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HILLTOP PRESS

Your Community Press newspaper serving College Hill, Finneytown, Forest Park, Greenhills, Mount Airy, Mount Healthy, North College Hill, Seven Hills, Springfield Township

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 20, 2013

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BECAUSE COMMUNITY MATTERS

McFarlin to lead health advisory council By Monica Boylson mboylson@communitypress.com

Ameritas, formerly Union Central Life Insurance Co., is making plans to stay in Forest Park. The firm is planning to renovate the existing Jacobs Engineering building, which stands to the left of the Ameritas office building behind the carillon tower, demolish much of the existing facility, and build a new 70,000-square-foot headquarters on the property near Waycross and Mill roads. JENNIE KEY/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Forest Park closing in on deal to keep Ameritas

Agreement would also draw Summit Investments back into the city By Jennie Key jkey@communitypress.com

Forest Park City Council plans to vote at a special meeting March 26 on an enterprise

agreement that will keep a employer in the city. Council looked over a recommended agreement with Ameritas, forBrehm merly called Union Central Life Insurance Co., at its March 11 work session. It basically seals the deal on retaining the firm, which is

a major employer in the city. It also provides the assistance necessary to initiate the rebuilding of its local headquarters in Forest Hodges Park. In 2006, Ameritas Acacia Mutual Holding Co. merged with Union Central Mutual Holding Co. and was renamed

UNIFI Mutual Holding Co. Last year, it changed its name to Ameritas Mutual Holding Co. and is now known as Ameritas. The incentive package under review includes several components such as an enterprise zone agreement, redevelopment grant, expedited permit approval, and discounted permit fees. City Manager Ray See AMERITAS, Page A2

Winton Woods schools restarts superintendent search By Monica Boylson mboylson@communitypress.com

The Winton Woods City School Board is starting its superintendent search over with the Ohio School Boards Association. Board President Tim Cleary said the board did not find the perfect candidate in their top five and will begin a second search for a superintendent. “We’re going to start from scratch,” he said. “We wanted to be assured that the candidate met the board’s expectations as

well as the community’s expectations. Everything didn’t align.” He said that they had good candidates for Cleary the job but no one was a perfect fit. “We’re very optimistic about our next search,” he said. “We want to jump right back in. It’s imperative that we get a permanent superintendent on board but it’s got to be the right one. We’re hoping to find somebody

as soon as possible.” The board will meet with OSBA Director of Board Services Kathy LaSota at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, March 19, to discuss the next steps. LaSota “I don’t know the new timeline or parameters yet,” she said. “The board is going to revisit their criteria and determine what is essential to them in their selection process.” She said that it is not uncom-

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mon for a board to repost a position. “It’s an opportunity for the board to take advantage of,” she said. “Part of (OSBA’s) guarantee is that we facilitate the search no matter how long it takes.” In the meantime, Cleary said that the board will also do their own search. He added that they will reach out to community groups to make suggestions as well. “We just want to be 100 percent sure we find the right person,” he said.

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Gwen McFarlin has served as a trustee in Springfield Township for 18 years and now she is adding a new title to her resume – chairwoman of the District Advisory Council for Hamilton County Public McFarlin Health. As chairwoman she will serve as a liaison between the 20-member board and local and state health organizations, foundations, hospitals and schools. “I was amazed,” she said of being appointed to her new position. McFarlin has served on the District Advisory Council board, which includes trustees, mayors and the president of the Hamilton County Commissioners, for 10 years. Her most recent role was as treasurer. The role of the council is to select four of the five members of the board of health, make recommendations to the board of health and authorize city contractual agreements. With a background in nursing and public health administration, she said she enjoys working with the county health council. “A lot of people don’t know what services Hamilton County Public Health provides,” she said. Services include: disease prevention, emergency preparedness, environmental health, epidemiology, health promotion and education. She said that one of the things that the advisory council has been working on is an accreditation program for the public health district. “Ultimately it means you’re going to provide efficient care, promote health, prevent disease and preserve the wellness and integrity of the community,” she said.

Vol. 76 No. 4 © 2013 The Community Press ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


NEWS

A2 • HILLTOP PRESS • MARCH 20, 2013

Ameritas Continued from Page A1

Hodges said an additional incentive for the company is the benefit of working with a community that has eliminated bureaucratic red tape in order to

Index Calendar .................B2 Classifieds ................C Deaths ...................B6 Food ......................B3 Police .................... B6 Schools ..................A5 Sports ....................A6 Viewpoints .............A8

expedite the approval process as well as the building process. Economic Development Director Paul Brehm said the city has been developing a plan to keep the business in Forest Park for about 15 years. “We wanted to be ready when the time came,” he said. “Our strategy long term has always been to make plans to keep our businesses.” The formal council vote will be at a special meeting at 8 p.m. Tuesday, March 26, in council chambers of the Forest Park Municipal Building, 1203 W. Kemper Road. Brehm said he expects the

Hamilton County Board of County Commissioners to approve the enterprise zone at its meeting on Wednesday, March 27. Hodges also praised the work of Forest Park Community Development Director Chris Anderson, who has been working with the group to finalize the deal. Hodges said Ameritas plans to invest almost $20 million to renovate the existing Jacobs Engineering building, which stands to the left of the Ameritas office building, demolish much of the existing facility, and build a new 70,000square-foot headquarters on the property. This retains 607 full-time equiva-

lents – 593 full-time and 29 part-time employees – with an annual payroll of more than $39 million. The anticipated completion date for construction of the new building is March of 2014. Ameritas is pleased to stay. JoAnn Martin, Ameritas president and CEO, said, “Through our affiliation with Union Central we have been a part of the Forest Park community for nearly 50 years. We see this investment as an opportunity to consolidate our associates from throughout the Cincinnati metro area into new and modernized facilities. “With this renewed

BREAKING IT DOWN Forest Park’s incentive package, if approved, has four major components: » Enterprise zone agreement – This would exempt 75 percent of the new property taxes associated with the project for a period of ten years. This will not affect existing property taxes. » Redevelopment grant - A local redevelopment grant in the amount of $100,000 to help the company with its relocation of equipment and employees. » Expedited permit approvals and discount - The city will expedite permit approvals for the project at no charge. To mitigate some the expense associated with the project, Forest Park also agrees to a 50 percent discount for these permits. » Support for state incentive application - In addition to these local and county incentives, Forest Park also agreed to support the company’s pursuit of any applicable state incentives or financing assistance programs.

commitment to Forest Park, we look forward to building upon our tradition of local community involvement and support.” In addition, Ameritas committed to bringing its financial investment arm back to Forest Park. Summit Investments moved to downtown Cincinnati in 2006 and employs 28 fulltime employees with an annual $3.8 million payroll. “By moving quickly, we can help the company meet its ambitious timetable for the project,” Hodges said. “Provided the incentive package is ap-

proved, Ameritas is prepared to move forward with the Summit relocation in May of this year. “By leveraging our resources with these other sources, we are able to retain our community’s largest employer all without increasing local taxes or placing an unnecessary burden on our operation. By moving forward with this agreement, we not only retain the existing operation but facilitate immediate growth at the current location. “The project will result in new revenue for the city from day one,” he said.

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NEWS

MARCH 20, 2013 • HILLTOP PRESS • A3

Four finalists to choose from in Finneytown By Monica Boylson

mboylson@communitypress.com

Four finalists are in the running for the Finneytown Local School District superintendent position. » Mike Holbrook – Mount Healthy City Schools executive director of Curriculum and Instruction » Bruce Kidder – Frontier Local Schools superintendent, New

Horn

Matamoras, Ohio » Bradley Neavin – Eaton Community Schools superintendent, Eaton,

Ohio » Tyrone Olverson – Licking Heights Local Schools K-12 Curriculum and Instruction director, Pataskala, Ohio

Second-round interviews are scheduled to begin March 27 and the board is hosting a community forum from 6-9 p.m. Tuesday, April 2, at the performing arts center on the Finneytown secondary campus, 8916 Fontainebleau Terrace. Board President Laura Horn said it will be a roundtable moderated discussion. The community may submit up to three questions by

Wednesday, March 27, to be answered by the candidates. To submit questions, visit http://www.finney town.org/Superinten dentSurvey.aspx or email Bthal@Finneytown.org. Questions can also be sent or dropped off at the board office, 8916 Fontainebleau Terrace, Cincinnati OH 45231. Each candidate will answer questions for one

hour. “It is important for the board of education to include the citizens and education community the opportunity to meet the candidates. We encourage everyone to come and participate in the forums,” Horn said. “This allows the community and staff to identify the candidate’s background and personal qualifications that best match the culture and

needs of our school district.” Ohio School Boards Association consultant Dick Caster who has facilitated the search for the school district said that the board is expected to vote for the superintendent during the week of April 8 and should reach a final decision and negotiate a contract by the end of April. He said, however, those dates are subject to change.

Mt. Airy churches walking the Way of the Cross The churches of Mount Airy will once again place the large wooden cross upon their shoulders and carry it along the streets of Mount Airy to commemorate Good Friday, March 29. The 3 p.m. procession begins at the parking lot of Mount Airy United Meth-

odist Church on North Bend Road near the Mount Airy water towers. It winds its way along Colerain Avenue, stopping at various churches of Mount Airy including Impact Worship Center, St. Therese Little Flower Church, and Praise Chapel.

John Douglas, right, the pastor at Praise Chapel Church of God, reads the eighth Station of the Cross during last year’s annual Mount Airy Way of the Cross on Good Friday. FILE PHOTO

Each year, for the past 12 years, participants take turns lugging the heavy cross for a distance to remember the passion and death of Jesus Christ as part of Christian Holy Week observances culminating on Easter Sunday, in remembrance of the Resurrection of Christ. “Carrying the cross gives me a sense of what Christ went through for me and how much he loves me. It reminds me of what Apostle Paul wrote in Phillipians 3:10 that says that I might to know him in the fellowship of his suffering,” said Pastor Rodney Posey of Impact Worship Center. The churches of Mount Airy conduct this annual event and invite passersby and anyone else to take their turn carrying the cross and stopping along the way for readings from

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the Bible, prayer and silence. The rain-or-shine event will also welcome members of the Light of the World community church led by Pastor Mike Scruggs. The congregation now occupies the Col-

erain Avenue building formerly the home of LaFary’s IGA grocery store. “There’s no mistake about it. You can see why Jesus fell down carrying such a cross,” added Betty Cepluch, a member of Lit-

tle Flower Church, who has participated in the annual Good Friday observance since its inception. Those who are not able to carry the cross often walk beside it to get as close as possible.

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NEWS

A4 • HILLTOP PRESS • MARCH 20, 2013

New St. Xavier principal can’t wait to start By Monica Boylson mboylson@communitypress.com

When Terry Tyrrell starts his new job July 1, he says his children will think it is easy. “My kids think my job is to watch basketball and eat popcorn and M&Ms,” the father of three joked. “They think that’s all I do because when we go to school that’s what we do. That’s their grasp of things.” Tyrell, 37, was recently named as St. Xavier High School principal. The Chicago resident is now the assistant principal for stu-

dent services for St. Ignatius College Prep in Chicago, Ill. “They also know that we’re Tyrrell moving to Cincinnati, that I’m going to be at St. Xavier and they know that girls aren’t allowed to be here,” he said. “They don’t think they can even come here so we’ll work on that but they’re excited.” Tyrrell’s wife is Marygrace and his three children are Mara, 5, Eleanor,

3, and Clarke who is 9 months old. He said he was happy to hear of the opening at St. Xavier. “Nobody wants to be a principal, you just get called to it,” he said. “I felt a calling to be principal and St. X has a great reputation within the Jesuit network, so I knew it to be a good school.” The principal position was available after former St. X Principal Dave Mueller took a job at Mercy High School last spring after 19 years. Then assistant principal Bill Sandquist stepped in as an in-

terim principal to give the school time to find a permanent replacement. Sandquist had already announced that he would be retiring after 19 years at the school. “We formed a committee of faculty, trustees, alumni and parents and put together a posting and that committee then received applications and decided who to interview,” St. Xavier President Fr. Tim Howe SJ said. Howe said, even though the school has had two lay principals, it is the first time in St. Xavier history that a lay principal is

and Saint Ignatius; and was a resident school prefect at Georgetown Preparatory School in Bethesda, Md. “My own goals are to do what is best for the students,” he said. “The first year I will listen, look and learn the culture of St. X.” In the meantime, Tyrrell is looking to find a home in Cincinnati and a good grade school for his children. “People have great things to say about Cincinnati,” he said. “My family and I are excited to move here and get started. I think St. X is the right fit.”

somebody who is new to St. X. “He brings a lot to the table and has a deep experience and affection for the Jesuit education,” he said. “He’s a product of the Jesuit education himself. But he also brings fresh eyes and can look at how we’re doing things here from a different perspective.” Tyrrell has also been the director of student activities and at St. Ignatius School in Chicago; taught social studies at St. Louis University High School, St. John’s College High School in Washington D.C.

Cinema could be in Northgate Mall plans McDonald’s moving onto property; other stores about to open By Jennie Key jkey@communitypress.com

Colerain

Northgate Mall is in the midst of a revitalization, adding new junior anchors, restaurants and maybe entertainment to the mix. COMMUNITY PRESS FILE PHOTO

Township

Members of the Colerain Township Business Association got a look at Northgate Mall’s future at its monthly meeting March 15. Mall manager Renee Bell said at the meeting the mall is talking with a number of retailers, including a movie theater that will occupy the space where the former J.C. Penney store was located

if a deal is reached. Claire Anderson, a spokeswoman for the Tabani Group, the Dallasbased retailer that owns Northgate Mall, said the mall cannot comment on the status of stores and businesses currently in negotiations until contracts are signed. She did say a rumored deal with Hancock Fabrics is not currently part of the mall’s plans. The mall will likely add HH Gregg to its lineup, as the electronics and appliance store was on the agenda for the Colerain Township Zoning Commission’s meeting Tuesday, March 19, for an approval that would allow it to move its store there. The McDonald’s restaurant currently across the street on Springdale

The Tabani Group bought Northgate Mall, a 915,956-square-foot regional mall, in 2012 for $21.5 million. The mall is anchored by Sears and Macy’s, following the closure of Dillard’s in 2009. Don Hughett, president of the Colerain Township Business Association, says he is excited about the mall’s future. “Our membership was very pleased at what we heard at the meeting,” he said. “There was a lot about potential tenants, but they also said they were in the process of receiving bids to resurface the parking lot. That kind of investment speaks volumes about the commitment the new owners are making. I think what we heard made everyone very happy.”

Road is also making the jump to the mall property, having been approved by the zoning commission last month. The mall is in the middle of a redevelopment plan that brings junior anchors DSW Shoes, Marshall’s, Michael’s and Ulta Cosmetics to the space formerly occupied by Dillard’s. Marshall’s is set for a May opening, with no date yet set for a grand opening celebration. The mall has also signed deals with restaurants Longhorn Steakhouse and Cheddars, which will be built on outlots. Work on Cheddars is already under way. The mall celebrated the opening of its newest tenant, Burlington Coat Factory, with a ribbon cutting ceremony March 8.

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SCHOOLS

MARCH 20, 2013 • HILLTOP PRESS • A5

HILLTOP

PRESS

Editor: Marc Emral, memral@communitypress.com, 853-6264

ACHIEVEMENTS | NEWS | ACTIVITIES | HONORS

CommunityPress.com

Junior receives writing awards

Pictured from left are sisters Lizzy Schutte, Lynn Schutte, Amanda Popp, Emily Popp, Samantha Baxter and Elizabeth Baxter. PROVIDED.

McAuley spring play is sister act McAuley High School’s spring play is “Once On This Island,” a contemporary, Caribbean-flavored musical by the Tony Award-winning songwriting team of Lynn Ahrens and Stephen Flaherty, and based upon the book “My Love, My Love” by Rosa Guy. The performance dates of “Once On This Island” are 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, March 22 and March 23, and 2 p.m. Sunday, March 24. Ticket prices are $6 for students and senior citizens, and $8 for adults. According to Emily Lafferty, McAuley director, “Once On This Island” is the original and theatrical adaptation of the popular fairy tale “The Little Mermaid.” In almost non-stop song and dance, the show tells the story of Ti Moune, a peasant girl who rescues and falls in love with Daniel, a wealthy boy from the other side of her island. When Daniel is returned to his people, the fantastical gods who rule the island guide Ti Moune on a

quest to test the strength of her love against the powerful forces of prejudice, hatred and death. There are three pairs of high school/grade school sisters in the show. McAuley senior Elizabeth Baxter is playing the parts of Lady Armand and the gate keeper, while her younger sister Samantha is in the chorus. Samantha is an eighth-grader at St. Catharine of Siena School in Westwood. Samantha said she “loves being able to spend time with Liz because I usually don’t have any time alone with her.” Sophomore Emily Popp really enjoys having her sister, St. Vivian seventh-grader Amanda, in the cast with her. “It’s nice. We are both so busy with our activities. This is a place where we can hang out,” Emily said. She plays the part of Ague, one of the gods, and Amanda is in the chorus. For more information, contact Emily Lafferty at laffertye@live.mcauleyhs.net.

Mother of Mercy High School junior Alena Flick won three regional awards in the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards Competition. Flick, the daughter of Anne and Robert Flick of Flick Springfield Township, was the only student from a Catholic Cincinnati high school to receive a writing award. She was awarded a Silver Key and two honorable mentions in the Midwest Writing Region-atLarge for the following pieces:

» “Banana Pudding and Black Birds” Silver Key in the Science Fiction/Fantasy category » “Just Monsters” Honorable Mention in the Science Fiction/Fantasy category » “The Guillotine Window” – Honorable mention in the Poetry category. In it’s 90th year, the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards “recognize the exceptional vision of our nation’s youth.” The competition allows students to be noticed for their creative talents and each year the number of participants has increased. Students’ submissions are judged by lumi-

naries in the visual and literary arts. They look for works that can best exemplify the Awards’ core values: originality, technical skill and the emergence of personal voice or vision. Past winners have included Andy Warhol, Sylvia Plath, Truman Capote, Richard Avedon, Robert Redford and Joyce Carol Oates. The Scholastic Art & Writing Awards continues to be the longest-running, most prestigious recognition program for creative teens in the U.S., and the largest source of scholarships for young artists and writers.

APPLE AWARDS

Winton Woods parent Melinda Arachikavitz showed up at the December board of education meeting to hug teachers Lisa Dye and Jim Bissell and watch them receive the Apple Awards she had nominated them for. Arachikavitz called Courtney Wilson, the district's executive director of human resources and legal affairs, to say Dye and Bissell, both special education teachers, deserved recognition for keeping her informed, following through with help, caring for her son Michael like he was their own, giving emotional support and providing contact information about programs her son can participate in. "My hand began to hurt, so I quit writing at this point," said Wilson. The Apple Award is given by Winton Woods City Schools to staff members who go above and beyond to assist students. Pictured from left are Lisa Dye, interim superintendent Jim Smith, Jim Bissell and Melinda Arachikavitz. HTP

SCHOOL NOTES WINTON WOODS CITY SCHOOL DISTRICT

Five schools in the district have received the Clean Kitchen Award given by the Hamilton County Public Health Department. Winton Woods High School, Intermediate School, Elementary School, and Primary North and South received the award. While Winton Woods Middle School had no violations this year, it was not eligible for the award. To receive the Clean Kitchen award, a facility must: Have fewer than three violations in the previous two years prior to applying; Have no “critical” or repeat violations in the previous two years; Maintain at least two staff members with Level I Food Handler certification or at least one staff member with a current ServSafe certificate; Submit applications along with corresponding documentation; Have a minimum of two years of inspection data on file with Hamilton County Public Health. Along with food service director Karen Homan, staff responsible for receiving the Clean Kitchen awards are: Winton Woods High School: Manager Debbie Siemon, Vicky Koeninger, Bev Wyrick, Sharon Meyer, Loretta Gordon, Ginny Bierman, Shawna Brocker, Kim Harig and Robyn Cross. Winton Woods Intermediate School: Manager Connie Bauer, Judy Beaver, Sandy McCor-

mick and Alicia Johnson. Winton Woods Elementary School: Lead Worker Kim Henry, Starr Simpson, Priscilla Cupp and Beth Hooper. Winton Woods Primary North: Lead Worker Shari Spaw and Debbie Weber Winton Woods Primary South: Lead Worker Linda McKeehan and Mary Phillips. ■ Two Winton Woods students are dancing their way through this year’s PTA Reflections arts program all the way to state competition. Aversa Prentosito, a seventhgrader at Winton Woods Middle School, and Janyla Thomas, a pre-school student at Winton Woods Primary North, both submitted dance choreography entries in their grade division. Following the theme “The Magic of the Moment,” Prentosito’s dance entry is titled “Dance is My Voice,” while Thomas’s entry is titled, “Rainbows are Magical.” Both have been forwarded to Ohio PTA for judging and hold the possibility of representing Winton Woods Community PTA in the National PTA Reflections Program competition. The National PTA Reflections program encourages students to explore the arts and express themselves by giving positive recognition for their artistic efforts. Students in pre-kindergarten through 12th grade create theme-based artwork in visual arts, literature, musical composition, photography, film production or dance choreography.

WINTON WOODS MUSIC BOOSTERS

The Winton Woods Music Boosters organization is offering a $500 post high school scholarship to the graduating senior who best exemplifies the character and tradition of the Winton Woods music program. The deadline for this $500 scholarship is April 19. Additional information can be found on the Music Boosters website at music.wintonwoodsboosters.org/ scholarships.

WINTON WOODS FRIENDS OF THE THEATER

The Winton Woods High School Friends of the Theater is offering two $250 post high school scholarships to the graduating seniors who best exemplify the character and tradition of the Winton Woods theater program. The scholarship deadline is 3 p.m. April 23. Additional information can be found on the theater website at theater.wintonwoodsboosters.org/scholarships/.

WINTON WOODS COMMUNITY PTA

The Winton Woods Community PTA will award three scholarships for 2013. Two $250 scholarships will be awarded to graduating seniors of Winton Woods High School, and this year, one $500 scholarship will be awarded that has been named in honor of Dr. Camille Nasbe for her service to the district’s students. The deadline for these scholarships is April 30. To download and print a copy of the scholarship, visit www.wintonwoods-

boosters.org/scholarships/.

WINTON WOODS HIGH SCHOOL

Students interested in applying to the Academy of Global Studies @ Winton Woods High School have the option to apply online through April 1 at the district’s website, www.wintonwoods.org. Winton Woods City Schools is an open enrollment district, so students outside of the district may also apply. The Academy of Global Studies opened in August 2011. In addition to completing four years of math, science, English and Social Studies, AGS students will complete four years of either Spanish or Mandarin Chinese, complete a yearly Global Seminar class, complete and present a capstone project in the senior year, log community service hours, attend eight bells a day instead of seven, and earn at least 26 credits, instead of 22. AGS students also meet twice a month with mentors from the business community. For questions or more information, contact AGS Coordinator Kevin Jones at 619-2430 or jones.kevin@wintonwoods.org.

WINTON WOODS MIDDLE SCHOOL

Jalyn Hill and Doryan Miller were honored at the December meeting of the board of education with the Kiwanis Character Is Key Award by Kiwanis member Jim Lawler. Hill was recognized for the character trait of fairness, while Miller was recognized for

his caring. “Jalyn understands that fairness is not everyone getting the same thing, but rather everyone getting what they need to be successful,” said Kim Sterwerf, WWMS counselor. “During group work she makes sure everyone is heard and their opinions are valued. She doesn’t dominate but leads in a quiet way to ensure that all students in her group are treated fairly and with respect.” Sterwerf said it’s not unusual to witness Miller letting others go before him or holding the door for someone to pass through. “He is always very compassionate and complimentary to those around him,” she said. “He is always very respectful to student and adults and is a caring, perfect gentleman.”

MISCELLANEOUS

The Catholic Order of Foresters, a fraternal insurance society, awarded $10,000 in tuition reimbursement to COF youth public school members attending a Catholic religious education program, kindergarten through high school. Mariah Girmann, the daughter of Chris and Mary Girmann, received a $50 COF Religious Education Assistance Program Award for the 2012-2013 school year in a random national drawing. The Girmann family are members of Catholic Order of Queen of Peace Court 2126 and attend St. Bartholomew Parish.


SPORTS

A6 • HILLTOP PRESS • MARCH 20, 2013

HILLTOP

PRESS

Editor: Melanie Laughman, mlaughman@communitypress.com, 513-248-7573

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | RECREATIONAL

CommunityPress.com

Lacrosse teams prepare for 2013 season By Tom Skeen and Nick Dudukovich tskeen@communitypress.com/ ndudukovich@communitypress.com

Roger Bacon’s Tyler Oldfield (3) makes a layup against Versallies’ Damien Richard during the first quarter of the Division III regional finals at Trent Arena March 16. JOSEPH FUQUA II/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Roger Bacon’s ‘comeback year’ dedicated to Corcoran

By Nick Dudukovich

ndudukovich@communitypress.com

KETTERING — After knock-

ing off top-ranked Summit Country Day en route to the Division III regional finals three days earlier, Roger Bacon High School came within a minute of punching its ticket for the state final four. But it wasn’t meant to be, as Versailles outlasted the Spartans 56-53 at Trent Arena March 16.

ONLINE EXTRAS

See a video interview with Erik Edwards after the March 13 win. http://cin.ci/15dpWI5

The lead changed 11 times, but the Spartans couldn’t close the game out in the final minutes. While up 51-49, Roger Bacon looked like it was about to come up with key steal. Instead, the ball found its way into the hands of Versailles senior Chad Win-

ner, who launched a deep 3pointer—a shot Spartans’ coach Brian Neal estimated at 28 feet. Roger Bacon answered when Carlas Jackson, who had a game-high 20 points, hit two free throws to put the Spartans up 53-52. With 30 seconds to play, Versailles came out of timeout and worked some clock before scoring with 13 seconds left. Roger Bacon turned the ball over and was forced to foul. Versailles cashed in both free throws to go

up three with 3.5 seconds to play. Carlas Jackson shot a desperation 3-pointer to no avail. “When they are making 28foot bombs on broken plays and we’re missing layups, it’s really one of those things, is it really not meant to be?” Neal said. “You know, you look back, would of, could of, should of, and they made a couple more plays than we did.” Roger Bacon ended the seaSee BACON, Page A7

Lancers come up just short in final

La Salle

The 2013 campaign will serve as a year of firsts as La Salle High School fields a competitive lacrosse team for the first time in school history. Josh Wellen will serve as head coach, as the Lancers make their way in the Ohio High School Lacrosse Association competing at the Division I level. Wellen founded the Westside Wildcats and the Cincinnati Outlaws competitive summer travel team. More recently, he has been the defensive coordinator for the lacrosse team at the College of Mount St. Joseph. La Salle begins play at Elder March 27. The squad hosts its first home match against Anderson April 8.

By Tom Skeen tskeen@communitypress.com

NORWOOD — The La Salle Lancers experienced just about all the highs and lows one team can during a single game. Unfortunately they felt the ultimate low as the buzzer sounded for the final time in the 2012-2013 season after their 5046 loss to Walnut Hills in the Division I regional finals at Xavier University’s Cintas Center March 15. “… Our guys played their tails off,” coach Dan Fleming said. “It was a great year and I’m so proud of them. We came up a basket or two short.” After leading by as many as six in the first half and trailing by as many as 11 in the third quarter, La Salle grabbed a onepoint lead with 3:23 to play. The Eagles regained the lead on a D.J. Wingfield lay-in before Blake Simpson gave the Lancers their final lead of the game at 42-41. Walnut outscored the Lancers 9-4 over the final 2:13 to advance to the state Final Four for the first time in school history. “We wanted to make them sweat, we wanted to make them think about losing and we got in that position,” Fleming said. “… If we would have had the ball up one and then made a play, I’d like to see our chances but you

From left, La Salle seniors Conner Speed (15), Trey Thompson (10), Eric Southers (13), and Brett Cooper (21) accept the regional runner-up trophy after losing to Walnut Hills 50-46 March 15 in the Division I regional finals at Xavier University. JOSEPH FUQUA II/COMMUNITY PRESS

ONLINE EXTRAS For videos of the Lancers’ last week of the basketball season, see http://cin.ci/YJdsB and http://cin.ci/ZeTu7A

have to give them credit. They did make the plays and they did make their free throws.” The second quarter really hurt the Lancers. It was similar

to what happened when the two teams met Jan. 15. La Salle led after the first quarter in both games, but the Eagles made a run and led at halftime in both contests. This time the Eagles outscored La Salle 17-6 and scored the final 10 points of the quarter. Walnut Hills won both games. “They’ve made their run in the second quarter game after game after game,” Fleming

With eight of their 10 starters back from a year ago, things are looking up for second-year coach Nate Sprong and the St. Xavier Bombers’ lacrosse team. Senior Ian King – who will play at Michigan next season – is back following an AllAmerican season in 2012 in which he led his team in scoring. “He makes my job easier,” Sprong said of King. “In addition to being a great scorer, he is a great feeder. He helps make his teammates better players.” Joining King as a team captain are fellow seniors Ryan Berning, Parker Greiwe and Benny Russert. Berning – a defensemen – will play at Richmond next season, while Greiwe will play defense for Holy Cross in 2014. Russert is a four-year starter in goal and provides rare stability seen in high school sports these days in net. “It’s reassuring for everyone having someone back there basically as a coach of the field who can direct the defense besides being a great stopper,” Sprong said of his goalie. “It’s definitely a confidence booster.” After bowing out in the Division I state quarterfinals last season, Sprong is hoping for more in 2013. “… We are trying to focus on the fundamentals and hopefully we pay attention to the details and the big picture falls into place by the end of the year,” the coach said. “We are optimistic and have an excited group coming back.” The Bombers get things started April 6 against Western Reserve High School.

said. “… We just couldn’t sustain our effort against them in the second quarter and that is what cost us.” While it will be hard for seniors Brett Cooper, Connor Speed, Eric Southers and Trey Thompson to come to terms with how their final game in a La Salle uniform ended, what they accomplished in the secSee LA SALLE, Page A7

McAuley

Coach Megan Miller leads an enthusiastic bunch into the season as McAuley embarks on the new campaign. The Mohawks will have experience at midfield, with Meggan Dollenmeyer, Liz Bren (center), Kate Calder and Courtney Haverbusch returning. Judy Pearce returns on defense, while Jessica Ventura will be back on the attack. McAuley begins its season at Walnut Hills March 26.


SPORTS & RECREATION

MARCH 20, 2013 • HILLTOP PRESS • A7

CATCHING UP WITH COLLEGE ATHLETES Scherpenberg is player of week

She recently averaged 13.5 points and 12.5 rebounds in two of Ohio Dominican’s victories. She had a double-double in a victory over Walsh, scoring 16 points and 18 rebounds. A total of 12 of those rebounds were the most by an Ohio Dominican player since before the 20012002 season.

McAuley High School graduate Melissa Scherpenberg, a freshman who plays basketball for Ohio Dominican University, was recently named the GLIAC South Division women’s basketball Player of the Week.

Against Malone, Scherpenberg helped her team come back from a 17-point deficit for the 61-59 win. She scored 11 points. Scherpenberg is averaging 8.9 points this season, and 10 rebounds per game. She ranks fourth in conference in rebounding and third with 28 blocked shots.

SIDELINES Football, cheer registration

Hilltop Youth Athletic Football and cheerleading signups for returning participants are

Roger Bacon senior Jake Westerfeld (30) battles for the loose ball against Versallies Damien Richard (23) in the fourth quarter. JOSEPH FUQUA II/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Bacon Continued from Page A6

son 24-4 and ranked No. 7 in the Associated Press’ Division III statewide poll. The 24 victories are tied for second most in school history, according to Neal. Senior Jake Westerfeld said the team devoted the season to athletic director Joe Corcoran, who died Feb. 13. “Our season, first of all…will be dedicated to him,” Westerfeld said.

La Salle Continued from Page A6

ond half of the season was something special.

4-6 p.m., Saturday, April 20, and 2-4 p.m., Saturday, May 4. Open registration is 4-6 p.m., Saturday, May 18; and 2-4 p.m., Saturday, June 8. Registration sessions will be

After the game, Neal said he was hurting for his team and school, because the Roger Bacon community had been through a lot with Corcoran’s death. Basketball served as an outlet that rallied the school. “…Playing basketball…and competing with a chance to go to Columbus, certainly kind of (energized) the school,” Neal said. “I don’t know if it was a remedy, but it helped,” Westerfeld added that it was a “comeback year,” as the Spartans beat many of the teams it lost to last

season, with victories over Summit and GCL rival Alter standing out. Summit ended Roger Bacon’s season in last year’s regional final. “(Summit) was probably one of the great wins we’ve had, and Alter, because they are still in (the tournament),” Westerfeld said. Neal said he’ll remember the members of the 2012-2013 squad fondly, but knows history remembers the teams that win the big one. “Losing in the regional finals, it’s hard to swallow,” he said.

The Lancers won 11 of their final 12 games and 16 of the last 19 and Fleming enjoyed every minute of it. “It’s just been awesome,” he said. “They

played so hard, they played so well and they’ve been such a good team to coach. These guys listen and they do what they are told. … It’s just been a joy.”

PRESS PREPS HIGHLIGHTS the criteria and placed on ballots for the public’s vote. Readers can vote once a day for their favorite athlete. Winners for 2013 will receive two Reds tickets courtesy of the Cincinnati Reds, a certificate and a story to be published in a late June edition. The nominations and voting are done online at cincinnati.com. Neither the articles, nominations forms nor ballots will count against the meter, so you do not have to be a Cincinnati Enquirer/cincinnati.com subscriber to nominate or vote on your favorite candidate. Email mlaughman@communitypress.com with ques-

By Tom Skeen tskeen@communitypress.com

Sportsman nominees

The nomination period for the fifth-annual Community Press and Recorder Sportsman and Sportswoman of the Year award is approaching in early April. The CP/CR sports staff seeks starting, stand-out athletes of great character and strong academic standing to represent each newspaper as its Sportsman or Sportswoman of the Year. Readers will nominate these junior or senior athletes via cincinnati.com, names that will be verified through the school as meeting

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VIEWPOINTS A8 • HILLTOP PRESS • MARCH 20, 2013

PRESS

Editor: Marc Emral, memral@communitypress.com, 853-6264

EDITORIALS | LETTERS | COLUMNS | CH@TROOM

SPELLING CHAMP

HILLTOP CommunityPress.com

Three’s a charm for seventh-grader Aversa Prentosito, who won the Winton Woods Middle School spelling bee, her third win in a Winton Woods spelling competition. Prentosito’s first win came at Winton Woods Primary South in second grade, and she has placed either first or second in every school bee since. Two years ago she was the first student from the district to advance to the Scripps Regional Spelling Bee, where at age 9 she competed against students up to age 14. Prentosito succeeded in out-spelling 50 of the 67 school champions. If she passes the online test in January, she will again get the opportunity to represent Winton Woods in the Scripps Regional Bee this February. PROVIDED.

Help lower idling time at schools We can all help improve air quality around schools How many times have you seen cars and buses waiting outside of schools with their engines idling? Children are particularly vulnerable to air Megan pollution. Hummel They inhale COMMUNITY PRESS more air per GUEST COLUMNIST pound of body weight because they breathe faster than adults. An idling vehicle is one whose engine is running while parked or not in use. Idling is a concern on school grounds due to the high congestion of vehicles in a traffic line up waiting for students. We can

all help to improve air quality at schools by turning off our engines while we wait. Help your local school start an anti-idling campaign! The Southwest Ohio Air Quality Agency can provide free antiidling signs and support materials to help parents, students, bus drivers and teachers learn how they can improve the air quality, and help strategize where to post signs and effectively engage the entire school community. Even without an anti-idling campaign, you can help improve air quality. Next time you are waiting in your car, remember: turn your engine off, breathe better, save money. Megan Hummel is the public relations coordinator for the Southwest Ohio Air Quality Agency.

Campaign helping leukemia society The Leukemia and Lymphoma Society is a national voluntary health agency dedicated to curing leukemia, lymphoma, hodgkin’s disease, myeloma, and to improving the quality of life of patients and their families. My name is Erica Steinbeck and my goal is to raise as much money as I can for this wonderful cause. Leukemia has personally touched my life through the loss of my dear friend, Annmarie. She was diagnosed at the age of 26. She fought for her life for six years before losing her battle at the age of 32. The

honored people who personally knew Annmarie would tell you that she always had a smile on her face and she Erica always found Steinbeck COMMUNITY PRESS laughter in every aspect GUEST COLUMNIST of life. This was also true during her battle with leukemia. I have committed to run for the Leukemia Society’s Woman of the Year. Though I could not help my friend sur-

vive this disease, I, along with my campaign team the Leukemaniacs are extremely determined to win the title of Woman of the Year. I have set a goal of raising $50,000 with the knowledge that I will be part of the effort that one day produces a cure. Everyone knows someone who has been diagnosed with a type of cancer. Imagine the gratitude a cancer patient will feel for someone to donate money to help assist in medical bills, cancer treatments, and research. Your contribution will fund us getting closer to a cure.

My campaign began March 8 and will end at the grand finale on May 17. If you would like to donate, here is the link to my personal website where you can make a secure online credit card donation – www.mwoy.org/pages/ soh/cincy13/ericas. You may also write a check made payable to: LLS. No amount is too large or small and all donations are tax deductible. If you choose to mail a donation with a check, please mail to the following address: 611 Coleberry Court, Cleves, Oh. 45002. There are other ways that you

Keeping the American Dream alive

The American Dream is an idea that embodies the optimism rooted in the American psychic. Sadly, when discussing today’s economy and random violence, too many no longer believe in the American Dream. The question at hand is, “How did we accumulate so much debt, and how did we become so uncivilized?” Urban planners and sociologists, who embrace a design philosophy called New Urbanism, propose an answer, as documented in the book “Suburban Nation: The Rise of Sprawl and the Decline of the American Dream.” It explains how our post war zoning laws, designed to move traffic, prevents development to be configured in a fiscally conservative, traditional-neighborhood manner. That suburban sprawl development, conceived during the time of cheap energy, has made us too auto dependent, and is now unsustainable. Sprawl’s expensive, spread-

out auto infrastructure created the expensive multi-carfamily, and forces the elderly to live in expensive Jim Grawe retirement COMMUNITY PRESS homes upon GUEST COLUMNIST losing their ability to drive. And, because it groups houses by value, it has isolated the poor, which inadvertently removed the proven neighborshelping-neighbors social safety net; now replaced with an array of expensive, Robin Hood style government programs. Taxed to the limit we glorify casinos, hoping to gamble our way to prosperity. Sprawl suburbs are designed to make automobiles happy; so they are not kid friendly. Activities are oftentimes beyond an adolescent’s independent reach. Most cannot walk or ride their bikes to school, the store, or to a pickup

HILLTOP

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A publication of

baseball game. Learning how to become a responsible adult is never easy. But it’s especially challenging when you’re warehoused in front of a TV, and your only opportunity to make choices, exercise judgment, and be independent, is deciding what channel to watch. Sprawl suburbs breed teen isolation and boredom, a cause for the sharp increase in teen suicide, and are the reason why car crashes are the No. 1 killer of American teenagers. Perhaps most tragically, when evaluating the Sandy Hook type assailants we see a trend. They never quite fit in – a heartbreak that is another casualty of sprawl. Sociologists conclude that children growing up in income-segregated communities are less likely to develop a sense of empathy for people from other walks of life, and are ill prepared to live in a diverse society; that their very unreality is an environment in which thrill-seeking young adults are more likely to make

the leap to fantasy. Where we aspire to live will always be a personal expression of the American Dream idea. Now, a growing number are suggesting that the traditional neighborhood design alternative should again be an option of choice when developing new communities; and that our authentic traditional neighborhoods are a resource waiting to be re-discovered, re-invented, and reinvested in,

can help me: corporate sponsorship, attending an event or help me throw an event, attend the grand finale by purchasing a ticket or table, provide an auction basket or item for the silent auction at the grand finale, or purchasing an ad for the grand finale program. I am looking forward to running as a candidate and anticipate a very successful campaign. Thank you so much for your support. Erica Steinbeck lives in Western Hills. She can be reached at EricaSteinbeck@roadrunner.com.

in a way that preserves and enhances the quality of life they offer. In my opinion, discussing these possibilities, instead of casino gambling and gun control, as a means to keeping the American Dream alive, would be a far better use of our time. Jim Grawe is the co-founder of the Covedale Neighborhood Association. He can be reached at covedaleneighborhoodassoc@gmail.com.

ABOUT LETTERS AND COLUMNS We welcome your comments on editorials, columns, stories or other topics important to you in The Hilltop Press. Include your name, address and phone number(s) so we may verify your letter. Letters of 200 or fewer words and columns of 500 or fewer words have the best chance of being published. All submissions may be edited for length, accuracy and clarity. Deadline: Noon Friday E-mail: memral@communitypress.com Fax: 853-6220 U.S. mail: See box below Letters, columns and articles submitted to The Hilltop Press may be published or distributed in print, electronic or other forms.

5556 Cheviot Road Cincinnati, Ohio 45247 phone: 923-3111 fax: 853-6220 email: hilltoppress@communitypress.com web site: www.communitypress.com

Hilltop Press Editor Marc Emral memral@communitypress.com, 853-6264 Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday See page A2 for additional contact information.


WEDNESDAY, MARCH 20, 2013

LIFE

HILLTOP PRESS

PEOPLE | IDEAS | RECIPES

Osmari Novoa and Olivia Roll demonstrate chemical reactions during the Solids, Liquids, and Gases show at St. Aloysius. THANKS TO KATHY DIETRICH

McAuley science students go

on the road

McAuley High School science students wore these traveling science show T-shirts during their show at St. Aloysius. THANKS TO KATHY DIETRICH

M

cAuley High School science students are currently in the middle of their traveling science show season. Under the guidance of retired McAuley chemistry teacher and coordinator of McAuley’s Women In Medicine Program Shirley Frey, they are taking a hands-on science show on the road, presenting the show to grade school students at various area elementary schools. The theme of the show is “Solids, Liquids, and Gases” and one of these shows occurred on Jan. 16 at St. Aloysius School in Bridgetown. Four McAuley sophomores, Megan DavishMaria Koenig, Osmari Novoa, and Olivia Roll presented the show at St. Al’s, spending their time working with fifth and sixth graders on four different experiments involving acids and bases, UV

Megan Davish demonstrates acids, bases, and dry ice during McAuley High School’s hands-on science show. THANKS TO KATHY DIETRICH

beads, carbon dioxide and density. Following the four experi-

McAuley High School took its hands-on science show Solids, Liquids, and Gases to \St. Aloysius School in Bridgetown. At the show ere, from left, Shirley Frey, a retired McAuley chemistry teacher and coordinator of McAuley’s Women In Medicine Program, Maria Koenig , Megan Davish, Olivia Roll and Osmari Novoa. THANKS TO KATHY DIETRICH

ments, the McAuley scientists gave a 30-minute show with “magic” chemicals, “exploding” foam, color-changing substances, silver plating cola bottles, and more. The St. Al’s boys and girls were enthralled by the whole program, and lots of “oohs,” “ahhs,” “wows,” “cools,” and “awesomes” could be heard throughout the classroom. These four McAuley sophomores are part of the school’s Science Outreach Program. Frey explained that students apply to be part of extra science activities: Science Olympiad, JETS, or the Traveling Science Show. They are selected for positions in one of these areas.

St. Aloysius fifth-grader Alex Grandstaff and McAuley High School science student Osmari Novoa making a density column during the McAuley is Solids, Liquids, and Gases show. THANKS TO KATHY DIETRICH St. Aloysius fifth-grader Mary Bauer with a carbon dioxide demonstration during the hands-on science experiment. THANKS TO KATHY DIETRICH


B2 • HILLTOP PRESS • MARCH 20, 2013

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD THURSDAY, MARCH 21

hop, Latin, jive and more danced to popular music. $10. Registration required. Presented by Cardio Dance Party. 617-9498; www.cardiodanceparty.com. Springfield Township.

Dance Classes Waltz Classes, 7 p.m., Parky’s Farm Hayloft Barn, 10073 Daly Road, Beginner-level dance class open to all capable ages. Wear smooth-soled shoes. With instructors Betty and Estil Owens. Free. Presented by Southwestern Ohio/Northern Kentucky Square Dancers Federation. 671-7219; www.sonksdf.com. Springfield Township. Square Dance Lessons, 7:309:30 p.m., Forest Park Activity Center, 651 W. Sharon Road, Low-impact activity to improve your mind, body and spirit. Ages 9 and up. $5. Presented by Happy Time Squares. 232-1303. Forest Park.

Music - Blues Blues and Jazz Jam, 9 p.m.-12:30 a.m., Poor Michael’s, 11938 Hamilton Ave., Featuring rotating musicians each week. Free. 825-9958. Springfield Township.

Seminars

Exercise Classes Zumba Fitness Classes, 7-8 p.m., Colerain Township Community Center, 4300 Springdale Road, Greg Insco, instructor. $5. 741-8802; www.coleraintwp.org. Colerain Township. Hatha Yoga, 9:15 a.m., Colerain Township Community Center, 4300 Springdale Road, Daytime class ages 50 and up on Thursdays. Evening class ages 18 and up on Mondays. Bring mat and engage in stretching, breathing and relaxing techniques. $5. 741-8802; www.coleraintwp.org. Colerain Township. Pilates Class, 6:30 p.m., Colerain Township Community Center, 4300 Springdale Road, Improve strength, flexibility, balance, control and muscular symmetry. Instructor Celine Kirby leads core-strengthening exercises using bands and weights. Bring yoga mat. Family friendly. $5. 741-8802; www.coleraintwp.org. Colerain Township.

On Stage - Student Theater How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying, 8 p.m., La Salle High School, 3091 North Bend Road, $8-$15. Presented by La Salle High School Drama. 741-2369; www.lasallehs.net. Green Township. Schoolhouse Rock Live! Jr., 7 p.m., Winton Woods Middle School, 147 Farragut Road, Auditorium. Spring musical featuring songs from Emmywinning 1970s PBS special. $5, $3 students. 619-2440; www.wintonwoods.org. Greenhills.

Support Groups Low Vision Support Group, 10:30 a.m.-noon, Clovernook Center for the Blind and Visually Impaired, 7000 Hamilton Ave., Community Room. Family members welcome. Free. 522-3860. North College Hill.

FRIDAY, MARCH 22 Dining Events Fish Fry, 5-7 p.m., St. Matthias Catholic Church, 1050 W. Kemper Road, Lonsway Hall. Dinners and a la carte items. $7 per dinner. 851-1930. Forest Park. St. Vivian Church Lenten Fish Fry, 4:30-7:30 p.m., St. Vivian Church, 7600 Winton Road, Dinner choices include: fried shrimp, baked cod and baked salmon along with the more traditional fried fish sandwich. Dinners are combined with fries and coleslaw or red potatoes and green beans. Other offerings include macaroni and cheese, cheese pizza and soup. Desserts available. Carryout available. Cost varies with food choices. 378-5482; www.stvivian.org. Finneytown. Fish Fry, 5-7 p.m., VFW Post 7340 Charles R. Gailey, 8326 Brownsway Lane, Cod, catfish, shrimp, chicken, platters come with choice of two sides. Carryout available. $7.50 platter, $4.50 sandwich. Presented by VFW Post 7340 Ladies Auxiliary. 521-7340; http://gaileypost.webs.com. Colerain Township. Our Lady of the Rosary Fish Fry, 5:30-7 p.m., Our Lady of the Rosary Church, 17 Farragut Road, Catholic Center Cafeteria. Dine in or carry out only. Dine in or carryout menu: Battered cod, baked salmon, baked cod, fried shrimp, pizza, clam chowder, french fries, coleslaw, green beans, macaroni & cheese, boiled new potatoes and drinks. Desserts are available for donation. Family friendly. 825-8626; www.olr.net. Greenhills. Fish Fry, 4:30-7:30 p.m., West Side Masonic Center, 4353 West Fork Rd, Dine in or carry out. 922-3234. Green Township. St. Ignatius of Loyola Church

The annual Easter Spectacular at Parky’s Farm, 10037 Daly Road, is 10:45 a.m., 11:30 a.m., 12:15 p.m., 1 p.m. and 1:45 p.m. Saturday, March 23, and Sunday, March 24. Children can take a wagon ride to an egg hunt, have lunch, take a photo with the Easter bunny and more. The cost is $9.25 and registration required online. Call 521-7275 for more information, visit www.greatparks.org to register. FILE PHOTO. Fish Fry, 5-9 p.m., St. Ignatius of Loyola Church, 5222 North Bend Road, Fried and baked fish, shrimp, as well as options for children including pizza, bread sticks, and macaroni and cheese. Dessert of the week available for purchase. Benefits St. Ignatius Loyola Church’s endowment fund and tuition assistance. $1-$7. 661-6565; saintiaa.countmein.com. Monfort Heights.

Farmers Market Lettuce Eat Well Farmers Market, 3-7 p.m., Cheviot United Methodist Church, 3820 Westwood Northern Blvd., Locally produced food items. Free. Presented by Lettuce Eat Well. 661-1792; www.lewfm.org. Cheviot.

Health / Wellness Mobile Heart Screenings, 7 a.m., Mercy Hospital Mount Airy, 2446 Kipling Ave., Several screening packages available to test risk of heart attack, stroke, aneurysm and other major diseases. Appointment required. Presented by Mercy Health Partners. 866-819-0127; www.mercyhealthfair.com. Mount Airy. Mobile Heart Screenings, 2 p.m., Fitworks Fitness Center White Oak, 5840 Cheviot Road, Several screening packages available to test risk of heart attack, stroke, aneurysm and other major diseases. Appointment required. Presented by Mercy Health Partners. 866-8190127; www.mercyhealthfair.com. White Oak.

Music - Rock Emmerson Project, 7:30 p.m., The Underground, 1140 Smiley Ave., With Lamps and Voids, Count the Stars, Ben Esposito and Corryne Hogan. Doors open 7 p.m. $8. 825-8200; www.theug.com. Forest Park.

On Stage - Student Theater How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying, 7 p.m., La Salle High School, $8-$15. 741-2369; www.lasallehs.net. Green Township.

SATURDAY, MARCH 23 Business Seminars Mount Healthy Business Expo, 10 a.m.-3 p.m., Mount Healthy Jr./Sr. High School, 8101 Hamilton Ave., Meet businesses health and recreation organizations from Mount Healthy, Springfield Township, Colerain Township, North College Hill and Wyoming. Free for Mount Healthy Business Association members with paid membership. Presented by Mount Healthy Business Association, Inc. 505-5358; www.mthealthyba.org. Mount Healthy.

Exercise Classes Zumba Kids Dance Fitness Class, 10:30-11:15 a.m., Great Commission Bible Church, 10200 Hamilton Ave., Family Life Center. Healthy program featuring explosion of music, dance and energy. Ages 4-12. $4. 851-4946; DebsFitnessParty.com. Mount Healthy.

Holiday - Easter Easter Spectacular, 10:45 a.m., 11:30 a.m., 12:15 p.m., 1 p.m. and 1:45 p.m., Parky’s Farm, 10037 Daly Road, Wagon ride to an egg hunt, lunch, a photo with the Easter bunny and more. $9.25, vehicle permit required.

ABOUT CALENDAR To submit calendar items, go to www.cincinnati.com and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to life@communitypress.com along with event information. Items are printed on a spaceavailable basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to www.cincinnati.com and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page. Registration required online. Presented by Hamilton County Park District. 521-7275; www.greatparks.org. Springfield Township. Easter Egg Hunt, 1 p.m., Garden Park Unity Church, 3581 W. Galbraith Road, Prizes awarded. Free. 385-8889; www.gardenparkunity.org. Colerain Township.

Home & Garden Hamilton County Recycling and Solid Waste District Yard Trimmings Drop-Off, 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Kuliga Park, 6717 Bridgetown Road, Hamilton County residents can drop off yard trimmings for free. Free. Presented by Hamilton County Recycling and Solid Waste District. 598-3089; bit.ly/11UQb9r. Green Township. Hamilton County Recycling and Solid Waste District Yard Trimmings Drop-Off, 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Rumpke Sanitary Landfill, 3800 Struble Road, Hamilton County residents can drop off yard trimmings for free. Free. Presented by Hamilton County Recycling and Solid Waste District. 851-0122; bit.ly/11UQb9r. Colerain Township.

Music - Classical Woodwind Quintet, 2 p.m., North Central Branch Library, 11109 Hamilton Ave., Performance by Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra’s woodwind quintet. Free. Presented by Public Library of Cincinnati & Hamilton County. 369-6068; www.cincinnatilibrary.org. Colerain Township.

Music - Religious Rose Hill, 7:30 p.m., The Underground, 1140 Smiley Ave., With the Few, the Fallen, Creating Constellations, Element of Surprise and others. Doors open 7 p.m. $8. 825-8200; www.theug.com. Forest Park.

Nature Oak Glen Spring Exploration, 11 a.m., Farbach-Werner Nature Preserve, 3455 Poole Road, Registration required online by March 21. Walk through forested tract of preserved land to see early wildflowers and migrating birds. Strenuous hike. Ages 12 and up if accompanied by adult. Free, vehicle permit required. Presented by Hamilton County Park District. 521-7275; www.greatparks.org. Colerain Township.

On Stage - Student Theater How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying, 8 p.m., La Salle High School, $8-$15. 741-2369; www.lasallehs.net. Green Township.

SUNDAY, MARCH 24 Holiday - Easter Easter Spectacular, 10:45 a.m., 11:30 a.m., 12:15 p.m., 1 p.m. and 1:45 p.m., Parky’s Farm, $9.25, vehicle permit required. Registration required online. 5217275; www.greatparks.org.

Springfield Township.

Home & Garden Hamilton County Recycling and Solid Waste District Yard Trimmings Drop-Off, 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Kuliga Park, Free. 598-3089; bit.ly/11UQb9r. Green Township. Hamilton County Recycling and Solid Waste District Yard Trimmings Drop-Off, 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Rumpke Sanitary Landfill, Free. 851-0122; bit.ly/11UQb9r. Colerain Township.

On Stage - Student Theater How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying, 5 p.m., La Salle High School, $8-$15. 741-2369; www.lasallehs.net. Green Township.

Recreation Outdoor Archery, 2 p.m., Winton Woods, 10245 Winton Road, Adventure Outpost. Basics of shooting a compound bow plus target practice. Archers must be able to pull a minimum of 10 pounds draw weight. With certified archery instructor. Ages 8 and up. Adult must accompany ages 8-17. $15, vehicle permit required. Presented by Hamilton County Park District. 521-7275; www.greatparks.org. Springfield Township. Egg Compass Course, Noon, Winton Woods, 10245 Winton Road, Registration required online by March 21. Children ages 8 and older can learn a basic compass lesson before testing their skills on an egg hunt. Compasses provided. $8, vehicle permit required. Presented by Hamilton County Park District. 521-7275; www.greatparks.org. Springfield Township.

Shopping Coin Show, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., American Legion Post Hugh Watson Post 530 Greenhills, 11100 Winton Road, Free admission. Presented by Jim Huffman. 937-376-2807. Greenhills.

MONDAY, MARCH 25 Exercise Classes Hatha Yoga, 6:30 p.m., Colerain Township Community Center, $5. 741-8802; www.coleraintwp.org. Colerain Township. Pilates Class, 11 a.m., Colerain Township Community Center, $5. 741-8802; www.coleraintwp.org. Colerain Township. FitBodz, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Colerain Township Community Center, 4300 Springdale Road, Instructed by Gary Terry, West Point graduate, Army master fitness trainer and certified personal trainer. Focusing on helping individuals improve their strength, stamina, flexibility and weight loss. Bring mat, 3- or 5-pound dumbbells and water. $8. 741-8802; www.coleraintwp.org. Colerain Township. Cardio Dance Party, 7:45-8:45 p.m., Cincinnati Dance and Movement Center, 880 Compton Road, Incorporates variety of dance styles, including jazz, hip

Job Search Seminar, 1:30-3 p.m., Family Life Center, 703 Compton Road, Dr. Ted Barrett presents Coping with the Emotional Roller Coaster of a Job Search. Weekly speakers advise job seekers on how to conduct an effective job search. Family friendly. Free. Registration required. 931-5777. Finneytown.

TUESDAY, MARCH 26 Dance Classes New Beginner Western Square Dancing Class, 7:30-9:30 p.m., Parky’s Farm Hayloft Barn, 10073 Daly Road, No experience necessary. Free, vehicle permit required. Presented by Hamilton County Park District. 860-4746; www.greatparks.org. Springfield Township.

9:30 p.m., Forest Park Activity Center, $5. 232-1303. Forest Park.

Education The History of the Seond Amendment, 7-8:30 p.m., Joy Community Church, 5000 North Bend Road, Learn history of this essential law. Free. Presented by Empower U Ohio. 250-4116; empoweruohio.org. Monfort Heights.

Exercise Classes Zumba Fitness Classes, 7-8 p.m., Colerain Township Community Center, $5. 741-8802; www.coleraintwp.org. Colerain Township. Hatha Yoga, 9:15 a.m., Colerain Township Community Center, $5. 741-8802; www.coleraintwp.org. Colerain Township. Pilates Class, 6:30 p.m., Colerain Township Community Center, $5. 741-8802; www.coleraintwp.org. Colerain Township.

FRIDAY, MARCH 29 Dining Events Fish Fry, 5-7 p.m., VFW Post 7340 Charles R. Gailey, $7.50 platter, $4.50 sandwich. 521-7340; http://gaileypost.webs.com. Colerain Township. Fish Fry, 4:30-7:30 p.m., West Side Masonic Center, 922-3234. Green Township.

Exercise Classes

Farmers Market

Zumba Fitness Classes, 7-8 p.m., Colerain Township Community Center, $5. 741-8802; www.coleraintwp.org. Colerain Township.

Lettuce Eat Well Farmers Market, 3-7 p.m., Cheviot United Methodist Church, Free. 661-1792; www.lewfm.org. Cheviot.

Senior Citizens

SATURDAY, MARCH 30

Life Story Workshop, 1:30-3:30 p.m., Springfield Township Senior and Community Center, 9158 Winton Road, Discover new techniques to remember and tell stories of your life journey thus far. Bring pens and sense of adventure. Appropriate for adults of any writing level and both new and returning students. $57.50, $50 residents. Registration required. Presented by Extraordinary Lives. 522-1154. Springfield Township.

Support Groups Strengths Based Career Management, 1:30-3 p.m., Family Life Center, 703 Compton Road, Identify how to leverage your strengths to reach your goals. Free. Registration required. 931-5777. Finneytown.

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 27 Art & Craft Classes Jewelry Design, 9-11:30 a.m., Colerain Township Community Center, 4300 Springdale Road, Bring jewelry beads and create with assistance from Linda Schneider. For ages 50 and up. Free. 741-8802; www.coleraintwp.org. Colerain Township.

Exercise Classes FitBodz, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Colerain Township Community Center, $8. 741-8802; www.coleraintwp.org. Colerain Township. Zumba Toning, 7:15 p.m., Colerain Township Community Center, 4300 Springdale Road, Targeted body sculpting exercises and high energy cardio work. Bring a mat or towel, and a water bottle. $5. 741-8802; www.coleraintwp.org. Colerain Township.

Home & Garden Get the Dirt on Backyard Composting, 7-8 p.m., Mount Healthy City Park, McMakin and Perry streets, Learn how to balance a compost bin, what materials are compostable and some troubleshooting. Free. Registration required. Presented by Hamilton County Recycling and Solid Waste District. 9467734; hamiltoncountyrecycles.org. Mount Healthy.

Senior Citizens Zumba Gold, 1-2 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Modified Zumba for seniors and beginners with standing and chair participation. For seniors. $3, $25 for 10 classes. Presented by Deb’s Fitness Party. 205-5064; www.debsfitnessparty.com. Green Township.

THURSDAY, MARCH 28 Dance Classes Waltz Classes, 7 p.m., Parky’s Farm Hayloft Barn, Free. 6717219; www.sonksdf.com. Springfield Township. Square Dance Lessons, 7:30-

Exercise Classes Zumba Kids Dance Fitness Class, 10:30-11:15 a.m., Great Commission Bible Church, $4. 851-4946; DebsFitnessParty.com. Mount Healthy.

Home & Garden Hamilton County Recycling and Solid Waste District Yard Trimmings Drop-Off, 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Kuliga Park, Free. 598-3089; bit.ly/11UQb9r. Green Township. Hamilton County Recycling and Solid Waste District Yard Trimmings Drop-Off, 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Rumpke Sanitary Landfill, Free. 851-0122; bit.ly/11UQb9r. Colerain Township.

SUNDAY, MARCH 31 Holiday - Easter Easter Brunch, 10 a.m., noon and 2 p.m., Mill Race Banquet Center, 1515 W. Sharon Road, Celebrate with the Easter bunny and a 25-item buffet. Beverages are included. $16.25, $8 ages 2-12, free for ages 1 and under; vehicle permit required. Reservations required, available online. Presented by Hamilton County Park District. 825-6467; www.greatparks.org. Springfield Township.

MONDAY, APRIL 1 Exercise Classes Hatha Yoga, 6:30 p.m., Colerain Township Community Center, $5. 741-8802; www.coleraintwp.org. Colerain Township. Pilates Class, 11 a.m., Colerain Township Community Center, $5. 741-8802; www.coleraintwp.org. Colerain Township. Cardio Dance Party, 7:45-8:45 p.m., Cincinnati Dance and Movement Center, $10. Registration required. 617-9498; www.cardiodanceparty.com. Springfield Township.

Music - Blues Blues and Jazz Jam, 9 p.m.-12:30 a.m., Poor Michael’s, Free. 825-9958. Springfield Township.

Seminars Job Search Seminar, 1:30-3 p.m., Family Life Center, Dana Glasgo, Cincinnati career coach, presents: Acing the Interview. Free. Registration required. 931-5777. Finneytown.

Support Groups Under One Roof Again, 7-8:30 p.m., Family Life Center, 703 Compton Road, Participants gain insights on issues that arise when parent-child relationships become adult-adult ones in same house. Find support and strategies for making transition, whether for long or short haul, peaceably. Free. Registration required. 931-5777. Finneytown.


LIFE

MARCH 20, 2013 • HILLTOP PRESS • B3

Rita shares Passover brisket, glazed berry tart

Delicious Passover brisket

Adapted from Zel Schulman’s book “Let My People Eat!” I love this brisket. I like to make mine in a slow cooker.

2 teaspoons vanilla 1/2teaspoon almond extract (optional, but very good)

Whip cream until soft peaks form. Set aside. Beat cream cheese and sugar until blended. Add orange juice, vanilla and almond extract. Fold in whipped cream. Chill at least 2-4 hours. Spoon into tart shell, smoothing top. Fruit topping: About 3 cups fresh berries (raspberries, blueberries, blackberries, etc. are good)

Arrange on top of tart, and then glaze. Glaze: Mix together and heat until warm. 1 ⁄3cup apricot preserves 1 tablespoon honey

Glazed Three-Berry Tart is a stunning recipe for a holiday dinner or any time you want to have a special dessert that looks a lot harder to make than it is. THANKS TO RITA HEIKENFELD

Put everything in sprayed slow cooker and cook on low 8-10 hours or until tender. Or bake, covered, in preheated 325 degree oven for about 50 minutes per pound. Remove bay leaves.

Glazed Three-Berry Tart

3 pounds brisket 1 12 oz. bottle chili sauce 1 ⁄2cup dark brown sugar, packed or bit more to taste 1 10 oz. can beef broth 1 really large onion, sliced 1 ⁄4teaspoon ground cloves 2 bay leaves

I consider recipes people share with me “food gifts.” And I usually can’t wait to make it for myself and then share with you. That’s how I feel about this tart.

I first tasted this at daughter-in-law Jess’ home. She got the recipe from her friend, Amy Obermeyer. This is a stunning recipe for a holiday dinner or any time you want to have a special dessert that looks a lot harder to make than it is. It does require a tart pan. I’ve adapted the recipe only slightly. Preheat oven to 350. Tart shell: Approximately 9 soft coconut macaroon cookies, crumbled fine (2

cups) 1 cup ground pecans 2 tablespoons butter, softened

Combine macaroons, pecans and butter and press firmly into a 10- to 11-inch tart pan. Bake for 15-18 minutes. Cool. This can be made a day ahead and kept covered in the refrigerator. Filling: ⁄2cup whipping cream 8 oz. cream cheese, softened 1 ⁄3cup sugar 1 tablespoon orange juice 1

LENTEN FISH FRIES 29 E. State Road, Cleves, 941-1643 5-7:30 p.m. Fridays through March 29.

CORPUS CHRISTI

2014 Springdale Road, New Burlington, 825-0618 5-8 p.m. Fridays through March 22.

HOLY FAMILY

814 Hawthorne Ave., East Price Hill, 921-7527 4:30-7:30 p.m. Fridays through March 22.

MOUNT HEALTHY EAGLES

1620 Kinney Ave., Mount Healthy, 931-2989 5-7 p.m. Friday, March 22 and March 29.

OUR LADY OF GRACE ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION

Little Flower Cafeteria, 5560 Kirby Ave., Mount Airy 5:30-7:30 p.m. Fridays through March 22.

OUR LADY OF THE ROSARY

17 Farragut Road, Greenhills, 825-8626 5:30-7 p.m. Fridays, March 15 (drive-thru only) and March 22 (dine in and carry out).

ST. ALOYSIUS GONZAGA

4366 Bridgetown Road, Bridgetown, 574-4840 4:30-7:30 p.m. Fridays through March 29.

ST. ANTONINUS

5425 Julmar Drive, Green Township, 922-2500 5-7 p.m. Fridays through March 29.

ST. CATHARINE OF SIENA

2848 Fischer Place, Westwood, 661-0651 4:30-7:30 p.m. Fridays through March 22.

ST. CLARE CHURCH

1443 Cedar Ave., College Hill 5-7 p.m. Fridays through March 29.

ST. DOMINIC

4551 Delhi Road, Delhi

Township, 417-7741 4-8 p.m. Fridays through March 22.

ST. IGNATIUS OF LOYOLA

5222 North Bend Road, Monfort Heights, 661-6565 5-9 p.m. Fridays through March 22.

ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST

5361 Dry Ridge Road, Colerain Township, 385-8010 4:30-7:30 p.m. Fridays through March 22.

ST. JOHN NEUMANN

12191 Mill Road, Springfield Township, 742-0953 5-7:30 p.m. Fridays through March 22.

ST. JOSEPH OF THE THREE RIVERS KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS

Our Lady of the Visitation, 3180 South Road, 347-2229 4:30-7:30 p.m. Fridays through March 29.

ST. MARTIN OF TOURS

Harvest Home Park, 3961 North Bend Road, Cheviot, 661-2000 5-7 p.m. Fridays through March 29.

ST. MATTHIAS THE APOSTLE

ST. TERESA OF AVILA

ST. VIVIAN

VETERANS OF FOREIGN WARS POST 7340

4353 West Fork Road, Green Township 4:30-7:30 p.m. Fridays through March 29.

ZION UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

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Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator and author. Find her blog online at Cincinnati.Com/blogs. Email her at columns@communitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-248-7130, ext. 356.

Take advantage of this great offer from the financial institution that’s Invested In You.

8326 Brownsway Lane, Colerain Township, 5217340 5-7 p.m. Fridays through March 29.

All Day Kindergarten

Check out my blog for naturally colored Easter eggs and marbled eggs.

From Debbie Motz: “My husband has made your quiche recipe two

Seniors can get applications and help completing forms by calling Council on Aging at (513) 721-1025.

4108 W. Eighth St., West Price Hill 4-7:30 p.m. Fridays through March 22.

4980 Zion Road, Cleves, 941-4983 4-7 p.m. Friday, March 22.

Fun recipes for Easter

Quiche recipe a hit

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7600 Winton, Finneytown, 378-5482 4:30-7:30 p.m. Fridays through March 22.

White chicken chili from Nick & Tom’s Bridgetown Restaurant. Reader Mary Ellen T. visited this restaurant for the first time. “What a treat. The white chicken chili is to die for. Lean meat and no beans.” When Mary Ellen asked if the restaurant would share the recipe, the answer was no, but the chili is available for takeout. So now Mary Ellen hopes someone has a similar recipe.

Applications are available for Ohio’s Home Energy Assistance Program (HEAP). The program helps low-income Ohioans pay heating bills.

1175 Overlook Ave., West Price Hill, 348-2043 3:30-7:30 p.m. Fridays through March 29.

Play Time Large Park-like Playground

Blender banana bread redo: Jean Heenan made a more healthful version of my blender banana bread. She lowered the sugar to 2⁄3 cup and used cinnamon applesauce instead of oil. She added a cup of fresh blueberries to the bread, as well. “I had to bake it for 1 hour and 10 minutes, and it was delicious,” she said.

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LIFE

B4 • HILLTOP PRESS • MARCH 20, 2013

Howe: An exciting time for the Catholic church The Rev. Tim Howe was shocked when he first heard the name of the new pope. “Jesuits typically don’t become bishops,” Howe, president of St. Xavier High School in Finneytown, said of Cardinal Jose Mario Bergoglio, a Jesuit order priest from Argentina, after his election as pope. “They usually serve the church in helping in schools, parishes, retirement centers, not leadership in the church. “At the same time, it is exciting.” Pope Francis, as the first religious order pope since the 19th century, and from the developing

world, Howe said he has concerns for the poor. He was impressed that he asked the Howe people to pray for him during his first appearance. “Because the Jesuits are an international order, he will being with him a consciousness into the church beyond the borders of Argentina,” he said. Howe, who was attending meetings with other Jesuits in Chicago when the announcement came

last week, said the group was excited, but also felt wonder at what it all means for the order. “He certainly has an understanding of us, who we are and how we work,” he said. “We wonder where he will direct us to new fields and missions as the leader of the church.” And Howe said that by taking the name of St. Francis of Assisi he is trying to bring the focus on the poor of the church. “He asked to be a humble servant, to have the church focus on, where it has always been, but in a renewed way, how we can best serve the least among us.”

INDEPENDENT BAPTIST

UNITED METHODIST

EVANGELICAL PRESBYTERIAN

FRIENDSHIP BAPTIST CHURCH 8580 Cheviot Rd., Colerain Twp 741-7017 www.ourfbc.com Gary Jackson, Senior Pastor 9:30am Sunday School (all ages) Sunday Morning Service 10:30am 6:30pm Sunday Evening Service 7:00pm Wedn. Service/Awana RUI Addiction Recovery (Fri.) 7:00pm

Christ, the Prince of Peace

At CHURCH BY THE WOODS

United Methodist Church 10507 “Old” Colerain Ave (513) 385-7883 Rev. Mark Reuter Sunday School 9:15am Worship 10:30am - Nursery Available www.cpopumc.org

Active Youth, College, Senior Groups Exciting Music Dept, Deaf Ministry, Nursery

SHARON BAPTIST CHURCH 4451 Fields Ertel Road Cincinnati, OH 45241 (513) 769-4849 gstep77507@aol.com

CHURCH OF THE SAVIOUR 8005 Pfeiffer Rd. Montgomery 791-3142 www.cos-umc.org Palm Sunday "Jesus: The Tragedy of His Victory" Traditional Worship 8:20am & 11:00am Contemporary Worship 9:40am Sunday School (All ages) 9:40 & 11am Nursery Care Provided

Services

Dr. Cathy Johns, Senior Pastor Rev. Doug Johns, Senior Pastor

Sunday School - 10:00 am Sunday Morning - 11:00 am Sunday Evening - 6:00 pm Wednesday - 7:00 pm Evening Prayer and Bible Study VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL June 25 through June 29 Ages 3 to 15 Theme: Amazing Adventures

Monfort Heights United Methodist Church

3682 West Fork Rd , west of North Bend Traditional Worship 8:30 & 11:00am Contemporary Worhip 9:45am

Nursery Available * Sunday School 513-481-8699 * www. mhumc.org Spiritual Checkpoint ... Bearing the Love of Christ...for you!

Wyoming Baptist Church

(A Church For All Seasons) Burns and Waverly Avenues Cincinnati OH 45215 821.8430

Steve Cummins, Senior Pastor Sunday School..............................9:00 am Coffee & Fellowship...................10:00 am Praise & Worship........................10:30 am www.wyomingbc.homestead.com Visitors Welcome!

CHRISTIAN CHURCH DISCIPLES Mt. Healthy Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)

7717 Harrison Ave Mt. Healthy, OH 45231 Rev. Michael Doerr, Pastor 513-521-6029 Sunday 9:00 a.m...... Contemporary Service 9:45a.m...... Sunday School 10:45 a.m........ Traditional Worship Nursery Staff Provided “A Caring Community of Faith” Welcomes You

Corner of Compton and Perry Streets 513-931-5827 Sunday School 8:45 - 9:45am Traditional Worship 10:00 - 11:00am Contemporary Gathering: Bible & Conversation 11:30 - 12:30 Nursery Available Handicap Access "Come as a guest. Leave as a friend".

Sharonville United Methodist

8:15 & 11amTraditional Service & Kingdom Kids 9:30am Adult & Children’s Sunday School 7:00pm Wednesday, Small Groups for all ages Infant care available for all services

3751 Creek Rd.

513-563-0117

EPISCOPAL

www.sharonville-umc.org

Christ Church Glendale Episcopal Church 965 Forest Ave - 771-1544 christchurch1@fuse.net www.christchurchglendale.org The Reverend Roger L Foote

NON-DENOMINATIONAL “Life on Purpose in Community” 2651 Adams Rd. (near Pippin) Worship Assembly-Sunday 10:45am Phone 825-9553 www.highviewchristianchurch.com

LUTHERAN Faith Lutheran LCMC

8265 Winton Rd., Finneytown www.faithcinci.org Pastor Robert Curry Contemporary Service 9am Traditional Service 11:00am

• Saturday: 5:30 and 7pm • Sunday: 9am, 10:30am & 11:59am

Trinity Lutheran Church (ELCA)

11340 Century Circle E., Springdale

Pastor Todd A. Cutter

Trinity Lutheran Church, LCMS 5921 Springdale Rd

Rev. Richard Davenport, Pastor Worship & Sunday School 10:30 a.m, Bible Study 9:15 a.m. Sundays

Classic Service and Hymnbook

www.trinitylutherancincinnati.com

385-7024

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“Growing Closer to God, Growing Closer to Neighbor”

1553 Kinney Ave, Mt. Healthy

Greenhills hunting Easter eggs

The annual Greenhills Easter Egg Hunt has been conducted by the village’s all-volunteer fire department for the past 75 years. Children and families gather on the Village Common to listen for the horn signaling the start of the fun. Organizers say it is not unusual to see three or even four generations from one family represented at the event, many of the parents and grandparents participated when they were children. This year the Easter Egg Hunt will take place at 2 p.m. on Easter Sun-

Sunday School Hour (for all ages) 9:15 - 10:15am Worship Service - 10:30 to 11:45am (Childcare provided for infants/ toddlers) Pastor: Rich Lanning Church: 2191 Struble Rd Office: 2192 Springdale Rd

(Located behind Best Buy in Tri-County)

VineyardCincinnati.com (513) 671-0422

day, March 31, on the Greenhills Common. Children will be divided according to age groups. You can watch the 2007 Easter Egg Hunt on YouTube narrated by Greenhills Fire Chief Tony Spaeth and long-time mayor Oscar Hoffmann at www.youtube.com/ watch?v=tZYKQcV.

Lucky birthday

College Hill twin brothers Ike and Ander Weyand-Geise turned 13 on March13. To celebrate their 13th birthday on 3/ 13/13 the boys had a meal of their favorite foods, cake and then a trip to a bowling alley with their friends.

Easter Sunday Hours Noon - 5 pm Reservations Recommended

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Choose One Entree: Prime Rib, Baked Salmon or Chicken Marsala. All entree’s served with a buffet that includes: • • • •

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WEDNESDAY’S GUITARS AND CIGARS NITES Starting in April, please call for details.

• Dinner Rolls • Assorted Desserts • Coffee and Iced Tea *Wine, beer and soft drinks available at cash bar.

Online Reservations @ www.vinokletwines.com

11069 Colerain Ave., Cinti., OH 45252 • 513.385.9309

542-9025

NCH seniors hosts foot care lecture

The North College Hill Senior Center is hosting a “Basic Foot Care” lecture at 11 a.m. Thursday, March 28, at the senior center, 1586 Goodman Ave. The lecture is part of a Thursday lecture series at the center. For more information, call 521-3462.

McAuley alumnae softball set

McAuley High School head softball coach Karen Wiesman is organizing two alumnae softball games on the Saturday before Easter. At 10 a.m. on Saturday, March 30, the first game will feature alumnae playing against the current McAuley varsity team. The second game, at 12:30 p.m., pits alumnae against alumnae in a friendly slow-pitch game. Both games at the St. James ballfield on Cheviot Road White Oak. Interested alumnae can contact Karen Wiesman at mcauleysoft ball@fuse.net. Spectators are welcome.

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PRESBYTERIAN Northminster Presbyterian Church 703 Compton Rd., Finneytown 931-0243 Growing Faith, Sharing Hope, Showing Love Sunday Worship Schedule Traditional Services: 8:00 & 10:15am Contemporary Services: 9:00 & 11:30am Student Cafe: 10:15am Childcare Available Jeff Hosmer, Rich Jones & Nancy Ross- Zimmerman - Pastors

Northwest Community Church 8735 Cheviot Rd, by Colerain HS Rev. Kevin Murphy, Pastor 513-385-8973 Worship and Sunday School 10AM Handicap Accessible/Nursery Available

UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST FLEMING ROAD United Church of Christ 691 Fleming Rd 522-2780 Rev Pat McKinney

Sunday School - All Ages - 9:15am Sunday Worship - 10:30am

Nursery Provided

St. Paul United Church of Christ 5312 Old Blue Rock Rd., off Springdale

Phone: 385-9077 Rev. Michelle Torigian Sunday Worship: 10:30am Sunday School: 9:15am Nursery Available/Handicap Access www.stpaulucccolerain.org www.facebook.com/StPaulUCC

Ike Weyand-Geise and his twin brother Ander celebrate their lucky birthday with hot wings and Cincinnati-style chili. PROVIDED.

at the Beautiful Vinoklet Winery

Salem White Oak Presbyterian

Celebrate Easter at the Vineyard!

Sunday School 10:15

Worship: 8:30 am traditional - 10:45 am contemporary Sunday School: 9:45 am Nursery provided

Pleasant Run Presbyterian Church plans a special Easter Fun day from 1 to 4 p.m. Saturday, March 23, at the church, 11565 Pippin Road. The event will include crafts, decorating plastic eggs, candy and movies. The program is appropriate for youngsters 4 to 12 years old. Call the church office for more information at 513-825-4544.

HIGHVIEW CHRISTIAN CHURCH

8am Holy Eucharist I 9am Holy Eucharist II 11am Holy Eucharist II Child Care 9-12

www. trinitymthealthy.org 513-522-3026

Easter fun

EVANGELICAL COMMUNITY CHURCH

Mt Healthy United Methodist Church

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“Small enough to know you, Big enough to care”

www.churchbythewoods.org 3755 Cornell Rd., Sharonville , Ohio 45241 You have a choice of Ministry: 1. Traditional Sunday Worship at 10:00 AM. Language: English Multi-cultural, multi-generational, and multi-ethnic. 2. Contemporary Sunday Worship with Freedom Church at 10:30 AM. Language: English It’s not about Religion; it’s about relationships! www.freedomchurchcincinnati.com 3. Taiwanese Traditional Sunday Worship st 2:00 PM. Language: Taiwanese, UC Campus Fellowship on Saturdays, www.cincinnatitaiwanese.org 4. Seventh Day Adventist Saturday Worship at 10:00 AM. Language: Spanish Loving - Caring - and Sharing God’s Word Notes: Nursery School is provided at each Worship time English as a Second Language (ESL) is taught on Saturday 10-12 AM. Various Bible Studies are available.

BRIEFLY

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LIFE

MARCH 20, 2013 • HILLTOP PRESS • B5

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LIFE

B6 • HILLTOP PRESS • MARCH 20, 2013

DEATHS Linda Penn Lakes Linda Presnell Penn Lakes, 65, died March 10. Survived by sons Mark, Steve, Jeff Penn; father Sam Presnell; siblings Carol Sand, Sam Presnell; five grandchildren. Preceded in death by mother Edna Presnell. Services were March 15 at Mihovk-Rosenacker Funeral Home.

Helen Orletsky Helen Herbert Orletsky, 94, Springfield Township, died March 8. She worked in personnel at the Veterans Administration Medical Center. Orletsky Survived by husband Terry Holden; stepdaughter Vicky Crooks; step-grandchildren; a nephew and grand-nephew.

Preceded in death by husband John Orletsky, parents James, Anna Herbert, siblings Catherine Boggs, Marian Findley, Kenneth, Charles Herbert. Services were March 12 at the Cedars of Lebanon Chapel, Spring Grove Cemetery. Arrangements by Vitt, Stermer & Anderson Funeral Home.

Hazel Schnecker Hazel Funk Schnecker, 90, died March 13. Survived by children Dennis (Linda), Robert (Patricia) Schnecker, Janice (Fred) Hoeweler; grandchildren Tim (Holly), Joe (Laura), Tracie Schnecker, Katie (Ted) Murphey, David (Katherine), Dan, Becky Hoeweler, Angie (Kyle) Payne; great-grandchildren Mallory, Kendall, Hayley, Gavin Schnecker, Aubrie, Kaleb Payne, Carson, Braden Murphey. Preceded in death by husband Clarence Schnecker,

POLICE REPORTS

brother Richard Lienenbrink. Services were March 16 at the Llanfair Retirement Community Chapel. Arrangements by NeidhardMinges Funeral Home. Memorials to: St. Paul United Church Schnecker of Christ, 5312 Old Blue Rock Road, Cincinnati, OH 45247.

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71, died March 7. Survived by husband Don Strotman; children Mike (Debbie), Tom (Julie), Maureen (Jeff), Denny (Jen) Strotman, Mary (Rich) Diemar; siblings Maurice, Mary Reardon; 27 grandchildren. Services were March 11 at St. Vivian. Arrangements by Mihovk-Rosenacker Funeral Home. Memorials to: Cincinnati Right to Life, 1802 W. Galbraith Road, Cincinnati, OH 45239.

Clarence Withrow Clarence B. Withrow, 70, died Feb. 20. He was a machinist. He was an Army veteran. Survived by sons Randy (Debra), Wayne (Jamie) Withrow; siblings Rose Mary Delmonaco, Withrow JoAnn Wagner, Jack, Daniel Sr. Crespo, Sr.; 11 grandchildren; 19 great-grandchildren. Preceded in death by daughter Christine Withrow, parents Joseph, Fern Crespo, brother Michael Crespo. Services were Feb. 25 at Ralph Meyer & Deters Funeral Home.

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Arrests/citations

Basic obituary information and a color photograph of your loved one is published without charge by The Community Press. Please call us at 853-6262 for a submission form. To publish a larger memorial tribute, call 242-4000 or pricing details.

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Essence Jones, born 1993, selling liquor to a minor, 5469 Kirby Ave., March 2. Arthur Reynolds, born 1993, possession of drugs, 5400 Kirby Ave., March 4. Mathew E. Stallworth, born 1983, possession of drugs, 2626 Chesterfield Court, March 4. Tyrone Burrow, born 1967, disorderly conduct, 5109 Hawaiian Terrace, March 4. Ron Barton, born 1990, possession of drug abuse instruments, 5829 Shadymist Lane, March 5. Violet Schweitzer, born 1965, possession of drug abuse instruments, 5829 Shadymist Lane, March 5. William Woods, born 1990, criminal damaging or endangering, domestic violence, 2988 Highforest Lane, March 5. Shawn K. Cornist, born 1992, assault, 2958 Highforest Lane, March 6. Yolanda Britten, born 1977, second adult curfew violation, 5438 Bahama Terrace, March 6. James Ronald Anderson, born 1963, criminal trespass, 5469 Kirby Ave., March 10.

6006 Lantana Ave., March 5. Assault 4922 Hawaiian Terrace, Feb. 28. 5438 Bahama Terrace, March 1. 5438 Bahama Terrace, March 1. 5469 Kirby Ave., March 2. 2958 Highforest Lane, March 6. Breaking and entering 1443 Aster Place, March 4. 1631 S. Dixon Circle, March 4. 1607 Llanfair Ave., March 6. Burglary 5014 Hawaiian Terrace, Feb. 27. 5963 Belmont Ave., March 1. 8096 Bobolink Drive, March 2. 5488 Bahama Terrace, March 3. 5434 Ruddy Court, March 5. Criminal damaging/endangering 4922 Hawaiian Terrace, Feb. 28. 5469 Kirby Ave., March 2. 1903 Savannah Way, March 5. 1609 Llanfair Ave., March 6. Domestic violence Reported on Marlowe Avenue, March 3. Endangering children 5469 Kirby Ave., March 2. Interference with custody 2958 Highforest Lane, March 1. Theft 6127 Hamilton Ave., March 1. 2600 Allaire Ave., March 4. 4796 S. Raeburn Drive, March 6. 5556 Colerain Ave., March 6.

FOREST PARK

Incidents/reports

Arrests/citations

Aggravated menacing 2622 Richwill Court, Feb. 28. 2638 Kipling Ave., March 7. Aggravated robbery

Anthony Carnes, 35, 11473 Fremantle, felonious assault

See POLICE, Page B7

ABOUT POLICE REPORTS The Community Press publishes the names of all adults charged with offenses. The information is a matter of public record and does not imply guilt or innocence. To contact your local police department: » Springfield Township: Chief David Heimpold, 729-1300 » Mount Healthy: Chief Marc Waldeck, 728-3183 » Cincinnati District 5, Captain David Bailey, 569-8500 » North College Hill: Chief Gary Foust, 521-7171 » Greenhills: Chief Thomas Doyle, 825-2101 » Forest Park: Chief Phil Cannon, 595-5220.

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LIFE

MARCH 20, 2013 • HILLTOP PRESS • B7

POLICE REPORTS Continued from Page B6

Grand theft auto Victim reported at 7436 Forest Ave., March 1.

at 11473 Fremantle, Feb. 26. Anthony Johnson, 32, 11001 Quailwood, abduction at 11001 Quailwood Drive, Feb. 26. Juvenile male, 13, obstructing official business at 2084 Quail Court, March 1.

NORTH COLLEGE HILL Arrests/citations Juvenile male, 17, assault at West Galbraith Road, Feb. 26. Timothy Grant, 48, 9612 Tanbark Drive, theft at 7132 Hamilton Ave., Feb. 27.

Incidents/reports Aggravated robbery Victim threatened with gun and $20 removed at 477 Dewdrop, Feb. 27. Victim threatened and headphones and phone of unknown value removed at 11065 Quailridge, March 2. Burglary Attempt made at 11424 Geneva Road, Feb. 28. Criminal damaging AC unit damaged at 777 Hargrove Way, Feb. 28. Discharging a firearm Victim reported at 11548 Southland, Feb. 27. Theft iPhone valued at $400 removed at 825 Waycross, Feb. 27. Theft of drugs Victim reported at 819 Northland Blvd., March 2.

Incidents/reports Burglary Residence entered and copper of unknown value removed at 1833 Bising Ave, Feb. 28. Domestic Reported at Dearmand Avenue, Feb. 26. Theft $10 removed at 1624 W. Galbraith Road, Feb. 28. Computer of unknown value removed at 1312 Telford Ave., Feb. 28.

SPRINGFIELD TOWNSHIP Arrests/citations Shakir Little, 21, 11035 Quailridge Court, criminal damaging at 1953 Lotushill Drive, Feb. 25. Reginald Crutchfield, 55, 4648 Winton Road, person with a gun at 10922 Birchridge, Feb. 25. Jamine Fears, 22, 1422 Wabash, operating vehicle intoxicated at 9100 Winton Road, Feb. 27. Timothy Roberts, 37, 4748 Delhi Road, operating vehicle intoxicated at 9100 Winton Road, Feb. 27. Michael Pritchard, 20, 478 Yale Drive, drug paraphernalia at 951 North Bend Road, Feb. 28. Matthew Pritchard, 20, 478 Yale Drive, drug paraphernalia at 951 North Bend Road, Feb. 28. Jeffery Camden, 27, 157 Junedail, operating vehicle intoxicated at Winton and McKelvey, March 1. Sean Warner, 33, 2230 Grant Ave., drug abuse at Waycross and Hamilton Avenue, March 2.

MOUNT HEALTHY Arrests/citations Troy Dudley, 22, 1765 Denham St., drug abuse at 7145 Hamilton Ave., March 7. Aaron Harris, 40, 1568 W. Galbraith Road, open container at 1605 Lakenoll Drive, March 4. Anthony Brown, 42, 3765 Borden St., carry concealed weapon at 8070 Hamilton Ave., March 3. Bryan Davis, 30, 242 Northern Ave, drug abuse at Hamilton Avenue, March 2. Brandon Cook, 20, 8315 Monroe Ave., drug abuse at 8070 Hamilton Ave., March 1.

Incidents/reports Criminal trespassing Victim reported at 7416 Hamilton Ave., Feb. 8. Domestic violence Juvenile victim reported at Perry St., March 4. Female reported at Clovernook, March 4.

Incidents/reports Burglary Residence entered at 1854 Windmill Way, Feb. 27.

Residence entered and copper and air conditioning of unknown value removed at 8916 Ebro Court, March 1. Criminal damaging Tires of unknown value removed at 1706 Newbrook Drive, Feb. 28. Window damaged at 1292 Bellune Drive, March 1. Breaking and entering Business entered and merchandise of unknown value removed at 9157 Winton Road, Feb. 11. Business opened at 8151 Winton Road, Feb. 19. Burglary Residence entered and TV of unknown value removed at 1998 Blue Hill Drive, Feb. 4. AC of unknown value removed at 981 Thunderbird Drive, Feb. 6. Residence entered and TV, computer valued at $900 removed at 1289 Landis, Feb. 5. Residence entered and Wii of unknown value removed at 8828 Desoto, Feb. 6. Residence entered and cash, credit cards, rings, jewelry of unknown value removed at 984 Galbraith Road, Feb. 9. Garage entered and camera and lens of unknown value removed at 10640 Mill Road, Feb. 12. Residence entered at 935 Galbraith, Feb. 14. Residence entered and computer of unknown value removed at 12025 Mill Road, Feb. 19. Child endangering Reported at 2250 Banning Road, Feb. 21. Criminal damaging Window damaged at 1310 Aldrich Ave., Feb. 5. Vehicle door damaged at 8735 Morningstar, Feb. 9. Vandalism reported at 2033 Roosevelt Ave., Feb. 14. Victim reported at 1162 Wellsprings Drive, Feb. 15. Vehicle damaged at 10847 Maplehill Drive, Feb. 10. Windshield broken by rock at 670 North Bend Road, Feb. 10. Business damaged at 9301 Winton Road, Feb. 20. Domestic Victim reported at Desoto, Feb. 10.

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MediGold is a Medicare Advantage organization with a Medicare contract. The benefit information provided is a brief summary, not a complete description of benefits. For more information contact the plan. Benefits and/or premium may change on January 1 of each year. You must continue to pay your Medicare Part B premium. H3668_011SEP2_13 CMS Accepted

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LIFE

B8 • HILLTOP PRESS • MARCH 20, 2013

Parks club learns of history, Derby party to benefit animals, shoes and more College Hill business district March 27. » Friday, April 26, 10 a..-4 p.m.: Spring in Spring Grove During this tour of Spring Grove Cemetery, study some hidden meanings behind gravestone symbols and learn of the stories of the ones buried beneath the stones. The program will begin at Winton Woods. Cost is $45 per adult. Registration is required by April 11. » Wednesday, May 8, noon-2 pm: Lunch & Learn: History of shoes Do you love shoes? Then you will be head over heels for this program. Join the tour for a step-bystep walk through the history of footwear from the natural materials of an-

LEGAL NOTICE Sealed proposals will be received at the Village of Elmwood Place, 6118 Vine Street, Elmwood Place, Ohio 45216 until 11:00 a.m. local time on Friday, April 5, 2013 and will be publicly opened and read aloud immediately thereafter for furnishing all labor, materials and equipment necessary to complete the project known as H I G H LAND AVENUE IMPROVEMENTS . Copies of the Plans and Contract Documents may be obtained at JMA Consultants, Inc., 4357 Harrison Avenue, Cincinnati, Ohio 45211 for a non-refundable deposit of $100.00 for each set of documents. Each bidder is required to furnish with its proposal, a Bid Guaranty and Contract Bond in accordance with Section 153.54 of the Ohio Revised Code. Bid security in Bond form shall be issued by a surety company or corporation licensed in the State of Ohio in the full amount of one hundred percent (100%) of the bid amount. Each bid must be submitted in a sealed envelope plainly marked "HIGHLAND AVENUE IMPROVEMENTS" on the outside of the envelope. Each bid must contain the full name of every person(s) or company interested in the same. The successful bidder, upon receipt of acceptance of their proposal, must furnish 100% Performance Bond and 100% Labor and Material Payment Bond to the Owner. Contractors must comply with the Davis-Bacon Act in the payment of prevailing federal minimum wages, and the contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act regarding compensation for overtime and safe working conditions in all contracts of $2,000 or more. On contracts of $25,000 or more, general contractors will be required to achieve 10% minority business entrepre neur participation in the contract, or clearly demonstrate and document a good faith effort to achieve MBE partici pation to be eligible for contract award . On all contracts $50,000 or greater, the following applies: Section 3 of the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1968 requires that, to the greatest extent feasible, in connection with work covered by this contract, opportunities for training and employment be made to lower income residents of the project area, and that contract work be awarded to business concerns which are owned substantially by low income residents of the project area. The Village of Elmwood Place reserves the right to waive irregularities and to reject any or all bids. 1753071

CE-0000525787

cient times to today’s modern creations. Please wear or bring your favorite pair of shoes. This program is at Winton Woods. Cost is $20 per adult. Registration is required by April 24. » Friday, May 31, 8:30 am – 5 pm: Red Wolf Sanctuary tour Wolves, wildcats, black bear, cougars and much more. Join the tour for a walk on the wild side to visit the Red Wolf Sanctuary and Rehabilitation Center in Rising Sun, Ind. There will be a staff-led tour for an up-close look at these remarkable animals. This program is at Winton Woods. Cost is $65 per adult. Registration is required by May 17. Registration for these programs can be done at www.greatparks.org or by sending name, address, daytime phone number and the appropriate fee to: Great Parks Club, Hamilton County Park District, 10245 Winton Road, Cincinnati, OH, 45231. Make checks payable to the Hamilton County Park District.

College Hill — The College Hill Community Urban Redevelopment Corporation (CHCURC) is hosting its third annual Derby Day Party and fundraiser at 5 p.m. Saturday, May 4, at Historic Laurel Court, 5870 Belmont Ave. CHCURC President Michael Cappel said he hopes they meet or exceed their goal of raising $20,000 at the party for the continued redevelopment of the College Hill business district. “CHCURC has been around a long time but they really didn’t start doing real projects until the last decade,” he said. “After Kroger’s moved up the street and Shuller’s Wigman and CVS closed, community neighbors got together and realized it was a critical time for CHCURC to get involved and actively redevelop the business district.” In the past decade, the city purchased the vacant properties and recently acquired the Kroger’s property.

Derby party co-chair Carolyn Royalty passes out mint juleps at last year’s College Hill Community Urban Redevelopment Corporation's Derby Day Party. PROVIDED.

CHCURC secured grants to redo sidewalks and develop streetscapes with “Welcome to College Hill” signs. It also received a matching grant to improve business facades along Hamilton Avenue, demolished a blighted property and installed new parking lots in the district. With $200,000 in matching funds from a benefactor coupled with $1.5 million from the city, the corporation was able to purchase many properties in the middle business district along Hamilton Avenue to renovate and rent. Cappel said that the money helped them purchase a row of six buildings which span most of one block that will be demolished in April or May and available for redevelopment. “We want to continue to bring in money from

fundraising so that we can refurbish and refresh these buildings in the business district,” he said. Admission to the party includes a catered meal, mint juleps and a bar. There will also be a silent auction, raffles and a hat contest. Early bird tickets are $65 per person until April 1, $75 thereafter, and may be purchased online at www.myeasytix.com or call toll free at 877-840-0457. An estimated $30 or $40 of ticket price is tax deductible depending on ticket cost. Consult your accountant for tax deduction guidelines. For more information visit: www.chcurc.com or contact Carolyn Royalty at 542-9792 or email royaltyct@fuse.net or call Tony Thompson at 276-7391 or email tonyt@fuse.net.

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Adults age 50 and older are invited to join the Hamilton County Park District Great Parks Club. The club includes various programs that entertain and educate about the parks and other fun recreational activities around Cincinnati. There is still room available for: » Wednesday, April 10, noon-2 p.m.: Lunch & Learn: History Along the Ohio Discover the “OYO” in new light by probing into fascinating stories that occurred along the Ohio River, from Native Americans, to river pirates, to floods. This program is offered at Sharon Woods. Cost is $20 per adult. Registration is required by

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