Page 1

INDIAN HILL

JOURNAL

Your Community Press newspaper serving Indian Hill 75¢

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2015

BECAUSE COMMUNITY MATTERS

FORREST SELLERS/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Monica Hickey, left, Kimberly Buczek and Jennifer Howell with Indian Hill Performing Arts have been instrumental in broadening the reach of performing arts in the community.

PROVIDED

Indian Hill Performing Arts presented "Shrek Jr." during June's summer theater camp.

Performing arts program expands into community Forrest Sellers fsellers@communitypress.com

An Indian Hill arts program has extended its reach beyond the classroom. Indian Hill Performing Arts is now a community-wide program offering everything form voice lessons to piano training. “It’s broader now,” said Lisa Harris, who started the pro-

Armstrong

gram at Indian Hill High School in 2003. Approved as a 501(c)3 at the start of the year, the group has formed community partnerships with a number of organizations including Indian Hill Church, Armstrong Chapel United Methodist Church and and the Greenacres Foundation among others. “We’re now able to offer

Barber

Cowan

opportunities to students outside of the (Indian Hill school) district,” said Kimberly Buczek, executive director of Indian Hill Performing Arts. “There is more of an opportunity for growth.” For example, the Village Voices an a cappella group formed in the fall has members not only from Indian Hill but Mason as well.

Feigelson

Kuenning

Harris, who is president of the board of directors for Indian Hill Performing Arts, said the goal in initially forming the program was to provide after school arts enrichment and “to support the performing arts.” That mission continues with a professional staff of community members, school administrators and business professionals providing support.

McGraw

“We are here to show how arts education is part of our culture,” Buczek said. Programs are offered for ages 4 and up and range from an introduction to dance class to private violin lessons. Additionally, musical camps are offered during the summer. For information go online to http://bit.ly/1PCTLgW.

Thayer

Turner

Candidates cite services, finances Jeanne Houck jhouck@communitypress.com

Finding ways to provide top-notch services while keeping a close watch on the village’s pocketbook is an issue of importance cited by candidate after candidate for Indian Hill Village Council. Eight people – five of them incumbents – are vying for seven seats on village council - two-year terms that begin Dec. 1. Challengers John B. Armstrong, Donald C. McGraw and David Turner will take on incumbents Vice Mayor Daniel J. Feigelson, Molly Barber, Melissa S. Cowan, Mark Kuenning and Abbot A. Thayer Tuesday, Nov. 3. Incumbents Mayor Keith Rabenold and Laura Raines did not file for re-election to Indian Hill Village Council, all seven seats of which come up for election every two years. Here’s a look at the candidates and their answers to the following two questions, for which they were allowed up to 150 words per answer. 1. What are the issues facing Indian Hill and how would you handle them? 2. Why do you want to serve on village council and what qualifications do you have that make you a good choice for council? In their answers, some candidates refer to the Indian Hill Mayor’s Nominating

TREATS WITHOUT TRICKS 7A Rita scares up some seasonal recipes

Committee, a process that has been in place since 1941 in which the current mayor seats members of the committee, who in turn interview and endorse candidates. This year the committee endorsed all of the candidates except Turner. » Armstrong, 68, is co-founder of the Wow Business Advisory, which counsels privately owned businesses. He’s never held elective political office. 1. “One of the biggest issues facing Indian Hill is to maintain its historical high levels of safety and services to its residents. These levels must be continued in light of the reduction in local government funding and the loss of the Ohio estate tax revenues. “I believe in keeping a tight budget and working closely with our great team of public employees to preserve our outstanding community.” 2. “My family has lived in Indian Hill for 26 years. We have enjoyed the great benefits here and I believe that it is time for me to give back to the village. “In my career I have been the president of The Crocker Fels Co. and Chester Labs Inc. since 1986. I practiced law in Cincinnati from 1973 to 1986 and was the solicitor of the city of Silverton. “I have served on several corporate boards.” » Barber, 57, is human resources man-

BALLOT PREP Get all of the latest elections news at http://cin.ci/1jfrmAt on Cincinnati.com

ager in global employee relations at Procter & Gamble. She was elected to Indian Hill Village Council in 2011 and 2013. 1. “The village of Indian Hill is a unique place to live, (and) to protect that, we must continue to look for opportunities to improve the efficiency of our resources to ensure the services we provide are sustainable. “I am honored to be nominated again by the Mayor’s Nominating Committee and am committed to preserving and enhancing the distinctive qualities that make Indian Hill so special and building upon its tradition of excellence.” 2. “I have served on numerous committees including finance, public works, water works and safety. I am also the council’s representative on the board of the Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana Regional Council of Governments. “I also served eight years on the board of education for Indian Hill (Exempted Village) Schools and was the board representative on the Indian Hill Public Schools Foundation. I am an active committee member of Armstrong Chapel United Methodist Church as well as the Indian Hill Historical Society. “I have also served as a cabinet member on the United Way of Greater Cincinnati campaign and also am actively involved with the Off the Streets program.” » Cowan, 56, practiced labor and em-

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ployment law with Dinsmore & Shohl before leaving to raise her three sons. She was elected to Indian Hill Village Council in 2013. 1. “The main challenge facing the village is to continue to be able to provide the exceptional service residents have come to expect while trying to keep taxes as low as possible.” 2. “Having grown up in Indian Hill, I am passionate about preserving Indian Hill’s special character, and I enjoy giving back to a community in which I have lived for over 44 years. “On council, I am the chairman of the Water Works and Utility Deregulation committees and serve on the Safety Committee, Buildings and Grounds Committee and the Grand Valley Advisory Committee. “Also, I am the council liaison to the Green Areas Advisory Committee. “This experience in addition to my knowledge of the village past and present, I believe are helpful to my service on council.” » Feigelson, 56, is chief financial officer and a co-founder/principal of NAI Bergman, a regional commercial real-estate brokerage, property management and real-estate investment firm. He was elected to Indian Hill Village Council in 2009, 2011 and 2013.

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Vol. 17 No. 30 © 2015 The Community Recorder ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


NEWS

2A • INDIAN HILL JOURNAL • OCTOBER 29, 2015

Index Calendar ................A6 Classifieds ................C Food .....................A7 Police .................... B6 Schools ..................A5 Sports ....................B1 Viewpoints .............A8

Creativities owner Christine Parker explains structures problems in the Muchmore House to the Madeira Historic Preservation Commission.

INDIAN HILL JOURNAL

Find news and information from your community on the Web Cincinnati.com/communities

News

Richard Maloney Editor ..................248-7134, rmaloney@communitypress.com Jeanne Houck Reporter ...................248-7129, jhouck@communitypress.com Forrest Sellers Reporter ..................248-7680, fsellers@communitypress.com Melanie Laughman Sports Editor .......768-8512, mlaughman@communitypress.com Scott Springer Sports Reporter ..........576-8255, sspringer@communitypress.com Twitter: @sspringersports Nick Robbe Sports Reporter ..............513-364-4981, nrobbe@communitypress.com Twitter: @nrobbesports

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Delivery For customer service ....................576-8240 Stephen Barraco Circulation Manager ....................248-7110, sbarraco@communitypress.com Diana Bruzina District Manager .........248-7113, dbruzina@communitypress.com

Classified To place a Classified ad .................242-4000, www.communityclassified.com

Content submitted may be distributed by us in print, digital or other forms To place an ad in Community Classified, call 242-4000.

Madeira Historic District tour T he Madeira Historic Preservation Commission toured the Madeira Train Depot, Muchmore House and Hosbrook House in the Madeira Historic District.

The commission creates design guidelines for the three properties. Members agreed to draft two sets of guidelines; one for the train depot and one for the historic houses.

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Madeira Historic Preservation Commission members Chris Hilberg (front) and Mike Mauch open the door to the attic of the Hosbrook house.

PHOTOSO BY MARIKA LEE/ THE COMMUNITY PRESS

CE-0000634283

Madeira Woman’s Club member Mary Jo Morgan lets the members of the Madeira Historic Preservation Commission into the basement of the Hosbrook House.

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Madeira Historic Preservation Commission members Mike Mauch (front) and Matthew Horne tour the basement of the Muchmore House.

BRIEFLY Voters guide online Where do the candidates stand on issues important to your community? What else is on the ballot that affects you? Use our online voters guide http://bit.ly/1VNQWh2 or http://c3.thevoterguide. org/v/enquirer15/ build.do. You can customize the

guide to your community. The guide includes information on more than 400 races and more than 750 candidates.

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NEWS

4A â&#x20AC;˘ INDIAN HILL JOURNAL â&#x20AC;˘ OCTOBER 29, 2015

Council Continued from Page 1A

1. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Council must continually strive to balance the expectation of high-level service delivery to our community while remaining fiscally responsible on behalf of our taxpayers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We must continue to monitor changes in state tax legislation and the impact it has on Indian Hill and we must challenge our superb team of professional public employees to continue to deliver bestin-class-service to our residents. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Finally, we must remain committed to preserving and enhancing the special characteristics

which all residents enjoy and which make Indian Hill such a unique, comfortable and safe place to live and raise a family.â&#x20AC;? 2. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have been an active volunteer in the community for many years. In addition to my various roles on Indian Hill council, including most recently that of vice mayor, I have served as chairman and treasurer of the Indian Hill Public Schools Foundation, president and treasurer of the Indian Hill Schools Booster Association and treasurer of the Indian Hill Football Club. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Outside of Indian Hill I currently hold board positions on several for-profit and not-for-profit organizations.â&#x20AC;?

Âť Kuenning, 60, is president and CEO of Global Drilling Suppliers, Inc. He was elected to Indian Hill Village Council in 2011 and 2013. 1. â&#x20AC;&#x153;All municipalities face fiscal challenges, including Indian Hill. Although we are fortunate to have a strong tax base, we always have to be aware of and react to mandates from the state of Ohio. â&#x20AC;&#x153;While working effectively with our state representatives, the council helps to represent and protect our interests. Also, we work very hard to ensure the wise use of our tax dollars. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are always looking for ways to do more with less while maintaining the

high quality of services that our residents deserve.â&#x20AC;? 2. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Indian Hill is a special place in which to live and raise a family. The Mayorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nominating Committee did a great job of finding a slate of outstanding council candidates who offer a wide range of talents and who demonstrate a commitment to serving the community. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am honored to be recommended by that committee for another term on council. With my financial and business management experience and other volunteer experience with a number of local charitable organizations, I look forward to serving the village to address the challenges that lie ahead of us.â&#x20AC;? Âť McGraw, 58, a retired U.S. Army colonel who is now president of Planet Products Corp., a small manufacturing company in Blue Ash. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not before held elective political office. 1. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The village has weathered some significant financial issues over

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the last several years and we should continue to keep a keen eye on its overall financial well-being while at the same time maintaining and improving the first-class services we have come to expect. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Growing up in the village, I have a deep appreciation for what the village means to its residents and I welcome the opportunity to continue the excellent work of council to maintain the integrity and quality of life so important to its residents.â&#x20AC;? 2. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I grew up in Indian Hill and benefited from its riches. Serving in other capacities (U.S. Army) for 30-plus years afforded me the opportunity to give back nationally and globally, but not yet to Indian Hill. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My interest is in maintaining the integrity, uniqueness, financial balance and efficient operations of our village. My skills in operations, personnel, and financial management have been honed by experience with escalating responsibilities and leadership expectations. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I believe these skills will be beneficial in policy review, financial stewardship and support of the village services and law enforcement.â&#x20AC;? Âť Thayer, 62, is an attorney with Dinsmore & Shohl. He was elected to Indian Hill Village Council in 2013. 1. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The biggest challenge is to continue providing the top-notch services that the residents expect despite cutbacks in state funding and the loss of the estate tax.â&#x20AC;? 2. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I believe that public service is important and that my 35 years as a municipal finance attorney and two years as a council member give me valuable insights which will make me a good council member.â&#x20AC;?

Âť Turner, 60, is a clinical neuropsychologist and president of The Rehab Continuum and The Counseling Source, which, between them, provide occupational therapy, physical therapy and mentalhealth services to school systems, the elderly and the developmentally disabled throughout Greater Cincinnati. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s never held elective public office. 1. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The issues facing the village include the continuation of responsible fiscal management, attending judiciously to providing the highest-quality police, fire and municipal services by ensuring adequate compensation and benefit packages for those who serve us and the opening of the electoral process such that our village council members are not pre-selected and then confirmed in skewed elections but actually chosen by a fully and fairly informed electorate.â&#x20AC;? 2. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I want to serve on the council because I believe I can make meaningful contributions to the village. I feel I am qualified by virtue of my unique perspective on the electoral process in the village. â&#x20AC;&#x153;l also feel qualified by virtue of my education and life experience which include having earned a Ph.D. in clinical neuropsychology, having founded and overseen multiple companies successful over the past 25 years in the health-care and mental-health fields. â&#x20AC;&#x153;(Also by virtue of) my residency in the village for almost 25 years and a 20-year history of volunteerism in the village in scouting, within the recreation commission and within the school system.â&#x20AC;? Want to know more about what is happening in Indian Hill? Follow me on Twitter @jeannehouck.

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SCHOOLS

OCTOBER 29, 2015 • INDIAN HILL JOURNAL • 5A

INDIAN HILL Editor: Richard Maloney, rmaloney@communitypress.com, 248-7134

ACHIEVEMENTS | NEWS | ACTIVITIES | HONORS

JOURNAL

CommunityPress.com

Titan McMullen, left, of Union Township, receives a helping hand from Josh Back, of Miami Township. Both are fifth-graders.

Fifth-garde math teacher Layton Gisbon, right, of Deer Park, holds a bamboo branch for fifth-grader Sami Hess, of West Chester, to cut.

Cincinnati Country Day students make a difference Cincinnati Country Day School fifth-graders helped out at Granny’s Garden School during their recent Make a Difference Day. The students cut bamboo branches that will be used for gardening stakes. Granny’s Garden School was just one of the locations to receive assistance as students from various grades also helped out at a local animal shelter and Matthew 25: Ministries.

Granny's Garden School garden assistant Kris Simmons, of Colerain Township, carries and loads bamboo branches that have been cut.

Photos by Forrest Sellers/The Community Press

Fifth-graders Kiliane Lair, of Terrace Park, left, and Erica Sotto, of Montgomery, carry animal skulls which were used in a presentation. Fifth-grader Alison Kohler, of Maineville, finds just the right spot to cut.

Fifth-grader Nathan Huang, of Loveland, uses a pair of scissors to tackle the job.

Fifth-grader Rebecca Groh, of Maineville, lays bamboo on the ground to help steady it.

Grace Noack, left, of Indian Hill, and Natalie Christine, of Milford, share a laugh. Both are fifth-graders.

Fifth-graders Nathan Cohen, left, of Montgomery, and Noah Webb, of Maineville, enjoy the autumn day while working.


6A • INDIAN HILL JOURNAL • OCTOBER 29, 2015

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD THURSDAY, OCT. 29 Art & Craft Classes Fundamentals of Drawing and Painting for Adults with Mary Lou Holt, 9:30 a.m to 12:30 p.m., Woman’s Art Club Cultural Center, 6980 Cambridge Ave., The Barn. Learn line drawing techniques, basic eye/hand coordination and how to identify positive and negative shapes. Light, shadow, tonal values and perspective taught using simple shapes. Ages 18 and up. $220. 226-3833; www.artatthebarn.org. Mariemont. Let’s Weave a Kitchen Rug, 1-4 p.m., Woman’s Art Club Cultural Center, 6980 Cambridge Ave., Tack Room at The Barn. Bring old bed sheet and either fabric or t-shirts and learn to use portable rug loom to make kitchen rug. Instruction and practice time given in class and students take looms home to finish rug. Loom rental included in course fee. $30. Registration required. Presented by Instructor Susan Austin. 703-5645; www.artatthebarn.org. Mariemont.

Art Exhibits Woman’s Art Club of Cincinnati All-Member Exhibition, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Woman’s Art Club Cultural Center, 6980 Cambridge Ave., The Barn. Features artwork in variety of media by members of Woman’s Art Club of Cincinnati. Showcases local talent and is great opportunity to purchase original art. Free. 272-3700; www.artatthebarn.org. Mariemont. Brad Robertson: New Emotions, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Gallery Veronique, 11324 Montgomery Road, Collection of textured abstract paintings inspired by seaside living. Through Oct. 31. Free. Through Oct. 31. 530-5379; galleryveronique.com. Symmes Township. Gregg Litchfield: Watercolor and Digital Art Photography, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., River Hills Christian Church, 6300 Price Road, Exhibit continues through Nov. 29. Free. Through Nov. 29. 677-7600. Loveland.

Auditions Call for Artists, 7 p.m., Sycamore High School, 7400 Cornell Road, Sycamore Community Band is looking for talented adult musicians to play in fullsized concert band. Free. Presented by Sycamore Community Band. 683-5845. Montgomery.

Cooking Classes Stump the Chef with Dan Berger, 6:30-9 p.m., Cooks’ Wares, 11344 Montgomery Road, Dan will show up with no food, only his little bag of tricks (and his Maple Grove Farm Maple Syrup). Cooks’ Wares provides ingredients for him to prepare 4-course dinner. $45. Reservations required. 489-6400; www.cookswaresonline.com. Symmes Township.

Dining Events Witches Brew, 4-9 p.m., Fifty West Brewing Company, 7668 Wooster Pike, Two specialty dinner options and two specialty brews available, with portion of sales going to charities. Benefits Pink Ribbon Girls and Team Fight Club Cincinnati. Free. 834-8789; fiftywestbrew.com/beer-events. Columbia Township.

Education Novel Writing in Community: NaNoWriMo Meets WWf(a)C, 7-9:30 p.m., Women Writing for a Change, 6906 Plainfield Road, National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) is motivational movement of writers working to complete novel draft in just 30 days. Ages 18 and up. $90. Registration required. 272-1171; bit.ly/nanof15. Silverton.

FRIDAY, OCT. 30 Art & Craft Classes Weave a Colorful Scarf, 6:309:30 p.m., Woman’s Art Club Cultural Center, 6980 Cambridge Ave., Learn to weave on rigid heddle loom using two colored yarns. Two session class instructs students to become weavers using rigid heddle loom and leave class with completed scarf. Loom rental available for $10 or bring your own. Instructor Susan Austin. Ages 9-99. $60. Registration required. 703-5645; www.artatthebarn.org. Mariemont.

Art Exhibits Woman’s Art Club of Cincin-

nati All-Member Exhibition, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Woman’s Art Club Cultural Center, Free. 272-3700; www.artatthebarn.org. Mariemont. Brad Robertson: New Emotions, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Gallery Veronique, Free. 530-5379; galleryveronique.com. Symmes Township. Gregg Litchfield: Watercolor and Digital Art Photography, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., River Hills Christian Church, Free. 677-7600. Loveland.

Reservations required. Presented by Montgomery Arts Commission. 891-2424; www.montgomeryohio.org. Montgomery.

Art & Craft Classes Art Club: After-School Art Class, 4-5:30 p.m., Woman’s Art Club Cultural Center, 6980 Cambridge Ave., The Barn. Kids grades 5-8 have fun exploring art and focusing on drawing and painting in 9-week class with Dave Laug. $105 for 9 weeks. Registration required. 885-5284; www.artatthebarn.org. Mariemont.

Fall SoulCollage Circle: Becoming the Conscious Heroine of Your Journey, 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., Women Writing for a Change, 6906 Plainfield Road, $179. Registration required. Through Nov. 20. 272-1171; bit.ly/sclg-fl15. Silverton.

Art Exhibits Gregg Litchfield: Watercolor and Digital Art Photography, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., River Hills Christian Church, Free. 677-7600. Loveland.

Shopping Art Bead Trunk Show, 5-8 p.m., The Bead Shop of Madeira, 7754 Camargo Road, Area’s top bead and wearable artists display new work. Glass, wire, metal and polymer clay. One of a kind art beads, components, and finished jewelry. Demos and refreshments Friday night. Free. 2715222. Madeira.

SATURDAY, OCT. 31 Art Exhibits Woman’s Art Club of Cincinnati All-Member Exhibition, 1-4 p.m., Woman’s Art Club Cultural Center, Free. 272-3700; www.artatthebarn.org. Mariemont. Brad Robertson: New Emotions, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Gallery Veronique, Free. 530-5379; galleryveronique.com. Symmes Township. Gregg Litchfield: Watercolor and Digital Art Photography, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., River Hills Christian Church, Free. 677-7600. Loveland. Peter Max: A Retrospective 1960-2015, 6-8 p.m. Preview party., Kenwood Towne Centre, 7875 Montgomery Road, Meetthe-artist receptions on Nov. 7 from 7-9 p.m. and Nov. 8 from 1-4 p.m. Artworks are on exhibition and available for acquisition. Reservations required. Presented by Road Show Company. Through Nov. 8. 866-9006699; www.roadshowcompany.com. Kenwood.

Drink Tastings Cincy Wine Wagon Winery Tour, 11:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., Maggiano’s Little Italy, 7875 Montgomery Road, Bar at Maggiano’s. Meet at restaurant, then head to Valley Vineyards, Vinoklet and Henke Wineries. Approximately 5 hour tour. Wine and snacks at each location. Ages 21 and up. $75. Reservations required. Presented by Cincy Wine Wagon. Through May 14. 258-7909. Sycamore Township.

Health / Wellness Lifestyle Weight Loss Classes, 2:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Peachy’s Health Smart, 7400 Montgomery Road, Program benefits individuals needing assistance in weight loss to prevent or reverse its negative consequences. Ages 21 and up. Free. Reservations required. 315-3943; peachyshealthsmart.com. Silverton.

Shopping Art Bead Trunk Show, noon to 4 p.m., The Bead Shop of Madeira, Free. 271-5222. Madeira.

Support Groups Diabetes Conversation Maps, 10 a.m. to noon, Duck Creek YMCA, 5040 Kingsley Drive, Small group discussions of Type 2 diabetes led by Jan Kellogg, certified diabetes educator. Class limited to 10 participants to encourage conversation and questions. Free. Presented by Jan Kellogg, RN, MEd,CDE. 791-0626. Duck Creek.

SUNDAY, NOV. 1 Art & Craft Classes Weave a Colorful Scarf, 1-4 p.m., Woman’s Art Club Cultural Center, $60. Registration required. 703-5645; www.artatthebarn.org. Mariemont.

Art Events Woman’s Art Club of Cincinnati All-Member Exhibition, 2-4 p.m., Woman’s Art Club Cultural Center, 6980 Cambridge Ave., The Barn. Closing reception exhibit featuring artwork in variety of media by members of Woman’s Art Club of Cincinnati.

Cooking Events

TUESDAY, NOV. 3

Education

PROVIDED

Gregg Litchfield: Watercolor and Digital Art Photography, will be on exhibit through Nov. 29 at River Hills Christian Church, 6300 Price Road, Loveland. Admission is free. Call 677-7600.

ABOUT CALENDAR To submit calendar items, go to Cincinnati.com/share, log in and click on “submit an event.” Send digital photos to kynews@communitypress.com along with event information. Items are printed on a space-available basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to Cincinnati.com/calendar. Free. 272-3700; www.artatthebarn.org. Mariemont.

Art Exhibits Gregg Litchfield: Watercolor and Digital Art Photography, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., River Hills Christian Church, Free. 677-7600. Loveland.

Education Stephen and Luisa Hornstein Program in Remembrance of the Holocaust and the Human Spirit, 10 a.m., Isaac M. Wise Temple, 8329 Ridge Road, Author speaks about his book, “The Fantastic Laboratory of Dr. Weigl.”. Free. Reservations recommended. Presented by The Center for Holocaust and Humanity Education. 53-487-3055; holocaustandhumanity.org. Amberley Village. Archbishop Moeller High School Open House, 2-5 p.m., Moeller High School, 9001 Montgomery Road, Opportunity to meet faculty, staff, parents and students, walk through facilities and learn about house system, curriculum, ministries and service opportunities. Free. 791-1680, ext. 1240; www.moeller.org. Kenwood.

Home & Garden Woodland Vistas Luxury Townhomes Open House, 1-3 p.m., Woodland Vistas Luxury Townhomes, 5983 Woodland Lane, Tour contemporary furnished model by John Hueber Homes. Free. 703-2353. East End.

Literary - Book Clubs Women’s Book Group, 3-5 p.m. This month’s selection is Sister Outsider by Audre Lorde., Women Writing for a Change, 6906 Plainfield Road, Fall book group series features feminist classics facilitated by Mary Pierce Brosmer. Ages 18 and up. Free. Registration recommended. 272-1171; bit.ly/bg-oct15. Silverton.

Youth Sports Cincy Swish Basketall Training, 5-8 p.m., Mariemont High School, 1 Warrior Way, Main gym. Grades 2-4 boys and girls 5-6 p.m., grades 5-6 boys and girls 6-7 p.m., grades 7-8 boys and girls 7-8 p.m. Ages 2-8. $20. Registration recommended. Presented by Cincy Swish Basketball. 484-0526; cincyswishbasketball.com. Mariemont.

MONDAY, NOV. 2 Art & Craft Classes Artivity: After School Art Class, 4-5:30 p.m., Woman’s Art Club Cultural Center, 6980 Cambridge Ave., The Barn. Dave Laug instructs kids grades 2-4 making wild art projects after school. Ideal for creative kids wanting more art time. Diverse, project-based enrichment activities include origami, crayon resist, pet portraits, mosaics, crazy sculpture, cartooning and more. $105 for 9 weeks. Registration required. 885-5284; www.artatthebarn.org. Mariemont.

Weave a Holiday Gift, 12:303:30 p.m., Woman’s Art Club Cultural Center, 6980 Cambridge Ave., Tack Room at The Barn. Two session class teaches students to use rigid heddle loom to create special plain weave scarf. Looms available to rent for $10. Students provide own yarns. $60. Registration required. Presented by Instructor Susan Austin. 703-5645; www.artatthebarn.org. Mariemont.

Cooking Classes Delights of Malaysian Cuisine with Angie Pang, 6:30-9 p.m., Cooks’ Wares, 11344 Montgomery Road, Malaysia’s culinary style is accented with influences from Thai, Portuguese, Dutch, and British cuisines. $47. Reservations required. 489-6400; www.cookswaresonline.com. Symmes Township.

Exercise Classes Tai Chi-Qi Gong-Yoga class, 5:30-7 p.m., Peachy’s Health Smart, 7400 Montgomery Road, Tai chi is gentle and relaxing way to exercise and get in shape. Ages 18 and up. $12. PeachysHealthSmart.com. 315-3943, ext. text only; www.peachyshealthsmart.com. Silverton. Yoga for Teen Girls, 4-5 p.m., Woman’s Art Club Cultural Center, 6980 Cambridge Ave., Great introduction for young women grades 8-12 to explore what yoga has to offer. Bring own mat. No cell phones permitted. $80 for 8 weeks. Registration required. 760-2552; karenjohnsyoga.com. Mariemont.

Health / Wellness National Memory Screening Day, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., CTI Clinical Research Center, 4760 Red Bank Expressway, Suite 4400, Qualified healthcare professionals administer face-toface memory screening, which takes approximately 10 minutes. Free. Reservations required. 721-3868; www.ctifacts.com. Madisonville.

Literary - Libraries Preschool Storytime, 10-11 a.m., Loveland Branch Library, 649 Loveland-Madeira Road, Enjoy books, songs, activities, crafts and more, while building early literacy skills. For preschoolers and their caregivers. Ages 3-6. Free. 369-4476; www.cincinnatilibrary.org. Loveland. Toddler Storytime, 11 a.m. to noon, Loveland Branch Library, 649 Loveland-Madeira Road, Encourage emerging language skills with books, rhymes, crafts, music and fun. For ages 18-36 months. Free. 369-4476; www.cincinnatilibrary.org. Loveland.

Music - Concert Series Live at the Uni Concert Series, 7-8 p.m. The Klezmer Project, Universalist Church-Montgomery, Montgomery and Remington roads, Receptions at Montgomery Inn immediately following music. Freewill offering.

and Digital Art Photography, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., River Hills Christian Church, Free. 677-7600. Loveland.

Cooking Classes Braising 101 with Le Creuset and Trish Ranallo, 6:30-9 p.m., Cooks’ Wares, 11344 Montgomery Road, Learn about braising with Trish Ranallo, of Le Creuset. It’s all about heat, time, and temperature. $27. Reservations required. 489-6400; www.cookswaresonline.com. Symmes Township.

Literary - Libraries Teen Club, 3:30-5 p.m., Deer Park Branch Library, 3970 E. Galbraith Road, Teens have fun with simple science experiments, play board games, participate in “make & take” activities, crafts and other engaging activities. Ages 10-18. Free. 369-4450; www.cincinnatilibrary.org/ branches/deerpark. Deer Park.

Literary - Story Times Reading and Rhyming Time, 1:30-2:30 p.m., Madeira Branch Library, 7200 Miami Ave., Preschoolers enjoy story time followed by early literacy games and activities. Ages 3-6. Free. 369-6028. Madeira.

Support Groups Overeaters Anonymous, 7:30-8:30 p.m., Montgomery Assembly of God, 7950 Pfeiffer Road, Welcome to anyone wanting to stop eating compulsively. No dues or fees. Not affiliated with any public or private organization, political movement, ideology or religious doctrine. Ages 18 and up. Free. Presented by Greater Cincinnati Intergroup Overeaters Anonymous. 528-2275; cincinnatioa.org. Montgomery. Eating Disorder Support Group for Women, 1-3 p.m., Eve Center, 7038 Blue Ash Road, 13-week Christian-based program provides women with necessary tools to overcome eating disorders. Ages 18 and up. $30. Reservations required. Presented by Living In Truth Ministries. 505-7386; raelynn2@comcast.net. Silverton.

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 4 Art & Craft Classes Weave a Holiday Gift, 1:30-4:30 p.m., Woman’s Art Club Cultural Center, $60. Registration required. 703-5645; www.artatthebarn.org. Mariemont. Madeira Creativity Lab, 3:30-5 p.m., Madeira Branch Library, 7200 Miami Ave., Some basic instruction plus your creativity equals amazing results. Ages 12-18. Free. 369-6028. Madeira.

Art Exhibits Gregg Litchfield: Watercolor

Girls NIght Out at Cooks’Wares, 6-8:30 p.m., Cooks’ Wares, 11344 Montgomery Road, Door prizes and special treats. Join industry representatives and cooking class instructors for evening of wine, hors d’oeuvres, product demos and shopping. Free. Reservations required. 489-6400; www.cookswaresonline.com. Symmes Township.

Lectures Travel Tales: Along the Saint Lawrence Seaway, 7-8:30 p.m., Madeira Branch Library, 7200 Miami Ave., Alan Lloyd of Photography Club of Greater Cincinnati shares experiences and stunning photography travelling along St. Lawrence Seaway from Atlantic to Great Lakes. Free. 369-6028. Madeira.

Literary - Libraries Multicultural Families Playdate, 11 a.m. to noon, Loveland Branch Library, 649 LovelandMadeira Road, Share joys, customs and traditions of raising children in multicultural home. Socialize with other parents while children play. Educational materials and toys provided. For ages 18 months-6 years. Free. 369-4476; www.cincinnatilibrary.org. Loveland.

Schools Coffee Social with Casey, 9 a.m., Children’s Meeting House Montessori School, 927 O’Bannonville Road, Parents of preschoolers learn about Montessori philosophy, tour 7-acre campus and visit classrooms. Free. 6834757; on.fb.me/1VcIlPj. Loveland.

Support Groups Al-Anon Meeting, noon to 1 p.m., Good Shepherd Lutheran Church Kenwood, 7701 Kenwood Road, Room 101. Fellowship of relatives and friends of alcoholics who share their experience, strength and hope in order to solve common problems. Ages 18 and up. Free. Presented by Kenwood Al-Anon Family Group. 947-3700. Kenwood.

THURSDAY, NOV. 5 Art & Craft Classes Fundamentals of Drawing and Painting for Adults with Mary Lou Holt, 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Woman’s Art Club Cultural Center, $220. 226-3833; www.artatthebarn.org. Mariemont.

Art Exhibits Gregg Litchfield: Watercolor and Digital Art Photography, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., River Hills Christian Church, Free. 677-7600. Loveland.

Cooking Classes Festive Southern Dishes for the Holiday with Marilyn Harris, 6:30-9 p.m., Cooks’ Wares, 11344 Montgomery Road, Southern dishes suited for busy schedules. $67. Reservations required. 489-6400; www.cookswaresonline.com. Symmes Township.

Education Novel Writing in Community: NaNoWriMo Meets WWf(a)C, 7-9:30 p.m., Women Writing for a Change, $90. Registration required. 272-1171; bit.ly/nanof15. Silverton.

PUZZLE ANSWERS V I C A O R E C W E R E T I I S I T S E T S E U R U P D O E Y E O S S O L T T O A R M S U P T O N A T H G H O S L O R O E T R A L E A V E S L E E

R A W D A T A F L I N G A T L E A S T

S R O L O G O O M T A D N E A L I I L R A O H N B U A S R A B L E

I F F Y B L O W O N V O U S

L E V

N P I E C O O T N O B L I T Z S S W E S I N S T O N E A V E R L P H T G I N G M M A O I T P O N H L D E D I G G Q U A S S C M T E R K E O N A R E N R A C K C A G A L A G E N E D U

E S T E E R A P P H E E T R I N O H R O E R I N D A T E U E T S E P

A N G R I L Y

P R I M A C H Y U M O P P H T I O O N N T H T E A D I L

M P L Y O L I E O A L S Y A M E S L I P S S T I C E S T A A M P F E E I E N S S E L P S N A I L D I N E D U D R A P S I N V E N S A G E S L G O T


NEWS

OCTOBER 29, 2015 • INDIAN HILL JOURNAL • 7A

Homemade Halloween treats kids can help make ‘Glowing’ swamp punch

This still boggles my mind: Halloween is second only to Christmas as the most decorated holiday. Not so when I was a kid. The house wasn’t decorated, and the eight girls in our family were either witches or gypsies. My brother, Charlie, the last born, was always a hobo. We used whatever we could find to dress up and we left at dark, by ourselves, and came home with grocery paper bags full of treats. Rita Fast forward to Halloween 2015. Even if Heikenfeld parental rules are stricter, Halloween is still so much fun! Here are last-minute RITA’S KITCHEN recipes for a ghoulishly good Halloween.

Let the kids help. They love the creepy crawler ice ring. 1 cup boiling water 2 packages, 4-serving size each, lime gelatin 3 cups cold water 1-1/2 quarts carbonated lemon-lime soda, chilled

Pour boiling water over gelatin and stir until dissolved. Stir in cold water. Pour into punch bowl. Stir in soda, making mixture fizz. Unmold ice ring by dipping bottom of mold briefly into hot water. Float in punch. Serve cups garnished with gummy worms. Creepy crawler ice ring1 cup gummy worms or other creepy crawler gummies 1 quart lemon-lime sports drink like Gatorade Arrange gummy worms in bottom of 5-cup ring mold; fill with Gatorade. Freeze until solid.

Homemade microwave popcorn

Check out my Abouteating.com site. You won’t believe how easy and inexpensive, not to mention healthy and amazingly tender it is. (Hint: 1/2 cup unpopped corn makes a generous 8 cups, but there’s a secret technique!) Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator, Jungle Jim’s Eastgate culinary professional and author. Find her blog at Abouteating.com. Email her at columns@communitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-248-7130, ext. 356.

My best caramel corn

Black cat cookie pops

This makes a lot so feel free to divide in half. Adding dried fruit elevates this to a new dimension. Preheat oven to 200 degrees.

Again, let the kids help. Don’t worry if their cookies look like something other than cats. It’s about creativity and fun, not perfection.

15-16 cups or so of popped corn About 3 cups salted mixed nuts 2 sticks or butter 2 cups brown sugar 1/2 cup light corn syrup 1/2 teaspoon salt 1 tablespoon vanilla 1/2 teaspoon baking soda 2 cups dried cranberries, cherries or apricots (opt)

1 cup creamy peanut butter 1/3 cup water 2 eggs 1 box chocolate cake mix Popsicle sticks Sugar Candy corn, red hots

To avoid sticking, use vegetable spray to coat both inside of large bowl, cookie sheets and spoons that you will use. Put popcorn and nuts in bowl. Set aside. Over medium heat in a large pan, bring to a boil everything but the soda. Boil 5 minutes. Add baking soda and stir. Mixture will foam up. Immediately pour over popcorn mixture, stirring well to coat. Pour in a single layer onto sprayed cookie sheets. Bake 1 hour, stirring every 15 minutes to distribute coating. Let cool for coating to harden; add fruit, and store at room temperature in covered containers. Makes about 20 cups.

Tip from Rita’s kitchen After popping corn, place in colander or bowl and scoop up popcorn gently with hands. Any unpopped corn will lie in bottom of bowl.

THANKS TO RITA HEIKENFELD

Rita Heikenfeld makes homemade caramel corn on the stovetop.

Preheat oven to 350. Beat peanut butter with water and eggs. Add cake mix and mix. Form into 1-1/2” balls and place on sprayed cookie sheet. Push in a popsicle stick. Flatten with bottom of glass dipped in sugar. Pinch two “ears” at top of cookie. Press fork into dough to form whiskers on either side of nose. Bake 10-12 minutes. Remove from oven and immediately add candy corn eyes and red-hot nose, pushing in gently. If they happen to fall off after they cool, glue them on with a little powdered sugar glaze or canned frosting. Makes 2-3 dozen


VIEWPOINTS 8A • INDIAN HILL JOURNAL • OCTOBER 29, 2015

INDIAN HILL Editor: Richard Maloney, rmaloney@communitypress.com, 248-7134

EDITORIALS | LETTERS | COLUMNS | CH@TROOM

Cincinnati.com/communities

Simple pleasures of life My first stop when I go to the grocery store is the produce section. Besides the normal lettuce, peppers, celery weekly purchases, I usually look for fruit that is in season. So this past summer with the heat/ humidly being the norm, I journeyed towards the watermelon display crate. There I found an elderly lady bent over the crate side attempting to reach a melon. I hurried over to help her to get one, but saw that she was knotting on each watermelon she could reach. The lady proceeded to stop after each knot and listen as getting some inter response from each melon regarding its ripeness. I join in with my own tapping and tried to act like I knew exactly the right resonance tone I was listening for. The lady noticing my attempt, told me its better if you use a spoon; which she forgot to bring, because when you tap each one, it’s easier to hear each melon’s pitch sound. Just then I envision her doing this as a crowd gathers around the melon crate to watch her “spooning melons.” She informs me they should sound like a bongo drum to be a good one. Holding one of the heavy melons close to my ear, I tap it and listen. I attempted to hear some drumming, bongo resounding reply, like when you shout in a canyon and the sound echoing its ghostly retort. We were starting to get stares from other shoppers as a few wandering over with curiosity to see what we were doing. Watermelons actually have a prized heritage, coming from Africa, eaten by ancient Egyptian pharaohs. I read somewhere, there were actually remnants of the melons discovered in tombs, as people believed watermelons were a source of water needed for their prolonged spiritual journey. But it’s the southern U.S. that seems to put a claim on them, as southerners say their water-

JOURNAL

melons are the best. Mark Twain put it this way: “The true Southern watermelon is a boon apart, and not to be mentioned with commoner things. It is chief of this world’s luxuries, king by the grace of God over all the fruits of the earth. When one has tastWes ed it, he knows what the angels Adamson eat. It was not a Southern watermelon that Eve took, we know it COLUMNIST because she repented.” When we were kids, my brother and I would eat watermelon in the backyard and have a seed-spitting contest. I can’t remember precisely, but the trick for the best shot was to put the seed on the tip of your tongue, rolling your tongue for a more of a tube release. Then rear back with a full lung thrust. Like everything else there are national watermelon seed spitting contests; the record is somewhere over 75 feet. Sadly I read somewhere that most watermelons today are seedless, maybe losing another great tradition. Society today appears to need all sorts of grading levels; such as if watermelons are sold commercially, they must meet a certain sweetness level. Defining and putting everything in a structural sense makes life seem so categorized. A keeping of order maybe, but removing much of the individual’s creative imagination of self-discovery. My elderly store lady friend and I just want our old summertime, two-handed mouth-eating favorite. I wonder if she’s a seed-spitting girl as the next time at the local watermelon crate, we definitely have more to talk about! Wes Adamson is a resident of Wyoming. His work has been accepted for publication by two literary magazines: River and South Review and Driftwood Press.

CH@TROOM

Save money with winter weatherization tips from PWC Winter is right around the corner, and with it comes colder weather and higher heating bills. October is National Weatherization Month, so now is the time to begin preparing homes in order to conserve energy and save money. At People Working Cooperatively we’ve been providing services to the low-income, elderly and disabled citizens of Greater Cincinnati for 40 years to help keep their homes warm and their bills low, and we’ve Nina put together a Creech few easy tips COMMUNITY PRESS for homeownGUEST COLUMNIST ers to prepare their home this season. Step one of preparing a home for winter is checking the windows and doors. These are two of the areas it is easiest for heat to escape and cold air to enter a home. Begin outside, checking the seal between windows and siding. Homeowners may need to strip away layers of old paint and caulking before re-caulking to ensure a tight seal. After sealing the outside, homeowners should move inside and check the weather stripping on their windows. If the weather stripping looks worn down it should be replaced. Just sealing windows could save 15 percent off energy bills this winter. Installing a programmable thermostat is another great way for homeowners to save money on their energy bill. For every degree a thermostat is set back over an eight-hour period, homeowners can save as much as one percent on their energy bill each month. It’s easy to program the ther-

mostat to turn the heat down at night while everyone is sleeping and during the day while the house is empty, but begin to warm it back up when the family will be up and around the house. Checking the furnace early before it gets really cold - is a good rule of thumb. Waking up on the first truly cold day of the season to discover the furnace isn’t working is a situation homeowners want to avoid. Call in a professional to evaluate the furnace and provide any tune-up necessary. Annual maintenance keeps furnaces running safely and efficiently and avoids larger problems down the line. Another easy maintenance tip is to change your air filter. Filters should be changed every few months, and it’s a good idea to change it out before the furnace gets heavy use. The new filter helps with efficiency, keeps air clean, and helps to keep the family healthy. It’s also important to clean gutters twice a year to make sure they are working properly. Now that leaves have started falling, it’s a good idea for homeowners to check their gutters for debris including animal nests, branches, leaves, and anything else that may have landed on the roof. Homeowners should also ensure that their downspout is pointed away from the house to avoid erosion to the foundation because of run-off. Taking the time to weatherize could mean significant savings on energy bills this winter. We encourage homeowners to evaluate their energy use and take some of these steps to ensure their homes stay warm and efficient this winter. Nina Creech is senior vice president of operations, People Working Cooperatively.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Candidates’ stances on transparency unclear

KAREEM ELGAZZAR/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Marvin Jones puts extra effort into his spike after scoring a touchdown in the third quarter of the Bengals’ win at Buffalo.

Oct. 22 question Who-dey? How far will the Bengals go this year?

THIS WEEK’S QUESTION

“Super Bowl 50 champs.”

Should college education be free? Why or why not?

D.H.

“The Bengals will go farther than the Reds did, but then again, how hard can that be? They are playing well and winning consistently – Yay! Now, if they can keep the injuries to a minimum we might just have something in this team. Since they are playing so well and selling many seats, can we renegotiate the asinine deal our stupid city leaders agreed to with Mr. Brown? It is beyond ridiculous for this city with its level of financial woes to have to pay so much to keep a team here that gives darned near nothing back. I want to have pride in this team and I do, but that pride gets very muddled when thinking about how thoroughly Brown takes the city to the cleaners year after year after year.”

Every week we ask readers a question they can reply to via email. Send your answers to rmaloney@communitypress.com with Ch@troom in the subject line.

JOURNAL

Randy Wakefield Indian Hill

ABOUT LETTERS AND COLUMNS “The Bengals are an exciting team with many great players on offense and defense. Barring major injuries (like last year) they are playoff bound. It would be great if they can get a first round bye in the playoffs along with home field advantage. But the New England Patriots stand in their way. The wish here is someone can knock of New England prior to the Bengals having to face them in the playoffs. That might just propel the Bengals to the Super Bowl ala the 1981 and 1988 seasons.”

T.D.T.

M.J.F.

INDIAN HILL

Regarding your interview with Indian Hill School Board candidates, the public learns very little about the prospects for transparency and abiding the rule of law as all three seemed to avoid revealing their feelings on the litigation with CRSS. The fact that the existing board acted illegally and covertly is not in dispute as the courts have ruled against them. Unfortunately this slate of candidates adds little input

as to their individual posture on returning the money owed the taxpayers which only makes one wonder if they aren’t quietly mulling “how can the next board work to do this same thing...legally?” That $38 million dollar piggy bank the school system sits on looms rather large over this discussion. As a taxpayer - and voter - in Indian Hill, I see nothing in their veiled responses to suggest I give them my vote.

A publication of

We welcome your comments on editorials, columns, stories or other topics important to you in The Indian Hill Journal. Include your name, address and phone number(s) so we may verify your letter. Letters of 200 or fewer words and columns of 500 or fewer words have the best chance of being published. Please include a photo with a column submission. All submissions may be edited for length, accuracy and clarity. Deadline: Noon Thursday E-mail: indianhill@communitypress.com Fax: 248-1938 U.S. mail: See box below. Letters, columns and articles submitted to The Indian Hill Journal may be published or distributed in print, electronic or other forms.

7700 Service Center Drive, West Chester, Ohio, 45069 phone: 248-8600 email: indianhill@communitypress.com web site: Cincinnati.com/communities

Indian Hill Journal Editor Richard Maloney rmaloney@communitypress.com, 248-7134 Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday See page A2 for additional contact information.


SPORTS

OCTOBER 29, 2015 • INDIAN HILL JOURNAL • 1B

INDIAN HILL

JOURNAL

Editor: Melanie Laughman, mlaughman@communitypress.com, 513-248-7573

CommunityPress.com

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | RECREATIONAL

GEOFF BLANKENSHIP/FOR THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Indian Hill’s doubles duo of Caroline Andersen, left, and Meredith Breda won the Division II doubles championship on Oct. 17 and was runner-up in the OCTA team tournament Oct. 18.

Indian Hill girls runners-up in team tennis GEOFF BLANKENSHIP FOR THE COMMUNITY PRESS

CCD’s Darryn Jordan (45) finds daylight and a long gain for the Indians.

Scott Springer

CHCA dominates CCD, 59-27

sspringer@communitypress.com

SYCAMORE TWP. – CHCA and Cincinnati Country Day haven’t played each other since the 2012 season. Friday night at Lindner Stadium, the two played a back-and-forth game usually reserved for rivals who meet perennially. But it didn’t come down to which team had the ball last. CHCA outscored CCD 36-3 in the second half en route to a 59-27 victory. CHCA won the Miami Valley Conference Scarlet division title. Eagles quarterback Johnny Noyen ran for four touchdowns. CHCA’s running game racked up eight total.

GEOFF BLANKENSHIP FOR THE COMMUNITY PRESS

GEOFF BLANKENSHIP FOR THE COMMUNITY PRESS

CHCA tailback Kesean Gamble eyes the end zone.

CCD quarterback J’Quaan Waite unloads a long pass for the Indians.

INDIAN HILL – Less than 24 hours after a triumphant Division II state championship for the Indian Hill High School girls tennis combo of Caroline Andersen and Meredith Breda, the Lady Braves had their racquets out again. The perennial Cincinnati Hills League champions traveled to Reynoldsburg, outside of Columbus Oct. 18 for another day’s work in the Ohio Coaches Tennis Association tournament. Running their traditional season lineup out in the semifinal against Lexington, the Lady Braves coached by Gary Samuels took three singles matches to advance to the championship. Senior Caroline Andersen, junior Gracey Hirsch and senior Meredith Breda won first, second and third singles, respectively. That put them against Shaker Heights Hathaway Brown, a team they defeated two years ago, and home of the doubles team Andersen and Breda had defeated just a day before. Samuels switched the lineup

to Andersen, Hirsch and Maren McKenna at singles, with Breda and Nina Price playing first doubles and Amalia Guzman and Sarah Price second doubles. Unfortunately, the team more than one coach has termed “best in the state” lived up to their billing. Hathaway Brown won three matches and the title with Indian Hill taking runner-up. “We thought we had a chance with the way they matched up their lineup at second and third singles and second doubles, but it didn’t go well,” Samuels said. “They were just incredible. They had their state doubles runner-ups together at first doubles, which surprised me. Five of their players are either freshmen or sophomores, the talent is just so deep there.” Making things difficult was the matchup of Andersen against the Division II singles champion, Lauren Gillinov. Then, as Samuels described, Breda, with new partner Nina Price, had to face Catherine Araklett and Ally Persky, whom she played the previous day See TENNIS, Page 2B

SHORT HOPS Scott Springer and Nick Robbe Community Press staff

Football » Indian Hill went to 9-0 with a 60-12 win over Deer Park. Junior quarterback Reed Aichholz was 10-16 passing for three touchdowns, two to senior Nick Heidel and one to junior Dawson Aichholz. Reed Aichholz also ran for two scores. The Braves host Reading Oct. 30 for a chance at a perfect season. » Moeller played Cleveland St. Ignatius Oct. 17 at Dublin Coffman and came from a 38-14 deficit in the second quarter to win 55-52. Senior Thomas MacVittie threw for 475 yards and six touchdowns with three going to senior tight end Jake

Hausmann. Senior Matt Coghlin hit two field goals in the fourth quarter, including the game-winner with 10 seconds remaining. Moeller was at Lakewood St. Edward Oct. 24 and got out to a 17-0 lead. From there, they didn’t score again as Lakewood St. Edward won 4917. MacVittie had touchdown passes to Hausmann and senior Kyle Butz in the loss. The Crusaders host Canada Prep Academy Oct. 30 at Lockland Stadium.

Boys tournament golf » Moeller’s Jake Fox was the runner-up medalist at the Divison I state golf tournament Oct. 23-24 - the highest individual placer of any local golfer. Fox shot two rounds of 74 at Ohio

nati.com Enquirer Preps Athlete of the Week. Voting ends noon Thursday, Oct. 29.

Girls cross country

ADAM BAUM/COMMUNITY PRESS

Moeller senior Jake Fox rips a drive down the fairway Oct. 23 at Ohio State University's Scarlet course.

State. Fox is a University of Cincinnati commit. He is one of the nominees on this week’s cincin-

» Mount Notre Dame senior Allison Rogiers finished sixth at the Girls Greater Catholic League meet at the Golf Center at Kings Island Oct. 17 in 19:49. » Indian Hill finished fourth at the Cincinnati Hills League meet at the Golf Center at Kings Island Oct. 17. Senior Rhian Horton was eighth in 20:37.8. Indian Hill finished third in the Division II, Race 1 district meet Oct. 24 at Voice of American Park to make the regional meet. Top finisher was Rhian Horton in seventh at 20:26.5. » Cincinnati Country Day finished third in the Division III

district race at Voice of America Park Oct. 24, and will advance to the regional race in Troy. Junior Grace Pettengill led the Indians with a secondplace finish, completing the course in 20:43.9.

Boys cross country » Indian Hill won the Cincinnati Hills League championship Oct. 17 at the Golf Center at Kings Island. Sophomore Joe Murdock was fourth in 16:48.3, senior Trent Geyer was sixth in 17:13 and junior Patrick Giroux was seventh in 17:18.7. Indian Hill’s Susan Savage was named CHL Coach of the Year. Indian Hill was the Division II, Race 1district champion Oct. See SHORT HOPS, Page 2B

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LIFE

2B • INDIAN HILL JOURNAL • OCTOBER 29, 2015

BRANDON SEVERN/ FOR THE COMMUNITY PRESS PHOTOS BY ADAM BAUM/COMMUNITY PRESS

St. Xavier senior Kirran Magowan watches his drive find the fairway on the first hole at the OHSAA Division I state tournament Oct. 23 at Ohio State University’s scarlet course.

Ally Jandes of Seven Hills uses her hips to fend Tessa Doan of CHCA off the ball.

Bombers win state golf team title

Stewart, Jandes lead Seven Hills’ playoff push

Adam Baum

Nick Robbe

abaum@communitypress.com

nrobbe@communitypress.com

SPRINGFIELD TWP. - With the final stroke of his high school golf career, St. Xavier senior Kirran Magowan sent the St. Xavier gallery into an uproar when he drained a 6-foot birdie putt on 18 to complete an even-par round of 72, helping the Bombers win their fourth Division I state golf championship. Magowan’s score wasn’t used on Friday, only a team’s four lowest rounds count toward the tournament total. “It’s kind of like a storybook finish,” said Magowan. “I always kind of replayed it in my mind that it would finish like this. Everything kind of lined up; I didn’t think I would play this well.” The Bombers won their first title since 2008 Saturday on the Scarlet course at the Ohio State University Golf Club. St. X shot 616 (303-313) to edge Dublin Jerome’s 621 (316-305). Springboro came in third with 629 (313-316). “If there was anybody on the team, if they shot 82 on day one, that I knew in my heart could come back and go low, it’s Kirran,” said St. Xavier coach Alex Kepley. “He’s played the last part of this season so stellar … 72, that’s a dream, but I felt like he could go 75 or lower.” Magowan led the Bombers with a 36-hole total of 154, followed by senior Domenic Maricocchi with 155 (71-84). Junior Zachary Pavlin shot 157

MADSIONVILLE – Prior to the season, Seven Hills girls soccer coach Nick Francis was asked questions like who he thinks will lead the squad this year, or who might be a pleasant surprise. Those queries make him bristle, and he typically refrains from answering them. On the surface, it seems odd that he wouldn’t highlight a few of the players. Dig a little deeper and it all makes sense. By highlighting a few players, it could heap extra pressure on the select few while effectively limiting the players he didn’t name. He lets the players assume an identity on the team. Claire Stewart, one of the seniors, and sophomore Ally Jandes have assumed the primary scoring roles on the team. Jandes has tabulated 49 points on 22 goals and five assists. Stewart adds 41 more points on 14 goals and 13 assists. “Ally’s a great player,” Stewart said. “I really count on her to get those goals and she does it 99 percent of the time. We’re so thankful she can get close and score.”

St. Xavier senior Kirran Magowan celebrates sinking a birdie putt on 18 to help the Bombers secure a Division I state golf championship on Oct. 24.

(77-80), and sophomores Michael Prebles (80-78) and Cameron Frazier (75-83) each shot 158. Magowan said after, “It’s surreal, it’s one of those things … I don’t know, I’m kind of speechless after that one.” Kepley, after winning his first state title as coach, said, “They don’t quit, they kept playing hard and they knew the importance of every single shot … what is so incredibly cool, is when you look at these five guys, everybody’s score counted at least once and everybody had a round in the 70s that counted. Their 36-hole totals ranging from 154-158 – that’s how it’s been all year.”

Tennis Continued from Page 1B

St. Xavier sophomore Michael Prebles walks to the first tee at the OHSAA Division I state tournament Oct. 23 at Ohio State University's scarlet course.

St. Xavier sophomore Cameron Frazier hits driver off the first tee at the OHSAA Division I state tournament Oct. 23 at Ohio State University’s scarlet course.

with Andersen. “They (Andersen and Breda) were in great spirits, just the matchups weren’t going to work,” Samuels said. The day capped off an overall successful season for Indian Hill. Another banner will hang off of Drake Road as the Lady Braves had six district qualifiers, five state qualifiers, a Divi-

Short hops 24 at Voice of America Park. Sophomore Joe Murdock was the Braves top runner finishing third in 17:00.8. Indian Hill advances to the regional meet in Troy. » Cincinnati Country Day finished third in the Division III district race at Voice of America Park Oct. 24, and will advance to the regional race in Troy. Charlie Sachs led the Indians in 17th place. » Mount Notre Dame defeated Indian Hill 6-1 on Oct. 21. Junior Emily Alexander and senior Sophie Sikora had two goals each. Senior Natalie More scored for Indian Hill.

sion II state championship in doubles and a state runner-up plaque as a team. Andersen, Breda and McKenna now move on, with familiar faces Hirsch, Nina and Sarah Price and Guzman returning. As always with Indian Hill, there’s more to come. “We’ll have Julia Yingling, who will be a junior, who was injured this year,” Samuels said. “We’ll also have three new freshmen and some other returning varsity players. It’s going to be a great team coming back.” after deadline. » Moeller beat Anderson 1-0 Oct. 24 in the Division I sectional. They play Turpin Oct. 27, after deadline.

Continued from Page 1B

Tournament field hockey

Jandes has surprised even herself with the impact she’s made this season. She admits to some trepidation when she joined the program as a freshman. Seniors, like Stewart, have done a good job making her feel welcome on the team. “I’m really proud of how far I’ve come with the support of the upperclassmen,” Jandes said. “With Claire, It’s like we are best friends and we’ve only known each other for a year.” Stewart and Jandes, along with their teammates, stayed afloat in the Miami Valley Conference, easily one of the toughest conferences in the area. Summit Country Day and Cincinnati Country Day as well as CHCA are a lot for the Stingers to navigate. Stewart said they treat all opponents like they’re the same and added they’re there to compete in every game. That attitude helped Seven Hills hold off the Eagles in a 1-0 victory which propelled them to the sectional final this week. “This group never quits, even when they are losing,” Francis said. “They are used to tough games and obviously at this stage of the season, they’re all tough.”

Girls tournament soccer

SCOTT SPRINGER/COMMUNITY PRESS

MND junior Erin Flanagan (center) works for the ball while being pursued by Indian Hill sophomore Shannon McCormick Oct. 21 during their playoff game. MND won 6-1.

Boys tournament soccer » Indian Hill shut out Bata-

via 3-0 Oct. 21. Scoring for the Braves were seniors Carter Hoffman, Casey McClay and

Josh Young. Indian Hill beat Waynesville Oct. 24, advancing them to play Mariemont Oct. 27

» Indian Hill blanked Clinton Massie 7-0 Oct. 22 in the Division II sectional. The Lady Braves moved on to face New Richmond Oct. 26 at Milford, after deadline. » Cincinnati Country Day defeated Ripley 8-0 in the Division III sectional Oct. 22. Olivia Brown recorded a hat trick for the Indians. CCD played Roger Bacon Oct. 26 after deadline. » Mount Notre Dame beat McAuley 1-0 on Oct. 22 in the Division I sectional. The Cougars moved on to play Oak Hills Oct. 26 at Hamilton, after deadline.


LIFE

OCTOBER 29, 2015 • INDIAN HILL JOURNAL • 3B

TERRENCE HUGE FOR THE COMMUNITY

Always entertaining, Steve Hartman addressed the Montgomery Woman's Club Town Hall audience at the Sycamore Junior High School Oct. 14. His presentation included insightful commentary and excerpts from his CBS weekly feature "On the Road."

King of ‘The Road’ The Montgomery Woman’s Club 2015-16 Town Hall Lecture Series is off to a fine start as CBS correspondent, News Steve Hartman, enterenthusiastic tained crowds Oct. 14-15. The two morning lectures were staged at the Montgomery Assembly of God, while the Wednesday evening event was at the Sycamore Junior High School Auditorium. is best Hartman known for his weekly feature “On the Road” which airs Fridays on the CBS Evening News. “On the

Road” is modeled after the legendary series originally reported by the late newsman Charles Kuralt. In fact, the series brought Hartman to the Tristate to report on Cincinnati hero Lauren Hill’s first basketball game. He has won prestigious broadcast journalism awards including nearly two dozen Emmy Awards for writing, reporting and editing. Hartman’s presentation was the first of four in the Town Hall series; the next scheduled being Nov. 11-12 when NASA as-

tronaut, Capt.Mark Kelly will appear. Janine Driver, international body language expert will speak March 9-10, and the fourth lecture will feature the best selling author Nicholas Sparks, whose works include “The Notebook” and “Message in a Bottle.” Ten of Sparks’ books have been made into movies. He’ll appear April 13-14. Those interested in upcoming lectures may contact www.montgomerywomansclub.org or call the Town Hall voice mail: 513-684-1632.

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LIFE

4B • INDIAN HILL JOURNAL • OCTOBER 29, 2015

Kindervelt 22-Montgomery celebrates CHMC Members of Kindervelt 22 (Montgomery chapter) attended the City Wide annual dinner for Kindervelt at the Cincinnati Woman’s Club. As the roaring ‘20s themed dinner “Heart Deco” celebrated the annual gift of Kindervelt $502,000 toward a fouryear commitment to the Children’s Hospital Medical Center’s Heart Institute. Citywide chapters of Kindervelt are supporting the Neurodevelopmental Educational Center to provided targeted individualized care to meet all of a child’s needs and prepare them for their best future. Kate Moody, Denise Rainero, Shelley Reddy and Debbie Young were recognized for their 20 years of membership while Sue Crosby, Kathy Ross (Market chair) and

PROVIDED

Kindervelt 22 board members Sue Crosby (2014-2015 Market Chairman), Kathy Ross and Kristen Rose (2015-16 Market co-chairmen).

Kristen Ross (Market chair) were inducted to the Board of Trustees for Kindervelt. KV 22 meets monthly, September-May, and is open to women from the Montgomery and surrounding areas who have

an interest in supporting Children’s Hospital Medical Center. Kindervelt is derived from the German language and translates as “children’s world” and has been supporting CHMC since 1973.

PROVIDED

Kindervelt 22 members at the city-wide annual dinner: Bonnie Finn, Debbie Young, Stephanie Janssen, Sue Crosby, Amy Rosenberg, Denise Rainero, Kathy Ross, Connie Bergen, Kristen Rose and Shelley Reddy.

Hyde Park Baptist Church Michigan & Erie Ave

513-321-5856 Bill Rillo, Pastor Sunday Worship Services: 11:00am & 6:00pm Sunday School: 9:45am Wednesday Bible Study: 7:00pm www.hydeparkbaptistchurch.org

CALVARY ALLIANCE CHURCH

986 Nordyke Road - 45255 (513) 474-4954

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SUNDAY MORNINGS 8:30 a.m. and 11:00 a.m. Traditional Worship 9:30 a.m. Contemporary Worship 9:30 a.m. and 11:00 a.m. Sunday School

calvaryalliancechurch.org (Cherry Grove turn off Beechmont at Beechmont Toyota)

Sunday Worship Times: 9:00 am Classic/Traditional 11:00 am Contemporary

Nursery care at all services. 8221 Miami Road

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First Church of Christ, Scientist 3035 Erie Ave 871-0245 Sunday Service and Sunday School 10:30am Wednesday Testimonial Meeting 7:30pm Reading Room 3035 Erie Ave

Experience the Light and Sound of God You are invited to the Community HU Song

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ECK Worship Service 11:00 am - Noon Second Sunday of Each Month Anderson Center Station 7832 Five Mile Road Cincinnati, OH 45230 1-800-LOVE GOD www.Eckankar.org Local (513) 674-7001 www.ECK-Ohio.org

Come, connect, grow & serve

2010 Wolfangel Rd., Anderson Twp. 513-231-4301 Sunday Worship: 9:00 & 10:15 AM with

Childrens Ministry & Nursery PASTOR MARIE SMITH

www.cloughchurch.org

CHURCH OF THE SAVIOUR 8005 Pfeiffer Rd. Montgomery 791-3142

WWW.COS-UMC.ORG Traditional Worship 8:20AM & 11:00AM Contemporary Worship 9:40am Sunday School (All ages) 9:40 & 11AM Nursery Care Provided Reverend Jennifer Lucas, Senior Pastor

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Kindervelt 22 20-year members Denise Rainero, Debbie Young and Shelley Reddy. Not pictured, Kate Moody.

CINCINNATI • SAWYER POINT • SATURDAY, NOV. 7

Sharonville United Methodist Traditional worship services at 8:15am & 11:00am Contemporary worship service at 9:30am Faith development opportunities for all ages!

3751 Creek Rd.

513-563-0117

www.sharonville-umc.org

2 Traditional Worship Services in our Newly Renovated Sanctuary TRADITIONAL WORSHIP SUNDAY 8:15 & 11:00

Sunday 8:30 & 11 am 3 Contemporary Worship Services CONTEMPORARY WORSHIP in our Contemporary Worship Center SATURDAY9:30 & SUNDAY Sunday 11 am 5:30

Connections Christian Church 7421 East Galbraith Cincinnati, OH 45243

Phone: 513-791-8348 • Fax: 513-791-5648

Jeff Hill • Minister

www.connectionscc.org Worship Service 10:30am Sunday School 9:15 am

9:30 & 11:00

Children’s programs and nursery & toddler care available at 9:30 and 11:00 services. Plenty of Parking behind church.

7515 Forest Road Cincinnati, OH 45255 513-231-4172 • www.andersonhillsumc.org

Sunday 9:00 & 11:00 a.m. 11020 S. Lebanon Road. 683-1556 www.golovelive.com

Epiphany United Methodist Church Welcomes You! Weekend Services: Saturday: 5pm Sunday: 9am and 10:30am

3850 E. Galbraith, Deer Park Next to Dillonvale Shopping Ctr www.TrinityCincinnati.org 791-7631 Worship Service - 10:00AM Sunday School - 10:15AM Pastor Cathy Kaminski EVANGELICAL COMMUNITY CHURCH

Sunday School Hour (for all ages) 9:15 - 10:15am Worship Service - 10:30 to 11:45am (Childcare provided for infants/ toddlers) Pastor: Rich Lanning Church: 2191 Struble Rd Office: 2192 Springdale Rd

542-9025

Visitors Welcome www.eccfellowship.org

Child care and Christian Education for all ages available throughout the weekend. Rev. Brian K.Swisher, Brown, Senior Pastor Pastor Dr. Stephen

6635 Loveland-Miamiville Rd. 45140 (513) 677-9866 www.Epiphanyumc.org

Building Homes Relationships & Families Sundays 9:15am & 10:45am

MADEIRA-SILVERWOOD PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 8000 Miami Ave. 513-791-4470 www.madeirachurch.org Sunday Worship 9:00 am - Contemporary Service 10:00am Educational Hour 11:00 am - Traditional Service LOVELAND PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

A Loving, Praying, Caring Church Join us for Sunday Services Sunday School .........9:15 - 10:00am Worship Service .....10:30 - 11:30am Fellowship ........................... 11:30am 360 Robin Av (off Oak St) Loveland OH

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LIFE

OCTOBER 29, 2015 • INDIAN HILL JOURNAL • 5B

RELIGION Armstrong Chapel Methodist Church Members and guests have three choices for Sunday morning services – 8:20 a.m. Old Chapel Worship includes traditional hymns, praise songs and message; 9:40 a.m. Classic Worship in the Sanctuary with pipe organ, hymns and chancel choir singing classic anthems; and 11:11 a.m. faith infusion contemporary service in the Worship Center with the Infused Praise Band leading contemporary music and using audio-visual technology. Nursery is available at 9:40 a.m. and 11:11 a.m. services for children ages three months to two years. The church provides Sunday school for children ages 2 to sixth-grade and for youth in seventh- through 12th-grades at the 9:40 a.m service. Armstrong Chapel is at 5125 Drake Road, Indian Hill; 5614220; www.armstrongchapel. org.

Ascension Lutheran Church The Adult Forum is looking at how we see God at work in our congregation and what we can offer to our community and the world. The series is based on a study authored by ELCA Bishop Elizabeth Eaton, and is offered at 9 a.m. Sundays. All are welcome. Healing Christ (healing touch) Ministry is offered at 7 p.m. on the fourth Tuesday of the month. More information on this ministry is available at

793-3288. Ascension collected 56 bags of food to celebrate National ELCA “God’s work. Our hands” day. The food was delivered to NEEDS. Sunday worship is at 8 a.m. and 10:15 a.m. Sunday school for all ages is 9 a.m. The 8 a.m. worship is a small, quiet and simple worship service in the Lutheran tradition. The 10:15 a.m. worship is in a variety of styles, from contemporary to traditional. Lyrics and portions of the service are projected for all to follow along easily. A children’s message is offered every Sunday. The church is at 7333 Pfeiffer Road, Montgomery; 793-3288; www.ascensionlutheranchurch.com.

Cincinnati Friends Meeting - Quaker Regular worship is 11 a.m. Sundays followed by fellowship in the Fireside room at noon. First day/nursery school is available. The Meetinghouse is at 8075 Keller Road, Cincinnati; 7910788; cincinnatifriends.org.

Madeira Silverwood Presbyterian Church The church is presenting “The Art of Marriage,” a multi-week course. Visit madeirachurch.org. The church is at 8000 Miami Ave., Madeira; 791-4470.

St. Barnabas Episcopal Church SMART Recovery Group meets at 6 p.m., Mondays in the library.

Visit www.smartcincy.com. Tai Chi is offered from 6-8 p.m. Mondays, and 4-6 p.m. Wednesdays. Men’s breakfast group meets at 8:30 a.m. Wednesday mornings at Steak N Shake in Montgomery. Ladies fellowship/religious study group meets at 10 a.m. Tuesdays at the church. Collection of soccer supplies for elementary school in Belize is under way. (Soccer shoes sizes 5-9, shin guards and soccer balls.) Education Ministry is 10 a.m. (grades 3-6) and 11 a.m. (grades seven to 12). Regular service times are at 8 a.m. with spoken Eucharist and 10 a.m. with Sunday School and child care. The church is at 10345 Montgomery Road, Montgomery; 984-8401; www.st-barnabas.org.

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St. Paul Community United Methodist Church Worship times are 8:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. (traditional) and 9:30 a.m. (contemporary). Come to the choir room at 10:30 a.m. to join the summer choir any Sunday morning. The church is at 8221 Miami Road, Madeira; 891-8181; www.stpaulcumc.org.

Call (513)421-CARE to schedule a free pickup or go to www.svdpcincinnati.org/Give_Help for more information.

SonRise Church SonRise Church is announcing the launch of a Celebrate Recovery ministry group. The church is at 8136 Wooster Pike; 576-6000.

REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS Indian Hill

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ABOUT REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS Information is provided as a public service by the office of Hamilton County Auditor Dusty Rhodes. Neighborhood designations are approximate.

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LIFE

6B • INDIAN HILL JOURNAL • OCTOBER 29, 2015

Collection of free materials available to artists, educators As part of a continued community recycling initiative, ZEROlandfill Cincinnati invites local artist, educators, students and recyclers to a specified location to take discontinued design samples/materials that can be used for various projects. has ZEROlandfill “Drop Off Days” on Fridays where it accepts donations, and “Take Away Days” on Saturdays for all teachers, artists, students, individuals, etc... to come and re-purpose what they want. Architecture and design firms, along with

manufacturer’s reps are joining forces to donate expired materials from their libraries. Items such as carpet tiles, upholstery swatches, ceramic tiles, plastic laminates, paint wallcovering chips, books, metal samples and three ring binders are available. All items are free, and there is no limit to how much any one person can take. ZEROlandfill is a volunteer based communitywide program designed to divert waste from the local landfills and promote re-purposing of unused materials. The program

started in 2008 and over that time has diverted over 192,000 pounds from the landfills to date. Below are some projects that our materials have been used for: » Laminates used to make for bags, sold to benefit the troops. » Tile for mosaic floor in kitchen. » Tile and wallcovering used to make necklaces. » Fabrics used to make purses, clothing, and pillows and more. » Metal used for a See MATERIALS, Page 7B

BUSINESS UPDATE JIM OWCZARSKI & PAUL DEHNER JR. Bengals Columnist

Sports are more than just games - they’re pillars of a city’s culture, and the people who play them are a source of a pride. They are people with great stories, Jim Owczarski and Paul Dehner Jr. share them by bringing you out of the stadium and into their lives. LET’S CONNECT: @JimOwczarski @pauldehnerjr

Mercy opens anticoagulation clinics Indian Hill resident Elizabeth Armitage of Merrill Lynch’s Knowles, Armitage & Lucus Group, has been recognized by .REP magazine as one of its 2015’s “Top 50 Wire-

house Women.” Armitage is a senior vice president, PIA program senior portfolio manager and certified financial planner for the Merrill Lynch group. The .REP annual award ranks wealth managers on total assets managed at warehouse. Wire-

houses are non-independent brokers working for firms with multiple branches such as Merrill Lynch. Armitage earned a bachelor’s degree in economics from Smith College and began her career at Merrill Lynch in 1983.

POLICE REPORTS INDIAN HILL Incidents/investigations Drugs Marijuana located in vehicle at traffic stop at area of Kugler Mill and Camargo, Oct. 1. Information Male reported selling meat door to door at 8700 block of Blome Road, Oct. 5. Vehicle struck metal object in roadway at area of Shawnee Run and Wyman, Oct. 8.

Theft Unauthorized use of credit card info at 5400 block of Miami Road, Oct. 8.

Trespassing Juveniles trespassing on property at 8600 block of Keller Road, Oct. 10.

ABOUT POLICE REPORTS Community Press publishes incident records provided by local police departments. All reports published are public records. To contact your local police department: » Indian Hill Rangers, 561-7000

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LIFE

OCTOBER 29, 2015 • INDIAN HILL JOURNAL • 7B

ProKids calls on friends of children to create difference for foster children ProKids Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA volunteers) make things happen behind the scenes. They advocate for abused and neglected children who are in the foster care system and work to help them have permanent and nurturing homes. ProKids Recently, brought CASA Volunteer Lori Feldman center stage before more than 600 guests at the annual of Children Friends Breakfast at the Cintas Center. Telling the story of a young mother who recovered from her drug-addicted past to be reunited with her daughter, Feldman of Green Township was the face of the community effort of ProKids. Board President Tom Cuni of Madeira, former board member and current CASA volunteer Dick Paulsen of Hyde Park, and TD Hughes of North Bend called on the group to support Cincinnati’s most vulnerable children with donations and volunteer time. “ProKids works,” Paulsen said. “It works because it focuses on a critical need that is often overlooked in our community: abused and neglected children need our help in order to have a different future.” Cuni said he began working with ProKids when the 33-year-old agency “showed me how to impact the lives of children who desperately need help so they can have something as fundamental as a safe place in which to live and grow.” Hughes, a former

Materials Continued from Page 6B

moveable magnetic sculpture installation at the 2012 Midpoint Music

PHOTOS THANKS TO JULIE KEMBLE BORTHS

Andy Black of Indian Hill catches up with Troy Burt of Anderson Township at the ProKids Breakfast.

Two CASA volunteers catch up - Wyndall Wyatt of Evendale and Denny Burger of Indian Hill.

board member, said “all children deserve a home… that comforts them and launches them into adulthood, adults who don’t let them down.” ProKids Executive Director Tracy Cook of Clifton also spoke. In her remarks she spoke of the baby girls who recently were killed in Cincinnati. “It is painful and heartbreaking to see this tragic news. But the truth is we are not helpless. We have power,” she said. “Our urgent goal is to get the community’s help to all the children in need. Reaching this vision means breaking a cycle of abuse and neglect that has

Box Festival/Artworks Truck Carnival. » Binders for reuse. » Carpet squares for daycare centers, cat owners and personal use to carpet floors. » Wallcovering for

Ralph Lee chairing United Way campaign in Eastern Area West Chester resident Ralph Lee, human resource vice president, Total Quality Logistics, is chairing the 2015 United Way of Greater Cincinnati – Eastern Area Campaign. Lee, who is also serving on the cabinet for the regional United Way of Greater Cincinnati campaign, has recruited his Eastern Area Campaign Cabinet and begun meeting with Brown and Clermont county business and community leaders. He and the cabinet members are focusing on engaging more companies and increasing the number of donors in the community. The results will help create lasting change for all in Brown and Clermont counties in the areas of Education, Income and Health. Lee received a bachelor of science in business management from Xavier University and attended Booth School of Busi-

Just before the ProKids Breakfast, Andy Black of Indian Hill joined ProKids Board Member Chip Turner and Bill DeCamp, both of Mariemont.

ness at the University of Chicago. Eastern Area Campaign cabinet members: Anderson Township: Matt Van Sant, president, Clermont County Chamber of Commerce. Georgetown: Margery Paeltz, emergency response coordinator, Brown County Health Department. Indian Hill: Stewart Greenlee, president, Center Bank. Liberty Township: Andy McCreanor, CEO, Access Business Development & Finance Inc. Newtonsville: Warren Walker, Cincinnati Area district manager, Community & Government Relations, Duke Energy. Pierce Township: David Gooch, president, Park National Bank; Jeff Graham, president, Mercy Health East-Market. Learn more about how you can give to United Way at www.uwgc.org.

spanned generations and create a new cycle of growing up safe and confident.” Clips of the stories the speakers shared and more details are at www.prokids.org. ProKids envisions a safe, permanent and nurturing home for every child. As a nonprofit organization in Hamilton County, Ohio, that mobilizes the community by training and supporting volunteers who break the vicious cycle of child abuse and neglect. ProKids Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA volunteers) speak up for abused and neglected children, guiding them to safe environments where they can thrive. For more than 30 years, ProKids has changed the arc of children's lives through engaged volunteers, a proactive staff and a Committed Community. We work to create a new cycle of growing up safe and secure, fundamentally changing the future for children and for Greater Cincinnati. Find out more at www.prokids.org.

wall art in a kid’s room. If you would like to get involved, volunteer or learn more details about this year’s program, email infozerolandfillcincy@gmail.com.

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LIFE

8B • INDIAN HILL JOURNAL • OCTOBER 29, 2015

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE

ANSWERS ON PAGE 6A

No. 1025 HALLOWEEN COSTUMES

1

BY BILL ZAIS / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ

109 Singer Falana and others 1 Church leaders 110 ____ mission 63 Fender product 7 Torn asunder 111 Snares 15 In sufficient quantity 64 Winter Olympics event 113 Caviar 20 Collier’s transport 65 Who said, “In waking 115 The George W. Bush 21 Fact addition a tiger, use a long years, e.g. 22 “Truly” stick” 116 Stimpy’s TV pal 23 Halloween costume 66 Eastern sch. with a 117 Be unsatisfied with, for … a CNN noted film program say anchor? 67 Tuition, e.g. 119 Ancient Hebrew 25 Net results? liquid measure 68 Longtime Chicago 26 Three times daily, in Symphony 120 Insouciant syllables Rx’s conductor 122 … a pop-folk singer 27 Yiddish cries with numerous 1970s 71 One of three for 28 Scand. country hits? J. R. R. Tolkien: 29 Bank abbr. Abbr. 128 Gutter locales 31 Side dish that’s 73 “Tush!” 129 Majority sometimes mashed 75 Aspects 130 “Time heals all 32 “Do we have wounds” and others 77 ____ fault approval?” 131 Forecast that might 78 Goose egg 35 Misdeed call for gloves and 80 Sports org. with galoshes 36 Is a buttinsky 25-Across 132 Tied 38 7-5, e.g. 82 Resembles 133 Like a pirate’s 39 … a former week-old flowers, treasure “Dateline” host? say 46 No one says his art 84 Hotel capacity: Abbr. DOW N was pointless 85 … an old Notre Dame 1 One of two at a 48 Head, for short basketball coach? wedding 49 “Lord, We Ask Thee 91 Doing 2 Wrath ____ We Part” 93 Cry of surprise 3 You can’t predict the (hymn) weather with this 94 Like the expression 50 Turbaned sort “Sakes alive!” 4 Do really well on a test 51 Beehive hairstyle, e.g. 95 Execute perfectly 5 Spreadsheet 52 Brewer Coors input 96 Eponym of a hot- dog 55 Info for an airport 6 Theater sign chain run 98 Letters before many 7 Doubtful 57 “Cómo ____ usted?” a state’s name 8 Cribbage one-pointers 101 Mil. authority Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more 102 First-aid supply 9 One running races for than 4,000 past puzzles, a living? nytimes.com/crosswords 104 … a silent film star? 10 “True” ($39.95 a year). 108 It never goes off AC R OS S

58 … a onetime House speaker?

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11 Lace 12 Con man 13 When the French toast? 14 Figure above God’s throne, in Isaiah 15 How a phone may be slammed down 16 ____ juice (milk) 17 Doesn’t take any chances 18 Actress Kedrova who won an Oscar for “Zorba the Greek” 19 Polite rural reply 24 Impend 30 Position of greatest importance 32 Children, in legalese 33 Like ooze 34 Scored between 90 and 100, say 37 Besides 40 Cool, as soup 41 Hard labor spot 42 Common sitcom rating 43 Equal 44 Coal extractors 45 Vistas 47 Sleep on it 53 Noted remover of locks 54 “Run to ____” (1961 hit) 56 Petty braggart 59 Summer romance, maybe 60 Carpet fuzz 61 Comment made with a handshake 62 “Be that way!”

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86 The “V” of R.S.V.P. 87 Slimy stuff 88 Flopped 89 Maxim tear-out 90 Winter Olympics equipment 92 Too, too 97 Start of a rationalization 99 Attic function

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100 Like some Roman aphorisms

117 Sauce brand since 1937 118 Conference USA sch. 103 Out of action, in 121 Actor Marvin baseball lingo 123 Book after Exodus: 105 Functional Abbr. 106 Really get to 124 Guy whose face might get slapped 107 Tic-tac-toe starters? 125 Mai ____ 112 Coke, to Pepsi 126 Gamer’s prefix with 113 Hwys. pets 114 Mouthy? 127 Retired boomer

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68 Like Christmas lights 69 Tuba sound 70 Party straggler 72 Religious deg. 74 Tater Tots maker 76 “Where should ____ the check?” 79 Cell part 81 Water, e.g.: Abbr. 83 “Trick” or “treat,” e.g.

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Indian hill journal 102815  
Indian hill journal 102815