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INDIAN HILL

JOURNAL

Your Community Press newspaper serving Indian Hill 75¢

THURSDAY, MAY 29, 2014

BECAUSE COMMUNITY MATTERS

Country Day Grade A Graduates stand out in leadership roles This is our salute to members of the Class of 2014 – those graduating seniors with a unique story to tell. We call them our Grade A Graduates.

Lenchitz is leader in marching band

Cincinnati Country Day School senior Ishan Ghildyal served as a peer mentor at the school. He is also active in the school’s theater productions. By Forrest Sellers fsellers@communitypress.com

Cincinnati Country Day School senior Ishan Ghildyal has helped guide students throughout the year. He was a peer mentor at the school, serving as both a teacher and what he calls “a big brother” for students in the freshmen class. “I really liked the kids I helped this year,” said Ghildyal, who is a resident of Kenwood. Ghildyal moved to the area from New Orleans after his family’s home was damaged during Hurricane Katrina in 2005. He plans to return to New Orleans after graduating. He will attend Tulane University, which is located there. Since eighth-grade, Ghildyal has performed in every musical at the school. He recently played the lead in “All Shook Up.” “It was a good way to spend my winters,” he said about the productions. “I never thought I’d do five musicals.” This past November, Ghildyal and classmate Matt Valido spearheaded “Movember” fundraisers at the school to raise awareness of men’s health issues. Ghildyal plans to study business and psychology at Tulane University.

Indian Hill High School senior Jordan Lenchitz’s early exposure to music led to a leadership role. Lenchitz, who is a resident of Sycamore Township, is a section leader for the school’s marching band. He also taught Advanced Placement music theory at the school. Lenchitz started playing the piano at age 6, adding that he was inspired by his aunt’s expertise at the piano while growing up. Lenchitz also played the flute adding that his great-uncle, who was a conductor for the San Francisco Symphony, was a role model for him. He said his musical background helped when he joined the marching band, adding that he welcomed the opportunity to provide “moral support” to students less familiar with playing instruments. Lenchitz plays the synthesizer in the marching band. “I like getting people as excited about music as I am,” he said. “I like to immerse them in the music.” Lenchitz’s involvement with music will continue after graduation. He plans to attend Indiana University, where he will study music composition and mathematics.

Indian Hill High School senior Jordan Lenchitz plays the synthesizer in the school's marching band. He is also a section leader in the band. PHOTOS BY FORREST SELLERS/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Cincinnati Country Day School senior Evelyn Nkooyooyo was senior class president. She helped co-organize the school’s Relay for Life event and was a Breakthrough Cincinnati teacher.

Nkooyooyo calls experience ‘a privilege’ Cincinnati Country Day School senior Evelyn Nkooyooyo said her years at Country Day have been “a precious privilege.” “I don’t think I’d want to go to school anywhere else,” she said. Nkooyooyo, who is a resident of Deer Park, served as senior class president and has been involved in numerous activities. She helped organize the school’s Relay for Life, saying she “wanted to join something that was a great cause.” Nkooyooyo was also a teacher for Breakthrough Cincinnati, an academic enrichment program that provides opportunities for middle school students. As a sixth-grader at Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy, she had attended the program years earlier. “It set a foundation for my learning (and) encouraged me to use the skills I learned,” she said, adding that it was nice to be “on the other side of the desk.” With her family, Nkooyooyo also formed a Luganda Club, which focuses on the language and culture of Uganda. She received honorable mention in the competition for the Mamie Earl Sells Scholarship awarded by the YWCA of Greater Cincinnati. Nkooyooyo will attend Grinnell College, where she plans to study global development and economics.

Indian Hill mulls new firehouse By Jeanne Houck jhouck@communitypress.com

Madeira is backing a proposal to rebuild firehouses in its city and Indian Hill, but the village continues to study the proposal. “We are still in the early stages of our due diligence,” Dina Minneci, Indian Hill city manager, said recently. “There is still much research regarding whether to rebuild or rehab, and if we do rebuild or rehab, how to effectively and responsibly pay for it. “This is a complex issue with several different options that requires much more forethought and information-gathering.” The Madeira & Indian Hill Joint Fire District board of trustees is recommending the fire stations be rebuilt at their current

sites for a total cost of up to $7.5 million. The recommendation is based on a study of the physical conditions, code compliance and functionality of the stations conducted by MSA Architects, which has an office in downtown Cincinnati. The joint fire district trustees discussed their recommendation to rebuild the firehouses at a meeting May 7 with members of Indian Hill Village and Madeira City councils, who said they would try to give the trustees an answer in about a month. But on May 12, Madeira City Council voted to support rebuilding the Indian Hill and Madeira firehouses. “We really need to look at this as a dual community situation and do what is best for the entire

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fire district,” Madeira Mayor Mike Steur said. Madeira City Council members are unsure how they would fund a new firehouse, but say a bond levy is one option. MSA Architects estimated these costs for the following options for the firehouses: » $1.8 million to $2 million to renovate the Indian Hill firehouse at 6475 Drake Road and $3.7 million to $4 million to rebuild it. » $1.5 million to $1.6 million to renovate the Madeira firehouse at 7205 Miami Ave. and $3.3 million to $3.5 million to rebuild it. » $5.8 million to $6.1 million to build a central firehouse. Want to know more about what is happening in Indian Hill? Follow me on Twitter @jeannehouck.

Officials are deciding whether to rebuild the Indian Hill firehouse. JEANNE HOUCK/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

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Vol. 15 No. 50 © 2014 The Community Recorder ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


NEWS

A2 • INDIAN HILL JOURNAL • MAY 29, 2014

Dever officially wins House GOP race By Marika Lee

Index

mlee1@communitypress.com

Calendar .................B2 Classifieds ................C Food ......................B3 Life ........................B1 Police .................... B7 Schools ..................A6 Sports ....................A8 Viewpoints ............A10

The results remain the same as predicted in the Ohio House 28th District GOP primary between Madeira lawyer and businessman Jonathan Dever and Blue Ash City Councilman Rick Bryan.

INDIAN HILL

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Find news and information from your community on the Web Indian Hill • cincinnati.com/indianhill Hamilton County • cincinnati.com/hamiltoncounty

News

Richard Maloney Editor ..................248-7134, rmaloney@communitypress.com Jeanne Houck Reporter ...................248-7129, jhouck@communitypress.com Forrest Sellers Reporter ..................248-7680, fsellers@communitypress.com Melanie Laughman Sports Editor .......248-7573, mlaughman@communitypress.com Nick Dudukovich Sports Reporter .......248-7570, ndudukovich@communitypress.com Scott Springer Sports Reporter ..........576-8255, sspringer@communitypress.com

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Dever will the Republican candidate on the Nov. 4 ballot. The Hamilton County Board of Elections posted official results May 21. Dever received 3,284 votes, or 45.94 percent, and Bryan received 3,218 votes, or 45.01 percent; Dever won by 66 votes. A third candidate, Kimberly Angel Clark, received 9 percent of the vote. Dever will take on Democrat Micah Kamrass, of Blue Ash, who was

Bryan

Dever

unopposed in the primary. Unofficial results on May 6 had Dever receiving 79 more votes than Bryan. “I am very proud of the positive campaign that my team ran for over a year. It was a year that we

were done in by low voter turnout and a strong negative campaign,” Bryan said. Bryan said he is glad he still has 18 months to serve the people of Blue Ash as a councilman. He said his team will assess were his political career will go after his term is up. Dever could not be reached for comment. The results remained unofficial until Wednesday because the Hamilton County Board of Election

Madisonville bridge creates problem for drivers By Forrest Sellers

Improvements at the Madison and Kenwood road intersection will be part of an open house format meeting on Wednesday, May 28, at the Madisonville Recreation Center. Clearance under the bridge at that location has been an issue for some truck drivers. FORREST

fsellers@communitypress.com

MADISONVILLE — Several business owners don’t see why the city is considering a change at the Madison and Kenwood road intersection. The Cincinnati Department of Transportation and Engineering will hold a meeting to discuss improvements at that location. The meeting will be from 5 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 28, at the Madisonville Recrea-

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SELLERS/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

tion Center, 5320 Stewart Ave. It will be in an open house format with displays illustrating some of the proposed changes. Transportation representatives will also be available to answer questions. Among the proposed changes are finding alternatives to a clearance issue involving the bridge. “It’s a safety issue,” said Andrea Henderson, a project manager for the Department of Transportation. A number of trucks have crashed into the bridge because of insufficient clearance, she said. From the roadway to the bottom of the bridge, there is about 12 feet of clearance, she said. Ideally, this clearance should be more than 14 feet, according to Henderson.

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A few options under consideration are lowering the road, replacing the bridge or raising the structure. Additionally, the meeting will focus on safety issues at the intersection of Stafford Street and Madison Road. Expansion of the sidewalks at that location is also under consideration. Henderson said people with strollers as well as individuals in wheelchairs have had difficulties navigating the sidewalks, especially with poles, benches and trash receptacles obstructing what is already a somewhat narrow path. “The whole point (of the meeting) is to get feedback and share information,” Henderson said. “People can make suggestions on how they would like to see (this) implemented.” For some, though, not doing anything with the bridge is a preferred option. “I don’t see the necessity of lowering the road,” said Ann Overbeck, co-owner of Overbeck Auto Services. “It doesn’t happen that often,” she said about accidents involving the bridge.

ROAD IMPROVEMENT MEETING When: 5 to 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 28. Where: Madisonville Recreation Center, 5320 Stewart Ave.

“There are alternate routes.” Overbeck said it’s more an issue of drivers not paying attention to the signage indicating the bridge clearance. Monti Deluca, owner of the Luxury Motor Co., said he does not consider it a big issue either. “It’s not a commercial area,” he said. Deluca said he considers the project an unnecessary expense. Both businesses are in close proximity to the bridge. Henderson said trucks hitting the bridge has been a “consistent” problem, though, and that some solution is needed. According to the Department of Transportation and Engineering, more than five crashes a year have involved a vehicle hitting the bridge. She said the earliest any changes would be implemented is 2017.

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had to count votes cast by 17-year-olds who will be18 by the November election, provisional ballots cast by voters whose eligibility was questioned by poll workers, and damaged ballots that could not be counted by automatic scanning. Dever and Kamrass will be going against each other in November to replace Rep. Connie Pillich, D-Montgomery, who is leaving the House to challenge State Treasurer Josh Mandel.

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NEWS

A4 • INDIAN HILL JOURNAL • MAY 29, 2014

Road rally coming to East Side neighborhoods By Lisa Wakeland lwakeland@communitypress.com

It’s an area steeped in history with many hidden gems. On May 31 there is a chance to discover some-

thing new in Columbia Tusculum, the East End and Linwood during a scenic road rally. The road rally, which starts at 10 a.m., is like a scavenger hunt mixed with historical facts cen-

tered in the three neighborhoods, said Nick Motz, who owns a business in the East End. “There’s a lot of history down here,” Motz said, “and people who haven’t been down here before

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are going to be amazed at all the things happening in both business and residential (development).” It costs $35 per carload of participants, who will travel through the neighborhoods to collect clues, solve riddles or take pictures at local businesses or historical spots. The race begins with a staggered start at St. Rose Church and ends with an awards ceremony at Eli’s BBQ, both on Riverside Drive. Hugo Tostado, who owns Tostado’s Grill in Columbia Tusculum, said they were looking for an event that would bring all

three neighborhoods together to have fun and attract people who are not familiar with the area. “Part of this is so people know the businesses in the area, the history in this area and all the hard work in the past 10 years that has changed this area,” he said. “A lot of people know this area, but they don’t know the potential we have.”

The road rally is sponsored by the 3 East Business Association, which includes all three neighborhoods. Preregistration available on the Scenic Road Rally website. Day-ofevent registration also available for $45 per car. Want more news from these Cincinnati neighborhoods? Follow Lisa Wakeland on Twitter, @lisawakeland.

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Hugo Tostado, left, and Nick Motz are helping organize the Scenic Road Rally through Columbia Tusculum, the East End and Linwood May 31. LISA WAKELAND/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

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SCHOOLS

A6 • INDIAN HILL JOURNAL • MAY 29, 2014

INDIAN HILL

JOURNAL

Editor: Eric Spangler, espangler@communitypress.com, 576-8251

ACHIEVEMENTS | NEWS | ACTIVITIES | HONORS

CommunityPress.com

Indian Hill Middle School eighth-graders Danny Vanatsky, left, Eli Reising, Kaira Fenix and Gabrielle Salvado helped spur interest in the media center by creating a new collaborative learning area. The area includes new furniture and technology additions. FORREST SELLERS/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Eighth-graders generate interest in media center

Several Indian Hill Middle School students have taken on the role of designer. Eighth-grader Danny Vanatsky, a resident of Montgomery, said he noticed the media center was less active than he’d expect during a typical day. He and other students in the gifted education program brainstormed on ideas to generate interest and bring more students into the center. They submitted a plan for a “collaborative learning area.” “The students were looking for a way to make the media center more student-centered and more of a collaborative work space,” said Principal Josh Kauffman. Last spring the students submitted a proposal that included new furniture, technology additions and even games to stimulate creativity. The improvements cost about $2,500 and were paid for through a grant and PTO dona-

tions. Students began using the learning area in the fall. “We wanted to choose furniture that was easily movable,” said eighth-grader Eli Reising, a resident of Kenwood. The furniture includes a couch, tables and a bean bag chair. Even the lighting and color scheme have been changed to create a friendlier ambiance. Eighth-grader Gabrielle Salvado, who lives in Symmes Township, suggested installing a sound dome that isolates music to a specific area of the room. Salvado said the changes have been welcomed by the students. Not only is the learning area used throughout the day, but teachers have even encouraged their students to take advantage of it. “It feels good we added something to the school that everyone uses and loves,” said eighth-grader Kaira Fenix, of Indian Hill.

Summit sophomore Maddie Amend joins her benefactor, Joseph H. “Jay” Clasgens II, in front of the main altar where a century-old crucifix was rededicated May 4. THANKS TO ROBERT A. FLISCHEL

SUMMIT REDEDICATES

HISTORIC CRUCIFIX

T

he Summit Country Day School rededicated a century-old French crucifix in the Immaculate Heart of Mary Chapel during the school’s annual Campus Day celebration of the arts May 4. The crucifix had been taken down in 2004 for restoration. Green Township sophomore Maddie Amend, with the help of her parents, Kenneth and Maureen, raised and donated funds to cover the costs to reinstall the crucifix. A vocalist with The Summit’s choral group Camerata and a member of the St. Ignatius Loyola parish choir in Montfort Heights, Amend held a fundraising musical performance at the Glass Eye Group recording studio near Indianapolis. The resulting CD of li-

turgical music, called “Songs for my Father,” were a personal gift to her father, Dr. Kenneth Amend, a Cincinnati ophthalmologist. Maddie was inspired to give back to her school community, because she had received The Summit’s Patricia and Joseph H. Clasgens II SBS ’37 Scholarship. During the Easter break, workers carefully constructed a scaffold over the chapel’s towering white Carrara marble altar. The crucifix was returned to the position where it had hung since 1903 when it was donated to The Summit by Fr. Xavier Lasance, the school’s chaplain from 18911924 and a prolific American Catholic writer during the early 20th Century. The signature of renowned Parisian art-

ist Raffl appears on the platform that supports the feet of the statuary corpus. Raffl is known for creating the statuary at the Way of the Cross at Lourdes in France. During the May 4 rededication ceremony, Joseph H. “Jay” Clasgens II of Anderson Township, a 1937 graduate of Summit Boys School, was honored for endowing the scholarship that Maddie received. One of more than 30 named endowed scholarships at The Summit, the Clasgens scholarship is given to qualified students who possess a cheerful, positive spirit, are good friends to others and are leaders who share their God-given talents with others. Amend is one of four students who have received the scholarship since it was established in 2004.

Indian Hill Middle School seventh-graders Kate Marrs, left, and Graham Wyler take advantage of the new collaborative learning area in the media center at the school. New furniture has been added to create a pleasant learning environment. FORREST SELLERS/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

A MARLIN’S FAVORITE

Michael Hill, president of baseball operations for the Miami Marlins, Pat Dunn of Milford, Cincinnati Country Day School English teacher, and Tony Perez, a Big Red Machine member and longtime Marlins special assistant, gather on April 15, Jackie Robinson Day, as Hill honors Dunn as the teacher who has had the most impact on him. Hill is a 1989 Country Day graduate. The team has launched a program that provides an opportunity for Marlins employees and fans to honor teachers who have impacted their lives. THANKS TO CINDY KRANZ


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MAY 29, 2014 • INDIAN HILL JOURNAL • A7

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Carpets & Floors


SPORTS

A8 • INDIAN HILL JOURNAL • MAY 29, 2014

Editor: Melanie Laughman, mlaughman@communitypress.com, 513-248-7573

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | RECREATIONAL

INDIAN HILL

JOURNAL

CommunityPress.com

CCD freshman fires Indians into district title game By Mark D. Motz

mmotz@communitypress.com

Indian Hill’s Ted Bolser was selected by the Washington Redskins in the seventh round of the NFL draft. THANKS TO THE NFL/WASHINGTON REDSKINS

TOUCHDOWN TED TO WEAR NFL RED By Scott Springer sspringer@communitypress.com

INDIAN HILL — On May 10, a long Saturday in front of the television was rewarded when 23-year-old Theodore Richard Bolser was summoned to our nation’s capital. “Touchdown Ted,” Indian Hill High School Class of 2009 and recently of the Indiana Hoosiers, was the 217th pick of the NFL draft in the seventh round. His new employer is the Washington Redskins, coached by former Bengals offensive coordinator Jay Gruden. “It was an amazing feeling; it’s one of a kind,” Bolser said of the NFL draft weekend. At 6-foot-6 and 248 pounds, Bolser caught 34 passes for 320 yards and six touchdowns at Indiana last fall. Over his career, he had 117 grabs for 1,337 yards and 15 trips to the endzone. In watching Bolser, the Redskins coach (in typical Gruden family style) had a creative description for the player from his previous hometown. “He called me a ‘War Daddy’ as I was running down covering the kick-off,” Bolser said. Bolser actually played at the Redskins’ stadium during his college career and is hoping to snare some passes at FedEx Field in addition to headhunting on kick coverages. “I’m planning on that,” Bolser said. “I love special teams. I love tackling. I used to play defense. I played linebacker all through growing up. I love hitting.” The three-year letter win-

INDIAN HILL — The best stuff never gets in the paper. Nor should it, usually. A lot of things drifted out from the Cincinnati Country Day baseball dugout during an extended weather delay in the Division IV sectional championship game May 21. Only one of them will the gentle readers of this family publication find here. Freshman Domenick Doane. Unbeknownst to him at the time, Doane had finished pitching for the day, having allowed New Miami just one hit - a fourth-inning bloop that dropped just out of the reach of the second baseman in shallow right field - and one unearned run over five innings to give the Indians a 2-1 lead. (Weather forced the game to be finished May 22. CCD tacked on two runs in the bottom of the fifth to win 4-1and advance to the district title game.) Doane said he wasn’t phased by the opportunity to pitch for a sectional crown as a freshman. “No pressure,” he said. “I think I’m good enough to go out there and compete at this level. It feels really go to go out and do this for my team.” CCD head coach Tim Dunn said he had a little more apprehension, but not much based on what his freshman class has done all season. “You say ‘trust a freshman’ to pitch in that situation. Nope,” he said with a grin. “But you put them out there anyway and

hope for the best. Domenick did a very good job for us today.” Doane and classmate Charlie Sachs - who owns a 5-1 - are just two of five freshman who start for CCD on any given day. They’re starting to mirror juniors Cam Alldred and Austin Richey, a duo Dunn described earlier in the season as “aces 1 and 1A” on the mound. Richey, however, injured his ACL a little past the midpoint in the regular season, giving Doane his chance to shine. “We’re ranked No. 4 in the state, but that’s probably a little inflated,” Dunn said. “They think we still have Richey. Good as he is on the mound, we really miss his bat. But we’ll have all four pitchers back next year. With two premiere pitchers you can go a long way. With four, you can be pretty special.” Doane began playing baseball in kindergarten, starting out as a third baseman and center fielder. He took up pitching in seventh grade and already has a fastball clocked in the low 80 mile-per-hour range. He throws a curve which he said “is different every day. Sometimes it’s a 12-6 and sometimes its more breaking over across the plate.” Doane works with former Cincinnati Reds rookie of the year Scott Williamson, trying to learn consistency with the curve and to add a sinker to his arsenal. CCD faced Tri-Village High School for the Division IV district title May 23 after early holiday deadlines. Visit www.cincinnati.com/preps.

Shown when he was a freshman, Indiana tight end Ted Bolser (83) against the Iowa Hawkeyes. The Indian Hill native set an IU freshman tight end record for touchdowns, receptions and receiving yards. THANKS TO ALAN PETERSIME

ner at Indian Hill in football, basketball and lacrosse had a stellar run back in the Kevin Siple days. As a sophomore, he caught 38 passes, upped it to 68 his junior season and added 63 more his senior season. He feels fortunate to be going to a pass-happy offense like Gruden’s. Recruited as a wide receiver by Indiana, Bolser was the proverbial “good hands man” for the Hoosiers. “I’m going to go get it wherever it’s at,” Bolser said. “They

used me for short yardage last year. I was like a fourth wide receiver. I caught a decent amount of balls, soaked it all in and loved every bit of it.” Bolser was home for the draft, having watched it at agent Jimmy Gould’s Indian Hill home. His parents, Toni and Tom, live in Hyde Park and his grandparents/uncles live in Delhi Township. He’s now in Washington, mastering the D.C. Metro and lobbying for some playing time.

Cincinnati Country Day freshman Domenick Doane throws against New Miami in the Division IV sectional title game May 21. He allowed only one hit and an unearned run through five innings of a 2-1 game before rain postponed the finish. MARK D. MOTZ/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

PRESS PREPS HIGHLIGHTS By Scott Springer and Mark D. Motz sspringer@communitypress.com mmotz@communitypress.com

Baseball

» Cincinnati Country Day beat Aiken 4-3 in the Division IV sectional tourney May 17. The Indians advanced to face New Miami in the sectional, winning 4-1 in a game begun May 21, postponed by weather and completed May 22. CCD played in the district title game May 23 against Tri-Village High School after early holiday deadlines.. » Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy beat East Clinton 10-0 May 16 in the first round of the Division III sectional tournament play behind Cam Varga’s fourth no-hit pitching performance of the season. The Eagles beat Clermont Northeastern 8-0 May 21 to take the sectional title

and advanced to the district championship against Versailles May 23 after early holiday deadlines. » In the Division I sectional at Schuler Park, Moeller beat Walnut Hills 9-4 May 17. Senior Zach Logue struck out eight for the win and junior Bryan Soth was 2-3 with a triple and three runs batted in. In the DI sectional final at Sycamore May 22, Moeller beat Loveland 2-1 on Jordan Ramey’s pinch double and a two-base error. Logue went the distance for the Crusaders. » For results, please visit www.cincinnati.com/preps.

Softball

» Indian Hill lost in the Division II sectional final at Deer Park to Ross, 10-0 May 20. The Lady Braves finished the season 11-14. » Mount Notre Dame lost to

Boys tennis

Senior Katina Calamari has a pre-game discussion with Indian Hill coach Pat Spurlock May 20 at Deer Park. Indian Hill lost to Ross 10-0 in the Division II sectional.

Seton 5-2 in the Division I sectionals May 16. MND ends the season at 12-11. » Ursuline Academy shut out Glen Este 3-0 for the Division

sectional title May 19. The Lions faced Lebanon for the district championship May 23 after early holiday deadlines.

» Cincinnati Country Day freshman J.J. Wolf beat senior teammate Asher Hirsch 6-4, 6-2 for the Division II sectional title May 17. Both advanced to the district tournament and reached the semifinals, qualifying for the state tournament, with the possibility of a rematch in the district championship looming. They were set to play semifinals May 24 after deadline. The CCD doubles teams of Patrick Wildman and Kevin Yu beat teammates Chase Tholke and Shaheel Mitra for the sectional doubles title. Both teams qualified for district competition. Wildman and Yu and advanced to the May 24 semifinals and qualified for the state tournament. » At the Division II sectional See PRESS PREPS, Page A9


SPORTS & RECREATION

MAY 29, 2014 • INDIAN HILL JOURNAL • A9

PRESS PREPS HIGHLIGHTS Continued from Page A8

at Camargo Racquet Club May 17, Indian Hill sophomore Alex Warstler made it to the semifinals and took third place defeating his opponent from Clark Montessori. Both Braves doubles teams made the semis with senior Ian Mandybur/junior Graydon Cowan beating seniors Trevor Cohen/Gibran Chaudhry 6-3, 7-6 for third place. In a regular season match May 19, Indian Hill beat Seven Hills 3-2. Warstler and freshman Milan Bhandari won singles. At the Division II district tournament May 22, Warstler made it to the semifinals to earn a second straight state appearance.

Cincinnati Country Day freshman Kevin Yu, left, and senior Patrick Wildman share a laugh and a low-five after winning a point during their opening round match of the Division II district tournament May 22 at the Lindner Family Tennis Center. TOM SKEEN/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

ment May 17, Moeller beat Indian Springs 12-7.

minic Isadore, Hanover College, soccer; Shelley Menifee, Northern Kentucky University, track; Kelsey Zimmers, Murray State University, soccer; J.R. Menifee , Wittenberg University, basketball; Patrick Wildman, Claremont McKenna College, tennis; Carson Aquino, Hanover College, football; Kat Mapes, College of Mount St. Joseph, volleyball and lacrosse; Elijah Engelke, Brown University, rowing; Matt Walton, Wittenberg University, basketball; Katie Barton, Dickinson College, lacrosse; Ashley Streit, University of St. Andrews in Scotland, soccer; and Hanna Gottschalk, Ohio State University, rowing.

Boys volleyball

Catching up

Track and field

» CCD’s Mantero Moreno-Cheek won the Division III boys district title in the discus with a throw of 117 feet and took the shot put with a toss of 46foot-6. Junior Kaitlin Harden and freshman Grace Pettengill finished 1-2 in the girls 800 meters. Pettengill won the 1,600 meters as well. » At the Greater Catholic League Championships May16, Moeller won the 4x200 relay.

Lacrosse

» Moeller defeated Cranbrook on May 17, 1916. David Sturgis had four goals. They won May 22 in the DI tournament over Lakota East, 19-5. » On May 20, Indian Hill girls defeated Columbus Academy 10-5 to advance on to play Summit Country Day in the regional final May 22. The Lady Braves beat Summit 14-9 to advance to the Division II state semifinals at New Albany.

Rugby

» In the state tourna-

Indian Hill sophomore Alexander Warstler hits a shot during his opening round match of the Division II district tournament May 22 at the Lindner Family Tennis Center. TOM SKEEN/COMMUNITY PRESS

» In the Division I regional final at Roger Bacon, Moeller lost to Elder on May 17 to end their season. The Panthers prevailed 16-25, 25-14, 25-16, 25-20.

College signings

» Cincinnati Country Day School announced its athletic signings for 12 seniors May 21, one of the largest groups in CCDS history. They include Do-

» Indian Hill’s Natalie Somerville finished fifth in the 400 meter hurdles for Bowling Green at the Mid-American Conference Championship at Ohio University May 17. Her time of 1:01.08 is the fourth fastest in Bowling green women’s track history. She also ran the second leg of the 4x400 relay that finished eighth and made the podium.

Seven Hills sophomore Georgie Fovel (5) attacks against Sycamore High School junior Stephen Mills (2) during an 8-5 win over the Aviators April 19. THANKS TO SEVEN HILLS

Fovel fires on all cylinders for 7 Hills lax By Mark D. Motz mmotz@communitypress.com

FAIRFAX — Time to dig into the way-back file. Sure, the spelling and gender are different, but “Georgy Girl” was a huge international hit song for an Australian band called The Seekers. But like the title character, Fovel is “swinging down the street so fancy free” as the scoring leader for the Stingers lacrosse team. Fovel racked up 74 goals and 21 assists in the regular season to not only lead his team, but also the Miami Valley Conference. Teammate Andrew Head stands next on the team and league scoring list with 44 goals and 53 assists. “He’s able to do it by working hard off the ball,” Seven Hills head coach Nick Greiwe said.

“He works in space very instinctively and he’s a very accurate shooter.” Fovel’s given name is George, but his mom has called him Georgie as long as he can remember and his friends have picked up on the nickname. Even though he does it regularly, scoring is the last thing on Fovel’s mind when he plays. “I just follow my teammates,” he said. “I’m just here to finish what they’re setting up. They do all the hard work on loose balls and defense. I just get the credit.” Greiwe likes the idea of sharing credit. “Georgie is one of many,” he said. “We are not a collection of individuals at Seven Hills. We are a true team. Everybody plays together for the good of the team. Georgie just has a role

that allows him to put the ball in the net.” Fovel often got the ball put in against him as a tyke. His older brother, Jacob, took him out the yard from the time he could walk and carry a stick simultaneously and shoot against him. Growing up in the game, Fovel has a deep appreciation for his sport. “I love the fast-paced style and the uniqueness of the game itself,” he said. “There’s something different about it, how the stick really becomes an extension of yourself like in almost no other sport. Maybe in surfing you’re that close with the board, but it’s not really like anything else.” Seven Hills finished 14-3, winning the inaugural MVC title in the process. The Stingers begin tournament play May 23, after print deadlines.

MND breaks ground on new athletic field Mount Notre Dame held two groundbreaking and blessing ceremonies for its new athletic field, “The Sister Dorothy Stang Memorial Field,” May 3 and 7. The field, scheduled to be completed by late August 2014, will be located to the west of the school on Columbia Road. The field will include a new and expanded synthetic turf competitive playing surface for girls’ soccer, lacrosse, and field hockey, and new sports field lighting. Eventually, MND hopes to add expanded seating and a new athletic building with concessions and restrooms. This new athletic complex will allow MND’s teams to

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Attending the May 7 Mount Notre Dame athletic complex ground breaking for all the students and staff were, from left: Mark Schenkel, MND’s athletic director; Larry Mock, MND’s head of school; Sister Ruth Bedinghaus, MND science teacher; Eileen Lipps, MND’s director of spiritual guidance; Tess Meyer, class of 2015; Megan Goslee, class of 2014; Emily Borgemenke, class of 2014 and Maria Veneziano, class of 2015.

play and compete on the school campus, and all students will be able to

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utilize the field during physical education classes.

Mary Duck Robertshaw, MD and Craig Gurney, MD 4460 Red Bank Expressway, Suite 122 Cincinnati, Ohio 45227 (513) 475-7370 Those attending the Mount Notre Dame groundbreaking and blessing ceremony May 3 for the public were, from left: Beth Vonderbrink, MND field hockey coach; Patrick Ross, city of Reading’s safety director; Bo Bemmes, Reading’s mayor; Mark Schenkel, MND’s athletic director; Don Johnson, MND’s field hockey coach; Russ Mackey, MND’s lacrosse coach; Sister Carol Lichtenberg, head of provincial team of the Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur; Holly Denny, MND’s soccer team representative; Jessica Burris, MND’s lacrosse team representative; Caroline Warning, MND’s field hockey team representative and Larry Mock, MND’s head of school.

UCHealth.com CE-0000592762


VIEWPOINTS

A10 • INDIAN HILL JOURNAL • MAY 29, 2014

Editor: Richard Maloney, rmaloney@communitypress.com, 513-248-7134

EDITORIALS | LETTERS | COLUMNS | CH@TROOM

Now for the good news

Boaters take to the river Saturday for the 2013 Ohio River Paddlefest. FILE What’s your favorite summer event in the area? What do you like about it?

“Paddlefest, as it a unique way to see the city and the river, hopefully without getting run over by a barge or go-fast boat. All of the local farmers’ markets. I am not necessarily a rabid proponent of ‘buy local,’ but if you are going to buy fresh vegetables and breads, etc. anyway, why not buy them from local small business people? The best thing about summer in Cincy is that is is all easily accessible.”

Mark Fertitta

“The annual July 4th Independence Day Fireworks off Springdale have been great. I hope they can be sustained financially as the event is good for the entire family as is the Taste of Colerain. The summer athletic events at Haubner Field in White Oak are a nightly event. One can run into peers who ‘played’ there many years ago along with kids and grandkids that do now. The older my peers get the better they ‘used to’ perform at Haubner. Go Figure!!!

T.D.T.

“Was the favorite @SummerfairCincy? It’s next weekend May 30 - June 1.”

Chris Hoffman

“Summerfair. Been going since the 1970s when it was a tiny little event in Eden Park. Just love walking around looking at all the creative

THIS WEEK’S QUESTION Where is the best park in the area and why do you think it’s at the top of the list? Every week we ask readers a question they can reply to via email. Send your answers to rmaloney@community press.com with Ch@troom in the subject line.

works.”

Gail Shotwell Chastang

“Labor Day fireworks on the river.”

Sheri Brown

“During summer: Fireworks on July 4th in Independence! End of summer: Labor Day fireworks on the river. Hmm ... I guess I just like fireworks.”

Joy Kent Tarleton

May 15 question What advice would you give to graduating high school and college seniors?

“My advice for a graduate is random and varied, but priceless nonetheless: “1. Never lie to you. “2. If it seems too hard, you are doing something wrong. “3. Sometime in your life live on the East Coast, but leave before you become too hardened; and sometime in your life live on the West Coast, but leave before you become too soft. “4. If you can’t fix it with a hammer, clearly it is an electrical problem. “5. Always use your turn

signals so the world will know which way you are headed.” “6. It doesn’t matter if the glass is half full or half empty, obviously the glass is twice as big as it needs to be.”

M.J.F.

“1. Be proactive. 10 percent of life is made up of what happens to you; 90 percent by how you react. Choose to see mistakes as opportunities to learn and know that with every choice comes consequence. You are the programmer. “2. Be grateful and always try to show appreciation to someone who has been kind or helpful to you. This is not only the right thing to do, it also demonstrates the all important self confidence prospective employers are looking for. “3. Network, network, network. Use your social media skills to your advantage while always being mindful that it’s likely that whatever you post is being seen by many different sets of eyes. “4. When you learn something, have a spirit of generosity and get others involved and aware of what’s going on currently vs. hiding it away in a self protective mode. “5. Be an empathic listener. Too many people listen with the intent to respond vs really hearing what is being said. In fact go one step further and listen with the eyes for feeling. “6. Differentiate yourself. You are a brand, with equity. Develop it and strategically market it.”

GarySullivan@gjsphotoart

Fight abuse by giving kids power Mother Theresa said: “You can’t do everything. But you can do one thing”. My one thing? – Preventing child abuse. In our society it is inherently the case that adults have “power” over children. So when adults are good this is a wonderful thing. But Sandy Owings when the Rabe adult is the COMMUNITY PRESS the perpetraGUEST COLUMNIST tor – we have a problem. What I have learned is that when children are with adults that are making bad choices, the best thing we can do is give a child knowledge; which in turn helps them to have power. Power to get help and

stand up to the abusing adult. Many studies show that much of this behavior is cyclical the longer we allow this to continue the problem becomes exponential. So I say, let’s give kids knowledge. Let’s give kids power. Let’s be the generation that stops these horrific crimes. Or at least try. But how? How do we reach these kids – when this is generally done behind closed doors. And, when the “trusted” adult says, “Don’t tell. It’s a secret.” Enter Council On Child Abuse. We have trained, extremely caring prevention specialists that provide classroom presentations about child abuse and peer abuse in K-12 schools throughout the Greater Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky area. Children learn abuse pre-

INDIAN HILL

JOURNAL

A publication of

JOURNAL

CommunityPress.com

CH@TROOM

May 22 question

INDIAN HILL

vention and personal safety strategies and have opportunities to disclose current or previous abuse, bullying and related problems. The information reported by the students results in getting help and keeping children safe. This is where giving knowledge to children is crucial. With knowledge children have power and now the tools to get help. Now is a great time to get involved. Call COCA to find out how you can get involved; 513-9368009, or visit our website: www.cocachild.org Sandy Owings Rabe is a resident of Symmes Township and a board member of the Council On Child Abuse. She is a retired kindergarten teacher in Sycamore Community School District.

This is my sixth article in an unintended series which have stemmed from my effort to respond to the plea of a teacher last fall to become better informed about the negotiations then in progress between the school board and the teachers’ association. My first article was written with an eye toward the immediate issues at play in the then current board – teacher negotiations. My second took into consideration the historical context of David those negotiaTurner COMMUNITY PRESS tions. My third urged a fresh GUEST COLUMNIST start. My fourth proposed a specific plan to positively resolve the issues at hand. In my last article I laid out the demographic destiny of our school district: It is shrinking, dramatically. In that article I made clear that this reality will be the source of tremendous upheaval in the district over the next several years. What I did not fully appreciate nor articulate at the time is that same demographic shift will also prove to be the district’s saving grace. In very simple terms over the next five years the board’s projected budget reflects the expectation that we will drain the district’s $30 million reserve at a rate of $3 million a year. The immediate conclusion is that over the next 10 years we will exhaust our reserves and begin to flounder. The obvious solution: radically curtail costs (i.e. salaries) and

hope for increasing revenue through increasing property values or other revenue streams. This, while a mathematically sound conclusion, is based on flawed and incomplete data. Consider the stable revenue projections ($30 million dollars a year, approximately 85 percent of which comes property taxes) with the fact that our enrollment will likely decrease by more than half in the next 12 years and we are left as much as 30 million in annual revenue and something on the order of $15 million to $18 million in annual cost. At that point we will have an extraordinarily flush school district with the potential to accumulate astronomical surpluses and eventually the moral imperative to reduce the cost to the tax payer by reducing the level of property taxation. The board and teachers’ association must think big picture and long-term. The longer-term prospects are very positive and they can and should be kept in mind. The board must compensate everyone fairly if not generously (the money is going to be there), and treat faculty and staff with respect. Teachers, parents and board members must commit to saving the best of what we have today: the best of our teachers and staff while planning judiciously for our district’s future. There is a banner currently flying over the high school. It says, “We love our teachers.” Banners are fine but actions, not words, will determine the district’s future. David Turner is an Indian Hill resident.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Summer Camp traffic

Summer means day camp at Stepping Stones – an oasis of fun and just being a kid for more than 400 children with disabilities who attend the summer program at the bottom of Given Road in Indian Hill. We want to alert neighbors to the camp schedule so motorists can be aware of possible traffic congestion around 5650 Given Road. Stepping Stones’ camp runs Monday through Friday, June 9, through Aug. 8. Close to 180 children with disabilities, 65 staff and 100 volunteers participate each day. Staff and volunteers arrive between 8 and 8:30 a.m. Children arrive in buses and cars at 9 a.m. and start leaving at 3 p.m. Life moves at a slower pace for most of the individuals we serve. Staff and volunteers must match that pace to give them the care and attention they need. We work hard to keep things moving quickly and appreciate your understanding. The times of highest congestion will be 9 a.m. to 9:45 a.m. and 3 p.m. to 3:45 p.m. The first week is the most challenging. Remember, Old Indian Hill Road is a possible alternate route. For motorists who may find their pace slowed by camp

394 Wards Corner Road Loveland, Ohio 45140 phone: 248-8600 email: indianhill@communitypress.com web site: www.communitypress.com

ABOUT LETTERS AND COLUMNS We welcome your comments on editorials, columns, stories or other topics important to you in The Indian Hill Journal. Include your name, address and phone number(s) so we may verify your letter. Letters of 200 or fewer words and columns of 500 or fewer words have the best chance of being published. Please include a photo with a column submission. All submissions may be edited for length, accuracy and clarity. Deadline: Noon Thursday Email: indianhill@community press.com. Fax: 248-1938. U.S. mail: See box below. Letters, columns and articles submitted to The Indian Hill Journal may be published or distributed in print, electronic or other forms.

traffic, we apologize for the inconvenience. Everyone at camp appreciates your patience. Your smile or cheery wave can be an incredible gift. The return smile may make your day.

Chris Adams, executive director, Stepping Stones Indian Hill

Indian Hill Journal Editor Richard Maloney rmaloney@communitypress.com, 523-248-7134 Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday See page A2 for additional contact information.


THURSDAY, MAY 29, 2014

LIFE

INDIAN HILL JOURNAL

PEOPLE | IDEAS | RECIPES

A baby pig, who'd surely hoped for something tastier.

BABY ANIMALS

DELIGHT AT TURNER FARM As if there aren’t enough reasons to visit Turner Farm in Indian Hill – to buy produce, meat and flowers; to attend educational programs about organic farming – now you can stop by and see its baby animals. You can bring your children to see little lambs bounding through the green grass and little pigs rooting through muddy fields as they enjoy their

New bodies, and new friends.

first days on earth on the farm at 7400 Given Road. Stop by for free during regular Turner Farm hours, which are Monday through Saturday, 8:30 a.m. to dark. The farm is closed Sunday. Photos by Jeanne Houck/The Community Press

Taking a walk on the mild side.

Guilty ... of aggravated cuteness.

Don’t fence us in.

A patient mother nurses two thirsty babies.

New friends share a perspective.

Three times the fun.


B2 • INDIAN HILL JOURNAL • MAY 29, 2014

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD THURSDAY, MAY 29

Physiques by Nico G, $115 per month. Registration required. 290-8217; www.fitnessphysiques.net. Blue Ash.

Art Exhibits May Affair, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., Woman’s Art Club Cultural Center, 6980 Cambridge Ave., The Barn. Eclectic art show and sale features work of three artists. Diane Corman exhibits her vibrant, contemporary expressionist oil paintings. Deborah Fox of Greenhouse shows whimsical, patterned furniture, toys and boxes. Jen Garrett creates themed antique frames embellished with vintage items. Free. 272-3700; www.artatthebarn.org. Mariemont. Today’s Food Trends with Ilene Ross, 6:30-9 p.m., Cooks’ Wares, 11344 Montgomery Road, $45. Reservations required. 489-6400. Symmes Township.

Dance Classes Line Dancing, 5:30-6:30 p.m., Fitness Physiques by Nico G, 9681 Kenwood Road, Music from variety of genres. $10-$15. Registration required. 290-8217; www.fitnessphysiques.net. Blue Ash.

PATRICK REDDY/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

per month. Registration required. 290-8217; www.fitnessphysiques.net. Blue Ash.

Exercise Classes

On Stage - Comedy

Zumba Class, 7-8 p.m., Hartzell United Methodist Church, 8999 Applewood Drive, $5. Presented by Zumba with Ashley. 9177475. Blue Ash.

Auggie Smith, 8-10:30 p.m., Go Bananas Comedy Club, $10-$16. 984-9288; www.gobananascomedy.com. Montgomery.

Home & Garden Planting Outstanding Annual Containers, 10 a.m. to noon, Pipkin’s Market, 5035 Cooper Road, Garden Center. Design and plant a summer container that will thrive throughout the season. $25. Reservations recommended. 791-3175; pipkinsmarket.com. Montgomery. Grow, Pick, and Eat Your Garden, 7-8 p.m., Pipkin’s Market, 5035 Cooper Road, Garden Center. Simple, creative ideas for using herbs, greens and edibles. Free. Reservations recommended. 791-3175; pipkinsmarket.com. Montgomery.

Literary - Libraries Kid’s Club, 3:30 -4:30 p.m., Deer Park Branch Library, 3970 E. Galbraith Road, Arts and crafts, presenters, board games and more. Ages 5-12. Free. 369-4450. Deer Park.

On Stage - Comedy Auggie Smith, 8 p.m., Go Bananas Comedy Club, 8410 Market Place Lane, $10-$16. 984-9288; www.gobananascomedy.com. Montgomery.

Pets Open Adoption Hours, 6-8 p.m., Ohio Alleycat Resource, 5619 Orlando Place, Meet cats and kittens at shelter. All cats are spayed/neutered, up-to-date on vaccinations, tested for FIV and Feline Leukemia and microchipped. Free admission. Adoption fee: $75. Presented by Ohio Alleycat Resource & Spay/Neuter Clinic. Through Dec. 28. 8717297; www.ohioalleycat.org. Madisonville.

Support Groups Codependents Anonymous, 7-8 p.m., The Community of the Good Shepherd, 8815 E. Kemper Road, Room 31. Literature discussion group. Free, donations accepted. Presented by Codependents Anonymous Inc.. 800-0164. Montgomery. Codependents Anonymous, noon to 1 p.m., Blue Ash Presbyterian Church, 4309 Cooper Road, Youth room. Big book/ discussion meeting. Brown bag lunch optional. Open to everyone who desires healthy loving relationships. Donations accepted. Presented by Codependents Anonymous Inc.. 673-0174; www.coda.org. Blue Ash.

THURSDAY, JUNE 5 Business Classes

Education

Twitter: Your Small Business PR Platform, 10-11:30 a.m., Dimalanta Design Group, 4555 Lake Forest Drive, No. 650, Learn basics for setting up and managing your Twitter account. Ages 18 and up. $20. 588-2802; www.dimalantadesigngroup.com. Blue Ash.

Fly Fishing Lessons, 9-11 a.m., Orvis Retail Store, Free. Reservations required. 791-2325. Kenwood.

Robotics Club, 3:30-5 p.m., Deer Park Branch Library, 3970 E. Galbraith Road, Learn to build Arduinos, EV3 Mindstorms and We Dos with the pros. Ages 8-18. Free. 369-4450. Deer Park.

Free fly fishing lessons are being offered from 9-11 a.m. Saturday, May 31, at Orvis Retail Store, 7737 Kenwood Road, Kenwood. The lessons, which cover fly casting and outfit rigging, are for beginners of all ages. Reservations are required. Call 791-2325.

Recreation TGIF at Kids First, 6-10 p.m., Kids First Sports Center, 7900 E. Kemper Road, Pizza, indoor swimming and night-time snack. $30, $20 each additional child. Reservations required. Through June 13. 489-7575. Sycamore Township.

SATURDAY, MAY 31 Cooking Classes Healthy Cooking Classes, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., Peachy’s Health Smart, 7400 Montgomery Road, Peachy Seiden discusses nutrition and health while preparing two delicious, simple and easy meals. Ages 18 and up. $30. Registration required. 315-3943; www.peachyshealthsmart.com. Silverton.

Education Fly Fishing Lessons, 9-11 a.m., Orvis Retail Store, 7737 Kenwood Road, Learn fly-fishing basics. For beginners of all ages. Lessons on fly casting and outfit rigging. Free. Reservations required. 791-2325. Kenwood.

Farmers Market Montgomery Farmers’ Market, 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Montgomery Elementary School, 9609 Montgomery Road, Parking lot. Roughly 30 vendors with fresh produce, artisan foods, locallyroasted coffee, handmade fresh bread and baked goods, local bison meat, chicken, beef, sausage, olive oil, music and more. Free. Presented by Montgomery Farmers Market. 5605064; montgomeryfarmersmarket.org. Montgomery.

Health / Wellness Mobile Heart Screenings, 2-5 p.m., Walgreens Deer Park, 4090 E. Galbraith Road, Several screening packages available to test risk of heart attack, stroke, aneurysm and other major diseases. Appointment required. Presented by Mercy Health. 866-819-0127; www.mercyhealthfair.com. Deer Park.

Home & Garden

FRIDAY, MAY 30

Spring Plant Exchange, 1 p.m., Madeira Branch Library, 7200 Miami Ave., Bring unwanted and excess plants to exchange with fellow gardeners. Ages 18 and up. Free. Registration required. Presented by Public Library of Cincinnati & Hamilton County. 369-6028; programs.cincinnatilibrary.org. Madeira.

Exercise Classes

Music - Jazz

Yoga Happy Hour, 5-7 p.m., Yoga Fit Boutique, 10776 Montgomery Road, Studio. Invigorating practice modified to accommodate all participants ending in deep relaxation. BYOB and enjoy complimentary healthy snack. Ages 21 and up. $15. 237-5330. Sycamore Township. Small Group Personal Training, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Fitness Physiques by Nico G, 9681 Kenwood Road, Session covers challenges in strength, stability, balance, core and metabolic training. Ages 18 and up. $115

The Hitmen, 8 p.m. to midnight, Tony’s Steaks and Seafood, 12110 Montgomery Road, Free. 6771993; www.tonysofcincinnati.com. Symmes Township.

On Stage - Comedy Auggie Smith, 8-10:30 p.m., Go Bananas Comedy Club, $10-$16. 984-9288; www.gobananascomedy.com. Montgomery.

ABOUT CALENDAR To submit calendar items, go to www.cincinnati.com and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to life@communitypress.com along with event information. Items are printed on a spaceavailable basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to www.cincinnati.com and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page.

Recreation Grand Papa Wheelie Car Show, noon to 3 p.m., Mercy St. Theresa, 7010 Rowan Hill Drive, Participants receive dash plaque. Music, cornhole, balloon animals, face painting and concessions. Free. Registration required. 527-0136. Mariemont.

SUNDAY, JUNE 1 Auditions Disney’s Beauty and the Beast Auditions, 2-5 p.m., The Studio for Dance, 10831 Millington Court, Open to those going into grade 5-12 for Fall 2014. Prepare song and monologue. Dress to dance. Free. Reservations required. Presented by Acting Up. 494-6062; www.actingup.com. Blue Ash.

On Stage - Comedy Auggie Smith, 8 p.m., Go Bananas Comedy Club, $10-$16. 984-9288; www.gobananascomedy.com. Montgomery.

Pets Open Adoption Hours, 1-4 p.m., Ohio Alleycat Resource, Free admission. Adoption fee: $75. 871-7297; www.ohioalleycat.org. Madisonville.

Runs / Walks Great Human Race, 10 a.m. to noon, Center for Holocaust and Humanity Education, 8401 Montgomery Road, 5K walk/run brings individuals to celebrate diversity and champion inclusion. Benefits Center for Holocaust and Humanity Education. $25-$30. Registration required. Presented by The Center for Holocaust and Humanity Education. 487-3055; www.holocaustandhumanity.org. Kenwood.

MONDAY, JUNE 2

Diva, 9797 Montgomery Road, Suite F, Learn how to handstamp aluminum rings with your personalization and bend them into shape in your size. Family friendly. $40. Registration required. 873-4561. Montgomery.

Auditions Disney’s Beauty and the Beast Auditions, 6-9 p.m., The Studio for Dance, Free. Reservations required. 494-6062; www.actingup.com. Blue Ash. Taking My Turn - Auditions, 7 p.m., Walton Creek Theater, 921-2909; www.mariemontplayers.com. Columbia Township.

Cooking Classes Garden Fresh Main Dishes with Marilyn Harris, 6:30-9 p.m., Cooks’ Wares, 11344 Montgomery Road, $60. Reservations required. 489-6400. Symmes Township.

Exercise Classes Zumba, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Fitness Physiques by Nico G, 9681 Kenwood Road, $15. Registration required. 290-8217; www.fitnessphysiques.net. Blue Ash. Zumba Class, 7-8 p.m., Hartzell United Methodist Church, $5. 917-7475. Blue Ash.

Literary - Story Times Preschool Storytime, 10:30-11 a.m., Deer Park Branch Library, 3970 E. Galbraith Road, Books, songs, activities and more, while building early literacy skills. For preschoolers and their caregivers. Ages 3-6. Free. 369-4450. Deer Park. Book Break, 3-3:30 p.m., Deer Park Branch Library, 3970 E. Galbraith Road, Children’s librarian reads aloud from some favorite books. Make craft to take home. Ages 3-6. Free. 369-4450. Deer Park.

Auditions

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 4

Disney’s Beauty and the Beast Auditions, 6-9 p.m., The Studio for Dance, Free. Reservations required. 494-6062; www.actingup.com. Blue Ash. Taking My Turn - Auditions, 7 p.m., Walton Creek Theater, 4101 Walton Creek Road, Those auditioning are asked to bring a resume and photo and to prepare two 16-bar contrasting songs from pre-70s Broadway, Cole Porter, Gershwin or the like. There will also be readings from the script. Presented by Mariemont Players Inc.. 9212909; www.mariemontplayers.com. Columbia Township.

Art & Craft Classes

Exercise Classes Small Group Personal Training, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Fitness Physiques by Nico G, $115 per month. Registration required. 290-8217; www.fitnessphysiques.net. Blue Ash.

Pets

TUESDAY, JUNE 3

Open Adoption Hours, 1-4 p.m., Ohio Alleycat Resource, Free admission. Adoption fee: $75. 871-7297; www.ohioalleycat.org. Madisonville.

Art & Craft Classes Rings Rings and Rings: Personalized Jewelry Making Class, 7-8:30 p.m., The Silver

Knitting, Crochet and Needlecraft Class, 7-8 p.m., Milford Heights Church of Christ, 1646 Ohio 28, Basic handwork techniques and fresh ideas in knitting, crochet and other handicrafts along with short devotional time. Free. 575-1874. Milford. Personalized Bracelets and Accessories Class, 7-8:30 p.m., The Silver Diva, 9797 Montgomery Road, Suite F, Learn how to hand stamp bracelets, keychains, money clips or tie bars with your personalization and bend them into shape. Family friendly. $30. Registration required. 873-4561. Montgomery.

Cooking Classes Chillin’ with Haute Chocolate - Frozen Concoctions and Confections, 6:30-9 p.m., Cooks’ Wares, 11344 Montgomery Road, $45. Reservations required. 489-6400. Symmes Township.

Exercise Classes Small Group Personal Training, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Fitness

Cooking Classes Healthy Cooking Classes, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., Peachy’s Health Smart, $30. Registration required. 315-3943; www.peachyshealthsmart.com. Silverton. Knife Skills with Shun Cutlery and Bob Hess, 1-3:30 p.m., Cooks’ Wares, 11344 Montgomery Road, $50. Reservations required. 489-6400. Symmes Township.

Literary - Libraries

Cooking Classes

SATURDAY, JUNE 7

Business Seminars Twitter: Your Small Business PR Platform, 10:30 a.m. to noon, Dimalanta Design Group, 4555 Lake Forest Drive, No. 650, $20. Presented by Ernie Dimalanta. 588-2802; www.dimalantadesigngroup.com. Blue Ash.

Cooking Classes Cooking for One with Carolyn Gray, 6:30-9 p.m., Cooks’ Wares, 11344 Montgomery Road, $45. Reservations required. 489-6400. Symmes Township.

Dance Classes Line Dancing, 5:30-6:30 p.m., Fitness Physiques by Nico G, $10-$15. Registration required. 290-8217; www.fitnessphysiques.net. Blue Ash.

Exercise Classes Zumba Class, 7-8 p.m., Hartzell United Methodist Church, $5. 917-7475. Blue Ash.

Home & Garden Designing Hot Kitchens and Cool Baths, 6:30-8 p.m., Neal’s Design Remodel, 7770 E. Kemper Road, Project consultants and designers discuss trends in kitchen and bath design. Light fare provided. Ages 18 and up. Free. 489-7700; neals.com. Sharonville.

Literary - Libraries Kid’s Club, 3:30-4:30 p.m., Deer Park Branch Library, Free. 3694450. Deer Park.

On Stage - Theater

Farmers Market Montgomery Farmers’ Market, 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Montgomery Elementary School, Free. 560-5064; montgomeryfarmersmarket.org. Montgomery.

Music - Jazz The Hitmen, 8 p.m. to midnight, Tony’s Steaks and Seafood, Free. 677-1993; www.tonysofcincinnati.com. Symmes Township.

Music - Religious Judah Praise Dance Expo, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., New Life Temple, 4836 Ward St., To equip male and female praise dancers with more knowledge, skills and resources for more effective dance ministry. $10, $8 ages 17 and under with valid ID/student ID. Includes light lunch. Presented by NLT Judah. 561-5120. Madisonville.

On Stage - Theater Seussical, 7:30-10 p.m., Blue Ash Amphitheatre, $9. 604-0537; www.esptheater.org. Blue Ash.

Pets Open Adoption Hours, 1-4 p.m., Ohio Alleycat Resource, Free admission. Adoption fee: $75. 871-7297; www.ohioalleycat.org. Madisonville.

Recreation Montgomery Kiwanis Fishing Contest, 9-11 a.m., Swaim Park, Zig Zag and Cooper roads, Fishing contest for ages 1-15. Cash prizes for first fish caught each half hour in each age group. Bring rod and bait. Free. Presented by Montgomery Kiwanis Club. 910-7068. Montgomery.

Seussical, 7:30-10 p.m., Blue Ash Amphitheatre, 4433 Cooper Road, Theater is outdoors, bring chair or blanket. Food and drink available. $9. Presented by East Side Players. 604-0537; www.esptheater.org. Blue Ash.

SUNDAY, JUNE 8 Education Fly Fishing Lessons, 9-11 a.m., Orvis Retail Store, Free. Reservations required. 791-2325. Kenwood.

Support Groups

On Stage - Theater

Codependents Anonymous, 7-8 p.m., The Community of the Good Shepherd, Free, donations accepted. 800-0164. Montgomery. Codependents Anonymous, noon to 1 p.m., Blue Ash Presbyterian Church, Donations accepted. 673-0174; www.coda.org. Blue Ash.

Seussical, 7:30-10 p.m., Blue Ash Amphitheatre, $9. 604-0537; www.esptheater.org. Blue Ash.

FRIDAY, JUNE 6

MONDAY, JUNE 9

Art & Craft Classes

Cooking Classes

SoulCollage Series, 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Theme: Blooming., Women Writing for a Change, 6906 Plainfield Road, Includes inspirations for using your cards to discover what is unfurling in you. All materials provided. For women, ages 21 and up. $25. Registration required. 272-1171; www.womenwriting.org. Silverton.

Chef’s Secrets to Entertaining with Stseve Helmich, 6:30-9 p.m., Cooks’ Wares, 11344 Montgomery Road, $50. Reservations required. 489-6400. Symmes Township.

Exercise Classes Yoga Happy Hour, 5 p.m.-7 p.m., Yoga Fit Boutique, $15. 513-237-5330. Sycamore Township. Small Group Personal Training, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Fitness Physiques by Nico G, $115 per month. Registration required. 290-8217; www.fitnessphysiques.net. Blue Ash.

Health / Wellness General Joint Screening, 4-6 p.m., Cincinnati Sports Club, 3950 Red Bank Road, Brief history and exam designed to troubleshoot and modify activities and exercise programs covered. Ages 18 and up. Free. Reservations required. Presented by Christ Hospital Physical Therapy. 527-4000. Fairfax.

On Stage - Theater Seussical, 7:30-10 p.m., Blue Ash Amphitheatre, $9. 604-0537; www.esptheater.org. Blue Ash.

Pets Open Adoption Hours, 1-4 p.m., Ohio Alleycat Resource, Free admission. Adoption fee: $75. 871-7297; www.ohioalleycat.org. Madisonville.

Exercise Classes Small Group Personal Training, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Fitness Physiques by Nico G, $115 per month. Registration required. 290-8217; www.fitnessphysiques.net. Blue Ash.

Health / Wellness UC Health Mobile Diagnostics Mammography Screenings, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., UC Health Primary Care, 9275 Montgomery Road, Cost varies by insurance. Financial assistance available to those who qualify. Registration required. Presented by UC Health Mobile Diagnostics. 585-8266. Montgomery.

Recreation Stepping Stones Golf Classic, 7 a.m. to 8 p.m., O’Bannon Creek Golf Club, 6842 Ohio 48, Includes breakfast, lunch, dinner, raffle, silent auction and player gifts. Benefits Stepping Stones. $200. Registration required. Presented by Stepping Stones. 559-2440; www.steppingstonesohio.org. Loveland.


LIFE

MAY 29, 2014 • INDIAN HILL JOURNAL • B3

Honey cider drink can help allergies

First thing to know: Never give honey to children under the age of 1 year. And if you’re going to make this drink, make it with raw local organic honey and organic raw apple cider. The reason? For the local honey, bees collect pollen from your area and this helps builds up in your system. If all goes right, you could become immune to the pollen in your area. As far as the organic apple cider goes, it’s not refined and distilled and it is thought to block histamine reactions. It also contains healthy enzymes, vitamins and minerals. It can help lower your cholesterol and blood pressure as well. For every cup of warm or chilled water, stir in: 1 generous tablespoon each local raw honey and organic apple cider vinegar. Add a squeeze of lemon for extra vitamin C if

you want. Drink a couple times a day, or more if you’re outdoors a lot. Recipe Hall of Fame: Tony Palazzolo’s version of Frisch’s vegetable soup. I can’t remember which class I was teaching, but a student came up and asked me if I would publish this favorite recipe again. Some of you will recall that Tony’s recipe, as well as my version, are in my Recipe Hall of Fame. “A result of over a dozen attempts, and I think it is very close to Frisch’s,” Tony told me way back when. Tony also noted the soup is best if allowed to rest for 2-3 hours after cooking or next day. I’ve made it with mostly broth and just a bit of water and it is really good that way, too. 4 tablespoons vegetable oil 1 cup onion, diced 1/2 cup each diced: carrots, celery 1/2 cup each frozen vegetables: peas, corn, cut green beans, baby lima beans (can use canned baby limas) 1 can, 14.5 ounce, diced tomatoes with juice 2 quarts beef broth 1 quart water 1/2 teaspoon each thyme, garlic powder 3/4 teaspoon black pepper

1 cup potato, diced 1/4 cup pearl barley 1/4 cup long grain rice Salt to taste In a large soup pot, sauté onion, carrot, and celery until onion is soft but not browned, about 10 minutes. Add rest of ingredients except potato, rice and barley. Bring to boil and lower to simmer partially covered for 30-45 minutes. Add potato, rice and barley, bring back to boil, lower to simmer partially covered for another 30 minutes or until potato, rice and barley are done. Add salt and pepper. Readers want to know: Are lilacs edible? Yes, as long as they’re “clean” not sprayed, etc.

They taste as good as they smell. Right now I’m gathering some to crystallize with egg white and sugar. I’ll let you know how they turn out. Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator, Jungle Jim’s Eastgate culinary professional and author. Find her blog online at Abouteating.com. Call 513248-7130, ext. 356.

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Hamilton County Au- owners who turn 65 on or ditor Dusty Rhodes says after Jan. 1, 2014. Those the deadline for apply- with annual incomes ing for a significant over $30,500 (not countproperty tax reduction ing Social Security payments) will no longer be is coming up. Applications must be eligible for this promade by Monday, June 2. gram. Existing HomeEvery property own- stead Exemption recipier who is 65 or over or is ents will not be affected permanently disabled is nor will those who were eligible for the state’s 65 prior to Jan. 1, 2014, homestead exemption. provided they are alAnnual tax savings un- ready on the program or der this program in they register for it beHamilton County range fore June 2 this year. Call the auditor’s offrom about $350 to $740. This exemption results fice at 513-946-4099 for in no loss in taxes to com- an application or with munities or schools as any questions. the reduction is made up by the state. It is especially important this year for owners who turned 65 before Jan. 1 and may have overlooked the program. If they don’t apply by June 2 they have to wait until next year and BINGO IS BACK IN LOVELAND! Every Monday Night! will be subject to a new Starting March 31st income test. Doors Open 5PM Bingo Promptly at 7PM The Legislature has Benefits Veterans Charities re-established an inAmerican Legion Post 256 come test for property 897 Oakland Road CE-1001804936-01

Easy and effective honey cider allergy drink

Rita’s honey cider allergy drink. RITA HEIKENFELD FOR THE COMMUNITY PRESS

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Are your allergies kicking in? Mine sure are, and as much work as we have outdoors in the vegetable and herb gardens it’s not, as Martha would say, “a good thing.” My friend and Cincinnati Rita Magazine Heikenfeld marketing director RITA’S KITCHEN Chris Ohmer said it best. “I’m living from tissue to tissue.” Well, I’ve got a natural home remedy that might help Chris and others who are affected by seasonal allergies. I can tell you this: My “potion” sure helps me get through these pollenladen spring days.

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LIFE

B4 • INDIAN HILL JOURNAL • MAY 29, 2014

Kids will ‘feel the learn’ at Brain Camp

Fight the summer drain on kids’ academic skills by signing them up for Brain Camps at the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County. Camps are part of the Library’s Summer Learning program. They are free, fun and offered at the Main Library and all branches. Registration begins May 1 for all Brain Camps. Call 369-3121 or visit www.cincinnatilibrary. org. Group size is limited, so register early. Weeklong Brain Camps at the Main Library are offered from1-4

p.m. Monday through Friday, at 800 Vine St., in the William Hueneke Homework Center. Brain Camp themes, targeted grade levels, and dates are: » June 2-6: Baseball & Our Hometown Reds (grades 1-5); June 9-13: The Great Book Adventure (grades 1-2); June 1620: World Cup & Brazil (grades 3-5); July 7-11: Wonders of the World (grades 3-5). » July 14-18: World’s Fair: Inventions (grades 4-8); July 21-25: Grosser than Gross Science

(grades 3-5); July 28-Aug. 1: Time Travel (grades 6-8); Aug. 4-8 – Hawaiian Hullabaloo (grades 1-5) Free, weeklong Brain Camps with the theme “The World of Wonders” are offered at select library branches. Activities include stories, games, science experiments and themed crafts. Camps are for students in first through fifth grades and run 1-4 p.m. Monday through Friday, unless otherwise noted. Weeklong camps are: » June 9-13: Cheviot, Forest Park and Monfort

Heights branches; June 16-20: North Central, Norwood and Oakley branches; June 23-27: Madisonville and Sharonville branches; July 7-11: Avondale, Corryville and Walnut Hills. » July 14-18: Covedale, Groesbeck and West End branches; July 21-25: Pleasant Ridge, Price Hill and College Hill branches (College Hill location that meets 2 p.m.-5 p.m.); July 28- Aug. 1: Northside, Westwood and Bond Hill branches. Free, day-long Brain Camps with the theme

“Grosser than Gross” are targeted for first through fourth graders and are held at select branches on the dates listed from 1-4 p.m., unless otherwise noted. Activities include icky, creepy, slimy and just plain gross science projects for a day filled with disgusting fun. » June 16: Delhi Township Branch; June 17: St. Bernard Branch; June 18: Elmwood Place Branch; June 19: Miami Township Branch; June 23: Anderson Township Branch; June 24: Blue Ash Branch. » June 25: Green Town-

ship Branch; June 27: Hyde Park Branch; June 30: Madeira Branch; July 1: Symmes Township Branch; July 3: Harrison Branch. » July 7: Deer Park Branch (Deer Park location meets 1:45 – 4:45 p.m.); July 9: Wyoming Branch; July 14: Clifton Branch; July15: Mt. Washington Branch. » July 16: Mt. Healthy Branch; July 18: Mariemont Branch; July 21: Greenhills Branch; July 22: Reading Branch. » July 23: Loveland Branch.

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Madeira High School seniors Bayla Fisher, Jasmine Wood and Christin Moermond were the recipients of the $2,000 scholarships awarded by the Madeira Woman’s Club. PROVIDED

Madeira Woman’s Club awards three scholarships The GFWC Madeira Woman’s Club awarded scholarships to three Madeira High Schools seniors at the club’s May 13 luncheon at the Seasons. This year’s $2,000 scholarships went to Bayla Fisher, who will attend the University of Vermont majoring in environmental science; Jasmine

Wood who will attend University of South Florida majoring in chemical engineering, and Christin Moermond, who will attend St. Mary’s at Notre Dame majoring in nursing. The three recipients attended the luncheon along with their school counselor.

Musical theater camp offered in Indian Hill Indian Hill Performing Arts Academy is providing a summer musical theater camp for thirdthrough ninth-grades June 9-21. Third- through sixthgrades will perform Disney’s “Cinderella Kids” and seventh- through ninth-grades will perform the popular “Once On This Island,” which is a calypso-flavored retelling of the traditional “Little Mermaid” tale. The music and dance is fantastic and will be a great learning experience for campers. The summer camp, in its third year, provides professional educators to teach master classes in dance, puppetry, costuming, make-up, acting, musical theater and vocal performance. IHPA Summer Camp welcomes back choreographer Jay Goodlett and music directors Xan Jeffrey and Alice Bohn. The camp is open to all students. For more information and to register for IHPA Academy Musical Theatre Summer Camp, visit ihperformingarts.com/ community-news/. Indian Hill Performing Arts Academy was

launched in the fall 2013 school year within the Indian Hill school district. IHPA Academy is after school programming in performing arts for students in all grades in the Indian Hill school and from nearby school districts. Many Indian Hill school students travel miles away to train in dance, acting, instrument and vocal instruction. IHPA Academy provides Indian Hill students and families the opportunity to study performing arts within their community, on Indian Hill school campus and after school. A percentage of student’s tuition and fees will go to support Indian Hill Fine Arts Teachers in the classroom, becoming a resource that can be passed on. Sponsored by the Indian Hill PTO, IHPA Academy is organized and led by Indian Hill High School Theatre Director and teacher Lisa Harris and PTO representative Robin Schwanekamp. For more information, visit ihperformingarts. com/ or email indianhillperformingarts@gmail. com.


LIFE

MAY 29, 2014 • INDIAN HILL JOURNAL • B5

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B6 • INDIAN HILL JOURNAL • MAY 29, 2014

Spring savings is here. Discovering all the great sales near you has never been easier. Check out our apps or visit FindnSave.com and start saving now.

findnsave.cincinnati.com

LIFE


LIFE

MAY 29, 2014 • INDIAN HILL JOURNAL • B7

POLICE REPORTS INDIAN HILL Arrests/citations Marcus A. Gran, 25, 254 Klotter Ave., failure to file annual registration, April 30. Laura A. Tracy, 24, 2123 Sinton Ave. No. A, speed , May 6. Isaiah Godoy, 21, 7608 Weatherly Court, speed, May 6. Stoddard P. Rowe, 55, 109 Wag-

on Road Lane, speed, May 8. Maria M. Gonzalez, 53, 11045 S. Lebanon Road, speed, May 9.

Incidents/investigations Burglary At 5300 block of Miami Road, April 30. Fraud Report of IRS fraud at block 10 of Stone Snail Lane, April 30.

Sycamore Community Band sets ’14 summer schedule The Sycamore Community Band led by Pete Metzger will perform a series of free concerts throughout the greater Cincinnati area this summer. The theme for this year is the “SCB Guide to the Concert Band.” The concerts will showcase the many different instrument sections that make up a concert band. The following are the dates, times, and locations for the concert season. All the concerts are free and open to the public. Please bring chairs or a blanket and check out our website for more information: www.sycamo reband.org. June 10, 7 p.m., Blue Ash Amphitheater, 4343 Cooper Road; June 20, 7:30 p.m., New Richmond Gazebo, Susanna Way alongside the Ohio River; June 29, 7 p.m., Madeira (McDonalds Commons), 7351 Dawson Road; July 1, 7 p.m., Fort Thomas Amphitheater, 900 Cochran Ave.; July 5, 7 p.m., Union Township Amphitheater, 4350 Aicholtz Road;

July 19, noon, Bastille Day in Montgomery, Montgomery and Cooper Road. For more information contact Paul Wallace at 513-697-0868.

At 7400 block of Drake Road, May 5. Theft Wallet taken at 7700 block of Chumani Lane, May 2. Vandalism Mailbox damaged at 7700 block of Annesdale Drive, May 5.

REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS

Amber Hunt, The Enquirer’s consumer watchdog reporter, and The Enquirer Call For Action team of trained volunteers are available to work for you. Specializing in mediation services, we’ll help you resolve consumer issues and get you resources that will help in the future.

INDIAN HILL

6700 Druwood Lane: Turvey, Richard John & Nancy Lee to Atkinson, John; $1,350,000.

Call 513.768.8833 between 11:00a.m.

and 1:00p.m. Monday through Friday to speak to a volunteer. Or, go online at Cincinnati.com/CallForAction to submit a consumer complaint.

Look for Amber Hunt’s weekly consumer protection column every Sunday in the more local section of The Enquirer and at Cincinnati.com/YourWatchdog.

7 MONTH @ 1.00% APY*

ENQUIRER CALL FOR ACTION IS HERE FOR YOU. Find this along with more watchdog coverage at Cincinnati.com/YourWatchdog. Activate the digital portion of your Enquirer subscription today at Cincinnati.com/Activate to stay connected to all of The Enquirer’s watchdog coverage and to enjoy the full value of your subscription.

If you’d like to help your neighbors resolve their consumer problems, join our Call For Action team by calling 800.647.1756.

CE-0000592304

CE-0000592118

Pat Donaldson, resident since 2009

CE-0000586512


LIFE

B8 • INDIAN HILL JOURNAL • MAY 29, 2014

AJC recognizes 31 students

On the evening of April 29, energetic and devoted volunteers from 31 high schools received recognition at American Jewish Committee’s 49th annual Simon Lazarus Jr. Human Relations Awards. In addition, AJC presented books, checks and Reds tickets to 10 junior and senior finalists who are devoted to good causes. Junior class winner was Sydney Armstrong of Mt. Notre Dame High School, known as a “natural motivator” who has advanced ongoing projects

at her school, taking them to a higher level. Senior class winner is Meredith Bailey of Walnut Hills High School, who collected more than 8,000 pairs of shoes delivered to six different charities, including one in Africa. Other junior finalists: » Julia Engel of Wyoming H.S., who focuses on education and health causes, including help for addicts; » Allison Flanigan of Glen Este High School, an accomplished fund-raiser for children’s causes; » Nancy Nzobigeza of

Mother of Mercy High School, who aids immigrants from Burundi; and » Kila Tripp of Ursuline Academy, a spokesperson for children with cancer and leading fundraiser for cancer research. Senior finalists: » MacKenzie Corbin of St. Ursula Academy; » Allison Hogan of Ursuline Academy, who coordinates her school’s numerous service outreach programs; » Madeline Martini of Villa Madonna Academy, and Sydney Schultz of Se-

ton High School. The judges for the 2014 awards who presented the finalists were » David Armstrong, President, Thomas More College; » Gwen Robinson-Benning, CEO, CincinnatiHamilton County Community Action Agency; » Bleuzette Marshall, Chief Diversity Officer, University of Cincinnati; » Fanon Rucker, Judge, Hamilton County Municipal Court, and » Homa Yavar, cofounder, Muslim Mothers Against Violence.

LAZARUS AWARD NOMINEES

Azieb Zeray, Lakota East

SENIORS

Meredith R. Bailey, Walnut Hills McKell Belnap, Mason JUNIORS Caleb Cook, Dixie Heights Sydney Armstrong, Catherine Mackenzie CorMount Notre Dame bin, North College Hill Talia Bailes, Sycamore Carson Curry, St. Xavier Carolyn Banks, Ludlow Kendra Fry, McAuley John Paul Bosse, St. Alisha Garg, Indian Hill Xavier Abriana Harris, Withrow Nathan Evangelas Caras, University Mason Alison Hogan, Ursuline Chzarlotte Corpuz, SiAcademy mon Kenton Alison Howe, Mariemont Julia Engel, Wyoming Alex Jofriet, Milford Allison Flanigan, Glen Madeline Martini, Villa Este Madonna Academy Pratiti Ghosh-Dastider, Morgan Massa, Cincinnati Cincinnati Country Day Hills Christian School Kolin Donald McCauley, Steven Hassey, MarieLudlow mont Claire Middleton, Lakota Delaney Kirbabas, CincinEast nati Hills Christian AcadJourdan Montgomery, emy Princeton Geneva Marr, Loveland Kaitlin Murray, Simon Katinina McCoy, North Kenton College Hill Cara Paolucci, Turpin Nancy J. Nzobigeza, Myra Poff, Woodward Mother of Mercy Daniel Sauers, The Seven Career Tech Joshua Rivers, Anderson Hills School Theresa Rust, Mother of Amanda Schleper, Villa Mercy Madonna Academy Sydney K. Schultz, Seton Lyndsey Schmucker, Cambray Smith, Wyoming McAuley Olivia Stanton, Loveland Heather Shams, Turpin Salamata Waiga, North Alexander Stringfellow, College Hill Anderson Jessica Wobig, Finneytown Kila Tripp, Ursuline Academy

*-;:-;;",-7:9=/#9?3$",:.690

Sew•Quilt•Fiber Arts

June 12-14, 2014 Sharonville, OH

Sharonville Convention Center • 11355 Chester Road Shopping, Classes, Stage Presentations & Quilt Art Displays

Nancy Zieman appears

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June 13 for Lectures & Book Signing • See the latest quilting, sewing, & knit products • Make & Takes & Door Prizes • FREE stage presentations • LoveQuilt Connection Charity

Featured Faculty:

Barb Callahan Connie Crawford Pam Damour Darlene Griffith Betty Mitchell Nancy Wiggins Colleen Casey Cathy Robbins

Hours: Thur & Fri - 10 am - 5 pm Mary Kaeser Sat - 10 am - 4 pm

Bobbie Bergquist Displays: Parkinson’s Quilt Project, SAQA, Hoffman, Recycled/Repurposed & more! Bring a non-perishable

2

food item for

Classes start 8 am - Doors open 7:30 am $ discount Admission: $8 per day -$16 multi - day, off admission Under 16 FREE Not valid with other offers

www.originalcreativefestival.com - 800-473-9464

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CE-0000591184


LIFE

MAY 29, 2014 • INDIAN HILL JOURNAL • B9

RELIGION Church of the Saviour United Methodist

Vacation Bible School registration is underway. “Son Treasure Island is 9:30 a.m. to noon July 28-Aug. 1, and “Workshop of Wonders is 6-8:30 p.m. July 11-13. Sign up online. The annual rummage sale is 6-9 p.m., May 29; 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., with a $5 bag sale from noon to 2 p.m. May 30. Weekday Children’s Programs run Monday mornings, Tuesday mornings and afternoons and Thursday mornings. Register on the website. Sunday services are 8:20 a.m. and 11 a.m. for traditional worship and 9:40 a.m. for

BAPTIST

Hyde Park Baptist Church

contemporary worship. The church is at 8005 Pfeiffer Road, Cincinnati; 791-3142; www.cos-umc.org.

Cincinnati Friends Meetinghouse

Regular meeting for worship is 11 a.m., Sundays followed by fellowship in the Fireside room at noon. First Day/ Nursery School is available at 11 a.m. The meetinghouse is at 8075 Keller Road, Cincinnati; 7910788;www.cincinnati friends.org.

Good Shepherd Lutheran Church

GSLC is a large church that offers a variety of styles of

worship and service times. Saturdays, 5 p.m. – Woven worship (mix of traditional and contemporary). Sundays, 8 a.m. and 11 a.m. – traditional worship. Sundays, 9:30 a.m. – contemporary worship. Sundays 9 a.m. – 30-minute Family Worship for wee ones; Sundays, 5:45 p.m. – “NOSH” dinner & worship off-site at UC Campus Ministry Edge House. The church offers preschool and student Sunday school at 9:30 a.m. SeptemberMay. “Worship without Worry” Sunday School is offered at 11 a.m. for families of children with special needs and kids of all ages. The church is at 7701 Kenwood Road, Kenwood; 891-1700; goodshepherd.com.

INTERDENOMINATIONAL

UNITED METHODIST

Equipping Service: 4:30 p.m. Sat. & 8:50 a.m. Sun. Exploring Service: 10:00 a.m. & 11:10 a.m. Sun.

Building Homes Relationships & Families

Michigan & Erie Ave

CHRISTIAN AND MISSIONARY CALVARY ALLIANCE CHURCH

Senior Pastor, Rev. Dave Robinette 986 Nordyke Road - 45255 (Cherry Grove turn off Beechmont at Beechmont Toyota) Worship Service, Sunday 10:45 am Classes For All Ages, Sunday 9:15 am Prayer Service Wednesday, 6:45 pm

CE-1001778787-01

513-321-5856 Bill Rillo, Pastor Sunday Worship Services: 11:00am & 6:00pm Sunday School: 9:45am Wednesday Bible Study: 7:00pm www.hydeparkbaptistchurch.org

Birth thru high school programs

3950 Newtown Road Cincinnati, OH 45244

513 272-5800 www.horizoncc.com

'5A $58C 759C "C BA !,5"@C; 2,5 "78 24CA)-":5 "7"=6CBC; B7CB85, ">>5CC 1,4: A+5 =4>@5, ,44: A4 A+5 1,47A 41/>5; 2+4A4 -"==5,B5C; <B854C; "78 :4,50

&;><+;:4 ;.5 $"%% '-<6-<<:0-76;) "243 (:328:++ :99 0;4:=7

Episcopal-Presbyterian Church www.stpaulcumc.org

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SUNDAY MORNINGS 8:30 a.m. and 11:00 a.m. Traditional Worship

First Church of Christ, Scientist 3035 Erie Ave 871-0245 CE-1001764504-01

(7.?B,5, #24,AC >4775>AC 64? A4 64?, *B7>B77"AB $58C "== C5"C47 =47- B7 4/1 7*&9-%1%; 47 8-*5-**2!-'5)+ "78 47 A+5 8-*5-**2!-'5)+ 613$ "2$1.2,, #((3

Indian Hill

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE Sunday Service and Sunday School 10:30am Wednesday Testimonial Meeting 7:30pm Reading Room 3035 Erie Ave

Sundays 9:15am & 10:45am

!;.5 #;)202:) *4,:<0:/21

9:30 a.m. Contemporary Worship Sunday Services 8 &10:30 am Sunday School 10:30 am

Programs for children, youth and adults 6000 Drake Road

9:30 a.m. and 11:00 a.m. Sunday School

561-6805

First Church of Christ, Scientist, Anderson Township 7341 Beechmont Avenue (near Five Mile Road) email: csandersontownship@gmail.com 231-1020 christiansciencecincinnati.com Sunday Service & Sunday School 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Testimonial Meeting 7:30 p.m. In Church Reading Rm/Bookstore open after all services. Downtown Reading Rm/Bookstore 412 Vine Street, Cincinnati Open M-F 9:00 a.m - 4:00 p.m.

ECKANKAR Experience the Light and Sound of God You are invited to the Community HU Song

2nd Sunday, 10:00 - 10:30 am

ECK Worship Service 11:00 am - Noon Second Sunday of Each Month Anderson Center Station 7832 Five Mile Road Cincinnati, OH 45230 1-800-LOVE GOD www.Eckankar.org Local (513) 674-7001 www.ECK-Ohio.org

UNITED METHODIST

8221 Miami Road

(CORNER OF GALBRAITH)

513-891-8181

NON-DENOMINATIONAL TRADITIONAL WORSHIP Sunday 8:30 & 11 am CONTEMPORARY WORSHIP Sunday 9:30 & 11 am Children’s programs and nursery & toddler care available at 9:30 and 11:00 services. Plenty of Parking behind church.

7515 Forest Road Cincinnati, OH 45255 513-231-4172 • www.andersonhillsumc.org

CHURCH OF THE SAVIOUR 8005 Pfeiffer Rd. Montgomery 791-3142 www.cos-umc.org "What Christians Believe About Jesus" Traditional Worship 8:20am & 11:00am Contemporary Worship 9:40am Sunday School (All ages) 9:40 & 11am Nursery Care Provided

2010 Wolfangel Rd., Anderson Twp. 513-231-4301 Sunday Worship: 9:00 & 10:15 AM with

EVANGELICAL COVENANT

3850 E. Galbraith, Deer Park Next to Dillonvale Shopping Ctr www.TrinityCincinnati.org 791-7631 Worship Service - 10:00AM Sunday School - 10:15AM Pastor Cathy Kaminski

Nursery care at all services.

Childrens Church & Nursery PASTOR MARIE SMITH

www.cloughchurch.org

Connections Christian Church 7421 East Galbraith Cincinnati, OH 45243

Phone: 513-791-8348 • Fax: 513-791-5648

Jeff Hill • Minister

www.connectionscc.org Worship Service 10:30am Sunday School 9:15 am

FAITH CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP CHURCH ~ Solid Bible Teaching ~ 6800 School Street Newtown, OH 45244 Phone: 271-8442

Web: www.fcfc.us

Dr. R. Edgar Bonniwell, Senior Pastor Pastor Justin Wilson, Youth Minister Vibrant Teen and Children’s Ministries

Sunday Worship 10:30 am All ages Sunday School 9:30 am Wed. Fellowship Meal 6:00 pm Wed. Worship/Bible Study 6:45 pm All are Welcome!

Sunday 9:00 & 11:00 a.m. 11020 S. Lebanon Road. 683-1556 www.golovelive.com

PRESBYTERIAN

&2<4 "7;6 */?4/B3 &B.3 ?<A @;/A> 741 +/6628 (4,;<B/B :02B>A 0/BA2476<></A 7> $2/B6/<4 %7@/B '2;A/ !+%*)15$3 "%0/ .& 5( -4'#,2 +2B 2;B "#$! A?28 >2 >769 766 >?<4@A =/1A - 24 741 2++ >?/ )/61.

Sunday Worship: 8:30 & 11 a.m. Sunday School: 9:45 a.m. Active Youth • Outreach • Fellowship Music Ministries • Bible Studies

Ark of Learning Preschool and Child Care Ages 3 through 12

681 Mt. Moriah Drive • 513.752.1333

mtmoriahumc.org

MADEIRA-SILVERWOOD PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

8000 Miami Ave. 513-791-4470 www.madeirachurch.org Sunday Worship 9:00 am - Contemporary Service 10:00am Educational Hour 11:00 am - Traditional Service

5(#!:02B>A


LIFE

B10 • INDIAN HILL JOURNAL • MAY 29, 2014

Tips to protect your joints while gardening

Mercy Health’s orthopaedic team offers the following tips to help gardeners protect their joints while beautifying their residences and our neighborhoods. Any gardener can tell you that gardening is physical and that it’s exercise. Physical exercise can lead to joint injuries

and doing too much or using the wrong technique can lead to overuse injuries, the most common type of gardening injury. Gardening injuries from overuse can affect the body. In the hands, elbows and shoulders, they can lead to: » Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, which involves

numbness of the hand, usually felt most at night. Small hand tools and vibrating motor equipment can contribute to swelling of the hand and pressure of the median nerve, which supplies sensation to the thumb, index and long finger. » Tendonitis, symptoms of which consist of

pain and weakness around the wrist and hand/fingers. Using small hand tools such as pruning shears or scissors can lead to tendonitis of the hand. » Tendonitis also affects elbows. Pain and weakness in the elbow are the hallmarks of tendonitis, which in gardening is

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often the result of overdoing a certain activity, such as lifting, shoveling and spreading mulch. Elbow pain is also known as tennis elbow when it affects the outside part of the elbow or golfers elbow when it affects the inside part of the elbow. » Rotator cuff injuries, especially if you do much of your gardening work overhead, either trimming tall plants and shrubs or watering flowering baskets. Knee injuries include: » Anterior knee pain, which can be caused by kneeling, bending and even digging in hard, clay soil that irritates the kneecap and surrounding structures in the front of the knee, causing anterior knee pain » Meniscus tears can result from deep squatting while planting and weeding. There are two menisci in the knee, which are small discs of cartilage located between the thigh bone (femur) and the shin bone (tibia). A meniscus tear can cause knee pain, swelling and locking. A common back injury includes: » Soreness, especially in the lower back, from time spent bent over weeding and planting or carting plants and soil The following common sense healthy gardening tips can help you avoid many of these common overuse injuries, stay healthy and protect your joints: » Start with stretches. » Take breaks and mix it up - Limit the time you spend doing one activity.

DR'94D"9RWL,

» Use knee pads - When weeding, use foam pads or knee pads. There are also small scooters or lightweight stools you can sit on while weeding to protect your knees and back. » Use proper tools Tools with extensions or long handles allow you to avoid kneeling or staying in a crouched position for extended periods of time or reaching higher that is comfortable for your shoulders. Small hand tools with springs to help you open and close them will decrease your chance of developing tendonitis. A wheelbarrow can help you avoid back injuries from moving heavy bags of soil. » Consider raised beds and planters - Planting in raised beds and planters can help spare your back and knees, especially if you sit on a gardening stool while you work » Watch bending and kneeling if you’ve had joint replacements - If you have a total hip replacement, you will want to avoid bending at the hip due to the possibility of hip dislocation. If you’ve had a knee replacement, avoid directly kneeling on your knee to avoid damaging your knee replacement. » Stay hydrated and use sunscreen. » Take care after gardening - If you have some soreness after gardening, ice the area for five to 20 minutes a couple of times each day until symptoms go away. If you experience continued pain, swelling and weakness, you might need to see a doctor.

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