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FORT THOMAS

RECORDER

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Fort Thomas

THURSDAY, AUGUST 22, 2013

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Football starts this weekend

BECAUSE COMMUNITY MATTERS

Highlands grad producing cabaret Performances were at Fort Thomas Coffee By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

Posing at the end of the Cincinnati Association for the Blind & Visually Impaired Know You Can 5K in Spring Grove Cemetery and Arboretum are, from left, CABVI Executive Director John Mitchell, Fort Thomas resident Charlotte Reed and CABVI board member and Fort Thomas resident Norma Rashid. THANKS TO ALLISON SCHRODER

Jogging along Woman runs to support blind, visually impaired By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

Fort Thomas — Charlotte Reed jogs or “race walks” quickly to stay in shape because she can despite a visual impairment. The Fort Thomas resident said she jogged in the Cincinnati Association for the Blind & Visually Impaired Aug. 11 Know You Can 5K because she supports the organizations’ goal to help people live inde-

pendent lives. “I know I can,” Reed said. “It’s educating the public that I can.” Reed was participating in the 14th annual 5K for CABVI, a not-for-profit, for the third time. She was one of 420 people running or jogging at Spring Grove Cemetery and Arboretum. Reed said she has some vision, but has Charles Bonnet Syndrome in addition to a different degenerative eye disease.

“Because of the Charles Bonnet it looks like I’m looking through a staticy TV screen as well as having no central vision,” she said. Participating in other 5K runs and walks is something Reed said she enjoys, and usually staying on course isn’t much of an issue as long as she can see other joggers. At Spring Grove Cemetery there were a couple of forks in the road

FORT THOMAS — For a night, Max Colvill brought his own version of a New York City cabaret night back to his hometown. Colvill, 18, and 15 other drama students in either college or high school, sang 22 different Broadway songs live at Fort Thomas Coffee Aug. 7. Colvill is preparing to begin theater classes at Columbia College in Chicago after spending his freshman year studying without a major at Pace University in New York City. A 2012 graduate of Highlands High School, Colvill said he wanted to bring to Fot Thoman experiences he had in New York. “There’s a lot of stuff that happens in New York around cabarets,” he said. “There’s always shows at popular cabaret places like Joe’s Pub and like 54 Below and all these places around New York.” The singers for the Aug. 7 Fort Thomas cabaret included fellow drama students from Northern Kentucky University, Highlands High School, Walton-Verona High School and Anderson High School, he said.

See JOGGING, Page A2

Highland Heights child a backyard archaeologist 7-year-old been finding artifacts for a year By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

HIGHLAND HEIGHTS — The empty

antique bottles 7-year-old Marissa Watson is finding in the woods around her home has her family full of questions

about their origins. Since Watson started finding old bottles and other small decorative metal artifacts a year ago, she has amassed a collection of more than 30 pieces. Watson said the bottles and other objects including an old metal brooch pin all seemed “really old.” The idea to keep them was initially so See BACKYARD, Page A2

FREEDOM

RITA’S KITCHEN

Family moves here from Romania See story, A8

Preserve summer taste by roasting tomatoes See story, B5

Marissa Watson, 7, holds a bottle of Sloan’s Liniment horse oil in her left hand. On the ground to Watson’s left are other old bottles she found in the woods near her CHRIS MAYHEW/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Contact us

News .........................283-0404 Retail advertising .......513-768-8404 Classified advertising ........283-7290 Delivery .......................781-4421

See CABARET, Page A2

COLLECTION TIME Community Recorder

In the next few days, your Fort Thomas Recorder carrier will be stopping by to collect $3.50 for delivery of this month’s Recorder. Your carrier retains a portion of this amount along with any tip you give to reward good service. This month we are featuring Ben Stratton, who is in the eighth grade. Stratton In his free time, he enjoys riding his bike and hanging out with friends. For information about our carrier program, call Cathy Kellerman, district manager, at 859-442-3461.

Vol. 14 No. 11 © 2013 The Community Recorder ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

See page A2 for additional information

ORTHOPAEDIC CENTERS

CommonwealthOrthoCenters.com

(859) 301-BONE (2663) CE-0000548405

Welcomes Adam V. Metzler, M.D. ! Accepting patients for General Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine ! Seeing patients at our Edgewood and Florence locations


NEWS

A2 • FORT THOMAS RECORDER • AUGUST 22, 2013

Backyard Continued from Page A1

she could show them off to family members and find out what they were, she said. “I thought they could bring back some memo-

ries for my grandma,” Watson said. Some of the bottles Watson has found are embossed with names of products and places. A bottle of Sloan’s Liniment is in Watson’s collection. Dr. Earl Sloan, a native of Zanesfield, Ohio, who died in 1923, mass

FORT THOMAS RECORDER

Find news and information from your community on the Web Forth Thomas • nky.com/fortthomas Campbell County • nky.com/campbellcounty

News

Marc Emral Editor ..............................578-1053, memral@communitypress.com Chris Mayhew Reporter .......................578-1051,cmayhew@nky.com Amy Scalf Reporter ............................578-1055, ascalf@nky.com Melanie Laughman Sports Editor ............513-248-7573, mlaughman@nky.com James Weber Sports Reporter ................578-1054, jweber@nky.com

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For customer service .........................781-4421 Sharon Schachleiter Circulation Manager ..442-3464, sschachleiter@nky.com Cathy Kellerman District Manager ...........442-3461, ckellerman@nky.com

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To place a Classified ad ......................283-7290, www.communityclassified.com

To place an ad in Community Classified, call 283-7290.

produced and sold the popular horse oil liniment in the late 19th and early 20th Century, according to the Ohio Memory Collection and Ohio Historical Society. Another of Watson’s bottles with markings includes a clear bottle with “Wm Rippey” and “Cincinnati.” A 1910 edition of The Druggists Circular listed William Rippey of Cincinnati as a seller of lemon flavored compounds. Watson’s mother, Janelle Watson, said the family has gone into the woods regularly, about 100 times, on “bottle scavenger hunts.” “She is the spotter,” Janelle said of her daughter. Why all the bottles and old objects are near their house is a mystery, she said. Janelle said she wants to find out more about the history of the property where they live and possibly find out why the bottles, she said. Some of the nicer bottles are kept on a kitchen windowsill, Janelle said. “They’re very special because we found them together,” she said.

Index

2013 Highlands Football Kickoff Tailgate Event

Saturday, August 24th

1:00 - 2:30

Fort Thomas Central Parking Lot

Free Eats, Sips & Dips Music 10% Bluebird Special

Live Podcast with

Fort Thomas Matters

Calendar ................A6 Classifieds ................C Deaths ...................B6 Food ......................B5 Police .................... B6 Schools ..................A4 Sports ....................B1 Viewpoints ............A11

Open MON – FRI 10 am - 6 pm SAT 10 am - 5 pm 3 N Fort Thomas Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075 CE-0000560255

859-609-6427

THE ART OF SAVING LIVES

Jogging Continued from Page A1

where Reed said she couldn’t always see the cones. She wasn’t sure of what direction to go. “Luckily at one point there was a jogger coming up behind me and he said ‘Hey, you’re going in the wrong direction’,” she said. “So I was able to shift and go the right direction.” Reed said she walks regularly. “You just stick on your sneakers and head out the door,” she said. “So, I really enjoy that.” Reed is also a Zumba instructor at her church. Her ultimate 5K goal is to “race walk” solo in the Cincinnati Flying Pig half marathon next spring. “My husband says he doesn’t want me to run because he is afraid I’m going to hurt myself, but I tell him I almost go as fast as most joggers,” she said. Reed said she volunteers for CABVI to give back, but has also used the services for low vision help including having them train her how to

opportunity to show the kids I’m standing here, I’m an artist and I do 5Ks and the gets really excited and they ask all kinds of crazy questions,” Reed said. It’s fun to watch the children go oh, she said, and make a connection people with disabilities or challenges can do many of the same things they do. “They may just do them in a different way,” Reed said. Reed said unless she is using a cane in a crowded space, which she sometimes does, people don’t usually realize she is visually impaired “I’ll have people who think I’m snobby because I don’t look them in the eye,” she said. Kathy Gottschlich, director of development and community relations for CABVI, said the organization works with people to overcome barriers and being told they can’t do certain things. CABVI’s services include helping people with access technology services, early childhood and youth services, support groups and a range of social services.

Cabaret Continued from Page A1

Colvill said he was performing a duet from the musical “Dogfight” and a duet from the musical “Spring Awakening” and the song “Who I’d Be” from “Shreck the Musical.” Holly Moss, 17, of Taylor Mill, a senior at Dixie Heights High School in Edgewood, was among a group of friends to snag an empty table before a standing room only crowd lined the coffee shop’s walls. Moss said it was her final chance to see her friend Aaron Schilling of Fort Wright perform a song before he leaves for college. Moss said Schilling was performing “Proud of you boy” from “Aladdin” with Sean Fanning, another friend. They are all participants in the Commonwealth

This is a free-flowing artery thanks to tPA. It may look like modern art, but it’s a lifesaver. tPA is a drug that breaks up blood clots, keeps arteries flowing and helps limit the damaging effects of a stroke. Today, thousands of neurologists all over the world use tPA, but the discovery happened right here in Cincinnati at the University of Cincinnati Medical Center’s Comprehensive Stroke Center. We continue to pioneer breakthroughs in science so we can perfect the art of saving lives. To learn more, visit uchealth.com/stroke or call (866) 941-8264.

CE-0000561488

use her iPhone initially. “I have also recently learned Braille here because I’ve gotten to that point where I felt like I need that,” she said. Reed said she believes in CABVI’s mission to help people live independently. She has had to work to overcome other people’s perceptions about what blind and visually impaired people can and cannot do. Moving at age 19 from Stockton, Calif., Reed said she first came to the area as student at Northern Kentucky University. “I got my bachelor’s of fine arts from NKU and became a professional artist and teacher despite being told that visually impaired people could be artists,” she said. “I said ‘I’ll show you,’ and I did.” Reed has taught privately and in the summer enrichment program at Fort Thomas Independent Schools, and has worked at Baker Hunt Art & Cultural Center in Covington. She also volunteers with the Everyone Counts programs in schools speaking with elementary students. “I’ve really enjoyed doing that because it’s an

CE-0000564550

Max Colvill, 18, of Fort Thomas, starts a round of applause Aug. 7 as he introduces the first of 16 local high school and college student singers during a cabaret night he organized at Fort Thomas Coffee.CHRIS MAYHEW/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Artists Summer Theatre in Fort Thomas. Olivia Ulmer, 16, of Fort Thomas, came to the cabaret night with friends to see a friend. “I’m really exited to see Hannah Laskey and Carly Weaver,” Ulmer said. “They’re doing ‘Take Me or Leave Me from Rent.’ They’re going to be really great.” Rachel Zimmerman,

14, of Fort Thomas, sang the first song at the cabaret night – “The Wizard and I” from “Wicked.” Fort Thomas Coffee is celebrating its one year anniversary in August, and has hosted art openings, musicians and performances by former residents, said David Valentine, who owns the shop with his wife Lori.


NEWS

AUGUST 22, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • A3

Vets set up restaurant ‘Taste’ festival

Head and Neck Surgery Associates, PSC

By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

BELLEVUE — Veterans programs and youth sports will benefit from a Labor Day weekend outdoor festival offering a taste of what some Campbell County businesses have to offer, with a side of entertainment. The Bellevue Vets will host its first Taste of Campbell County on the group’s parking lot Aug. 30-Sept. 1, with food booths from at least seven restaurants and live entertainment. Local craft vendors will set up booths on Saturday and Sunday. There will also be casino games inside the Vets hall, including blackjack. The primary beneficiary of the taste will be the Bellevue Vets Youth League, said Dennis Buschle, chairman of the Vets entertainment committee. The Vets have a ballfield behind the club where youth teams play home games. The idea for the taste fundraiser started with the goal of it being an event for Northern Kentucky restaurants, but it was scaled back to Campbell County, Buschle said. The idea is to make it an annual event and spread booths out across the Vets property – and not just the parking lot, she said. “Hopefully as it gets bigger and bigger we’ll have to use the whole field,” Buschle said.

Welcome Our Newest Physician Jim Fisher, owner of the new Elusive Cow Cafe in Bellevue, shows a sampling of his menu items including chicken and Italian sausage flatbread, portabella burger and hand-cut french fries in November 2012.FILE PHOTO

IF YOU GO: The Bellevue Vets, 24 Fairfield Ave., have organized the group’s first ever Taste of Campbell County. There is no admission fee, and restaurants will be selling food samples at prices of $4 or less per serving. Times: » 6-10 p.m. Friday, Aug. 30 » 2-10 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 31 » 2-8 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 1

There is no admission to the taste, but each restaurant booth will be selling their own specialties. “Each booth can have one specialty item for $4, and then everything else has to be $3 and under,” she said. The restaurants serving food at the Taste include:

» Pasquale’s Pizza of Bellevue, » The Elusive Cow Cafe of Bellevue, » Marco’s Pizza Store of Bellevue, » Beef ‘O’ Brady’s of Newport, » Mr. Herb’s Restaurant of Alexandria, » Candy and Cones of Alexandria, and » Mokka of Newport. The schedule of music and entertainment will be: » Friday, Aug. 30: DJ Joe Barns from 5-8 p.m.; and Rapid Fire from 8-10 p.m. » Saturday, Aug. 31: Fort Thomas based Tallulah’s Belly Dance Studio will perform from 3-4 p.m.; DJ Ray from 4-8 p.m.; and Kyle Ryan will perform an Elvis tribute from 8-10 p.m. » Tallulah’s Belly Dance Studio wil perform from 3-4 p.m.; and Johnny and the Lug Nuts will perform from 6-8 p.m.

Dr. Kaden, a native of Germany and resident of Northern Kentucky, received his Doctor of Medicine degree at the University of Texas Medical School at Houston in 2008. His internship and residency training in Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery was recently concluded with The University School of Medicine in Indianapolis, Indiana. Dr. Kaden is accepting patients in our Ft. Thomas, Edgewood and Grant County offices in Northern Kentucky.

Andreas Kaden, MD

All our physicians are accepting referrals and new patients. Our board certified surgeons provide excellent care to children and adults for: Ear, Nose & Throat (Otolaryngology) Allergy Audiology (audio, BSER, ENG) CT Imaging Outpatient Surgery in our state-of-the-art, 2 OR, AAAHC accredited, Medicaid/Medicare certified facility: Center for Surgical Care

Steven Woodruff, MD

W. Mark Gutowski, MD

Todd M. Kirchhoff, MD

Steven P. Magary, MD

Bryan J. Krol, MD

Michael A. Domet, MD

James J. Kempiners, MD

Theodore H. Miller, MD

Michelle A. Veazey, MD

859.781.4900

Fort Thomas, Edgewood, Florence Kentucky And Lawrenceburg, Indiana www.nkyent.com

CE-0000565806

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SCHOOLS

A4 • CCF RECORDER • AUGUST 22, 2013

COMMUNITY

RECORDER

Editor: Marc Emral, memral@communitypress.com, 578-1053

ACHIEVEMENTS | NEWS | ACTIVITIES | HONORS

CommunityPress.com

Parents complete leadership training Community Recorder

Campbell County parent, Michelle Prodoehl from Crossroads Elementary School and Newport Independent parents, Bernie and Gena Combs from Newport Middle School and Wauneda Vaughn from Newport Primary School, were four of 28 parents from Northern

Kentucky who graduated from the Commonwealth Institute for Parent Leadership. An initiative of the Prichard Committee for Academic Excellence, the nationally recognized 16-year program helps parents become more effective advocates for their children’s education. The parents participated in

three two-day training sessions designed to increase their understanding of school performance and how to improve it. The parents will be responsible for conducting a follow-up project designed to accelerate the academic achievement of students at their children’s school and to involve more parents in the effort.

The institute has prepared the parents to work toward higher achievement for all public school students by creating a new level of parent engagement. Since it was established in 1997, the institute has trained more than 1,690 Kentucky parents as education advocates. Starting this year, the insti-

tute’s name will change to the Governor’s Commonwealth Institute for Parent Leadership. For more information about the Governor’s Commonwealth Institute for Parent Leadership and how to register for the next institute, call 859-233-9849, ext. 231.

Toolkit pushes business education Community Recorder

A few of the seventh-grade boys from St. Joseph School, Cold Spring, pose for a photograph before their music performance, Rocking Through the Ages. THANKS TO ST. JOSEPH PUBLICITY COMMITTEE

ROCKING THROUGH THE AGES Seventh-grade students from St. Joseph School, Cold Spring, prepared for their music performance Rocking Through the Ages. They sang and danced to songs from many decades to the delight of their audience.

A few of the seventh-grade girls from St. Joseph School, Cold Spring, pose for a photograph before their music performance, Rocking Through the Ages. THANKS TO ST. JOSEPH PUBLICITY COMMITTEE

Standen named dean at Chase Community Recorder

Northern Kentucky University announced that Jeffrey A. Standen has been named dean of the Chase College of Law, effective July 1. Standen currently is Van Winkle Melton Professor of Law and associate dean for faculty at Willamette University College of Law in Salem, Ore. He has been at Willamette since 1990, rising through the ranks from assistant to associate to full professor. He also spent one year, as visiting professor and scholar-in-residence at the Uni-

versity of Virginia School of Law and another as visiting professor of law at the University of San Diego. “I am honored to be selected by NKU to lead the Chase College of Law, and I very much look forward to working with the faculty, administration and alumni to ensure that our students receive a world-class, practice-ready education that prepares them for every success,” Standen said. As associate dean for faculty, Standen’s primary responsibilities have included faculty development, program develop-

ment, academic standards and curriculum. He supervised the transition to electronic evaluations, created an LL.M. program, revised the college’s research grant program, instituted a faculty newsletter, contributed to the development of a part-time evening program, oversaw the summer school program, revamped the bar education program and provided oversight for curricular matters and faculty work. He will replace Dennis Honabach, who announced last fall that he would be stepping down after seven years as dean.

Is your business engaged in education? As a business you can support the education pipeline and be a key partner for student success. Simply put, successful students equal a quality future workforce. Not sure how to get involved? Now there is a new business engagement toolkit that employers can use to help them focus their efforts. “Our company has been committed to education for a number of years, but now we have a new toolkit that provides us with concrete information about programs that have measurable results and demonstrated impact in our schools,” said Jean Loftus of Loftus Plastic Surgery. “We want our commitment of time and resources to make a real difference, and having this toolkit makes it possible to do so.” This year, the Northern Kentucky Education Council’s volunteer Action Team that focuses on business engagement developed the toolkit which outlines ways in which a business can help impact student achievement. The toolkit provides concise program overviews, success stories, and ways to get involved. By using the toolkit, businesses can easily match their available resources and areas of interest with specific programs and initiatives. Graphic design for the toolkit was made possible by establishing a unique collaboration with Thomas More College’s Art Department. Assistant Professor Rebecca Ruehl Amann and her students donated both time and talent to the project for the graphic design. The Action Team, comprised of business, education and community leaders, is currently developing a strategic distribution plan to get the toolkit into “the hands” of business leaders. In partnership with the Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce, the team is identifying local companies that may be interested in connecting with neighboring schools and engaging in tool-

kit programs. Melanie Frey, regional business manager for Turner Construction and cochair of the Action Team, said, “The involvement of local businesses in high impact education initiatives is critical to the economic prosperity of our region. Our business community requires a prepared workforce which requires a community-wide investment and the support and engagement of local businesses in education. This toolkit shows employers how to do that effectively.” For instance, a Junior Achievement section helps corporate and community volunteers promote workforce readiness through easy-to-implement programs. Business Education Success Teams can partner with local schools to support student needs and develop activities that impact student achievement. Through One-to-One Reading, business and community volunteers can help struggling readers in first through third grade. Under service learning, organizations can help students develop critical problem solving skills, energize employees and learn the benefits of meaningful civic engagement. “We are focused on helping each one of our students reach their full potential and our business partners play an essential role in the education of our youth,” said Dr. Terri Cox-Cruey, superintendent of Kenton County Schools and member of Action Team 5. “With their support, our students will reach their college and career goals.” The toolkit was made possible through a grant to Action Team 5 from Vision 2015. For more information, visit www.nkyec.org or to receive a copy of the Business Engagement Toolkit, email the Northern Kentucky Education Council at ncostello@nkyec.org.

CE-0000565226

We are celebrating our 25 th Year of excellence in education.

We are accepting open registration at this time for our 3’s, 4’s and Pre-K classes. We offer unique, rotating classrooms.

Please contact our Director, Debbie Bechtol at 859-496-6867 for more information.


NEWS

AUGUST 22, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • A5

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A6 • CCF RECORDER • AUGUST 22, 2013

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD FRIDAY, AUG. 23

County. 859-586-9207; www.teapartyboonecounty.org. Florence.

Art & Craft Classes Wine and Canvas, 6:30-9:30 p.m., Newport Syndicate, 18 E. Fifth St., Painting class with cocktails. No experience necessary. $35. Reservations required. Presented by Wine and Canvas. 513-317-1305; www.wineandcanvas.com. Newport.

Exhibits Northern Kentucky Music Legends, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, Included with admission. 859491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

Cruises

Karaoke and Open Mic

Pirates of the Ohio Cruise, 3-4:30 p.m., BB Riverboats Newport Landing, 101 Riverboat Row, Afternoon cruise with games for entire family. Children receive free pirate hat, eye patch and treasure map. $16. Reservations required. Presented by BB Riverboats. 859-2618500; www.bbriverboats.com. Newport.

Open Mic, 9 p.m.-2 a.m., The Southgate House Revival, 111 E. Sixth St., The Lounge. Awardwinning open mic features singer-songwriters, comedians, marimba players, storytellers and more. Ages 21 and up. 859-431-2201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport.

Dining Events Newport Elks Fish Fry, 4:307:30 p.m., Newport Elks Lodge, 3704 Alexandria Pike, Dinner includes fish, slaw and choice of fries, onion rings or macaroni and cheese. Beer, wine and soda for dining room. Carryout available. Benefits Newport Elks Lodge 273. $8.50 dinner, $6 sandwich. 859-441-1273. Cold Spring.

Drink Tastings Friday Night in the Aisles Wine Tasting, 4-8 p.m., Party Source, 95 Riviera Drive, Flight of four wines, free of charge. Ages 21 and up. 859-291-4007; www.thepartysource.com. Bellevue. Culture and Cocktails, 7-10 p.m. Music by the Bluegrass Mafia., Newport on the Levee, 1 Levee Way, Sampling of unique cocktails, music, dance and more. Free. 859-815-1389; www.newportonthelevee.com. Newport.

Exhibits Northern Kentucky Music Legends, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, 1600 Montague Road, Highlights performers, bands, DJs, composers, lyricists and other musical artists from Northern Kentucky who have spent 20-plus years sharing love of music with the public. Included with admission. 859-491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

The Village Vintage & Arts Bazaar, formerly 4th Sunday MainStrasse Antiques Etc., will take place 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 25. Vendors selling art, antique, vintage and re-purposed items such as furniture, home goods and decor, jewelry and clothing will line the 6th Street promenade in MainStrasse Village in Covington. PROVIDED Luke Muller Golf Tournament Afterparty, 6 p.m.-midnight, Covington Turners, 447 Pike St., Food provided by Kroger along with McHale’s Catering and raffles. Music by Dave May. Benefits Arlyn Shields and Elizabeth Smith. Free. Presented by Fort Thomas Provides. 859491-5015. Covington. Rathkamp Matchcover Society Convention, 9:30 a.m.-8 p.m., Holiday Inn Cincinnati Airport, $10. Registration required. 859-525-0588; www.matchcover.org. Erlanger.

Music - Concerts

Music - Benefits

Joe Nichols and Diamond Rio, 4 p.m. With Ryan Broshear and the Sleepin’ Dogs, Alexandria Fairgrounds, 100 Fairgrounds Lane, Country music artists. VIP filed seat tickets include access to VIP food tent. Annual Alexandria Fair Kickoff. All ages. $35$75. 859-635-2667; www.rwatickets.com. Alexandria.

Summer’s End Music Blast, 6-11 p.m., Turfway Park, 7500 Turfway Road, The Paddock. With five local bands: Walsh Band, Cincinnati Rag Pickers, Sami & the Ugly Truth, White Liger and A Little Bit Dixie. Carnival games, auctions and raffles. Benefits Piner Elementary School. $5. Presented by Piner Elementary School. 859356-2155. Florence.

Ben Walz Band, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., JerZee’s Pub and Grub, 708 Monmouth St., Free. 859-4913500; www.jerzeespub.com. Newport.

On Stage - Comedy Damon Wayans, 8 p.m.; 10:30 p.m., Funny Bone Comedy Club, Newport on the Levee, Actor, writer, producer and comedian. $40. 859-957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

On Stage - Theater Chicago, 7:30 p.m., The Carnegie, 1028 Scott Blvd., Based on play by Maurine Dallas Watkins. The sexy, salacious jazz age sizzles in 1920s Chicago, where small-time show girl Roxy Hart becomes the toast of the town after murdering her lover in cold blood. $19-$26. Through Aug. 25. 859-957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

Sports Florence Freedom Baseball, 6:35 p.m. vs. Southern Illinois Miners. Local 12 Fireworks Friday presented by CBTS., University of Cincinnati Medical Center Stadium, 7950 Freedom Way, $14 VIP, $12 dugout, $10 reserved. Presented by Florence Freedom Professional Baseball. 859-594-4487; www.florencefreedom.com. Florence.

Music - Concerts Adam Ant and the Good, the Mad and the Lovely Posse Tour, 9 p.m. Doors open 8 p.m., Madison Theater, 730 Madison Ave., Stuart Leslie Goddard an English musician and singer. $27. 859-491-2444; www.madisontheateronline.com. Covington.

Music - Rock Spin Cycle, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., JerZee’s Pub and Grub, 708 Monmouth St., Free. 859-491-3500. Newport.

On Stage - Comedy Damon Wayans, 7:30 p.m.; 10 p.m., Funny Bone Comedy Club, $40. 859-957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

On Stage - Theater Chicago, 7:30 p.m., The Carnegie, $19-$26. 859-957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

Recreation

SATURDAY, AUG. 24

Luke Muller Golf Outing, noon-6 p.m., Kenton County Golf Course, 3908 Richardson Road, Registration begins 10 a.m. Shotgun start at noon. Lunch provided. Benefits Arlyn Shields and Elizabeth Smith. $100 includes raffle tickets, $75. Reservations required. Presented by Fort Thomas Provides. 859-371-3200; lmgo.org. Independence.

Benefits

Sports

Art & Craft Classes Wine and Canvas, 6:30-9:30 p.m., Naked Tchopstix, Newport on the Levee, Painting class with cocktails. No experience necessary. $35. Reservations required. Presented by Wine and Canvas. 513-317-1305; www.wineandcanvas.com. Newport.

Exhibits

Exhibits

Farmers Market

TUESDAY, AUG. 27

New Perceptions Dinner, 6-9 p.m., Receptions Banquet and Conference Center Erlanger, 1379 Donaldson Road, Dinner honors clients and employees. Benefits New Perceptions. $30. Reservations required. Presented by New Perceptions. 859-3449322, ext. 32; www.newperceptions.org. Erlanger.

Sushi Rolling and Dining, 7 p.m., Sushi Cincinnati, 130 W. Pike St., Includes training, choice of at least three sushi rolls, BYOB and recipe/product information. $25. Reservations required. 513-335-0297; www.sushicinti.com. Covington. Northern Kentucky Music Legends, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, Included with admission. 859491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

Bluegrass Jam Session, 8 p.m., Molly Malone’s Irish Pub and Restaurant, 112 E. Fourth St., All bluegrass pickers invited to participate. Free. 859-491-6659; mollymalonesirishpub.com. Covington.

Benefits

Cooking Classes

American Rail Council, 9 p.m. The Waywards, The Southgate House Revival, 111 E. Sixth St., $8 ages 18-20; $5 ages 21 and up. 859-431-2201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport.

Music - Rock

To submit calendar items, go to www.NKY.com and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to life@communitypress.com along with event information. Items are printed on a space-available basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to www.NKY.com and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page.

Clubs & Organizations

Newport Farmers’ Market, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., Historic Newport Business District, Monmouth Street, Held at 709 Monmouth St. in city parking lot adjacent to Pepper Pod Restaurant. Homegrown fruits, vegetables and annual and perennial flowers. Presented by City of Newport. 859-292-3666. Newport.

Music - Blues

ABOUT CALENDAR

Music - Bluegrass

Children will get a pirate hat, eye patch and treasure map on the 1.5-hour Pirates of the Ohio Cruise presented by BB Riverboats. You can take the cruise on 3-4:30 p.m. Friday, Aug. 23. 859-261-8500. PROVIDED Florence Freedom Baseball, 6:05 p.m. vs. Southern Illinois Miners. 92.5 The Fox Rockin’ Saturday presented by Joseph Subaru. Music by Doghouse, University of Cincinnati Medical Center Stadium, $14 VIP, $12 dugout, $10 reserved. 859-5944487; www.florencefreedom.com. Florence.

Tours Ultimate Gangster Tour, 2 p.m., Gangsters Dueling Piano Bar, 18 E. Fifth St., More in-depth tour expands on Newport’s history. Includes visiting three additional locations not on regular tour. $30. Presented by American Legacy Tours. 859-491-8000; www.americanlegacytours.com. Newport. HomeFest, 11 a.m.-9 p.m., Triple Crown Country Club, $10, $8 advance at Kroger stores. 859331-9500; www.hbanky.com. Union.

a.m., Miller’s Fill Inn, 52 Donnermeyer Drive, Free. 859-431-3455; www.facebook.com/millers.fillin. Bellevue.

Music - Religious Shannon Bunch, 6 p.m., Highland Avenue Baptist Tabernacle, 1080 Highland Ave., One of today’s most loved soloists and pianists in gospel music. Free. 859-781-4510. Fort Thomas.

Music - Student Performances Future Music Legends Take the Stage, 2 p.m. CANCELED, Behringer-Crawford Museum, 1600 Montague Road, Youth performance. $5, $3 ages 3-17, free for members. 859-491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

On Stage - Theater

The Village Vintage and Arts Bazaar, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., MainStrasse Village, Main Street, Antiques and collectibles available for sale along MainStrasse’s Promenade. Free admission. Presented by MainStrasse Village Association. 859-468-4820; www.mainstrasse.org. Covington.

Nothing by Nic Balthazar, 2-3 p.m.; 7-8 p.m., Monmouth Theatre, 636 Monmouth St., Multi-media production inspired by true events featuring Ben, a wordsmith/tech enthusiast with autism. Using poetry, music and video, Ben shares his story of meeting “Barbie” in a divine online connection, standing up to his high school bullies and finding ways to fit into a normal world. $15. Presented by Unity Productions. 859-655-9140; unityproductionsohio.weebly.com. Newport.

Dining Events

Sports

Country Breakfast, 8 a.m.-1 p.m., Fort Thomas Masonic Lodge No. 808, 37 N. Fort Thomas Ave, All-you-can-eat. Eggs, bacon, sausage, goetta, biscuits and gravy, grits, pancakes, waffles, potatoes, toast and more. $7, $4 children. Presented by Fort Thomas Masonic Lodge No 808. 859-694-3027. Fort Thomas.

Florence Freedom Baseball, 6:05 p.m. vs. Southern Illinois Miners. Great Country 94.1 Family Fun Sundays presented by The Bank of Kentucky. “Red Rifle” bobblehead giveaway., University of Cincinnati Medical Center Stadium, $14 VIP, $12 dugout, $10 reserved. 859-5944487; www.florencefreedom.com. Florence.

Exhibits

Tours

Northern Kentucky Music Legends, 1-5 p.m., BehringerCrawford Museum, Included with admission. 859-491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

HomeFest, 11 a.m.-6 p.m., Triple Crown Country Club, $10, $8 advance at Kroger stores. 859331-9500; www.hbanky.com. Union.

SUNDAY, AUG. 25 Antiques Shows

Karaoke and Open Mic Karaoke, 9 p.m., Molly Malone’s Irish Pub and Restaurant, 112 E. Fourth St., With DJ Will Corson. $10 buckets and $4 grape and cherry bombs. Ages 21 and up. Free. 859-491-6659. Covington. DJ-led Karaoke, 9:30 p.m.-1:30

Northern Kentucky Music Legends, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, Included with admission. 859491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

Health / Wellness Weight Loss That Works, 6:30-7 p.m., Hickory Grove Baptist Church, 11969 Taylor Mill Road, $60 for 12-week membership. First class free. Presented by Equipped Ministries. 859-8028965; www.equipped4him.blogspot.com. Independence.

Music - Acoustic Roger Drawdy, 8 p.m., Molly Malone’s Irish Pub and Restaurant, 112 E. Fourth St., Irish music. Free. 859-491-6659; mollymalonesirishpub.com. Covington.

Music - Blues Open Jam, 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m., Miller’s Fill Inn, 52 Donnermeyer Drive, Free. 859-431-3455; www.facebook.com/Millersfillinn. Bellevue.

Music - Concerts Fort Thomas Summer Series, 7 p.m. Troubadors., Tower Park, 950 S. Fort Thomas Ave., Amphitheater. Bring seating. Rain moves concert to community center. Free. Presented by Fort Thomas Recreation Department. 859-781-1700; www.ftthomas.org. Fort Thomas.

Music - DJ Devout Wax, 8 p.m.-1:30 a.m., The Southgate House Revival, 111 E. Sixth St., The Lounge. Vinyl night. Margaret and Jonathan spin eclectic wax. Including an all spin-by-request set, bring your own records. Also, local/regional-only set. Ages 21 and up. Free. 859-4312201; www.facebook.com/ DevoutWax. Newport.

WEDNESDAY, AUG. 28 Civic

MONDAY, AUG. 26

Northern Kentucky Tea Party Meeting, 6-7:30 p.m. Kenton County Jailer Terry Carl speaks on penal system and fiscal responsibility., PeeWee’s Place, 2325 Anderson Road, Free. Presented by Northern Kentucky Tea Party. 859-992-6615; www.nkyteaparty.org. Crescent Springs.

Civic

Exhibits

Tea Party Meeting, 6-8 p.m., Sub Station II, 7905 Dream St., Meet and discuss limited government, free markets and fiscal responsibility. Free. Presented by Grassroots Tea Party of Boone

Northern Kentucky Music Legends, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, Included with admission. 859491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

Karaoke and Open Mic DJ-led Karaoke, 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m., Miller’s Fill Inn, Free. 859-431-3455; www.facebook.com/millers.fillin. Bellevue.

Music - Blues Ricky Nye, 7:30-11:30 p.m., Chez Nora, 530 Main St., Free. 859491-8027; www.cheznora.com. Covington.

Music - Jazz Mike Darrah, 7 p.m., Dee Felice Cafe, 529 Main St., Pianist. 859-261-2365; www.deefelice.com. Covington.

On Stage - Comedy Paul Mooney, 8 p.m., Funny Bone Comedy Club, Newport on the Levee, $20. 859-957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

Support Groups DivorceCare Support Group, 6:30-8 p.m., Florence United Methodist Church, 8585 Old Toll Road, Those suffering from experiencing separation or divorce heal and find hope in shared experiences. Child care provided. $15. Registration required. Through Nov. 20. 859-371-7961. Florence.

THURSDAY, AUG. 29 Exercise Classes Cardio Dance Party!, 7:30-8:30 p.m., Locomotion on the Levee, 1 Levee Way, $10 drop-in. Presented by Cardio Dance Party. 513-617-9498; www.cardiodanceparty.com. Newport. Jazzercise Classes, 9:30-10:30 a.m.; 4:30-5:30 p.m.; 6-7 p.m., Jazzercise Crescent Springs Center, $34 for unlimited monthly classes. 859-331-7778; jazzercise.com. Crescent Springs.

Exhibits Northern Kentucky Music Legends, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, Included with admission. 859491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

Farmers Market Dixie Farmers Market, 2-6 p.m., Erlanger Baptist Church, 116 Commonwealth Ave., Presented by City of Erlanger. 859-727-2525; www.ci.erlanger.ky.us. Erlanger.

Music - Blues Ricky Nye, 8-11 p.m., Pompilios Restaurant, 600 Washington Ave., Presented by Pompilio’s Restaurant. 859-581-3065. Newport Historic District.

Music - Cabaret Don Fangman, 6:30-9 p.m., Knotty Pine On The Bayou, 6302 Licking Pike, Don Fangman sings Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, Tony Bennett, Neil Diamond, Michael Buble and Andrea Bocelli. Free. 859-781-2200. Cold Spring.

Music - Concerts Live at the Levee, 7-10 p.m. Music by the Whammies., Newport on the Levee, 1 Levee Way, Riverwalk Plaza. Summer concert series. Free. 859-815-1389; www.newportonthelevee.com. Newport.

Music - Country Original Hillbilly Thursdays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m., The Southgate House Revival, 111 E. Sixth St., The Lounge. Country, bluegrass, Americana and old fashioned hillbilly music. Different artist each week. Includes 50 cents off Jack Daniels. Ages 21 and up. Free. 859-431-2201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport.

Music - World Alpen Echos, 7:30-11 p.m., Hofbrauhaus, 200 E. Third St., Free. 859-491-7200; www.hofbrauhausnewport.com. Newport.

On Stage - Comedy Dan Davidson, 8 p.m., Funny Bone Comedy Club, Newport on the Levee, $10-$15. 859-9572000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

Recreation Aerial Fitness, 6-7 p.m., Locomotion on the Levee, 1 Levee Way, Work on core body strength and endurance and use aerial equipment for workout. Rigorous course suitable for all fitness levels. Ages 18 and up. $15. Presented by Cincinnati Circus Company. Through July 31. 513-921-5454; www.cincinnaticircus.com. Newport.


NEWS

AUGUST 22, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • A7

NewCath mock trial team ‘states’ its case The Newport Central Catholic High School mock trial team recently placed ninth in the state mock trial competition. The first two rounds were at Eastern Kentucky University, with rounds three and four were at the Fayette County District and Circuit Courthouses in Lexington. The case this year was

a civil case titled, “Walton v. BNN.” The NewCath team argued the case from both the plaintiff and defense sides. The NewCath plaintiff team consisted of lawyers Jill Hamilton, Catherine Louis and Christina Seibert. Their witnesses were James Johnson, Wally Johnson and Johnny Lampe. They won their

The Newport Central Catholic mock trial team placed ninth in the state competition. Front row from left, Nick Hardt, Alex Jones, Patrick Allen, Catherine Louis, John Lampe and Wally Johnson; back row, Jeremy Bricking, Matt Frey, Robby Cox, Ethan Anost, Jill Hamilton, Christina Seibert and James Johnson. THANKS TO MARY CIAFARDINI

first trial and then lost to the runner-up team, Madison Central. The defense team included lawyers Patrick Allen, Jeremy Bricking

and Matt Frey. Their witnesses were Ethan Anost, Alex Jones and Nick Hardt. They won their first trial and then lost to the state-champion Mont-

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Cline Elementary School’s Fifth Grade recognition night. Schott is the son of Kristen Schott of Cold Spring and John Schott of Fort Mitchell.

Begins Sept. 7th

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SCHOOL NOTES Schott earns recognition

Walton: Jeremy Daugherty, Third Place, Poetry Contest; Kayo Fuji, English as a Second Language Image Award

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Taylor Milburn, Outstanding Education Student; Carla Perry, Student Organization Officer of the Year, and Spirit of Inspiration Award; Loretta Huffman, Adult Education Student Image Award; Yossetty Luzon, English as a Second Language Image Award; Cassandra S. Krautsack, Environmental Science Award of Excellence; Carrie Ann Kurdys, Environmental Science Award of Excellence and Outstanding Introduction to Biology Award; Ruth Moore, English Department Writer of Excellence; Julie Martha, English Department Writer of Excellence; Michelle Gaye, Psychology Thinker of the Year; Margaret Grace Whitley, Library Bookmark Contest Winner; Brian L. Norris, Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning Student of the Year Fort Mitchell: Matthew Malatt, Anatomy and Physiology I Award Fort Thomas: David Strange, Information Technology Spirit of Perseverance; Heather Byerly, Second Place, Poetry Contest Fort Wright: Ryan Bell, English Department Writer of Excellence; Marecus Aaron, Student Veteran Award Hebron: Ashley Marthaler, KCTCS All-Academic team; Tim Nikoley, Phi Rho Pi Speech Honorary Inductee Independence: Vinh Truong, Collision Repair Technology Student of the Year; Therese Miller, Outstanding Education Student; Rebecca Raynor, Student Government Association Officer of the Year; Dennis Humbert, Outstanding Geology Student; Bradley Gamm, Outstanding Manufacturing and Trades Technologies Student Latonia: Stacy Jones, Outstanding Developmental Math Award Ludlow: Dale Kidwell, Criminal Justice Academic Excellence Award, Criminal Justice Student Leadership Award and KCTCS All-Academic Team; Robert Himes, Criminal Justice Academic Excellence Award; Edward Emerson, Spirit of Student Support Services; Rob Himes, Ludlow, Third Place, Prose Writing Contest Newport: Mallory Gemmer, Phlebotomy Student of the Year; Jennifer Noel, Student Support Services Graduate of Distinction Park Hills: Christopher Cannon, Outstanding Computerized Manufacturing and Machining Student Union: Jenny Fraiture, Spirit of Nursing; Karen M. Brown, Medical Administrative Services Student of the Year; Chris Fussenegger, Collision Repair Technology Work Ethics Award; Ashley Richardson, Outstanding Education Student; Micah Greenhill, Phi Rho Pi Member Award of Highest Distinction; Robert M. Robinson, Deger-Hall

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Gateway Community and Technical College recently recognized the exemplary academic, leadership and technical performance of 188 students, including 106 scholarship recipients, at its annual Night of Excellence. Rani Clark and David Strange, both of Fort Thomas, received top honors as recipients of the J.D. Patton Award for academic and technical excellence. The Phi Theta Kappa academic honorary earned the award for best student organization of the year. Recipients are selected by faculty and staff committees and academic divisions based on student performance. Other local students receiving awards include: Alexandria: Courtney Griffith, Pharmacy Technician Award; Sarah Metcalf, Early Childhood Education Outstanding Academic Achievement Bellevue: Bobby Polick, Outstanding Student in College Mathematics Burlington: Cara Light, Outstanding Medical Microbiology Student; Shania Conner, First Place, Poetry Contest, and First Place, Black and White Photography Contest Cold Spring: Sarah Hilf, Outstanding Developmental Writing Award Covington: Ryan Ward, Massage Therapy Student of the Year; Amanda Kohler, Phlebotomy Student of the Year; Whitney Craig, Outstanding Paramedic Student; Suzanne Tasayco, Student Government Association Outstanding Senator; Nzinga Huston, Spirit of Inspiration Award; Tiffany Steeley, Basic Anatomy and Physiology Student of the Year; Brandi Ross, English Department Writer of Excellence; Thomas Petty, Outstanding Visual Communication Portfolio; Michael W. Phillips, Second Place, Prose Writing Contest Crestview Hills: Brian Lesshafft, Anatomy and Physiology II Student of the Year Erlanger: Danitra Brown, Outstanding Student in College Mathematics; Rhonda Moore, Accounting Student of the Year; Joshua Anderson, Second Place, Black and White Photography Contest; Douglas Brian Stetter, Outstanding Manufacturing Engineering Technology Student; Scott Gregory Vandergriff, Outstanding Computer Aided Drafting and Design Student Florence: Paul Eshiba, Outstanding Developmental Reading Award; Carla Perry, Medical Information Technology Student of the Year; Nathan McIntosh, Automotive Technology Best Student Award; Amber Hardy, Early Childhood Education Outstanding Dedication and Determination; Douglas House, Third Place, Poetry Contest;

gomery County team. The timekeeper for both sides was Robby Cox. Allen was named the

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NEWS

A8 • CCF RECORDER • AUGUST 22, 2013

Alexandria family left Romania for graduations By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

ALEXANDRIA — Elena Humpert, 18, of Alexandria, never had to experience the limitations of living in Communist Romania – and for that freedom, her family is thankful. Humpert’s May 26 graduation from Bishop Brossart High School served as a reminderof why her family left Romania in 1973. Humpert said she was brought up with family stories about leaving Romania for a chance at a better life. Humpert’s grandparents Josef and Magdalena Holz brought

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her mother, Brigitte, to Cincinnati from Romania at age 14. They left Romania with one suitcase each, and were not allowed to take any family photos or money. Fast forward to 2013, and Humpert is a graduate from Bishop Brossart with honors including awards for being in Spanish Honors Society, National Honor Society and Beta Club. She has accepted a fouryear, $5,000 annual scholarship to attend Northern Kentucky University. Humpert said being the only grandchild, there are expectations. Humpert said she can tell her grandmother, Magdalena, who lives in the house next door, is proud of her. “They’re always like ‘Oh my goodness, you did this!’ and you know always supporting me,” she said. Humpert said her interest in the family history is becoming serious. She wants to talk to her grandparents about their

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Elena Humpert of Alexandria, right, accepts her diploma during Bishop Brossart High School's graduation ceremonies at Thomas More College in Crestview Hills Sunday, May 26. CHRIS MAYHEW/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

experiences and learn more details. “I think I’m getting to the age now where I’m really starting to appreciate it,” Humpert said. Her mother said she spoke four languages including French and German when her parents brought her to Cincinnati on Dec. 22, 1973, but not English. Brigitte started school in English Jan. 3 at St. Williams Catholic School in Price Hill. “English was my fifth language, and I was very miserable,” she said. One thing Brigitte said she did understand, was that her family was in better circumstances. Her father worked as a brick layer and her mother worked as an apartment manager. The family had emigrated from Albrechtsflor, a village of 300 people in Western Romania not far from the Russian border, she said. Brigitte said she had a happy childhood, and was shel-

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Alexandria resident and 2013 Bishop Brossart High School graduate Elena Humpert, left, stands outside her home with her mother Brigitte. Brigitte immigrated to the U.S. at age 14, and is thankful for the opportunity for her daughter to live in a free country and attend high school and college. CHRIS MAYHEW/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Brigitte went on to graduate from Seton High School, received a bachelors of arts degree from the College of Mount St. Joseph, and a master’s degree from Georgetown College. She works as a teacher in Campbell County Schools now, working to educate students in the Campbell County’s juvenile detention center. Brigitte said her par-

ents always emphasized how education is the most important thing a person can do for themselves. Brigitte said she has stressed the value of education to her daughter Elena. The opportunity to do well and have a chance to graduate was a big reason why the family left Communist Romania, she said. “I didn’t know what freedom was until I came here,” Brigitte said.

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tered from most, but not all of the realities of the Communist state. Brigitte said she remembers an 18-year-old man from their town who failed in an illegal attempt to escape the country on foot. The army brought him back to town, she said. “They brought him back to the town and they marched him around to all the people,” Bridgitte said. Then the man was executed in the town square as an example, she said. “They knew that a lot of people wanted out,” Brigitte said. Their family prayed for 13 years and waited for a legal passport to leave the country, she said. Brigitte said her own fortunes changed in the U.S. after a woman who spoke German tutored her for two years, Brigitte said. “She was my savior,” she said.

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AUGUST 22, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • A9

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NEWS

A10 • CCF RECORDER • AUGUST 22, 2013

Kick up your boots ‘n’ heels

Bark for Life coming to N. Ky. By Melissa Stewart mstewart@nky.com

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their owners will be 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Diocesan Catholic Children’s Home Fairgrounds, 75 Orphanage Road, Fort Mitchell. Registration fee for one dog is $15 and $5 for each additional dog. “This takes our Relay for Life concept and expands it to involve our pets,” said Kila Hanrahan, Bark for Life organizer. For nearly a century, the American Cancer Society has raised funds to support cancer research at Relay for Life events. These funds have contributed to a 20 percent decrease in the overall cancer death rate since its peak in 1991. That means that more than 400 lives each day are saved. “For a lot of us, our pets are a part of our family,” Hanrahan said. “A pet can be there for the family going through something like cancer just as much as a human being can.” This is the first Bark for Life in the region. The

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Party with a purpose targets child abuse

goal for the event, Hanrahan said, is to raise $5,000. The Aug. 31 event includes a short walk, doggie games, top dog and dress up contests, team and community fundraising, music and food, as well as special dog guest demonstrations. Tami Costello, Crescent Springs, a Bark for Life committee member and cancer survivor, said she is excited about this new event. “I’ve seen the comfort a furry friend brings to someone going through cancer,” she said. “Dogs don’t ask questions, they don’t judge, they just simply love. I’m happy to be part of an event that honors them the way they should be.” She hopes that the event is successful and supported by the community so it can grow more each year. “Everyone has seen the face of cancer, whether it be a parent, child, sibling, aunt, uncle, friend, coworker or even a stranger in the store,” she said. “It’s time to put an end to this terrible disease and have fun doing it.”

By Melissa Stewart mstewart@nky.com

FLORENCE — Kick up your boots ‘n’ heels to fight child abuse 7-11 p.m. Friday, Aug. 23, at the Radisson Hotel Cincinnati Riverfront in Covington. The Family Nurturing Center in Florence is hosting its 19th annual August Affair, Boots & Heels: The Remix. “Because of the success of last year’s event, our volunteer planning committee decided overwhelmingly to bring back our fun theme of Boots & Heels,” said Tracy Fuchs, director of marketing and special events for the center. “It’s truly a party with a purpose; to prevent and confront all forms of child abuse and neglect.” According to Jane Herms, executive director of the center, more than five children die everyday in the U.S. as a result of child abuse. “Every single day,” she said. “It is every adult’s responsibility to

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protect children and confront all forms of child abuse and neglect. But this won’t happen until we change the conversation from fear and avoidance to full awareness and discussion of the prevalence and signs of abuse, the prevention strategies and the response.” The August Affair event is focused on raising awareness. Tricia Franke, of Cold Spring, has attended August Affair the last two years. “Awareness of any issue is the first step to creating a solution and making a difference,” she said. “I believe we need to do what we can as a society to provide stable, safe homes for children to grow up in and learn. I believe children who have a nurturing environment have a better chance at succeeding in life and contributing back to society positively.” Franke appreciates August Affair for raising awareness. In addition, “it is a fun evening where you can gather with girlfriends and make new friends,” she said. Keeping up with the theme of Boots & Heels, there will be items up for auction from the

genres’ biggest stars including an electric guitar signed by rock ‘n’ roll legends Eddie Van Halen, Eric Clapton, Santana, Slash, BB King, Neil Young, Pete Townshend, Edge, and Jimmy Page, and sheet music signed by Taylor Swift. Other collectibles include a framed print drawing signed by all six actors who played James Bond; a “Walking Dead” photo signed by the entire cast; and a photo of the 1980 Olympics U.S. Men’s Ice Hockey team with 21 signatures of players and coaches. Tickets cost $70 per guest in advance; $80 at the door, and include a two-hour open bar along with live entertainment with the band Off-RRockers, a silent auction of more than 100 themed packages and works of art donated by local artists. Select, hard-to-acquire autographed memorabilia and experiences will be available at the limited edition live auction with professional benefit gala auctioneer Susan Johnson. For tickets, visit familynurture.org or call 859-538-1630.

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VIEWPOINTS

AUGUST 22, 2013 • FORT THOMAS RECORDER • A11

COMMUNITY

RECORDER

Marc Emral, memral@communitypress.com, 578-1053

EDITORIALS | LETTERS | COLUMNS | CH@TROOM

CommunityPress.com

From pre-K to pretty amazing

In May of last year, Covington Latin High School released another group of outstanding, high-achieving students into the post-secondary world. One of those students was valedictorian Malory Thelen. Malory graduated from high school with a resume that many of us, with years of experience in the workforce under our belts, could look to Tess Hammons for motivaCOMMUNITY PRESS tion. Dave TheGUEST COLUMNIST len, Malory’s grandfather, has been very involved in Malory’s life from the beginning. He and Malory’s mother, Terri, credit Malory’s strong education foundation to her time spent in preschool. (Author’s note: Dave and Terri have been very humble about their own contribution, which was also essential to this wonderful girl’s myriad achievements.) Her educational journey began at Cathedral Child Development Center, across the street from the Thelen Cathedral Basilica and Covington Latin. It was here that Malory was offered a Montessori experience, and she flourished. Terri notes, “She has always been a self-starter, and this was the perfect setting for her. She worked on assignments that she found interesting, mastered them and moved on to the next challenge … I really think her self confidence was enhanced during her years at the Montessori school. Mike and I were so impressed with the program that Malory attended kindergarten at the school.” A quality environment

McConnell knows it’s post time

Malory Thelen gives her graduation speech from kindergarten at Cathedral Child Development Center.PROVIDED

during the birth to 5 years of a child’s life is absolutely essential to success later in life. The Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University points out in one edition of its series “InBrief: The Science of Early Childhood Development” that during the first few years of life, 700 new neural connections are formed every second. Early learning environments are places to grow a child’s cognitive, language, and socialemotional skills. When Malory entered first grade at St. Pius X, she was already reading at third-grade reading level. Her grandfather, Dave, writes “Her social, behavioral, and language skills all were developed early in life at the age of 3.” Malory has continued to shine. At 12, she was the youngest volunteer with the American Cancer Society and Be Concerned (a Covington-based nonprofit assisting low-income Northern Kentuckians in meeting basic needs). “Basically, it was regular tag, but I was always ‘it.’ I remember one day in particular when a newer student ran up to me during this game and

gave me a big hug for letting him play with the older students. A simple game had accomplished something bigger: I, along with the other students, had fostered a sense of inclusiveness and fun in that microculture of the playground.” Early childhood investment is gaining favor throughout the political spectrum. A recent Public Opinion Strategies and Hart poll found that 60 percent of Republicans, 64 percent of independents, and 84 percent of Democrats support a federal plan that helps states provide better early childhood education programs to low- and middle-income families without increasing debt. Transylvania University is now fortunate enough to host Malory through the next phase of her education. She is taking general studies right now, and her inspiring writing can be found on the student blog, Write on Broadway http://bea pioneer.wordpress.com/. Tess Hammons is communications and media coordinator at Children Inc.

Why are N. Ky. gas prices so high? As I travel the state, I am frequently asked what I can do about high gas prices and price fluctuations across the commonwealth. I understand the frustration with high gas prices. I understand how tough it is on Jack Conway hard-working COMMUNITY PRESS families. No GUEST COLUMNIST one wants to choose between filling up the gas tank or putting food on the table or paying a bill. And many of us rely on our vehicles to get to work, so that we can pay our bills. Be assured, protecting Kentucky consumers at the gas pumps is a top priority of mine. So, why are gas prices in parts of Kentucky between 12 and 20 cents higher on average? In 2008, we launched an investigation into the whole-

sale price of gasoline. Our experts uncovered strong data to suggest that Marathon’s acquisition of Ashland Oil in the late 1990s negatively impacted competition in the wholesale gasoline market in Kentucky. In other words, our investigation indicated Marathon has a regional monopoly that allows it to manipulate gas prices at the wholesale level. Even after approving the merger in the 1990s, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) warned that of the nine states involved in the merger, one state bears watching – that was Kentucky. Marathon, which bases its prices off of the Chicago Spot Market, is the dominant supplier of gas to retailers who sell that gas in Kentucky. In Louisville and Northern Kentucky, where the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) mandates that reformulated gas (RFG) must be used, it supplies nearly 100 percent of the wholesale RFG. Wheth-

FORT THOMAS

RECORDER

A publication of

er you buy gas at a Chevron station, BP or Thornton’s, you are likely buying Marathon gas. EPA requirements account for about a 10-cent increase in the price of reformulated gas. Our investigation shows the monopoly accounts for the additional 5 to 10 cent difference. After we completed our investigation in 2008, we provided then FTC Chairman Jon Leibowitz with our findings because this is an antitrust issue that falls under the FTC’s jurisdiction. The FTC did nothing. We even made our case to the U.S. Attorney General and the Justice Department’s Oil and Gas Price Fraud Working Group. Again, federal regulators have done nothing to address Marathon’s dominant position in Kentucky. I refuse to let this matter rest. Jack Conway is attorney general of Kentucky.

On Saturday, Aug. 3, at the annual Fancy Farm picnic in far western Kentucky, Sen. Mitch McConnell and his two leading challengers – Tea Party candidate Matt Bevin and 34-year-old Democrat Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes – took the three inside positions. McConnell should have concerns out of the gate with a 51 percent disapproval, and being neckand-neck with Grimes David in two recent Wolfford COMMUNITY PRESS polls. He handled the GUEST COLUMNIST challengers with tactics from a veteran’s campaign playbook and he realizes their handicaps. As McConnell approached the podium, roughly equally sized crowds representing McConnell and Grimes reflected the polls, yelling alternatively, “We Want Mitch” and “Ditch Mitch.” He refused to formally acknowledge either challenger (Bevin whatsoever), and instead reminded the audience of the commonwealth’s disdain for Democratic leadership. His speech cast him as a candidate against Obama, Pelosi or Reid, not Grimes. “Every liberal in America is out to beat us,” he said, pointing at the stable of Democrats who he said stand against coal, against liberties, and against lower taxes. In courting the state’s independent voters, he subtly touted his influence in the Senate chamber that would be lost if he were replaced, saying you can’t take care of national issues for Kentucky from the back-bench. Grimes is a more-thanformidable candidate hand-

picked by the establishment. As a fairly new political face with great potential, she’s taking the classic outsider’s strategy against what she calls DC – the “Dysfunctional Capital.” Playing up McConnell’s obstructionist label while he looked on and smirked inches away in the first chair, she declared with the best jab of the afternoon, “If the doctors told Senator McConnell he had a kidney stone, he’d refuse to pass it.” McConnell disappeared before insurgent Matt Bevin introduced himself to the state. Bevin is a Kentucky immigrant and first-time candidate who might develop a niche following with support from unique places. Can such a challenger defeat an establishment figure? Ask Rand Paul, the newcomer who ran under the Tea Party banner in 2010 to defeat McConnell’s hand-picked candidate. Both challengers benefited from the Fancy Farm stage, but they are on a Kentucky raceway familiar to the experienced McConnell since 1984. In a state with a closed primary and an early registration deadline, Bevin will have challenges in earning crossover support. Grimes has created her own muddy track. Last week, Politico revealed five issues she refused to discuss, though her party has taken clear positions on the same. She must run from her leaders and from their views, while simultaneously convincing conservative and moderate Kentucky voters why they should support her. You can bet the old war horse will soon exploit his opponent’s uncertain start to avoid that one fateful career loss. David Wolfford teaches government and politics.

CIVIC INVOLVEMENT Boone County Jaycees

Meeting time: 7 p.m. first Wednesday of the month Where: Florence Government Center, 8100 Ewing Blvd., Florence (lower level) Contact: President Katie Beagle, 859-466-8998 Description: Community and young professional organization to provide community service and leadership development.

Campbell County Rotary Club

Meeting time: Noon Wednesdays Where: Highland Country Club, 931 Alexandria Pike, Fort Thomas Contact: Arnd Rehfuss, arndpat@aol.com, 859-635 5088 Description: Rotary welcomes new members who enjoy community service.

Covington Rotary Club

Meeting time: 12:15 p.m. Tuesdays Where: Radisson Hotel in Covington Contact: President David Miller at jdavid.miller@kctcs.edu

Daughters of the American Revolution

Rebecca Bryan Boone Chapter, National Society Daughters of the American Revolution of Fort Thomas Meets: Second Wednesday or Saturday of the month When: Various locations Contact: Zella Rahe, 1106 Craft Road,

228 Grandview Drive, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017 654 Highland Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075 phone: 283-0404 email: kynews@communitypress.com web site: www.nky.com

SHARE YOUR CLUB INFORMATION To be included in this listing, send the name of your civic or community group, its regular meeting time and date, meeting place, contact name, and brief description of the club. Email to Civic Groups, memral@communitypress.com or mail in to Civic Involvement, Community Recorder, 228 Grandview Drive, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017. Alexandria KY 41001, 859-635-5050, zella.rahe@twc.com Description: DAR members prove their lineage back to a Revolutionary War patriot. They offer service to troops, veterans, schools and preserve history. Members are from Boone, Campbell and Kenton counties.

Florence Lions Club

Meeting time: Second and fourth Wednesdays of each month Where: Lions Clubhouse, 29 LaCresta Drive, Florence Website: www.florencelions.com Contact: Membership chairman markh@tciky.com Description: Florence Lions Club’s main mission is to provide local eyesight care for those that need help in Boone County.

Fort Thomas Recorder Editor Marc Emral memral@communitypress.com, 578-1053 Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday See page A2 for additional contact information.


NEWS

A12 • CCF RECORDER • AUGUST 22, 2013

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From left, Highlands offensive threats include Zach Harris, Drew Houliston and Nick True.CARRIE COCHRAN/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

HIGHLANDS GOAL: EVERY PLAYER GETS BETTER EVERY DAY By Adam Turer presspreps@gmail.com

2013 HIGHLANDS SCHEDULE Aug. 24 – JACKSONVILLE UNIVERSITY CHRISTIAN (FLA.), 3:30 p.m. Aug. 30 – CAMPBELL COUNTY, 7 p.m. Sept. 6 – LEXINGTON BRYAN STATION Sept. 14 – at Elizabethtown John Hardin, 6 p.m. Sept. 21 – at Paducah Tilghman, 6 p.m. Sept. 28 – at Covington Catholic, 1 p.m. Oct. 4 – HARRISON COUNTY, 7 p.m. Oct. 18 – HOLMES, 7 p.m. Oct. 25 – at Elder (Ohio) Nov. 1 – BOWLING GREEN WARREN CENTRAL All games at 7:30 p.m. unless noted.

Zach Harris is a three-year starter at running back.CARRIE COCHRAN/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

FT. THOMAS — Despite its long tradition of championships, Highlands High School’s football program has never gotten complacent under head coach Dale Mueller. This year, after winning six straight state titles, the Bluebirds will challenge themselves in the regular season like never before. “We have the best schedule that we have had since I have coached at Highlands,” said Mueller. The Bluebirds open the season with a nationally televised game on ESPNU against Florida state champion University Christian. The game is part of the annual Skyline Chili Crosstown Showdown, and marks Highlands’s first appearance in the season-opening celebration of high school football. The Bluebirds will get to show off their home field and supportive fans on a national broadcast. Then, Highlands takes on Campbell County and three quality opponents from downstate before its marquee District matchup with Covington Catholic. The Bluebirds also must travel to The Pit to face Elder, one of the top teams in Cincinnati and one of the toughest high school football stadiums in the country for visiting teams. “By the time we have done all of that,” said Mueller, “we are ready for the playoffs.” Stellar quarterback play has been a cornerstone for Highlands throughout Mueller’s tenure. This year, Drew Houliston takes the mantle. After spending time at wide receiver the past two years while waiting his turn behind Patrick Towles and Donovan McCoy, he has shown that he is ready to take control

From left, Highlands defensive leaders include Thomas Wrobleski, Joey Cochran and Seth Hope. CARRIE COCHRAN/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

of the offense. “He makes reads and delivers the ball like an NFL quarterback,” said Mueller. “The players and coaches are so excited because he is fast and athletic with a great arm, but especially because he is brilliant and makes such fast and excellent decisions.” Houliston has an experienced leader behind him in the backfield. Zach Harris is a three-year starter at running back and provides leadership for the offense. The defense is led by lineman Seth Hope, who has committed to play for Cornell University. Thomas Wrobleski and Michael Ayers also bring experience and strength

to the defense. Head coaches throughout the state have likely spent countless hours trying to figure out the secret to the Bluebirds’ success. The thing is, Mueller keeps it simple. The demanding schedule this year will provide Highlands with a bigger challenge, but the daily goals remain the same. “The key to our success is every player doing his best to get better every day,” said Mueller. “We have 96 players and right now about 50 of them are ready to play varsity football. We need more guys to advance into that category and the guys who are varsity players to step up another level.”

Highlands High School head football coach Dale Mueller gives direction during a drill Aug. 1.CARRIE COCHRAN/THE COMMUNITY PRESS


SPORTS & RECREATION

B2 • FORT THOMAS RECORDER • AUGUST 22, 2013

Depth, experience key for NewCath By Adam Turer presspreps@gmail.com

NEWPORT — A head coaching change often comes with other changes, whether it’s to the roster, depth chart or playbook. Other than the man in charge, Newport Central Catholic’s football program is not going to look very different than the 2012 edition led by Eddie Eviston. This year, Dan Wagner, a former assistant on Eviston’s staff, takes over. The Thoroughbreds have an experienced roster and a system in place. “We are using the same system as last year,” said Wagner. “The only change is the name of the head coach. The coaching staff is back and has been here for a while.” Not only are the ‘Breds experienced this year, but the team has depth, something that is often elusive for Class 2A teams. Jack Sutkamp, Tyler Lyon, and Steve Brooks will be leaders on both sides of the ball, but NewCath has players who will be able to impact games on just one side of the ball. Mac Franzen, Matt Lenz, Jacob Smith, Tommy Donnelly, and Nat Kling will contribute on offense, with Wyatt Boberg, John Caudill, Kalvin Moore, Mie Runyon, and Kole Zenni leading the defense. “We should be able to play more players on both sides of the ball,” said Wagner. “We should be a little deeper this year.” Brooks may be the most physical player on the team. The offensive lineman and linebacker will need to balance playing tough and staying healthy. The defensive line is

2013 NEWPORT CENTRAL CATHOLIC SCHEDULE Aug. 23 – ASHLAND BLAZER Aug. 30 – Cooper, 6 p.m. at Dixie Heights Sept. 6 – at Campbell County Sept. 13 – at Simon Kenton Sept. 20 – DIXIE HEIGHTS Sept. 27 – LLOYD Oct. 11 – at Newport Oct. 19 – Bishop Brossart, at Scott Oct. 25 – HOLY CROSS Nov. 2 – at Beechwood, noon All games at 7 p.m. unless noted.

NCC senior Kalvin Moore looks to make a tackle during a scrimmage against Holmes Aug. 16. JAMES WEBER/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

the biggest question mark entering the season. The offense, led by Franzen, should improve on last year’s numbers. The consistency on the coaching staff will no doubt help the Thoroughbreds improve. “It’s the same things as always,” said Wagner. “Continue work hard, pay attention to detail, and take care of your assignment.” The schedule will prepare NewCath for the postseason. Although one of the smaller

schools in Northern Kentucky, the Thoroughbreds benefit from playing against some of the top competition the region has to offer. The program is hungry for another Class 2A state championship and will be battle-tested by the time the postseason comes around. “After our first five games against stiff competition and larger schools, we feel like we have seen teams as good as any that we will see throughout the playoffs,” said Wagner.

NCC senior Mac Franzen throws a pass during a scrimmage against Holmes Aug. 16. JAMES WEBER/THE

NCC head coach Dan Wagner gives instructions during a scrimmage against Holmes Aug. 16. JAMES WEBER/THE COMMUNITY

COMMUNITY RECORDER

RECORDER

Brossart hopes to establish tradition By Adam Turer presspreps@gmail.com

ALEXANDRIA — There is not much tradition in Bishop Brossart’s football program, which is understandable for a program entering just its seventh season. The Mustangs hope to create a tradition under new head coach Lee Teegarden, who took over in January as just the third coach in the program’s brief history. The team is coming off of a disappointing 1-9 season, but is just three years removed from its last winning season. The goal this year is to record the second winning season in program history. “A winning season would make this a very successful transition for the program,” said Teegarden. The foundation is there. Brossart has enjoyed success and won state championships in other sports. Football is still relatively new to the community, but there is excitement and support for Mustangs football. “The Brossart community works really well for the kids,” said Teegarden. “We really have the potential for great success here.” It helped that Teegarden and his staff joined the program in January. They had time to implement changes right away, rather than wait until the players put on pads in August. “We made a lot of progress in the weight room and we were able to install some things in the spring,” said Teegarden. The biggest changes to the program go beyond X’s and O’s. Teegarden’s first order of business was to instill his style of discipline, which affects the players on the field and in the classroom.

2013 BISHOP BROSSART SCHEDULE Aug. 24 – DAYTON Aug. 30 – at Middletown Christian Sept. 7 – BRACKEN COUNTY Sept. 20 – at Ludlow Sept. 26 – HOLY CROSS Oct. 4 – at Newport Oct. 11 – at Lloyd Oct. 19 – NEWPORT CENTRAL CATHOLIC Oct. 26 – at Pendleton County Nov. 1 – GALLATIN COUNTY All games at 7 p.m. unless noted. All home games are at Scott High School, Taylor Mill.

Quinn O’Bryan is a returning senior for the Brossart football team.FILE PHOTO

“The guys have had to learn a different way of life,” said Teegarden, the former head coach at Pendleton County. “We have increased their conditioning, discipline and expectations.”

Nine seniors return, eight of whom started last year. Quarterback Casey Pelgen leads the offense out of the shotgun. The Mustangs aim to be very balanced on offense. Running

back/defensive back Sean Tieman, wide receiver/defensive back Quinn O’Bryan, tight end/ defensive end Austin Shannon, and offensive/defensive lineman Charlie Britt also provide

senior leadership. The defense is based out of a 5-2 slant front, but with athletic ends who can drop into a 3-4 scheme. The Mustangs will have one of the more experienced teams in their district, but know that it will be a challenge to compete with Class 2A powers Holy Cross and Newport Central Catholic. The young program is still seeking an identity, and hopes that it can find one under the former Ryle High School offensive coordinator. “It’s up to us to go out this year and begin to make a change,” said Teegarden.


SPORTS & RECREATION

AUGUST 22, 2013 • FORT THOMAS RECORDER • B3

Colonels ready to keep winning By James Weber jweber@nky.com

PARK HILLS — Dave Wirth hopes to have his Covington Catholic football team back in top form as he enters his fifth season at the helm. Wirth is 31-19 with the Colonels, several of those defeats coming to Class 4A rival Highlands, who once again will be an obstacle to overcome this year. The Colonels were 9-4 last year, falling to Highlands in the Class 4A state quarterfinals 2813. While preseason practices prepare the Colonels for their postseason rivals, they are also about short-term goals as Cov Cath will take things game by game. Wirth’s main task is replacing Blake Bir, who graduated with most of the school’s career and single-season passing marks. He threw for 2,851 yards and 38 touchdowns a year ago. Adam Wagner, a 6-1, 170pound junior, is likely to take over at quarterback. Wagner is a strong athlete and good thrower who will face the task of replacing Bir’s skill and veteran savvy. “Adam has picked it up faster than we thought,’’ Wirth said. ‘‘Adam is probably the second best athlete on our team. He has incredible speed, is tough mentally and physically, and defenses are going to have to be really careful rushing him, because if he gets out, look out.’’ The Colonels averaged 40 points per game on offense last year and Wirth believes the team can maintain that level of excellence. The CCH offense may be more run-oriented this year, according to Wirth. Luke Bir rushed for 555 yards and eight scores a year ago, and Sam

2013 COVINGTON CATHOLIC SCHEDULE

Covington Catholic junior quarterback Adam Wagner takes the controls this year. He runs a play Aug. 16 during a scrimmage at Campbell County. JAMES WEBER/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Dressman posted 489 and 15. They will gain yards behind a big, athletic offensive line. Cov Cath has three returning starters there plus two juniors who missed most of last year due to injury and were potential starters. A newcomer to watch there is 6-foot-5, 272-pound junior Sam Murrer. Evan Braun is the top returning receiver with 32 catches for 565 yards and seven TDs. He stands 6-foot-3, 185 pounds. Senior Sam Hatter posted 26 grabs for 328 yards and three scores. On defense, CCH limited teams to 12 points per game a year ago, posting five shutouts and two other games of allowing less than a touchdown.

The Colonels returns several key players on defense, led by senior linebacker Sam Burchell, senior safety Matthew Way, senior safety Austin Oberhausen and senior cornerback Adam Fisher. Burchell, considered one of the top linebackers in the state, had 97 tackles and nine tackles for loss a year ago. He is likely to miss the first couple of games due to injury. Oberhausen had 80 tackles. Newcomers to watch on defense include end Luke Foertsch, linebacker Lucas Timmerman and backs Alex Wagner and Matt Schmahl. Way and junior Lee McClure give Cov Cath an explosive return game. McClure will also

look to make an impact in the receiving corps. Wirth said a concern is the graduation losses in the defensive line, but added the Colonels should have size and depth there. Cov Cath starts the year at Boone County Aug. 23, then plays the other Colonels of Dixie Heights Aug. 30. CCH also plays Moeller Sept. 7, then Kentucky 6A team Henderson County, who is coming off a 9-3 season. Cov Cath also plays local stalwarts Beechwood, Ryle and Conner. This year’s regular Highlands game is Sept. 28. Follow James on Twitter @RecorderWeber

Aug. 23 – at Boone County, 7 p.m. Aug. 30 – at Dixie Heights, 8:30 p.m. Sept. 7 – MOELLER (OHIO) Sept. 13 – at Henderson County, 7:30 p.m. Sept. 28 – HIGHLANDS Oct. 3 – at Beechwood, 7:30 p.m. Oct. 12 – RYLE Oct. 18 – at Harrison County, 7:30 p.m. Oct. 26 – HOLMES Nov. 2 – CONNER All games at 1 p.m. unless noted.

Covington Catholic senior Sam Hatter is one of the team’s top receivers. JAMES WEBER/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Holmes aims to establish identity By Adam Turer

presspreps@gmail.com

COVINGTON — Holmes High School’s football program is under new leadership in 2013 and is looking to establish an identity on and off the field. Ben Nevels enters his first year as head coach with lots of talent to work with, and one playmaker who can change a game in an instant. Running back Jon Scruggs averaged more than eight yards a carry last season, and is also a major factor on special teams and defense for the Bulldogs. With the graduation of several other skill position players, Holmes is counting on Scruggs to produce even while opposing defenses are keyed in on stopping him. “Jon is a difference-maker on both sides of the ball,” said Nevels. “He is a threat to score any time he touches the ball.” While the team was hit hard by graduation at the skill positions, the offensive line returns almost entirely intact. Led by Breandon Johnson, the line returns four starters. Joining Johnson up front are Kamron Griffith, Tyler McIntosh, and Marco Bright. Johnson, a 6’2”, 315 lb. junior, has the size and skills to dominate. “He possesses a rare blend of size, speed and strength,” said Nevels. “Breandon has an opportunity to be one of the most dominant linemen ever to play at Holmes.” Nevels was pleased to inherit a roster that is willing to put in the work to get better. Players like sophomores Sean Sullivan, Alex Vancini, and Shawndale Mincey have shown a commitment to make the future bright for Holmes football. “As a team, our biggest strengths are our athleticism

2013 HOLMES SCHEDULE Aug. 23 – HOLY CROSS Aug. 30 – at Scott Sept. 6 – at Lloyd Sept. 13 – WALTON-VERONA, 7:30 p.m. Sept. 27 – BEECHWOOD Oct. 4 – BELLEVUE Oct. 11 – HARRISON COUNTY, 7:30 p.m. Oct. 18 – at Highlands Oct. 26 – at Covington Catholic, 1 p.m. Nov. 1 – at Newport All games at 7 p.m. unless noted.

Holmes senior Fred Wardlaw heads upfield during a scrimmage against NCC Aug. 16 at Thomas More College. JAMES WEBER/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

and our drive to improve,” Nevels said. “Our young men want to get better every time they step on the field. This attitude will allow us to transform adversity into opportunities.” Receiver and defensive back Freddie Wardlaw is another upperclassmen who provides leadership on both sides of the ball. The Bulldogs would like to be deeper in order to compete in possibly the toughest division in Northern Kentucky. Class 4A boasts both Highlands and Covington Catholic. Holmes is more concerned with internal

improvement that catching up with those storied programs this year. “A major key for our team this season will be staying healthy and maturing,” Nevels said. “We feel like if we can stay healthy and improve on the little things day in and day out, we will be right where we need to be when the playoffs arrive.” The offense will need to master a new spread system and find a starting quarterback who can distribute the ball to the team’s athletic skill players. The defense prides itself on its

athleticism and relentless pursuit out of the 3-3-stack base. If the Bulldogs can stay healthy and find additional playmakers around Scruggs, the first year under Nevels should be a smooth transition. In his first year as a head coach, Nevels is focused on the details that will help the program grow for years to come. “Our team goal is to do the little things right, on and off the field, day in and day out,” said Nevels. “We feel that if we take care of this single goal, all the rest will take care of itself.”

Holmes senior Jonathon Scruggs is a dangerous playmaker for the Bulldogs. JAMES WEBER/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER


SPORTS & RECREATION

B4 • FORT THOMAS RECORDER • AUGUST 22, 2013

UC Clermont starts new season after 7th nationals appearance

The UC Clermont volleyball team is back on the court preparing for the 2013 campaign. Coming off their seventh consecutive appearance at the U.S. Collegiate Athletic Association National Championship tournament in New York, the Cougars are working hard in hopes of putting together another stellar season. Head Coach Joe Harpring expects the squad to be quick, deep and athletic this year. “We plan to use our depth to keep everyone fresh and avoid dragging a bit at the end of the season,” said Harpring who is beginning his ninth year as head coach at UC Clermont (13th year overall coaching at UC Clermont). “We have the luxury of a substantial number of talented individuals.” In spite of some key losses to graduation, etc., the Cougars are returning eight quality players and a talented transfer for the coming campaign. Setter Becca Walton (Mother of Mercy) and right-side hitter Haley Weber (Mariemont) enter their senior seasons and will be counted on to lead the squad. Junior outside hitter Kaitlyn Miller (Sycamore) and junior defensive specialist Courtney Maier (Newport Central Catholic) will also lend a veteran presence to the team. Five sophomores will be

Harping

This year’s UC Clermont volleyball team members are, from left: Back, Amber Lawrence, Haley Weber, Kiley Collins, Kaitlyn Miller, Heather Rowland and Sarah Barrial; and front, Courtney Maier, Taylor Herrmann, Rebecca Walton, Samantha Gilbert, Alex Robb, Amber Peters and Shannon Arnold. THANKS TO DOTTIE STOVER

back with a year of collegiate experience under their belts – middle hitter Kiley Collins (Goshen), middle hitter Heather Rowland (Norwood), setter Alex Robb (Amelia), right-side hitter Shannon Arnold (Glen Este) and outside hitter Amber Peters (Loveland and Thomas More College).

Four newcomers will supplement the veteran core of the Clermont team. Two are true incoming freshmen – outside hitter Amber Lawrence (FelicityFranklin) and defensive specialist Samantha Gilbert (Franklin County, Ind.). The others are walk-on defensive specialist Taylor Herrmann (Glen

Este) and outside hitter Sarah Barrial (Goshen). All four won numerous awards during their high school careers. The Cougars will face an especially challenging schedule in 2013. In addition to the usual strong USCAA, NCAA and independent opponents, Clermont will also meet a number of high-

PRESS PREPS HIGHLIGHTS

LEAGUE DOMINANCE

By James Weber jweber@nky.com

Boys golf

» Highlands beat Holy Cross 169-180 Aug. 15. Jackson Bardo shot a 34 with three birdies to earn medalist honors. » Newport Central Catholic finished second in the All “A” regional. Matt Striegel tied for second with an 80 and Luke Holtz shot 81 as both qualified for the state tourney Sept. 7 in Somerset.

Girls golf

» Brossart beat Highlands 217235. Highlands’ Laura Fernandez shot a 49 to medal. » Newport Central Catholic beat Campbell County 245-254. NCC’s Chelsea Schack was medalist with a 45.

Freedom Trail

The Kentucky Warriors seventh-grade AAU girls basketball team was the regular-session champion and the post-session tournament champion of the Sports Of All Sorts-Union Spring League. From left are: Front, Kira Asch and Anja Arlinghaus; back, Caroline Buddenberg, Shelby Harmeyer, coach Ben Coffman, Emily Ross and Bree Roberts. THANKS TO BEN COFFMAN

SIDELINES Fall basketball

Golf for a cause

Town and Country Sports and Health Club in Wilder is registering teams for the fall session of men’s basketball. The eight-game session begins Sept. 22, with games on Sundays after 6 p.m. Cost is $250 per team, with additional referee fees of $25 per game. Registration deadline is Sept. 13. For more information, visit www.towncountrysports.com, or call 859-442-5800.

Golfers will have a chance to take a swing at poverty at the 12th annual MASTER Pro Golf Outing, Saturday, Sept. 7, at Lassing Pointe in Union. The event begins with lunch at 12:30 p.m. at nearby Union Baptist Church prior to the 2 p.m. shotgun start. Proceeds from the day will benefit the work of MASTER Provisions and Lifeline Ministries, Northern Kentucky non-profit organizations who work

er level NAIA programs. “This year we may be facing our toughest schedule ever,” said Harpring. “We want to be prepared to play the best in case we are fortunate enough to receive another post season bid.” The season will kick off on Friday, Aug. 23, as the Cougars host Ohio Christian University – a team selected to the National Christian College Athletic Association (NCCAA) National Tournament in 2012. Game time is 6 p.m. in the Student Activities Center. For more information about the UC Clermont volleyball team visit: www.ucclermont.edu.

» Home games are running out for the Florence Freedom at University of Cincinnati Medical Center Stadium in 2013, and the promotions schedule is stacked. The most notable promotions include Rozzi fireworks and fan appreciation night on Friday, Aug. 23, with giveaways such as golf bags, UK and Bengals area rugs, annual passes to the Newport Aquarium, and $50 gift cards to Morris Home Furnishings. Aug. 24 will include a double fireworks show along with a bicycle helmet giveaway for kids. Aug. 25 is Andy Dalton Bobblehead Night. For a full explanation of promotions, visit www.florencefreedom.com. The Freedom are 44-37 through Aug. 18 and fighting for a playoff spot in the Frontier League with 15 games to go.

TMC Notes

as partners in area hunger relief. The event can accommodate 112 golfers and foursomes can still sign up. There are also opportunities for “hope” sponsors to help fund event expenses. Golfers are asked to make a love offering as they register for the outing, keeping in mind that the actual cost of the day is $60 per person. To register a foursome or become a sponsor, call Vince Meiman at 859-803-5939, or Roger Babik at 859-816-6087.

» Former Boone County High School women’s basketball standout Sydney Moss is returning to Northern Kentucky as she is transferring to Thomas More College from Division I University of Florida. Moss, who will be a sophomore for the Thomas More women’s basketball team, was named to the 2013 All-Southeastern Conference Freshman Team and the 2013 Postseason Women’s National Invitational Tournament All-Tour-

nament Team in her lone season on the Gainesville, Fla., campus. She played in all 37 of the Gators’ games last season, including 24 starts. Moss scored in 36 games and led the team in assists (143), was second in scoring (11.8 ppg), rebounding (6.8 rpg), steals (52). She was also second on the team in in minutes played (28.4 mpg). In Florida’s five-game WNIT run to the semifinals, Moss led the team in scoring (19.6 ppg), rebounding (9.0), assists (4.0 apg) and field goal percentage (57.1 percent). Moss played her final three prep seasons at Boone County for head coach Nell Fookes. After her senior season (2011-12) she collected every significant player of the year honor for the state of Kentucky, including the 2012 Gatorade Kentucky Girls Basketball Player of the Year and the 2012 Associated Press Kentucky Player of the Year, as well as being named 2012 Kentucky “Miss Basketball.” During her prep career Moss compiled 2,997 points (19.6 ppg), 1,602 rebounds (10.5 rpg), 323 steals, 315 assists and 136 blocks (1.5 bpg), while shooting 53.6 percent from the field and 67 percent from the free throw line.

NKU Notes

» Northern Kentucky University will play host to the University of Kentucky in a men’s soccer exhibition game Sunday, Aug. 25, at 7 p.m. at the NKU Soccer Stadium. NKU hosted UK in an exhibition last year and the two teams played to a 2-2 tie before a standing-room only, school-record crowd of 1,206 fans in Highland Heights, Ky. The first 500 fans in attendance for Sunday night’s NKU/ UK contest receive a free 2013 NKU soccer schedule poster. A year ago, NKU posted a 7-10-1 overall record in its inaugural Division I campaign, including an impressive home record of 3-1-1. The Norse are picked fifth in the Atlantic Sun Conference preseason poll. NKU begins regular-season play Aug. 30 with a road contest at IPFW. The Norse then compete in the University of Dayton Classic, with games against host Dayton (Sept. 6) and Eastern Illinois (Sept. 8).


LIFE

AUGUST 22, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • B5

Preserve summer taste by roasting tomatoes As I’ve mentioned before, I know when a recipe hits a chord with readers by the amount of response it generates long after it’s published. This is particularly true of seasonal recipes, like roasted tomatoes. This recipe is slightly different from one I shared last year. Tomatoes are in season right now and the homegrown/best are abundant at farmers’ markets. Rita As for Heikenfeld me, my RITA’S KITCHEN tomatoes are the best I’ve ever grown and since most of them are the indeterminate type, they keep bearing all season long. I’m not even begrudging the groundhogs eating their share, there’s that many! When I do find veggies and fruit that have been bitten into by Mother Nature’s clan, I just cut them up and feed them to my girls (my chickens). They make a quick meal of them, Tomatoes are full of lycopene, which is good for our hearts, men’s prostates and our immune system. Plus the yellow and orange tomatoes have just as much nutrition as their red counterparts.

Roasted regular-size tomatoes with herbs (or not) Preheat oven to 400425 degrees. Cut tomatoes in half. Lay either cut side up or down (I laid mine cut side down but next time will lay them cut side up since I think that will keep more of the tomato flavor in). Drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle on any herbs you like – basil, thyme, rosemary all work well. But be sure and chop them up fine. I also like

nicely, and salt and pepper. Just mix this up in a bowl. If you have any herbs, again like basil, thyme or rosemary, chop up fine and add to taste. Pour onto sprayed baking pan and roast until skins look spotty and a bit puffy, about 20 minutes.

Baked potato nachos with secret ingredient For Bart L., who likes this spicy appetizer at restaurants but wants to make them at home. By boiling potatoes first, they bake up really nice in the oven. And the secret ingredient that

Freeze those garden tomatoes for winter using Rita’s recipe for roasted tomatoes.THANKS TO RITA HEIKENFELD

to add salt and pepper. Roast until skins start to look spotty if you are roasting skin side up. Otherwise, roast until tomatoes look wrinkled and are soft. Let cool and, if you like, remove skins. The first time I made them I didn’t remove the skins, but when I used them in cooked dishes they were a little tough. My suggestion is to remove them or put them in the blender or food processor and the skins will process small enough. You will wind up with more of a puree if you put them through the blender or food processor, but the bonus is you get the nutritious benefits of the skin. Freeze in desired quantities.

of minced garlic, a drizzle of olive oil to coat

10 medium red or Yukon gold potatoes 1 pouch ranch salad dressing Jalapeño slices (optional) 16 oz. shredded Mexican blend or favorite cheese 16 oz. sour cream Green onions or chives, sliced thin

Cook potatoes with skin on: cover with cold water and a dash of salt. Bring to boil, reduce heat, cover and cook just until tender, about 15 minutes. Drain and cool so that you can cut them into thick slices. Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Put slices in single

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Tom & Sue Williams celebrated 60 years of marriage on 8/1/13. They have 3 children, 7 grandchildren and 2 greatgrandchildren. Sue worked for PNC for 16 years; after leaving PNC she worked for the Campbell Co. Child Support Office and retired in 1999. Tom worked for GE in Evendale for 17 years and then worked at Gladstone Labs for 25 years and retired in 2000. They resided in Dayton, Ky for most of their married life and now reside in Cold Spring.

Appel

By Amy Scalf ascalf@nky.com

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Mike Little conquers a half-wall during the Fleeing Felon Run at Lincoln Ridge Park on Saturday, Aug. 10.

Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator and author. Find her blog online at Cincinnati.Com/blogs. Email her at columns@communitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-248-7130, ext. 356.

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Runners overcome challenges at Fleeing Felon Run INDEPENDENCE — Felons flee from police to stay out of jail, but at the Fleeing Felon Run, participants make their way through 3.5 miles filled with 12 different obstacles in an effort to stay fit, have fun and raise money to fight cancer. The Independence Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 75 hosted the run Saturday, Aug. 10, through the woods of Lincoln Ridge Park. Proceeds from the race benefit Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Cancer/Oncology Blood Research Center. Approximately 80 people, ranging in age from 13-51, completed the course, according to volunteer Phyllis Vetter. At the finish line, a team of runners talked about how much fun they had, as well as their favorite and least favorite parts of the course. “This year is better than last year,” said Eric Nelson.

layer on sprayed baking sheets. Sprinkle each with the dressing mix, jalapeños, and the cheeses. Bake uncovered for 8-10 minutes or until cheese melts. Dollop with sour cream and onions or chives.

Florence Rare Coin

Roasted cherry tomatoes with herbs and garlic This is nice since everything is mixed in a boil and then just poured onto a sprayed pan to roast. Delicious as a side dish and, if you want to freeze them, you can either leave the skins on (they may be a bit tough) or puree them as directed above. Now you can also roast these plain, with just a sprinkling of salt and pepper and oil. Preheat oven to 400425 degrees. For every pint of cherry or grape tomatoes, add a teaspoon

makes these so different? Ranch dressing!

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Al and Mary Appel of Fort Wright, are celebrating their 65th anniversary on August 24th. They were married at St. Agnes Church on August 21, 1948.. Mr. and Mrs. Appel have eight children: Ruth (Steve) Averdick, Carol (John) Dickman, Rita (Dave) Smith, Joyce, (Joe) Burwinkel, Betty (Willie) Schadler, Mary Jo (John) Pollitt, Al Appel Jr., and James (Brenna) Appel. They have 29 grandchildren and 31 great-grandchildren.

RICHIE

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AMY SCALF/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

He said his favorite part was crawling under a shocking field of solarpowered electric wires. “I like being shocked. It was fun,” he said. "The creek was the best part,” said Bart Beck. “I tripped, slipped, fell down, while running through waist-deep water for a half-mile.”

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Congratulations Ed & Sue (Hobbs) Richie on 50 years of marriage. You are wonderful Parents and Grandparents and we love you very much!!! Love, Joey (Jennie), Jeanne (Stuart), Kathy (Don), Katie, Adam, Savannah, Emily, Ashley & Grace.


LIFE

B6 • CCF RECORDER • AUGUST 22, 2013

DEATHS Emma Early Emma “Boots” Early, 81, Dayton, Ky., died Aug. 5, 2013, in Dayton. She was a member of St. Bernard Church, Dayton, and was owner-operator of Boo-Joes Laundra Lounge, Dayton. Her husband, Joseph Early, died previously. Survivors include son, Terry Renaker of Carlisle, Texas; daughters, Sharon Early Murphy of Dayton, Kathy Early Powell of Dayton, and Peggy Early Sparks of Dayton; sister, Rosemary Murphy of Bellevue; 10 grandchildren; and 10 great-grandchildren. Memorials: St. Elizabeth Hospice, 483 South Loop Drive, Edgewood, KY 41017 or Hoxworth Blood Center, 3130 Highland Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45229.

Charles Hartman Charles Patrick Hartman, 86, died Aug. 13, 2013, at his residence in Dayton. He was a U.S. Navy veteran who served in World War II. He worked as a production manager at Display Sales Inc. He was a member of St. Bernard’s Parish in Dayton, the Catholic Order of Foresters, Knights of Columbus, and a past member of The Sodality, Men’s Choir, and St.

ABOUT OBITUARIES Basic obituary information and a color photograph of your loved one is published without charge by The Community Press. Please call us at 283-0404 for more information. To publish a larger memorial tribute, call 513-2424000 for pricing details. For the most up-to-date Northern Kentucky obituaries, click on the “Obituaries” link at NKY.com.

Vincent De Paul. His wife, Joan M Hartman, and two grandchildren died previously. Survivors include children, Anne Morrow, Caroline Gruner, Margaret Ison, Therese Breitenstein, Patricia Mahan, Barbara Robke, Stephen Hartman, Gregory Hartman, Laura Evans, Joan Geiger and Christina Collins; brothers, Father Ralph Hartman, Father Ray Hartman and Lawrence Hartman; 24 grandchildren; and 11 greatgrandchildren. Memorials: St. Bernard Furnace Replacement Fund.

Charles Hatcher Charles “Charlie” Lee Hatcher, 90, Alexandria, died Aug. 6, 2013, at his home. He was a retired agent for Commonwealth Insurance, an

Army veteran of World War II and the Korean conflict, a member and former deacon of the First Baptist Church of Highland Heights, a former member and officer of the Alexandria Fair Board, Campbell County Cooperative Extension Service, Kentucky Livestock Improvement Association and former president of the State 4-H Leader Council. His wife, Beulah Mae Hatcher, died previously. Survivors include daughters, Judith Ihrig and Mary Beth Hatcher, both of Alexandria; sons, Charles Lee Hatcher II of Milton, Ky., and Vaughn Hatcher of Williamsburg; sisters, Neree Wood of Columbia, S.C., and Jessie Sills of Rockledge, Fla.; one brother, John Hatcher of Brazil; eight grandchildren; and great-grandchildren. Memorials: Baptist Faith

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Ruth Jett Ruth Schwalbach Jett, 87, Edgewood, formerly of Cold Spring, died Aug. 10, 2013, at Emeritus Senior Living, Edgewood. She was a retired bank teller with Fifth Third Bank, Newport. Her husband, Henry Jett, died in 2009. Survivors include her daughters, Kathy Molique of Cold Spring and Carol Schwalbach of Fort Thomas; son, Mike Schwalbach of Indianapolis; and five grandchildren. Entombment was at Evergreen Cemetery, Southgate. Memorials: Alzheimer’s Association , 644 Linn St., Suite 1026, Cincinnati, OH 45203.

Donna McCleary Donna L. McCleary, 49, Alexandria, died Aug. 6, 2013, at her home. She loved her children, her husband and Jesus. Survivors include her husband, Emeric; son, David McCleary; and daughter, Elena McCleary.

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Lloyd K. McMillan Sr., 73, died Aug. 10, 2013, at his residence in Bellevue. He worked at General Motors for many years where he retired and was a member of the Newport Eagles Lodge 280 and the Dayton Mason Lodge 607 F&AM. His brother Carl McMillan and sister Sharyn Thompson died previously. Survivors include his wife, Margaret McMillan; children Lloyd K. McMillan Jr., Brenda Corman, Rick McMillan and Anthony McMillan; siblings, Joyce Harris, Doris Burnette, Marlene Martin, Donald McMillan, Russell McMillan and Tom McMillan; six grandchildren; five great-grandchildren; and many nieces and nephews. Memorials: American Cancer

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Phyllis Parrott Phyllis J. Parrott, 74, Fort Thomas, died Aug. 12, 2013, at her home. She was a retired clerk for Midland Guardian Insurance Co. and a homemaker. Her grandson, Brett Parrott, brothers Albert and Edward Smith; and sister Helen Smith died prevously. Survivors include her husband, Walter Parrott; sons, John, David and Robert Parrott; sisters, Nancy Parrott, Pam Hill, Karen Boberg and Judy Wilson; seven grandchildren; and six great-grandchildren. Burial was in Evergreen Cemetery, Southgate, KY. Memorials: Hospice of the Bluegrass, 7388 Turfway Road, Florence, KY 41042.

Janet Schuster Janet E. (Fry) Schuster, 81, Fort Thomas, died Aug. 6, 2013, at her residence. She was a member of St. John’s United Church of Christ, Newport. She retired from Electronic Data Services, Cincinnati. She previously worked in sales for McAlpin’s and was employed with Western Life Insurance Co., Fifth Third Bank and Provident Bank, Cincinnati. She was also a homemaker. Her husband, Raymond E. Schuster, died in 2003. Survivors include by her sons, Richard Schuster of Fort Thomas and Robert Schuster of Cincinnati; daughters, Rae Lynn Couch of Union and Regina Carpenter of Fort Thomas; and four grandchildren. Burial was in Alexandria Cemetery. Memorials: Stan Straus Student Aid Fund, St. John’s United Church of Christ, 415 Park Ave., Newport, KY 41071.

Max Seligman Max Nicholas “Nick” Seligman, 64, of Cold Spring, died Aug. 7, 2013.

Arrests/citations

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Kevin Pollitt, 47, 3809 W. Ky. 10, first-degree possession of controlled substance - heroin, possession of drug paraphernalia at AA Highway, July 27. Michele Vienneau, 46, 3809 W. Ky. 10, first-degree possession of controlled substance - heroin, possession of drug paraphernalia at AA Highway, July 27. Jesse D. Shoemaker, 28, 7067 Mount Carmel Road, firstdegree possession of controlled substance - heroin, possession of drug paraphernalia at AA Highway, July 27. Thomas M. Rahan, 24, 1057 Pebble Creek Road, receiving stolen property under $10,000, possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia at 415 Crossroads Blvd., July 23. Nicholas T. Lee, 23, no address known, receiving stolen property under $10,000, possession of marijuana, possession of drug

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Please take notice that Duke Energy Kentucky, Inc. has applied to the Kentucky Public Service Commission for approval to revise its Demand Side Management (DSM) rate for electric service and gas service for residential and commercial customers and add new products for its DSM program available to customers. Duke Energy Kentucky’s current monthly DSM rate for residential gas customers is ($0.039396) per hundred cubic feet (ccf) and for non-residential gas customers is $0.000000 per hundred cubic feet. Duke Energy Kentucky’s current monthly DSM rate for residential electric customers is $0.001988 per kilowatt-hour (kWh) and for nonresidential customers is $0.001104 per kilowatt-hour for distribution service and $0.001070 per kilowatt-hour for transmission service. Duke Energy Kentucky seeks approval to revise these rates as follows: Duke Energy Kentucky’s monthly DSM rate for residential gas customers would increase to ($0.038919) per hundred cubic feet and for non-residential gas customers would remain at $0.000000 per hundred cubic feet. Duke Energy Kentucky’s monthly DSM rate for residential electric customers would increase to $0.002003 per kilowatt-hour and for non-residential customers would increase to $0.001131 per kilowatt-hour for distribution service and would remain at $0.001070 per kilowatthour for transmission service. The rate contained in this notice is the rate proposed by Duke Energy Kentucky. However, the Public Service Commission may order a rate to be charged that differs from this proposed rate. Such action may result in a rate for consumers other than the rate in this notice. The foregoing rates reflect a proposed increase in electric revenues of approximately $91 thousand or 0.03% over current total electric revenues and an increase of $31 thousand or 0.03% over current gas revenues. A typical residential gas customer using 70 ccf in a month will see an increase of $0.03 or 0.04%. A typical residential electric customer using 1000 kWh in a month will see an increase of $0.02 or 0.02%. A typical non-residential electric customer using 40 kilowatts and 14,000 kWh will see an increase of $0.39 or 0.03%. Non-residential gas customers and non-residential electric customers served at transmission voltage will see no change in their bills from this application. Any corporation, association, body politic or person may by motion within thirty (30) days after publication or mailing of notice of the proposed rate changes, submit a written request to intervene to the Public Service Commission, 211 Sower Boulevard, P.O. Box 615, Frankfort, Kentucky 40602, and shall set forth the grounds for the request including the status and interest of the party. The intervention may be granted beyond the thirty (30) day period for good cause shown. Written comments regarding the proposed rate may be submitted to the Public Service Commission by mail or through the Public Service Commission’s website. A copy of this application filed with the Public Service Commission is available for public inspection at Duke Energy Kentucky’s office at 4580 Olympic Boulevard, Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 and on its website at http://www.duke-energy.com. This filing and any other related documents can be found on the Public Service Commission’s website at http://psc.ky.gov. CE-0000565760

Nick Sharp Nick Sharp, 49, Alexandria, died Aug. 8, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Medical Center in Fort Thomas. He was a welder and tool maker with Oakley Die & Mold Co. in Mason, Ohio, and he was a member of the NRA. Survivors include his wife, Kathy Sharp of Alexandria; daughter, Katie Sharp; son, Owen Sharp; brother, Jeff Sharp; and mother, Colette Sharp. Burial was in the Johns Hill Cemetery, Wilder. Memorials: American Heart Association, 5211 Madison Road, Cincinnati, OH 45227.

Nicholas Specht Nicholas Specht, 30, Fort Thomas, died Aug. 10, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Medical Center in Fort Thomas. He was a member of the First Christian Church of Fort Thomas. He loved animals and was a former employee of the Bellevue Animal Hospital. He also loved playing Frisbee, golf and fishing. His daughter, Leah Nicholette Specht, died previously.

See DEATHS, Page B7

POLICE REPORTS COLD SPRING

WHAT’S ON YOUR GROCERY LIST?

He was an honorary graduate and member of the Covington Catholic Hall of Fame, and a former president of the school’s Boosters Club. He was also a member of the Raiders Youth Football Hall of Fame. His parents Max and Dell Seligman died previously. Survivors include his wife, Sharon Edwards; children, Nicole Seligman, Max Jason Seligman and Whitney Mulroney; three grandchildren; and siblings, Vicki Seligman, Melissa Paton and Mark Seligman. Burial was at Mother of God Cemetery in Fort Wright. Memorials: Max Nicholas Seligman Scholarship Fund, c/o Covington Catholic High School, 1600 Dixie Highway, Park Hills, KY 41011.

paraphernalia at 415 Crossroads Blvd., July 23. Jordan N. Watson, 21, 704 Eden Court, receiving stolen property under $10,000, possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia at 415 Crossroads Blvd., July 23. Michelle N. Galiccio, 24, 208 W. 32nd St., receiving stolen property under $10,000, possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia, warrant at 415 Crossroads Blvd., July 23. Everette U. Wright, 28, 230 E. 5th St., warrant at Alexandria Pike, July 31. Robert M. Uebel, 52, 1 Chalon Lane, third-degree criminal trespass at 70 Martha Layne Collins Blvd., July 31.

Incidents/investigations First-degree burglary Report of cash and firearm taken from residence at 14 Henry Court, July 29. Second-degree robbery Report of woman concealed merchandise and shoved store employee and fled when confronted at 5400 Alexandria Pike, July 21. Theft by unlawful taking Report of wallet taken from vehicle at 70 Martha Layne Collins Blvd., July 19. Report of money missing from cash register at end of shift at 17 Martha Layne Collins, July 29. Theft by unlawful taking or shoplifting Report of women took items without paying at 70 Martha Layne Collins Blvd., July 29. Theft by unlawful taking or shoplifting, first-degree wanton endangerment Report of men took air conditioner without paying and almost struck store employee with vehicle while fleeing at 5400 Alexandria Pike, July 28.

ABOUT POLICE REPORTS The Community Recorder publishes the names of all adults charged with offenses. The information is a matter of public record and does not imply guilt or innocence.


LIFE

AUGUST 22, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • B7

Coldframe can take garden through winter

MARRIAGE LICENSES

Question: My spring/ summer garden did poorly, but I have heard it’s also possible to plant a fall and winter garden. Is this true? How and when should I begin this project? Answer: There is still time to plant a few things without winter protection or many more if you construct a simple cold frame or just Mike cover the Klahr crops with HORTICULTURE some kind CONCERNS of frost protection. It is not too late to continue to enjoy the garden and add new plantings. A variety of produce can be grown in Northern Kentucky gardens in the coming weeks, allowing fresh items to be available well into the fall. The cooler nights experienced later in the year as these vegetables mature may increase the sugar content of many crops and thus increase their quality. Cooler nights also slow growth, however, so crops can take longer to mature than in the summer. Keep this slower pace in mind when you check seeds for days to maturity. You need to plant let-

throughout the fall. After planting the crops mentioned above, it’s time to build a simple coldframe. All you need is 4 boards (2 by 12 inches) for the sides, and some kind of clear plastic or glass for the roof. Old glass sliding doors or old double-pane windows work great for this. Build your base to fit the glass or plastic roof. Make the length whatever you want, but keep the width to about 4 feet so you can easily reach the middle of the bed from each side without climbing into the coldframe. Put this “empty sandbox” on the ground, dig up the existing soil, add some compost or a few bags of potting mix, and plant in it. This will be your cold frame. Now, inside your coldframe, you can plant all sorts of cool-season veggies: carrots, kale, collards, Bibb lettuce, turnips, kohlrabi, Chinese cabbage, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, spinach, radishes, turnips, beets, parsley, snow peas and leaf lettuce. You will enjoy har-

UPCOMING EVENTS Northern Kentucky Master Gardener Program: Register now for the next Master Gardener class, only held once every three years in Boone County, and this is the year. Call 586-6101 for Tomato & Pepper Tasting Party: 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 22, at the Boone County Extension Office. Bring one or more fresh tomatoes and/or peppers of known variety to enter into the “Tomato & Pepper Tasting” event, and if you have some big ones, you can enter the “Largest Tomato” or “Largest Pepper” contest. If you can, also bring a covered dish made with tomatoes or peppers to share for the pot luck portion. Play tomato/ pepper games, puzzles, tomato bowling for the kids, win prizes.

tuce seeds right away for a fall harvest. Try some of the red, purple, yellow or spotted varieties for added color and fun. In addition, go ahead and plant seeds now for mustard greens, turnip greens and beet greens. Also, between now and Sept. 1, make two staggered plantings of spinach. Between now and Sept. 15, make weekly plantings of radish seeds for a prolonged harvest

Survivors include his parents, Eric Specht and Holly Stegner Specht; sister, Jennifer Specht; grandparents, Carol Stegner and Noel Stegner and Alice Specht. Burial was in the Evergreen Cemetery. Memorials: First Christian Church of Fort Thomas Building Fund 1031 Alexandria Pike Fort Thomas, KY 41075 or the Droegge House 925 Fifth Ave. Dayton, KY 41074.

Hope, Indiana Town Square Sunday, August 25

Helen Wilhelm-Olsen, 78, Fort Thomas, died Aug. 9, 2013, at Carmel Manor Nursing Home, Fort Thomas. She was a retired executive assistant to the provost at Northern Kentucky University. She was also a member of St. Thomas Church, Fort Thomas, where she often volunteered. Her husband, Tom, died in 2001. Survivors include sons, Alexander H. Wilhelm-Olsen of Walton, Gregory Wilhelm-Olsen of Camp Springs, Nicholas Wilhelm-Olsen of Apex, N.C.; brother, Hugh Coomes of Independence; sister, Anne Coomes

9:00-4:00

of Fort Thomas; and seven grandchildren. Burial was in St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas. Memorials: Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research Grand Central Station, P.O. Box 4777, N.Y., N.Y. 101634777 or St. Thomas Church, 26 E. Villa Place Fort Thomas, KY 41075.

Helen Wilhelm-Olsen

Mike Klahr is the Boone County extension agent for horticulture.

Arts & Antiques Fair on the Square

DEATHS Continued from Page B6

vesting up until Christmas, and many of these crops will actually survive the winter and start growing again in February and March for an April harvest. If you vent the roof about ½-1 inch, your coldframe will never get too hot. Otherwise, if it is kept tightly closed, the temperature inside will climb to 100 degrees on a sunny winter day. Ventilation is essential to avoid high-temperature damage to the plants growing inside the coldframe.

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Quality of life at the end of life.

(859) 301-4600 | www.stelizabeth.com/hospice CE-0000542761

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Angel Craddock, 23, of Fort Thomas and Dallas Stumler, 24, of Seoul, issued Aug. 1, 2013. Julie Richardson, 48, of Buffalo and Curt Barlow, 49, of Spokane, issued Aug. 1, 2013. Christine Wolfzorn, 24, and Keith Bezold, 26, both of Fort Thomas, issued Aug. 1, 2013. Parris England, 20, and Brandon Bragg, 22, both of Columbus, issued Aug. 2, 2013. Alishia Shupert, 23, of Dayton and Kevin Isaacs, 31, of New Lebanon, issued Aug. 2, 2013. Brittany Shireman, 25, of Fort Thomas and Christopher Van Hoose, 34, of Prestonburg, issued Aug. 3, 2013. Susan Scherzer, 26, of Lexington and Bento Gurley, 26, of Cincinnati, issued Aug. 3, 2013. Peggy Lane, 47, of Marie-

mont and Michael Welch, 46, of Maysville, issued Aug. 5, 2013. Kathryn Bezanson, 32, of Cincinnati and Carlos Saienz, 39, of Mexico City, issued Aug. 5, 2013. Stacey McLean, 26, of Youngstown and Kyle Kuhlman, 26, of Bluffton, issued Aug. 6, 2013. Gilliam Marksberry 38, and Gilbert Marksberry, 45, both of Covington, issued Aug. 6, 2013. Kristin Kendall, 26, of Richmond and Mahmoud Mohamed, 25, of Egypt, issued Aug. 6, 2013. Patricia Berry, 67, of Cincinnati and Dewayne Thomas, 63, of Somerset, issued Aug. 6, 2013. Liisa Hiltunen, 22, of Sydney and Timothy Burns, 23, of Cincinnati, issued Aug. 7, 2013.


LIFE

B8 • CCF RECORDER • AUGUST 22, 2013

Plate it up Kentucky Proud

Whether it’s spring, summer, fall or winter, you can Plate It Up with delicious recipes that put a new twist on your favorite Kentucky Proud foods. Plate it Up Kentucky Proud encourages individuals to explore local food options to prepare a variety of recipes. Purchasing locally helps keep money in the area.

It also helps keep local producers in business. Kentucky is fortunate to grow Diane and proMason duce a EXTENSION wide varieNOTES ty of food products. During the

growing season fresh fruits and vegetables are available at farmers markets throughout the area. In addition valueadded products are often featured at farmers markets and local stores. Some value-added items available include cheese, jams, relishes, canned vegetables, meats, and baked items. The Boone County

City of Cold Spring Audit Report – year ending 6/30/2012 The City of Cold Spring audit report is published in compliance with KRS 91A.040(6). The entire audit report including financial statements and supplemental information is available for public inspection at the Cold Spring City Building, 5694 E. Alexandria Pk., Cold Spring, Ky. during normal business hours. Citizens may obtain a copy of the complete audit report at a cost of ten cents per page. In addition copies of the financial statement prepared in accordance with KRS 424.220 are available to the public at no cost. Charles A. Van Gorder, CPA John P. Walker, CPA, MBA Lori A. Owen, CPA John R. Chamberlin, CPA, MBA Members of AICPA & KyCPA Licensed in Kentucky & Ohio

Independent Auditor’s Report To the Honorable Mayor and Members of the Council City of Cold Spring, Kentucky

We have audited the accompanying financial statements of the governmental activities, the business-type activities and each major fund of the City of Cold Spring, Kentucky (City), as of and for the year ended June 30, 2012, which collectively comprise the City’s basic financial statements as listed in the table of contents. These financial statements are the responsibility of the City’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audit. We conducted our audit in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United States of America. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion. In our opinion, the financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the respective financial position of the governmental activities, the business-type activities and each major fund of the City of Cold Spring, Kentucky as of June 30, 2012, and the respective changes in financial position and, where applicable, cash flows thereof for the year then ended in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. In accordance with Government Auditing Standards, we have also issued our report dated May 1, 2013 on our consideration of the City of Cold Spring, Kentucky’s internal control over financial reporting and our tests of its compliance with certain provisions of laws, regulations, contracts and grant agreements and other matters. The purpose of that report is to describe the scope of our testing of internal control over financial reporting and compliance and the results of that testing and not to provide an opinion on the internal control over financial reporting or on compliance. That report is an integral part of an audit performed in accordance with Government Auditing Standards and should be considered in conjunction with this report in considering the results of our audit. The management’s discussion and analysis on pages 4 through 8 and the budgetary comparison information on pages 25 and 26, are not a required part of the basic financial statements but are supplementary information required by accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. We have applied certain limited procedures, which consisted principally of inquiries of management regarding the methods of measurement and presentation of the required supplementary information. However, we did not audit the information and express no opinion on it.

Van Gorder, Walker & Co., Inc. Erlanger, Kentucky May 1, 2013 CITY OF COLD SPRING, KENTUCKY BUDGETARY COMPARISON SCHEDULE - BUDGET TO ACTUAL - GENERAL FUND For the Year Ended June 30, 2012

Original

Revisions

Final

Actual

Variance with Final Budget Favorable (Unfavorable)

$ 5,463,145

$ (117,751)

$ 5,345,394

$ 5,524.099

$ 178,705

873,000 110,500 114,515 335,400 1,964,455 18,000 -

60,775 10,195 135 (324,150) (1,626,005) (11,400) 1,921,110

933,775 120,695 114,650 11,250 338,450 6,600 1,921,110

940,908 133,372 136,878 15,659 338,620 1,265 1,991,358

7,133 12,677 22,228 4,409 170 (5,335) - 70.248

8,879,015

---(87091)

8,791,924

9,082,159

290,235

898,783 1,671,695 564,330 9,700 55,150 -

(63,463) (297,598) (144,158) (2,700) (9,590) 61,013 158,720

835,320 1,374,097 420,172 7,000 45,560 61,013 158,720

772,624 1,262,577 413,982 4,488 45,850 32,846 133,230

62,696 111,520 6,190 2,512 (290) 28,167 25,490

3,199,658

(297,776)

2,901,882

2,665,597

236,285

-(165,000)

----------

-(165,000)

121,500 -----------

121,500 (165,000)

$ 210,685 $ 5,725,042 $ 6,538,062

$ 813,020

----------Budgeted Amounts-----------

Budgetary fund balance, July 1 Resources (inflows) Property taxes Licenses/permits Intergovernmental Fines and forfeitures Charges for services Parks, trees and recreation Other

Cooperative Extension Service is offering a challenge. Information about the Plate it Up Kentucky Proud Challenge is available at our office. The seven-day challenge can be completed anytime between Aug. 26 and Sept. 27. It involves tracking your fruit and vegetable intake, sharing the names of the local foods used, and making a Plate it Up Kentucky Proud recipe. Plate it Up Kentucky Proud is a partnership project between the University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service, the Kentucky Department of Agriculture and the University of Kentucky School of Human Environmental Sciences. This project provides healthy, great tasting recipes using Kentucky Proud products for the people of the Commonwealth. Visit kyproud.com/recipes/ for more Kentucky Proud information and recipes.

Easy Cheesy Eggplant

Yield: 12, 1/2 cup servings 3 cups cubed eggplant 2 medium tomatoes, sliced 1 large onion, sliced 1/4 cup melted butter 1/4 cup unsweetened

applesauce 1/4 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon dried basil 1/4 teaspoon garlic powder 8 ounces shredded mozzarella cheese 1/2 cup whole wheat bread crumbs 2 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese Peel eggplant and slice into one-half inch cubes. Layer eggplant, tomatoes, and onions in a casserole dish. Mix butter and applesauce and pour half over the vegetable mixture. Sprinkle with the salt, basil, and garlic powder. Cover and bake for 20 minutes in a 450 degree F oven. Remove from oven and top with mozzarella cheese, whole wheat bread crumbs, and Parmesan cheese. Pour the remaining butter and applesauce mixture over the cheese. Bake an additional 10 minutes, uncovered. Nutritional Analysis: 120 calories, 7 g fat, 170 mg sodium, 6 g carbohydrate, 2 g fiber, 6 g protein. Diane Mason is county extension agent for family and consumer sciences at the Boone County Cooperative Extension Service.

NOTICE OF ADOPTION, TITLE AND SUMMARY OF ALEXANDRIA ORDINANCE 2013-12 I hereby certify that the following is the Title and Summary of Ordinance 2013-12 of the City of Alexandria, in Campbell County, Kentucky, which was adopted by City Council on August 15, 2013: ORDINANCE NO. 2013-12: AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF ALEXANDRIA, IN CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY, AMENDING SECTION 38.01 OF THE CITY CODE OF ORDINANCES, AND ORDINANCES 22-94, AND 2002-05, IN ORDER TO AMEND THE CITY’S CODE OF ETHICAL CONDUCT PERTAINING TO THE REQUIRED NUMBER OF ANNUAL MEETINGS OF THE BOARD. This Ordinance changes the number of required annual meetings of the City Ethics Board from four (4) to (2). *************************************** I, Michael A. Duncan, an attorney licensed to practice law in the Commonwealth of Kentucky, for Ziegler & Schneider, P.S.C., City Attorneys for the City of Alexandria, in Campbell County, Kentucky, do hereby certify that this Notice of Adoption, Title and Summary of Ordinance 2013-12 was prepared by me, and that it represents an accurate description of the summary of the contents of the Ordinance. The full text of the Ordinance, and other information relative to the Ordinance, is on file at the office of the City Clerk/Treasurer, 8236 West Main Street, Alexandria, Kentucky 41001. /s/ Michael A. Duncan Michael A. Duncan, attorney For Ziegler & Schneider, P.S.C., City Attorneys 1776355

Dinner honors staff, others Community Recorder

The Edgewoodbased organization New Perceptions will honor 59 individuals for their years of dedicated service at their annual dinner on Aug. 27 at Receptions in Erlanger. Staff, employees of the Site-Based and Community Based Employment Program will receive recognition. Employment, education and therapy is provided to children and adults with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities. New Perceptions provides opportunities for over 800 children and adults to achieve in school and work. Adults with special needs receive job placement assistance and support to succeed and excel in their job. Children with developmental or physical disabilities starting at birth to 3 years of age receive speech, occupational, and/or physical therapy in-home sessions to prepare them for success in school and beyond. Working with the children at an early age makes a dramatic difference in the progress made over the lifetime of the individual. The mission is to provide the opportunities needed to facilitate each individual’s achievement to their maximum potential. “This dinner will move you to laughs and tears, leaving you inspired,” said Shawn Carroll, executive director of New Perceptions. The opening reception is at 6 p.m. with dinner and awards from 7 to 9 p.m. Presenting sponsors for the evening are A-1 Electric Motor Service and Meridian Bioscience Inc.

Amounts available for appropriation General government Police Public works Planning and zoning Parks, trees and recreation Debt service Capital expenditures Total charges to appropriations Proceeds from leases/loans Transfer from (to) Municipal Aid

The Fort Thomas Board of Education will hold a public hearing at the Central Office located at 28 N. Fort Thomas Avenue, Fort Thomas, KY, on Thursday, August 29, 2013, at 7:00pm to hear public comments regarding a proposed general fund tax levy of 98.6 cents on real property and 98.6 cents on personal property.

Road Fund Budgetary fund balance, June 30

$ 5,514,357

The General Fund tax levied in fiscal year 2013 was 95 cents on real property and 95 cents on personal property and produced revenue of $10,731,737.30. The proposed General Fund tax rate of 98.6 cents on real property and 98.6 cents on personal property is expected to produce $11,090,338.85. Of this amount, $388,836.53 is from new and personal property. The compensating tax for 2014 is 94.9 cents on real property and 95 cents on personal property and is expected to produce $10,674,550.35.

CITY OF COLD SPRING, KENTUCKY BUDGETARY COMPARISON SCHEDULE - BUDGET TO ACTUAL MUNICIPAL AID ROAD FUND For the Year Ended June 30, 2012

-Revisions-

---Final---

--Actual--

$ 909,033

(30)

$ 909,003

$ 565,527

$ (343,476)

-----44,000

-----39,643

----83,643

488 ----83,643

488 -------------

Amounts available for appropriation ----953,033

-----39,613

---992,646

---649,658

---(342,988)

Charges to appropriations (outflows) Equipment and vehicles 47,000 995,386 Municipal road fund Debt service ------------

188 (237,316) -------------

47,188 758,070 ------------

47,189 707,538 ---465,341

(1) 50,532 ---(465,341)

Total charges to appropriations Proceeds from capital financing Transfer from General Fund Budgetary fund balance, June 30

---237,128) ------------$ (197,515)

---805,258 ---165,000 $ 352,388

-1,220,068 -----------$(570,410)

---(414,810) ---(165,000) $ (922,798)

Budgetary fund balance, July 1 Resources (inflows) Other income Intergovernmental

-1,042,386 ---165,000 --$ 75,647

The general areas to which revenue of $ 358,601.05 above 2013 revenue is to be allocated are as follows: Cost of collections, $5,379.02; and instruction $ 353,222.03. &($#))#%%'""!$)#

--Original--

Variance with Final Budget Favorable (Unfavorable)

----------Budgeted Amounts-----------

The General Assembly has required publication of this ad1775133 vertisement and information contained herein.


LIFE

AUGUST 22, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • B9

Police presence helps keep schools safe By Amy Scalf ascalf@nky.com

ALEXANDRIA — When Campbell Ridge Elementary students see police volunteers like Rodney Henson, they start running – not because they’re scared, but because they want to get a hug. Henson worked with Alexandria Police Chief Mike Ward at the end of the last school year to develop the Volunteers In Police Service, or VIPS, in Schools program, to provide safety for students in the wake of the Newtown, Conn., shootings. “I’ve never had any tragedy affect me like the Connecticut shootings. It ripped my heart out,” said Henson. “There’s nothing more precious than innocent kids.” VIPS in Schools is the only program of its kind in Kentucky, and Ward expects to present it during the International Association of Chiefs of Police conference in October. The volunteers were in schools for a month before the term ended, but they were back on the first day of the new school year. As students file past him in the hallway, they stop for high-fives, hugs or just to say hi. Mayor Bill Rachford said Henson and the seven other volunteers see those hugs as their reward. “Each volunteer has got one, and they say that’s when they know they’re in the right spot,” he said. “I’m amazed at how a small agency can do this without adding a huge amount of expense.” Henson and seven other volunteers patrol three schools – Campbell Ridge, St. Mary School and Bishop Brossart High School. The next VIPS in Schools training session starts in September. For

Campbell Ridge Elementary students signed this banner for the VIPS in Schools volunteers who oversee safety precautions. AMY SCALF/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

more information, call Henson at 859-957-9372. He said the seven-week training “touches on every aspect of police patrols” except weapons, because they don’t carry firearms. They do get to drive a police cruiser, which stays parked outside the school while they’re on duty. Ward said his officers also stop by to check the school. “So there’s no telling if there’s an officer or a volunteer with that car,” he said. The group trained during the summer to carry stun guns as they walk through the school and its grounds each day, but the volunteers also have a deeper social involvement. “There’s a huge emphasis on social services and how to deal with at-risk kids,” said Ward. The volunteers also escort all visitors through

LEGAL NOTICE "In accordance with Chapter 65 and 424 of the Kentucky Revised Statutes, the financial statement of the Campbell County Conservation District can be inspected by the general public at the Campbell County District Office at 8351 E Main Street, Suite 104, Alexandria, KY on August 26, 28, and 30, 2013 between the hours of 8:00 AM and 4:00 PM. Board Supervisors are: Ron Walter-Vice Dennis McCormick-Chair, Chair, Ken McCormick Sec/Treas, Linda Bray-Schafer, Rick Simon, Gene Dobbs, 1775568 and Sanford Record. NOTICE OF ADOPTION AND SUMMARY OF ORDINANCE The undersigned City Clerk of the City of Bellevue, Kentucky, hereby states that on the 14th day of August, 2013, the City of Bellevue, Kentucky, adopted Ordinance No. 2013-07-02 titled "AN ORDINANCE DELETING A PORTION OF 112.4 OF THE CODE OF CITY ORDINANCES RELATING TO LIQUOR SALES ON ELECTION DA, AND DIRECTING THAT THIS ORDINANCE BE PUBLISHED BY SUMMARY." In summary, this is an Ordinance repealing a portion of a Section of the City Code that prohibits liquor sales during the hours that polls are open on election day (thus allowing such sales on election day during such hours). The City Clerk of the City of Bellevue hereby certifies that the above summary is true and correct and written in a way to inform the public of its contents. Full text of the above Ordinance is available in the Office of the Clerk-Treasurer, 616 Poplar Street, Bellevue, Kentucky. Mary H. Scott City Clerk / Treasurer The undersigned, an attorney licensed to practice law in the Commonwealth of Kentucky, hereby certifies that he prepared the summary of Ordinance referred to above and that the summary represents an accurate depiction of the contents of the Ordinance adopted by the City of Bellevue, Kentucky, on the 14th day of August, 2013. /s/ Richard Robinson City Attorney

6235

officers, not as someone who gets the bad guys, but someone who helps people.” Ward and Henson hope the new group of VIPS in Schools will allow them to keep one volunteer at Campbell Ridge each day, and one to go between the other two schools. Henson said volunteers should expect to spend one day every two weeks “on duty,” and that’s if they make it through the rigorous testing process. Ward said each volun-

the school, and make sure classroom doors are closed and locked, in accordance with new Campbell County School District policies. “As far as safety goes, they have really made an impact, especially making our dismissal process safer,” said Stacie Hardy, Campbell Ridge Elementary assistant principal. “As far as student impact, I’d say it’s important for the children to see someone from the community take time to take care of us. They get to see police

Campbell Ridge Elementary student T.J. Hardy shoots some hoops with VIPS in Schools coordinator Rodney Henson. The police volunteers patrol the school and its grounds each day. AMY SCALF/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

teer submits to drug screening, criminal background check and polygraph test before they’re approved. “We’re going that extra set to make sure we’re putting the right people in the right place,” he said. Henson said he hopes

to see the program become “standard in every school. We want to make Alexandria schools safer, but we want to make all the schools safer everywhere. That’s my dream.” Want to continue the conversation? Tweet @AmyScalfNky

INVITATION TO BID Date: August 22, 2013

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Pursuant to KRS 132.027, as amended by the Kentucky General Assembly Extraordinary Session of 1979, the City of Newport, KY will hold a Public Hearing on Thursday, August 29, 2013 at 5:00 p.m., local time, in the Multi-Purpose Room of the Newport City Building, 998 Monmouth Street, to hear comments from the public regarding a proposed real estate tax rate of $2.74 per $1,000 valuation and proposed personal property tax rate of $2.81 per $1,000. As required by law, this includes the following information: Tax Rate Per $1000 Assessed Valuation

Revenue

Preceding Year Tax Rate and Real Property Revenue

$2.58

$1,721,559

Tax Rate Proposed for 2013 and Expected Real Property Revenue

$2.74

$1,794,998

$2.64 Compensating Tax Rate and Expected Real Property Revenue

$1,729,487

Revenue Expected from New Real Property

$2.74

Tax Rate Proposed for 2013 and $2.81 Expected Personal Property Revenue

$0 $211,528

All revenues in excess of the amounts generated in 2013 will be allocated to all City operating departments and divisions, including: Police, Fire/EMS, Public Works, Recreation, Code Enforcement, and General Administration. The Kentucky General Assembly has required publication of this advertisement and the information contained herein. Amy B. Able, CMC City Clerk, Newport, KY 1001775155 NOTICE OF ADOPTION AND SUMMARY OF ORDINANCE The undersigned City Clerk of the City of Bellevue, Kentucky, hereby states that on the 14th day of August, 2013, the City of Bellevue, Kentucky, adopted Ordinance No. 2013-07-01 titled "AN ORDINANCE RELATING TO SECTIONS OF THE CITY’S CODE OF ORDINAN CES ALLOWING THE USE OF BELLEVUE BEACH PARK FOR LIMITED OUTDOOR EVENTS, FOR THE ISSUE OF SPECIAL TEMPORARY ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE LICENSES FOR LIMITED OUTDOOR EVENTS AND DIRECTING THAT THIS ORDINANCE BE PUBLISHED BY SUMMARY." In summary, this is an Ordinance that allows the City of Bellevue, Kentucky ("City") to approve and issue permits for "Limited Outdoor Events" in the City, allows the city to establish license fees and application regulations for such permits, and allows, pursuant to a written application process, for permits for Limited Outdoor Events to be held at the area in the City commonly known as the Bellevue Beach Park. The Ordinance further allows that its existing Special Temporary Distilled Spirit and Wine License, Special Temporary Wine License and a Special Temporary Malt Retail License may, upon application, be granted for a Limited Outdoor Event to any valid existing license holder. The City Clerk of the City of Bellevue hereby certifies that the above summary is true and correct and written in a way to inform the public of its contents. Full text of the above Ordinance is available in the Office of the Clerk-Treasurer, 616 Poplar Street, Bellevue, Kentucky. Mary H. Scott, City Clerk / Treasurer The undersigned, an attorney licensed to practice law in the Common wealth of Kentucky, hereby certifies that he prepared the summary of Ordinance referred to above and that the summary represents an accurate depiction of the contents of the Ordinance adopted by the City of Bellevue, Kentucky, on the 14th day of August, 2013. /s/ Richard Robinson, City Attorney 1776356

PROJECT: Tower Park Amphitheater Landslide Stabilization, Ft. Thomas, Kentucky SEALED BIDS WILL BE RECEIVED AT: Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) 2835 Crescent Springs Road Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 UNTIL:

Date: September 5, 2013 Time: 9:00 AM (local time)

At said place and time, and promptly thereafter, all Bids that have been duly received will be publicly opened and read aloud. The Tower Park Amphitheater Landslide Stabilization Project is generally described as follows: undercutting existing soils in the landslide area, benching & compacting the fills per plans and specifications, importing appropriate additional fills, installation of bedrock trench drains, restoration of disturbed area and other related work. This work cannot start until after September 29, 2013. All Bids must be in accordance with the Instructions to Bidders and Contract Documents on file, and available for examination at: Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) 2835 Crescent Springs Road Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 Copies of the Bidding Documents may be obtained from the office of Northern Kentucky Water District at the address indicated herein. Charges for all documents obtained will be made on the followCharge ing basis: $ 20.00 Complete set of Bidding Documents Mailing and Handling (U.S. Mail) (if requested)$ 5.00 Charges for Bidding Documents and mailing and handling, if applicable, will not be refunded. Bids will be received on a lump sum basis as described in the Contract Documents. Bid security, in the form of a certified check or a Bid Bond (insuring/bonding company shall be rated "A" by AM Best) in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the maximum total bid price, must accompany each Bid. The Successful Bidder will be required to furnish a Construction Payment Bond and a Construction Performance Bond (insuring/bonding company shall be rated "A" by AM Best) as security for the faithful performance of the contract and the payment of all bills and obligations arising from the performance of the Contract. Contractor and all Subcontractors will be required to conform to the labor standards set forth in the Contract Documents. This project does not fall under the provisions of KRS 337.505 to 337.550 for prevailing wage rates. Evaluation of Bids and the awarding of a final contract are subject to the reciprocal preference for Kentucky resident bidders pursuant to KRS 45A490 to 45A.494 and (KAR 200 5:400). Owner reserves the right to reject any or all Bids, including without limitation the right to reject any or all nonconforming, nonresponsive, incomplete, unbalanced, or conditional Bids, to waive informalities, and to reject the Bid of any Bidder if Owner believes that it would not be in the best interest of Owner to make an award to that Bidder. Owner also reserves the right to negotiate with the apparent qualified Bidder to such an extent as may be determined by Owner. Minority Bidders are encouraged to bid. Bids shall remain subject to acceptance for 60 days after the day of bid opening or for such longer period of time to which a Bidder may agree in writing upon request of the Owner. If a Contract is to be awarded, the Owner will give the successful Bidder a Notice of Award during the period of time during which the successful Bidder’s bid remains subject to acceptance. Richard Harrison, Vice President of Engineering, Water Quality, & Production Northern Kentucky Water District 1776263


LIFE

B10 • CCF RECORDER • AUGUST 22, 2013

Festival began as recognition of town’s ‘old-timers’ By Stephanie Salmons ssalmons@nky.com

RABBIT HASH — An annual end-of-summer festival continues to pay homage to Rabbit Hash’s history. The 34th annual Old Timers Day Festival will be held from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 31, in the river community. “We will have food, fun, kids games, live music and general merrymaking,” organizer and Rabbit Hash General Store proprietor Terrie Markesbery said.

Gunpowder Creek, Markesbery said, always makes an appearance. Additional live music will be provided by Whiskey Bent Valley Boys, Downtown County Band, G. Miles and the Hitmen and more. There will also be a carnival in the barn for children, face painting and pottery demonstrations. The festival, she explained, first began as a way to recognize the patrons of the circa-1831 general store and “the people who have lived here their whole lives, the

old-timers.” The day is “just downhome fun,” and a gathering where families, friends and people of all walks of life can gather, Markesbery said. “People just keep showing up for this consistent Americana fun.” Old Timers Day is, to the locals, also a time of closure and renewals, she said. “It marks time for people that live here and marks time for the oldtimers,” said Markesbery. “They can say another year has gone by.” The best part though, at least according to Markesbery, is to see how the locals come together.

Old Timers Day is a tradition in Rabbit Hash. This year, the festival, pictured here several years ago, is Aug. 31.FILE PHOTO

“You could not do this festival if you (didn’t) have 50 volunteers.” Parking in the town is limited so those who attend are asked to carpool. There will be a shuttle to bring visitors from the

INVITATION TO BID August 22, 2013 PROJECT: Memorial Parkway Treatment Plant- Fluoride Tank Replacement SEALED BIDS WILL BE RECEIVED AT: Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) 2835 Crescent Springs Road P.O. Box 18640 Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 UNTIL:

Date: Time:

September 5, 2013 2:00 p.m., local time

At said place and time, and promptly thereafter, all Bids that have been duly received will be publicly opened and read aloud. The Northern Kentucky Water District is requesting bid prices for the purchase and installation of the following item: one 6,800 gallon polypropylene tank with appropriate coatings for the storage of hydrofluoro silicic acid for installation at the Northern Kentucky Water District’s Memorial Parkway Treatment Plant, 2055 Memorial Parkway, Ft. Thomas Kentucky to replace an existing tank that has failed. This work shall also include assembly of the tank within the existing fluoride chemical room and checking the tank for water tightness. The fluoride chemical room access will be made through 7’2" x 3’ door. All tank connections and accessories shall match the existing tank piping configurations and shall be installed at the factory. All Bids must be in accordance with the Bidding Documents on file, and available for examination at: Northern Kentucky Water District, 2835 Crescent Springs Road, Erlanger, Kentucky 41018. Copies of the Bidding Documents may be obtained from the office at the address indicated herein by contacting Denise Manning, at (859) 426-2718. There is no charge for these documents. All questions concerning the Work or requests for site visits should be directed to Kevin Owen at (859) 547-3277. Bids will be received and awarded on a Lump Sum Basis as described in the Contract Documents. Bid security, in the form of a certified check or a Bid Bond (insuring/bonding company shall be rated "A" by AM Best) in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the maximum total bid price, must accompany each Bid. The Successful Bidder will be required to furnish a Construction Payment Bond and a Construction Performance Bond (insuring/bonding company shall be rated "A" by AM Best) as security for the faithful performance of the contract and the payment of all bills and obligations arising from the performance of the Contract. Contractor and all Subcontractors will be required to conform to the labor standards set forth in the Contract Documents. This project does not fall under the provisions of KRS 337.505 to 337.550 for prevailing wage rates. Evaluation of Bids and the awarding of a final contract are subject to the reciprocal preference for Kentucky resident bidders pursuant to KRS 45A490 to 45A.494 and (KAR 200 5:400). Owner reserves the right to reject any or all Bids, including without limitation the right to reject any or all nonconforming, non-responsive, incomplete, unbalanced, or conditional Bids, to waive informalities, and to reject the Bid of any Bidder if Owner believes that it would not be in the best interest of Owner to make an award to that Bidder. Owner also reserves the right to negotiate with the apparent qualified Bidder to such an extent as may be determined by Owner. Minority Bidders are encouraged to bid. Bids shall remain subject to acceptance for 60 days after the day of bid opening or for such longer period of time to which a Bidder may agree in writing upon request of the Owner. If a Contract is to be awarded, the Owner will give the successful Bidder a Notice of Award during the period of time during which the successful Bidder’s bid remains subject to acceptance. Richard Harrison, Vice President of Engineering, Water Quality and Production Northern Kentucky Water District 6526

parking area. Coolers are not permitted. Want to continue the

Cornhole tourney to help veterans By Stephanie Salmons ssalmons@nky.com

LEGAL NOTICE TRANSIT AUTHORITY OF NORTHERN KENTUCKY (T.A.N.K.) As required by KRS 65.070(1)(c), the names and addresses of the members of the T.A.N.K. governing body and its chief executive officer are as follows: 1. Chief Executive Officer : Andrew C. Aiello, General Manager 3375 Madison Pike Fort Wright, Kentucky 41017 Telephone Number-(859) 814-2143 2. Board Members : Bryan Carlisle 10751 Omaha Trace Union, Kentucky 41091

Phil Ciafardini 37 Brigadier Court Wilder, Kentucky 41076

Jean Miller 2491 Legends Way Crestview Hills, Kentucky 41017

Steve A. McCoy 9266 Tranquility Drive Florence, Kentucky 41042

Bill Voelker 10028 Timbercreek Court California, Kentucky 41007

Brian Ellerman 560 East Fourth Street Newport, Kentucky 41071

Timothy Donoghue 8671 Valley Circle Drive Florence, Kentucky 41042

Ed Kuehne 5303 Old Taylor Mill Road Taylor Mill, Kentucky 41015

Dave Sogar 3261 New Orleans Court Edgewood, Kentucky 41017 In accordance with Chapters 65 and 424 of the Kentucky Revised Statutes, Transit Authority of Northern Kentucky financial records may be examined by the general public at the TANK general office, 3375 Madison Pike, Fort Wright, Kentucky, during normal business hours when said office is open. /ss/David L. Anneken Secretary-Treasurer Transit Authority of Northern Kentucky

1001776030

Legal Notice The Campbell County Board of Education will hold a public hearing at 6:00 p.m. on Thursday, August 29, 2013, at the Alexandria Educational Center, 51 Orchard Lane, Alexandria, Kentucky, for the purpose of hearing public comments regarding proposed 2013-14 general fund tax levies of 59.2 cents per $100 on real estate and on personal property. In fiscal year 2012-13 the general fund tax rate levied was 56.6 cents on real estate and on personal property and produced total revenue of $17,495,907, compared to that year’s expected total of $18,004,168 assuming a 100% collection rate. For 2013-14 the proposed general tax rates of 59.2 cents on real estate and on personal property are expected to produce revenue of $18,790,623 (assuming a 100% collection rate) of which $1,676,444 is expected to be from new and personal property. Of the total expected tax revenue for 2013-14, $18,226,905 is projected to be collected as current year’s taxes, based on an estimated collection rate of 97%. The 2013-14 compensating general tax rate is 57.0 cents on real estate and on personal property with total revenue expected to be $18,092,323 if these rates were used and if there were a 100% collection rate. The general areas to which the estimated tax revenues for 2013-14 in excess of the collected tax revenues for 2012-13 will be allocated are as follows: instruction, cost of collections, technology; retirement contributions; and building fund. The General Assembly has required publication of this advertisement and information contained herein.

conversation? Tweet at @SSalmonsNKY

CRESTVIEW HILLS — A cornhole tournament at Thomas More College will raise money for a veterans’ scholarship. Eddie Oestreicher, an assistant professor in the Department of Business Administration, said the college decided about a year ago they “wanted to be a lot more veteran friendly.” “We – a group of administrators and educators – formed a task force to develop strategies and approaches that would promote the school, inform the military of our ‘Yellow Ribbon’ status and provide fun events to honor both our returning reserve and active duty service members and their families,” Oestreicher said in an email. Enter, then, the inaugural Heroes Cup Cornhole Tournament, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 24, near the Bank of Kentucky Observatory on the Thomas More campus. While 70 percent of the proceeds will go to tournament payout, 30 percent will go to the school’s Heroes Scholarship Fund.

Oestreicher said that’s a new scholarship that will benefit returning veterans. According to Oestreicher, there will be “a whole host of vendors that are military-related.” Winners also qualify to participate in a West Virginia tournament with a $20,000 prize payout. The event is something that can be enjoyed not only by folks who play regularly, Oestreicher said, “but also people who play in their backyard.” According to Oestreicher, the tournament is “open to everyone. “We want to make it an annual event.” Oestreicher, who has lived in Union since 2005, retired in 2012 after 31 years in the military. He spent 10 years in the U.S. Army Reserves and nearly 22 years in the U.S. Navy Reserves. Online registration is $30 per team of two. Visit bit.ly/cornholetourney or call 513-965-8687 to register. Registration is $40 the day of the event. Want to continue the conversation? Tweet at @SSalmonsNKY

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Pursuant to KRS 132.027, the City of Bellevue will hold its public hearing on the 11th day of September 2013 at 6:45 p.m. The meeting will be held at 322 Van Voast Ave., (the Callahan Community Center.) for the purpose of hearing comments from the public regarding the institution of proposed tax rates for the 2013-2014 Fiscal Year. As required by law,

Tax Rate (Per $100.00 of Assessed Value)

Revenue

Preceding Year’s Rate & Revenue Generated

.273 (Real) .287 (Personal)

$ 969,758. $ 86,113.

Tax Rate Proposed & Revenue Expected

.290 (Real) .354 (Personal)

$1,023,844. $ 91,103.

Compensating Rate & Revenue Expected

.263 (Real) .276 (Personal)

$ 934,236. $ 82,679.

Expected Revenue Generated from New Property

none

Expected Revenue Generated from Personal Property

.354

none $

91,103.

The City of Bellevue proposes to exceed the compensating tax rate by levying a real property tax rate of .290 (per $100.00 of assessed value) and a personal property tax rate of .354 (per $100.00 of assessed value). The excess revenue generated will be utilized for the following purposes: General Fund for governmental purposes THE KENTUCKY GENERAL ASSEMBLY HAS REQUIRED PUBLICATION OF THIS ADVERTISEMENT AND THE INFORMATION CONTAINED HEREIN. Edward Riehl, Mayor City of Bellevue Publication dates:

1001775468

August 22, 2013 August 29, 2013

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LIFE

AUGUST 22, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • B11

New medical education center opens in Erlanger By Kamellia Soenjoto Smith Recorder Contributor

ERLANGER — “When students come here, we know their objective. Everybody wants a job,” explained Sherry AlstonFeltson, campus director of Ross Medical Education Center in Erlanger. “We give everybody the tools.” The new school, which opened just last month, provides training in subjects such as medical assistant, pharmacy technician, as well as medical insurance billing and office administration. What makes Ross unique? Size, for one thing. “The campus is meant to be small.” Denise Stock is studying to be a pharmacy technician. “The classes are small. I like that because we got a lot of oneon-one,” she said. “Our students are more to us than just a number,” Alston-Feltson pointed out. “The reason for the small class is to develop personalized relationships with our students. We’re here to help them to succeed.” Students at Ross can expect to enter the job market sooner than those from other schools. “We have a certificate pro-

Instructor Jane Burk, left, demonstrates on student Lisa Matuskiewicz how to measure blood pressure at Ross Medical Education Center in Erlanger. KAMELLIA SMITH FOR THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

gram, so our programs are eight to nine months long,” she said. All students participate in a six-week externship after they complete their classroom training. She is optimistic about the prospects for graduates. “We’ve seen a growing need for jobs in the medical industry,” she said. What kinds of jobs? Take, for instance, a graduate with a Medical Assistant certificate. “They can work in a hospital, they can work at urgent

care centers, they can work in a doctor’s office,” Alston-Feltson explained.

THERE WILL BE A PUBLIC HEARING AT THE ALEXANDRIA FIRE STATION ON AUGUST 27, 2013. THE PURPOSE OF THIS PUBLIC HEARING IS TO DISCUSS THE PROPERTY TAX RATE FOR ALEXANDRIA FIRE DISTRICT FOR 2013. THE HEARING WILL BEGIN AT 7:15 P.M. AT THE ALEXAN DRIA FIRE STATION, 7951 ALEXANDRIA PIKE, ALEXANDRIA, KENTUCKY 41001. THERE WILL BE A MEETING OF THE FIRE DISTRICT BOARD BEGINNING AT 7:30 P.M. ON AUGUST 27, 2013. THIS MEET ING WILL INCLUDE ACTION TO ENACT THE PROPERTY TAX RATE FOR 2013, TANGIBLE TAX RATE AND VEHICLE AND WATER CRAFT TAX RATES FOR 2013, AND ALL OTHER REGULAR BUSINESS OF THE BOARD. THE TAX RATE FOR 2012 WAS 15.000 CENTS PER 100.00 DOLLARS OF ASSESSED VALUE. THIS RATE PRODUCED APPROXIMATELY $1,137,425.75. THE PROPOSED PROPERTY TAX RATE FOR YEAR 2013 WILL BE 15.000 CENTS PER 100.00 DOLLARS OF ASSESSED VALUE. THE TOTAL REVENUE THIS WILL GENERATE WILL BE APPROXIMATELY $1,130,229.80. THE COMPENSATING TAX RATE AND EX2012, FOR YEAR REVENUE PECTED .1510 CENTS PER 100.00 DOLLARS OF ASSESSED VALUE. THE TOTAL REVE NUE THIS WILL GENERATE WILL BE APPROXIMATELY $1,137,764.66. THE TOTAL TAXABLE VALUE OF ALL PROPERTY TO THE FIRE DISTRICT FOR 2012 IS $753,486,530.00. THE TAX REVENUE FROM NEW STRUCTION WILL BE $10,869.93.

CON-

THE PROPOSED TAX OF 15.000 CENTS PER 100.00 DOLLARS OF ASSESSED VALAND WATER UE ON ALL VEHICLES CRAFT. THE PROPOSED TANGIBLE TAX RATE FOR YEAR 2013 SHALL BE 15.000 CENTS PER 100.00 DOLLARS OF ASSESSED VALTHE REVENUE THIS WILL GENER UE. APPROXIMATELY BE WILL ATE $48,358.56. THE TOTAL TAXABLE VALUE OF ALL TANGIBLE PERSONAL PROPERTY FOR 2013 IS $32,239,039.00 THIS ADVERTISEMENT IS REQUIRED BY THE KENTUCKY GENERAL ASSEMBLY UNDER PROVISIONS OF KRS 132.023 (2) (b) 8. 1001776329

quired over the past 25 years as a nurse,” said Jane Burk, another of the instructors. “I really enjoy it, their eagerness to learn.” The first Ross Medical Education Center opened in 1969. They now have 26 campuses, located in Michigan, Ohio, Indiana, West Virginia and Ken-

INVITATION TO BID Date: August 22, 2013 PROJECT: KY 8 (Mary Ingles Highway) - Melbourne 8" Water Main Replacement SEALED BIDS WILL BE RECEIVED AT: Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) 2835 Crescent Springs Road P.O. Box 18640 Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 Date: September 5, 2013 Time: 10:00 AM

At said place and time, and promptly thereafter, all Bids that have been duly received will be publicly opened and read aloud. The proposed Work is generally described as follows: Construction of approximately 4,247 feet of Class 50, 8" Ductile Iron Pipe and 396 feet of 8" directional bore ductile iron pipe along KY 8 (Mary Ingles Highway) from #221 Mary Ingles Hwy to St. Phillips Church in Melbourne, Campbell County, Kentucky.

tucky. The other Kentucky branch is in Bowling Green. “The capacity for this campus is under 200 students,” Alston-Feltson said. Those with high school education or GED are welcomed to apply. “And we have classes starting every four to six weeks.”

INVITATION TO BID Date: August 22, 2013 PROJECT: Avon Drive Water Main Replacement City of Fort Mitchell, Kenton County, Kentucky SEALED BIDS WILL BE RECEIVED AT: Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) 2835 Crescent Springs Road P.O. Box 18640 Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 UNTIL:

UNTIL:

LEGAL NOTICE ALEXANDRIA FIRE DISTRICT

“They’re trained for both front and back office, so they can handle administrative duties and clinical duties as well.” Ross also offers flexible schedules. “We have morning and evening classes,” she pointed out. “A lot of times what we see is students that have children that go to school. So the morning session might work better. They put the kids on the school bus and then they’re in school.” Bradford Fletcher has been a pharmacy technician for seven years and now teaches at Ross. “The students are learning well. They were a little afraid at first, but once we actually sit down and start explaining it, they’re not afraid,” he said. “It’s a privilege to teach the skills I have ac-

Date: September 4, 2013 Time: 11:00 AM (Local Time)

At said place and time, and promptly thereafter, all Bids that have been duly received will be publicly opened and read aloud. The proposed Work is generally described as follows: Construction of approximately 340 linear feet of 8" PVC water main together with the appurtenances and related work along Avon Drive from Buttermilk Pike to Summit Drive in the City of Fort Mitchell, Kenton County, Kentucky. All Bids must be in accordance with the Instructions to Bidders and Contract Documents on file, and available for examination at: Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) 2835 Crescent Springs Road Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 Or CDS Associates, Inc. 7000 Dixie Highway Florence, Kentucky 41042 Phone: (859) 525-0544

Charges for Bidding Documents and mailing and handling, if applicable, will not be refunded. Bids will be received on a unit price and/or lump sum basis as described in the Contract Documents. Bid security, in the form of a certified check or a Bid Bond (insuring/bonding company shall be rated "A" by AM Best) in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the maximum total bid price, must accompany each Bid. The Successful Bidder will be required to furnish a Construction Payment Bond and a Construction Performance Bond (insuring/bonding company shall be rated "A" by AM Best) as security for the faithful performance of the contract and the payment of all bills and obligations arising from the performance of the Contract. Contractor and all Subcontractors will be required to conform to the labor standards set forth in the Contract Documents. This project falls under the provisions of KRS 337.505 to 337.550 for prevailing wage rates. Evaluation of Bids and the awarding of a final contract are subject to the reciprocal preference for Kentucky resident bidders pursuant to KRS 45A490 to 45A.494 and (KAR 200 5:400). Owner reserves the right to reject any or all Bids, including without limitation the right to reject any or all nonconforming, nonresponsive, incomplete, unbalanced, or conditional Bids, to waive informalities, and to reject the Bid of any Bidder if Owner believes that it would not be in the best interest of Owner to make an award to that Bidder. Owner also reserves the right to negotiate with the apparent qualified Bidder to such an extent as may be determined by Owner. Minority Bidders are encouraged to bid. Bids shall remain subject to acceptance for 60 days after the day of bid opening or for such longer period of time to which a Bidder may agree in writing upon request of the Owner. If a Contract is to be awarded, the Owner will give the successful Bidder a Notice of Award during the period of time during which the successful Bidder’s bid remains subject to acceptance.

Copies of the Bidding Documents may be obtained from the office of CDS Associates, Inc. at the address indicated herein. Charges for all documents obtained will be made on the following basis: Charge Complete set of Bidding Documents $ 30.00 Mailing and Handling (U.S. Mail) (if requested) $ 15.00 Charges for Bidding Documents and mailing and handling, if applicable, will not be refunded. Bids will be received on a unit price and/or lump sum basis as described in the Contract Documents. Bid security, in the form of a certified check or a Bid Bond (insuring/bonding company shall be rated "A" by AM Best) in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the maximum total bid price, must accompany each Bid. The Successful Bidder will be required to furnish a Construction Payment Bond and a Construction Performance Bond (insuring/bonding company shall be rated "A" by AM Best) as security for the faithful performance of the contract and the payment of all bills and obligations arising from the performance of the Contract. Contractor and all Subcontractors will be required to conform to the labor standards set forth in the Contract Documents. This project does not fall under the provisions of KRS 337.505 to 337.550 for prevailing wage rates. Evaluation of Bids and the awarding of a final contract are subject to the reciprocal preference for Kentucky resident bidders pursuant to KRS 45A490 to 45A.494 and (KAR 200 5:400). Owner reserves the right to reject any or all Bids, including without limitation the right to reject any or all nonconforming, non-responsive, incomplete, unbalanced, or conditional Bids, to waive informalities, and to reject the Bid of any Bidder if Owner believes that it would not be in the best interest of Owner to make an award to that Bidder. Owner also reserves the right to negotiate with the apparent qualified Bidder to such an extent as may be determined by Owner. Minority Bidders are encouraged to bid. Bids shall remain subject to acceptance for 60 days after the day of bid opening or for such longer period of time to which a Bidder may agree in writing upon request of the Owner. If a Contract is to be awarded, the Owner will give the successful Bidder a Notice of Award during the period of time during which the successful Bidder’s bid remains subject to acceptance.

Richard Harrison, Vice President of Engineering, Water Quality, & Production Northern Kentucky Water District

Richard Harrison, Vice President of Engineering, Water Quality, & Production Northern Kentucky Water District 6519

All Bids must be in accordance with the Instructions to Bidders and Contract Documents on file, and available for examination at: Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) 2835 Crescent Springs Road Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 Or Cardinal Engineering One Moock Road Erlanger, KY 41071 Copies of the Bidding Documents may be obtained from the office of Cardinal Engineering at the address indicated herein. Charges for all documents obtained will be made on the following basis: Charge Complete set of Bidding Documents $ 46.50 Mailing and Handling (U.S. Mail) (if requested) $ 15.00 Mailing and Handling (FED EX) (if requested) $ 15.00

1776286


LIFE

B12 • CCF RECORDER • AUGUST 22, 2013

LIVING HISTORY

By Amy Scalf ascalf@nky.com

FORT WRIGHT —

History fans from all over the Tristate region converged on the James A. Ramage Civil War Museum Aug. 17 to celebrate the area’s Civil War history at Battery Hooper Days. The event featured historical re-enactors, Civil War-era crafts, cannon firings and a petting zoo.

This year’s Battery Hooper Days at Fort Wright’s James A. Ramage Civil War Museum featured Gen. Adam R. “Stovepipe” Johnson, presented by Bernie O’Bryan. AMY SCALF/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

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Ladies Living History re-enactor Jackie Gardiner has a word with Abraham Lincoln, portrayed by Stan Wernz, at Battery Hooper Days in Fort Wright Aug. 17. AMY SCALF/THE

Historian Robert Mohat discusses candlemaking, beekeeping and uses of honey during Civil War times at the James A. Ramage Museum's Battery Hooper Days Aug. 17. AMY

COMMUNITY RECORDER

SCALF/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

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