINKE JOSEPH R.L. FINKE DAVID J. FINKE PETER E. FINKE MARY FINN BOB FINN On this thirty-eighth anniversary of the infamous CATHERINE FIORE decision of the Supreme Court exercising its raw GLORIA FIORE ROSANNA FIORE judicial power over the lives of the defenseless BOB & CATHY FLAIG unborn, we join with a multitude of others in many LARRY & BETTY FOLTZ MARY FOSTER cities across this nation, to carry the message of JANET FOUSHEE ANN & DAVID FOUTCH Life to President Barrack Obama and to the 112th BETTY A FRAGGE Congress. We join the over 100,000 people who RONALD G FRAGGE, MD THE FRAMBES FAMILY marched in a circle of life around the capitol in STEVE FRANZEN Washington DC on January 22. DEBBIE FRANZEN NICHOLAS FRANZEN As much as we would like to be there, for many LEAH FRANZEN it is impossible to travel to Washington. Again, MCKINLEY FRANZEN VIC FREIHOFER we March on Paper. We openly lend our names REX FREIHOFER to urge The adoption of a mandatory Human Life FRED & PAMELA FREIHOFER & FAMILY A FRIEND Amendment to the Constitution of the United LEONARD FRITZ & FAMILY AL GARNICK States of America. LOIS GARNICK We pledge to strive to attain that goal in memorial RICHARD GAUTRAUD, M.D. & FAMILY RUTH GAVIN of those little ones who have no identity and bear THE GEDEON FAMILY no names but nonetheless are written on the WILLIAM & CHRISTINA GERDES FAMILY consciences of all Americans. We are all manner JUDITH A. GERDING of people - We are Democrats, Republicans, MARY JO GERMANN HANK GERMANN Independents, Conservatives, Liberals and all the NICK GERMANN shades in between. MEGAN GERMANN SARA GERMANN The beautiful red rose, symbol of short life HANK GIESKE VINCE & BETTY GIGLIO FAMILY and martyrdom, will again bloom in Washington MRS JANE GILKEY January 22. JOHN GILKEY PAUL GILKEY WE HAVE TAKEN A STAND! CATHERINE GINDELE WE WILL NOT COMPROMISE! CHRIS GINDELE ELLARIE GLENN AND WE WILL BE HEARD! DENNY & BARB GLENN KELSEY GLENN COURTNEY GLENN IN LOVING MEMORY OF ABBY KATHY BESSLER JACINTA BRUEGGEMANN SHAWN GLENN JACOB BESSLER DEAN & AILEEN ADAMS CATHERINE BRUEGGEMANN BRENDA GLENN BEN BESSLER DOMINIC & MELISSA BRUEGGEMANN GRACE ADAMS KEVIN GLENN ABBEY BESSLER NICHOLAS BRUEGGEMANN BETTY ADAMS MAGGIE GLENN TONY BESSLER THERESA BRUEGGEMANN JOHN ADAMS KERRY GLENN BRIDGET BESSLER GABRIEL BRUEGGEMANN JANET ALBERS MICHAEL GLENN JUDE BESSLER JEROME BRUEGGEMANN ROBERT ALBERS MATTHEW GLENN AL BESSLER IGNATIUS BRUEGGEMANN KACEE ALLEN MARK GLENN L NATE BESSLER REGINA BRUEGGEMANN OLIVIA ALLEN MICHELLE GLENN BRO BLAISE BETLEY CFP STANISLAUS BRUEGGEMANN MARCUS ALLEN PAT & PAM GLENN RICHARD BEYER JOACHIM BRUEGGEMANN STEVE & DIANE ALLEN’S DONNIE GLENN ANTHONY BEYER MERCEDES BRUEGGEMANN GRANDCHILDREN LAUREN GLENN VICTORIA BRUEGGEMANN MR & MRS MARTIN ALTER NICHOLAS BEYER NICHOLAS GLENN THERESA BEYER DIEGO BRUEGGEMANN ANTHONY ALTER KELLY GLENN MARY JO BEYER PATRICK BRUEGGEMANN ANNA ALTER BRENDA GLUCK JERRY & LOIS BIEDENBENDER ANNA BRUEGGEMANN COLIN ANICKA KEITH GLUCK BRUCE & MARY BIEDENHARN MARIA BRUEGGEMANN AMY ARLINGHAUS ANTHONY GLUCK JOE & RITA BIEDENHARN ELIZABETH BRUEGGEMANN DALE ARLINGHAUS LUCAS GLUCK JEFF & JEN BIEDENHARN JOSEPH BRUEGGEMANN EMILY ARLINGHAUS VALERIE GLUCK DAVID BIEDENHARN MICHAEL BRUEGGEMANN ERIC ARLINGHAUS HOLLY GLUCK DANNY BIEDENHARN GRACE BRUEGGEMANN MONICA ARLINGHAUS VERONICA GLUCK MARY & ZACHARY BITZER NICHOLAS BRUEGGEMANN NATALIE ARLINGHAUS NORBERT GOETZ MARY ANN BLACK MARK BRUEGGEMANN STEFANIE ARLINGHAUS INGA GOETZ PATRICK BLACK ANGELA BRUEGGEMANN PAUL & MARLYS COLLEEN & NORBIE GOETZ RICHARD & BARBARA BLANK DIANA M. BRUEGGEMANN ARLINGHAUS & FAMILY SAMANTHA GOETZ CHARLES & TAMMY ARMITAGE LORETTA BLEICHNER HOLLY BRUEGGEMANN LARRY GOETZ DIANNA ARNOLD PAUL & MARY ANN BLOM & FAMILY JOHN BRUEGGEMANN PHILLIP GOETZ ANGELA BOH MARK G. ARNZEN BENEDICT BRUEGGEMANN SARAH GOETZ AARON BOH KATHY ASHCRAFT LISA BRUEGGEMANN THE GOETZ FAMILY STEPHANIE BOH BARB & WAYNE BACH JOHN BRUEGGEMANN DOROTHY GOLD BERNADETTE BRUEGGEMANN JACK BOH BOB & ROSE BACON ROY GOLD CARMELITA BRUEGGEMANN DOUGLAS BOH ELISSA BAKER BEN GOLDADE MARY BRUEGGEMANN DENNIS BOH JIMMY BAKER THERESA GOLDADE BERNARD BRUEGGEMANN GARY BOLTE TATIANA BAKER MICHELLE GOLDADE BOB BRUEGGEMANN MATTHEW BOLTE BRODY BAKER ASHLEY GOLDADE NATASHA BRUEGGEMANN RUTH ANN BOLTE LUIS R. BALLESTER FRANCIS GOLDADE ISABELLA BRUEGGEMANN KATHERINE F. BALLESTER GINA BONDICK PETER GOODWIN M.D. NATALIE BRUGGER PAUL BONDICK LYNETTE M. BALLESTER DONNA GRADY BOB & HONEY BRUNSON NICHOLAS A. BALLESTER THE BOOHER FAMILY WILL GRADY MRS DOROTHY BANKEMPER WHITNEY BOONE SUSAN BUCHER EILEEN GRADY HELEN BARBARA THE BUCHER FAMILY LAWRENCE R. BORNE BILL GRADY PAUL BARCOMB LOIS BUERGER ROBERT BOWLING MARSHA J GRAN GINETTE BARCOMB TIM BUERGER JEANNINE BOWLING JOAN GREEN SOLOMON BARCOMB MARILYN BUESCHER JACK BOWLING JAMES GREEN CALEB BARCOMB AMY BUETER MEGAN BOWLING MICHAEL GREEN CONSTANCE BRADY-BALDWIN JOE BURWINKEL KATHLEEN BARCOMB THE. GREER FAMILY MRS STELLA BRANNEN & FAMILY JOYCE BURWINKEL MAX BARCOMB ELIZABETH GRENKI MARY FRANCES BRAY STAN BARCZAK MICHELE BURWINKEL JAMES & SUSAN GREVE LARRY BRENNAN CATHY BARCZAK ANDREW BURWINKEL BEVERLY GRIMME ADELLE BRENNAN MARY BARCZAK CHRISTOPHER BURWINKEL PAUL A GRIMME SHAE BRENNAN ELIZABETH BARCZAK BETH BURWINKEL BETTY L GRIMME RON BRESSER RACHEL BARCZAK PAUL A BUSAM, MD WAYNE GRIMME, SR DONNA BRESSER SARAH BARCZAK RITA BUSHELMAN THE ERIC & ANGELA JOSH BRESSER ROSE BARCZAK D.J. BUSHELMAN GROESCHEN FAMILY DOROTHY BRINKER IN LOVING MEMORY OF CASEY BUSHELMAN MARY K GRONOTTE MR & MRS ROBERT BROCKMAN MARIA BARCZAK SUSAN BUSHELMAN MARY ANNE GRONOTTE ANTHONY BROCKMAN IN LOVING MEMORY OF SHERI BUSHELMAN TIM GRONOTTE PHIL BROCKMAN WALTER BARCZAK BILL BUTLER ELIZABETH GRONOTTE MR & MRS BRIAN BROCKMAN JERILYN BUTLER IRENEUSZ BARCZAK FRANK & JOAN GROSS LAUREN BROCKMAN CHERLYN BARCZAK ANITA BUTLER BRENDA GROSS IN MEMORY OF JOE BARKET EMMA BROCKMAN MARY DOLORES BUTLER CURTIS TOM GROSS LUKE BROCKMAN MIKE BARNES JULIANNA BUTLER DOROTHY GROTHAUS MRS & MRS JOHN BROCKMAN MICHAEL BUTLER DEBBIE BARNES JACK GROTHAUS CHRIS & SUSAN BARNETT JACK BROCKMAN HELEN BUTLER PAUL W. GRUNENWALD, M.D. DANNY BROCKMAN JOHN M BARRY CHRISTOPHER BUTLER BARBARA GRUNENWALD, R.N. LUKE BROCKMAN LILLY C BARRY GABRIEL BUTLER THE HAACKE FAMILY RICH & MARLENE BROERING MARIA BUTLER MELISSA BARTELS IN LOVING MEMORY OF REV. RICHARD & RACHEL BROERING SUZANNE BUTLER PARKER BARTELS HENRY HAACKE STEVE & CHRISTY BROERING ANTHONY BUTLER NATALIE BARTELS IN LOVING MEMORY OF CRAIG & KAREN BARTH PAUL HAACKE COURTNEY BARTH TASHA HAASER JUSTIN BARTH HE ABY AT EEKS ANN & EBERT F. HAEGELE KYLE BARTH • Heart Beats • Brain Waves • Will Grasp Objects EBERT H. HAEGELE CAITLIN BARTH MICHAEL & LIZ HAEGELE WILLIAM R BAUEREIS HANNAH HAEGELE MR & MRS MARK BAUMGARTNER IN LOVING MEMORY OF KELLY BAUMGARTNER MEL HAIGIS MICHAEL BAUMGARTNER ELAINE HAIGIS JOSEPH & MARY LOU BAUTE THE HALL FAMILY JENNY BECKNELL KARA HANKS MATT BECKNELL BEN HANKS AUSTIN BECKNELL ELLIE BETH HANKS BLAKE BECKNELL PORTER HANKS COLIN BECKNELL PAULA HASS DONAVON BECKNELL CHRIS HASS WAYNE BEIL THE HAVENS FAMILY TIERSA BEIL STANLEY & BEVERLY HAY NICHOLAS BEIL JEROME HAY CRISTIN BEIL DAVID HAY CATHY BEIL GARY HAY NICK BEIL BRIAN HAY PHILOMENA BEIL BRENT HAY ISABELLA BEIL PAULA HAY WAYNE BEIL, II CARLA HAY WAYNE BEIL, III SARA HAY With permission, “Abortion, Questions and Answer” MARTENE A BEIMESCH T. HEGENER FAMILY Wilke-Hays Publishing Co., Cincinnati, OH GLENN & THERESE MR & MRS CHARLES F HEGGE BEIMESCH CAROL D. HEHEMANN NICK BELL MATTHEW BROERING JANET FEISER CAROLYN BUTLER IN LOVING MEMORY OF JOE CHRISTY BELL JOSEPH BROERING JEFF FEISER ANNE BUTLER HELMERS GENEVIEVE BELL KATHERINE BROERING LARRY FELTHAUS MARGARET BUTLER ROBERT HENRY CHRISTIANA BELL MARK BROERING DENNIS FESSLER JORDAN BYRNE THELMA HENRY GIOVANNI BELL KATIE BROERING NORMA FESSLER MARILYN CAHILL KEMBER HERRING ABRAHAM BELL RICHARD BROERING PAUL & CONNIE FESSLER MAGGIE & SHEA HICKS BON CAHILL ALEXANDER BELL RACHEL BROERING SR MONICA FESSLER OSB MRS CHARLES K. HIGDON MICHAEL CANNANE ANASTASIA L. BELL MR & MRS STEPHEN E FIEGER THE MARK HIGDON FAMILY MATTHEW BROERING KAY CAPETILLO LUCY BELL ANNE M. FIELD CARLA BROSE THE CAREY FAMILY THE KIRT HIGDON FAMILY MARTIN BELL CELINE FIELD DAVE & DONNA CARNOHAN BERNIE BROSSART THE GERALD M. HIGDON FAMILY MARY DENISE BELL BENEDICT FIELD & FAMILY PAT BROSSART TIMOTHY HILLEBRAND MONICA BELL DOMINIC FIELD RIVER CARPENTER FRED BROWN MR & MRS MICHAEL HILLEBRAND PATRICK BELL JONATHAN FIELD SKYE CARPENTER MARK BROWN KATRINA HILLEBRAND CLAUDIA BELL JOSEPH FIELD LANDEN CARPENTER ROBERT J. BROWN PATRICK HILLEBRAND ABRAHAM BELL, II KATHLEEN FIELD OUR CATHOLIC STORE BARBARA A. BROWN THE HILLEBRAND FAMILY PATRICIA BENDEL MARIA FIELD JULIE BROWN HENGEHOLD MICHAEL P CETRULO VON HILLIARD WILLIAM BENDEL & FAMILY PAUL BRUECKNER PAUL FIELD IN LOVING MEMORY OF MARJEAN HILS NANCY BENNETT PETER FIELD CAMILLO D CETRULO ROSE BRUECKNER JUDE HILS CAROLYN & STEVE BERBERICH MAE BRUEGGEMAN THOMAS FIELD IN LOVING MEMORY OF ROBERT HOFACRE MR MARK A BERGMAN JAMES & EMILY BRUEGGEMANN ESTELLE MCGRATH CETRULO AMY W. FINDLEY BETTE HOFACRE ART & CHARLOTTE BERLING JIM BRUEGGEMANN CHRIS FINDLEY IN LOVING MEMORY OF JEAN HOFFMAN VINCE BESSLER JACOB FINDLEY MARIA BRUEGGEMANN CATHLEEN M CETRULO LAWRENCE HOFFMAN IN LOVING MEMORY OF JOAN CETRULO ANDREWS ROBERT C CETRULO, J.D. ROSE CLASS FAMILY FRED & HARRIET CLAYTON LYNNE CLAYTON JANE COLE SR ELEANOR COLGAN, S.N. DEN. JANET COLLINS JOSEPH & PEGGY COLLOPY AGNES COLLOPY ELIZABETH COLVILLE, GLM KAREN COMBS TYLER COMBS THE COMBS FAMILY THOMAS W CONDIT KRISTINA M CONDIT MEGAN A CONDIT RITA CONNELLY JON CONNELLY THE ROBERT COOK FAMILY MR & MRS JESSE CRAIL JONAH CRAIL JOSIE CRAIL JUDE CRAIL GARY CRUM, PHD PAT CUETTE KATHRYN CUPITO TERRY CUPITO MICHAEL DANT HEATHER DANT JACK & MARION L DAUER THE DAUGHERTY FAMILY CONGRESSMAN GEOFF DAVIS PAT DAVIS IN LOVING MEMORY OF THE DECEASED MEMBERS OF: - THE HAEGELE FAMILY - ST CHARLES LEGION OF MARY - AT. AUGUSTINE LEGION OF MARY JEANNE DECKER FRANK DECKER ROBERT S. DEHNER BARBARA A. DEHNER ROBERT C. DEHNER JOHN A DEHNER JOSEPH M. DEHNER MICHAEL S. DEHNER STEPHEN P. DEHNER CHRISTOPHER DEHNER ANGELA DEHNER KUNKEL PAUL & PERI DENKE ALICIA DENKE JOHN DENKE ELENA DENKE CHRISTOPHER DENKE JAMES DENKE LUCIA DENKE MICHAEL & FRANCESCA DENKE THE KAY DIETRICH FAMILY SHARON M DIETZ IN LOVING MEMORY OF THOMAS X. DILLON TIMOTHY DILLON BRENDAN DILLON KATIE DILLON ANNE DILLON TERRY DILLON SEAN DILLON GRACE DILLON MARY ELLEN DILLON CLAIRE DILLON BRIAN DINEEN CAITLIN DINEEN SHANNON DINEEN ADRIENNE DINEEN AMY G DINEEN PENNY DIRR GEORGIANN DISCHAR BRANDON DOLHANCRYK ANNA DOLHANCRYK CHRISTOPHER DOLHANCRYK MRS JOHN DONADIO MRS J.B. DONADIO MOLLY DONNERMEYER MELISSA DONNERMEYER JOSH DONNERMEYER NATALIE DONNERMEYER HARRY & KATHY DONNERMEYER NICHOLAS DONVILLE BEVERLY DRAUD JON DRAUD SCOTT DRAUD & FAMILY DAVID DRESSMAN THOMAS & DARLA DRESSMAN GERI DURITSCH MARIE DURITSCH MR CLEM DWERTMAN F. ROBERT DWYER KATHY DWYER MATT DWYER DAN DWYER JOHN DWYER BILL EDWARDS BRENT ELLIOT MICHELLE ENGEL SHARON ENGEL RON & DEBBIE ENGELMAN JOSEPH & ELVERA ENZWEILER KAREN ENZWEILER JOSEPH & CINDY ENZWEILER, III LOU & MARILYN ESSELMAN DOTTIE M. FARRELL BERNIE T. FARRELL JOAN FASOLD DONALD FASOLD FRANK FEINAUER TRUDY FEINAUER BEVERLY FEINAUER ADAM FEINAUER BRIDGET FEINAUER KEITH FEINAUER

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GRACE E HOGAN MRS JEAN HOLLENKAMP FRED HOLLMANN MARIANN HOLLMANN ANNA HOLLMANN CHARLENE HOLTZ JOHN HOLTZ PAUL HOLTZ ELLEN HOLTZ BARBARA HOLZDERBER LAURA HORAN MARGIE HOWE ROBERT & HELEN HUBER MR & MRS LEE HUESMAN JOHN & MARLENE HUMMEL SARA & BEN HUMMEL JOHN HUMMEL ED HUMMEL CAROLE HUMMEL DAN HUTH IN LOVING MEMORY OF JACK HUTH IN LOVING MEMORY OF SHIRLEY HUTH MARGIE HUTH IN LOVING MEMORY OF THOMAS HUTH, M.D. MRS MARY P. HUTZEL RACHEL M. JACKMAN DR & MRS. MICHAEL A. JAINDL, SR MICHAEL JAINDL, JR DANIEL JAINDL ROBERT JAINDL JOSEPH JAINDL MARY JAINDL ANDREW JAINDL KENNETH JAINDL ELIZABETH JAINDL JERRY & KATHY JEHN PEGGY JENT FIREMAN JOE MARY ELLEN JOHNSON SANDRA JONES KATHERINE M. JONES JOHN W JONES CARROLL JONES AMI JONES MR & MRS MICHAEL JORBERT MIKE KEIPERT PATTI KEIPERT DAN & SANDY KELLER DAVE & JULIE KELLER CRAIG KELLEY PEGGY KELLY JACK KELLY JACK KENKEL, SR KATHLEEN KENNEDY CATHERINE KENNEDY MARY KENNEDY MARY THERESA KENNEDY THOMAS KENNEDY AMY KENNEDY OWEN KENNEDY LUCY KENNEDY OWEN KENNEDY, JR KATHLEEN KING KAITLYN KING LILLA KIRALY JUDY KITCHEN NICOLE KITCHEN KELLY KITCHEN PAUL L KLEIN LETTY A KLEIN JAMES KLUEMPER CHRIS & JORDAN KLUEMPER LEO J KNIPPER VIRGINIA C KNIPPER SHERI LYNN KNIPPER NIKOLAUS CHRISTIAN KNIPPER BENJAMIN GREGORY KNIPPER LUKE MATTHIAS JOSEF KNIPPER MARK WILLIAM KNIPPER, II MARK WILLIAM KNIPPER, SR SHARON KNOX TOM KNOX SARAH KNOX PHIL KOCH WILLIAM E. KOCH MICHAEL KOLB MR & MRS MARK KOLB DONALD KOLB DRUCILLA KOLB ELIZABETH KOLB DAVID L KRAMER BARBARA A. KRAMER BERNICE KREBS MARIE KREUTZJANS MONICA KRIVANEK RYAN KRIVANEK MR ANDY KRUMME MRS CLARE KRUMME ANDREW KRUMME ROBERT KRUMME PATRICK KRUMME CAROLINE KRUMME ANGIE KUHL KYLA KUHL REECE KUHL TY KUHL ZACH KUHL COLLEEN M. KUNATH CAITLIN KUNATH COLIN KUNATH CONOR KUNATH SEAN KUNATH AIDAN M. KUNATH ARTHUR M. KUNATH, M.D. JOSEPH KUNKEL BERNIE KUNKEL ANGELA KUNKEL ANTHONY & CATHERINE KUNKEL NORA KUNKEL VIRGINIA KUNKEL JAMES KUNKEL MARIANNE KUNKEL MARK KUNKEL ERIC KUNKEL LISA KUNKEL MARY KUNKEL MARIA KUNKEL RACHEL KUNKEL JULIANNA KUNKEL MELISSA KUNKEL KATHERINE KUNKEL NICHOLAS KUNKEL BRIDGET KUNKEL GERARD KUNKEL PAUL C. KUNKEL DONALD & THERESA KUNKEL ADAM KUNKEL MICHAEL KUNKEL LAURA KUNKEL ALBERT KUNKEL ZACHARY KUNKEL MATTHEW KUNKEL BILL & KAREN KUNKEL WILLIAM & MARIANNA KUNKEL ANDREW KUNKEL JOHN KUNKEL LEO KUNKEL JOAN KUNKEL JEROME KUNKEL CAELI KUNKEL

JOSEPH & MARY KUNKEL GEORGE KUNKEL BENJAMIN KUNKEL PAUL & ANNE KUNKEL AUDREY KUNKEL PATRICK KUNKEL CHRISTOPHER KUNKEL MARY KUNKEL ALEXANDER KUNKEL SEBASTIAN KUNKEL

CAROLYN & JEFF ROSENSTIEL SAMANTHA SUMME SAM ROSENSTIEL DARLENE H. SUMME BEN ROSENSTIEL ANTHONY T. SUMME AVA ROSENSTIEL PAM SUMME LOUISE ROTH MARK SUMME LESHIA RUDD BILLY SUMME KRISTEN RUGH MATTHEW SUMME BARB RUH SCOTT SUMME JIM RUH JANE & CHARLIE SUMME KATHLEEN RYAN FRED H. SUMME, J.D. PATRICK RYAN HANNAH SWENSON MIKE RYAN GLENN & DOTTIE SWIKERT MATT RYAN AL TALLARIGO DOLOURES RYAN JAN TALLARIGO MICHAEL RYAN JOE TALLARIGO SHAWN RYAN JOHN TALLARIGO JEROME KUNKEL MR & MRS JAMES SANDER JEN TALLARIGO XAVIER KUNKEL THE BONNIE SARGE FAMILY THE TELECK FAMILY SOPHIA KUNKEL LINK BETWEEN CONTRACEPTION AND ABORTION MARIA SAUERLAND JAY & KATHY THAMANN LARRY & ALICE KUNKEL “Decades of silence, interpreted by most of the faithful as consent to ERMA SCHADLER MARY LOIS THEMANN CHARLES KUNKEL MARI ANGELA SCHAPPACHER MARYBETH L. THEMANN their contraceptive practice, had left its mark. …The distance between SAMANTHA KUNKEL ELIZABETH SCHAPPACHER FR. DANIEL THEMANN Church teaching and the use of contraceptives continues to be perceived LAWRENCE KUNKEL SUSANNA SCHAPPACHER JOSEPH E. THEMANN by most of the population as neither a sin nor a rebellion. TONY KUNKEL VIRGINIA SCHAPPACHER CHRISTI THEMANN ANTHONY KUNKEL “…Even afterward…the condemnation of contraceptives would be VICTORIA SCHAPPACHER SR VIRGINIA MARIE THOMAS, S.J.W. AUSTIN KUNKEL NATHAN THORWORTH PETER SCHAPPACHER the subject of papal documents, but already at the level of the bishops it JOHN & CHRISTANNA KUNKEL MICHAEL SCHAPPACHER CHRISTINE THORWORTH would hardly appear in preaching.” GABRIELLA KUNKEL ETHAN THORWORTH LEO SCHAPPACHER, JR. “The clergy, for their part, would be almost completely silent on SEBASTIAN KUNKEL MADDIE THORWORTH LEO SCHAPPACHER, SR JOSEPH KUNKEL it and would continue to be very understanding and indulgent in the ESTELLE THORWORTH LAURA SCHARF KATERINA KUNKEL confessional,” concluded Sandro Magister, a Vatican analyst. MARY LOU TOELKE JEFF SCHARF TOMMY & MELISSA KUNKEL MARTI TUNGET ABBIGAIL SCHARF TIMOTHY KUNKEL GLENN TUNGET ANNA SCHARF The practice of artificial contraception is intrinsically evil. EMMA KUNKEL WILLIAM R. TWEHUES ANN SCHENK No circumstances and no method justify the practice of artificial ELIZABETH KUNKEL SANDRA L. TWEHUES THOMAS SCHEPER JACOB KUNKEL contraception. FATIMA URIBE RUTH SCHEPER GABRIEL KUNKEL MARY VENNEMANN MARGIE SCHEPMAN RAPHAEL KUNKEL ROBERT VENNEMANN JACK SCHEPMAN “Periodic continence, that is, the methods of birth regulation based MONICA KUNKEL IN LOVING MEMORY OF MS RUTH SCHERRER on self-observation and the use of infertile periods, is in conformity PATRICK KUNKEL STATE SENATOR JOHN SCHICKEL ELIZABETH VENNEMANN ANNA KUNKEL with the objective criteria of morality… In contrast, ‘every action which, JACK SCHIERER RICH VENNEMANN MARTIN KUNKEL whether in anticipation of the conjugal act, or in its accomplishment, or LOUIS SCHLOSSER LINDA VENNEMANN AMELIA KUNKEL RANDY VENNEMANN in the development of its natural consequences, proposes, whether as an ROSE SCHLOSSER OLIVIA KUNKEL LOUIS A SCHLOSSER DANIEL VENNEMANN end or as a means, to render procreation impossible’ is intrinsically evil.” DAVID & ELIZABETH KUNKEL ANN SCHLOSSER NICK VENNEMANN Catechism of the Catholic Church, 2370 CLARE KUNKEL DANIEL SCHLOSSER JOHN P VINCENT DAVID KUNKEL MARGARET SCHLOSSER THOMAS & CAROL VOET VINCENT KUNKEL “The Catholic Church clearly teaches that the use of artificial MARY E SCHNEIDER CHARLOTTE VOLPENHEIN ISSAC KUNKEL ERIC & MARY SCHNEIDER TOM VOLPENHEIN contraception in all its forms, including direct sterilization, is gravely PHILIP & MARIA KUNKEL YANDELL SCHNEIDER JIM VOLPENHEIN immoral, is intrinsically evil, is contrary to the law of nature and nature’s DOMINIC KUNKEL MR & MRS ANDREW SCHNEIDER CHARLES VOLPENHEIN God…Catholics who practice artificial birth control may not receive Holy LUKE KUNKEL CHARLIE SCHNEIDER BETTY J. VOORHEES PHILIP KUNKEL Communion without committing sacrilege.” Bishop G.P. Flavin, Bishop ELENA SCHNEIDER ANDREW WALKER NICHOLAS KUNKEL STEPHEN SCHNEIDER BETH WALKER of Lincoln, Nebraska REBECCA KUNKEL TOM & TRUDY SCHNEIDER CAROLINE WALKER CHRISTOPHER KUNKEL BUTCH & GINA SCHNEIDER & FAMILY JOSEPH WALKER Abortion and Contraception SARA KUNKEL ROBERT A SCHRODER KATIE WALKER ANTHONY KUNKEL BILL & AMY SCHULT & FAMILY MARIA WALKER JOSEPH KUNKEL, JR The acceptance of the practice of contraception has led to the KEN & PATRICIA SCHULTE MARGARET WALKER WILLIAM KUNKEL, JR GREGORY SCHUTTE ROBERT WALKER acceptance of abortion. SETH KUPER KRISTEN SCHUTTE STEPHEN WALKER MARY KUPER STEPHEN SCHUTTE PEYTON WALLACE Malcolm Potts, former Medical Director of the International DONALD J. KUPER ANDREW SCHUTTE VIVIAN WALLACE M. TRINETT KUPER Planned Parenthood Federation, stated in 1979: “As people turn to LILLY SCHUTTE EILEEN WALTERS DONNA S. LA EACE contraception, there will be a rise, not a fall, in the abortion rate.” RITA A SCHWEITZER JULIE WARTMAN MARY JO LA EACE DON & CRYSTAL SEBASTIAN JEREMY WARTMAN IN MEMORY OF RITA & KENDALL SEBASTIAN JENNIFER WARTMAN “In every nation, bar none, contraception has led to abortion, and GEORGE LA EACE ANDY SHAW KYLE WARTMAN PAUL LAJOYE from abortion to infanticide, the prelude to full-blown euthanasia!” CECILIA SHAW DEVIN WARTMAN BRIDGETTE LAJOYE Fr. Paul Marx, OSB, Ph.D., founder of Human Life International EMILY SHAW TYLER WARTMAN JULIANNE LAJOYE ANDREW SHAW, JR KARA WARTMAN ADRIANA LAJOYE MR & MRS GERALD L. SHAWHAN MACY WARTMAN “We cannot solve all the problems of the world, but let us never CHRISTINE LAJOYE MICHAEL SHAWHAN EVAN WARTMAN bring in the worst problem of all, that is to destroy love. And this is what JOSEPH LAJOYE KATE SHAWHAN MACY WARTMAN GINA LAJOYE happens when we tell people to practice contraception and abortion.” ANDREW SHAWHAN LARRY WARTMAN, JR STEVE LAJOYE Mother Teresa WILLIAM SHAWHAN LARRY WARTMAN, SR PAUL LAJOYE, JR. MONICA SHAWHAN JEREMY WARTMAN, SR JOHN LALLEY GABRIEL SHAWHAN LOUISE WEED Chemical Abortion SHIRLEY LALLEY MARY SHAWHAN JOHN WEED DOLORES C LANDWEHR & FAMILY CHRISTOPHER SHAWHAN JOHN WEED, JR JEFFREY S LEARMAN It has long been acknowledged by all drug manufacturers of DAN SHAWHAN PAUL & ELIZABETH ROBERT F. LEDERER EMILY SHAWHAN WEGENER oral contraceptives (birth control pills), and by the Food and Drug EVELYN LENHOFF FAMILY FRANCIS SHAWHAN JOHN & DONNA WEGENER Administration, that standard birth control pills also abort the newly DAVID & MELISSA LEYLAND DOMINIC SHAWHAN DAVE WELLER conceived child. ETERNAL LIFE ROSE SHAWHAN DAVID WELLER THE LINDSLEY FAMILY BENEDICT SHAWHAN CHRISTINA WELLER KAIYA LINKUGEL “There are over 30 ‘contraceptive’ pills on the market, each differing ANNE SHAWHAN MICHAEL WELLER ALBERT & ROSE LITTNER FAMILY MICHELLE SHAWHAN GERI WELLER a little from the others. They ‘prevent’ pregnancy through three separate TOM LITZLER TOM SHAWHAN MARLENE WENDLING functions: PAT LITZLER AMY SHAWHAN DOUGLAS WENK 1. They thicken the mucous plug at the cervix. If this is the KRISSY LIVINGSTON REGINA SHAWHAN JOHN WENK JOHN LIVINGSTON primary effect, then it truly is contraceptive because it prevents sperm MARY MARGARET SHAWHAN RYAN WENK JOHN PATRICK LIVINGSTON from entering. JOSEPH SHAWHAN ANDREW WENK DORA LIVINGSTON TIMOTHY SHAWHAN THOMAS WENK 2. They prevent release of the ovum. If this is the primary NELLIE LIVINGSTON MATTHEW SHAWHAN SUSAN WENK, M.D. effect, the function is ‘temporary’ sterilization. HOPE LIVINGSTON DAVID SHAWHAN MRS JANET WERMELING MARY ANN LOHRE 3. They render the lining of the womb hostile to the TOMMY SHAWHAN PAULA WESTWOOD DOUGLAS J. LOHRE implantation of the tiny new human at one week of life. This effect is STEPEHEN SHAWHAN GREG WESTWOOD JIM & BETH LOISELLE KATHLEEN SHAWHAN ABIGAIL WESTWOOD abortifacient. The reason is that at one week of life this tiny new boy or MICHELLE & OREN LONG FAMILY LUKE SHAWHAN MARY WESTWOOD girl cannot implant in the womb lining and dies.” J.C. Wilke, M.D. MARY LUEBBE IN MEMORY OF GAYLE WHALEY MIKE & DONNA SHEEHY IN LOVING MEMORY OF IN MEMORY OF JUDITH WHALEY ROSE SIEGRIST RICHARD & HELEN LYON “The close connection which exists, in mentality, between the ROSEMARY WHALEY JERRY SMITH TONY & ELVERA MAIER practice of contraception, and that of abortion, is becoming increasingly WILLIAM WHALEY JIM & ERIKA SMITH MARY ANN MALONEY ROBERT & JUDITH WHEELER BOBBY & NICOLE SMITH obvious. It is being demonstrated in an alarming way by the DR & MRS DAVID MANN EDWARD WHELAN L. BABY SMITH development of chemical products, intrauterine devices and vaccinations GIANNA MANN CAROL WHELAN MARY JO SOVA which, distributed with the same ease as contraceptives, really act as AUDREY MANN THOSE WHO WOULD HAVE BEEN TODD SOVA MRS ROSE MANNING abortifacients in the very early stages of the development of the life of TRACEY WICAL GAGE SOVA DON & MARY MANNING & FAMILY ANNETTE F. WICAL KEITH SOVA the new human being.” Pope John Paul II, Evangelium Vitae, Sec. 13 PAUL & KITTY MARCOTTE THE WILLENBRINK FAMILY CHRISTINE SOVA SR VIRGINIA MARIE THOMAS, SJ.W. PHIL & MARTHA SPALDING NANCY J WILLS The Solution GINNY MAROSI CHRISTOPHER SPALDING ANNA MARIE WILSON GINA MARTINI The Church, meaning its hierarchy, its clergy, its religious orders, EDWARD A. WILSON MARSHA SPEARS EMILY MASON its institutions, and, equally important, its laity, need to confidently JASON WILSON ANDREW SPOOR MICHAEL MASON TRISHA WILSON DEAN SPOOR and boldly express the consistent 2,000-year teaching of the Catholic FREDDIE MASON LAURA WILSON IRIS SPOOR Church, which has been, is now, and will be in the future, the ANGIE MATTISON HOPE WILSON RICHARD SPOOR unchanging truth for all ages and for all cultures and societies. JOEL MATTISON MELANIE WILSON ROBERT SPOOR MARK MCCLOREY EVAN ALEXANDER WILSON RICHARD SPOOR MICHELLE MCCLOREY Let us pray that we accept God’s grace to have the courage to MARIA ROSEANNE WILSON PAMELA SPOOR JOSEPH MCCLOREY PAUL WILSON ST. AUGUSTINE LEGION “Stand up for life!” as Pope John Paul II commanded. LUCY MCCLOREY ALICE R WINTERSHEIMER OF MARY ANDREW MCCLOREY JUSTICE DONALD C. ST. CHARLES LEGION HELEN MCCLOREY WINTERSHEIMER OF MARY JANE MCCLOREY STEPHEN REEN ANDY MOORE HANNAH NIEPORTE BLAISE Q. WINTERSHEIMER JOE STADTMILLER CLAIRE MCCLOREY JACKIE REGNER JIM MOORE SAMANTHA NIEPORTE JOEY SCOTT STAMBUSH CRAIG P. WINTERSHEIMER GREGORY MCCLOREY TIMOTHY M. REILLY NICOLE MORI CHRISTINE NIEPORTE MARK D. WINTERSHEIMER REGINA STAMBUSH PAUL MCDONOUGH CLAIRE MORICONI DR & MRS JAMES A NOLL MARY JANE REILLY GEORGE K WITTE JOSEPH STAMBUSH MARIANNE MCDONOUGH BOB MORICONI KATIE REILLY JOHN NOONAN THE STEVEN E.WITTMAN FAMILY RICARD P. STAMBUSH LAURIE MCKINLEY CHRIS MORICONI FR & MRS JOHN F NOVAK,III BRADY REILLY EDWIN WOESTE CARA P. STAMBUSH SCOTT MCKINLEY SGT & MRS JOHN F NOVAK,IV MARY KAY REILLY TONI MORICONI THOMAS C WOLFE WILLIAM A STARKS THE MCMAHON FAMILY MRS MARGARET O’BRIEN MS MARY BARBARA REINERT FLORA JO STARKS CHASE MORICONI JOSEPH & THERESA MRS JOAN MCNALLY THE REINERT FAMILY PAUL O’DANIEL MACY MORICONI WOLTERING WILLIAM N STARKS GARY MCNAY JOHN & MARYLORETTO RESING FIESTY JO STARKS SAMANTHA O’DANIEL DAN MOSER LAURA WOOLHISER DOROTHY MCPHERSON DOLORES RETTIG BRYAN O’DANIEL THERESE MOSER ANN V. YAEGEL MARK S JERRY STEGMAN RAY MCPHERSON IN LOVING MEMORY OF BROOKE O’DANIEL SUE MOSER YAEGEL JOHANNA STEGMAN ALOYSIUS MEESE GEORGE & BILL RETTIG LAURA & MIKE MUELLER BEVERLY O’DANIEL BARBARA ZERHUSEN RUTH M STELTENKAMP MRS EILEEN MEHURON ALEX RICHARDS ROBERT E OSSEGE LUCIA MUELLER MR & MRS WILLIAM TOM STELTENKAMP THE R.C. MENKE FAMILY JANE RIEHEMANN MARK OWENS JULIA MULREY ZERHUSEN STEVE STELTENKAMP THE JOHN MENKE FAMILY RUTH MURPHY MARILYN RIEHLE, GLM JAN PAOLUCCI JACK & DOLORES STEWART ANGELA ZERHUSEN THE TOM MENKE FAMILY JOE MURPHY THE RIEL FAMILY JOHN PAOLUCCI CARRIE BROWN STRITTHOLT EVAN ZERHUSEN THE MENKE FAMILY ROBERT & JUDITH PARSONS BOB & MARY LOU RINGO VIRGINIA STRUNK SHANE MURPHY JADEN ZERHUSEN KEN MERTLE MR & MRS GREG PATTERSON KRISTIN RINNE PATRICK MURPHY ROBERT STRUNK WILLIAM ZERHUSEN JAN MESSER WILL & ELLIE RITTER SUSAN PATTERSON CECILIA MURPHY MIKE STRUNK HANNAH ZERHUSEN IN LOVING MEMORY OF ISABELLA JOY PATTERSON THE JIM & TERRY ROESSLER FAMILY PETER & SHIRLEY SUDDETH ISABELLE ZERHUSEN XAVIER MURPHY HAROLD MESSICK GABRIELLE HOPE PATTERSON BLANCHE ROGERS KATHLEEN M MURPHY DAVEY SULLIVAN KELLY ZERHUSEN THE METTEY FAMILY ALEXANDRA FAITH PATTERSON LLOYD ROGERS PAUL MURPHY ANDREA SULLIVAN LILIAN ZERHUSEN GEORGE & DIANE MEYERRATKEN & FAMILY JAYNE MURPHY KENNETH ROGERS SEN RAND & KELLEY PAUL MICHAEL SULLIVAN MONICA ZERHUSEN RICHARD & ALLISON MEYERS REV. ROBERT MUSSMAN KEN ROGERS & FAMILY CAROLYN SULLIVAN ZACHARY ZERHUSEN VERA MEYERS DONNY & JANET NAEGELE JOHN & MARY BETH PEAVLER TRUDY ROGERS JOEY SULLIVAN KATIE ZUERNER GREG & PEGGY MEYERS KEVIN ROGERS CATHERINE PERRY DANIEL NAEGELE MAUREEN SULLIVAN JOE ZUERNER KEITH & DONNA MEYERS STEPHEN & MARY NAEGELE ELIZABETH PERRY JOY & JUSTINA ROGERS JOE SULLIVAN ANNE ZUERNER TIM MICHEL JOHN ROGERS JOSEPH PERRY THOMAS NAEGELE PATRICK SULLIVAN AMELIA ZUERNER KYNDAL MICHEL ANNA ROMITO MARGARET PERRY CHRISTOPHER NAEGELE THERESA SUMME KIRSTEN MICHEL MICHAEL PERRY MARY RUTH NAEGELE KASSIDY MICHEL STEPHEN PERRY DONALD NAEGELE KARLEY MICHEL DAVID A. PERRY, ESQ. MATTHEW NAEGELE Thanks to the generosity of the above LISA W MICHEL KYLE PETERS ROBERT NAEGELE JIM MIDDENDORF Northern Kentucky pro-lifers, this ad runs in DOROTHY PHIRMAN JAMES NAEGELE GAY MIDDENDORF WALT & KATHY PIESCHEL MARGARET NAEGELE Community Recorder Papers on Jan. 20th & Jan. 27th GREG MIDDENDORF GAYLE PIRON JEAN NEHUS and the The KY Enquirer on Jan. 22nd & Jan. 23rd DAVID MIDDENDORF DAN PIRON SHARON NEHUS ISABELLA MIDDENDORF DAVID PIRON ALLYSON NEHUS LILLIAN MIDDENDORF SARAH PIRON MARC NELTNER Name GREG & JAIME MIDDENDORF & FAMILY SUSAN NELTNER RICHARD & AUDREY PLYE DR JAY MIDDENDORF, D.V.M. REBECCA NELTNER REV ROBERT POANDL CHESTER MILLAY VIC & SUE PONZER & FAMILY WILL NELTNER DONNA MILLAY Address PEGGY PREMEC BRIDGET NELTNER JULIE MILLER PAIGE PREMEC LAURA NELTNER JOE PRIEST JOE NEYER JULIET PRIEST BRENDA NEYER City Zip Phone SERENA PRIEST IN LOVING MEMORY OF LARRY & ALVA PRIEST NORB NIENABER JEANNE NIENABER & FAMILY KATHY PURCELL BARB NIEPORTE JIM PURCELL Church VERN NIEPORTE REV. FR. ADAM PURDY BRYAN NIEPORTE JOHN DAVID RABE FAMILY Northern Kentucky Right To Life PATTY NIEPORTE MONICA RAHE 859-431-6380 JAKE NIEPORTE RYAN RAMDASS KEVIN NIEPORTE BRENDAN RAMDASS Your Contribution Brings You KATIE NIEPORTE BECCA RAMDASS ANN MILLER JUSTIN NIEPORTE JILL RAMDASS, RN The Newsletter & Special Mailings WILLIAM MILLER JOSH NIEPORTE STEVE RAWLINGS RUTH MILLER FRANCES NIEPORTE MELODY RAWLINGS Donation Membership (any amount) _____________ MARIETTA MILLER & FAMILY FRAN NIEPORTE KAITLYN RAWLINGS BYRON MILLS $20 RON NIEPORTE MEREDITH RAWLINGS _____________ Regular Membership GLORIA MILLS AARON NIEPORTE REV JAMES REBER GLENN & KIM MINTON GINA NIEPORTE LOIS REBER Mailing Address: P.O. Box 1202 • Covington, KY. 41012 GLENMARY LAY MISSIONERS LINDSAY NIEPORTE DORAN REED www.nkyrtl.org DAVID L MOLIQUE AVERY NIEPORTE GEORGIANA REED TOM MOORE SOPHIE REEN

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YourCommunityRecordernewspaperservingCovington,Independence,Latonia,RylandHeights,TaylorMill LaurenTibbsmadeScott HighSchoolhistorywhenshe b...