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Volunteer Amy Leigh holds up an old American flag during a presentation to class at Moyer. AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Police merger could end Three years after merging their operations, the Highland Heights and Southgate police departments may become separate entities again. The Highland Heights City Council Tuesday night had a first reading to withdraw the city from the Highland Heights Southgate Police Authority. News, A4

Schools hold reverse trick or treat Visitors to the the soup kitchen in Newport’s Henry Hosea House will soon be getting a sweet little something extra with their dinner thanks to students from Fort Thomas’s elementary schools. For the first time, students from Moyer, Johnson and Woodfill elementary school are holding a reverse trick or treat, where they bring in extra or unwanted candy to donate to the Hosea House. Schools, A5

FORT THOMAS

RECORDER THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2011

Branch closes Nov. 28 By Amanda Joering Alley

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Fort Thomas

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ajoering@nky.com

FORT THOMAS — The Carrico/Fort Thomas Branch of the Campbell County Public Library will soon be closing for remodeling. The remodel, which will last from Monday, Nov. 28, to Monday, Jan. 2, will include updating the front lobby and restrooms, installing new carpet through the building, painting, reupholstering furniture, adding two new study rooms and relocating some things like the children’s area and computers. “We’re all very excited and enthusiastic about this renovation,” said Sandy Prell, manger of the Fort Thomas branch. “It will provide improvements for all areas of the library and help us offer a more enriching experience.” This is the first major renovation of the building, which was built in 1995 and expanded in 2002. JC Morgan, director of the library, said with all the use the branch has seen over the years, the approximately $150,000 renovation project is needed. “Fort Thomas is the busiest branch in terms of foot traffic,” Morgan said. “In the past five years there has been almost a million visitors to that branch, which really wears down the carpet.” Replacing the carpeting makes up a big

The Carrico/Fort Thomas branch of the Campbell County Public Library will be closed for renovations from Monday, Nov. 28, until Monday, Jan. 2. AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

chunk of the expense, and is also the reason the library has to close for the renovation since everything will have to be moved around. Morgan said a lot of the renovations and relocation were decided through lessons learned about what works best at the library’s other two branches in Newport and Cold Spring. With some patrons complaining about noise due to high foot traffic at all the branches, the addition of the two study rooms was included in the Fort Thomas branch renovations. “This way people can have a very pri-

Fort Thomas police officer Emily Leising trains with Highlands High School sophomore Lauren Daly during the department's Rape Aggression Defense (RAD) class Thursday, Nov. 3. AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

See LIBRARY, Page A2

‘Salute’ program to feature new exhibits By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

Your online community Visit NKY.com/local to find news, sports, photos, events and more from your community. You’ll find content from The Community Recorder, The Kentucky Enquirer and your neighbors. While you’re there, check out Share, and submit stories and photos of your own.

Share your news Have a great photo from your kid’s latest field trip? Trying to drum up publicity for your group’s event? Visit NKY.com/Share to submit your photos, news and events. It’s a one-stop-shop for submitting information to The Community Recorder, The Kentucky Enquirer, NKY.com and our other publications and websites.

FORT THOMAS — The upcoming fourth annual Salute to Veterans program will feature even more exhibits and re-enactments than past events. The event, put on by the Fort Thomas Renaissance and Museum, is an annual celebration of veterans, featuring military displays, war re-enactors and performances by local students. “We started this event to celebrate veterans as well as our heritage as a fort,” said Debbie Buckley, the city’s renaissance manager. “The event has grown, but our goal has stayed the same.” Buckley said some of the highlights of this year’s event include re-enactors from various eras in history including the Civil War, Revolutionary War, and World War II as well as an Abra-

Tim Ledford poses for a picture by a diorama of World War II by the Six Scale Collectors at the Salute to Veterans event in 2008. PROVIDED ham Lincoln collector showing the artifacts he’s collected. Other features include a World War II weaponry demonstration and a large diorama of the 1940 Battle of France presented by the Sixth Scale Collectors Club. Dick Schuarte, president of

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Shirley Bowman sings with the Swingtime Band at Fort Thomas Renaissance and Museum Committee's Salute to Veterans in 2008. PROVIDED

the club, who has been involved in the event since the beginning, said the group has worked over the years to not only put together interesting displays from their collection, but also to coordinate other exhibits at the event from other organizations. “We participate in the Salute to Veterans event as a way of saluting those people who have served and because we feel people need to learn this history,” Schuarte said. Along with the 1940 Battle of France display, the group will also be showing a Civil War display in honor of the war’s 150th anniversary this year. At this year’s event, more than 100 second-grade choral students from Moyer, Woodfill and Johnson elementary schools will perform patriotic songs for visitors. Fort Thomas music teacher Mary Scaggs said through recent travels, she has started to have a greater appreciation for the United States and the privileges

citizens here have, which she credits to military personnel, including some that she knows personally from the community. “By having the second grade sing their Veterans Day show for the Fort Thomas community, I hope to give the students a sense of pride in themselves and their country,” Scaggs said. “It is also my way, as a music teacher, to use my talents to ‘pay forward’ my gift of music to the community and the military personnel.” Student Matthew Grimme said he is nervous about the show, but excited to perform in honor of the veterans. “We’ve been practicing a long time, and I think we’re ready,” Grimme said. For some students, like Sarah Thurnauer, whose grandfather is a veteran, the performance means even more. The event is from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 12, and Sunday, Nov. 13, in Tower Park. The students will be performing at 2 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 13.

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NEWS

A2 • FORT THOMAS RECORDER • NOVEMBER 10, 2011

Continued from Page A1

vate, quiet space that they can reserve and use,” Morgan said. To increase the life of the carpet, the renovation includes adding rubberized flooring on top of the

Index

Calendar ..........B2 Classfieds ..........C Food ...............B4 Life .................B1 Police ............. B6 Schools ...........A5 Sports .............A6 Viewpoints ......A8

CHRISTMAS CRAFT BAZAAR

carpet in high-traffic areas, similar to what they use at the other branches, Morgan said. Kiki Dreyer Burke, director of public relations, said they decided to keep the back lobby of the Fort Thomas branch open from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Friday during the renovation for basic circulation needs only. Patrons will be able to pick up books on hold, return books and pay fees at the branch, but the branch’s entire collection of books, CDs and DVDs will be closed to the public. Prell said some of the branch’s patrons, while supportive, were concerned about having to go to the other branches and were grateful when the decision was made to still offer limited circulation in Fort Thomas. Morgan said the Fort Thomas branch staff members who aren’t working the back lobby will be helping with the renovations and filling in gaps left from vacations and sick leave at the other branches.

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ALEXANDRIA — Work is scheduled to begin before the end of the year on an expansion of the Campbell County Animal Shelter, and future private donations will be earmarked to pick up some of the project’s cost. Campbell County Fiscal Court approved a total of $195,151 in construction bids at the Nov. 2 meeting in Alexandria for the planned animal shelter expansion. The animal shelter, located at Poplar Ridge Road and Four Mile Road in Camp Springs, opened in 1986. Campbell County Administrator Robert Horine said the project’s total estimated cost is $234,000. The construction will add eight new indoor dog kennels and five larger indoor/outdoor dog kennels, Horine said. Also included in the design is an extra exam

room, extra area for cats, a restroom and shower facility, he said. The construction will also free up one existing dog kennel currently blocked by a generator that will be moved to a storage area in the new building. The county will use $133,000 in state grant money and about $71,000 in private donations already given to the shelter to pay for a majority of the costs, Horine said. Judge-executive Steve Pendery said the county also went through a series of deletions and changes to the project design to get the best design and cost figures possible. Among the moves made was going with a four-inch deep concrete slab for the base of the new addition rather than a five-inch slab, Pendery said. That change saved $500, he said. The county will be shy of the total project cost anywhere between $14,000 and $25,000, said Melissa

Williams, director of administration. Williams said she budgeted an additional 5 percent of the project cost, or about $10,480 as contingency money in case any changes are needed, though it is hoped the money won’t be needed. The fiscal court has also previously approved a construction design fee of $20,900 to Century Construction, and $2,800 for geotechnical engineering service, Williams said. Additional costs for the project include about $2,000 for expanding the existing camera system in the shelter to the new area, $1,500 for inspection work, and about $1,200 for extending the smoke detector system. Donation drives are helping pay for a planned $800 tub, and $500 exam table for the animals, she said. Williams said she was going to begin organizing a work schedule immediate-

ly with the contractors and work could start before the end of the year. “I think we’re going to hope to get started now,” she said. Williams said in the past some donations have been used to pay for things including the cost of the building’s utilities, and hasn’t always gone into a the donation savings fund. “I recommend that donations in the coming years be earmarked to pay the county back for these funds,” said Commissioner Ken Rechtin at the meeting. Pendery and the other two commissioners agreed to earmark the future donations. Rechtin said people, if they want to support animals, can help finish paying for the cost. “If your heart goes out to animals, especially dogs and cats, then make a donation,” he said.

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COLD SPRING — Police captured and arrested a man suspected of tak-

ing copper wire from a Duke Energy facility early Wednesday morning after a brief foot chase, and are now searching for two additional suspects. For Cold Spring Police Department officer Jeremy Enzweiler it was his

second arrest in two months of a person in connection with reported thefts of copper from the Duke facility at 1122 Industrial Road. There have been five thefts reported at Duke’s Industrial Road facility in

FORT THOMAS

RECORDER

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News

Michelle Shaw Editor ..........................578-1053, mshaw@nky.com Chris Mayhew Reporter .......................578-1051,cmayhew@nky.com Amanda Joering Reporter ....................578-1052, ajoering@nky.com Melanie Laughman Sports Editor ............513-248-7573, mlaughman@nky.com James Weber Sports Reporter ................578-1054, weber@nky.com

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the past two years, said Chief Ed Burk. It’s thought the man arrested Wednesday morning might be one of the people who had taken items from the Duke facility in the past, Burk said. Enzweiler responded to the facility at approximately 12:15 a.m. Wednesday, Nov. 2, after a report that two suspects cut through the fence, went inside and started cutting wire, according to a news release from the department. Enzweiler arrived and arrested one of the suspects after a brief chase, according to the news release. George Eblan, 41, of 121 30th St., Covington, was arrested and charged with third degree criminal trespassing, third degree criminal mischief, theft by unlawful taking over $500, and fleeing and evading a police officer. Officers from Newport Police Department used a canine unit, and tracked the second suspect for 1.5 miles. Officers from the Campbell County Police Department, Highland Heights Southgate Police Authority, and Fort Thomas also assisted. An interrogation of Eblan revealed the identities of the other suspect who evaded capture, and the driver of a vehicle that dropped them off with plans to pick them up later, according to the news release. Police are seeking arrest warrants for the remaining two suspects. On Sept. 1, Enzweiler arrested Eric Collins, 39, of 902 3rd St., unit 3, Dayton, at the same Duke facility on Industrial Road. Collins was arrested on the same list of charges as Eblan was charged with Nov. 2. Collins confessed to taking items from the Industrial Road facility in June, Burk said. The department also had reports of two thefts from the Industrial Road facility in the fall of 2010, he said. Tthere was also a theft of copper reported from a cell phone tower in the city earlier this year, Burk said.


SPORTS & RECREATION

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VIEWPOINTS

NOVEMBER 10, 2011 • FORT THOMAS RECORDER • A11

COMMUNITY

RECORDER

Editor: Michelle Shaw, mshaw@nky.com, 578-1053

EDITORIALS | LETTERS | COLUMNS | CH@TROOM

CommunityPress.com

Thankful for public health Each day, more than 160 Northern Kentucky Health Department employees serve our communities. They inspect restaurants for food safety. They provide childhood immunizations. Lynne They investigate disease outSaddler breaks. They GUEST COLUMNIST work to make changes to combat obesity and lung cancer. They place dental sealants on childrens' teeth to prevent cav-

ities. They work behind the scenes, preparing for disasters or making sure the Health Department operates smoothly. It would take me a long time to describe all the services the health department provides to promote health, prevent diseases, death, and disability, and protect all of us from health hazards in the environment. Our staff is dedicated to this mission, even in the challenging times in which we live and work. Like many public organizations, the Health Department has experienced declining funding. At the same time, the need for the Health Depart-

Silver Grove has big year

The city hosted several events this year in celebration of Silver Grove’s100th Centennial. It has been a big year for this small town. We kicked off the year with a New Year’s Eve dance at St. Philip Parish Center. Old black and white photos of trains, the corner drug store, a 55 Chevy police cruiser and much more adorned Jill the tables. Fessler On Arbor GUEST Day we distribCOLUMNIST uted 300 tree saplings to residents, varieties included: pin oak, flowing dogwood and eastern red bud. In May, we hosted a Health Fair in the school gym. This event included a bike giveaway, information on butterfly gardening, freebies from the Heath Dept., a large bouncy for young kids and much more. During the dog days of summer, the city hosted “water games” in the city park. This was a well attended event because there was a fire truck, bubble blowers, a huge slip and slide, kiddy pools and the most loved water balloon launcher. The city’s main event was

the Founders Day parade and pig roast in the city park. Servattii’s provided a large Centennial cake beautifully decorated with our centennial logo. During the month of October – things got even better – with a live music, a chili cookoff and pumpkin walk in the woods. I was truly amazed at how it all came together. Many thanks go to the Centennial planning committee, our Mayor, public works and the city council for hosting these celebratory events. It brought together our local businesses, the fire department, members of the school staff, representatives from several churches, friends and neighbors. Our last event of the year will be the lighting of our city Christmas tree, a visit with Mr. and Mrs. Santa, hot chocolate and cookies plus a toasty bonfire. This place is not Mayberry, but a similar spirit of a small town community exists. What will it be like around here in the next 100 years? I hope the same sense of community still thrives. Perhaps a speedy bullet train will replace the coal trains passing through town. Time will tell. Jill Fessler is member of the Silver Grove city council and the city Centennial planning committee.

ment has increased, as local families also struggle with difficult economic times. The landscape of public health itself is also shifting. National health care reform aims to refine the roles that public health plays in our community. We’ll be working more closely with existing partners and building relationships with new ones as we navigate new territory in improving the health of Northern Kentuckians. Even as all these changes are occurring, we continue to move forward with our goal of becoming nationally accredited. The public health accreditation

system, launched in September, demonstrates the capacity of health departments to deliver all of the public health services essential for a healthy community. We would like to be one of the first in the nation to achieve this recognition. Monday, Nov. 21, is Public Health Thank You Day, and with Thanksgiving just around the corner, please join me in thanking our public health workers for the incredible work they do to improve our community’s health. Their commitment to service and to make a difference is an inspiration, reminding us that we are

all linked together. To all 160 public health workers at the Health Department and those across the nation—a heartfelt thank you. If you would like to share how public health has impacted you in a positive way, please visit our Web site, www.nkyhealth.org. On Nov. 21, follow @nkyhealth on Twitter for more thoughts on why public health is valuable.

Lynne Saddler, MD, MPH is the District Director of Health for the Northern Kentucky Health Department.

IN THE L.E.A.D.

Three time Olympic medalist, Margaret Hoelzer, poses for a photo with event coordinators for the Young Women Lead Conference held at Northern Kentucky University Tuesday, Oct. 18. THANKS TO KIMBERLY TANEY

Know the facts about disability What would happen if one day you could no longer work? How would you pay for fixed expenses? Would you tap into your life’s savings or rely on other family members? If you believe disability cannot happen to you, you may want to Bob Beatrice think again. In most cases GUEST COLUMNIST you are considered disabled if: » You cannot do the same work that you did before. » Your disability has lasted or is expected to last for at least one year. » Social Security Administration decides that you cannot adjust to other work because of your medical condition. “Studies show that a 20-yearold worker has a three in 10 chance of becoming disabled be-

fore reaching retirement age,” according to the Social Security Disability Planner, 2009. During your working years, you have a greater chance of becoming disabled than dying before age 65. With the advances in medical technology, people are living longer. So what would happen if you were not able to care for yourself or to provide for your loved ones due to a disability? Would you turn to savings accounts, credit cards, a second mortgage, a family member or friend, or wait without income until Social Security Disability was approved? Unless you are willing to roll the dice with your income, you may want to consider protecting your income through long-term disability insurance. Policies can be purchased on an individual basis or through an employer-sponsored plan. An individual policy tends to be more expensive, but can have a stronger

contract, providing greater protection. With an individual policy you are also the owner of the policy, paying the premiums with after tax dollars, so that in the event of a disability, the benefit is tax-free. A group disability policy sponsored by an employer can be employer-paid or voluntary, or employee-paid. Group policies are typically offered as a guarantee issue basis, meaning you do not have to medically qualify (unlike an individual policy). In addition, group disability policies are often not as strong, but are frequently the least expensive route to purchase disability policies. If the employer is paying for the premium of the long-term disability policy, the benefit is taxed. Bob Beatrice is a benefits consultant in Fort Mitchell.

Put ideology aside, get things done When I first served in Congress, in the 1960s and 1970s, I would often sit on the floor of the House and listen carefully to members from both sides. I was trying to figure out the differences between the liberLee als and the conHamilton servatives, and to COLUMNIST perceive how those differences could be narrowed or bridged. They broke over how to answer the overriding question of

American government – the proper role of government – with liberals seeing an expansive role and conservatives a limited one. At the time, there was plenty of gray area where the two could find common ground. In recent years, the attitudes of liberals and conservatives toward government’s role have become more complex. In general, conservatives want just a small role when it comes to taxes, the economy, and social welfare. But they are more supportive of an expansive national-security apparatus and an active government role in regulating

FORT THOMAS

RECORDER

A publication of

such social issues as abortion and gay marriage. They generally like Edmund Burke’s definition of a statesman as a person with “a disposition to preserve and an ability to improve.” Liberals generally accept the flip side: They’d prefer a person with the disposition to improve and an ability to preserve. They are more open to an expansive role for government on social welfare policy, job creation, and the economy, but generally want the government to give Americans a free hand on such issues as abortion and gay marriage. The result of this tension is our mixed economy – neither en-

tirely free-market nor owned and controlled by the state – and our pendulum-swing politics. My experience is that apart from the ideologically committed, most Americans don’t worry a lot about whether a given policy is “liberal” or “conservative.” They worry about whether or not it works. Yet these ideological battles are engrained in the dialogue of our democracy. The argument between a smaller and a greater role for government has been with us since the very beginning of our nation; in some ways it defines our political history. Our challenge today, as it has

228 Grandview Drive, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017 654 Highland Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075 phone: 283-0404 email: kynews@communitypress.com web site: www.nky.com

always been, is to balance the passions of those who find themselves firmly on one side or the other against the common sense of the great mass of Americans, who are most concerned about making progress on the problems that beset them. As the common phrase has it, they want not big government or small government, but smart government. They want our political leaders to set ideological purity aside, and just get things done. Lee Hamilton is director of the Center on Congress at Indiana University. He was a member of the U.S. House of Representatives for 34 years.

Fort Thomas Recorder Editor Michelle Shaw mshaw@nky.com, 578-1053 Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday See page A2 for additional contact information.


NEWS

A12 • CCF RECORDER • NOVEMBER 10, 2011

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$ ,

36 MO. LEASE* $2799 DUE AT SIGNING

Camry LE ..................................... $12,989 Corolla LE..................................... $13,877 Corolla LE..................................... $13,988 Yaris Base .................................... $14,134 Camry LE ..................................... $14,345 Corolla LE..................................... $14,564 Corolla LE..................................... $14,877 Yaris Base .................................... $14,877 Corolla LE..................................... $15,877 Corolla LE..................................... $16,888 Matrix Base ................................. $17,342 Camry LE ..................................... $17,491 Tacoma Base................................ $18,995 Prius III ........................................ $22,576 Tacoma PreRunner....................... $23,456 Sienna LE 7-Passenger................ $23,567 Sienna LE 7-Passenger................ $24,988 Tundra SR5 .................................. $28,250 Tacoma Base................................ $29,987 Avalon Touring ............................. $30,988 Highlander................................... $32,487 Highlander Limited ...................... $34,546

29MPG EPA HWY

1000

$

PER MO. OR

MODEL 3544

36 MO. LEASE* $3799 DUE AT SIGNING

NEW 2012 TOYOTA

CERTIFIED USED

Toyota Toyota Toyota Toyota Toyota Toyota Toyota Toyota Toyota Toyota Toyota Toyota Toyota Toyota Toyota Toyota Toyota Toyota Toyota Toyota Toyota Toyota

20 AVAILABLE!

35 MPG

PRIUS

7 YEAR • 100,000 MILE LIMITED POWERTRAIN WARRANTY 2007 2009 2009 2010 2009 2009 2010 2009 2010 2011 2010 2011 2005 2010 2009 2009 2010 2008 2011 2010 2011 2011

• 10 AIR BAGS, BLIND SPOT MONITORING AVAILABLE

36 MO. LEASE* E E** $2799 DUE AT SIGNING

NEW 2011 TOYOTA

$

CAMRY LE

NEW 2011 TOYOTA

$

MONTHS

ON NEW 2012 SIENNA & HIGHLANDER

(EXCLUDES CAMRY HYBRID)

NEW 2011 TOYOTA

FOR

APR FINANCING

FACTORYY ER CUSTOMER CASH

ON NEW TUNDRA CREWMAXX

2008 2006 2008 2007 2010 2004 2007 2010 2010 2008 2010 2007 2010 2008 2009 2006 2008 2010 2008 2010 2009 2011 2011 2011 2009 2009

PRE-OWNED

Ford Focus .............................................. $10,487 Nissan Altima 2.5S.................................. $10,488 Hyundai Sonata GLS................................ $10,787 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 Classic LS ...... $10,987 Hyundai Sonata GLS................................ $13,588 BWM X3 30i ............................................ $13,988 Pontiac Torrent ....................................... $14,346 Ford Fusion SE ........................................ $14,898 Nissan Sentra 2.0SL ............................... $14,987 Ford Focus SES....................................... $14,988 Ford Focus SE ......................................... $15,987 Honda Accord EX .................................... $15,988 Hyundai Elantra Touring.......................... $16,688 Ford Fusion SE ........................................ $16,877 Ford Focus SES....................................... $16,892 Ford F150................................................ $16,988 Mazda 3 LX ............................................. $17,237 Dodge Charger SXT................................. $17,488 Acura TL .................................................. $18,456 Nissan Altima 2.5S.................................. $18,497 Volkswagen Jetta SE .............................. $18,976 Hyundai Sonata GLS................................ $18,994 Chrysler 200 Touring............................... $19,495 Hyundai Sonata GLS................................ $19,705 Chrysler Town & Country Touring............ $20,576 Pontiac G8 .............................................. $23,499

Plus tax title and registration. Price excludes $249 doc fee. $500 bonus/subvenention cash thru Toyota Financial Services Only. No security deposit with approved credit thru TFS. All factory rebates applied. $350 disposition fee at lease termination. 12,000 miles per year, .15 per mile over limit. 0% APR, no down payment, on approved credit see dealer for details. 2 year prepaidToyota Care is provided byToyota Financial,Covers normal factory scheduled service. Plan is 2 years or 25K miles, whichever comes first. . 0% APR, Avalon 36 mos. $27.78, Corolla, Rav4, Venza, Camry & Tundra 60 mos, $16.67 PER 1000 borrowed. No Down Payment with Approved Credit. See dealer for warranty and Toyota Care details. See dealer for complete Certified Pre-Owned Warranty. Offer good 11/10 - 11/16/11.


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