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FORT THOMAS

RECORDER

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Fort Thomas 75¢

THURSDAY, APRIL 25, 2013

UP TO BAT B1

BECAUSE COMMUNITY MATTERS

Fort Thomas Civil Air Patrol cadet earns his wings By Amanda Joering ajoering@nky.com

FORT THOMAS — A 17-yearold member of Fort Thomas’s Civil Air Patrol cadet program recently fulfilled his dream of earning his wings. Christian Davis, who has been a member of the program since he was 12, became a licensed Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) private pilot earlier this month. “This is a really big accomplishment, especially for someone one so young,” said the program’s public relations officer First Lieutenant Keith Clapp, who said Christian is the first cadet in the recent history of the Fort Thomas wing to achieve this goal. With the private pilot license, Clapp said Christian is qualified to fly small, single engine

planes right now, but is on his way to being able to fly larger planes and fulfill one of his biggest dreams, becoming a pilot in the United States Air Force. “My dad took my flying for the first time when I was 7, and I just loved it,” Christian said. “Since then my dream has been to fly and serve in the Air Force.” To earn his license, Christian had get his student pilot license when he was 16, then undergo classroom and ground work, flying with an instructor and logging 40 hours of flying time. When he turned 17, the youngest age anyone can become a licensed pilot, Christian began preparing to take the FAA’s written, oral and air tests with the help of his instructor, who also happens to be his father, Stephen Davis. “I’m extremely proud of him,” said Stephen, a pilot and

Teen entrepreneur to run summer painting business By Amanda Joering ajoering@nky.com

FORT THOMAS — From the time Fort Thomas resident Will Weber was a paper boy for the Fort Thomas Recorder, he knew he wanted to be his own boss. This summer Weber, 18, an Entrepreneurship and Economics major at Northern Kentucky University (NKU), will have his chance through Young Entrepreneurs Across America, a program designed to teach young students to run a small business. Weber is serving as the manager of the Campbell County Branch of Student Painters, the program’s national company that, partnered with Sherwin Williams, has been in business for more than 25 years painting home exteriors and decks. “This is a great opportunity for me to get experience in running my own small business,” said Weber, a graduate of Highlands High School. “This is my first real job, and being the boss

EAT YOUR VEGGIES Rita shares a spring recipe for asparagus with brie B3

in The dOCTOR iS

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is a lot to take on, but I have a strong entrepreneurial spirit and am excited about this challenge.” As the manager, Weber is in charge hiring two teams, a marketing division, to advertise the business, and a painting division, to paint the homes booked through marketing. To prepare for this experience, Weber said he spent time in Michigan, where the company is based, going through training on everything from doing estimates and painting to managing his teams. Currently, during the prepainting season, Weber has been working to spread the word about his job openings to fellow NKU students and set up jobs for the production season, which run from mid-May to mid-August. While he is managing the whole company, Weber said he will also be working side by side with his teams. See PAINTING, Page A2

Christian Davis, a 17-year-old member of the United States Air Force Auxiliary's Civil Air Patrol cadet program in Fort Thomas, became a licensed FAA private pilot earlier this month. AMANDA JOERING/COMMUNITY RECORDER

member of the Indiana wing of the Civil Air Patrol and Master Sergeant with the 121st Ariel Refueling Wing of the Ohio Air National Guard in Columbus.

“He’s a very sharp young man, so I had no doubts that he would be able to accomplish this.” “It is a great thing for a father to be able to give his child a

gift as great as the gift of flight,” Stephen said. Christian also recently enlisted in the Air Force, hoping that his experiences thus far will help him reach his goal of being an Air Force pilot. He’ll be shipping out for basic training in Texas this summer, going in with a E-3 instead of E-1, meaning more money and more authority, because of his work with the Civil Air Patrol, Christian said. Christian, who has been a member of the Civil Air Patrol since 2008, will become a senior officer in the program once he turns 18 and plans to make his career the Air Force. The Civil Air Patrol is the auxiliary of the Air Force and fulfills three primary missions including cadet programs, aerospace education and emergency services.

VOLUNTEERS PLANT 1,000 TREES DURING REFOREST FORT THOMAS EVENT

Jillian Jones, 18, and Jordan Jones work together to plant a tree during the event. AMANDA JOERING/COMMUNITY RECORDER

PUT IT IN WRITING Howard suggest getting a written contract before using insurance money for roof repairs B4

Contact us

News .........................283-0404 Retail advertising .......513-768-8338 Classified advertising ........283-7290 Delivery .......................781-4421

Vol. 13 No. 48 © 2013 The Community Recorder ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

See page A2 for additional information

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NEWS

A2 • FORT THOMAS RECORDER • APRIL 25, 2013

Work ethic, dedication makes Highlands’ Teacher of the Year ‘one of a kind’

FORT THOMAS RECORDER

By Amanda Joering

Find news and information from your community on the Web Forth Thomas • nky.com/fortthomas Campbell County • nky.com/campbellcounty

ajoering@nky.com

News

Michelle Shaw Editor ..........................578-1053, mshaw@nky.com Chris Mayhew Reporter .......................578-1051,cmayhew@nky.com Amanda Joering Reporter ....................578-1052, ajoering@nky.com Melanie Laughman Sports Editor ............513-248-7573, mlaughman@nky.com James Weber Sports Reporter ................578-1054, jweber@nky.com

Advertising

Lisa Lawrence Sales Manager ...............................513-768-8338, llawrence@enquirer.com

Delivery

For customer service .........................781-4421 Sharon Schachleiter Circulation Manager ..442-3464, sschachleiter@nky.com Cathy Kellerman District Manager ...........442-3461, ckellerman@nky.com

Classified

To place a Classified ad ......................283-7290, www.communityclassified.com

To place an ad in Community Classified, call 283-7290.

FORT THOMAS — Since 1988, Fort Thomas resident Ann Meyer has been touching the lives of students at Highlands High School. First, as a family and consumer science teacher and then since 2002 as a counselor, Meyer has worked with countless students and is now being honored by being named the Highlands High School Alumni Association’s Teacher of the Year. “Ann is one of the, if not the greatest educator I

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know,” said Highlands Principal Brian Robinson. a member of the committee that chose Meyer for the honor. “Her sense of pride inourschool,desiretomake our community a better place and genuine concern for the success of every student is second to none.” Meyer, a Highlands graduate who grew up in the city, said she’d always wanted to be a teacher, following in the footsteps of her father, who was a teacher, principal, then superintendent in Kenton County Schools. As a teacher, Meyer said she always took on duties beyond teaching, from volunteering on various committees to working to improve education on a state level.

It was this involvement that led Meyer, after several years of teaching, to return to school to become a counselor. “I always tell the kids that having a career is a journey and you have to wait and see how it plays out,” Meyer said. “Becoming a counselor was the next path in my journey.” Robinson said the committee noted that Meyers’ “incredible work ethic and dedication to students makes her one of a kind.” “Ann truly is respected and loved by the entire Highlands community,” Robinson said. Along with her work in the school, Meyer and her family have also supported the school by becoming major donors to the Fort

Thomas Education Foundation’s capital campaign to raise money to renovate the school buildings, said Jennie King, the foundation’s executive director. “Now, she and her family will be able to to impact generations to come by their generosity, truly leaving a legacy,” King said. For Meyer, it is an honor to be chosen as Teacher of the Year, but she still feels like she’s the lucky one because she gets to do what she loves in a school that she loves. “I’m honored to be able to work here,” Meyer said. “I’m with people every day that have dreams, and that’s a wonderful place to be.”

Painting

At each job, Weber has to do an estimate, powerwash the home or deck, paint a test strip and do a final walk-around once the job is complete to ensure 100 percent customer satisfaction. Weber said while it is a student run and operated business, the company has a quality of work guar-

antee, warranty and liability insurance. Through he’s only in pre-season, Weber said things are going well so far, and his goal is to hit $100,000 by the end of the summer, an accomplishment he thinks will look great on his resume in the future. So far, Weber said one of his favorite parts of the job is having business cards. “Having business cards is really the coolest thing ever,” Weber said. “I was ecstatic about that.” Weber’s mentor through the company, general manager Josh Drushel, said he feels confident that Weber will succeed. “This is very unique opportunity, but it takes the right kind of individual to take it on and be successful,” Drushel said. “Will is very passionate and works hard.” Weber’s branch of the company will be serving Campbell County. Students interested in a job and residents interested in having their home or deck painted can contact Weber at 620-6268. For more information about Student Painters, visit www.studentpainters.biz.

Continued from Page A1

“To be the boss you have to know how to do everything and show your employees how to do it,” Weber said. “The success of my business is built on me.”

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NEWS

APRIL 25, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • A3

BRIEFLY

The Mercy Health Mobile Mammography Van is coming to Bellevue from 7-11 a.m. Thursday, May 16, at 322 Van Voast Ave. Screening mammography is a usually covered benefit with most insurance carriers. To schedule a mammogram call 513-686-3300. For women who are uninsured or under-insured, financial assistance is available. Call 513-686-3310 for more information.

High school’s year-end musical April 26-28

ALEXANDRIA — Campbell County High School Drama’s spring musical is the school edition of Dirty Rotten Scoundrels. Performances in the school auditorium will be at 7:30 p.m. Friday, April 26 and Saturday, April 27; and at 2 p.m. Sunday, April 28. Tickets are $9. For information visit the website www.cchsdrama.org.

Car shop plans 25th anniversary with Bigfoot

ALEXANDRIA — Community Car Care, 1047 Perkins Drive, Alexandria will have a 25th anniversary celebration from noon to 5 p.m. Saturday, May 18. As part of the celebration, the monster truck Bigfoot will make an appearance, and there will be games for children and free food and drinks. “Knowledge is Power” women’s car care classes will also be offered during the day. For information call Community Car Care at 859-635-1788.

State law requires the auditor to annually audit the accounts of each county sheriff, according to a news release from the office of Auditor of Public Accounts Adam H. Edelen. The audit covered the time Fickenscher was the interim sheriff between Aug. 1, 2012 and Nov. 8. Fickenscher was appointed by Campbell County Judge-executive Steve Pendery to operate the office in the absence of former Sheriff John Dunn, whom had resigned before his term was complete. Jeff Kidwell, a Republican, was elected Sheriff in November 2012. Kidwell took office immediately after the election. According to an additional comment from the auditor, “the interim Sheriff lacked adequate segregation of duties.” The auditor’s office recommended crosstraining of employees on some of the bookkeeper’s duties, and having the Sheriff periodically review bank deposits and bank account deposits and reports prepared by others. The auditor’s office also recommended dual signatures on checks with the Sheriff being one of them whenever possible. Fickenscher responded to the audit stating: “Cross training in progress when I left office.” For the complete Sheriff’s audit visit the auditor’s website www.auditor.ky.gov.

Auditor showed interim Sheriff books balanced

NEWPORT — The state audit of Interim Campbell County Sheriff David Fickenscher has been released with no adverse financial findings.

Barrington, Highlandspring host health and wellness fair

The Barrington of Fort Thomas and Highlandspring are hosting a health and wellness fair from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Saturday, April 27 at 960 Highland Ave., Fort Thomas. The event includes a keynote presentation about common areas and pains of arthritis from 9:30-10:30 a.m. and seminars about a variety of topics including in-home care, medical supplies, life lines, diabetes, heart health, pharmacy information, community services, stroke prevention and blood pressure.

MELBOURNE — The United Way of Greater Cincinnati will honor two Melbourne residents with community service awards at the organization’s Leaders and Legends Luncheon at the Duke Engergy Center in Cincinnati April 30. The United Way is hon-

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community service award. Sucietto has served on the United Way Campaign Committee at Western & Southern for more than 10 years as either the chair or co-chair, according to the news release. She was selected for the award for her experience and dedication to create seamless transitions. “She lays the groundwork, serves as a coach and shares creative approaches,” according to the news release. “In 2010, she successfully worked with the committee chair to move Western-Southern to the number six spot of the top 25.”

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Fender, through her work at the library, has implemented programs to improve education, income and health, according to the news release. Fender’s accomplishments include work on an early grade level reading campaign to improve the reading success of third grade students. Fender is also a member of the United Way’s Success By 6 executive committee, the Tocqueville Society and Women’s Leadership Council. » Teresa M. Sucietto, executive assistant for Western & Southern Financial Group, will be honored with the “For Developing Resources”

oring six people with leadership awards, and 10 people with community service awards at the luncheon. The New Century Award salutes individuals “whose caring and compassion improve people’s lives and foster the spirit of volunteers,” according to a news release from the United Way. » Kimber L. Fender, director of the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County since 1999, and a member of the Campbell County Schools Board of Education, will be honored with the “For Improving Our Community” community service award.

United Way honors two Melbourne residents

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NEWS

A4 • CCF RECORDER • APRIL 25, 2013

Fiscal courts delving into SD1’s budget WHAT’S A CONSENT DECREE? After being sued by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to clean up raw sewage and the region’s water, SD1 entered into a legally-binding federal consent decree in 2007. SD1 came up with a plan to eliminate and clean up sewage overflows in Northern Kentucky and be in compliance with the federal Clean Water Act by 2025.

a z a l P s a m o h Ft. T

By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

FORT WRIGHT — The Fiscal courts of Boone, Kenton and Campbell counties will meet with the board of Sanitation District No. 1 of Northern Kentucky April 30 for a review of the sewer utili-

ty’s operations. The special meeting will be at the SD1 headquarters, 1045 Eaton Drive, Fort Wright, at 6 p.m. Tuesday, April 30. The SD1 board will also have a budget workshop at 1:30 p.m. Monday, April 29 to review the proposed 2013-14’ budget for the fis-

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cal year . Both meetings are open to the public. The meeting is a recognition of a change in state law requiring the three fiscal courts to approve SD1’s annual rate change if it is above a 5 percent increase. Since 2011, SD1 has reiterated a position to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency that the terms of the federal consent decree requiring pro-

jects to improve water quality are not all tenable to pay for in the current economic climate, said David Rager, executive director of SD1. The EPA has not yet responded to the request for relief, and until they do SD1 is bound to fulfill the terms of the decree , Rager said. The total SD1 budget for 2012-13’ was $92 million, and of that $40 million was for construction projects, he said. The last time SD1’s board set it’s annual rate, the increase was 15 percent for the 2012-13’ fiscal year.

Camp Springs project SD1’s plans to build a 20-inch diameter force main sewer line from Silver Grove through the Four Mile Road area of Camp Springs and a discussion of alternate routes that will cost as much as $7.5 million more are part of the ongoing budgeting process. Pendery said, at the April 10 Campbell County Fiscal Court meeting, he thinks SD1’s board is in a budget process where potentially more expensive alternate routes to avoid Camp Springs are being considered. The three county fiscal courts will have a chance to weigh in on the SD1 budget, he said. Pendery and Campbell County Fiscal Court members attended a February SD1 board meeting to hear about the Camp Springs force main sewer project. “I think among the things I heard discussed at the board meeting was the possibility that in order with the consent decree as it stands right now they would have to have a route identified and construction completed by a very early date like 2015,” Pendery said. The project has a Dec. 31, 2015 completion deadline under the federal consent decree with the E.P.A. One of the alternate routes being considered it to instead take the force sewer main on a route through Melbourne and near Fender Road to the sewage treatment plant in Alexandria. “One of the things I heard clearly from the (SD1) board is that any changes financially is going to involve the fiscal courts,” said Commissioner Ken Rechtin. “It was clearly stated to us if you really want to go up this (Fender) road, it’s going to cost more money.”


SCHOOLS

APRIL 25, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • A5

COMMUNITY

RECORDER

Editor: Michelle Shaw, mshaw@nky.com, 578-1053

ACHIEVEMENTS | NEWS | ACTIVITIES | HONORS

CommunityPress.com

Reiley’s Burns wins Golden Apple award By Chris Mayhew

DISTRICT GOLDEN APPLE NOMINEES

cmayhew@nky.com

ALEXANDRIA — Nancy Burns left a career in the corporate world at age 40 to educate children. Now 20 years later, peers have helped set a Golden Apple Award on her desk in recognition of all she does. Burns is a staff developer at Reiley Elementary School. Burns said she was working as a manager of corporate employee benefits for PNC Bank when she decided to return to college and become a teacher to take her life in a different direction. After being nominated by another teacher, Burns was one of the Golden Apple Award winners honored March 28 for the 2013 Excellence in Education Celebration. The annual celebration is presented by the Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce and the Northern Kentucky Education Council. “I believe this is my 17th year, I started when I was 43,” Burns said. She’s worked her entire

Campbell County Schools had four other educators nominated for a 2013 Golden Apple Award in addition to Golden Apple winner Nancy Burns. The nominees from the district included: » Campbell Ridge Elementary School teachers Juanita Nelson and Roxie Gross. » Cline Elementary School staff developer Leslie Hagan. » Campbell Ridge Elementary School staff developer Dena Gosney.

Reiley Elementary School staff developer Nancy Burns, left, winner of a 2013 Golden Apple Award, performs a science experiment with students two years ago. THANKS TO NANCY BURNS

teaching career in Campbell County Schools. Burns said she likes being a staff developer because she

gets to teach all grade levels. “I go in and I model lessons for teachers, and I pull students out and I work with them inde-

pendently,” she said. It’s a chance to work with every teacher and many students, Burns said. “You don’t get to just know and love 25 kids, you know and love the whole school,” she said. Burns said she enjoys how kindergarteners at the school always call her “Fancy Nancy.” She earned the nickname because each fall she dresses up sometimes as the storybook

character Fancy Nancy and reads aloud to the kindergarteners. Burns said she’s now working with teachers and students to implement new state science standards, and she regularly works with students to meet goals in reading and math. The Golden Apple Award was “a huge honor for me,” and ranks professionally up there with becoming a national board certified teacher, she said. Receiving a Golden Apple was more of an affirmation about how her own colleagues feel about her work, Burns said. She was nominated by Reiley third-grade teacher Kelly Jones. At the awards ceremonies, Burns said she was handed a bushel of golden delicious apples and a plaque award that now sits on her desk. A native of Indiana, Burns said she had to come up with a parallel to explain the significance of the award to her father. “I said Dad, it’ like the Academy Awards for teachers,” Burns said.

St. Thomas students making stained glass window for school By Amanda Joering ajoering@nky.com

FORT THOMAS — Every year, the eighth-graders from St. Thomas give the school a gift at their graduation. This year, students are giving something that is truly one-of-a-kind by making a stained glass window, which will be installed at the entrance of the school. “This group has always been pretty creative, so I think this gift fits them,” said art teacher Katie Keuffer of the 18 eighth-graders. Keuffer said the idea for the gift came about when local craftsman Terry Rasche, a friend of some parents, donated a stained glass window for one of the school’s fundraiser. At the time, Rasche said he would be happy to help the students create a stained glass window, and the class decided it would be a great gift to give the school, Keuffer said. Student Emma Schutte, who has been going to St. Thomas since preschool, said she wanted to give the window as a gift so every time someone walks in the school, they’ll see it. “It’s kind of nice to be a part of something like giving back to the school that has given so much to you over the years,” Schutte said. Rasche, a Woodlawn resident whose father owned a stained glass company in Norwood, said he’s been making and repairing stained glass windows since he was a child. Now Rasche, recent winner of Cincinnati Preservation’s craftsmanship award, is an independent contractor who works on residential and church stained glass. For him, helping the students went along with his goal of teaching people about the art and giving them an appreciation for the craftsman-

Local craftsman Terry Rasche works with St. Thomas School eighth-graders Claire Lonneman and Elise Bielski on their gift to the school, a new stained glass window. AMANDA JOERING/COMMUNITY RECORDER

ship, Rasche said. “A lot of people consider it a lost art, and I thought doing this might open someone’s eyes,” Rasche said. The students did research about stained glass, went on a field trip to see examples of stained glass windows and came up with possible designs for the window, centered around the school’s theme, “Fruits of the Spirit.” For the past few weeks, Rasche has been coming to the school to work with the students, taking them through the process of creating the window. Keuffer said the window will be complete in mid-May, in time to have it on display at the students’ graduation ceremony.

St. Thomas students work on their stained glass window, which they giving as a gift to the school. AMANDA JOERING/COMMUNITY RECORDER


SPORTS

A6 • FORT THOMAS RECORDER • APRIL 25, 2013

Editor: Melanie Laughman, mlaughman@communitypress.com, 513-248-7573

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | RECREATIONAL

COMMUNITY

RECORDER

CommunityPress.com

Highlands High School shortstop Quentin Murray flips over the top of Boone County’s Tyler Morgan after catching a pick off throw from pitcher Jake Liggett in a 2012 game. FILE PHOTO

PITCHING PACES BLUEBIRDS Full, focused team finds success

By Adam Turer presspreps@gmail.com

Highlands pitcher Mitchell Jones throws last year. FILE PHOTO

PRESS PREPS HIGHLIGHTS By James Weber jweber@nky.com

SOY voting: May 1

The fifth-annual Community Press and Recorder Sportsman and Sportswoman of the Year Award voting period for the 2013 award will run Wednesday, May 1, through Tuesday, May 22. When it’s time to vote, you’ll go to cincinnati.com/ preps. Click on the Sportsman of the Year item on the right-hand side of the page. Readers will be able to vote once a day for their favorite athlete per paper. Winners for 2013 will receive two Reds tickets courtesy of the Cincinnati Reds, a certificate and a story to be published in a late June edition.

Neither the articles nor ballots will count against the meter, so you do not have to be a Cincinnati Enquirer/ nky.com subscriber to vote on your favorite candidate. Email mlaughman@nky.com with questions and follow the hashtag #SOY2013 for updates on Twitter.

Baseball

» Dixie beat Newport Central Catholic 7-3 April 18.

Boys tennis

» NewCath beat Bellevue 4-1 April 16. Winners were Haas, Brennan Devoto, Luke Holtz/Ty Meyer and Emerson Dawson/Tyler Rawe. Seiter won for Bellevue. » Notre Dame beat Highlands 3-2 April 16.

FORT THOMAS — Nearing the midway point of the season, Highlands High School’s baseball team is even at 11-11. The first half of the season has seen the Bluebirds struggle with weather, a road trip to Myrtle Beach and a doubleheader on prom day. All of these tests figure to benefit the team as it heads into district play.

“It’s hard to bring it every day,” head coach Jeremy Baioni said. “Now, the games really mean something.” Playing without a full and focused team on April 20, the Bluebirds dropped two games that they could have won. Highlands blew a late lead to Campbell County, blowing a four-run seventh inning lead in a 8-6 loss. Highlands also lost 4-0 to Boyle County. Several underclassmen saw varsity action as the juniors and seniors were preoccupied with prom. “We probably lost a little focus,” Baioni said. “Still, it came

down to not getting timely hits. We still got good pitching and defense.” The pitching staff has been the team’s strength this season. Led by Mitchell Jones, the pitching staff has tossed eleven complete games this season. Starters Joey Cochran, Joseph Martin, and Ben Vermeil have contributed. Senior Jake Liggett is the team’s workhorse out of the bullpen, and is the only senior contributing significantly to the pitching staff. “That is good news for our fuSee BASEBALL, Page A8

‘Breds ready to bounce back By Adam Turer presspreps@gmail.com

Newport Central Catholic High School came very, very close to claiming its second Ninth Region All “A” Classic softball championship in three years. Instead, the Thoroughbreds lost another close contest this season. NewCath fell, 11-10, to St. Henry in eight innings on April 19, in the Ninth Region All “A” Classic championship game. The team will need to bounce back from that defeat. So far, it has been a struggle, as the ‘Breds lost their next three games following the All “A” championship game defeat. “Yes, the All ‘A’ championship game was hard on the girls,” said head coach Denny Barnes. It was an encouraging tournament for the ‘Breds, who scored double figures in each contest,

Newport Central Catholic pitcher Haley Meyers pitches during their girls softball game against Villa Madonna, April 15. TONY TRIBBLE/FOR THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

averaging nearly 12 runs per game. It has been an up and down season for NewCath, which has

tossed four shutouts, but been shutout three times. “We need to put an all-around game together to show how could we can be if we have defense and offense together,” said Barnes. The Thoroughbreds were shutout in consecutive games on April 20 and 22, but gave up just nine runs combined in those two games. The pitching, led by Sarah Neace, has been strong. Eighth-grader Haley Meyers has been solid in relief of Neace. Junior Taylor Burkart and sophomores Casey Kohls, Loren Zimmerman, Kristen Schreiber, and Morgan Martini have provided the majority of the offensive pop. On any given day, a different girl can drive in the bulk of the ‘Breds runs. “The good thing is we don’t depend on any one person,” said See SOFTBALL, Page A8


SPORTS & RECREATION

APRIL 25, 2013 • FORT THOMAS RECORDER • A7

Swimmers finish season at record ‘Clip’

ROYALS WIN STATE TITLE

Community Recorder

The Northern Kentucky Clippers completed their shortcourse season with success at both the NCSA Junior Nationals in Orlando, Fla., March 12-16, and the 2013 Ohio J.O. Championships in Bowling Green, Ohio, March 8-10. The meets were highlighted by four Ohio State LSC records and 21 team records broken by the Clippers.

2013 NCSA Junior Nationals

The Clipper Seniors sent 15 swimmers who accounted for 75 individual swims. The meet as a whole had more than 1,700 swimmers and more than 7,000 swims representing 255 clubs. Ohio LSC record-breakers included: Sharli Brady of Burlington, 400 individual medley; Max Williamson of Fort Mitchell, 100 breaststroke, 200 IM, and 400 IM. Team record-breakers included: Annie Davies of Fort Mitchell, 15-16 girls 200 breast; Sharli Brady, 17-and-over girls 200 freestyle, and 400 IM; Mike Summe of Edgewood, 15-16 boys 100 breast; Max Williamson: 17-and-over 100 breaststroke, 200 IM, and 400 IM. Relay team record-breakers included: 15-and-over boys 200 medley, Max Williamson, Chase Vennefron of Fort Mitchell, Rob Newman of Fort Mitchell, and Mike Summe; 15-andover boys 400 medley, Max Williamson, Mike Summe, Rob Newman, and Chase Vennefron; 15-and-over boys 800 free, Max Williamson, Mike Summe, Rob Newman, and Zach Smith of Fort Mitchell; 15-and-over girls 800 free, Kenzie Mar-

The 15-and-over girls 800 freestyle relay of Sharli Brady, Kenzie Margroum, Hanna Gillcrist and Lauren Herich recently set a new Northern Kentucky Clippers team record. THANKS TO DEB HERICH

groum of Fort Thomas, Lauren Herich of Hebron, Hanna Gillcrist of Burlington, and Sharli Brady.

2013 Short-Course Ohio Age Group Junior Olympics Championship The Clippers 14-and-unders finished second overall, with the girls winning the meet and the boys finishing third. The 10and-under girls and 13-14 girls both won their respective age groups. Individual event winners included: Seth Young of Florence, 50 breaststroke; Sophie Skinner of Independence, 13-14 girls 1,650 free; Kenzie Skaggs of Edgewood, 10-and-under girls 100 backstroke; Amanda Smith of Walton, 13-14 girls 200 back; Mallory Beil of Edgewood, 13-14 girls 100 butterfly; Jake Lentsch of Hebron, 13-14 boys 200 breast, and 200 fly; Abbi Richards of Crescent Springs, 11-12 girls 200 IM; Ma-

deleine Vonderhaar of Lakeside Park, 13-14 girls 200 IM, and 200 butterfly. Relay event winners included: 10-and-under girls 200 medley, Mariah Denigan of Walton, Anna Long, Kenzie Skaggs, and Alexa Arkenberg of Union; 13-14 girls 400 medley, Sophie Skinner, Madeleine Vonderhaar, Mallory Beil, and Amanda Smith; 13-14 girls 400 free: Sophie Skinner, Mallory Beil, Mikayla Herich, and Bray Zimmerman. Team record-breakers included: Kenzie Skaggs, 9-10 girls 50 fly (30.21), and 100 fly (1:06.58); Alexa Arkenberg, 9-10 girls 100 fly (1:08.28); Madeleine Vonderhaar, 13-14 girls 100 breast (1:03.80), and 200 breast (2:19.12); Seth Young, 9-10 boys 100 IM (1:07.48) and 200 IM (2:24.16); Jake Lentsch, 13-14 boys 100 breast (59.80), and 200 breast (2:10.33). For more information about the Clippers, go online at www.clipperswim.org.

The Kentucky Royals girls basketball team won the AAU fifth-grade state title and are currently ranked 11th in the nation. Most of the team maintains an “A” average in the classroom. They are coached by Tricia Macke and Kristi Hayes. From left are: Front, Maggie Jones, Meghan Walz, Beka Sergent, Jillian Hayes, Lauren Klare, Maddie Scherr and Piper Macke; back, Tricia Macke, Kristi Hayes and Audrey Graves. THANKS TO JANIE KLARE

Fans keep up with Norse with app The Northern Kentucky University Office of Information Technology has released a new mobile app that allows Norse fans to keep up-to-date with NKU athletics. GoNorse provides up-tothe-minute Northern athletics information via the app’s news ticker in addition to schedules, ticket information and event promotions. The app features a news ticker that scrolls across the bottom of the device screen as the user navigates differ-

ent Northern sports via a 3-D carousel wheel. Users can click on a sport icon, which will take them to that sport’s roster, schedule and news. There are also icons for Northern’s official student spirit group, the Norse Force, as well as athletics photos and a virtual tour. GoNorse has been developed for both iOS and Android. To download for iOS, visit http://bit.ly/ZANPtI. For Android, visit http://bit.ly/13RRB5w.

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SPORTS & RECREATION

A8 • FORT THOMAS RECORDER • APRIL 25, 2013

Baseball Continued from Page A6

The Northern Kentucky Sports Hall of Fame inducted new members March 20 at the Villa Hills Civic Club. Carol Brown (softball, basketball, coach), Tom Daley (football, basketball, baseball - Dayton and Ludlow), Adrienne Hundemer (track and field - Dayton), George Schloemer (basketball - CovCath), Mark Schloemer (basketball - CovCath), Doug Schloemer (basketball - Holmes - Mr. Basketball 1978). Front, from left: Brown, Daley. Back: Dick Maile, George Schloemer, Mark Schloemer, Doug Schloemer and Hundemer. JAMES WEBER/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

ture,” said Baioni of the strength of his young pitchers. “Our pitching has been rock solid.” The pitchers have succeeded by trusting the defense behind them. Centerfielder Hector Molina has been the team’s constant in the outfield. “Our pitchers are confident, letting teams put the ball in play and trusting their defense,” Baioni said. Molina has been flanked in the outfield by a rotating cast, including sophomores Brady Murray and Alex Veneman. The young players took advantage of their opportunities and give the Bluebirds depth and competition for starting

spots. “We used the first half of the season to give guys opportunities and see who could get it done,” said Baioni. “We’re going to try to ride the hot hands.” A 12-2 win over Dayton on April 22 showed what the Bluebirds can do with a full, focused lineup. With the weather clearing up, it looks like normalcy has returned to the schedule. Fortunately for the Bluebirds, their most consistent areas have been difference makers. If they can add some timely hitting, they will be a threat to make another deep postseason run, as they did in 2012. “We’re hoping to see some consistency offensively,” Baioni said. “Our pitching and defense have been solid. Those are the two constants that you have to have.

Some CovCath and Holmes royalty gathered at the Hall of Fame ceremony March 20. They are, from left, George Schloemer, Dick Maile, Mark Schloemer, Doug Schloemer and Reynolds Flynn.

Hall of Fame inducts 6 The Northern Kentucky Sports Hall of Fame inducted new members March 20: Carol Brown, Tom Daley, Adrienne Hundemer, George Schloemer, Mark Schloemer and Doug Schloemer.

JAMES WEBER/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

New Cath’s Christini Enzweiler bunts for a hit during the Breds’ softball game against Villa Madonna. TONY TRIBBLE/FOR THE COMMUNITY

SIDELINES NewCath basketball

ball organization will have tryouts in April for the spring and summer AAU basketball season – boys and girls, grades 3-12. Contact Ben Coffman at Ben@KentuckyWarriors.com or 859640-6458 for specific grades tryout date. Visit KentuckyWarriors.com.

Registration is open for the the NewCath 2013 Hoops Camp. The girls session is 9 a.m. to noon, June 3-6, for girls in grades 3-8. The boys session is 9 a.m. to noon, June 10-13 for boys in grades 3-8. For more information, visit ncchs.com or call 859-292-0001.

Church softball

AAU basketball tryouts The Kentucky Warriors AAU basket-

Kenton County Parks and Recreation needs one more softball team for Monday Men’s Church League play. The season begins Monday, April 29.

RECORDER

League fees for a 10-game season, plus a single-elimination tournament, are $250 per team. Umpires fees are an additional $15 per team. Games will be played at 6:15 and 7:15 p.m. Monday nights at Lincoln Ridge, Pioneer, and Middleton-Mills parks. Teams compete for a league champion trophy, T-shirts, and tournament seeding, and then a winning team trophy and T-shirts in the tournament. Call 525-PLAY if interested.

Softball Continued from Page A6

Barnes. “They all can somehow help their team win.” Since the extra-inning loss to St. Henry, the NewCath bats have gone quiet. They will need to regain their form

as district play begins. Getting a full, healthy roster will help this young squad as it prepares to make a postseason run. “We keep working to get ready for the district,” said Barnes. “We have had some setbacks with girls getting hurt. I hope we can stay healthy.”

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VIEWPOINTS

APRIL 25, 2013 • FORT THOMAS RECORDER • A9

COMMUNITY

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Editor: Michelle Shaw, mshaw@nky.com, 578-1053

EDITORIALS | LETTERS | COLUMNS | CH@TROOM

CommunityPress.com

2013 session accomplishes major legislation

The 30-day session of the General Assembly saw much action on a variety of legislative items. While not all of my goals were accomplished, I believe that through bipartisan compromise, many top priorities were achieved. Legislation was passed that will produce jobs, provide oversight and transparency in government and protect the public.

Legislative accomplishments

Oversight for taxing districts – Legislation was passed to strengthen accountability and oversight of state’s 1,200plus taxing districts that collect revenue from the taxpayers. Hemp – creating jobs and providing a boost for Kentucky’s farmers was achieved with

passage of industrial hemp legislation. Economic development – On March 19, the governor Dennis Keene signed into law new tax inCOMMUNITY RECORDER GUEST crement fiCOLUMNIST nancing adjustment legislation to make economic development in Newport more feasible for developers. Pension reform – The House and Senate came together to pass bipartisan reform that includes funding and reforms for new hires to strengthen the state pension program. Human trafficking – Governor signed House Bill 3 into

law that will strengthen enforcement against the fast growing crime of human trafficking. Prescription drug regulation – The General Assembly passed new legislation to cleanup issues with the sweeping prescription drug abuse legislation that passed during last year’s session. Child pornography – House Bill 39 was signed into law making viewing of child pornography a criminal offense. Military voting – Legislation was passed to make it easier for Kentucky’s active duty citizens to vote while serving in the military overseas during election season. Land-line protection – An attempt to de-regulate telephone service in Kentucky was defeated because of the fear of

Protect vets from predatory practices When I began investigating the questionable business practices of some for-profit colleges in 2010, I wanted to make sure students were getting the education they paid for and that federal and state tax dollars were being used wisely. Since then, I have filed suit against four forprofit colleges, including Daymar College, National College, Education Management Corp. (the parent comJack Conway pany of Brown COMMUNITY Mackie College) RECORDER GUEST COLUMNIST and most recently Spencerian College, which is owned by Sullivan University and has campuses in both Louisville and Lexington. I also continue to lead a national bipartisan effort to examine potential abuses in the forprofit college industry. There are currently 32 states involved in this working group. In March, I joined 13 of my colleagues to announce my support for the Protecting Financial Aid for Students and Taxpayers Act sponsored by Sen. Kay Hagan, D-N.C., and Sen. Tom Harkin, D-Iowa. This bill ensures that federal assistance for college students is being used to serve and educate students rather than to fund advertising campaigns, student recruitment and aggressive marketing. Fifteen of the largest for-profit education companies received at least 86 percent of their revenues from federal student aid programs, such as the GI Bill and Pell grant programs. In fiscal year 2009, these for-profit colleges spent $3.7 billion, or 23 percent of their budgets, on advertising, marketing and recruitment, which was often overly aggressive and deceptive. In the case of Spencerian, our investigation found that the school provided students with information that it knew was false. Our investigation found that the job placement numbers Spencerian promoted publicly were, in many instances, 30 to 40 percent higher than the numbers it reported to its national accreditor. Spencerian’s claims that its “graduates are recession proof,”

simply were not true. In 2008 at its Louisville branch, Spencerian touted a 100 percent job placement rate in its Medical Clinical Specialist program; however, it reported placement rates of 66.7 percent to its accreditors. I believe Spencerian was more concerned about getting its hands on student loan money than in educating students and placing them in jobs. The bottom line is, I believe Spencerian preyed on people who were trying to build better lives for their families in these tough economic times. Our lawsuit seeks an injunction against Spencerian to prohibit further deceptive trade practices and civil penalties of $2,000 per violation, as well as recovery of investigative costs and attorney’s fees. If you attended Spencerian from 2007 until the present and want to file a complaint or provide information to my office, please visit ag.ky.gov and click on “Student Complaints.” Military service members also continue to be a popular target of many for-profit schools trying to get their hands on GI Bill benefits. That’s why I led an effort of 20 attorneys general to secure a $2 million settlement with QuinStreet Inc., which operated the website GIBill.com to funnel service members and veterans to for-profit colleges. As a result of our settlement, the website’s domain name was transferred to the Department of Veterans Affairs, where it now contains legitimate information about the GI Bill program. I will continue to do whatever it takes to protect our nation’s heroes and their families from these unconscionable and predatory practices. The actions of some within the for-profit industry have turned the dreams of those seeking a better life for themselves through higher education into nightmares. I will continue fighting to ensure that students aren’t left with thousands of dollars in debt and no degree, and that our federal tax dollars are used to serve and educate students and not prey on them to get their hands on student loan dollars. Jack Conway is Kentucky’s attorney general.

FORT THOMAS

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A publication of

leaving certain areas without reliable telephone and Internet services. Simplify alcoholic beverage laws – I served on the governor’s task force and we passed legislation to clean up the state’s hundreds of alcohol laws, meeting the recommendations of the task force. House Bill 300 provides consistency for the industry, regulators and law enforcement. Redistricting – The House passed a modified redistricting plan that more fairly aligns legislative districts with the changing population demographics.

Looking ahead

Looking ahead to 2014’s legislative session, next year’s major focus will be adopting a budget that includes funding

for transportation and road projects. This will be among my top priorities. I will also continue to work for tougher DUI laws, passage of my rape victim protection legislation, angel tax credits and support for tougher laws against heroin dealers in the Commonwealth. Representative Dennis Keene has served the citizens of the 67th District since 2005 and is the chairman of the House Licensing and Occupations Committee, Vice Chairman of Economic Development, Vice Chairman on the Budget Subcommittee on Transportation and a member of the Banking & Insurance Committee. Keene is a small-business owner and an economic development advisor for EGC Construction. For more information, visit www.DennisKeene.com.

Legislature delivers in 2013 General Assembly Following the 2012 election cycle, there was widespread optimism across Kentucky for what the General Assembly had the ability to accomplish during the 2013 legislative session. All the stars were aligning with fresh, new leadership in the Kentucky Senate under the guide of President Robert Stivers. Recent Steve Stevens sessions of COMMUNITY PRESS the General GUEST COLUMNIST Assembly have missed opportunities to produce needed and substantive public policy changes to not only advance this region, but the entire commonwealth. The 2013 General Assembly will go down in history as one that saw lawmakers come together to solve the most pressing issues impacting our future. There was no greater issue facing the state than the reform of our public pension system. Schools don’t have the funds to purchase textbooks for students. Roads and bridges are deteriorating. Critical public investment needs are unable to be met. These problems may be attributed to the fact that the $30+ billion unfunded liability of our public pension system was limiting the state from meeting its obligations. During 2012, the NKY Chamber monitored and supported the efforts of the bipartisan, bicameral Task Force on Pension Reform. The result of that Task Force was Senate Bill 2 (sponsored by NKY Legislative Caucus Member and Senate Majority Floor Leader Damon Thayer) which offered substantial policy changes to the public pension system to put it on a sustainable path. Senate Bill 2 worked its way through the legislative

ABOUT LETTERS AND COLUMNS We welcome your comments on editorials, columns, stories or other topics important to you in the Community Recorder. Include your name, address and phone number(s) so we may verify your letter. Letters of 200 or fewer words and columns of 500 or fewer words have the best chance of being published. All submissions may be edited for length, accuracy and clarity. Deadline: Noon Monday E-mail: mshaw@community press.com Fax: 283-7285. U.S. mail: See box below Letters, columns and articles submitted to the Community Recorder may be published or distributed in print, electronic or other forms.

process creating spirited debate and meeting many challenges. Because of what had been witnessed in previous legislative sessions, many were quick to write off the possibility its passage. In a time when every public dollar must be invested wisely, the actions of the General Assembly have put Kentucky back on a path where dollars can be appropriated to key areas like education and economic development. Our elected officials did not stop there. In addition to solving our state’s own version of the “fiscal cliff” in its public pension system, the General Assembly also passed other important pieces of legislation, each having their own legacylike implications. These bills include: » Special Taxing District Reform/House Bill 1 was a result of the work of Auditor Adam Edelen and will bring greater transparency for taxpayers through a centralized registry for Kentucky’s special taxing districts. It requires districts to create that demonstrate funds are being used for

228 Grandview Drive, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017 654 Highland Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075 phone: 283-0404 email: kynews@communitypress.com web site: www.nky.com

their intended purposes. » Heroin Epidemic Solution/House Bill 366 was promoted by the NKY Heroin Impact Task Force to allow third parties to administer nasal naloxone as an opioid overdose treatment. Northern Kentucky now has a treatment tool to combat the heroin epidemic and improve the chance for rehabilitation of users to become productive members of society. » High-School Dropout Age/Senate Bill 97 gives local districts the ability to raise the dropout age from 16 to 18. Once 55 percent of local school districts adopt the policy, all school districts will then be required to adopt the compulsory attendance requirement. This bill will ensure our students are prepared for the 21st century workforce. » Industrial Hemp/Senate Bill 50 creates a structure for the regulation and production of what could be Kentucky’s next great cash crop: industrial hemp. Of course there were items that did not get addressed by the General Assembly, but the NKY Chamber will be working on major priorities for the next legislative session. Our No. 1 priority will be to build a new Brent Spence Bridge (BSB) Corridor safer, quicker and with the most positive benefit to the region. Although challenges remain, we should spend this time acknowledging and thanking members of the Kentucky General Assembly for being the leaders we need. In the past, we have come to expect partisan gridlock to be a barrier to solving complex issues. Fortunately, 2013 was different. This General Assembly came into the legislative session with new ideas to benefit businesses, employees, and citizens and … they delivered the results we needed. Steve Stevens is president and CEO of Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce.

Fort Thomas Recorder Editor Michelle Shaw mshaw@nky.com, 578-1053 Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday See page A2 for additional contact information.


A10 • CCF RECORDER • APRIL 25, 2013

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LIFE

THURSDAY, APRIL 25, 2013

COMMUNITY RECORDER

PEOPLE | IDEAS | RECIPES

Cold Spring resident Cameron Snyder, left, grabs a rolling ground ball from the dirt as Jordan Hensley, right, of Highland Heights, backs him up in case the catch is missed during practice. CHRIS MAYHEW/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Little leagues go up to bat By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

MELBOURNE — Along with the arrival of spring weather, members of the Campbell County Rural Knothole baseball league taken to the fields. The “Northern Kentucky Bulls” team for 6-year-olds tossed, caught and practiced running the bases at the league’s home fields at Pendery Park on the evening of Wednesday, April 17. Fathers serving as coaches worked with the boys as the players got to know one-another. Socializing is just as important as practicing baseball skills at the youngest levels of Knothole, said team manager Ray Verst of Fort Thomas. Verst said he grew up in Alexandria, and he wanted to give his son the same Knothole experience he had. Most of the children on the team, who were in their first year of machine pitch Knothole play, are from Alexandria, Cold Spring and Highland Heights, he said. Verst said he has a 13-yearold son whose team he also

coached. Most of the coaches in the league are fathers, he said. “We’ve got about six dads helping out,” Verst said. “At this age, that’s what you need.” Most of the practices last about an hour, and at this age most players want to play catcher because there is a lot of equipment that comes with the position they think is "cool.” Brittany Snyder of Cold Spring said her son, Cameron, is in his second year in the league. Playing baseball his something her son really enjoys, Snyder said. “He loves first base, but I think he likes catching even better,” she said. Shawn Hensley of Highland Heights said Knothole is good for her son and that Verst is a good role model. Besides learning sportsmanship, her son gets to interact with other children his own age on the field, Hensley said. “He gets outside, and he gets excitement,” she said. “It’s really nice.” Knothole teams are organized by age groups from ages 5 to 17. For information visit the website http://ccknothole.com/.

Ethan Baird of Cold Spring plays catch with his Ray Verst of Fort Thomas, manager of the Northern Kentucky Bulls Knothole team for 6-year-olds during practice at Pendery Park in Melbourne April 17. CHRIS MAYHEW/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Jordan Hensley of Highland Heights concentrates before tossing a ball back to his coach during practice. CHRIS MAYHEW/THE

Ben Verst of Fort Thomas, wears catcher equipment as he tosses a baseball back to his father and coach Ray Verst during practice for the Northern Kentucky Bulls team at Pendery Park in Melbourne. CHRIS MAYHEW/THE COMMUNITY

COMMUNITY RECORDER

RECORDER

Cold Spring resident Reid Enxel, far left, rears back and tosses a ball back to a coach during practice for the Northern Kentucky Bulls Knothole team. CHRIS MAYHEW/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER


B2 • CCF RECORDER • APRIL 25, 2013

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD FRIDAY, APRIL 26 Art Exhibits Chris Felix, 11 a.m.-10 p.m., Art on the Levee Gallery, Newport on the Levee, More than 100 paintings with stories of baseball from Cincinnati native and artist. Through May 31. 859-2615770; www.artonthelevee.com. Newport.

Art Openings Disruptors: QRtifacts by Peiter Griga, 6-10 p.m., Artisans Enterprise Center, 27 W. Seventh St., Guest curated by Morgan Cobb. Interactive exhibition exploring intersection of fine art and disruptive technology featuring local entrepreneurs. Opening features Analogue Silhouettes performance by Hark + Hark and DJ Zealous Knock. Exhibit continues through May 24. Free. 859-2922322. Covington.

Drink Tastings Friday Night in the Aisles Wine Tasting, 4-8 p.m. Feature: Viva Espana., Party Source, 95 Riviera Drive, Flight of four wines, free of charge. Ages 21 and up. 859-291-4007; www.thepartysource.com. Bellevue.

Music - Rock Kentucky Myle Band, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., JerZee’s Pub and Grub, 708 Monmouth St., Free. 859-4913500. Newport. Goat, 9 p.m. With Holy Wave. Part of Cincy Psych Fest FreakOut Series. Doors open 8 p.m., The Southgate House Revival, 111 E. Sixth St., $12, $10 advance. 859-431-2201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport.

On Stage - Comedy Stand Up for 9/11, 8-10 p.m. Comedians Mike Armstrong, Dave Hyden, Rob Wilfong and Lorain Braun. Gary Burbank, radio Hall of Famer, master of ceremony. Doors open at 7 p.m., Radisson Hotel Covington, 668 W. Fifth St., Cash bar, raffles, split-the-pot and more. On display a 200 pound steel I-beam from Ground Zero at World Trade Center in New York after terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001. Beam will be part of Northern Kentucky 9/11 Memorial. $25, $20 advance. 859-3413017. Covington.

The Village Vintage and Arts Bazaar – formerly known as 4th Sunday MainStrasse Antiques, Etc. – opens its fifth year, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Sunday, April 28. The Bazaar is free to shoppers, and all are welcome to browse and buy from vendors lining the 6th Street promenade in MainStrasse Village in Covington. THANKS TO DONNA KREMER

ABOUT CALENDAR To submit calendar items, go to www.NKY.com and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to life@communitypress.com along with event information. Items are printed on a space-available basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to www.NKY.com and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page.

On Stage - Student Theater Dirty Rotten Scoundrels, 7:30-10 p.m., Campbell County High School, 909 Camel Crossing, Auditorium. Story revolves around two con men, one classy and the other crass, competing on the Riviera. Musical with current comedy and classic charm. $9. Presented by Campbell County High School Drama. Through April 28. 859-635-4161, ext. 1146; www.cchsdrama.org. Alexandria. Anything Goes, 7:30 p.m., Newport Central Catholic High School, 13 Carothers Road, $8. Registration required. Through April 27. 859-907-0178; www.ncchs.com. Newport.

On Stage - Theater School House Rock, Live!, 8 p.m., Stained Glass Theatre, 802 York St., A pop culture phenomenon takes the stage. Emmy Award-winning Saturday morning cartoon series that taught history, grammar, math, science and politics through clever, tuneful songs is now a stage musical. $20. Presented by Footlighters Inc.. Through May 4. 859-652-3849; www.footlighters.org. Newport. The Sisters of Rosenweig, 8 p.m., Village Players, 8 N. Fort Thomas Ave., By Wendy Wasserstein. Sara Goode, an enormously successful American woman working as the British representative of a major bank is about to celebrate her 54th birthday and she isn’t exactly happy about it. $15. Through April 27. 859-392-0500; www.villageplayers.biz. Fort Thomas.

SATURDAY, APRIL 27 Art & Craft Classes Day of Scrapping, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Holy Trinity Junior High School, 840 Washington Ave., Scrapbooking event. Lunch, snacks and beverages. Shopping with Stampin’ Up, Creative Memories, 31 and Pampered Chef. Benefits Holy Trinity. $25, $20 advance. 859-240-9927; amy.hennekes@dbadirect.com. Newport.

Art Exhibits

The Carnegie’s Otto M. Budig Theatre presents Buster Keaton’s 1926 classic “The General,” 7:30 p.m. Thursday, May 2 with a live modern underscore by Jeff Rapsis, pictured. THANKS TO SHANNAN BOYER Chris Felix, 11 a.m.-10 p.m., Art on the Levee Gallery, 859-2615770; www.artonthelevee.com. Newport.

Newport Central Catholic High School, $8. Registration required. 859-907-0178; www.ncchs.com. Newport.

Karaoke and Open Mic

On Stage - Theater

Super Bowl of Karaoke, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Super Bowl Bellewood, 1211 Waterworks Road, $12 buckets, $3 domestics, $2 jello shots. With DJ Weezy and DJ Love MD. No cover. Presented by Super Bowl. Through May 11. 859-781-1211; www.superbowlnky.com. Newport.

School House Rock, Live!, 8 p.m., Stained Glass Theatre, $20. 859-652-3849; www.footlighters.org. Newport. The Sisters of Rosenweig, 8 p.m., Village Players, $15. 859392-0500; www.villageplayers.biz. Fort Thomas.

Music - Oldies The New Lime, 8 p.m.-midnight, Sis’s Family Affair, 837 Monmouth St., A 1967 Columbia recording artists. 859-431-3157. Newport.

Music - Rock Ben Walz Band, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., JerZee’s Pub and Grub, 708 Monmouth St., Free. 859-4913500; www.jerzeespub.com. Newport.

On Stage - Student Theater Dirty Rotten Scoundrels, 7:30-10 p.m., Campbell County High School, $9. 859-635-4161, ext. 1146; www.cchsdrama.org. Alexandria. Anything Goes, 7:30 p.m.,

Pets It’s A Pet aFair, 11 a.m.-4 p.m., Gil Lynn Park, Third Street and Greendevil Lane, Various pet rescue booths, food, music, demos, heart-worm testing, nail trims, ask-a-vet, pet parade and costume contest at 3 p.m., Mascot Mingle 2-3 p.m. Car Show 11 a.m.-4 p.m. No retractable leads. All cats must be in carriers. Free parking. Family friendly. Free for spectators. $15 car show entry, $5 pet parade entry. Presented by Stray Animal Adoption Program. 859-3911234; www.adoptastray.com. Dayton, Ky.

Recreation Cincy Custom Street Machines Car Show, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Gil Lynn Park, Third Street and

Greendevil Lane, Registration 10 a.m.-1 p.m. In conjunction with Stray Animal Adoption Program’s Its a Pet aFair. Trophies in various categories. Benefits Stray Animal Adoption Program. $15 per car registration. Presented by Cincy Custom Street Machines. 859-391-1234; www.adoptastray.com. Dayton, Ky. Mascot Mingle, 2-3 p.m., Gil Lynn Park, Third Street and Greendevil Lane, With Frisch’s Big Boy, Cincinnati Red’s Gapper, Who Dey from Cincinnati Bengals, Coke Bear, Chic Fil A Cow, Twister from Cincinnati Cyclones, Icee Bear, Slush Puppy, Fritz the Barktoberfest Dog, Hero the Dog from the SPCA, Sparkey the Firedog and more. Bring cameras and pets. Benefits Stray Animal Adoption Program. Free. Presented by Stray Animal Adoption Program. 859-3911234; www.adoptastray.com. Dayton, Ky.

SUNDAY, APRIL 28 Art Exhibits Chris Felix, noon-6 p.m., Art on the Levee Gallery, 859-261-5770; www.artonthelevee.com. Newport.

Dining Events Country Breakfast, 8 a.m.-1 p.m., Fort Thomas Masonic Lodge No. 808, 37 N. Fort Thomas Ave, All-you-can-eat. Eggs, bacon, sausage, goetta, biscuits and gravy, grits, pancakes, waffles, potatoes, toast and more. $7, $4 children. Presented by Fort Thomas Masonic Lodge No 808. 859-694-3027. Fort Thomas.

Music - Religious Spring Concert, 4-5 p.m., St. Thomas Church, 26 E. Villa Place, Esther and Christina Nam, St. Thomas Choir and the Contemporary Liturgical Emsemble. Directed by Song Hun Nam. Free. 859-441-1282. Fort Thomas.

Music - Rock Matt Cowherd, 10 p.m., Jefferson Hall, 1 Levee Way, Suite 2118, 859-491-6200; www.jeffersonhall.com. Newport.

On Stage - Student Theater Dirty Rotten Scoundrels, 2-4:30 p.m., Campbell County High School, $9. 859-635-4161, ext. 1146; www.cchsdrama.org.

Alexandria.

On Stage - Theater School House Rock, Live!, 2 p.m., Stained Glass Theatre, $20. 859-652-3849; www.footlighters.org. Newport.

MONDAY, APRIL 29 Art Exhibits Chris Felix, 11 a.m.-9 p.m., Art on the Levee Gallery, 859-2615770; www.artonthelevee.com. Newport.

Karaoke and Open Mic Open Mic, 9 p.m.-2 a.m., The Southgate House Revival, 111 E. Sixth St., The Lounge. Awardwinning open mic features singer-songwriters, comedians, marimba players, storytellers and more. Ages 21 and up. 859-431-2201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport.

Music - DJ Cincinnati DJ Battles, 9 p.m.-2 a.m., Toro on the Levee, 1 Levee Way, Drink specials. Open to all DJs. DJs must register. Ages 21 and up. Free. 859-652-7260; www.torolevee.com. Newport.

TUESDAY, APRIL 30 Art Exhibits Chris Felix, 11 a.m.-9 p.m., Art on the Levee Gallery, 859-2615770; www.artonthelevee.com. Newport.

Clubs & Organizations Triangle Toastmasters Meeting, 7-8:30 p.m., Campbell County Fiscal Court, 1098 Monmouth St., Become a confident, more effective speaker. Free. Presented by Triangle Toastmasters. Through July 16. 859-6523348; triangle.toastmastersclubs.org. Newport.

Exercise Classes Cardio Dance Party!, 7:30-8:30 p.m., Locomotion on the Levee, 1 Levee Way, $10 drop-in. Presented by Cardio Dance Party. 513-617-9498; www.cardiodanceparty.com. Newport.

Music - DJ Devout Wax, 8 p.m.-1:30 a.m., The Southgate House Revival, 111 E. Sixth St., The Lounge. Vinyl night. Margaret and Jonathan spin eclectic wax. Including an all spin-by-request set, bring your own records.

Also, local/regional-only set. Ages 21 and up. Free. 859-4312201; www.facebook.com/ DevoutWax. Newport.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 1 Art Exhibits Chris Felix, 11 a.m.-9 p.m., Art on the Levee Gallery, 859-2615770; www.artonthelevee.com. Newport.

On Stage - Theater School House Rock, Live!, 8 p.m., Stained Glass Theatre, $20. 859-652-3849; www.footlighters.org. Newport.

THURSDAY, MAY 2 Art Exhibits Chris Felix, 11 a.m.-9 p.m., Art on the Levee Gallery, 859-2615770; www.artonthelevee.com. Newport.

Exercise Classes Cardio Dance Party!, 7:30-8:30 p.m., Locomotion on the Levee, $10 drop-in. 513-617-9498; www.cardiodanceparty.com. Newport.

Music - Cabaret Don Fangman, 6:30-9 p.m., Knotty Pine On The Bayou, 6302 Licking Pike, Don Fangman sings Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, Tony Bennett, Neil Diamond, Michael Buble and Andrea Bocelli. Free. 859-781-2200. Cold Spring.

Music - Country Original Hillbilly Thursdays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m., The Southgate House Revival, 111 E. Sixth St., The Lounge. Country, bluegrass, Americana and old fashioned hillbilly music. Different artist each week. Includes 50 cents off Jack Daniels. Ages 21 and up. Free. 859-431-2201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport.

Music - World Alpen Echos, 7:30-11 p.m., Hofbrauhaus, 200 E. Third St., Free. 859-491-7200; www.hofbrauhausnewport.com. Newport.

On Stage - Theater School House Rock, Live!, 8 p.m., Stained Glass Theatre, $20. 859-652-3849; www.footlighters.org. Newport.

Recreation Aerial Fitness, 6-7 p.m., Locomotion on the Levee, 1 Levee Way, Work on core body strength and endurance and use aerial equipment for workout. Rigorous course suitable for all fitness levels. Ages 18 and up. $15. Presented by Cincinnati Circus Company. Through July 31. 513-921-5454; www.cincinnaticircus.com. Newport.


LIFE

APRIL 25, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • B3

Celebrate spring with roasted asparagus What a difference a few warm days make. The Caudill kids who live down the road brought me a baggie full of wild violets that they patiently picked. I’ll add that to what I’ve picked and I’ll have enough to make a batch of violet jelly (so gourmet!) and violet vinegar. After they left, I started pulling weeds away from Rita the elderHeikenfeld berry RITA’S KITCHEN bushes when I happened to look over at the asparagus patch. Beautiful asparagus poking up everywhere! And a couple of the stalks were already feathering out at the top, which means they’re too tough to eat. Well, I stopped what I was doing, ran into the house to get a paring knife and basket, and started harvesting asparagus. I got about a pound from his first cutting, and that’s pretty good. Asparagus can help detoxify our system, has anti-aging properties and not only reduces the risk of heart disease, but it can help prevent birth defects. It’s in season now so pick some up at your local farmer’s market or grocery. Like all seasonal, local produce, asparagus contains optimum

2 tablespoons apricot jam

Can be refrigerated up to a week.

Sausage stew with root veggies

Rita adapted an asparagus with brie recipe from Tom Keegan of Keegan’s Specialty Seafood. THANKS TO RITA HEIKENFELD.

nutrition levels right now.

Roasted asparagus with brie

Sound different? I first tasted this when Tom Keegan of Keegan’s Specialty Seafood in Mount Washington was a guest on my cable show. “We make this all the time to serve alongside our entrees for our classes,” he said. (Check out his site at www.keeganseafood.com). No kidding, asparagus this way is addictive. Here’s my adaptation: Snap tough ends off. Lay in single layer on baking sheet. Sprinkle

with lemon pepper. Remove rind from brie (it’s edible but a bit tough and is easier to do when the cheese is cold). Lay slices of brie on top. Roast or grill at high temperature (475 degrees) for a few minutes or until asparagus just starts to wrinkle but turns bright green and is still plump and Brie starts to melt.

Phyllis Lowe’s apricot mustard sauce for pork tenderloin I need to eat more rosemary. That’s the herb for remembrance. Or

maybe sage, which is good for the mind. The reason I need to munch on these herbs is I can’t for the life of me remember which engagement I was doing where I met Phyllis. Actually, she attended a couple of my presentations and raved about this sauce, which she says is delicious alongside pork. Well, I can’t wait to try it and wanted you to have the recipe, too. Mix together: ⁄3cup sour cream Up to 1⁄3cup Dijon mustard 3 tablespoons whole-grain mustard

Each Thursday morning at 7:20 a.m., I have a live segment on Sacred Heart Radio with Brian Patrick about Bible foods and herbs. Recently we talked about carrots and turnips (check out my blog for a recap). About an hour later, a fax came in with this recipe “from a fan.” He/she indicated that “the stew is delicious.” That’s what makes this column so fun, the ability to share recipes like this. I’ll be making this as soon as our carrots and turnips are ready!

⁄2to 3⁄4pound bulk pork sausage 2 medium potatoes, peeled and cut into chunks 2 medium carrots, cut into chunks 1 small turnip, peeled and cubed 1/2medium onion, chopped, or more to taste 31⁄2cups water or broth (vegetable or chicken)

Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator and author. Find her blog online at Cincinnati.Com/blogs. Email her at columns@communitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-248-7130, ext. 356.

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Cook sausage until done. Add potatoes, carrots, turnip, onion, water and seasonings. Bring to boil, reduce heat, cover and simmer until veggies are tender, about 20 minutes. Stir in tomatoes and heat through.

1

MARRIAGE LICENSES Brittany Daniel, 26, of Highland Heights and Carey Sweeny II, 28, of Hopkinsville, issued March 15. Ashlee Jett, 25, and Logan Gindele, 27, both of Fort Thomas, issued April 8. Angela Whisner, 45, of Cincinnati and Richard Wherle, 50, of Fort Thomas, issued April 8. April Christian, 40, of Fort Thomas and John Baker Jr., 44, of Covington, issued April 9. Francine Gubser, 26, and Christopher Draughn, 30, both of Cincinnati, issued April 9. Lyndsay Hasson, 26, of Fort Thomas and Tyler Barto, 28, of Newport, issued April 9. Elizabeth Frazier, 29, of Ev-

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Alisha Rust, 28, of Fort Thomas and Andrew Kuntz, 29, of Hamilton, issued April 11. Ashley Shafer, 20, of Hamilton and Adam Thacker, 25, of Fort Thomas, issued April 11. Elizabeth Taubeneck, 34, of Evanston and Michael O’Leary, 36, of Cincinnati, issued April 12. Stacey Daniel, 40, of Newark and Joseph Jarrells Jr., 29, of Portsmouth, issued April 12. Megan McGreevy, 29, of Wichita and Timothy Lavens, 30, of Royal Oak, issued April 12. Kelly Lahner, 27, of Lexington and Kris Collins, 37, of Cincinnati, issued April 12.

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LIFE

B4 • CCF RECORDER • APRIL 25, 2013

‘Sisters Rosensweig’ runs through April 27

Get a contract before paying for work

Community Recorder

This is something I’ve seen happen several times. Many companies advertise they’ll get you a free roof. Actually, what happens is they work with your insurance company and your insurance company pays for the roof. But I’ve learned you have to be very careful when dealing with these firms. Sharon Brooks has lived in her North College Hill house for five and a half years. She said she started getting leaks from her roof. “My back room started to leak and last summer when there was a windstorm that came through with heavy winds and rain, it started to leak even worse,” she said. Brooks said her son knew somebody that worked with a roof repair firm, so she called. “He came out, walked the roof and said I definitely needed a new roof,” Brooks said. An insurance adjuster checked the roof and talked with the roof repairman, but only authorized minor repairs to the roof. However, he agreed there

The Village Players present “The Sisters Rosensweig,” by the Pulitzer-Prize-winning playwright Wendy Wasserstein, through April 27, at the Village Players Theater, 8 N. Fort Thomas Ave., in Fort Thomas. All proceeds for the Village Players annual spring charity fundraiser will be donated to Senior Services of Northern Kentucky. “The Sisters Rosensweig” is the story of Sara Goode, an enormously successful American woman working in London, about to celebrate her 54th birthday, but her quiet, expatriate life is

NON-DENOMINATIONAL

Angela Forbes, Kenneth Klem, Karra Robinson, and Michael Gunter star in "The Sisters Rosensweig," at the Village Players Theater in Fort Thomas. THANKS TO PHIL PARADIS

tures the acting talents of Clint Bramkamp, Kenneth Klem, Amy Sullivan, Renee Maria, Angela Klocke Forbes, Karra Robinson, Peter Merten, and Michael Gunter. The stage manager is Denise Knox. All tickets are $15 and can be purchased in advance by calling 859-3920500. For performance dates and times, visit www.villageplayers.biz.

about to be interrupted by a visit from her two sisters. As if that weren’t enough, her daughter announces a trip to Lithuania as a political protest. Unexpected guests arrive, leading to romance, recriminations and, above all, new-found love and acceptance. Directed by Cynthia Emmer and produced by Gregory Carl Smith, The Sisters Rosensweig fea-

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a different firm. Get a firm that’s been in business long enough to both have money and good credit to get the needed materials. Brooks said the contractor walked off the job last September. He had bought some drywall, but it was just sitting on the floor of the room uninstalled. Brooks said the room is worse now than its ever been. “They never answer the phone. I’ve left numerous messages,” she said. So I contacted the company and am happy to report they sent out a worker to finish the room. In addition, Brooks said her son was able to stop the leaks. Bottom line, when you get an insurance check, don’t sign it over to the repair company. Instead, deposit it into your own bank account and pay the firm a little at a time. It should all be spelled out in a written contract.

was major damage in her back room. “So, they did print out a check that day. I signed it over to him,” Brooks says. The check was for more than $1,200 and Brooks says the firm started working right away. “The guy took all of the paneling off the back room and Howard put it in Ain my backHEY HOWARD! yard and left it there. Now I have no walls on my back room,” she said. In fact, that was the last she saw of that company. The problem here is that Brooks signed over the entire insurance check to the roofer before any work had been done. “He said that that’s the money that would get him started on purchasing the material,” Brooks said. If the company doesn’t have enough money to do the job without first getting your money, then I believe you should look for

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LIFE

APRIL 25, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • B5

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LIFE

B6 • CCF RECORDER • APRIL 25, 2013

POLICE REPORTS ALEXANDRIA

stance - heroin, possession of marijuana, tampering with physical evidence at Alexandria Pike and Summerlake, March 26. Justin A. Newberry, 20, 315 Brookwood Drive, seconddegree fleeing or evading police - on foot at Willow Street and Alexandria Pike, March 30.

Arrests/citations Brandon J. Keating, 25, 142 Ridgewood Drive, speeding, DUI - first offense at East Main St., March 17. Rodney L. Dougoud, 21, 1396 Alabama Hwy. 117, warrant at Alexandria Pike, March 27. Joshua B. Young, 27, 209 Montjoy St., possession of drug paraphernalia, first-degree possession of controlled sub-

Incidents/investigations Fourth-degree assault

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Neal Raymond, 30, 317 Walnut St., first-degree possession of a controlled substance at 15 Donnermeyer Drive, April 11. Jeffrey Durham, 45, 722 Sixth Ave., first-degree possession of a controlled substance at 15 Donnermeyer Drive, April 11. Aaron Mille, 38, 2796 Hempling Road, first-degree promoting contraband, second-degree possession of a controlled substance at Campbell County Jail, April 12. Brian Bonnick, 33, 93 Rose Ave., first-degree possession of a controlled substance, thirddegree possession of a controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia, prescrip-

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6711 Alexandria Pike, March 23. Report of mailbox destroyed overnight - apparently with ball bat at 196 Ridgewood Drive, March 23. Third-degree terroristic threatening Report of student threatened teacher with physical harm at 51 Orchard Lane, March 21. Report of man threatened over phone to shoot another man at 6720 Alexandria Pike S, March

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Report of man punched another man after men were involved in an auto accident at Washington Street and Grove Street, March 28. Theft by unlawful taking Report of mailbox vandalized at 8473 Whitewood Court, March 21. Report of watch and drill taken from residence at 305 Washington St., March 26. Theft by unlawful taking firearm

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LIFE

APRIL 25, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • B7

POLICE REPORTS Continued from Page B6 tion drug not in proper container, operating a motor vehicle on a suspended license at Fairfield Avenue, April 13. Michael Duddey, 59, 473 Foote Ave., reckless driving, DUI at 400 block of Foote Ave., April 6. Jerry Thomas, 30, 532 Eighth Ave., failure to give right of way to emergency vehicle, DUI at 700 block of Fairfield Ave., April 7. Shandra Hughes, 20, 4088 Union St., public intoxication at 258 Lafayette Ave., April 10. Michael Gregory, 35, 422 Thornton St., possession of marijuana at alley behind 209 Division, April 11. Aaron Miller, 38, 2796 Hempfling Road, public intoxication, possession of marijuana at Fairfield Avenue, April 12. Jane Thomas, 22, 3166 Werk Road Apt. 4, careless driving, DUI at Fairfield Avenue, April 14. Rodney Turner, 47, 323 Ward Ave., alcohol intoxication in a public place, second-degree disorderly conduct at Callahan Center parking lot, April 15. David Ailstock, 40, 4 Mel Lawn Drive No. 2, DUI at Covert Run Pike, April 17. Jeremy Creekmore, 24, 418 Johnson St., warrant at Berry Avenue, April 4. Bobbi Wysong, 24, homeless, warrant at 145 Fairfield Ave., April 4. Billy Clutter III, 26, 258 Lafayette Ave., warrant at 258 Lafayette Ave., April 11. Michael Haynes, 30, 325 Ward Ave., warrant at 325 Ward Ave., April 14.

COLD SPRING Arrests/citations

wood Drive, warrant at 303 Knollwood, March 7. Jesse P. Ashcraft, 32, 224 East Fourth St., operating on suspended or revoked operators license, failure of non owner operator to maintain required insurance at U.S. . 27 north at Ripple Creek, March 9. Calvin F. Covey, 47, 30 Sabre Drive, warrant at 30 Sabre Drive, March 9. Ladon J. Barnard, 27, 335 Salmon Pass, warrant at 35 Sabre Drive, March 12. Jared B. Slocum, 32, 4622 Alexandria Pike, warrant at 5400 Alexandria Pike, March 12. Daniel L. Reynolds, 31, 144 Blue Jay Circle, alcohol intoxication in a public place - first and second offense, possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia at 5710 Alexandria Pike, March 16. Robert L. Mayfield, 25, 24820

16th Ave. N, warrant at 649 Meridian, March 16. Richard J. Penter, 26, 160 Waxwing Drive, warrant at Martha Layne Collins Blvd., March 22. Luis Garcia Quirog, 36, 1041 Rockyview Apt. 6, no operators - moped license at U.S. 27, March 25. Michael J. Ferrari, 45, 1015 Park Ave., speeding, operating on suspended or revoked operators license at U.S. 27, March 27. Kristen M. Rice, 28, 478 Pinnacle Way, warrant at 6600 Alexandria Pike, March 26. Alexandir N. Allehouse, 20, 1080 Lickert Road, warrant at 5400 Alexandria Pike, March 27.

Incidents/investigations Fourth-degree assault Report of woman shoved man into wall causing bump on forehead and scratches at 29 Sabre Drive, March 3.

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Report of woman assaulted another woman at 29 Sabre Drive, March 9. Report of two men fighting inside store at 375 Crossroads Blvd., March 5. Sale or purchase of a credit card from person other than issuer Reported at 25 Orchard Terrace, March 19. Second-degree criminal possession of a forged instrument Report of check forged and cash

at 136 Plaza Drive, March 21. Second-degree forgery Report of package and check taken and cashed at 3955 Alexandria Pike, March 12. Theft by unlawful taking Report off truck taken from parking lot at 16 Martha Layne Collins Blvd., March 22. Report of vehicle taken at 4135 Alexandria Pike, April 2. Report of deposit and money taken from register at 58

Martha Layne Collins Blvd., April 2. Theft by unlawful taking or shoplifting Report of meat taken without paying at 70 Martha Layne Collins Blvd., March 2. Report of item taken without paying at 395 Crossroads Blvd., March 14. Report of DVDs taken without

See POLICE, Page B8

ORDINANCE NO. O-06-2013 AN ORDINANCE PROVIDING FOR AND ORDERING THE STREET IMPROVEMENT OF CLOVER RIDGE FROM ITS INTERSECTION WITH MEMORIAL PARKWAY TO ITS INTERSECTION WITH ROSSFORD AVENUE; ROSSFORD AVENUE FROM ITS INTERSECTION WITH CLOVER RIDGE TO ITS INTERSECTION WITH NORTH FORT THOMAS AVENUE; BROADVIEW PLACE FROM ITS INTERSECTION WITH NORTH FORT THOMAS AVENUE TO ITS TERMINUS; AND MEL LAWN DRIVE FROM ITS INTERSECTION WITH NORTH FORT THOMAS AVENUE TO ITS TERMINUS; ALL IN THE CITY OF FORT THOMAS, CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY, AND ALL IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE PLANS AND SPECIFICATIONS THEREOF AS SUBMITTED BY THE CITY ENGINEER, AND AS APPROVED BY THE BOARD OF COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF FORT THOMAS; AND FURTHER, PROVIDING THAT THE ACTUAL COST OF THE CONSTRUCTION OF SAID STREET IMPROVEMENTS ARE TO BE BORNE BY THE CITY FIFTY PERCENT (50%) AND THE PROPERTY OWNER FIFTY PERCENT (50%) WITH THE EXCEPTION OF CLOVER RIDGE AND ROSSFORD AVENUE WHERE STREET IMPROVEMENT COSTS FOR THE CITY’S TYPICAL SECTION ARE TO BE BORNE BY THE CITY SIXTY PERCENT (60%) AND THE PROPERTY OWNER FORTY PERCENT (40%), AND PROVIDING FOR THE PAYMENT OF AN IMPROVEMENT ASSESSMENT. The following streets shall be improved as more fully described in the Ordinance. Some of the improvements shall include performing spot curb repair, mudjacking, full depth pavement repair as necessary bituminous asphalt pavement, surface milling, Fibermat installation, asphalt surface, driveway alignment and adjusted downspout leads. The total preliminary cost estimate and the preliminary cost estimate per front foot are as follows: Total Preliminary Cost Estimate

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Preliminary Cost Estimate by Front Foot to City

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David H. McKenzie, 44, 321 Fifth Ave., possession of drug paraphernalia, first-degree possession of controlled substance - heroin, warrant at 375 Crossroads Blvd., March 1. Babette D. South, 51, 303 Knollwood Drive, warrant at 303 Knollwood, March 7. Kearria D. South, 21, 303 Knoll-

City Share / Owner Share

Upon completion and acceptance of the work under the contract, the cost and expense of the street improvements shall be ascertained, levied, assessed and apportioned to and against the lots or parts of lots (abutting said streets) and the owners thereof, according to the number of front feet of real estate abutting the improved street. I, Jann Seidenfaden, City Attorney for the City of Fort Thomas, Campbell County, Kentucky, and an attorney licensed to practice law in the Commonwealth of Kentucky, do hereby certify that this Summary was prepared by me at the direction of the Mayor and Board of Council, and that this Summary is a true and accurate summary of the contents of the Ordinance.

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LIFE

B8 • CCF RECORDER • APRIL 25, 2013

POLICE REPORTS Continued from Page B7

Report of items taken without paying at 395 Crossroads Blvd., April 2. Theft of identity of another without consent Reported at 311 Town Square Circle, April 2. Theft of property or mislaid by mistake Report of wallet left on counter taken at 60 Martha Layne Collins Blvd., March 1. Report of bank deposits either lost or taken at 3701 Alexandria Pike, April 2. Third-degree criminal mischief Report of vehicle vandalized at 16 Martha Layne Collins Blvd., March 29.

paying at 375 Crossroads Blvd., March 20. Report of items taken without paying at 5400 Alexandria Pike, March 19. Report of item taken without paying at 375 Crossroads Blvd., March 18. Report of items taken without paying at 395 Crossroads Blvd., March 5. Report of clothing taken without paying at 395 Crossroads Blvd., March 5. Theft by unlawful taking or shoplifting, operating on suspended or revoked operators license

FORT THOMAS Arrests/citations

LEGAL NOTICE Mr. Herb’s LLC, mailing address 6809 Alexandria Pike, P.O. Box 547 Alexandria, KY 41001 hereby declares intention(s) to apply for a Retail Beer and Restaurant Wine by the drink license(s) no later than May 1, 2013, the business to be licensed will be located at 6809 Alexandria Pike, Alexandria, Kentucky 41001 doing business as Mr. Herb’s The (owner(s); Principal Officers and Directors; Limited Partners; or Members) are as follows: Owner Linda Waters of 3364 Nine Mile Rd., Melbourne, KY 41059. Any person, association, corporation, or body politic may protest the granting of the license(s) by writing the Office of Alcoholic Beverage Control, 1003 Twilight Trail, Frankfort, KY 406018400, within 30 days of the date of this legal publication. 1758468

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Felicia Sizemore, 19, 108 Park Place, warrant at 108 Park Lane, April 10. Mar'Shun Oden, 22, 825 South Grand Ave. Apt. 101, warrant at 100 block of North Grand Ave., April 14. Bradley Oberding, 31, 232 South Grand Ave., alcohol intoxication in a public place at Ridgewood Place, April 16. Jennifer Stamper, 39, 2 Henry Court, DUI at Evergreen Cemetery, April 15. Mitchell Iles, 41, 422 Sixth Ave., warrant at 600 South Fort Thomas Ave., April 16.

Incidents/investigations

At 18 Robanette Court, April 15. Second-degree indecent exposure At South Fort Thomas Ave., March 27. Theft by unlawful taking At 53 Brentwood Place, April 15. Third-degree criminal mischief At 40 Hollywood's Drive, April 10. At 12 Robanette Court, April 11. At 35 Mayfield Ave., April 14. Highland Heights Arrests/citations Andrea Lang, 46, homeless, warrant at 57 Rose Ave., April 10. Joshua Johnson, 26, 1618 Hewitt Ave., warrant, first-degree possession of a controlled substance at I-275 at I-471, April 9. James Bolster, 44, 5533 Bosworth Place Apt. 3, possession of marijuana at AA at Towne, April 5. Jack Kleier, 29, 25 Ash St., warrant at I-471 at U.S. 27, April 4. Michelle Mason, 28, 24 Chapel Road, possession of drug paraphernalia, warrants at I-275 at I-471, April 4. Charles Williams, 31, 4299 Bullfork Road, first-degree possession of a controlled substance at I-275 at I-471, April 3. Danielle Steele-Mathis, 24, 574 Russell Lewis Road, first-degree possession of a controlled substance at I-275 at I-471, April 3.

Second-degree burglary

See POLICE, Page B9

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LIFE

APRIL 25, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • B9

DEATHS Stephen Ament Stephen D. Ament, 69, of Alexandria, died April 5 at his residence. He was an Army veteran of the Vietnam War, retired machine operator with United Dairy Farmers in Norwood, Ohio, member of First Christian Church in Fort Thomas, and member of the Tuesday Night Dance Group in Fort Wright. His stepson, Kevin Ament, died previously. Survivors include his wife, Bette Ament of Alexandria; son, David Chrzanowski of Fort Thomas; daughters, Julie Perry of Maineville, Ohio, and Dawn Koesters of Liberty Township, Ohio; stepson, Keith Ament; brothers, William Ament Jr. of Independence, and Andrew R. Ament of Edgewood; sisters, Virginia Herrmann of Cold Spring, and Carol Paden of Highland Heights; close friend, Barry Siemereight; eight grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Memorials: Miami Valley Down Syndrome Association, 1133 S. Edwin C. Moses Blvd., Suite 190, Dayton, OH 45417.

Margaret Brewer Margaret Worth Brewer, 93,

of Wilder, died April 11, 2013. She was a registered nurse, the first Police Matron for the city of Wilder, a post she held from 1978 until 2000, assisting female prisoners after their arrest. She was a member of Bellevue Christian Church and later Rolling Hills Christian Church in Cold Spring, was president for 30 years of the Spears Nurses’ Association, member of VF Post 3205 among many other groups, and volunteered for the Burn Center of Northern Kentucky, the Veterans Hospital of Cincinnati, and the Veterans Hospital in Fort Thomas. Her husband, Basil Roy Brewer; and siblings, Ava Wandelohr Horne, Col. William Webster Holmes, John Coleman Holmes, Mary Lee Roberts, James Wandelohr Holmes and Charles Gosney Holmes Sr., died previously. Survivors include her sister, Anna Bryan Holmes of Fort Thomas; and many nieces and nephews. Interment was at Butler Cemetery. Memorials: Salvation Army of Northern Kentucky, 340 West 10th St., Newport, KY 41071.

Jamie Caudill Jamie Caudill, 50, formerly of Alexandria, died April 12, 2013. His father, Les Caudill Sr., died previously. Survivors include his mother, Lyda Caudill; daughter, Ashley Caudill; siblings, Julie Caudill Hammack, Robert Caudill, and Les Caudill Jr.; special friends, Pam Holland and Debbie Bennett McCarthy; and several nieces and nephews.

Jesse Dean Jr. Jesse Bryant Dean Jr., 82, of Falmouth, formerly of Bellevue, died April 11, 2013, at the Hospice of the Bluegrass, Northern Ky. Care Center in Fort Thomas. He was a retired mail carrier, Air Force veteran of the Korean War, member of the Falmouth Baptist Church, avid coin collector, and loved southern gospel music, especially the Kingdom Heirs Quartet at Dollywood. His wife, Lina Picklesimer; grandson, Grayson Wolfe; sisters, Josephine Burchett and Lilly Potter; and brothers, Paul Dean, Alfred Dean, Ronnie Dean, and John Dean, died previously. Survivors include his children,

Jeff Dean of Falmouth, Mallory Wolfe of Butler, Tammy Feldkamp of Bellevue, and Steve Dean of Bellevue; sister, Margaret Price; brothers, Herman and Frank Dean; special friends, Carla, James, and Mary Reed; eight grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. Burial was at Riverside Cemetery. Memorials: River Valley Nursing Home Patient Fund, 305 Taylor St., Butler, KY 41006; or the American Cancer Society.

Joseph Deinlein Joseph J. Deinlein, 87, of Alexandria, died April 12, 2013, at the Baptist Convalescent Center in Newport. He retired from United Trucking Service in Cincinnati, and was a member and greeter at Nilles Pointe Baptist Church in Fairfield, Ohio.

POLICE REPORTS Morgan Brodt, 22, 130 Hickory Drive, possession of drug paraphernalia at I-275 east, April 2. Josey Masterson, 20, 3792 Mineral Springs Road, possession of drug paraphernalia at I-275 east, April 2. Amy Mills, 24, 119 Newlun Court, first-degree possession of a controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia at I-275, April 1. Bradley Quire, 26, 11324 Orchard St., warrant at I-275, April 1. Dawn Dearing, 42, 4680 Sharps Cutoff Road, warrants, possession of drug paraphernalia at I-275, March 31.

City of Cold Spring Invitation to Bid City of Cold Spring, Kentucky, is seeking a bid for construction of an extension to the city maintenance garage. The structure is located at the rear of 5589 East Alexandria Pike, Cold Spring, Kentucky. Bidder is responsible for demolition and removal of all materials from the site, as well as construction of new extension as per requirements. Bidder will carry all applicable insurances required for construction work. All work will need to be invoiced no later than June 30, 2013. In order to be considered, all bids must be received by 3:00 p.m., May 10, 2013, at the following address: City of Cold Spring, ATTN: Garage Extension, 5694 East Alexandria Pike, Cold Spring, Kentucky 41076. For property inspection or further information, please contact Steve Taylor, City Administrative Officer, 859-4419604. 1758394

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2013, at the VA Nursing Home in Fort Thomas. He was a bookkeeper with the DAV, and an Army veteran of World War II, fighting in the Battle of the Bulge. His wife, Eleanor; sisters, Vera Duesing, Lillian Kaiser, and Thelma Goebel; and brothers, Wilber and Arthur Fortner, died previously. Survivors include his daugh-

Legal Notice: AT&T Mobility is proposing to construct a teleco mmunications site at 10001 Morvue Drive, Alexandria, KY 41001. This site will consist of a 250ft selfsupport tower and a 1story radio equipment shelter. The tower and shelter will be enclosed within a chain link fenced compound. A zoning hearing will be held by the Campbell County and Municipal Planning & Zoning Commission on May 14th at 7:30pm under Case#119-13-SPD-01. You may contact the Campbell County and Municipal Planning & Zoning Commission in writing at 1098 Monmouth Street, Suite 343, Newport, KY 41071 for further information. 1757778

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His second wife, Lillian Deinlein; son, John E. Deinlein; daughter, Patricia Deinlein; and brother, Robert W. Deinlein, died previously. Survivors include his first wife, Verna Deinlein; daughter, Laura Iles; son, Mark Deinlein; stepchildren, Larry Milnes and Judy Little; sisters, Joan Board and Donna Patterson; 13 grandchildren, 19 great-grandchildren and six great-great-grandchildren. Interment was at the Crown Hill Memorial Park in Cincinnati. Memorials: Hospice of the Bluegrass, 7338 Turfway Road, Florence, KY 41042; or American Diabetes Association, 4555 Lake Forest Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45242.

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LIFE

B10 • CCF RECORDER • APRIL 25, 2013

DEATHS Continued from Page B9 ters, JoAnn Tischner of Taylor Mill, and Theresa Huber of Fort Wright; sons, Douglas and Mark Fortner, both of Cincinnati; and three grandchildren. Interment was at St. Stephen Cemetery in Fort Thomas.

Rosemary Huesing Rosemary Deutsch Huesing, 90, of Fort Thomas, died April 17, 2013. She was a member of St. Thomas Church. Survivors include her husband, William Huesing; sons, Bill Huesing, Barry Huesing, and Robert Huesing; daughter, Mariann Hollmann; brother, Carl Deutsch; sister, Jo Ann Pierce; 22

grandchildren and 15 greatgrandchildren. Burial was at St. Stephen Cemetery. Memorials: St. Charles Care Center, 600 Farrell Drive, Covington, KY 41011.

Kristina Johnson Kristina Ann Johnson, 17, of Alexandria, died April 16, 2013. She enjoyed school, swimming for the Special Olympics, and texting her sisters and friends. She spent the summers camping with her family, where she loved to fish, ride her bike, and enjoy campfires at night. Survivors include her parents, Greg and Janet Johnson; sisters, Sara Johnson and Erica Johnson; sister and Godmother, Holly

LEGAL NOTICE The Fort Thomas Board of Education will accept sealed proposals on the following items: PROPERTY, FLEET, GENERAL LIABILI TY, EDUCATOR’S LEGAL LIABILTY, EX CESS UMBRELLA LIABILTY, WORKERS COMPENSATION, AND STUDENT IN SURANCE Requests for proposal can be obtained from: Jerry Wissman, Director of Operations Fort Thomas Board of Education 28 North Fort Thomas Avenue Fort Thomas, KY 41075 859.815.2018 All proposals to be considered shall be received by 2:00 p.m. on Wednesday, May 8, 2013. The Fort Thomas Board of Education reserves the right to reject any or all proposals received. 1757963 LEGAL NOTICE The Fort Thomas Board of Education will accept sealed BIDS for property listed as: SURPLUS EQUIPMENT Items included in the specification include, but are not limited to: metal shop equipment, wood shop equipment, pianos, vehicles, classroom and office furniture, and miscella neous items. Copies of this invitation to bid can be obtained from: Jerry Wissman, Director of Operations Fort Thomas Board of Education 28 North Fort Thomas Avenue Fort Thomas, KY 41075 859.815.2018 All bids to be considered shall be received by 2:00 p.m. on Tuesday, May 7, 2013. The Fort Thomas Board of Education reserves the right to reject any or all proposals re1001757962 ceived. PUBLIC NOTICE

Campbell County Fiscal Court in conjunction with the Kentucky Association of Counties (KACo), will be accepting bids via a Reverse Online Auction on May 9, 2013 at 3 p.m. eastern time (2 p.m. Central) for the purchase of road salt for the county road department. For bid participation / registration and specification contact Orbis Online at 210-481-9840 or log onto www.orbisonline.com or contact, Diane E. Bertke, Campbell County Fiscal Court at 859-547-1825 or Scott Martin with KACo at 800-264-5226. The Fiscal Court reserves the right to reject/accept any and all bids. Bids will be accepted online only. 1001758074 NOTICE OF BOND SALE The Secretary of Dayton Independent School District Finance Corporation, Dayton, Kentucky, will until 12:00 P.M., E.T., on May 2, 2013, receive at the Office of the Executive Director of the Kentucky School Facilities Construction Commission, 229 West Main St., Suite 102, Frankfort, Kentucky 40601, sealed competitive bids for approximately $1,750,000 of the Corporation’s School Building Revenue Bonds, Series 2013, being fully registered bonds in denominations in multiples of $5,000 (within the same maturity), maturing as to principal in varying amounts on May 1, 2014 through 2033. Bonds of this issue are subject to optional redemption prior to their stated maturities on or after May 1, 2023. Electronic bids may be submitted via BiDCOMP™/PARITY™. The Corporation reserves the right to increase or decrease the amount of Bonds to be purchased by the successful bidder by an amount not to exceed $175,000 in increments of $1,000 at the sale price per $1,000 of Bonds; such increase or decrease to be made in any maturity. Bids must be on Official Bid Form contained in the Preliminary Official Statement, available from the under signed or Ross, Sinclaire & Associates, LLC, 325 West Main Street, Suite 300, Lexington, Kentucky 40507. Reference is made to the Official Terms and Conditions of Bond Sale contained in the Preliminary Official Statement for further details and bidding conditions. For further information regarding BiDCOMP™/PARITY™, potential bidders may contact BiDCOMP™/PARITY™, Telephone: (800) 850-7422. Sale on tax-exempt basis, subject to approving legal opinion of Peck, Shaffer & Williams LLP, Bond Counsel, Covington, Kentucky. The Corporation has designated the Bonds as "qualified taxexempt obligations" pursuant to Section 265 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended. Right to reject bids or waive informality reserved. DAYTON INDEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICT FINANCE CORPORATION By: /s/ Jay Brewer, Secretary

1758149

Phelps and her husband, Todd and daughters, Brooklynn and Bailee; grandparents, Jim and Eileen Woeste, and Rita Anderson; and Godparents, Charley and Gayle Johnson. Interment was at St. Mary Cemetery. Memorials: Our Lady’s Farm, 5820 Hwy. 159, Falmouth, KY 41040; or Memorial for Kristina Johnson, Bishop Brossart High School, 4 Grove St., Alexandria, KY 41001.

Betty Kaufman Betty Kaufman, 72, of Alexandria, died April 11, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. She was a homemaker. Her husband, Glenn H. Kaufman, and daughter, Lynn Clift, died previously. Survivors include her daughters, Kelly Seifer, Amy Caruso, Holly Kaufman, Betsy Kaufman, Carrie Kaufman, Erin Morris, and Mandy Kaufman; sons, David Kaufman, Jimmy Kaufman, and Billy Kaufman; 20 grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren. Burial was at St. Stephen Cemetery.

Jo Ann Lewis Jo Ann Lewis, 67, of Wilder, died April 13, 2013.

Her brothers, Charles and James Beach; and sisters, Lillian Donaldson and Louise Howard, died previously. Survivors include her husband, Benny; sister, Sue Ahr of Florence; and brothers, Richard, Eugene and Bobby Beach of Carrollton.

Elsie Long Elsie Frances Long, 86, of Newport, died April 11, 2013, at her residence. She worked in housekeeping at St. Elizabeth North Hospital in Covington. Her husband, Clifton Raymond Long, died previously. Survivors include her daughter, Bertha Britton; son, Harry Trinkler; sisters, Eula Mefford and Beaulah Mefford; six grandchildren, nine great-grandchildren and three great-greatgrandchildren. Burial was at Highlands Cemetery in Fort Mitchell.

Dr. Daniel Nutzel Dr. Daniel C. “Dan” Nutzel, 50, of Indianapolis, formerly of Fort Thomas, died April 13, 2013. He was an associate professor of German, the Hoyt-Reichmann Chair in German American Studies, and the director of the

ABOUT OBITUARIES Basic obituary information and a color photograph of your loved one is published without charge by The Community Press. Please call us at 283-0404 for more information. To publish a larger memorial tribute, call 513-2424000 for pricing details. For the most up-to-date Northern Kentucky obituaries, click on the “Obituaries” link at NKY.com.

INVITATION TO BID Date: April 25, 2013 PROJECT: Broadview Place Water Main Replacement City of Fort Thomas, Campbell County, Kentucky SEALED BIDS WILL BE RECEIVED AT: Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) 2835 Crescent Springs Road P.O. Box 18640 Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 Date: May 7, 2013 UNTIL: Time: 10:00 AM (Local Time) At said place and time, and promptly thereafter, all Bids that have been duly received will be publicly opened and read aloud. The proposed Work is generally described as follows: Construction of approximately 900 linear feet of 8" PVC and 405 linear feet of 6" PVC water main together with the appurtenances and related work along Broadview Place in the City of Fort Thomas, Campbell County, Kentucky. All Bids must be in accordance with the Instructions to Bidders and Contract Documents on file, and available for examination at: Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) 2835 Crescent Springs Road Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 Or CDS Associates, Inc. 7000 Dixie Highway Florence, Kentucky 41042 Phone: (859) 525-0544 Copies of the Bidding Documents may be obtained from the office of CDS Associates at the address indicated herein. Charges for all documents obtained will be made on the following basis: Charge $ 35.00 Complete set of Bidding Documents $ 15.00 Mailing and Handling (U.S. Mail) (if requested) Charges for Bidding Documents and mailing and handling, if applicable, will not be refunded.

Max Kade Center for GermanAmerican Studies at the Indiana/ Purdue University in Indianapolis. A graduate of Xavier University, the University of Cincinnati, and Purdue University, he won many scholarships, including two Fulbrights, studied at the Sorbonne in Paris, University of Hamburg and the University of Salzburg. He spent most of his adult life living and teaching in Germany. His father, Carl Nutzel, died previously. Survivors include his mother, Mary Lou Nutzel; siblings, Vickie Rebholz and Karen Tracy; and many nieces and nephews. Memorials: Max Kade Center at IUPUI; or Xavier University.

Norbert Pelgen Norbert A. Pelgen, 88, formerly of Fort Thomas, died April 9, 2013. He was a World War II veteran, auditor for the Cincinnati Union Terminal Railroad, realtor for 30 years, and ardent golfer. Survivors include his wife, Heloise; son, Paul; daughter, Donna; granddaughter, Melinda; and two great-grandsons. Burial was at Williamstown Veterans Cemetery.

Lucille Pickett Lucille Jeanette Pickett, 101, of Newport, died April 16, at Baptist Convalescent Center in Newport. She was a member of First Baptist Church of Newport where she served as secretary for more than 50 years. Her husband, Clarence Pickett, died previously. Survivors include her daughter, Nancy Stodghill of Newport; granddaughter, Jill Scully; and two great-grandchildren. Memorials: First Baptist Church 801 York St. Newport, KY 41071.

William Stuttler William “Billy” Stuttler, 60, of Cold Spring, died April 11, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. His father, Bill Stuttler, died previously. Survivors include his mother, Delores Stuttler; brothers, Greg, Keith, Steve and Mark Stuttler; and sisters, Kim Hoefker and Shellee Wagner. Burial was at St. Stephen

Cemetery in Fort Thomas. Memorials: Redwood School, 71 Orphanage Road, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017; or Active Day, 725 Alexandria Pike No. 109, Fort Thomas, KY 41075.

Nancy Weaver Nancy K. Weaver, 69, of Newport, died April 17, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. She retired as a deputy clerk with the Campbell County District Court. Her sister, Judy Weier, died previously. Survivors include her daughters, Karen Pope of Erlanger, and Cindy Weaver of Newport; sister, Joyce Dorsey; brother, Paul Weier; and grandson, Bryce Polley. Interment was at St. Stephen Cemetery. Memorials: St. Elizabeth Hospice, 483 South Loop Drive, Edgewood, KY 41017; or American Cancer Society, 297 Buttermilk Pike, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017.

Donald Wiedeman Donald Martin Wiedeman, 83, of Melbourne, died April 11, 2013, at Emeritus of Edgewood. He retired after 37 years as executive vice-president of Home Builders of Northern Kentucky, was past president of Executive Officers Council of the National Association of Home Builders, member of the American Society of Association Executives, past president of Cincinnati Society Association Executives, helped to organize the Herbst Tour in Camp Springs, member of the Tri State Photographic Society, Army veteran of the Korean Conflict, and member of Camp Springs Volunteer Fire Department. His wife, Louise S. Wiedeman, died previously. Survivors include his daughter, Dena Crain; sisters, Carole Cleves and Marilyn “Binky” Sullivan; and brothers, Louis “Pete” Wiedeman and Robert Wiedeman. Interment was at St. Stephen Cemetery in Fort Thomas. Memorials: Newport Central Catholic High School, 13 Carothers Road, Newport, KY 41071.

LEGAL NOTICE CAMPBELL COUNTY PROPERTY VALUATION ADMINISTRATOR Campbell County Administration Building 1098 Monmouth Street Room 329, Newport, KY 41071 INSPECTION PERIOD FOR THE PROPERTY TAX ASSESSMENT ROLL The Campbell County real property tax roll will be opened for inspection from May 6 through May 20, 2013. Under the supervision of the Property Valuation Administrator or one of the deputies, any person may inspect the tax roll. This is the January 1, 2013 assessment on which state, county, and school taxes for 2013 will be computed. The tax roll is in the office of the Property Valuation Administrator in the county administration building in Newport and may be inspected between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 4:15 p.m. Monday through Friday and from 9:00 a.m. until 12:00 p.m. on Saturday.

Bids will be received on a unit price and/or lump sum basis as described in the Contract Documents.

Any taxpayer desiring to appeal an assessment on real property made by the PVA must first request a conference with the PVA or a designated deputy. The conference may be held prior to or during the inspection period.

Bid security, in the form of a certified check or a Bid Bond (insuring/bonding company shall be rated "A" by AM Best) in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the maximum total bid price, must accompany each Bid.

Any taxpayer still aggrieved by an assessment on real property, after the conference with the PVA or designated deputy, may appeal to the county board of assessment appeals.

The Successful Bidder will be required to furnish a Construction Payment Bond and a Construction Performance Bond (insuring/bonding company shall be rated "A" by AM Best) as security for the faithful performance of the contract and the payment of all bills and obligations arising from the performance of the Contract. Contractor and all Subcontractors will be required to conform to the labor standards set forth in the Contract Documents. This project does not fall under the provisions of KRS 337.505 to 337.550 for prevailing wage rates. Evaluation of Bids and the awarding of a final contract are subject to the reciprocal preference for Kentucky resident bidders pursuant to KRS 45A490 to 45A.494 and (KAR 200 5:400). Owner reserves the right to reject any or all Bids, including without limitation the right to reject any or all nonconforming, non-responsive, incomplete, unbalanced, or conditional Bids, to waive informalities, and to reject the Bid of any Bidder if Owner believes that it would not be in the best interest of Owner to make an award to that Bidder. Owner also reserves the right to negotiate with the apparent qualified Bidder to such an extent as may be determined by Owner. Minority Bidders are encouraged to bid. Bids shall remain subject to acceptance for 60 days after the day of bid opening or for such longer period of time to which a Bidder may agree in writing upon request of the Owner. If a Contract is to be awarded, the Owner will give the successful Bidder a Notice of Award during the period of time during which the successful Bidder’s bid remains subject to acceptance. Richard Harrison, Vice President of Engineering, Water Quality, & Production Northern Kentucky Water District 10017582443

The taxpayer can appeal his assessment by filing in person or sending a letter or other written petition stating the reasons for the appeal, identifying the property, and stating the taxpayer’s opinion of the fair cash value of the property. The appeal must be filed with county clerk’s office no later than one work day following the conclusion of the inspection period. Any taxpayer failing to appeal to the county board of assessment appeals, or failing to appear before the board, either in person or by designated representative, will not be eligible to appeal directly to the Kentucky Board of Tax Appeals. Appeals of personal property assessments shall not be made to the county board of assessment appeals. Personal property taxpayers shall be served notice under the provisions of KRS 132.450(4) and shall have the protest and appeal rights guaranteed under the provisions of KRS 131.110. The following steps should be taken when a taxpayer does not agree with the assessed value of personal property as determined by the office of the Property Valuation Administrator. 1. He must list under protest (for certification) what he believes to be the fair cash value of his property. 2. He must file a written protest directly with the Department of Property Taxation within 30 days from the date of notice of assessment. 3. This protest must be in accordance with KRS 131.110. 4. The final decision of the Revenue Cabinet may be appealed to the Kentucky Board of Tax Appeals. Daniel K. Braun Campbell County Property Valuation Administrator

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