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Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Fort Thomas E-mail: kynews@communitypress.com T h u r s d a y, D e c e m b e r 1 7 , 2 0 0 9

RECORDER W e b s i t e : N K Y. c o m

B E C A U S E C O M M U N I T Y M AT T E R S

Ft. Thomas to hire group to count deer

Annie Garcia and Sidney Bayless

Volume 10, Number 30 © 2009 The Community Recorder ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

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By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

Raising funds

Finding the beat

New weekly “Health Rhythms” sessions at Campbell County’s Senior and Wellness Center in Highland Heights are about relaxing and having fun, not technical ability. “The idea is we’re not teaching anyone how to play, we’re just giving them the opportunity to experience music and enjoy their own rhythm,” said Sarah Manhardt, wellness coordinator for the center. Playing music is healthy and fun, and something everyone ought to do every day, she said. LIFE, B1

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Firefighter Chris Rust (above left) holds a hat of split-the-pot tickets while Natalie Gerano, executive director of the Cincinnati Muscular Dystrophy Association, picks a winner at the 915 Pub and Grill Saturday, Dec. 12. Below, left: Monica Rath, wife of Fort Thomas firefighter Steve Rath, helps out bartending at the event to raise money for Muscular Dystrophy. Below, right: Fort Thomas Firefighter Chris Wulfeck, fundraiser coordinator, sells raffle tickets at the department’s second annual guest bartender night at the 915 Pub and Grill. For information on donating, visit www.ftfirefighters.org.

Graduating green

When Northern Kentucky University graduates walk across the stage at The Bank of Kentucky Center to receive their diplomas Dec. 19, they’ll be wearing green. The graduate regalia will be traditional black, but for the first time parts of that regalia will be sustainable. The gown fibers are harvested from renewable, managed forests and will decompose in soil within a year. The Eco-Zip coil zipper has tape and teeth made from 100 percent recycled polyethylene terephtalate. And the gown packaging will contain earthfriendly ECM BioFilms materials that promote the decomposition process. In addition, Jostens will contribute $1 for each student participating in its “give back” program.The resulting dollars will be contributed to an environmental sustainability project. Jostens is also looking into ways to make graduation caps, cords and hoods more sustainable.

To place an ad, call 283-7290.

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AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Fort Thomas City Council will soon have an idea of how many deer are living in the city. In a recent meeting, council voted unanimously in favor of hiring Vision Air Research, Inc. to do the count sometime this winter. “They will use an infrared camera mounted on an airplane and will fly over quadrants of the city to count the deer,” said City Administrator Donald Martin. Martin said the company has the ability to distinguish between infrared images that are deer and those that are people or other animals. Along with counting the deer, the information will also give city officials an idea where the “hot spots” are in the city where a lot of deer are congregating, Martin said. The count is, which will cost about $8,000 the latest thing city officials are doing as part of their effort to reduce the amount of deer-related accidents. In 2007, city council adopted on ordinance allowing the discharge of a bow and arrow during certain days and times for those who wish to hunt deer. Martin said until now, the city has been watching to see if the number of deer-related accidents are going down to determine whether the hunt is effective. “In the future this count may be useful to seeing whether or not to continue the program,” Martin said. “This number will set the benchmark for this year.” The hunting ordinance is set to expire February 1, 2011, which may be when the council will consider doing another count to see if the numbers are going down, Martin said. Until then, the council will review the program each year to see if any changes need to be made.

County building opens on Monmouth Street By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

The idea of creating a dual Campbell County and Newport government square area has been realized with the opening of a new county administration building. When the building at 1010 Monmouth St. is finished being demolished, only a parking lot and a street will separate Newport’s city building and the new county building. County officials introduced the new county administration building and health center at 1098 Monmouth St., Newport, during an open house Dec. 9. The three-story, 52,000square-foot building cost $13.5 million, a figure that includes buying the land, construction costs and the furnishings. The open house drew the

judge-executives from Boone and Kenton counties, Newport officials, and contractors who worked on the building. The City of Newport and Phil Ciafardini, the city’s former city manager, guided the county to the site with the idea of creating a government square with the county and city buildings facing each other, said Campbell County Judge-executive Steve Pendery during the grand opening. Pendery said construction on the building also came at a good time for the local economy. “Most of the bids went to local contractors who were in need of the work,” he said. Pendery said he also wanted to thank the local health department for being patient and working with the county because the health department had identified their need for a new space in

1996. Having the health center, the county clerk and all the other offices in one place is good for customer service, but it’s also good for Monmouth Street’s growth, said Robert Yoder, Newport’s Main Street Coordinator. The new county building will draw more people to Monmouth Street, and once they are there they might stop in at businesses like Dixie Chili or Detroit Joe’s, Yoder said. “One of the things you want to do is bring people downtown, and let them see what is available,” he said. Plus, people are often sent from the county offices to the Newport offices and vice-versa, Yoder said. Now, instead of going across town, they can walk across the street. Yoder said there is adequate

parking in the downtown area near the county building with lots for the county building specifically. “I think it’s a great investment, it’s at the north end of the Renaissance District,” Yoder said. “It’s a nice capstone there.” The new county building puts Campbell County’s government in an up-to-date building for the first time, and is set up to be very customer-friendly, said Boone County Judge-executive Gary Moore. “It’s a very common sense approach to providing facilities,” Moore said. Kenton County Judge-executive Ralph Drees said it’s an attractive building with open space, and the view of downtown area is spectacular. And it was a good price, Drees said. “It seems like to me the price was really right,” he said.


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Fort Thomas Recorder

News

December 17, 2009

City to host the 2010 winter senior games By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

Gabriela Gabennesch will be playing a Ginger Kid and Claire Snider will perform as a Sword.

PROVIDED

Two Fort Thomas dancers perform in ‘The Nutcracker’ Eighty-six children from Southern Ohio and Northern Kentucky, are performing in the 2009-10 season presentation of Cincinnati Ballet’s “Frisch’s presents The Nutcracker.” The children have been hard at work since their September audition. To put extra sparkle in this year’s production, they have been rehearsing every weekend, in addition to completing their regular dance and academic studies. Included in this year’s

performance is Claire Snider, 11, of Fort Thomas. Snider started dancing at 3 years old with Manyet Dance Studio in Southgate. She now does ballet, tap, jazz and pointe at Manyet. She is a student at Ruth Moyer Elementary. Gabriela Gabennesch, 10, of Fort Thomas is also in this year’s performance. Gabennesch started dancing at two-and-a-half years old at Ziegler Dance Studio in Covington, and in second grade started dancing with

the Otto M. Buddig Dance Academy (Cincinnati Ballet). This is her second year performing in “The Nutcracker.” The Aronoff Center for the Performing Arts will host 13 shows between Dec. 16-27, including two student matinees. Tickets are $30-$70, and are available at The Cincinnati Ballet Box Office, 513621-5282, Aronoff Box Office 513-621-2787 or online at www.cincinnatiballet.com. Your Aprilaire® Comfort Specialists:

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Seniors will soon have the chance to throw some “freezebee” and do some Nintendo Wii skiing at the winter edition of the Northern Kentucky Senior games. The one-day event offers local citizens 50 years or older a chance to participate and compete in a variety of activities. “The whole idea behind the senior games is to get people active,” said Paul Ankenbauer, chair of the senior games committee and program planner for the Boone County Parks and Recreation. “We have an indoor facility in Fort Thomas, which is perfect for this time

By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

With lights flashing and sirens blaring and buzzing, dozens of police officers pull their cruisers into the parking Meijer in Cold Spring each year on a Saturday in December escorting children for a day of shopping, lunch and buddying-up. Officers from Fraternal order of Police Campbell County Lodge No. 10 annually buy children a jacket, two sets of clothing and some toys. After shopping together, the children and officers are treated to lunch courtesy of the Tropics Restaurant at Manhattan Harbour in Dayton and the Harbour’s Commodore Boat Club. Fundraising from the

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boat club and the restaurant’s donation helped provide a sit down meal for 300 people including the children, officers and volunteers associated with the event, said Bellevue Police Department Lt. Jimmy Poynter, president of FOP Lodge 10. “We have the kids do lunch while we’re wrapping gifts,” Poynter said. The boat club has also enabled the FOP to expand the event to about 60 children in recent years, he said. “Their donation allowed us to take 20 extra kids again this year,” Poynter said. In addition to the shopping and luncheon, the FOP has also donated 15 bags of toys that will be distributed to children in Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical

RECORDER

Find news and information from your community on the Web Fort Thomas – nky.com/fortthomas Campbell County – nky.com/campbellcounty News Michelle Shaw | Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1053 | mshaw@nky.com Amanda Joering | Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1052 | ajoering@nky.com Melanie Laughman | Sports Editor . . . . . . . . 513-248-7118 | mlaughman@nky.com James Weber | Sports Reporter . . . . . . . . . 578-1054 | jweber@nky.com Advertising Debbie Maggard | Advertising Manager. . . . . . 578-5501 | dmaggard@nky.com Michelle Schlosser | Account Rep . . . . . . . . 578-5521 | mschlosser@nky.com Delivery For customer service. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 781-4421 Sharon Schachleiter | Circulation Manager. . 442-3464 | sschachleiter@nky.com Cathy Kellerman | District Manager . . . . . . . . . 442-3461 | ckellerman@nky.com Classified To place a Classified ad. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283-7290 | www.communityclassified.com To place an ad in Community Classified, call 283-7290.

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A holiday to remember

activity.” For the senior games, the committee have again teamed up with Best Buy, who is providing a television and Nintendo Wii game system for the seniors to use during the event. The event, sponsored by Cardinal Hill of Northern Kentucky, is at 8:30 a.m. Thursday, Jan. 21 at the armory gymnasium in Tower Park, Fort Thomas. The cost, which includes a continental breakfast and lunch is $10 for those who register by Monday, Jan. 4 and $15 for those who don’t pre-register. For more information visit www.ftthomas.org and click on the Recreation Department link or call 7811700.

Police lavish children with gifts

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Fort Thomas

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of year when the weather is bad.” For years, Northern Kentucky parks and recreation departments and the Northern Kentucky Area Development District have been coming together to host the senior games every spring, but this is only the second year in the recent past that the groups have hosted a winter edition. “The spring games are our biggest event, but we had a pretty good turn-out for the winter games last year,” said Dave Buerger, member of the committee and director of the Fort Thomas Recreation Department. “It helps keep seniors active, give them something to do and offer them a social

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Cold Spring Police Department Sgt. Brian Messer walks the aisles of Meijer in Cold Spring with his buddy for the day, Xander Kerns, 6, of Melbourne. Center during Christmas, he said. During the shopping spree at Meijer, Cold Spring Police Department Sgt. Brian Messer smiled as he asked Xander Kerns, 6, of Melbourne, shop, whether he liked one jacket or another. “It’s a good program, it’s just good to give back to the kids, they enjoy it and we enjoy it,” Messer said. It’s also a chance for the children and community to see and associate the police in a positive, not negative, way, said Alexandria Police Department officer Lucas Cooper.

Index

Calendar ......................................B2 Classifieds.....................................C Life...............................................B1 Police reports..............................B8 Schools........................................A6 Sports ..........................................A7 Viewpoints ..................................A9

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December 17, 2009

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CCF Recorder

News

December 17, 2009

Beshear announces DEFENDER Direct to locate new call center in Newport Gov. Steve Beshear and Cabinet for Economic Development Secretary Larry Hayes announced that DEFENDER Direct Inc., an authorized dealer for ADT Security Services and Dish Network, will open a new call center in Northern Kentucky. The new location project will create 100 new full-time jobs and represents a capital investment in the Commonwealth of more than $2.3 million. “We warmly welcome DEFENDER Direct and the 100 new jobs the company will bring to the Commonwealth and Northern Kentucky,” said Gov. Beshear. “Kentucky recently improved its economic development incentive toolbox and DEFENDER Direct is one of the first companies to benefit from the new Kentucky Business Investment program.” DEFENDER’s newest call center will be located in 14,000-square-feet of the Newport Shopping Center at 1727 Monmouth Street, Newport. The call center is now one of four call centers for the company including its headquarters in Indi-

anapolis, Ind. DEFENDER also has 175 ADT installation branch offices across the U.S. and Canada. “We considered other markets in the Midwest for our newest call center, but we were particularly impressed with the workforce in Northern Kentucky,” said DEFENDER Chief Operations Officer, John Corliss. “The support and cooperation we received from the City of Newport, Northern Kentucky Tri-ED and the Kentucky Cabinet for Economic Development played a large part in our decision. We are excited to expand our business in Northern Kentucky and work with these organizations.” The Kentucky Economic Development Finance Authority preliminarily approved DEFENDER Direct for tax benefits up to $750,000 under Kentucky’s newest incentive program, the Kentucky Business Investment (KBI) Program. The incentive can be earned over a 10-year period through corporate income tax credits and wage assessments. The maximum

annual approved amount to be earned by DEFENDER Direct is $75,000. “The Newport community appreciates DEFENDER Direct’s confidence in Northern Kentucky’s workforce and the services our city offers the business community,” said Newport Mayor Jerry Peluso. “The Newport Shopping Center provides a convenient location with easy accessibility, including public transportation systems, and is a perfect fit for Newport’s urban core.” “Northern Kentucky TriED is actively marketing our region to a variety of businesses in target industries,” said Steve Pendery, Campbell County Judge Executive and Tri-ED Executive Committee member. “We appreciate DEFENDER Direct’s confidence in our region and will work with the company to ensure the new center’s success.” Interested applicants should visit www.defenderdirect.com or call the company’s job line at 888-2604473 for more information about working at DEFENDER.

PROVIDED

Top cops for DUI

Officers from Campbell County police agencies receive 2009 Governor’s Impaired Driving Enforcement Award for fighting DUI’s during a Dec. 2 banquet in Lexington. From left are Ben Wisner of the Dayton Police Department, Brian Waldorf of the Fort Thomas Police Department, Nick Heiert of the Campbell County Police Department, Lucas Cooper of the Alexandria Police Department, and Bruce Markus of the Newport Police Department. Not pictured are Cold Spring Police Department officer Jeremy Enzweiler, and Michael Murdock of the Wilder Police Department.

Since Christmas is a time of remembering, take the time this Christmas season to rekindle memories of yesterday and to create new ones for tomorrow. May the peace and joy of Christmas fill your heart and home.

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December 17, 2009

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BRIEFLY Katherine Simpson has been elected president of the American Heart Association’s Northern Kentucky Division and will serve a two-year term beginning July 1, 2009. She has been a member of the board of directors since 2006. In her position as president Simpson ushered in four new members to its Board of Directors. Joining the board are: Billy Anderson, Regional Sales Executive, US Bank; Marlene Feagan, RN, Parish Nurse, Health Ministries, St. Elizabeth Health Systems; and Chris Schilling, Sales Manager, Terryberry Company. “We are pleased that such outstanding individuals have joined the Northern Kentucky Board,” Simpson said. “We are looking forward to working together to raise awareness and lead the fight against heart disease and stroke in our community.” The American Heart Association is the largest voluntary health organization fighting heart disease, stroke and other cardiovascular diseases in local communities throughout America. These diseases devastate millions of people of all ages and claim nearly 950,000 lives a year. To learn more, visit americanheart.org or call Amy Howe at 513-281-4048.

Bowling league signups

Sign ups for the Winter Youth Bowling league at Southern Lanes Sports Center in Alexandria has begun. Anyone between the ages of 4 and 19 is welcome. Team and individual signups are welcome. The league begins play Jan. 9 and lasts 12 weeks. Contact 635-2121 for go to www.southernlanes.com.

active beginning at 6 p.m. on Friday, Dec. 31. For the past 13 years, Care Cab, a joint effort between MADD and AAA Insurance (AAA Allied Insurance Services, Inc.), has provided almost 2,000 safe rides home to over 5,100 passengers. Hamilton County Safe Communities is also a proud partner of the program.

Free cabs New Year’s Eve Clarification A story in the Dec. 10 edi-

Free cab rides will be available to impaired partygoers on New Year’s Eve to prevent drunk driving and help people get home safely. MADD estimates that three in 10 people will be affected by an alcohol-related crash in their lifetime. Men, between the ages of 21 and 34, are more likely to be involved in a fatal drunk driving crash. Care Cab, a joint effort between MADD and AAA Insurance, will be available 6 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 31 through midnight Friday, Jan. 1, providing 30 hours of free service. The cab ride by Towne Taxi is free for callers, 21 years old and over, in need of safe transportation from a public establishment to a private residence within the I275 loop. Call 513-768-FREE (513-768-3733) to request service. The phone line will be

tion of The Campbell County Recorder about a turf battle between fire districts did not fully convey the details of a deal Southern Campbell Fire District officials say they offered to the Alexandria Fire District. The deal was for Southern Campbell to take over medical service calls in the area of Persimmon Grove Pike and Shaw Hess Road from Alexandria. The deal Southern Campbell officials said was offered to Alexandria was for Southern Campbell to give Alexan-

dria back the $8,0000 in annual property tax money from the affected areas. But, under the offer, Southern Campbell officials said they intended to keep the money billed to insurance companies, about $2,500 annually, from all medical service calls in the area.

Trash night changes

Rumpke waste removal and recycling services will not run on Christmas Day, Dec. 25 or New Year’s Day, Jan. 1. Collection will be delayed one day during the weeks of the holidays. The week of Christmas:

Rumpke will provide service as scheduled on Thursday, Dec. 24, but there will be no collection Friday, Dec. 25. Customers with regularly scheduled Friday pickup should place their trash at the curb for Saturday pickup. Week of New Year’s Day: Rumpke will provide service as scheduled Thursday, Dec. 31, but there will be no collection Friday, Jan. 1. Customers with regularly scheduled Friday pickup should place their trash at the curb for Saturday pickup. Collection schedules will return to normal the week of

Jan. 4. This schedule applies to the following Kentucky counties: Boone, Bracken, Campbell, Grant, Harrison, Kenton and Pendleton. Rumpke encourages residents to place waste and recycling containers at the curb the evening before collection. Contact Rumpke’s customer service with additional questions at toll free 1-877786-7537 or visit www.rumpke.com

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SCHOOLS Highlands seniors A6

Fort Thomas Recorder

December 17, 2009

ACHIEVEMENTS

Editor Michelle Shaw | smhaw@nky.com | 578-1053

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first students to direct a full-length play

By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

Two Highlands High School students have gone where none of the school’s students have gone before … to the director’s chair of a full-length play. Seniors Charles Croley and Molly Deaton have put their names in the Highlands history books with “A Christmas Carol,” the first full length, completely student directed, adapted, cast, produced and designed production at the school.

“We really wanted to take all that we have learned in the past years and create something on our own,” Croley said. “It was awesome, I really learned a lot from the experience.” Croley, who has been in many productions in the district and plans to attend college for musical theater, teamed up with his best friend, Deaton, who has spent her high school career concentrating on the technical aspect of theater, working as a stage manager. “I wanted to do this because I felt like there was a need for more

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Max Colvill, plays the ghost of Ebenezer Scrooge’s business partner Jacob Marley, warns him that he will be visited by three ghosts.

people to get involved in theater,” Deaton said. “This helped introduce some new people to acting and the technical things like design and lighting.” While directing her peers was a little tough at times, Deaton said she enjoyed the experience overall. “It was hard because I couldn’t go home with actors and make

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Ebenezer Scrooge, played by Brian Kremer, sits grumpily in his chair. them memorize their lines, and I couldn’t give them more energy on stage,” Deaton said. “It was stressful at times, but totally worth it in the end.” Croley said combining students who had experience in what they were doing and those who had never acted and directed before really worked out for everyone.

“I think everyone learned a lot from each other and from this experience,” Croley said. The performance was held Thursday, Dec. 10 through Saturday, Dec. 12 in the school’s new Black Box Theatre, part of recent renovations to the school that included many additions in the performing arts areas.

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Beau McGhee (left) playing Fred and Brian Kremer playing his uncle Ebenezer Scrooge act out a scene during the show.

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Teacher Jason Burgess (center) introduces Molly Deaton (left) and Charles Croley, the student directors of Highlands High School’s production of A Christmas Carol, at the opening night of the play Thursday, Dec. 10.

Will Bardgett (left) and Clare Coughlan act out a scene from Scrooge’s past.

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Maddie Huber, Etana Plymesser and Amanda Fraysure and Kelsey Theil perform during the program.

Artsy

ALL PICTURES BY AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Highlands Middle School students Lily Fennel, Bobby Dale and Sam Steiden play the song Infant King during the school’s Fine Arts Night, Thursday, Dec. 10.

Saxophone players Kano Nakayama and Brooks Brown play during the intermediate instrumental ensemble’s performance during Fine Arts Night.

Brian Johncox and Donnie Adams play the stand-up bass during the strings program.


SPORTS BRIEFLY

This week in basketball

• Newport High School boys beat the School for Creative and Performing Arts 107-43, Dec. 5. Casey McDaniel was Newport’s topscorer with 20 points, including two three-pointers. Newport’s Travis Jones scored seven points, including one three-pointer; Brandon Carter scored six; Brandon Sizemore scored 10, including two three-pointers; Timmy Slusher scored two; Brandon Tucker scored eight, including two three-pointers; Anthony Luther scored eight; Demarko Foster scored 10; Kron Covington scored six; Cody Collins scored 12; Devin Opitz scored six; Deiontei Glenn scored four; Eli Hambrick scored one and Melvin Calhoun scored eight, including two-three-pointers. • Campbell County High School boys beat Calvary Christian 65-28, Dec. 5. Brady Kennedy was Campbell’s high-scorer with 14 points, including one three-pointer. Campbell’s Brady Jolly scored eight points; Corey Cox scored four; Cody Neises scored four; Nate McGovney scored two; Greg Geiman scored 10l Smith scored 10, including one three-pointer; Dalton Griffin scored two; Eric Sinclair scored seven; Jeff Skinner scored two and Cameron Addie scored two. • Dayton High School boys beat Silver Grove High School 78-45, Dec. 5. Shawn Eastin was Dayton’s highscorer with 27 points, including one three-pointer. Dayton’s Jesse Simons scored three points; Cody Turner scored 11 points, including one three-pointer; Greg Kraft scored two; Tyler Lovell scored 16, including two three-pointers; Brandon Thornton scored four; Thomas Rogg scored two; Timmy Massey scored 10 and Ben Schoultheis scored one. • Newport Central Catholic High School boys beat Holy Cross High School 61-37, Dec. 5. Jake Geisler was NCC’s high-scorer with 2 points. NCC’s Shaun Meyer scored 11 points, including one three-pointer; Grant Pangallo scored 10 points; Brady Hightchew scored 10 points, including two three-pointers and Derek Schmidt scored eight points. • Newport Central Catholic girls beat Campbell County High School 74-27, Dec. 5. Mariah Tabor was NCC’s high-scorer with 14 points. NCC’s Hannah Thiem scored three 3-pointers; Kiley Bartels scored 11 points; Courtney Sandfoss scored eight; Trisha Taylor scored five, including one three-pointer; Brittany Fryer scored 12; Ally Buchanan scored two; Christine Ciafardini scored four; Aubrey Muench scored one; Paige Piccola scored four and Jamey Kohls scored four. • Silver Grove High School girls beat Eminence 38-38, Dec. 5. Amber Fancher was Silver Grove’s top-scorer with 17 points. Silver Grove’s Richelle Walls scored four points, Kristas Govan scored six, Desiree Gossitt scored three and Payton Govan scored eight. • Newport High School girls beat the School for Creative and Performing Arts 4723, Dec. 5. Newport’s Jamie Watts scored one three-pointer, Margaret Faison scored 10 points, Maddy Wiedeman scored three, Lila Edwards scored 10, Alysa Wilfong scored six, Brittany Beasley scored four, Sara Darnell scored 10 and Ciara Mobley scored one.

CCF Recorder

December 17, 2009

HIGH SCHOOL | Editor Melanie Laughman | mlaughman@nky.com | 513-248-7118

YOUTH

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RECREATIONAL

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

N K Y. c o m

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RECORDER

Highlands swimmers young, talented

By Tony Meale tmeale@communitypress.com

The Highlands High School swimming team lost 10 seniors to graduation last year, but head coach Nancy Barre is confident in her returning veterans. The girls’ team, which finished seventh out of 37 teams at state last year, will be led by seniors Brooke Schutte and Gracie Lynne, as well as sophomore Natalie Schultz. “We have high expectations for the three of them,” Barre said. “Gracie and Brooke are entering their sixth year in the program. They’re seasoned, experienced swimmers hoping to finish off in a positive way. Natalie has a few more years ahead of her, but they all work hard. As far as role models, the other kids look to them and see ‘This is what it takes to be successful.’” Barre has also been impressed with junior newcomer Mackenzie Cole. “She’s been a pleasant surprise in freestyle sprints,” Barre said. On the boys’ side, freshman Phillip Englert is the top returner. “He’s probably the

Highland High School sophomore Conner Downard is one of the top returners for the Bluebirds this season. fastest on the team,” Barre said. “Everyone respects his ability and marvels at how fast he goes. He has a good rapport with his teammates.” Sophomore Conner Downard will be another key contributor. “He has sheer determination to work hard and achieve to the best of his expectations,” Barre said. Also swimming will be senior Spencer Bankemper,

a running back on the Highlands football team. Due to the Bluebirds’ success this past season – they won their third straight state title – Bankemper was unable to report to practice until Dec. 8. “The football season went a few weeks longer, which is great for our football team,” Barre said. “We’re looking for Spencer to be one of our leaders.” Bankemper is the lone

FILE PHOTO

senior on the boys’ team, which also has just two juniors. One of them, Bennett Paradis, is improving every day – literally. “He just drops time every time he’s in the water,” Barre said. “It’s kind of become a running joke.” Barre has also been pleased with the work ethic of freshman Mayson Hurtt. Leading the Bluebirds in diving will be junior Evan Duckworth and seventh-

grader Carly Hill. “It’s such a unique event,” Barre said of diving. “These kids have to do 11 dives – two in each of the five categories and (a total of) three in one of them. This is a full commitment.” The five categories for diving are forward, backward, inward, twisting and reverse. Hannah Gadd, who graduated from Highlands last year, won a state title in diving as a senior. She is now diving at the University of Louisville. Barre hopes that her middle-school swimmers and divers will fill the void of losing so many seniors, a privilege that many Kentucky schools enjoy. “The OHSAA does not allow you to compete until you are a freshman in high school,” Barre said. “But using younger swimmers is common in Kentucky. Most teams do.” Overall, Barre is confident in her team, which will participate in the Northern Kentucky Athletic Conference championships at Scott Jan. 22-23. “We’re not as deep as we were last year,” she said. “But we still have good strength.”

Camels focus on improving times in ’09 By Adam Kiefaber akiefaber@nky.com

Not one member of last year’s Campbell County High School swimming and diving team participated on a club squad during the offseason. However, that didn’t stop a few of them for qualifying for events at the Swimming & Diving Championships in Louisville last February. Diver Olivia Schultz headlined the group and finished ninth in the Girls’ 1 Meter Diving event. On the boys’ side, the relay team of Tyler Huff, Justin Sand,

Dreyer Koeninger Ryan Hornback and Zak Koeninger qualified to complete in the both the 200yard and 400-yard freestyle relay events at the state meet. Of that group only Koeninger returns this season. Schultz, Huff, Sand and Hornback have all graduated.

Koeninger is also the lone senior on the boys’ roster, which is comprised of six juniors, two sophomores, three freshmen, an eighth-grader, three seventh-graders, two sixthgraders and two fifthgraders. “I have a very young boys’ team,” head coach Melissa Dreyer said. “It will take a lot of hard work and dedication to accomplish what last year’s boys’ team did, but I am very hopeful that Zak Koeninger, who is coming off a knee injury from football, will have one of his best swim seasons.”

Other swimmers that could have good seasons this year are junior Andrew Dezold, sophomore Ryan Field and freshmen Matt Dreyer and Kyle Vandrutten. On the girls’ side, Dreyer has a roster of 41 swimmers and divers including the experience of eight seniors and the inexperience of 14 seventh-graders. “My girls’ team is also a young team, but they have started to realize they can and have a very good chance to qualify for the state meet,” Dreyer said. Leading the way for the

girls is senior Sarah West, juniors Carolynn Dreyer and Heidi Schultz, sophomores Erin Walch and Lydia Bear and freshman Sam Styler. Overall, both the boys’ and girls’ sides are young and inexperienced. In fact, of the 60 swimmers on the roster only two swim club. “My outlook for this season is to continue to improve on their on their times every time they swim,” Dreyer said. “I am proud of everyone on my team because with limited practice time they will go out and give their all every time they compete.”

Collinsworth dubbed U.S. Army All-American By Adam Kiefaber akiefaber@nky.com

Highlands High School senior Austin Collinsworth joined an elite group of high school football players Dec. 8 when he was selected to play in the U.S. Army AllAmerican Bowl. Collinsworth is only player from Kentucky to be selected in the 2009 game, which includes the sports’ top 90 high school players, and is the first to be selected from Northern Kentucky since Rob Smith of Highlands in 2002. “Anyone who has seen Austin Collinsworth play knows that he is a gamechanger,” SportsLink Director of Media and Public Relations Kristian Dyer said. “Whether it is a threetouchdown performance to lift Highlands to a perfect season and a state championship or it is the resiliency of playing through two broken thumbs. He has that type of mettle, call it Army Strong if you will, that makes him a great selection as a U.S. Army All-American.”

Currently, Austin Collinsworth has offers from Cincinnati, Kentucky, Louisville, Middle Tennessee State, Oregon, Stanford, Vanderbilt and Harvard. SportsLink is the producer of the event, which will be nationally televised on NBC from the Alamodome in San Antonio, Texas, at 1 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 9. Aiding SportsLink in the selection process is recruiting service Rivals.com and recruiting expert Tom Lemming. Former participants in this game, which began in 2001, include current Cincinnati Bengals Andrew Whitworth, Keith Rivers and Andre Caldwell. Other notable alumni include NFL stars Vince Young, Reggie Bush and Adrian Peterson. “It now just comes down to the game itself and proving that I belong amongst those elite players,” Collinsworth said. “I hope I play well.” Throughout 2009, Collinsworth has been playing well and has rushed for

1,502 yards and 23 touchdowns on only 172 carries. In November Collinsworth was awarded the Paul Hornung Award, which is given annually to the top high school player in Kentucky. Collinsworth hasn’t eliminated the possibly of making his college decision during the U.S. Army AllAmerican Bowl, which has become a tradition for its players over the years. “If I make my decision sometime this month maybe I will make my announcement before that, but if I make my decision around that time then I don’t see why I wouldn’t announce it during that game,” Collinsworth said. Currently, Collinsworth has offers from Cincinnati, Kentucky, Louisville, Middle Tennessee State, Oregon, Stanford, Vanderbilt and Harvard.

ADAM KIEFABER/STAFF

Highlands senior Austin Collinsworth is presented a U.S. Army All-American jersey in front of his family and classmates in the school’s library Dec. 8. Collinsworth is the only high school football player in Kentucky to be selected to play in the game, which will take place Jan. 9 at 1 p.m. at the Alamodome in San Antonio, Texas.


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CCF Recorder

Sports & recreation

December 17, 2009

BRIEFLY This week in basketball

• Highlands High School girls beat Holy Cross High School 67-42, Dec. 8. Katie Allen was Highlands’ highscorer with 23 points, including three 3-pointers. Highlands’ Ava Abner scored seven points, Allie Conner scored six, Bekah Towles scored 18, Leah Schaefer scored five, Hope Cutter scored six and Kelsey Dunn scored two. • Dayton High School boys beat Bellevue High School 8644, Dec. 8. Cody Turner was Dayton’s high-scorer with 20 points. Dayton’s Jesse Simons scored 15 points, including one three-pointer; Greg Kraft scored one three pointer; Tyler Lovell scored three points; Thornton scored six; Timmy Massey scored seven; Shonn Bowden scored 14; Shawn Eastin scored 16 and Ben Schoulthesis scored two. • Campbell County boys beat Dixie Heights High School 66-55, Dec. 8. Jordon Smith was Campbell’s high scorer with 19 points, including three 3-pointers. Campbell’s Alex Wolf scored 11 points, including one three-pointer; Brady Jolly scored 14 points, including one three-pointer; Dalton Griffin scored two points; Corey Cox scored one; Cody Neises scored eight; Nate McGovney scored four and Greg Geiman scored seven. • Highlands High School boys beat St. Henry High School 75-41, Dec. 8. Garrett Smith-Keller was Highlands’ high-scorer with 18 points. Highlands’ Zach Lother scored

JIM OSBORN/CONTRIBUTOR

Up and at ‘em

Bishop Brossart’s Jordan Armstrong floats through the lane in front of Campbell County’s Brady Jolly during the fourth quarter Dec. 11. Brossart beat Campbell County 45-36 making them undefeated in their first four games, with other wins over St. Henry, Silver Grove and Pendleton County. eight points, including two three-pointers; Alex Dean scored two points; George Grote scored seven, including one three-pointer; Stephen

Woman Decorates Three City Blocks After Using Thera-Gesic

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sore shoulder and proceeded to decorate every house for three city blocks in anticipation of the holidays. When asked if she had each homeowner’s permission to create her magic, she painlessly replied: “None of your dang business!”

Kowolonek score 16, including one three-pointer; Jack Stewart scored 11; Ben Watson scored seven and Cory Dill scored six. • Bishop Brossart High School boys beat Pendleton County 63-56, Dec. 8. Justin Morscher was Brossart’s highscorer with 19 points, including six three-pointers. Brossart’s Jordan Armstrong scored 16 points, including one threepointer; Zach Fardo scored four; Kramer scored six; Travis Norton scored two; Dylan Dierig scored one three-pointer; Jacob Reiger scored nine and Justin Saunders scored four. • Newport High School

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boys beat Lloyd High School 71-38, Dec. 8. Demarko Foster was Newport’s top-scorer with 14 points, including one threepointer. Newport’s Travis Jones scored 13 points, including three 3-pointers; Brandon Sizemore scored nine, including one three-pointer; Timmy Slusher scored two; Brandon Tucker scored five, including one three-pointer; Anthony Luther scored seven; Casey McDaniels scored five; Kron Covington scored two; Cody Collins scored seven and Devin Opitz scored seven. • Dayton High School boys beat Bellevue High School 8644, Dec. 9. Cody Turner and Shawn Eastin were Dayton’s top-scorer with 20 points each. Dayton’s Jesse Simons scored 13 points, including one three-pointer; Greg Kraft scored one three-pointer; Tyler Lovell scored three; Brandon Thornton scored six; Timmy Massey scored seven; Shonn Bowden scored 14 and Ben Schoultheis scored two. • Dayton girls beat Cooper High School 59-51, Dec. 9. C.C. Centers was Dayton’s top-scorer with 13 points, including one three-pointer. Dayton’s Sammy Powell scored seven points; Wayman scored two; Tabitha Kilburn scored seven, including two three-pointers; Julia Kilburn scored four; Sarah Schoultheis scored 11; Allison Dilts scored 11 and Danielle Moses scored four. • Newport Central Catholic boys beat Dixie Heights High School 68-59 in overtime, Dec. 10. Grant Pangallo was New Cath’s top-scorer with 27 points, including two three-pointers. New Cath’s Shaun Meyer scored 14 points; Brady Hightchew scored two; Jake Giseler scored 18; Brian Doyle scored five, including one three-pointer; Evan Morse scored two. • Dayton High School girls beat Silver Grove 66-38, Dec. 10. Danielle Moses was Dayton’s top-scorer with 12 points. Dayton’s CC Centers scored 10

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points, Sammy Powell scored nine, Heather Wayman scored five, Tabitha Kilburn scored four, Julia Kilburn scored four, Sarah Schoultheis scored nine, Rachael Ackerson scored three, Charlissa Smith scored six and Allison Dilts scored four. • Bishop Brossart High School boys beat Campbell County High School, Dec. 11. Jacob Rieger was Brossart’s top-scorer with 18 points, including one three-pointer. Brossart’s Jordan Armstrong scored five points, Zach Fardo scored one three-pointer, Justin Morscher scored six, Allen Kramer scored two, Travis Norton scored three, Justin Saunders scored six and Nathan Brugger scored two. • Bellevue High School girls beat Calvary Christian High School 62-52, Dec. 11. Catherine Kessen was Bellevue’s topscorer with 16 points. Bellevue’s Shelby Carelock scored six points, including one threepointer; Cassie Glancy scored eight, including one threepointer; Kaylynn Dill scored four; Arnden scored 14; Tyalor McIntyre scored 10, including one three-pointer and Morgan Rowland scored four.

This week in wrestling

• Campbell County High School beat Deer Park High

School 51-17, Dec. 8. Campbell’s Fousz won by forfeit with 112 points; Fryer pinned Mendiola in 1 minute, 27 seconds and scored 119; Woods won by forfeit with a 125; Hamilton pinned Morris in 4 minutes, 58 seconds and scored a 135; Shotwell pinned Mallow in 1 minute, 16 seconds and scored 145; Freidley beat King in a 7-3 major decision and scored 171; Ilg pinned Sayer in 2 minutes, 14 seconds and scored 215 and Sranck pinned Johnson in 1 minute, 20 seconds and scored 285. • Campbell County beat Brookville High School 48-21, Dec. 8. Campbell’s Yenter won by forfeit and scored 103 points; Fousz pinned Rupp in 3 minutes, 32 seconds and scored 112; Fryer won in a 141 major decision against Champine and scored 119; Hamilton won in a 12-5 decision against Ares and scored 130; Spahr pinned Combs in 1 minute, 7 seconds and scored 140; Shotwell pinned Williams in 3 minutes, 8 seconds and scored 145; Denhken won in a 9-4 decision against Meirose and scored 160; Lee won by default against O’Connor and scored 171; Ilg technical fall against Dunn and scored a 189 and Frank pinned Wheeler in 53 seconds and scored 285.

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SIDELINES Holiday soccer camp

The second annual OSYSA Soccer Unlimited Winter Holiday Camp is from 10 a.m. to noon, Tuesday and Wednesday, Dec. 22 and 23, at Pleasure Isle, Covington. Cost per participant is $60, with a 10 percent discount offered to families with more than one athlete attending. Bring a ball. The camp is open to boys and girls ages 5 to 15. There is a maximum of 20 participants. Register through www.osysa.com/camps.

Fast pitch softball sign-ups

The Northern Kentucky Bandits Fastpitch Softball Organization is currently conducting tryouts for the 2010 summer softball season. The organization is seeking players for the following ages: 10 (born after Jan. 1999), 12 born after Jan. 1997), 14 (born after Jan. 1995) and 16 (born after Jan. 1993). For tryout information, e-mail nkybandits@yahoo.com, or visit www.leaguelineup.com.


VIEWPOINTS

EDITORIALS

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LETTERS

because he doesn’t have bus fare. At the Society of St. Vincent de Paul, we receive more than 250 calls each day from people in desperate need – double the number of calls compared to 2008. Sometimes it can feel overwhelming. As the days grow shorter, I am aware that virtually every night of the week, St. Vincent de Paul volunteers are heading out into the cold to meet with a family in need. But it is also a great comfort to know that there are many others in Greater Cincinnati who share our concern for those who are suffering, giving generously of their time and resources to help local neighbors. When we all work together to help one another, incredible things happen. There are ways to help: • Adopt-A-Family: Fulfill a child’s wish list by adopting a family for Christmas. You will receive a wish list of gifts to purchase and may either deliver them to the family or bring them to St. Vincent de Paul for distribution. If you do not have time to shop, a gift of $150 will purchase gifts for a family of four. Contact LaMonica

want do differently. Then plan to do or not do these things. Give yourself a break. Be kind to yourself and don’t feel guilty about any of your emotions; happy or sad. Try new things, such as meeting friends at a restaurant instead of having them to your house. If you put up a tree, put it in a different place in your home or put up a miniature tree. Fewer decorations, less greeting cards, baking less can help you feel less stressed. It is especially important that you get adequate rest. Stress and grief can take a lot of energy from your body. Make sure you are getting enough sleep. Exercise is important, too. Ask for help. You will feel sad at certain times this season. Give yourself permission to express those feelings. Feelings should not be “stuffed” away. It’s okay to ask for what you need. People gain satisfaction from helping those they care about. If you need assistance with shopping or decorating or cooking, tell them so! If you need a shoulder to cry on, let someone know. Give something of yourself to others. You are not alone. You are not the only one grieving this holiday season. It may help your healing process to assist other people. If you can bring yourself to do so, volunteer your time at a church, adopt a needy family, or help out at a homeless shelter. Create New Traditions. Creating new traditions can be more helpful than keeping the old. You can involve the family in planning and carrying out the new ritual(s). Also, keep in mind that any

James Ellis Community Recorder guest columnist

COLUMNS

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N K Y. c o m

Last week’s question

Liz Carter Community Press guest columnist

Sherman at 513235-3353 or lsherman@SVDPcincinnati.org. • Organize a drive: Organize a drive or event at schools, workplaces or churches. Contact Julie Rack at 562-8841, ext. 225, or jrack@SVDPcincinnati.org. • Make a financial gift to keep a family from becoming homeless, or toward the purchase a child’s bed, by sending your contribution to 1125 Bank Street Cincinnati, OH 45214 or visit www.SVDPcincinnati.org. As the Society of St. Vincent de Paul continues to address the most pressing needs of the poor in our community, I am grateful to every person who gives their time or financial support. And I am honored to be part of such a caring community, working together to provide small acts of kindness and support that go along way during the holiday season. Liz Carter is executive director of the Society of St. Vincent de Paul, Cincinnati Council. For more information, go to www.SVDPcincinnati.org.

Grief support groups

Support groups offered throughout the year. New sessions start in January. Call 859-301-4611 for more information about any of these groups. Journey Through Grief - This is a 6-week class for adults. The focus is on helping participants better understand the grief process while gaining support from each other. Journey Through Grief Grant County - Meets twice a month with a breakfast meeting and support group designed to assist participants with support and understanding of the grief process. Men’s Breakfast Club - One group designed for retired age widowers focuses on developing friendships through fellowship. Another group has recently been established for workingage men. HOPE: Helping Overwhelmed Parents Endure - Support group for parents who have experienced the death of an older child. STARS: Grief Support for Kids This program is for school-aged kids who have experienced the death of a loved one and their caregivers. changes you make do not have to be permanent! You can say “for this year” we will try this. Know that You Will Survive. It may be hard to imagine right now, but you will survive this season. It may be the hardest time of your grief process thus far, but it will pass. You will probably find yourself becoming stronger than before. If you find a few moments of happiness, enjoy it. The best gift you can give to anyone you care about, even someone you have lost, is to be honest with yourself and make the most of every moment of your life. James Ellis is the Bereavement Coordinator for Hospice Care of St. Elizabeth.

President Obama has called up 30,000 additional troops to Afghanistan. Would you support a “war tax” to pay for this deployment? “Yes.”

K.P.

“No! This is one of the very few reasons we have the constitutional government we have, military support. Stop the other spending and take care of the military.” M.C. “We don’t need a ‘war tax.’ Defending our country from invaders domestic and foreign is one of the few things that our taxes that we already send in bulk to Washington is supposed to be used for! “According to our Constitution, our federal government should NOT be dabbling in education, health insurance or businesses. All those things, and most of what D.C. now does, are supposed to be powers left to the state and local governments or the private sector. Why don’t we send representatives and senators that will say ‘no’ to all the pork and unconstitutional use of our tax money and use it for the few things it is supposed to be used for?” J.K.T. “Yes. We actually have to win there first and it should be funded by a war tax the same as World War I and World War II were paid for (the last wars the United States won). “If we leave before we really win; we’ll face a worse threat from this area than we did before 2001. The Taliban would return; and with them, their friends in Al Qaeda. We need to declare victory and get out.” Duke “Absolutely not! No more taxes! I support worthwhile causes and this war is not one of them. I would support spending money to put a helmet on Nancy Pelosi and Harry Reid and sending them to the front lines! They would send the Al Qaeda running!” N.C. “Yes, under one condition. That President Obama personally lead the attack with his Nobel Peace Prize in his hand.” G.G. “Absolutely not! The federal budget was increased exponentially during the last year. Take a look especially at the budget of the EPA. It was increased by a crazy amount, all based on the lie of global warming. We should just go back to the budget levels of last year, and that will pay for the war and then some.” T.H.

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Next question: What is your favorite Christmas or holiday tradition? What makes it special? Send your response to kynews@communitypress.com with “chatroom” in the subject line. “Absolutely not. Perhaps Our Dear Leader hasn’t had time to check how our national budget works, but if he would ask someone to show him, he would see that the category of ‘Defense’ already takes 21 percent of our total budget, or $613 billion. “That’s where the cost of our national defense is handled. Perhaps if he spent less time giving empty speeches, and more time trying to understand how things are supposed to work, he and his friends wouldn’t even consider such a proposal. They could use some of the billions they are giving away in their ‘stimulus’ programs to pay any extra costs for the efforts in Afghanistan. (Or maybe this new approach to paying for defense is part of the ‘change’ he campaigned on?)” B.B. “No! We already have an income tax structure that should be able to produce the revenue. War taxes have typically been imposed on telephone service and habit of sticking around long after the war. They get forgotten by the public. “The telephone excise tax was imposed to pay for the Spanish American War. It expired in 1902 and was reinstated from 1914 to 1916 and again from 1919 to 1924. During the depression in 1932 it was again reinstated and stayed with us until in various forms until 2006. “Today, a telephone tax would be a very regressive and exceptionally broad based tax on everyone who uses a phone. For wealthy people, it would be a minor annoyance because it would be a small part of their income. For businesses, it might be a major new expense and for the average Joe, it would add to already high cell phone bills.” F.S.D. “I have to say NO! I think that it is time for the United States to refocus our resource to the UNITED STATES. We as a democratic nation will never have the impact on other countries of different philosphy of governing their own people and we need to stop wasting the tax payers dollars trying. “We need to pour our energy into building our country back up. We need to focus on strengthening the business model so that we can once again create sustaining jobs for those who are without employment. We need to get them off public assistance and back to being productive citizens.” G.G.F.

About guest columns

We welcome guest columns on all sides of an issue; however, potential columnists should reserve space in advance with Editor Michelle Shaw by calling 578-1053. Include with your column your name, address, daytime telephone number, and a two-to-three line biography outlining your expertise related to this topic. Either include a color headshot of yourself, or make arrangements when you call to have your photo taken here. We reserve the right to edit for length, accuracy and clarity. Columns may be no more than 500 words. Deadline: Noon Friday for next Thursday’s issue. E-mail: mshaw@communitypress.com Letters, columns and articles submitted to The Community Recorder may be published or distributed in print, electronic or other forms.

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Dealing with loss and grief during the holiday season “Happy Holidays!” we hear so often at this time of year. Expectations of joy and togetherness with picture-perfect family and friends are in the air. These gatherings can be stressful enough with everyday pressures we all deal with. But if you have experienced the death of a loved one, the season may be anything but joyous. What will you do? Many people become so anxious about the holidays that panic sets in and fears of disrupting the rest of the family prevail. The good news is that there is something you can do to help reduce the stress associated with grief during the holidays. The bottom line is that it helps to have a plan, some plan, to approach the holidays. It can be very helpful to convince yourself that you do not have to do everything you normally would during the holidays. It does not have to be all or nothing! Compromise works well! The following suggestions provide ideas on how you can compromise on the usual celebrations in order to reduce the stress. Lower Expectations: You have suffered a significant loss. Realize that it is normal to not want to celebrate this year. Feelings are more intense, so recognize that you are not able to function at the same levels you used to. Give yourself permission to feel what you’re feeling. Look at what’s expected and decide to cut back: Look at the things you ordinarily do for the holidays-- sending greeting cards, decorating the house, putting up a tree, holiday baking, entertaining, going to parties, visiting friends, exchanging gifts, etc. Decide what you can do this year, what you don’t want to do, and what you

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Editor Michelle Shaw | smhaw@nky.com | 578-1053

A community in overwhelming need According to Hamilton County Job and Family Services, unemployment in the Greater Cincinnati area is at a 25-year high with 316,000 adults and 167,000 children living in poverty. During home visits to the needy, volunteers with the Society of St. Vincent de Paul see first hand the suffering this causes – elderly people who sleep on the floor because they have no bed; children who go to school dirty because the water has been disconnected; families with no heat, facing eviction, or with too little food each day. If I didn’t see it with my own eyes, I would never have thought such need could be possible here in Cincinnati. But we also see moving examples of the very best the human spirit has to offer. I have seen families who stay strong and faithfilled during times of unbearable hardship. I have seen a young boy who gave up his bed so his little brother would have a place to sleep; parents that go hungry so their children can eat; a man who walks miles to work each day

Fort Thomas Recorder

December 17, 2009

Fort Thomas Recorder Editor . .Michelle Shaw smhaw@nky.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .578-1053

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Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Friday | See page A2 for additional contact information. 283-0404 | 228 Grandview Drive, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017 | 654 Highland Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075 | e-mail kynews@NKY.com | Web site: www.NKY.com


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CCF Recorder

December 17, 2009

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Hundreds of People Cash In at the Florence Roadshow Yesterday

By Jason Delong

Treasure Hunters Roadshow STAFF WRITER

Gold and Silver pour into yesterdays Roadshow due to highest prices in 40 years.

not the only items the Roadshow is buying. “Gold and silver markets are soaring.” says Archie Davis, a Roadshow representative. “Broken jewelry and gold or silver coins add up very quickly. I just finished working with a gentleman that had an old class

Yesterday at the Springhill Suites, hundreds lined up to cash antiques, collectibles, gold and jewelry in at the Roadshow. The free event is in Florence all week buying gold, silver antiques and collectibles. One visitor I spoke with yesterday

“If you go to the Roadshow, you can cash-in your items for top dollar. Roadshow representatives will be available to assess and purchase your items at the Springhill Suites through Saturday in Florence.”

“It is unbelievable, I brought in some old coins that had been in a little cigar box for years and some old herringbone necklaces and in less than fifteen minutes I left with a check for $712.37.” said “It’s unbelievable, I brought in some old coins that had been in a little cigar box for years and some old herringbone necklaces and in less than fifteen minutes I left with a check for $712.37. That stuff has been in my jewelry box and dresser for at least 20 years.” Another gentlemen brought an old Fender guitar his father bought years ago. “Dad had less than fifty bucks in that guitar.” The Roadshow expert that assisted him, made a few phone calls and a Veterinarian in Seattle, Washington bought the guitar for $5700.00. The seller continued, “I got another $150.00 for a broken necklace and an old class ring, it’s not everyday

Above • A couple waits with anticipation while Roadshow expert examines their antiques and gold items. The Roadshow is at the Springhill Suites this week. someone brings six thousand dollars to town with your name on it.” Jeff Parsons, President of the Treasure Hunters Roadshow commented, “Lots of people have items that they know are valuable but just don’t know where to sell them. Old toys, trains, swords,

Collectors desire vintage military items, Items from both U.S. and foreign origins from the Civil War, World War Spanish-American I, World War II, Spanish American War, Revolutionary War and Calvary times have great value. Items such as swords, daggers, medals, hardware bayonets, etc.

guitars, pocket watches or just about anything old is valuable to collectors. These collectors are willing to pay big money for those items they are looking for.” This week’s Roadshow is the place to get connected with those collectors. The process is free and

anyone can brings items down to the event. If the Roadshow experts find items their collectors are interested in, offers will be made to purchase those items. About 80% of the guests that attend the show end up selling one or more items at the event. Antiques and collectibles are

www.treasurehuntersroadshow.com The Roadshow is featured this week:

December 15th-19th

Tuesday - Friday 9 AM - 6 PM and Saturday 9AM - 4PM

FREE ADMISSION

Gold Prices High, Cash In Now

“It’s a modern day gold rush,” said Jeff Parsons. Gold is now trading at 40 year highs, and you can cash in by bringing your items to the Treasure Hunters Roadshow.”

All types of gold are wanted, including gold coins, Krugerrands, Maple Leafs, and other gold bars, etc. All gold jewelry, including broken jewelry is accepted. Anything gold is wanted. All silver items, including silver coins, bars and American Eagles are accepted. Sterling silver items like flatware, tea sets, etc. are welcome.

Roadshow Coin and gold expert Paul Dichraff examines a large presentation of coins, gold and collectibles.

Springhill Suites 7492 Turfway Rd. Florence, KY 41042

Directions (859) 371-3388

The entire process only takes a few minutes The Treasure Hunter’s Roadshow event continues through Saturday in Florence.

We have been directly involved in millions of dollars worth of rare cash and coin sales over the past 15 years.

Our private collectors are seeking all types of rare coins and currency. We have the resources available to pay you top prices for all types of rare coins or entire collections. We can arrange a private discreet meeting with you at your bank or in one of our private suites. Whether you are ready to sell your life long collection or you are settling an estate we are at your service. We are professional, honest and discreet.

Cash in with the power of the International Collectors Association Treasure Hunters Roadshow represents over 5000 members worldwide who are paying TOP DOLLAR the following types of items. • COINS - Any and all coins made before 1965. This includes all silver and gold coins, dollars, half dollars, quarters, dimes, nickels and pennies. All conditions wanted! • GOLD & SILVER - PRICES AT 40 YEAR HIGH! for platinum, gold and silver during this event. Broken Jewelry, dental gold, old coins, pocket watches, Kruggerands, Gold Bars Canadian Maple Leafs, etc.

• WATCHES & POCKET WATCHES - Rolex, Tiffany, Hublot, Omega, Chopard, Cartier, Philippe, Ebel, Waltham, Swatch, Chopard, Elgin, Bunn Special, Railroad, Illinois,Hamilton, all others.

Here is how it works:

We represent many of the world’s top numismatic coin collectors

Show Info (217) 726-7703

• JEWELRY - Gold, Silver, Platinum, diamonds, rubies, sapphires and all types of stones, metals, etc. Rings, bracelets, necklaces, all others including broken jewelry. Early costume jewelry wanted.

• Gather items of interest from your attic, garage, basement, etc There is no limit to the amount of items you .can bring • No appointment necessary • If interested in selling, we will consult our collector ’s database to see if a buyer exists. 90% of all items have offers in our database • The offer is made on the spot on behalf of our collectors making the offer • If you decide to accept the offer, we will pay you on the spot and ship the item to the collector. The collector pays all shipping and handling charges • You get 100% of the offer with no hidden fees

ring, two bracelets, and handful of silver dollars,… his check was for over $650.00. I would say that there were well over 100 people in here yesterday that sold their scrap gold.” One gentleman holding his check for over $1250.00 in the lobby of the event yesterday had this comment, “I am so happy I decided to come to the Roadshow. I saw the newspaper ad for the event and brought in an old German sword I brought back from World War II and some old coins and here is my check. What a great thing for our community. I am heading home now to see what else I have they might be interested in.” The Roadshow continues today starting at 9am. The event is free and no appointment is needed.

• TOYS, TRAINS & DOLLS - All types of toys made before 1965 including: Hot Wheels, Tonka, Buddy L, Smith Miller, Nylint, Robots, battery toys, Mickey Mouse, Train sets, all gauges, accessories, individual cars, Marklin, American Flyer, Lionel, Hafner, all other trains, Barbie Dolls, GI Joe, Shirley Temple, Characters, German, all makers accepted. • MILITARY ITEMS, SWORDS - Civil War, Revolutionary War, WWI, WWII, etc. Items of interest include swords, badges, clothes, photos, medals, knives, gear, letters, The older the Swords, the better all types wanted. • ADVERTISING ITEMS - Metal and Porcelain signs, gas companies, beer and liquor makers, automobile, implements, etc.

Silver and Gold Coin Prices Up During Poor Economy.

Collectors and Enthusiasts in Florence with $2,000,000 to Purchase Yours!

Got Coin? It might be just the time to cash in. This week starting Tuesday and continuing through Saturday, the International Collectors Association in conjunction with Treasure Hunters Roadshow will be purchasing all types of silver and gold coins direct from the public. All are welcome and the event is free.

From a single item to complete collections, the most sought after types of coins are: • Any coins dated prior to 1820, especially those dated 1700’s • High Grade Early Coins • Graded Coins • Proof Coins • Gold Coins with C, D,O and CC mint marks • Rare Dates • Complete Coin Type sets • Rare Paper Currency

GREAT PRICES PAID FOR: 1950’S & 1960’S Era Electric and Acoustic

GUITARS

- Dobro - Fender - Gibson - Martin - Gretsch - Richenbacker - National - And others


Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

RECORDER

T h u r s d a y, D e c e m b e r 1 7 , 2 0 0 9

PEOPLE

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IDEAS

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RECIPES

BEST FRIENDS FOREVER

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Annie Garcia, left, of Wilder, and Sidney Bayless, of Cold Spring, both 11, are best friends.

Classmates stick together because of honesty Sidney Bayless of Cold Spring says she tells her best friend and fifth-grade classmate Annie Garcia, of Wilder if she doesn’t like what her friend is wearing. It’s that type of honesty, their willingness to listen to each other and to get over any differences that makes their friendship work, Bayless said. “She doesn’t just ditch you when you’re talking,” Bayless said. Garcia said she likes Bayless’ sense of humor, and although they have different reserved and outgoing personalities, they just get along well. “She’s not one of those on-and-off friends, she sticks with you the whole time,” Garcia said of Bayless. “We’re like glue.”

The girls said when they’re not spending time together they’re often text messaging each other. “We text a lot,” Bayless said. Garcia, who is a cheerleader, said she is more of a reader, but Bayless, who performs Irish dancing, is more athletic. When they’re together they talk about television shows and books, Garcia said. They’re favorite topic is mythological books, she said. They’ve been friends since they sat next to each other in class at Cline Elementary School. “We are best friends, we met in third grade, and we instantly clicked then,” Garcia said. Chris Mayhew/Staff

THINGS TO DO Santa at the aquarium

See Scuba Santa’s Water Wonderland at the Newport Aquarium through Jan. 3. Kids can visit Scuba Santa’s Post Office to write him a letter and also take part in the Reindeer Roundup game. For dive times and more information, visit www.newportaquarium.com. The Newport Aquarium is open daily from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Scuba Santa will not be at the aquarium on Christmas day. General admission is $20 for adults and $13 for Children (ages 2-12). Children under 2 are admitted free.

‘A Christmas Carol’

Dwight Blubaugh and other members of the Cincinnati Historical Dance Society will perform the Christmas classic, “A Christmas Carol,” from 2 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 20 at the BehringerCrawford Museum in Covington. Following the performance, finger sandwiches, scones, cakes and holiday treats will be available. Reservations are required by Friday, Dec. 18. For reservations or for

more information, call 4914003. The Behringer-Crawford Museum is located at 1600 Montague Road.

Become a skater

Toss those ice skates aside and learn how to skateboard at Ollie’s Skatepark this Saturday, Dec. 19 from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. After the two-hour lesson, you can skate for free from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. The cost is $20. No appointment necessary. For more information, visit www.skateollies.com or call 525-9505. Ollie’s Skatepark is located at 8171 Dixie Hwy. in Florence.

Share your events Go to nky.com and click on Share! to get your event into The Recorder.

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Rose Lee, left, of Cold Spring, and Joy Christofield of Fort Thomas sing a name aloud while banging out a beat on the drums during a Health Rhythms session at the Campbell County Senior Center & Wellness Center in Highland Heights, Wednesday, Dec. 9.

Seniors who’ve got the beat

By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

Drumming up a good time has never been easier for Campbell County senior citizens. New weekly “Health Rhythms” sessions at Campbell County’s Senior and Wellness Center in Highland Heights are about relaxing and having fun, not technical ability. “The idea is we’re not teaching anyone how to play, we’re just giving them the opportunity to experience music and enjoy their own rhythm,” said Sarah Manhardt, wellness coordinator for the center. It’s about opening up, and the ultimate goal is to have the seniors feeding off each other and get to know one another while they’re playing the instruments, Manhardt said. Joy Christofield of Fort Thomas said she’s always enjoyed music, but hasn’t played. Going back to the beginning of time the drum was an important instrument, and playing it releases tension, Christofield said. Playing music is healthy and fun, and something everyone ought to do every day, she said. “Rhythm is everywhere, the way you walk, the sound of your voice, even the way a baby crawls is rhythm,” Christofield said. Each hourly session typically starts off with Manhardt asking the participants to take a deep breath, close their eyes and let go of anything they’re thinking of and focus on the present moment instead. Next, there is rhythmic naming where participants say their name to the group and play whatever drum beat they like. Rose Lee of Cold Spring said her favorite part of the class is when they pass around apple-shaped shakers to the next person in the group, often with their eyes closed. “That’s fun,” Lee said. Lee and her friend Helen

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Helen Horton of Wilder rattles a shaker to accompany some holiday music from a programmed piano during a Health Rhythms session at the Campbell County Senior Center & Wellness Center in Highland Heights Wednesday, Dec. 9. Horton of Wilder have attended every Health Rhythms session since it started in August. “I think it releases tension and stress,” Lee said.

Singing aloud, swapping stories and just having fun is what the sessions are about, Horton said. Joe Rakosi of Highland Heights said he likes beat-

ing on a drum because it’s good for releasing frustrations. “It’s also a good place to meet people and make friends,” Rakosi said.


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CCF Recorder

December 17, 2009

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD F R I D A Y, D E C . 1 8

ART & CRAFT CLASSES

The Great American Aran Afghan Knit Along, 6:30 p.m.-8:30 p.m. Knit On, 735 Monmouth St. Squares feature variety of stitches from basic cables to more challenging designs. For advanced beginner to advanced knitters. Family friendly. $210 for 21 sessions in advance; $12 per session, plus materials. Registration required. 2915648. Newport.

ART EXHIBITS

Gone Baby Gone, 11 a.m.-11 p.m. York St. Cafe, 738 York St. Works by Linda Tabler. Through Jan. 9. 261-9675. Newport. Holiday Bling, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Passionate Arts Center, 31-33 W. Pike St. Gallery 31. Paintings, photographs, textiles, pottery, calligraphy, stained glass, jewelry, sculpture and more. Light refreshments provided. Through Dec. 23. 393-8358. Covington. The Colors of Nature, 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Art on the Levee Gallery, 1 Levee Way, Oil paintings by Jose Luis Nunez. Through Jan. 5. 2615770. Newport.

ATTRACTIONS

Light Up the Levee Holiday Light Show, 6 p.m. Newport on the Levee, 1 Levee Way, In front of Barnes & Noble 6:10 p.m. Featuring LED lights dancing in synchronization to holiday music. Shows every 20 minutes with last show at 11:50 p.m. and pre-programmed to take place 18 times nightly. Free. 291-0550; www.newportonthelevee.com. Newport.

FOOD & DRINK

Wine Tasting, 5 p.m.-9 p.m. StoneBrook Winery, 6570 Vineyard Lane, $5. 635-0111; www.stonebrookwinery.com. Camp Springs. Fish Fry, 4:45 p.m.-8 p.m. Newport Elks Lodge, 3704 Alexandria Pike, Fish, steak, shrimp, cheeseburger, chicken nuggets and sides. Dinners and sandwiches. Carryout available 4:45-8 p.m. Benefits Newport Elks Lodge #273. $2.25-$8, 25 cents carryout. 441-1273. Cold Spring. Early Bird, 5 p.m.-6 p.m. Vito’s Cafe, 654 Highland Ave. Suite 29, Prix fixe menu: Soup or salad and entree special. 442-9444. Fort Thomas.

HOLIDAY - CHRISTMAS

Scuba Santa’s Water Wonderland, 10 a.m.6 p.m. Newport Aquarium, Newport on the Levee, Holiday decorations throughout Aquarium, Scuba Santa’s Post Office and Reindeer Roundup game. Scuba-diving Santa Claus performs in dive shows with sharks daily. Included with admission: $20, $13 ages 2-12. 261-7444. Newport.

MUSIC - CHORAL

Dickens Carolers, 6 p.m.-8 p.m. Newport on the Levee, 1 Levee Way, Riverwalk Level. 291-0550. Newport.

MUSIC - CLASSIC ROCK

Strange Brew, 8:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. Guys ‘n’ Dolls Restaurant and Nightclub, 4210 Alexandria Pike, DJ music and dancing continues to 2 a.m. $5. 441-4888; www.guysndollsllc.com. Cold Spring.

MUSIC - CONCERTS

Frequency 94.1’s Thank God It’s Not Christmas Music Show, 7 p.m. Madison Theater, 730 Madison Ave. With Gym Class Heroes, Pilot Around the Stars, Famous Mr. Nobodies and Small Time Crooks. $25. Presented by Mix 94.1 Radio Station. 4912444. Covington.

MUSIC - INDIE

Matt Jones, 9 p.m.-11 p.m. Southgate House, 24 E. Third St. Juney’s Lounge. Michiganbased indie-folk artist. Ages 21 and up. Free. 431-2201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport.

MUSIC - JAZZ

New Sleepcat Band, 7:30 p.m. Dee Felice Cafe, 529 Main St. 261-2365; www.deefelice.com. Covington.

ON STAGE - COMEDY

Jim Short, 8 p.m. Dinner available. $16. Funny Bone Comedy Club, Newport on the Levee, Comedian and actor. Ages 21 and up. 9572000. Newport.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Oliver!, 7:30 p.m. Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, 1028 Scott Blvd. Musical based on “Oliver Twist” by Charles Dickens. With Kentucky Symphony Orchestra. $25, $20 members, $18 students. Through Dec. 27. 957-1940. Covington. Holiday Hoopla, 7:30 p.m. Shadowbox Cabaret, Newport on the Levee, Sketch comedy shorts and music by BillWho? Dedicated to the hustle and bustle of the season. $20$30. Reservations recommended. Through Jan. 9. 581-7625. Newport.

SPORTS

Thoroughbred Racing, 5:30 p.m. Holiday Meet. Holiday Meet. Dollar Friday: Draft beer and hot dogs $1 each. DV8 performs. Homestretch Restaurant: Prime rib buffet, 6:30-8:30 p.m. $15.95. Turfway Park, 7500 Turfway Road, Free. Through Dec. 31. 3710200; www.turfway.com. Florence. S A T U R D A Y, D E C . 1 9

AUDITIONS

Katalyst Talent Agency Open Call, 2 p.m.-5 p.m. Katalyst, LLC, 525 West Fifth Street, Suite 118, All experience levels seeking representation with Katalyst. First come, first served. Requirements at web site. Free. 581-4555; www.katalyst.tv. Covington.

ATTRACTIONS

Jellyfish Gallery, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Newport Aquarium, Included with admission; $20, $13 ages 2-12. 261-7444; www.newportaquarium.com. Newport. Frog Bog, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Newport Aquarium, Included with admission: $20, $13 ages 212. 261-7444. Newport.

FOOD & DRINK

Taste of Kentucky, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Sample Kentucky Proud food items including Ruth Hunt candy, Weisenberger Mills mixes, Elmwood Inn Fine Teas and John Conti gourmet coffee. Kentucky Haus Artisan Center, 411 E. 10th St. Free. 261-4287; www.kentuckyhaus.com. Newport.

HOLIDAY - CHRISTMAS

Strolling Santa, 1 p.m.-5 p.m. Newport on the Levee, 1 Levee Way, Santa passes out candy to children. Guests can use own cameras for photos with Santa. 291-0550. Newport. Scuba Santa’s Water Wonderland, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Newport Aquarium, Included with admission: $20, $13 ages 2-12. 261-7444. Newport. Holiday Toy Trains are on Track, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. BehringerCrawford Museum, $7, $6 seniors, $4 ages 3-17. 491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington. Breakfast with Santa Cow, 8 a.m.-9 a.m. Chick-fil-A Florence, 4980 Houston Road, Children receive free mini-moo cow and photo with Santa Cow. Family friendly. 5944600; www.chick-fil-a.com/houstonroad. Florence.

For more about Greater Cincinnati’s dining, music, events, movies and more, go to Metromix.com. Christmas at the Creation Museum, 6 p.m.-8 p.m. Holiday musicals and planetarium presentation of “The Christmas Star” inside museum, tickets required. Creation Museum, Included with admission: $21.95 ages 13-59; $16.95 ages 60 and up; $11.95 ages 5-12; free military, police and firefighters; free ages 4 and under. 888582-4253. Petersburg.

MUSIC - CLASSIC ROCK

Strange Brew, 8:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. Guys ‘n’ Dolls Restaurant and Nightclub, $5. 4414888; www.guysndollsllc.com. Cold Spring.

MUSIC - CONCERTS Robin Lacy and DeZydeco and Ricky Nye Inc. 8 p.m. With Ricky Nye. Madison Theater, 730 Madison Ave. Christmas in New Orleans party. Family friendly. $10. 491-2444. Covington.

Lacy ERNEST COLEMAN/CONTRIBUTOR

ON STAGE - COMEDY

Jim Short, 7:30 p.m. Dinner available. $16. Funny Bone Comedy Club, 957-2000. Newport.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Mark Woodrum of Villa Hills discusses trains with his daughter Sarah Ann Woodrum (left) and family friend Lex Boggs of Campbell County, Nov. 27 at the toy train display at the Behringer-Crawford Museum in Covington. It is the largest interactive train display in Northern Kentucky with more than 25 stations and 250 feet of track. For more information, visit www.bcmuseum.org or call 491-4003. The museum is located at 1600 Montague Road and is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday and 1-5 p.m. Sunday and closed major holidays.

Breakfast and Lunch with Saint Nicholas, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Wertheim’s Restaurant, 514 W. Sixth St. Food available a la cart. Free. Reservations recommended. Presented by MainStrasse Village Association. 261-1233. Covington. Wine Tasting, 1 p.m.-6 p.m. StoneBrook Winery, $5. 635-0111; www.stonebrookwinery.com. Camp Springs. Wine Tasting, 1 p.m.-6 p.m. Camp Springs Vineyard, $1. 448-0253; www.campspringsvineyard.com. Camp Springs.

Dickens Christmas Celebration, 2 p.m.4:30 p.m. Behringer-Crawford Museum, 1600 Montague Road, Reading of “A Christmas Carol” by Mr. Dwight Blubaugh, member of Cincinnati Historical Dance Society. Performed in period costume and accompanied by other society members. Followed by finger sandwiches, scones, cakes and holiday treats. $25, $22 children; $20, $18 children for members. Reservations required by Dec. 18. 491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington. Children’s Christmas Play, 6 p.m.-7 p.m. Grant’s Lick Baptist Church, 941 Clay Ridge Road, Children of church present play telling Christmas story and how much Jesus means to them. Reception follows performance. Free. 635-2444. Alexandria.

LITERARY - LIBRARIES

ON STAGE - THEATER

Oliver!, 7:30 p.m. Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, $25, $20 members, $18 students. 957-1940. Covington. Holiday Hoopla, 7:30 p.m. Shadowbox Cabaret, $20-$30. Reservations recommended. 581-7625. Newport. S U N D A Y, D E C . 2 0

FOOD & DRINK

Hills of Kentucky Dulcimers, 2 p.m. Florence Branch Library, 7425 U.S. 42, Celebrate the season with special Christmas concert, featuring holiday songs. Free. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 342-2665; www.bcpl.org. Florence.

HOLIDAY - CHRISTMAS

Strolling Santa, 1 p.m.-5 p.m. Newport on the Levee, 291-0550. Newport. Scuba Santa’s Water Wonderland, 10 a.m.6 p.m. Free ornament craft noon-3 p.m. while supplies last. Newport Aquarium, Included with admission: $20, $13 ages 212. 261-7444. Newport. Holiday Toy Trains are on Track, 1 p.m.-5 p.m. Behringer-Crawford Museum, $7, $6 seniors, $4 ages 3-17. 491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

Holiday Hoopla, 7 p.m. Shadowbox Cabaret, $20-$30. Reservations recommended. 5817625. Newport.

RECREATION

Paintball Camp, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Town and Country Sports and Health Club, 1018 Town Drive. All experience levels. Ages 10 and up. 45. 442-5800; www.towncountrysports.com. Wilder. M O N D A Y, D E C . 2 1

About calendar

To submit calendar items, go to “www.NKY.com” and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to “life@communitypress.com” along with event information. Items are printed on a space-available basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to “www.NKY.com” and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page. W E D N E S D A Y, D E C . 2 3

T H U R S D A Y, D E C . 2 4

KARAOKE AND OPEN MIC Karaoke, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Billie’s Skyline Tavern, 430 Johns Hill Road, A variety of drink specials, including $2 Bud Light Limes. Ages 21 and up. 441-6713. Highland Heights. Acoustic Open Mic Night, 9 p.m.-11 p.m. Claddagh Irish Pub Newport, One Levee Way, Nautical Room. With Bootleg Red. Includes Little Kings drink specials. Free. 513-4856502; www.claddaghirishpubs.com. Newport.

ART EXHIBITS The Colors of Nature, 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Art on the Levee Gallery, 261-5770. Newport.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Holiday Hoopla, 7:30 p.m. Shadowbox Cabaret, $20-$30. Reservations recommended. 581-7625. Newport.

RECREATION

Town & Country Drop N Shop, 9 a.m.-noon, Town and Country Sports and Health Club, $10. Registration required by Dec. 17. 4425800; www.towncountrysports.com. Wilder.

ATTRACTIONS

Light Up the Levee Holiday Light Show, 6 p.m. Newport on the Levee, Free. 291-0550; www.newportonthelevee.com. Newport.

HOLIDAY - CHRISTMAS

Scuba Santa’s Water Wonderland, 10 a.m.6 p.m. Newport Aquarium, Included with admission: $20, $13 ages 2-12. 261-7444. Newport.

ART EXHIBITS Gone Baby Gone, 11 a.m.-10 p.m. York St. Cafe, 261-9675. Newport. The Colors of Nature, 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Art on the Levee Gallery, 261-5770. Newport. ATTRACTIONS

Penguin Parade, 10:15 a.m. Newport Aquarium, Free. 261-7444. Newport. Light Up the Levee Holiday Light Show, 6 p.m. Newport on the Levee, Free. 291-0550; www.newportonthelevee.com. Newport.

MUSIC - STUDENT PERFORMANCES

Turpin High School Orchestra, 11 a.m. Newport on the Levee, 1 Levee Way, Free. 291-0550. Newport. T U E S D A Y, D E C . 2 2

FOOD & DRINK Tuesday Tastings, 8 p.m.-10 p.m. Claddagh Irish Pub Newport, One Levee Way, Nautical Room. Sample five in-house wines and five menu items paired to compliment each wine. Ages 21 and up. $10. Reservations recommended. 513-485-6502; www.claddaghirishpubs.com. Newport. HOLIDAY - CHRISTMAS

Scuba Santa’s Water Wonderland, 10 a.m.6 p.m. Newport Aquarium, Included with admission: $20, $13 ages 2-12. 261-7444. Newport. PROVIDED

The Cincinnati Museum Center celebrates Train Weekend Saturday-Sunday, Dec. 19-20. Already hosting Holiday Junction in the history museum, a large collection of model trains in a winter wonderland (through Jan. 3,) Train Weekend celebrates the mode of transportation with an extra focus on the holidays. “‘Twas the Night Before Christmas,” a live recreation of a 1940s radio program, is in the Newsreel Theater at 1, 2, and 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Character interpreter William Turner will offer stories from the Pullman porter days at Union Terminal from the 1940s at 2 p.m. Saturday, in the history museum. For more activities and information, visit www.cincymuseum.org or call 513-287-7000.

RECREATION

Town & Country Drop N Shop, 9 a.m.-noon, Town and Country Sports and Health Club, 1018 Town Drive, Supervised fun while parents prepare for holidays. Ages 6-13. $10. Registration required by Dec. 17. 442-5800; www.towncountrysports.com. Wilder.

PROVIDED

The Cincinnati Ballet performs its yuletide tradition, “The Nutcracker,” tonight through Sunday, Dec. 27, at the Aronoff Center. The production will feature Tchaikovsky’s score performed live by the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra. Opening night tickets are $30; remaining performances are $30-$70. There will be Sugar Plum Parades after the 2 p.m. performances Dec. 22 and Dec. 26, in which parents can escort their children across the stage to be greeted by the performers. For tickets and information, visit www.cincinnatiballet.com or call 513-621-5282. Pictured is ballerina Janessa Touchet.


Life

CCF Recorder

December 17, 2009

Messy lives attract a loving God

The scene was messy and scary to say the least. It was dark, turbulent and chaotic – until God began the work of creation. That’s how the Judaic-Christian scriptures describe the creation of the world as God began to bring order and beauty out of futile nothingness. Works of grandeur often emerge gradually from chaotic messiness. Many an excellent musical composition is born from a troubled life or tortured mind. Another stupendous Godevent we’re about to celebrate, Christmas, follows the same principle. We envision the original Christmas with a certain pious romanticism. Handel’s “Messiah,” crib scenes with sparkles in the straw, wide-eyed shepherds, adoring animals, angels heralding on high, and Joseph, Mary and baby Jesus comfortable centerpieces. This warm and fuzzy scenario is more the work of our imagination than reality. That’s all right for celebrations, but we leap over the

messiness that can mean so much to the development of our spirituality. We suppose messy lives before God mean unloved souls. Don’t we have to be pure, perfect and eminently prayerful to have God notice us and love us? The universe, the incarnation, and the coming of God to our individual souls are all usually accompanied by less than ideal situations. There is inevitably a complexity and messiness to it. At the first Christmas there was the anxiety of a man named Joseph, worried about his financée’s unexplained pregnancy and what to do about it. There is Mary his wife, pulled from an ordinary life and confused by sudden events, “How can this be since I do not know man?” A recent law necessitated their travel in the last week of her pregnancy, creating fears of roadside robbers as real as those who rip off people at malls today. Add to this the fact that there was no place to stay,

then a begged and borrowed stable for a birthplace, the smell of manure, the effort to find food and medical attention if necessary. Wouldn’t you say there was a certain messiness to it all? A combination of stress, inconvenience, worry and puzzlement? The first Christmas was far from pretty. We need to remember this about the coming of God into our lives. It rarely occurs in a milieu of perceived perfection. Doubts, darkness and chaos may not be far away. As a clergyman I have had the privilege of being privy to the inner life of many people. Most of them, and I as well, resonate to the description of messiness being present in our lives. We usually don’t see ourselves as holy specimens that God is proud of and whom he loves to be around. Yet it is stumbling and imperfect people who have taught me the most about the coming of God and his wonderful work of love within us, despite the cluttered messi-

ness we create. And one characteristic has been made clear to me – the coming of God, whether at the beginning, at the first Christmas, or today to you and me, is achieved because of and in the midst of the messiness of life. God comes close to the woman feeling so abandoned by her husband who has left her for another woman; to a couple who have lost a child; to someone trying to kick the drug habit. God comes along with the sullenness of a lasting depression; along with a suspicious mammogram; a person who lost a job; or a single parent doubting their effectiveness with their children. It may sound contradictory, but about Christmas we know more than we can say. If we have opened our hearts and messiness to God, we know a good news that exceeds our ability to spell out what it is. The essence is always more than we can know. Although the lower can acknowledge the higher, it

or contact him directly at P.O. Box 428541, Cincinnati, OH 45242. Please include a mailing address or fax number if you wish for him to respond.

cannot comprehend it. We can only use images, stories and metaphors to try and express the loving God who was willing to become one with us. Father Lou Guntzelman is a Catholic priest of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati. Reach him at columns@communitypress.com

B3

Father Lou Guntzelman Perspectives

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B4

CCF Recorder

Life

December 17, 2009

Make these treats for homemade holiday gifts There’s no doubt in my mind that a gift from the hands is a gift from the heart. It’s even more meaningful this year when budgets may be tighter and there’s not a lot of “wiggle room” for purchasing gifts. But you know what? Even if you can afford an expensive store-bought gift, try making something homemade to give, perhaps as an accompaniment to the gift or just as a stand-alone present. There’s something magical and nurturing when we gather together making homemade gifts. That’s how traditions begin, and continue.

Countdown to Christmas: Crunchy white peppermint bark with dark chocolate drizzle

2 cups crushed peppermint candies 4 cups white chocolate chips 3 ⁄4 teaspoon peppermint extract 2 cups puffed rice cereal or bit more to taste

Spray a rimmed baking sheet with nonstick cooking spray. M e l t w h i t e Rita chocolate Heikenfeld w i t h extract Rita s kitchen over low heat or microwave. Be careful. It tends to burn easily. Remove from heat source while there are still some unmelted chips. Stir and the residual heat will melt them. Stir in candies and cereal. Pour onto pan and spread to 1 ⁄4 inch. Chill. Optional but good: After candy has chilled but before breaking into pieces, drizzle melted dark chocolate in a zig-zag pattern on top. Chill again before breaking into pieces.

Mulled cider

This makes about 12 cups.

3

⁄4 cup each: water and sugar 4 cinnamon sticks, about 2 inches long each 8 each: whole cloves and allspice 1 lemon and one orange, sliced thin 21⁄2 quarts cider

Combine everything but cider in pan. Bring to boil, then lower to simmer, covered, for five minutes. Remove from heat, add cider and stir.

Carol’s coffee-infused vodka liqueur

Best friend Carol Vanover shares this trendy drink. Better and so much less expensive than anything you can buy. The longer it ages, the smoother it gets. 1.75 liter Smirnoff vodka ⁄2 cup good quality coffee beans (Carol uses Colombian), crushed coarsely 4 teaspoons sugar (I told Carol when we tested this with the store bought version that hers was less sweet, so add more if you like.) 1

2 teaspoons salt 1 ⁄2 teaspoon pepper 2 cups shredded cheese Potato chips

Mix everything together and let infuse at room temperature for 10 to 15 days. The color will darken and flavor will develop.

Put all ingredients except cheese and chips in sprayed 13-by-9 pan. Sprinkle with cheese and chips. Bake at 350 degrees for 30 minutes.

Mom’s hot chicken salad

For Delhi reader Sydney Davis, who said her mom made this back in the ’60s. “After she died, I found many of her recipes but not this one, which was always one of our favorites. “It was shredded chicken with a creamy texture and maybe a touch of lemon and a crunchy topping which was probably potato chips.” This one should work and it’s thanks to Patty Poor, Grant County Extension Agent in Williamstown, Ky. Patty sent me a cookbook from the Grant County Extension Homemakers. It has 1,000 yummy recipes like this and costs $28.95. Contact Patty at Patricia.poor@uky.edu or 859824-3355 for a copy. The recipe doesn’t say if the chicken is skinless, but I would assume so.

COURTESY RITA HEIKENFELD

Here, my friend Carol and I “testing” her vodka-infused coffee liqueur. I would also cut up the chicken fairly small and mix it with ingredients as listed below, before pouring into pan. And if the celery is real strong, I might use less. 2 pounds boneless chicken breast 4 cups diced celery 1 can cream chicken soup 2 cups mayonnaise 2 cans water chestnuts 1 can mushroom stems and pieces 1 cup slivered almonds 2 tablespoons each: chopped onions and lemon juice

Whoops!

Recipe clarification: Withrow High school/ Cincinnati public school’s chess/transparent pie The instructions given in my column didn’t say when to add egg yolks. Add them with the milk. If you want my recipe for this, it’s archived in our files so let me know. I also put it in our online column again this week. Rita Nader Heikenfeld is Macy’s certified culinary professional and family herbalist, an educator and author. E-mail her at columns@ communitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-248-7130, ext. 356. Visit Rita at www.Abouteating.com.


Community

CCF Recorder

December 17, 2009

B5

Simpson takes helm of heart association Katherine Simpson has been elected president of the American Heart Association’s Northern Kentucky Division and will serve a two-year term. She has been a member of the board of directors since 2006. In her position as president Simpson ushered in four new members to its board of directors. Joining the board are Billy Anderson, regional sales executive, U.S. Bank; Marlene Feagan, parish nurse, Health Ministries, St. Elizabeth Health Systems;

Bright Days

Villa Madonna senior Blake Bryan helps toddler Jordan Owen put icing on a cookie at Bright Days Child Development Center in Newport. Since 1993, each Villa senior class has provided Christmas treats, school supplies, and entertainment for children at this Brighton Center preschool.

munities throughout America. These diseases devastate millions of people of all ages and claim nearly 950,000 lives a year. To learn more, visit americanheart.org or call Amy Howe at 513-2814048.

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• Navy Seaman Recruit Clifford J. Bisch, son of Karen K. Bisch of Fort Thomas, recently completed U.S. Navy basic training at Recruit Training Command, Great Lakes, Ill. During the eight-week program, Bisch completed a variety of training which included classroom study and practical instruction on naval customs, first aid, firefighting, water safety and survival, and shipboard and aircraft safety. An emphasis was also placed on physical fitness. The capstone event of boot camp is “Battle Stations”. This exercise gives recruits the skills and confidence they need to succeed in the fleet. “Battle Stations” is designed to galvanize the basic warrior attributes of sacrifice, dedication, teamwork and endurance in each recruit through the practical application of basic Navy skills and the core values of Honor, Courage and Commitment. Bisch is a 2006 graduate of Newport High School of Newport. • Air Force Airman Jason M. Rimer graduated from basic military training at Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio, Texas. The airman completed an intensive, eight-week program that included training in military discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physical fitness, and basic warfare principles and skills. Airmen who complete basic training earn four credits toward an associate in applied science degree through the Community College of the Air Force. He is the son of Jeanette Rimer of Alexandria, and brother of Erica Wildeboer of Cold Spring. Rimer is a 2007 graduate of Campbell County High School, Alexandria. • Air Force Airman Justin

T. Wallace graduated from basic military training at Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio, Texas. The airman completed an intensive, eight-week program that included training in military discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physical fitness, and basic warfare principles and skills.

Airmen who complete basic training earn four credits toward an associate in applied science degree through the Community College of the Air Force. He is the son of James and Debra Wallace of Alexandria. Wallace is a 2007 graduate of Simon Kenton High School, Independence.

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and Chris Schilling, sales manager, Terryberry Co. “We are pleased that such outstanding individuals have joined the Northern Kentucky Board,” said Katherine Simpson. “We are looking forward to working together to raise awareness and lead the fight against heart disease and stroke in our community,” she said. The American Heart Association is the largest voluntary health organization fighting heart disease, stroke and other cardiovascular diseases in local com-

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B6

CCF Recorder

Community

December 17, 2009

Northern Kentucky takes 22 awards at tourism conference The Creation Museum, Newport Aquarium, Northern Kentucky Convention & Visitors Bureau and Cincinnati USA Regional Tourism Network combined to earn 22 Traverse Awards for Excellence in Marketing at the 2009 Kentucky Tourism Industry Annual Conference. All in all, the Creation Museum won Best of Show for their outdoor billboards and three First Place honors while the Cincinnati USA

FA THE

Regional Tourism Network earned five First Place honors, Northern Kentucky CVB won two First Place awards and the Newport Aquarium earned one First Place honor. A full list of awards follows by organization and category: The Creation Museum earned the following Traverse Awards: • Best of Show: Creation Museum Outdoor Billboards also earned First Place

• Visitors Guide/Souvenir Guide: Creation Museum Guide, First Place • Television Advertisement: Creation Museum TV spot, First Place The Newport Aquarium earned the following Traverse Awards: • Television Advertisement: Newport Aquarium’s Jellyfish exhibit, First Place • Visitors Guide: Newport Aquarium Visitors Guide, Second Place • Print Advertisement,

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four• color: Newport Aquarium Visitors Guide, Second Place • Marketing Campaign: Newport Aquarium’s Jellyfish exhibit marketing campaign, Honorable Mention The Northern Kentucky Convention & Visitors Bureau was awarded for the following Traverse Awards for its initiatives: • Direct Mail: “Will Plan for Food” cube mailer, First Place • Web Site: Association Landing page, First Place • Print Advertisement, less than four-color: Kentucky Jailer’s Association, Second Place • Web Site ad: Healthcare IT Web Site ad, Honorable Mention Cincinnati USA Regional Tourism Network earned the following Traverse Awards: • Rack Brochure: Cincinnati USA Seasonal Pocket

Brochure, First Place • Print Advertisement: Cincinnati Reds program ad, First Place • Web Site: www.cincinnatiusa.com, First Place • Social Media: Travel Cincinnati USA Radio Network with Linda Antus and Travel Cincinnati USA Digital Media Network, First Place • Newsletter: Stay Cincinnati USA Weekend Newsletter, First Place • Direct Mail: Multicultural Summer Campaign, Second Place • Marketing Campaign: Cincinnati Reds Marketing Partnership, Second Place • Visitor’s Guide: Cincinnati USA Visitor Guide, Honorable Mention • Specialty Item: Carpe Weekend Summer Events Tshirt, Honorable Mention “The awards are a terrific honor to recognize the

regional collaboration between the Northern Kentucky Convention & Visitors Bureau, the Cincinnati USA Convention & Visitors Bureau and P&G along with our world-class regional attractions,” said Linda Antus, president of the Cincinnati USA Regional Tourism Network. “We will continue using these award-winning strategies and tools to engage our visitors to invite them to visit Cincinnati USA,” she said. Kentucky tourism businesses and marketing organizations vied for awards in 20 categories during the annual competition produced by the Kentucky Tourism Council. A panel of out-of-state experts judged 211 entries from across the state for this year’s presentation of awards.

Publishes every Tuesday in The Kentucky Enquirer, every Thursday in The Community Recorder. Search ads online any day, any time at NKY.com. To place an ad call 859-578-5509, fax 859-578-5515 or email bkrosnes@nky.com.

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Community

CCF Recorder

December 17, 2009

RELIGION NOTES Bullittsville Christian

The Bullittsville Christian Church in Burlington presents its annual live nativity Dec. 19 from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. In addition to the outdoor display, the church will serve hot cocoa and snacks. For more information, call 689-7215. The church is located 2.1 miles west of Ky. 237 at 3094 Petersburg Road (Ky. 20).

Mary, Queen of Heaven

Mary, Queen of Heaven Parish in Erlanger is hosting its fourth in a series of presentations on the Catechism of the Catholic Church.

The parish’s adult education program, “Growing in Faith Together,” is held the first Tuesday of the month beginning at 6:30 p.m. The topic Jan. 5 will be “I Believe in Jesus Christ the Only Son” and will be presented by Fr. Matt Cushing. The evening is open to all adults of the Diocese. Babysitting is provided. For more information, call 525-6909. The parish is located at 1150 Donaldson Rd.

Prince of Peace

Pastor Neal Bosse and Prince of Peace Lutheran Church in Bellevue will host

In command

a traditional German Christmas service Dec. 20 at 4 p.m. This is the second year that the church has had this service. The candlelight service will have scriptures and carols in German. Rev. Andrew Norris will be delivering the homily. A coffee hour with traditional German fare will follow. For more information, call 581-7129. The Prince of Peace Lutheran Church is located at 306 Center Street.

Lt. Col. Gregory P. Sarakatsannis, a 1998 Highlands High School graduate, was given command of the 510th Fighter Squadron June 30 at Aviano Air Base in Aviano, Italy. As commander of the squadron he will be responsible for ensuring that the approximately 40-pilot group remains capable of conducting offensive and defensive air combat operations required in support of US and NATO taskings. He is a senior pilot with more than 1,700 flight hours in the F-16. He is shown here with his wife, Julie, and children, Demetri, Sophia and Eva. He is the son of Panny and Judy Sarakatsannis.

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Huff toy drive benefits children This holiday season you can help Huff Realty bring much needed smiles to the faces of the young patients at the Cincinnati Shriners Hospital. For the tenth year in a row, Huff Realty is conducting a toy drive to benefit the children at the Cincinnati Shriners Hospital. From Nov. 28 to Dec. 24, new toy donations will be accepted at each of the 11 Huff Realty office locations in Greater Cincinnati and

Northern Kentucky. The Shriners Hospital in Cincinnati is a 30-bed pediatric burn hospital providing comprehensive acute, reconstructive and rehabilitative care to children who are recovering from burns and burn-related injuries. Upon admission, the hospital gives every child several toys that provide entertainment and therapeutic comfort during their treatment. Through the annual toy

drive, Huff Realty has become the hospital’s largest toy donor delivering more than 3,000 items and $2,500 last year. Here are the Huff office locations in Northern Kentucky: • Campbell County, 2808 Alexandria Pike, Highland Heights • Florence, 60 Cavalier Blvd., Florence • Fort Mitchell, 334 Beechwood Road, Fort Mitchell

Explore 19th-century London with ‘Oliver!’ “Oliver!” is the ever-popular musical based on Charles Dickens’ “Oliver Twist.” To a score performed by Kentucky Symphony Orchestra, the young orphan finds his way through the dark corners of 19th century London and the adventures of a band of pick-pockets led by Fagin (Charlie Clark) to a happy ending.

Performances are 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 3 p.m. Sunday through Dec. 27. Additional 3 p.m. matinee Dec. 26. No performance Christmas Day. Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, 1028 Scott Blvd., Covington. Tickets $25, $20 members, $18 students. 859957-1940.

Fundraiser benefits Rock Against Cancer Rock Against Cancer, an organization dedicated to providing the healing power of music to pediatric cancer patients nationwide, is reaching out to the Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky area to help support music therapy programs across the country. On Dec. 17, from 11 a.m. to closing, the Hofbräuhaus in Newport will donate 20 percent of each check from patrons who bring in a specified flier to Rock Against Cancer. Rock Against Cancer was founded by Lisa White, Ph.D, in 2000 after her son, Gabriel, was diagnosed with leukemia and fought through 38 months of treatment using music as his own form of therapy. Dr. White is the sister-inlaw of Boone County resident Greg D. Voss, attorney and Rock Against cancer board of directors chair. Voss teamed up with Huntington Bank and the Hofbräuhaus Newport in order to initiate this first annual fundraiser.

“I have been involved with this organization since the founding in 2000 and I have seen the wonderful effects music can have on children battling cancer,” Voss said. “With this fundraiser, we are looking to raise awareness and funds for Rock Against Cancer and hopefully begin a continuing partnership with Huntington Bank and Hofbräuhaus for

future events in this area.” Founded in 2000 in Chapel Hill, N.C., Rock Against Cancer is a national nonprofit organization using music therapy and innovative music programs while working with entertainers from the music industry to empower and support the emotional needs of young cancer patients. For details, visit www. rockagainstcancer.org.

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ON

RECORD

CCF Recorder

THE

ALEXANDRIA

Arrest

Scott A. Shackelford, 19, 10300 Bob White Lane, operating motor vehicle under 21 years old under the influence of alcohol, failure of nonowner operator to maintain required insurance at 8244 Alexandria Pike, Dec. 4.

December 17, 2009

| DEATHS | Editor Michelle Shaw | smhaw@nky.com | 578-1053

William M. Flynn Jr., 40, 111 E. 24th St., warrant at AA Highway and Enzweiler Road, Dec. 6.

FORT THOMAS Arrest

Tyler Chavis, 21, 523 North Miller, reckless driving, DUI at South I471, Nov. 29.

BIRTHS

INVITATION TO BID Date: December 17, 2009 PROJECT: Steelman Avenue and Linet Avenue Water Main Replacement SEALED BIDS WILL BE RECEIVED AT: Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) 2835 Crescent Springs Road P.O. Box 18640 Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 UNTIL: Time:

Date:January 7, 2010 10:00 AM (Local Time)

At said place and time, and promptly thereafter, all Bids that have been duly received will be publicly opened and read aloud. The proposed Work is generally described as follows: Construction of approximately 2,300 linear feet of 6" & 8" PVC water main together with the appurtenances and related work along Steelman Avenue and Linet Avenue in the City of Highland Heights, Campbell County, Kentucky. All Bids must be in accordance with the Instructions to Bidders and Contract Documents on file, and available for examination at: Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) 2835 Crescent Springs Road Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 Or Cardinal Engineering One Moock Road Wilder, KY 41071 Copies of the Bidding Documents may be obtained from the office of Cardinal Engineering at the address indicated herein. Charges for all documents obtained will be made on the following basis: Charge Complete set of Bidding Documents $50.00 Mailing and Handling(U.S. Mail) (if requested) $16.00 Mailing and Handling (FED EX) (if requested) $16.00 Charges for Bidding Documents and mailing and handling, if applicable, will not be refunded. Bids will be received on a unit price and/or lump sum basis as described in the Contract Documents. Bid security, in the form of a certified check or a Bid Bond in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the maximum total bid price, must accompany each Bid. The Successful Bidder will be required to furnish a Construction Payment Bond and a Construction Performance Bond as security for the faithful performance of the contract and the payment of all bills and obligations arising from the performance of the Contract. Contractor and all Subcontractors will be required to conform to the labor standards set forth in the Contract Documents. This project falls under the provisions of KRS 337.505 to 337.550 for prevailing wage rates. Owner reserves the right to reject any or all Bids, including without limitation the right to reject any or all nonconforming, non-responsive, incomplete, unbalanced, or conditional Bids, to waive informalities, and to reject the Bid of any Bidder if Owner believes that it would not be in the best interest of Owner to make an award to that Bidder. Owner also reserves the right to negotiate with the apparent qualified Bidder to such an extent as may be determined by Owner. Minority Bidders are encouraged to bid. Bids shall remain subject to acceptance for 60 days after the day of bid opening or for such longer period of time to which a Bidder may agree in writing upon request of the Owner. If a Contract is to be awarded, the Owner will give the successful Bidder a Notice of Award during the period of time during which the successful Bidder’s bid remains subject to acceptance. Richard Harrison, Vice President of Engineering Northern Kentucky Water District 1001525868

|

REAL

ESTATE

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

N K Y. c o m

E-mail: k

ws@

unit

RECORDER

POLICE REPORTS Russell Guy, 37, 704 South Grand Ave., operating a motor vehicle on a suspended license at South Grand and South Fort Thomas avenues, Dec. 4. Robert Taylor, 31, 28 Mary Ingles Highway, operating a motor vehicle on a suspended license, improper registration, failure to maintain insurance, third degree

LEGAL NOTICE ORDINANCE NO. O-20-2009

Section 00020

POLICE

AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF FORT THOMAS, CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY, AMENDING SECTION 97.07 OF THE FORT THOMAS CODE OF ORDINANCES REGULAT ING SIDEWALK CLEARANCE. BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY OF FORT THOMAS, CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY: SECTION I

TO BE

Whoever, being the owner, agent, lessee, occupant, or person otherwise in charge or control of any prem ises abutting street in the city, shall fail to remove, with reasonable promptness, from the sidewalk area along the premises, all debris, rubbish, litter, vegetation, and other matter which may at any time accumulate or be deposited thereon from any cause whatever, or shall fail to remove any matter or item which impedes the use of the sidewalk to a height not less than seven feet, shall be guilty of a misdemeanor. Each day’s failure to remove shall constitute a separate offense. For the purpose of this section SIDEWALK shall mean the entire area from the property line to the established curb line or edge of pavement when a public sidewalk exists within this area. SECTION II All ordinances, resolutions or parts thereof, in conflict with the provisions of this ordinance, are to the extent of such conflict, hereby repealed. SECTION III This Ordinance shall be in full force and effect from and after its passage, approval, and publication as required by law. APPROVED: ______________________________ Mary H. Brown, Mayor 1st Reading: November 16, 2009 2nd Reading: December 7, 2009 Publication: December 17, 2009 ATTEST: _______________________________ Melissa K. Kelly, City Clerk 921724/1001525171 LEGAL NOTICE The Melbourne Volunteer Fire Department will be accepting bids on a 2010 Brush Truck. The vehicle will be N.F.P.A. compliant Bid packets can be picked up at the Firehouse, 912 Mary Ingles Highway, Melbourne KY. Bids can be returned by contacting Paul Hehman at Cell Phone 859912-0674. Bids will be opened on January 18th 2010 at 19:00 hours. Winning bid will be awarded February 1st, 2010. The Melbourne Volunteer Fire Department reserves the right to reject any and all bids. 9217601001525276

Community Classified

513.242.4000 Sell it quicker by selling it closer to home.

Incidents/reports Fraudulent use of a credit card

Reported at 16 Montrose Ave., Dec. 8.

Second degree burglary

Reported at 35 Custis Ave., Dec. 6. Reported at 82 Southview Ave., Dec. 7.

Theft of identity

Reported at 86 Vernon Lane, Dec. 9.

Third degree criminal trespassing

Reported at 29 Watchpoint Drive, Dec. 4.

HIGHLAND HEIGHTS/ SOUTHGATE Arrest

Section 97.07 of the Fort Thomas Code of Ordinances is amended as follows: Section 97.07 SIDEWALKS KEPT CLEAR

criminal trespassing, warrant at 29 Watchpoint Drive, Dec. 4. Gary Ruble, 30, 205 Washington St. No. 6, careless driving, DUI at I471 south, Dec. 6. Cameron Grimme, 24, 53 Shaw Lane, possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia at US 27 and Custis, Dec. 10.

LEGAL NOTICE Organizations interested in receiving Campbell County Tax Funds to service the citizens of Campbell County in the areas of Mental Health, Mental Retardation, or Aging must download, complete, and mail the Boone, Campbell and Kenton Grant Application, available on the Campbell County web-site.www.camp bellcounty.ky.gov, (click on the County Services; click on the link Human Services, MH/MR/AG Fiscal Year 2011-12 Grant Application.) Policies & Procedures, Payment Request, and Reimbursement Forms and Instructions are also available. Applications will not be accepted after January 15, 2010. Inquiries may be directed to Pat Dressman, Director of Human Services, 859-547-1870. One application can be used for Boone, Campbell and Kenton Counties, but must be mailed to each county. Each county has their own policies & procedures on their web-sites.1525272

Jason Eldred, 37, 309 Lawver Lane, possession of marijuana at 2700 Alexandria Pike, Dec. 5. Melissa Gail Helton, 36, 203 Evergreen Ave., fourth degree assault at 203 Evergreen Ave., Dec. 7. Clifford Huff, 39, 2386 Sunnyhill Drive, warrant at Bluegrass and Bonnie, Dec. 7. Mark Wilfong, 43, 5941 Rice Road, resisting arrest, second degree disorderly conduct at 500 Louie B Nunn Drive, Dec. 5. Deborah Eades, 25, 32 Summer Hill Road No. 2, warrant at I-275 west, Dec. 5. Terry Stamper, 50, 1960 Taylor Road, alcohol intoxication in a public place at 1960 Taylor Road, Dec. 2. Toby Bryant, 36, 707 Monroe St. No. 1, first degree possession of a controlled substance, third degree possession of a controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia

About police reports

at 2611 Alexandria Pike, Dec. 1. Robert Dearhammer, 19, 9220 Grossman Road, possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia at 120 Hidden Valley Drive, Dec. 1.

Incidents/reports Criminal possession of a forged instrument Reported at 712 Ravine Circle Apt. 2D, Dec. 5.

Fraudulent use of a credit card

Reported at 150 Steelman St., Dec. 3.

Theft by deception

Reported at 2887 Alexandria Pike, Dec. 2.

Theft by unlawful taking

Reported at 2369 Alexandria Pike, Dec. 4. Reported at 8 Bordeaux Drive, Dec. 4. Reported at 120 Hidden Valley drive, Dec. 4.

NEWPORT

Arrest

James Koester, 49, 710 Linden Ave., fourth degree assault, violation of EPO/DVO at 710 Linden, Dec. 9. Carl Kirkendal, 27, 1999 Sutter Ave. No. 503, third degree burglary at 342 Monmouth St., Dec. 9. Tina Crabtree, 35, 730 Park Ave. Apt. 1, fourth degree assault at 730 Park Ave., Dec. 9. Anthony Bowling, 51, 311 Columbia St., second degree possession of drug paraphernalia at Sixth and York, Dec. 8. Perrish Stallworth, 19, 1807 Lawn Ave., trafficking a controlled sub-

The Community Recorder publishes the names of all adults charged with offenses. The information is a matter of public record and does not imply guilt or innocence. stance within 1000 yards of a school at Eighth and Saratoga, Dec. 8. Tara Hannig, 36, 4064 Dubber Drive, first degree possession of a controlled substance, controlled substance not in original container at 103 East Fifth St., Dec. 5. Kevin Malone, 40, 1118 Cypress, DUI, second degree wanton endangerment at Park Avenue, Dec. 6. Johnny Grayson III, 22, 209 East Eighth St., first degree trafficking a controlled substance, third degree trafficking a controlled substance, possession of marijuana at Ninth and Central, Dec. 4. Kelly Lawson, 34, 902 Central Ave. Apt. 1, theft by unlawful taking at 82 Carothers Road, Dec. 3. Gary Andrews, 39, 335 Chestnut Way Apt. 204, violation of DVO/EPO at Seventh and Washington, Dec. 2. Kristina Rhodes, 35, 1042 Washington, warrant at 2517 Alexandria Pike, Dec. 1. Billy Brandenburg, 26, 936 Ann St., fourth degree assault, second degree disorderly conduct at 936 Ann St., Nov. 29. Latasha Robinson, 23, 2609 Alden Court, theft by unlawful taking at 1765 Monmouth St., Nov. 27.

Incidents/reports Theft by unlawful taking

Reported at 82 Carothers road, Dec. 3. Reported at 82 Carothers Road, Nov. 30.

DEATHS Janet Berry

Janet Rose Hardy Berry, 64, Cold Spring, died Dec. 7, 2009, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. She worked for Lakeside Nursing Facility in Highland Heights and was a member of First Baptist Church of Cold Spring. Survivors include her husband, Larry Edward Berry; daughters, Vickie Flood of Alexandria, Kimberly Houp of Hebron and Shannon Berry of Cold Spring; sister, Judith Miller of Alexandria; brothers, Daniel Hardy of Lexington, Thomas Hardy of Alexandria and Randall Hardy of Bellevue and three grandchildren. Memorials: Hospice of the Bluegrass Northern Kentucky, 7388 Turfway Road, Florence, KY 41042.

Louise Caudill

Louise Stidham Caudill, 62, Dayton, a homemaker, died Dec. 12, 2009, at Grant Manor in Williamstown. Survivors include her husband, Henry Caudill; daughters, Mary Simmons and Judy Klette of Dayton; sons, Leonard Caudill of North Bend, Ohio, and Charles Caudill of Dayton; sister, Dorothy Hamilton of Mount Sterling; brother, Dorsey Stidham Jr. of Mount Sterling; stepmother, Verna Stidham of Morehead; nine grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren.

Madge Elam

Madge M. Lowry Elam, 92, a homemaker of Carmel Manor in Fort Thomas, formerly of Independence, died Dec. 6, 2009, at Hospice of the Bluegrass Care Center, Fort Thomas. Her husband, Hurst Elam, and son, John Elam, died previously. Survivors include her daughter, Mary Christensen of Independence; sons, Lee Elam of Speedwell, Tenn., Russell Elam of Huntington, Ind. and Joe Elam of Milford, Ohio; seven grandchildren; 12 great-grandchildren and two great-great-grandchildren. Burial was in Floral Hills Memorial Gardens, Taylor Mill.

Carl Fuchs

Carl William Fuchs, 86, Dayton, died Dec. 10, 2009, at Hospice of the Bluegrass Care Center, Fort Thomas. He was a self-employed carpet installer, a World War II Army veteran, member of St. Bernard’s Church in Dayton, Dayton City Council, vice-mayor, and recently a deputy sheriff at the Campbell County Court House in Newport. His son, Gregory Pete Fuchs, died previously. Survivors include his wife of 63 years, Rosemary Petroze Fuchs; daughter, Cynthia Day of Highland

Heights; sister, Marie Fuchs of Fort Thomas; brothers, Jack Fuchs of Louisville and Charles Fuchs of Dayton and two grandchildren. Memorials: St. Bernard Church, 401 Berry Ave., Dayton, KY 41074 or Hospice of the Bluegrass Northern Kentucky, 7388 Turfway Road, Florence, KY 41042.

Juanita Garrett

Juanita A. Garrett, 83, Fort Thomas, died Dec. 11, 2009, at Hospice of the Bluegrass Care Center, Fort Thomas. She was a bookkeeper for E&J Swigart Wholesale Jewelers Co. Her husband, Robert Garrett, died previously. Her brother, Linus Reinert of Palm Harbor, Fla., survives. Burial was in St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas. Memorials: Hospice of the Bluegrass, 7388 Turfway Road, Florence, KY 41042.

Linda Hanson

Linda Carol Hanson, 54, California, a homemaker, died Dec. 7, 2009, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. Survivors include her husband, Dan Hanson; son, Dan Hanson Jr. of California; brother, Keith Lykins of Smyrna, Ga. and three grandchildren. Cooper Funeral Home handled the arrangements.

Connor Herald

Connor Laine Herald, one month, Independence, died Dec. 5, 2009, at his home. Survivors include his parents, James and Carisa Herald; brothers, Caleb and Jackson Herald; sister, Anna Herald, all of Independence; grandparents, Everett and Terri Herald of Brooksville, Robin Harper of Lakeside Park, Stew Selby of Dry Ridge; great-grandparents, James and Elsie Hall of Newport, Reva Herald of Talbert, Stewart and Rita Selby of Dry Ridge, and L.C. and Dean Harper of Louisville. Memorials: Good Samaritan Hospital Foundation, 375 Dixmyth Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45220.

Ella Hoggatt

Ella Frances Hoggatt, 91, Alexandria, died Dec. 8, 2009, at River Valley Nursing Home, Butler. She was a supervisor for Bardes Electric, built fighter planes during WWII, was a volunteer firefighter and a member of the Highland Heights Baptist Church. Her husbands, George Rose and Ralph Hoggatt, and daughter, Irene Rose, died previously. Survivors include her daughter, Imogene Wise of Alexandria; stepchildren, Dave, Terry and Gary Hoggatt, and Joanne Gray; four grand-

children, nine great-grandchildren and six great-great-grandchildren. Burial was in Trautwein Cemetery, Lynchburg, Ohio. Memorials: River Valley Nursing Home, 305 Taylor St., Butler, KY 41006.

Terry Ingram Sr.

Terry Allen Ingram Sr., 54, Fort Thomas, died Dec. 5, 2009, at his home. He was a member of First Apostolic Church of Cincinnati and was a volunteer firefighter in Wilder. Survivors include his son, Terry Ingram Jr. of Newport; mother, Joyce Ingram of Wilder and sister, Sherry Barnes of Ohio. Alexandria Funeral Home handled the arrangements.

William Kuhnheim

William D. Kuhnheim, 39, Melbourne, died Dec. 10, 2009, at his home. He was a maintenance worker in the food industry. Survivors include his son, Austin Kuhnheim of Newport; parents, Dale and Carolyn Kuhnheim of Melbourne; and brother, Shawn Kuhnheim of Melbourne. Memorials: The Kidney Foundation, 2200 Victory Parkway, Suite 510, Cincinnati, OH 45206.

Virginia Lickert

Virginia “Sis” Lickert, 84, Alexandria, a homemaker, died Dec. 7, 2009, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. Her husband, Clayton “Doc” Lickert, died previously. Survivors include her daughters, Sue Tamme of Louisville, Diane Hill of Cold Spring and Sandy Schwalbach of Indianapolis, Ind.; son, Ron Lickert of Alexandria; sisters, Kate Racke of Cold Spring and Ruth Mefford of Cold Spring; six grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren. Burial was in Alexandria Cemetery. Memorials: American Cancer Society, 297 Buttermilk Pike, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017; or Baptist Hospital East Foundation, 4000 Kresge Way, Louisville, KY 40207.

Mary Ann Mieling

Mary Ann Mieling, 69, Covington, a homemaker, died Dec. 10, 2009, at her home. Survivors include her husband, John Mieling; daughters, Sherry Mieling of Colorado, Bonnie Currens and Laura Mieling of Cincinnati; son, John Mieling of California; sisters, Pat Bacon of Cincinnati, Nancy Lagaly of Myrtle Beach, S.C., and Peggy Kincaid of Harrison; and four

Deaths continued B9


On the record DEATHS From B8

bara Cox, of Vandalia, Ohio. Memorials: Pamela North Cox and Isaiah Rhealand Faye North, Bank of Kentucky, Newport Branch.

grandchildren. Serenity Funeral Care, Covington, handled the arrangements.

ter, Barbara Lemberg of Florence; four grandchildren and two greatgrandchildren. Burial was in St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas. Memorials: Alzheimer’s Association, 644 Linn St., Cincinnati, OH 45203; or Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, 600 E. Main St., Suite 102, Louisville, KY 40202.

Joe Oldham

David Newman

David L. Newman, 50, formerly of Silver Grove, died Dec. 8, 2009, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He was a member of the Jokers Bike Club and was employed by Camco Chemical. Survivors include his wife, Lettie Newman; sons, David Kerish of Union, Randy Kerish of Orlando, Fla., Brandan Newman of Florence; stepson, Larry Erskine of Flemmingsburg; step-daughters, Regina Cuneo of Newport and Tracy Reed of Dayton, Ky.; brothers, Darryl Newman of Silver Grove, Mike Newman of Erlanger and Jason Newman of Melbourne; 17 grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren. Burial was at the Dunaway Cemetery, Beattyville.

Lora North

Lora L. North, 23, Southgate, died Dec. 8, 2009, in Wilmington, Ohio. She was a server for Bob Evans, and a member of the Bellevue Lighthouse Church. Survivors include her son, Isaiah North; mother, Pamela Cox of Southgate; father, Gregory Cox of Wilmington; sister, Melissa Bartee of Newport; brothers, Michael Smith of Newport, Joshua Bartee of Newport, David, Jeremy and Stephen Bartee of Huber Heights and grandparents, Glen and Bar-

Joe Thomas Oldham, 53, Demossville, died Dec. 12, 2009, at his home. He was a journeyman electrician with Local 212 in Cincinnati, member of Grassy Creek Christian Church and Getting Ready Quartet. Survivors include his wife, Lois Baker Oldham, daughter, Joanne Hicks of Demossville; son, Jeremy Oldham of Demossville; parents, Joe Oldham of Butler and Sieglinde Oldham of Fort Thomas; brother, Michael Oldham of San Antonio, Texas, and two grandchildren. Burial was in Gardnersville Cemetery, Demossville. Memorials: Grassy Creek Christian Church, 6884 U.S. 17 N., Demossville, KY 41033.

Berenice Reardon

Berenice A. Reardon, 91, Fort Thomas, died Dec. 3, 2009, at her home. She was a member of St. Joseph Catholic Church in Galion, Ohio. Her husband of 59 years, Eugene F. Reardon, died previously. Survivors include her sons, Jim Reardon of Breaux Bridge, La., Tom Reardon of Fort Thomas, Jerry Reardon of Taylor Mill and Bob Reardon of Columbus; five grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Burial was in Mt. Calvary Catholic Cemetery, Galion, Ohio. Memorials: American Cancer Society, North West Region, 740 Commerce Drive, Suite B, Perrysburg, OH 43551.

Joseph Radenheimer

Joseph A. Radenheimer, 86, Fort Thomas, died Dec. 12, 2009, at Carmel Manor Nursing Home, Fort Thomas. He was a retired captain of the Fort Thomas Fire Department, commander of the American Legion, member of the Southgate Veterans of Foreign Wars, Fort Thomas Retired Men’s Club, Club 55 at St. Thomas Church and Northern Kentucky Electrical Association. His wives, Dorothy Raeckers Radenheimer and Victoria Murray Radenheimer, died previously. Survivors include his son, Ron Radenheimer of Southgate; daugh-

Elizabeth Sands

Elizabeth A. Sands, 83, Fort Thomas, died Dec. 9, 2009, at Brighton Gardens in Edgewood. She worked as a medical assistant, an exercise instructor for the European Health Spa in Newport, was a homemaker, a volunteer for the ARC of the Salvation Army in Norwood and a member of Old St. Mary’s Church in Over-the-Rhine in

Cancer society provides info line

Cancer doesn’t take a holiday and neither does the American Cancer Society. The society’s information line – 1-800-227-2345 – is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week with information and support for cancer patients, family members and others who have questions about cancer. By calling the National Cancer Information Center,

ESSE

E

Emily Rawe, 20, and Nicholas Wagner, 20, both of Fort Thomas, issued Nov. 16. Holly Mounce, 37, of Fort Thomas and Douglas Mounce, 37, of Cincinnati, issued Nov. 25. Pamela Wilcox, 41, and Michael Rosenberg, 39, both of Newport, issued Nov. 20. Julie Morfor, 21, of Fort Thomas and Alonzo Allen II, Somerset, 21, of Nov. 21, 2008. Kristi Baker, 34, and Jason Gilbert, 34, both of Fort Thomas, issued Nov. 21. Corinda Childress, 35, of Covington and Dennis Evans, 55, of Cincinnati, issued Nov. 22. Lisa Henry, 51, and Kevin Henry, 45, both of Fort Thomas, issued Nov. 22. Holly Brown, 28, of Louisville and Jonathan Paul, 24, of Fort Thomas,

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Gerald Seiter

Gerald L. Seiter, 58, Butler, died Dec. 11, 2009, at his home. He was an overhead electric supervisor with Cinergy for more than 36 years, member of Sts. Peter & Paul Church and Catholic Order of Foresters Court 1492 for 50 years. Survivors include his wife, Jackie

issued Nov. 23. Allison Cuthrell, 25, of Cincinnati and Joseph Scharf, 26, of Fort Thomas, issued Nov. 23. Iryna Bosko, 44, and James Watte, 58, both of Fort Thomas, issued Nov. 23. Debra Phillips, 49, of Cincinnati and Woodrow Good Jr., 48, of Covington, issued Nov. 24. Holly Bezold, 24, of Cincinnati and Brandon Schweitzer, 26, of Fort Thomas, issued Nov. 13. Christine Mech, 36, of New York and Kevin Burkart, 42, of Fort Thomas, issued Nov. 17. Ceera Durham, 19, of Anderson and Jonathan Baker, 19, of Covington, issued Nov. 17. Danielle Wilson, 23, and Jason Wilder, 26, both of Newport, issued Nov. 17.

There is a joke among friends here, “It’s a Phoenix that has risen from the ashes. ”When Charles and Allison Hahn Sobieck purchased the property at 502 North Main Street (in Somerset, Kentucky), there was a lot of work to be done, to say the least. With the vision of a B & B and a home in ruins, there were little choices. The dilapidated structure was removed, then reconstructed as it had been in the 1850’s. It’s a brand new home. A bit of an unusual concept for a bed and breakfast. “We reconstructed the home from scratch. This gave us the benefit of designing every amenity possible along the way, ”said Allison Sobieck, owner. Every room is equipped with many amenities you don’t often find in a traditional bed and breakfast, but rather a fine hotel. Every room has a full sized closet with a pair of micro-fiber robes hanging in them, 400- count Egyptian cotton sheets, cable TV with DVD players, queen sized beds, and a host of other things. For instance, 2 rooms have gas fireplaces and 3 rooms have whirlpool tubs. We even offer many add on amenities such as massage, dinner, flowers, etc…

FLORIDA

Wright Seiter; daughter, Julie Feinhauer of Independence; son, Jason Seiter of Alexandria; mother, Elizabeth Bezold Seiter of California; sisters, Patty Verst of Alexandria, Diane Haubner, Brenda Baker, Linda Govan, Carol Hinkel, and Lisa Rust, all of California; brothers, Ken Seiter of Ocoee, Fla., Norb, David and Steve Seiter, all of California and seven grandchildren. Burial was in Grand View Cemetery, Mentor. Memorials: Sts. Peter & Paul Building Fund, 2162 California Cross Roads, California, KY 41007.

Jules Skinner

Jules Earl Skinner, 83, Alexandria, died Dec. 8, 2009, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. He was a Master Mason at Alexandria Lodge and a World War II Navy veteran. His wife, Joyce Smith Skinner, died previously. Survivors include his son, Bruce Skinner of Spokane, Wash.; daughter, Jackie Sgrecci of Alexandria, sister, Juanita Hawley of San Diego, Calif.; three grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Burial was in Floral Hills Memorial Gardens in Taylor Mill. Memorials: Masonic Lodge, PO Box 323, Alexandria, KY. 41001.

Wei Ya Dou, 54, of China and Elijah Stephenson, 68, of Alexandria, issued Nov. 17.

Cheryl Sowder

Cheryl Ann Sowder, 50, Ryland Heights, died Dec. 8, 2009. at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. She was a pharmacy technician with Cardinal Hill Specialty Hospital, Fort Thomas. Survivors includes her husband, Jimmy Trapp; daughters, Amber Sowder and Amanda Overbay, both of Latonia; sister, Janice Hill of Madisonville, Ohio; brothers, William Hill of Madisonville and Edward Hill of Dayton, Ky. and four grandchildren. Burial was in Mother of God Cemetery, Fort Wright.

Louis Yockey

Louis Yockey, 77, Alexandria, died Dec. 8, 2009, at his home. He worked for the Disabled American Veterans and was a Korean War Army veteran. Survivors include his wife, Mary Anderson Yockey; daughter, Pam Yockey of Alexandria; sons, Fred, Louis, Eugene and Mike Yockey, all of Alexandria.; nine grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren. Burial was in Floral Hills Memorial Gardens, Taylor Mill. Memorials: Veterans of Foreign Wars, 8261 Alexandria Pike, Alexandria, KY 41001-1155.

Amanda Bauman, 24, and Gary Knight, 26, both of Park Hills, issued Nov. 18.

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Unique and rewarding opportunities for full-time and part-time houseparents at a private, residential school for mentally-challenged children and adults. Ideal fulltime candidate would live on the beautiful 850 acre campus in Frankfort, KY. Regular Schedule: 3 weeks on, 1 week off. Overnight required. Excellent salary and benefits package with extras: housing, utilities, cable television, meals and use of school facilities. Retirees and Others Welcome! For information, please call Machele W. Lawless or Melissa Ford. Stewart Home School “Special Care for Special People” EOE

(502) 227-4821

FT. MYERS. Luxury 2 BR, 2 BA condo overlooking golf course & lake. Nr. airport, shopping & dining. Rental includes golf & country club privileges at reduced price. Owner • 513-260-3395 or 812-537-0495 The rooms are only half of the reason to come to The Doolin House. Owners Charles and Allison just happen to both be chefs. Some of the breakfast specialties include Caramel Banana French Toast and Southern Eggs Benedict (2 fried green tomatoes topped with 2 slices of smoked bacon, 2 eggs over easy and Hollandaise). Chuck is usually in charge of breakfast and tries to do new and different things every day. Chef Chuck pointed out, “It’s fun to experiment with breakfast. It’s the one meal that encompasses all foods. It’s perfectly acceptable to see smoked salmon or a pork cutlet at the breakfast table. ”For those in no rush to rise and shine, breakfast in bed is served at no additional charge. When you need a weekend get away that’s not too far from home or you are planning your summer vacation to beautiful Lake Cumberland, remember that The Doolin House Bed and Breakfast is only a phone call away.

For more information, Visit the website at: www.doolinhouse.com or call 606-678-9494

INDIANA

EAST COAST, NEW SMYRNA BEACH Luxurious oceanfront condos & vacation homes. Closest & best beach to Disney. Ocean Properties Vacation Rentals 800-728-0513 www.oceanprops.com

SANIBEL ISLAND Quality, beachfront condos. Excellent service! Great rates! www.SanibelIslandVacations.com 1-888-451-7277

www.stewarthome.com

SIESTA KEY Condos 2 & 3 bedrm, 2 bath, directly on world-famous Crescent Beach. Owner offers Great Winter Specials! 847-931-9113

TENNESSEE 1-7 Affordable, Deluxe Chalets & Cabin Rentals. Pigeon Forge in the Smokies. Vacation/Dollywood Specials. Free brochure. Call 1-800-833-9987. www.firesidechalets.com

’Cause we need a little Christmas ... Make holiday memories at the Comfort Inn, Nashville, Indiana. Live music & theatre thru 12/18. 812-988-6118 ChoiceHotels.com

LOUISIANA

NEW ORLEANS • Sugar Bowl & New Year’s Eve. Premier accomodations, Presidential Suite. Wyndham LaBelle Maison . Only one left! Call now! 1-256-452-9756

A Beautiful Cabin Getaway Gatlinburg/Pigeon Forge. Hot tub, jacuzzi, fireplace, gas grill. $85/nt, 5 nt special $375. 800-793-8699. smokymtncrossrdrentals.com

A Beautiful Luxury Log Cabin Resort minutes from Dollywood & Pigeon Forge! Great amenities, pet friendly cabins. Excellent rates! Call now or visit us online www.hiddenspringsresort.com 1-888-HSR-TENN (477-8366)

NEW YORK MANHATTAN--NYC HOTEL $129/2 persons. Singles $124. Suites $139-$159. Lincoln Ctr area, Hudson River views, 18 flrs, kitchenette, 5 mins to midtown, safe, quiet, luxury area. RIVERSIDE TOWER, Riverside & 80th St. Call 1-800-724-3136 or visit: www.riversidetowerhotel.com

1001523976-01

Beautiful Seagrove Beach Rent & Relax. Nr Destin, between famous Seaside & Rosemary Beach. Cozy Cottages to Gulf Front Condos. Web Specials. 1-800-537-5387 www.garrettbeachrentals.com

Basic obituary information and a color photograph of your loved one is published without charge by The Community Press. Please call us at 283-0404 for more information. To publish a larger memorial tribute, call 513-242-4000 for pricing details. For the most up-to-date Northern Kentucky obituaries, click on the "Obituaries" link at NKY.com.

513.768.8285 or travelads@enquirer.com

Bed & Breakfast

$99/nt*. Sanibel & Boca Grande Discover the charm & comfort of beachfront vaca tion homes, cozy cottages or spacious affordable condos. *rates from. Grande Island Vacations. 800-962-3314 bocagrandevacations.com

Frank Anthony Santini Jr., 45, Covington, died Dec. 6, 2009, at his home. His son, Frank Santini, died earlier this year. Survivors include his father, Frank Santini of Elsmere; mother, Patricia Phelps of Alexandria; stepfather, Lloyd Phelps of Alexandria; brothers, Huston Haynes of Alexandria and Joey Santini of Covington; sisters, Lisa Neiser of Alexandria and Misty Callahan of Alexandria; and one granddaughter. Burial was in St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas.

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B9

MARRIAGE LICENSES

patients can speak to an information specialist and receive information on various types of cancer, cancer treatments, how to manage symptoms, prevention and detection guidelines, and many other topics. The American Cancer Society’s 1-800-227-2345 number can also accommodate Spanish-speaking individuals.

TENN

Cincinnati. Her husbands, Gilbert H. Sands and Frederick G.W. Styles, died previously. Survivors include her daughters, Ruth Styles-Hawk of Williamsburg, Ohio and Sylvia Liles of Fort Thomas; step-daughter, Sandra Marshall of Richmond, Va.; three grandchildren; three stepgrandchildren and one great-grandchild. Burial was in Evergreen Cemetery, Southgate. Memorials: Hospice of the Bluegrass Northern Kentucky, 7388 Turfway Road, Florence, KY 41042.

CCF Recorder

December 17, 2009

NORTH CAROLINA EMERALD ISLE. Ocean Front luxury vacation homes with community pool. Call for free brochure. 1-252-354-5555 Spinnaker’s Reach Realty www.SpinnakersReach.com

CHALET VILLAGE www.chaletvillage.com Cozy cabins to luxurious chalets Fully furnished, hot tubs, pool tables. Check SPECIALS, availability and book online 24/7, or call 1-800-722-9617

GATLINBURG. Affordable rates. Fully furnished. 1-8 bdrms. Chalets, Cabins, Privacy, Views, Hot Tubs, Jacuzzis, Fireplaces. 1-800-235-2661 www.alpinechaletrentals.com

SOUTH CAROLINA CLEARWATER - Indian Rocks Beach 2br, 2ba Gulf Front condo. Heated pool, balcony. Many up grades. 513-771-1373, 260-3208 www.go-qca.com/condo

SEABROOK EXCLUSIVES Villas & Private Homes. Ocean, golf, tennis, equestrian. Pet friendly rentals. Free brochure. Book online! 888-718-7949. www.seabrookexclusives.com

www.AUNTIEBELHAMS.com Gatlinburg-Pigeon Forge. Vacation in a beautiful log cabin or chalet with hot tub, Jacuzzi, views & pool tables. Call about specials! 800-436-6618


B10

CCF Recorder

December 17, 2009 INVITATION TO BID December 17, 2009

INVITATION TO BID Sealed Bids for construction of Advanced Treatment Facilities at the Fort Thomas Treatment Plant, addressed to (Northern Kentucky Water District, P.O. Box 18640, 2835 Crescent Springs Road, Erlanger, KY 41018), will be received at the office of the Northern Kentucky Water District, (Owner), until 2:00 p.m., local time, on the 12th day of January, 2010. Any Bids received after the specified time will not be considered. Bids will then be publicly opened and read. The Project contemplated consists of a concrete and masonry Advanced Treatment building housing 8 Granular Activated Carbon contactors with 12 feet of media depth, a rotary positive displacement blower for contactor air scour, a low lift pump station, 3 medium pressure high output ultraviolet disinfection reactors, a 2 ton bridge crane in the UV Disinfection Room, a concrete equalization tank beneath the building with submersible pumps, and ancillary systems including but not limited to controls, security systems, chemical feed, plumbing, heating, air conditioning and ventilating. The pump room contains vertical turbine pumps with adjustable frequency drives including 3 GAC feed pumps, 2 backwash pumps and 2 slurry water supply pumps and is served by a 5 ton bridge crane. A service elevator, and monorail crane will be installed. Roofing systems include a pitched vegetated roofing system, a metal roof, and a flat modified bituminous roof with pavers. A standby electrical power system is provided with capacity to serve a majority of the plant systems. Site work including excavation, yard piping, concrete valve vaults, a splitter box with sluice gates, a concrete outfall structure, fencing, concrete and asphalt paving, grading and landscaping. Demolition of existing backwash pumps and connections of piping to existing piping and concrete flumes will be completed in the existing filter building. The existing treatment facilities and laboratory must be kept in operation during construction. Alternate bid items for which prices must be supplied include stainless steel and plastic GAC contactor underdrain systems, two alternate UV system manufacturers, deletion of the UV system, deletion of the air scour system, deletion of the service elevator, and substitution of a metal roof for the vegetated roof. The Work will be completed in all respects within 790 calendar days from the date when the Contract Times commence to run. Bidding Documents may be examined in Owner’s office, (Northern Kentucky Water District, 2835 Crescent Springs Road Erlanger, KY 41018, or at Engineer’s office, CH2M HILL, (300 E-Business Way, Suite 400, Cincinnati OH, 45241 or at the offices of HDR Engineers, 2517 Sir Barton Way, Lexington, KY, 40509. Copies of the Bidding Documents may be obtained from the office of QCR Imaging and Supply, located at 2456 Fortune Drive, Suite 120, Lexington, Kentucky 40509 (859 699 5105 or 800 966 2260 and www.qcrepro.com), at the address indicated herein. Charges for all documents obtained will be made on the following basis: Charge Complete Set of Bidding Documents With Half Size Drawings $600.00 Complete Set of Bidding Documents With Full Size Drawings $900.00 Copy of Geotechnical Reports $75.00

PROJECT: Installation of New Water Services at Various Locations SEALED BIDS WILL BE RECEIVED AT: Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) 2835 Crescent Springs Road P.O. Box 18640 Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 UNTIL:

Date: January 7, 2010 Time: 2:00 p.m., local time

At said place and time, and promptly thereafter, all Bids that have been duly received will be publicly opened and read aloud. The proposed work is generally described as follows: Install new water services and meters at various locations throughout the District’s service area over a one-year period beginning March 1, 2010 with an optional one-year extension at the same unit prices Bid. All Bids must be in accordance with the Bidding Documents on file, and available for examination at: Northern Kentucky Water District, 2835 Crescent Springs Road, Erlanger, Kentucky, 41018. Copies of the Bidding Documents may be obtained from the office at the address indicated herein by contacting Denise Manning at (859) 578-9898 ext. 2060. There is no charge for these documents. Bids will be received on a unit price basis as described in the Contract Documents. Owner reserves the right to reject any or all Bids, including without limitation the right to reject any or all nonconforming, non-responsive, incomplete, unbalanced, or conditional Bids, to waive informalities, and to reject the Bid of any Bidder if Owner believes that it would not be in the best interest of Owner to make an award to that Bidder. Owner also reserves the right to negotiate with the selected Bidder to such an extent as may be determined by Owner. Minority Bidders are encouraged to bid. Bids shall remain subject to acceptance for 60 days after the day of bid opening. Richard Harrison, V.P. Engineering Northern Kentucky Water District 1001525456

Return of the documents is not required, and the amount paid for the documents is nonrefundable. The following plan room services have received sets of Bidding Documents for the Work contemplated herein:

LEGAL NOTICE ORDINANCE O-21-2009

Reed Construction Data McGraw Hill Construction 30 Technology Parkway South, Kenwood Executive Center Suite 500 7265 Kenwood Road, Suite 202 Norcross, GA 30092 Cincinnati, Ohio 45236 Ph: 800-424-3996 Ph: 513-345-8218 Fax: 800-317-0870 Fax: 888-376-4319

AN ORDINANCE ENACTING AND ADOPTING A SUPPLEMENT TO THE CODE OF ORDINANCES OF THE CITY OF FORT THOMAS, 859-441-5104CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY.

Builders Exchange Allied Construction Industries (ACI) 9555 Rockside Road, Suite 300 3 Kovach Drive Valley View, Ohio 44125 Cincinnati, Ohio 45215 Ph: 216-393-6300 Ph: 513-221-8020, ext. 1010 Fax: 866-907-6304 Fax: 513-221-8023 Each Bid must be submitted on the prescribed Bid Form and accompanied by Bid security as prescribed in the Instructions to Bidders. The Successful Bidder will be required to furnish the additional bond(s) prescribed in the Bidding Documents. Bidders are not required to be prequalified by the Owner to perform the type and size of Work contemplated herein but will be subject to the qualifications requirements set forth in the bidding documents. The project advertised will be funded by the Kentucky Infrastructure Authority (KIA) through a Federally Assisted Drinking Water State Revolving Fund (DWSRF) Loan and Local Funds. All Bidders must comply with the President’s Executive Order 11246 (EEO) as amended. All Bidders must comply with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Anti-Kickback Act, and the Contract Work Hours Standard Act, and 40 CFR, and 40 CFR 33.1016. All Bidders, Contractors and Subcontractors must comply with 41 CFR 60-4, in regard to Affirmative Action, to ensure equal opportunity to females and minorities and will apply the timetables and goals set forth in 41 CFR 60-4 as applicable. All Bidders must comply with OSHA (P.C. 91-596) and the Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act (P.E. 91-54). The Successful Bidder and all Subcontractors will be required to conform to the labor standards set forth in the Contract Documents. This project falls under the provisions of KRS 337.505 to 337.550 for prevailing wage rates. Owner reserves the right to reject any or all Bids, including without limitation the right to reject any or all nonconforming, nonresponsive, incomplete, unbalanced, or conditional Bids, to waive informalities, and to reject the Bid of any Bidder if Owner believes that it would not be in the best interest of Owner to make an award to that Bidder. Owner also reserves the right to negotiate with the apparent Successful Bidder to such an extent as may be determined by Owner. A non-mandatory prebid conference will be held for prospective Bidders on December 18, 2009 at 10:00 a.m. at the District’s Central Facility located at 2835 Crescent Spring Road, Erlanger, Kentucky 41018. Site visits will begin at 12:30 p.m. on December 18, 2009 at the Fort Thomas Treatment Plant located at 700 Alexandria Pike, Fort Thomas, Kentucky 41075. Minority Bidders are encouraged to bid and bidders must employ Good Faith Effort steps to solicit participation of Disadvantaged Business Enterprises. Bids shall remain subject to acceptance for 90 days after the day of bid opening or for such longer period of time to which a Bidder may agree in writing upon request of the Owner. If a Contract is to be awarded, the Owner will give the Successful Bidder a Notice of Award during the period of time during which the Successful Bidder’s bid remains subject to acceptance. Award of the Contract will be in accordance with Article 21, Evaluation of Bids and Award of Contract, specified in the Instructions to Bidders. For information concerning the proposed Work, contact Nick Winnike, CH2M HILL, telephone: 513- 337- 9351. For an appointment to visit the Site, refer to the District’s website www.nkywater.org for scheduling at least 48 hours in advance. Questions about site visits should be directed to Jeff Schuchter, NKWD, Staff Engineer, telephone: 859-426-2703. Dated this 17th day of December, 2009. Northern Kentucky Water District By: Bari L. Joslyn, V.P., Water Quality & Production 1001525731

WHEREAS, American Legal Publishing Corporation of Cincinnati, Ohio has completed the 2009 supplement to the Code of Ordinances of the City of Fort Thomas, which supplement contains all ordinances of a general nature enacted since the prior supplement to the Code of Ordinances of this municipality; and WHEREAS, American Legal Publishing Corporation has recommended the revision or addition of certain sections of the Code of Ordinances which are based on or make references to sections of the Kentucky Revised Statutes; and WHEREAS, it is the intent of Council to accept these updated sections in accordance with the changes of the law of the Commonwealth of Kentucky;

Section 00020 INVITATION TO BID

CITY OF SOUTHGATE CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY ORDINANCE NO 09-06

Date: December 17, 2009

AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF SOUTHGATE, KENTUCKY, IN CAMPBELL COUNTY, APPROVING THE AGREEMENT FOR THE TRANSFER AND ASSIGNMENT OF OWNERSHIP OF THE SANITATION DISTRICT NO. 1 STORM WATER DRAINAGE SYSTEM OWNED BY THE CITY OF SOUTHGATE TO SANITATION DISTRICT NO. 1, INCLUDING THE DUTIES AND OBLIGATIONS IMPOSED ON THE CITY OF CRESTVIEW HILLS BY LAW ATTEND ANT TO SUCH OWNERSHIP, INCLUDING THE DAILY MAINTENANCE, REPAIR, IMPROVEMENT, AND RECONSTRUCTION AND OPERATION OF THE STORM WATER DRAINAGE SYSTEM, AND AUTHORIZING THE MAYOR TO EXECUTE THE TRANSFER AND ASSIGNMENT BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY OF SOUTHGATE, KENTUCKY, IN CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY, AS FOLLOWS: WHEREAS, the City of Southgate entered into an Interlocal Agreement with Sanitation District No. 1 ("SD1") on January 31, 2003 (attached hereto as Exhibit A) to provide Kentucky Pollutant Discharge Elimination System ("KPDES") Storm Water Related Services and Other Storm Water Discharge Permit Services in Boone, Campbell, and Kenton Counties, Kentucky, in order to comply with the requirements of the Environmental Protection Agency ("EPA") and Kentucky Division of Water ("KDOW"); WHEREAS, the Interlocal Agreement provided for SD1 to undertake the permitting requirements and other related services regarding the Storm Water Phase II Management Program, while the responsibility for the ownership, maintenance, and operation of the public storm water system remained with Southgate; WHEREAS, the Interlocal Agreement provided that SD1 would at some point assume the ownership of the drainage facilities located with Southgate’s jurisdictional boundaries and owned by Southgate and the duties and obligations imposed on Southgate by law for maintaining, repairing, improving, reconstructing, and operating the drainage facilities; and WHEREAS, SD1 is now prepared to assume the ownership of the drainage facilities located with Southgate’s jurisdictional boundaries and owned by Southgate and the duties and obligations imposed on Southgate by law for maintaining, repairing, improving, reconstructing, and operating the drainage facilities; and WHEREAS, Southgate and SD1 have entered into an Agreement for the Transfer and Assignment of the SD1 Storm Water Drainage System, pursuant to which Southgate will transfer its ownership of that portion of the SD1 Storm Water Drainage System to SD1 and assign and delegate to SD1 all of the duties and obligations imposed on Southgate by law regarding the SD1 Storm Water Drainage System, including, without limitation, its daily maintenance, repair, improvement, reconstruction, and operation; BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY OF SOUTHGATE, CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY: SECTION I The Southgate City Council hereby approves the Agreement for the Transfer and Assignment of the SD1 Storm Water Drainage System between Southgate and SD1. A copy of the Agreement is attached hereto as Exhibit B. A copy of the map identifying the storm water lines that are included in the Agreement is on file for public inspection at the office of the City Clerk. SECTION II The Southgate City Council hereby authorizes the Mayor, Jim Hamberg, to sign and execute the Agreement for the Transfer and Assignment of the SD1 Storm Water Drainage System between Southgate and SD1.

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY OF FORT THOMAS, KENTUCKY:

SECTION III All Ordinances or parts of Ordinances in conflict herewith to the extent of such conflict, if any, are hereby repealed to the extent of such conflict.

SECTION I

SECTION IV This Ordinance shall take effect and be in full force when passed, published, and recorded according to law.

That the 2009 supplement to the Code of Ordinances of the City of Fort Thomas, Kentucky, as submitted by American Legal Publishing Corporation of Cincinnati, be and the same is hereby adopted by reference as if set out in its entirety. SECTION II That this ordinance shall take effect and be in force from and after its date of passage, approval and publication as required by law.

APPROVED: __________________ Mary H. Brown, Mayor 1st Reading: November 16, 2009 Adopted: December 7, 2009

PASSED by the City Council of the City of Southgate, Campbell County, Kentucky, assembled in regular session. CITY OF SOUTHGATE, KENTUCKY Jim Hamberg, Mayor ATTEST: Jody Anderson, City Clerk First Reading: Second Reading: Published: 1001526161

09/16/09 11/18/09 12/17/09

PROJECT: Altamont Road Water Main Replacement SEALED BIDS WILL BE RECEIVED AT: Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) 2835 Crescent Springs Road P.O. Box 18640 Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 UNTIL: Date:January 6, 2010 Time: 10:00 AM (Local Time) At said place and time, and promptly thereafter, all Bids that have been duly received will be publicly opened and read aloud. The proposed Work is generally described as follows: Construction of approximately 1,300 linear feet of 12" D.I. water main and approximately 1,000 linear feet of 8" D.I. water main together with the appurtenances and related work along Altamont Road in the City of Covington, Kenton County Kentucky. All Bids must be in accordance with the Instructions to Bidders and Contract Documents on file, and available for examination at: Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) 2835 Crescent Springs Road Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 Or KZF Design 655 Eden Park Drive Cincinnati, OH 45202-6000 Copies of the Bidding Documents may be obtained from the office of KZF Design at the address indicated herein. Charges for all documents obtained will be made on the following basis: Charge Complete set of Bidding Documents $ 75.00 Mailing and Handling (UPS) (if requested) $ 25.00 Charges for Bidding Documents and mailing and handling, if applicable, will not be refunded. Bids will be received on a unit price and/or lump sum basis as described in the Contract Documents. Bid security, in the form of a certified check or a Bid Bond in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the maximum total bid price, must accompany each Bid. The Successful Bidder will be required to furnish a Construction Payment Bond and a Construction Performance Bond as security for the faithful performance of the contract and the payment of all bills and obligations arising from the performance of the Contract. Contractor and all Subcontractors will be required to conform to the labor standards set forth in the Contract Documents. This project falls under the provisions of KRS 337.505 to 337.550 for prevailing wage rates. Owner reserves the right to reject any or all Bids, including without limitation the right to reject any or all nonconforming, non-responsive, incomplete, unbalanced, or conditional Bids, to waive informalities, and to reject the Bid of any Bidder if Owner believes that it would not be in the best interest of Owner to make an award to that Bidder. Owner also reserves the right to negotiate with the apparent qualified Bidder to such an extent as may be determined by Owner. Minority Bidders are encouraged to bid. Bids shall remain subject to acceptance for 60 days after the day of bid opening or for such longer period of time to which a Bidder may agree in writing upon request of the Owner. If a Contract is to be awarded, the Owner will give the successful Bidder a Notice of Award during the period of time during which the successful Bidder’s bid remains subject to acceptance. Richard Harrison, Vice President of Engineering and Distribution Northern Kentucky Water District 1001525856

If you’re looking for buyers, you’re in the right neighborhood.

Published: December 17, 2009 ATTEST: _______________________________ Melissa K. Kelly, City Clerk 921724b/1001525182

To place an ad call 513.242.4000 or 859.283.7290, or visit CommunityClassified.com


fort-thomas-recorder-121709