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BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT B1

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Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Fort Thomas Email: kynews@communitypress.com Website: NKY.com T h u r s d a y, A p r i l 2 1 , 2 0 1 1

Volume 11, Number 48 © 2011 The Community Recorder ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Bump, set, spike

Inside or outdoors, there’s a sand volleyball match going on at Alexandria’s Southern Lanes Sports Center pretty much any time of year. Many know the Alexandria business for its bowling lanes, but the two indoor sand courts are used every month of the year when the outside courts are not available because of the weather. LIFE, B1

RECORDER

B E C A U S E C O M M U N I T Y M AT T E R S

Loved ones remember fallen soldier By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

From his contagious smile to his kind heart, Army Pvt. Brandon Pickering left his mark on many of those who knew him. Family and friends of the fallen 21-year-old Army infantryman, who died Sunday, April 10, in Germany from wounds he suffered in Afghanistan’s Wardak province, gathered at a memorial service at Highlands Middle School Saturday, April 16, to share their memories of him. “Brandon is a hero, not only to this country, but he’s a hero to everyone of us,” said Don Donovan, the father of one of Pickering’s best friends. “He gave gave

his life for this country, and he’ll always be remembered.” Donovan said when he thinks of Pickering, he remembers his smiling face and goofy persona, attributes mentioned by several people at the service. Pickering’s former classmate Stephanie Orleck, who knew him since second grade, said he was always very free-spirited and could always make her smile. “Brandon was always able to bring the best out of anybody,” Orleck said. Highlands High School Principal Brian Robinson, who was the assistant principal at the school when Pickering was a student, said he remembers his smile, and how it could light up a room.

Nominate the Amazing Mom in your life and she could have the chance to win a $100 gift card to Mitchell's Salon & Day Spa. To enter, visit the Contests page located on CincinnatiMomsLikeMe.com. Click on the Amazing Moms Contest and upload a photo of your nominee along with a caption of 100 words or less on the why this mom is amazing. Deadline to enter is Monday, April 25, 2011 at 9 a.m. Winner will be determined by public voting from April 25 through May 2.

By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

Send us prom photos

It’s prom season again, and we want you to send us your photos, and we’ll feature them on NKY.com We’re looking for high school prom photos from this spring’s events. Send your prom photos by attaching them to an email and send them to NKYproms@ NKY.com Please make your photos no smaller than 640x480 pixels, and no larger than 100KB. Be sure to include the names of those in the picture, and the date and school of the prom.

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Have a great photo from your kid’s latest field trip? Trying to drum up publicity for your group’s event? Visit NKY.com/Share to submit your photos, news and events. It’s a one-stop-shop for submitting information to The Community Recorder, The Kentucky Enquirer, NKY.com and our other publications and websites.

To place an ad, call 283-7290.

Robinson said the large turnout at the service, which was planned on short notice by some of Pickering’s friends and family, shows how much he touched the community. “This is not just a loss for Highlands High School or Fort Thomas, but for the entire country,” Robinson said, “Our heart aches for his family and friends.” Pickering’s cousin Jenny Warr, who knew him since he was born, said she is very proud of him. “Keep (our family) in your prayers,” Warr said. “We appreciate the support.” Funeral arrangements for Pickering are still pending. For more about your community, visit www.nky.com/fortthomas

PROVIDED

Army Pvt. Brandon Pickering, from Fort Thomas, died Sunday, April 10, after being injured in Afghanistan.

Former SD1 exec is back in town

Moms contest

Keep up with news from across Northern Kentucky by liking “NKY.com” on Facebook.

50¢

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Eggs aplenty

Stephanie Madsen of Fort Thomas points out a plastic egg on the ground for her 13month-old son Maxx to grab during the annual egg hunt at Alexandria Community Park sponsored by the Alexandria Park and Recreation Board Saturday, April 16.

Jeff Eger, the former general manager of Sanitation District No. 1 of Northern Kentucky, was back in town to attend a national conference about clean water and treating wastewater that was organized by the nonprofit Water Environment Federation (WEF) group he now leads. Eger, 57, led Northern Kentucky’s regional sewer utility from 1994 until leaving Jan. 20, to take the job of executive director of WEF in Arlington, Va. Eger said the new job at WEF is an extension of a career in public service, and it was good to be back in town for the April 11-12 “Disinfection 2011” conference in Cincinnati. About 175 people, including researchers from academia including Harvard University, officials from the federal CDC and EPA, and 75 corporate exhibitors were at the WEF-organized conference to share knowledge, he said. “Being engaged with clean water professionals all over the world, we all feel passionate about our work of being able to protect clean water,” Eger said. Eger said he’s been focusing on helping with telling the story of local water utilities since taking the job as the WEF executive director.

WEF has a staff of about 100, and the association has about 34,000 individual members who work on water quality issues including Eger employees of utilities and academics, he said. “I think we have been very strong in education and training and technology transfer,” Eger said. As a professional association that’s been around for more than 75 years, WEF does a good job sharing knowledge and information amongst members, and public education is now the key, he said. WEF and the American Waterworks Association recently joined together to host a first-ever joint fly-in of water professionals around the country to talk with members of the U.S. Congress about the how much water matters and also the costs of maintaining water infrastructure to federal standards. “We cannot take for granted our water, and we have,” Eger said. Some people in the general public are informed and educated about the cost of needed maintenance and upgrades while others

See EGER on page A2

Sisters celebrate Good Friday with biblical dinner By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

The Sisters of the Good Shepherd in Fort Thomas are celebrating Good Friday with an authentic biblical dinner. Using only foods that were found in the time of Jesus, the residents of the sisters’ retirement home will celebrate the religious holiday while gaining a better understanding of what things

were like during Jesus’ life. Activities coordinator Barbara Barker said she got the idea for the dinner, which has been a tradition for the past three years, after reading about a biblical garden in Catholic Digest. “I just thought it sounded interesting,” Barker said. “We try to make it as authentic as possible and most of (the residents) really enjoy it.” Barker said getting the dinner

together has taken a lot of research, but that she’s had fun doing it. Kitchen manager Dee Collins said she only uses fruits, vegetables, fish and herbs that were found in the Holy Land during biblical times. “I don’t go as far a cooking with bricks, but we do make unleavened bread and keep it very simple,” Collins said. While the menu is kept a secret each year, Collins said last year it

included tilapia, carrots with cumin, papaya, barley cakes and olive oil. Sister Elise Kramer, the administrator of the home, said it is really interesting to learn more about how Jesus lived. “I think this dinner makes Good Friday more real for everyone,” Kramer said. “It reminds us what it was really like in those days.” For more about your community, visit www.nky.com/fortthomas


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Fort Thomas Recorder

News

April 21, 2011

Campsite with stables likely for horse riders By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

In 2006, volunteers of the Northern Kentucky Horse Network dreamed of an active trail network inside A.J. Jolly Park with a campsite including an overnight barn for horses, and the coup of a grant windfall is likely to make that a reality in 2011. Campbell County Fiscal Court is applying for $100,000 from the state Recreational Trails Program grant to help pay for 12 camp sites with a 28-stall horse barn at the county park. Volunteers from the horse network have revived and expanded the trail network at A.J. Jolly that as recently as 2006 were closed down in a state of disrepair. Thanks to the work of the volunteers the county is in a position to obtain the grant money, Pendery said. The county will match $25,000 in money for the grant, and the attraction that will be created will pay that money back because it’s economic development, he said.

Contributing to the grant opportunity is a way to support the work that the volunteers have already done to create trails at the park, Pendery said. “I think it’s a wonderful opportunity,” he said. “They have proven both by the work they’ve already done at the park. We’ve got close to 20 miles of trails at the park that they have laid.” It’s “highly probable” the county will receive the money because the $100,000 had been already slated for use with a different Campbell County project, Pendery said. The grant money was originally awarded for the Camp Springs Initiative’s Stone House Trail, but CSI couldn’t use the money before the deadline to use the money expired, said Linda Bray-Schafer of Grant’s Lick, a member of the horse network’s board. Bray-Schafer said the work on the camp sites and barn at A.J. Jolly Park will probably be done by September to comply with the terms of the grant. “So, it will be there in prime time for fall riding

season,” she said. There is a large group of volunteers who have made the trail system a reality, including a recent expansion of the trails into an additional 100-acre portion of the park, Bray-Schafer said. The campsites with a barn is one more achievement for the trails in the park since they were closed in the summer of 2006 and the horse network lobbied to have them reopened, Bray-Schafer said. A horse barn next to a campsite was one of the major goals set when the horse network took an interest in opening the trails back up, and it’s a major accomplishment, she said. Dave Rust of Cold Spring, secretary of the horse network, said credit must go to the county for pulling the entire project together, that still isn’t officially a done deal. “It’s a great deal, and it’s something we’ve always wanted, and hopefully it’s going to happen,” Rust said. For more about your community, visit www.nky.com/campbellcounty

Earth Fair

Jonah Giesmann (above) held by his grandfather Cliff Shisler and Jeremiah Giesmann held by his grandmother Linda Heath talk to Brittany Corson from Sanatation District No. 1 during Fort Thomas’s Earth Fair Saturday, April 16.

Will Bardgett, a sophomore at Highlands High School, promotes a game students used to raise money for the Enviro-thon team at the school.

ALL PHOTOS: AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/ STAFF

NKU professor selected for summer studies Northern Kentucky University English professor Tonya Krouse is one of 14

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scholars selected from a national pool of applicants to participate in the National Humanities Center Summer Institute in Literary Studies from June 26 through July 1. The seminar’s theme is “Reading the Golden Notebook,” and will be directed by Toril Moi, the James B.

Highlands High School volunteer Garrett Pieratt helps Callum McAtee plant a flower during the Earth Fair.

Duke Professor of Literature and Romance Studies at Duke University, where she also teaches English and theater. The National Humanities Center Summer Institutes in Literary Studies are funded through a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

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YOU ARE CORDIALLY INVITED TO A VIEWING OF THE HIDING PLACE Spend an evening with Golden Globe Nominee Jeannette Clift George

The Hiding Place is the autobiographical story of Corrie Ten Boom which chronicles her family’s nightmarish experiences in the Nazi concentration camp system. Ms. George, who plays the role of Corrie Ten Boom in the movie will be present for a question Ms and answer session after the movie and an opportunity to meet the star in person.

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either need to learn more about the infrastructure or just take the system for granted, he said. Eger said although completely different, many people didn’t take much notice of nuclear power plants in the U.S. until after the tsunami in Japan. Protecting the water infrastructure is also something people usually don’t think about what cost it takes to maintain, he said. The existing aging underground infrastructure has to be reinvested in because the consequences

Index

Calendar ......................................B2 Classifieds.....................................C Life...............................................B1 Police reports..............................B8 Schools........................................A6 Sports ..........................................A9 Viewpoints ................................A11

MADISON AVENUE CHRISTIAN CHURCH

1530 Madison Ave., Covington, KY This event is free to the public - reservations required - Call 859-441-6332 Free parking adjacent building / elevator service available

OUR MOTHER’S LEGACY

Saturday, May 14, 2011 1:00 - 4:00 pm Especially for those who no longer have the physical presence of their Moms. An afternoon tea followed by a presentation featuring Golden Globe nominee, actor, director, author and noted speaker - Jeannette Clift George. Wear or bring something that belonged to your mother and celebrate the legacy of those special women who live in our memories.

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Eger

of doing nothing can lead to a health crisis, and then the costs will be much greater, Eger said. “This is an expensive business,” he said. “SD1 has $1 billion worth of infrastructure that they have to maintain, and if they don’t maintain it, it’s expensive to fix.” SD1 has hired the Georgia-based Mercer Group Inc. to handle the ongoing search process for a new general manager, said Peggy Casey, a spokesperson for SD1. Candidate interviews haven’t started yet, and it may be June or July before someone is hired, Casey said. A representative of the Mercer Group has just finished interviewing the board and staff about the general manager position before posting the job description, she said. For more about your community, visit www.nky.com/campbellcounty

EARLY SPONSORS EVENT SPONSORS The Family of Lois Quayle Miller The Family of Helen Wichmann

PROGRAM SPONSORS Robin Weiss Goldberg in memory of Sandra Weiss Linnemann Family Funeral Homes TEA SPONSORS Spring Grove Cemetery and Arboretum

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Fort Thomas Email: kynews@communitypress.com Website: NKY.com

RECORDER

Find news and information from your community on the Web Fort Thomas – nky.com/fortthomas Campbell County – nky.com/campbellcounty News Michelle Shaw | Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1053 | mshaw@nky.com Amanda Joering | Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1052 | ajoering@nky.com Melanie Laughman | Sports Editor . . . . . . . . 513-248-7118 | mlaughman@nky.com James Weber | Sports Reporter . . . . . . . . . 578-1054 | jweber@nky.com Advertising Debbie Maggard | Advertising Manager. . . . . . 578-5501 | dmaggard@nky.com Michelle Schlosser | Account Executive . . . 750-8687 | mschlosser@nky.com Sheila Cahill | Account Relationship Specialist 578-5547 | scahill@nky.com Delivery For customer service. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 781-4421 Sharon Schachleiter | Circulation Manager. . 442-3464 | sschachleiter@nky.com Cathy Kellerman | District Manager . . . . . . . . . 442-3461 | ckellerman@nky.com Classified To place a Classified ad. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283-7290 | www.communityclassified.com To place an ad in Community Classified, call 283-7290.


News

CCF Recorder

April 21, 2011

A3

Agritourism group promotes local farming By Stephanie Salmons ssalmons@nky.com

When Linda Salsbury and her husband, Greg, started Burlington’s Eagle Bend Alpaca farm, it was a small venture and the only alpaca farm in Northern Kentucky. Having begun with five alpacas, the farm has grown in six years. The couple now has more than 100 alpacas – with more babies expected this spring – some chickens and a “guard llama,” she said. “We’ve worked really hard,” Salsbury said. “The animals are a delight to work with and we try to make ourselves visible in the county because we want to educate the community about alpacas and the fleece industry. It’s another source of farming.” However, Salsbury is most excited about a new agritourism board serving Boone, Kenton, Campbell and Pendleton counties. She serves as a director. The Northern Kentucky Agritourism Network formed in February, she said. There

STEPHANIE SALMONS/STAFF

An alpaca at Burlington’s Eagle Bend Alpacas. Owner Linda Salsbury serves as a member of the newly formed Northern Kentucky Agritourism Network. are two directors from each county and one at-large director from Campbell County, she said. While farms in these counties are diminishing, the group is trying to keep the farming experience “alive and well” for the public, she said. “I’m so impressed with the people who set this into play,” Salsbury said. Northern Kentucky is

unique in that there is a large “big city” base nearby to draw from, but some areas can still remain rural. There are a number of “mom and pop” farms around the area that offer unique services and products, Salsbury said. “This will connect those dots, making (farming and agriculture) available to the public and bring people into the area to spend money.”

The group is currently working on membership. Once that’s established, they’ll put together a brochure of places to visit in Northern Kentucky, she said. “This area has a lot to offer and now it will be out there where people can access it,” Salsbury said. Cherokee Bronk of Union’s Hickory Hollow Farm is Boone County’s second rep on the agritourism board. The network is connecting the consumer with the farmers and vice versa, Bronk said. Tobacco used to be the state’s major cash crop, but since production has dwindled farmers are looking to other options like agritourism, she said. According to Jerry Brown, Boone County extension agent for agriculture and natural resources, networking these local ventures together allows them to draw more people than they could on their own. “If they could come in and spend a day or a few days going to several agri-

tourism ventures, they’re more likely to come,” he said. Networking allows the smaller ventures to work together on advertising, promotions and even grant applications, Brown said. Not only does agritourism promote locally grown foods, but keeping farms thriving is more important now than it was in the past, he said. “Twenty years ago, almost everyone had a par-

. I’m Alive. . because someone like YOU joined the Kentucky Organ Donor Registry A 3 months old, Levi’s parents At were told he would not live w w without a life-saving organ ttransplant. He’s alive because ssomeone like you said “yes” to organ donation. Now, Levi is a happy 3-year-old. He loves to run, jump and swim.

BRIEFLY The Piano students of Joy Cabrera will be performing their annual spring piano recital Thursday April 28 at 7 p.m. The public is invited to join this evening of music by talented students of all ages. This event will take place at the Grants Lick Baptist Church 941 Clayridge Road in Grants Lick (Across the road from Grants Lick Elementary School). The students will present selections from a variety of music genres.

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Give your hand-me-down a pick-me-up.

OMEGA opens in Iowa

A Midwestern credit card processing company is expanding into a new territory this year. OMEGA Processing, based out of Fort Thomas, will open a Cedar Rapids, Iowa sales office to grow their community bank and direct sales agent program. Vice President and Managing Partner of the Cedar Rapids office Dean Sturtz said the expansion will bring new opportunities for the community and existing clients. OMEGA Processing offers credit and debit card processing, point-of-sale and cash register equipment, check guarantee and recovery, business funding, gift card and loyalty programs and 24/7 service and support. The credit card processor was founded in 2003 by two industry executives with more than 50 years of combined professional experience. The new sales territory will include Iowa, Western Illinois and northern Missouri. For additional information about OMEGA Processing, visit www.omegap.com.

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ent or grandparent that had lived on a farm ... (and) knew where their food came from,” Brown said. “Now kids are three or four generations away from the farm. They have no appreciation or knowledge of where their food comes from. Agritourism locations work on (kids’) education about agriculture.” For more about your community, visit www. nky.com/campbellcounty

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CCF Recorder

News

April 21, 2011

Pinwheels honor abused children

THANKS TO MARK BEALER

Karly Holleran of Independence helps with pinwheel planting.

April is Child Abuse Prevention Month. In recognition of the observance, Northern Kentucky Children’s Advocacy Center in Florence planted 1,764 pinwheels – one for each child abused in Northern Kentucky during the past year – outside its facility on April 7. Pinwheels are the national symbol for child abuse prevention. They represent hope, health and safety. The pinwheels were assembled by volunteers, including students at Covington Catholic High School. The pinwheels were planted by children of NKCAC staff and The Advocates. The Advocates are the fundraising group for the NKCAC.

THANKS TO MARK BEALER

On April 7, 1,764 pinwheels were planted at the Northern Kentucky Children’s Advocacy Center in Florence in recognition of Child Abuse Prevention Month. These pinwheels were planted in honor of the abused and neglected children in Northern Kentucky in 2010. Pinwheels were planted by (front row, from left): Hannah Ziegler, Aiden Dickerson, Jackson Fornash, Karly Holleran, Garrett Holleran, Luke Ziegler, Ben Ziegler. Back row: Amanda Stephens, Darla Holleran, Meghan Wright and Candace Ziegler. Not pictured: Amy Pugliano.

THANKS TO MARK BEALER

Aiden Dickerson of Southgate plants a pinwheel at the Northern Kentucky Children’s Advocacy Center event in Florence.

In addition, the NKCAC hung T-shirts on a clothesline to represent the nine Northern Kentucky children who were either killed or seriously injured in 2010 as a result of child abuse. The T-shirts were painted by art students at Baker Hunt Art and Cultural Center in Covington. As they painted the shirts, we asked the children

about their shirts. Abby Noll and Lydia Bruns, who painted a shirt representing a 2year-old, said, “We did some hearts representing that we love them and we miss them, and some stars to show they are in heaven and they are shining down on us.” Amy Pugliano also used hearts in her shirt’s design. “The hearts represent the

people who love them,” she explains. Grace Gieske said, “These two hand praying say that these kids were abused, and we should pray for them.” The Northern Kentucky Children’s Advocacy Center is a nonprofit organization that provides services to children that have been sexually abused, severely physically abused and children

who have witnessed violent crimes. In addition, the NKCAC provides supportive services for non-offending parents, caregivers, siblings, family members and professionals. The center serves Boone, Campbell, Carroll, Gallatin, Grant, Kenton, Owen and Pendleton counties. More information is available at www.nkycac.org.

Program helps those facing foreclosure By Stephanie Salmons ssalmons@nky.com

A new statewide program which aims to prevent foreclosures debuted last

,

week, but a Northern Kentucky agency has been piloting the program since

th e

of a

January. The Kentucky Unemployment Bridge program is a new loan option for eligible homeowners to assist them in making their mortgage payments. To be eligible, the homeowner must have experienced a job loss or reduction in income due to changing economic conditions through no fault of their own and demonstrate a need for assistance, among other requirements. The maximum amount of assistance is $20,000 or 12 months, whichever comes first. Kentucky was chosen to receive federal money for the program because of the state’s high unemployment rate, said Stephanie Stiene, financial services director at the Brighton Center. The Kentucky Housing Corporation selected the Brighton Center to represent

the state in the program’s development, Stiene said. “We typically serve on average between 14 and 18 counties, so we have the capacity to reach out to some of those southern and rural areas, to provide the same resources to them as well,” she said. According to Ashley Pate, a financial services specialist with the Brighton Center, the organization is the only HUD agency in the state that has offered the program this long. In a recent presentation, Pate said there were 176 foreclosures in Northern Kentucky during January which accounts for approximately 15 percent of foreclosures in the state. Some 46 of those occurred in Boone County, Pate said, with 19 more foreclosures happening in February. The earlier a homeowner seeks foreclosure prevention

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assistance, the more options are available, he said. Individuals facing these challenges should contact their mortgage company and be honest, Pate said. “If you don’t, the lender doesn’t know and the lender can’t help you,” Pate said. Pate said he expects foreclosure rates to climb in the future. “Unemployment is growing in this state, therefore this could grow.” Newport-based Brighton Center is social service agency that offers a variety of programs. For more information about the Unemployment Bridge program, or other foreclosure prevention programs, contact the Brighton Center at 859-491-8303, ext. 2323. For more about your community, visit www.nky.com/campbellcounty

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News

April 21, 2011

CCF Recorder

A5

Landlords sue to halt Newport fee hike An association of landlords has challenged the legality of Newport’s rental license fee a week after the city doubled the cost of the fee. The Greater Cincinnati Northern Kentucky Apartment Association filed a lawsuit in Campbell County Circuit Court Wednesday against Newport, claiming the city’s rental license fee is illegal. Newport City Commission originally enacted the fee in 2008 and last week voted to raise the annual

rental license fee from $40 to $80 per unit. The apartment association received complaints from more than a dozen landlords in Newport about the fee increase, said Charles Tassell, a lobbyist for the Greater Cincinnati/ Northern Kentucky Apartment Association. The lawsuit claims the fee is excessive and violates state law that “prohibits user fees from generating revenue or profits in excess of the reasonable costs

associated with providing a public service.” The lawsuit also criticized the Newport city manager for saying in the press that the fee is needed to bridge a budget shortfall. The apartment association argued in the lawsuit that state law allows user fees to go only to the intended purposes under the law. The plaintiff contends that the periodic rental unit inspections in Newport’s ordinance violate the Fourth Amendment protecting

against unreasonable searches and seizures and also contends that some of the sections of the rental license fee ordinance are so vague they can “only be enforced in an arbitrary and discriminatory manner.” The landlords want the court to declare the rental license fee illegal and want to work with the city in drafting an ordinance that will satisfy both sides, said Jack S. Gatlin, attorney for the apartment association. “We see the current ordi-

nance as doing nothing more than raising revenue and providing a tax on landlords that are already facing economic challenges,” Gatlin said. City Manager Tom Fromme said the cost of code enforcement and police calls to rental units helped create budget shortfalls. He estimated that rental units on average cost the city $216 per unit per year to provide police, fire and code enforcement services. The increase in fees would

cover this cost and allow the city to hire two part-time code enforcement officers to help the city follow up on landlords who don’t cut their grass and perform other maintenance, he said. “Homeowners are subsidizing the rental property,” Fromme said. “It’s well-documented. Rental property is woefully undervalued and a majority of the calls for services are to rental properties. They should be paying their way.” Kentucky News Service

Jim Bunning named Independence Day Parade grand marshal The Campbell County YMCA and City of FortThomas have just named their 2011 Independence Day Parade Grand Marshal – legendary major league pitcher inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame and former U.S. Senator, Jim Bunning. Bunning was born in Southgate, the son of Gladys (nee Best) and Louis Aloysius Bunning. He graduated from St. Xavier High School in Cincinnati in 1949, and later received his

b a c h e l o r ’s degree in economics from Xavier University. Jim Bunning is married to M a r y Bunning Catherine Thies. They have five daughters and four sons. After retiring from baseball, Bunning returned to his native northern Kentucky and was subsequently elected to the Fort Thomas City Council for two

years, and then the state senate, in which he served as minority leader. In 1986, Bunning was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives from Kentucky’s 4th congressional district. He served in the U.S. House from 1987 to 1998. In 1998 Jim Bunning was elected to the United States Senate where he served as a U.S. Senator from 1999 to 2010. The Campbell County YMCA 2011 Independence Day Parade “Fun in the Sun

For Independence Day” will begin at 10:30 a.m. Monday, July 4. Entries are now being accepted. To enter the parade, please contact the Campbell County YMCA at 859-781-1814. Parade entries will assemble at 9:30 a.m. on Memorial Parkway from

North Fort Thomas Ave, split to Inverness. For information please

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CCF Recorder

April 21, 2011

ACHIEVEMENTS

Editor Michelle Shaw | mshaw@nky.com | 578-1053

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Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

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RECORDER

Campbell County school greenhouse in full bloom By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

A virtual sea of green and brightly colored flowers fill the Campbell County High School greenhouse – the fruition of a class of students’ work they’re now ready to sell. “We taught them how to create a product, and now we teach them how to sell it,” said agricultural teacher Samuel Evans. Plants in the greenhouse, located in the parking lot south of the school near the athletic practice fields, will go on sale to the public starting Tuesday, April 26. Greenhouse hours will be 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, and from 8 a.m. to noon Saturdays in May. Plant supplies typically last until the second or third week of May, Evans said. Evans said this year he has installed a doorbell system for during school hours so that someone will be notified when someone is at the greenhouse instead of people having to call ahead. The students started working in the greenhouse to get the plants ready in March, he said. “They transplanted a lot of them or they grew them from seeds or cuttings,” Evans said. In the classroom, students in the greenhouse class learned about how to operate a greenhouse and grow the plants. Students are being tested this week on identifying particular plants and how to properly care for them including whether a plant likes lots of sun or lots of water, he said. For some students it’s their first time gardening, and for others they’ve been working with plants their entire life, Evans said. Students who didn’t know

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Jake Woodyard of Grant’s Lick, a senior at Campbell County High School, transplants a tomato plant into a new pot inside the school’s greenhouse Monday, April 18. much about gardening were paired with students with experience along the way, he said. Kaleb Hadden, a sophomore of California, said he hadn’t grown his own garden before, but he did like planting something and watching it grow inside the greenhouse. Hadden said his favorite plant to grow was the tomato because it was easiest to transplant. Abbey Sebastian, a senior, of Alexandria, a FFA member, said she’s gardened before, but she liked learning about different types of flowers than she had known before and how to care for each kind of plant. “I know how to plant things, but I thought what was cool was learning each individual plant,” Sebastian said. The CCHS greenhouse sale fea-

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Jonathan Nelson, left, a junior of California, and Keith Scharstein, a senior of Alexandria, turn the way hanging ferns are facing the sun to ensure they receive even amounts of sunlight on each side inside the school’s greenhouse class Monday, April 18.

THANKS TO SAMUEL EVANS

Campbell County High School agriculture teacher Samuel Evans’ students hold the flowers and plants they’ve grown as part of their greenhouse class in 2011. From left, first row are Sammy Miller, L.T. Thompson, Abigail Sebastian and Jake Woodyard. Second row: Jonathan Flores, Raif Jones, Stacey Sears, Jacob Macht, Preston Field and Alonzo Shelton. Third row: Jordan Bowling, Tyler Losey, Kaleb Hadden. Fourth row: Devin Allmoslecher, Joe Franzen, Easton Copley, and Keith Scharstein. tures dozens of types of flowers in pots, hanging baskets or plastic flats and six tomato and five pepper varieties. Flower varieties include (but are not limited to) dahlia, coleus, geraniums, petunias, gerber daisy, marigold, boston fern, geranium, impatiens, moss rose, zinnia, cockscomb, sweet potato vine, wax begonia. Tomato plant types available include: better boy, sugar hybrid, jet star, Mr. Stripey, celebrity and Campbell’s Soup canning. Pepper varieties include: flavorburst hybrid, bell boy hybrid, mucho nacho, super chili and atris hybrid. Greenhouse relocation Profits from the annual sale typically benefit Campbell County High School’s Future Farmers of America chapter, but this year’s will go toward the more pressing need for a new concrete greenhouse since upcoming construction on the high school’s campus requires tearing the glass building down and moving it elsewhere on campus, said agricultural teacher Samuel Evans. There will be no greenhouse

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Campbell County High School agricultural teacher Samuel Evans points to hanging plants as he explains instructions on how to care for them to senior Jacob Macht of Grant’s Lick, inside the school’s greenhouse Monday, April 18. class next school year because of the construction, he said. The greenhouse is next to athletic fields and the parking lot and is in the area where construction is scheduled to begin on a new technical school and sports com-

plex this year. Evans said the structure of the greenhouse will be taken down and reused at a different location on campus. For more about your community, visit www.nky.com/campbellcounty

Student goes the extra mile for a new school playground By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

In an effort to help raise money for new playground at Woodfill Elementary School, second-grader Zoe Zoller went the extra mile, or five to be exact. While all students at the school are selling paper slides to go towards the Woodfill Elementary School Playground Fund, Zoller said she wanted to do more. Recruiting the support of her family and friends, Zoller did a five mile bike-a-thon, raising $309 for the fund. “I want all the students to have a good playground for everybody to enjoy,” Zoller said. “I want my little brother to be able to enjoy it when he starts school next year.” Kim Kelsay, a parent who is part of the six-person committee raising money for the playground,

While all students at the school are selling paper slides to go towards the Woodfill Elementary School Playground Fund, Zoe Zoller said she wanted to do more. said with the current construction of a new building to house the school, the students don’t have a playground and the district is lacking funds for a new one. “They have nothing right now, so we’re hoping that between this year and next year we can raise enough to put in a new playground next summer,” Kelsay said. “The goal for this year is $6,000, and so far we’re up to

$3,332.” Kelsay said the committee has students selling paper slides as a way to get them involved, so they can feel like they’re contributing to the school. “It is great to see all the students getting into this and how much students like Zoe care about this,” Kelsay said. Zoller’s father Jayson Zoller said Zoe has always been creative and that she came up with the bike-a-thon idea on her own. “We’re very proud of Zoe, she really has a lot of school spirit,” Jayson Zoller said. Anyone interested in donating to the fund can send checks payable to the Woodfill Elementary Playground Fund to 1025 Alexandria Pike, Fort Thomas, KY 41075. For more about your community, visit www.nky.com/fortthomas

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Woodfill Elementary School second-grader Zoe Zoller poses for a picture in front of the school. Zoller recently held a bike-a-thon to raise money for the school’s new playground.


Schools

CCF Recorder

April 21, 2011

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Via Dolorosa Stations

Gio Bakunawa (Cat in the Hat) chats with guests at the Green Eggs and Ham Brunch performance of Seussical the Musical at Newport Central Catholic.

To commemorate the events of Holy Week, the eighth grade-students at St. Joseph, Cold Spring re-enacted the Via Dolorosa Stations of the Cross April 15. The stations are done with the students in mime with narration being done by fellow classmates. This moving presentation is a wonderful way to share the Easter Story. Shown: Eighth grade student Jade Rauen portrays Mary, with Jordan Smith as Jesus, in the St. Joseph re-enactment of the Via Dolorosa Stations.

SCHOOL NOTES Dance helps school weight room

The Camel Athletic Boosters will have a benefit with food, music and dancing to support student athletes at Campbell County High School with the expansion of a weight room facility. The event will be at the Alexandria firehouse, 7951 Alexandria Pike, Alexandria, from 8 p.m. to midnight Saturday, April 16.

A silent auction and gift baskets will also be part of the event. Cost is $30 per person or $50 per couple. For information or to buy pre-sale tickets call Jenny Berkley at 859-448-0844 or Dacey Martin at 859-6350087. Tickets are also available at the boosters website www.ccboosters.com. Make checks or donations payable to Camel Athletic Boosters, P.O. Box 11, Alexandria, KY 41001.

Golf clinic

Bishop Brossart High School will hold a golf clinic for girls in grades four through eight. Dates are Thursdays: April 21, 28 and May 5, 12 from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. at the Town and Country Golf Range in Wilder. Pat Mendell is the teaching pro and the cost is $35. Please contact BBHS at 859635-2108 to register or at sglaab@bishopbrossart.org.

NCC juniors selected as Governor’s Scholars Four juniors from Newport Central Catholic High School have been selected to represent NCC in the Governor's Scholar Program this summer. They are as follows: • Matthew Broering – son of Richard and Rachel of St. Mary Parish • Lila Garner – daughter of David and Joanne of St. Catherine Parish • Katrina Hlebiczki – daughter of Louis and Helen of St. Thomas Parish

• Maria Kues – daughter of Joe and Patty of St. Thomas Parish • Kevin Goldstein (alternate) – son of Keith and Marilyn of St. Therese Parish This prestigious fiveweek study program provides academic and personal growth in a non-traditional experience at Bellarmine University, Centre College, or Morehead State University. Students were selected on the basis of test scores

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Cast members of Seussical the Musical at Newport Central Catholic. The show ran through Aril 17.

from the PSAT, SAT or ACT. Their unweighted GPA and difficulty of course load was also taken into consideration. Students submitted a writing entry and demonstrated what they have done in the areas of extracurricular activities and service.

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CCF Recorder

Schools

April 21, 2011

Student portrayed Cold Spring police officer in play Rugg’s ‘recommends’ N. Kentucky University By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

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When the director of a play at St. Joseph School wrote in a Cold Spring police officer as a new character to teach students about the dangers of tobacco, the result was a comedic scenestealing moment. In the school’s performance of the play “Without Strings,” a retelling of the story of the Pinocchio story March 25-27, Cold Spring Police Department officer Andy Hyett, the school resource officer for St. Joseph, was portrayed by eighthgrader Garrett Ahlbrand. “I’m honored by it,” Hyett said of Ahlbrand’s

portrayal of him. “I think it was kind of cool.” Hyett said the idea to put a character of him into the play came up after the school realized the play included a scene of youth smoking. It was the job of Hyett’s character to explain to the boys smoking in the play about the dangers of tobacco and why it was wrong. Hyett said he thought it was an excellent idea and good way to address in a constructive manner a dilemma the school had. Before the play, Hyett said Ahlbrand asked for a little costume help. “The kid has already come up to me and said he’s going to need my gun belt

THANKS TO ANNE GERNER ST. JOSEPH SCHOOL

Eighth-grader Garrett Ahlbrand, left, portrays Cold Spring Police Department officer Andy Hyett in the Cold Spring school’s March 25-27 play “Without Strings.”

so he can play me properly,” Hyett said. The eighth-grade play is a tradition at St. Joseph, said Anne Gerner, an English and reading teacher for seventh and eighth grades. The reason officer Hyett was selected to be represented in the play is because all of the students “just love him,” Gerner said. Gerner said Ahlbrand told her his favorite part about playing officer Hyett was making the crowd laugh while also teaching an important lesson – just like Hyett does in his instruction. The character of Hyett came in and talked to the boys in the play while they

were skipping school, eating too much and smoking before the characters of the boys changed just like in Pinocchio, she said. “So, we had them turning into donkeys and doing a little dance,” Gerner said of the school-skipping boys characters in the play. When Ahlbrand came on stage the audience of parents and students it was a scene-stealing moment, especially on the night Hyett was in the audience, she aid. “The audience immediately recognized he was supposed to be officer Hyett,” Gerner said. For more about your community, visit www.nky.com/coldspring

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Officer Andy Hyett speaks with students at St. Joseph School in Cold Spring in 2010 where he works as a school resource officer.

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SPORTS BRIEFLY

The week at Campbell

• The Campbell County boys track team April 16, placed first with a score of 72 in the Donnie Carnes Memorial Invitational. Campbell’s relay team won the 4x800 meter in 8 minutes, 28.55 seconds’ Groneck won the shot put at 40 feet, 11.50 inches; and Walerius won the discus at 118 feet, 5 inches; and Long won the pole vault at 12 feet, 9 inches. • In girls track, April 16, Campbell placed third with a score of 81.50 in the Donnie Carnes Memorial Invitational. Campbell’s Christina Heilman won the 300 meter hurdles in 48.64 seconds; the relay team won the 4x800 meter in 10 minutes, 18.30 seconds; and Kennedy Berkley won the triple jump at 32 feet, 4 inches. • The Campbell County baseball team won the April 13 game against Simon Kenton 3-1 in eight innings. Campbell’s Jake Rebholz was 2-3 and scored a homerun.

The week at Brossart

• In boys track, Brossart placed sixth with a score of 44 in the Donnie Carnes Memorial Invitational. • In girls track on April 16, Brossart placed fourth with a score of 73 n the Donnie Carnes Memorial Invitational. Brossart’s Klump won the 400 meter in 1 minute, 1.31 seconds; and Ridder won the 100 meter hurdles in 16.90 seconds. • In baseball, Brossart beat Grant County 11-4, April 13. Brossart’s Zach Fardo was 3-5 with two RBI, and Jared Hahn was 2-3 with two RBI. • In softball, Brossart beat Newport Central Catholic 7-0, April 13. Brossart’s Erica Riedeman was 2-3, with two doubles and two RBI. NewCath’s Heather Hausfeld was 2-3. On April 16, Brossart beat Silver Grove 17-0 in three innings. Miller pitched seven strikeouts, and Griffith was 23, hit a double and had four RBI.

The week at Highlands

• The Highlands boys track team April 16 placed fourth with a score of 50 in the Donnie Carnes Memorial Invitational. Highlands’ McGurn won the 200 meter in 24.53 seconds. • In softball, Boone County beat Highlands 9-2, April 13. Highlands’ Allie Conner was 1-1. On April 14, Highlands beat Dayton 20-1 in five innings. Highlands’ Allie Conner was 2-5, scored three runs and had two RBI. On April 14, Conner beat Highlands 7-4. Highlands’ Mitchell Meyer scored a homerun and had two RBI. • The Highlands boys tennis team won the April 13 match against Villa Madonna 5-0. Highlands’ Freybergerbeat Kenney 6-0, 6-0; Mitchell beat D. Lord 6-0, 6-0; Sarkisov beat Poos 6-1, 6-7, 10-8; Emery and Harrett beat Gibson and McLean 6-4, 6-2; Coughlan and Lewis beat Van Melle and H. Lord 2-6, 6-3, 61. • In girls track on April 16, Highlands placed firth with a score of 103 in the Donnie Carnes Memorial Invitational. Highlands’ Collinsworth won the 100 meter in 12.89 seconds; Rosenhagen won the high jump at 4 feet, 10 inches, and the long jump at 16 feet, 7.25 inches; Ossege won the 3200 meter run in 11 minutes, 8.14 seconds; and Geiman won the pole vault at 9 feet.

CCF Recorder

April 21, 2011

HIGH SCHOOL | Editor Melanie Laughman | mlaughman@nky.com | 513-248-7118

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RECORDER

Mustangs, ‘Breds advance in All ‘A’ By James Weber jweber@nky.com

Two county rivals are still alive in the All “A” Classic baseball tournament. Newport Central Catholic won the Ninth Region championship with an 8-5 win over Beechwood April 17, a game postponed two days by rain. Jake Cain got the win on the mound for NCC, pitching five innings of one-hit ball while striking out seven. Brady Hightchew was 2for-4 with four RBI for NewCath (9-3), who has won seven games in a row. Bishop Brossart (11-5) continued its domination of

the 10th Region with an 84 win over Bracken County in the final. It is the ninth straight regional title for the Mustangs. Zach Fardo was the winning pitcher against the Polar Bears and was named to the all-tournament team with five hits including two doubles and five RBI in two games. Travis Norton was an alltourney pick after getting hits in seven of his eight atbats with one double, one triple and three RBI. John Schack was 4-for-4 to merit an all-tourney pick as well. Jake Ollier pitched five innings of two-run ball and

eight strikeouts to get the win in the semifinals against Calvary. Trevor Bezold had a key two-run homer against Bracken. Jared Hahn had four hit and three runs scored in the two games. The state baseball tourney is at Whitaker Bank Park in Lexington May 7-8. Eight teams will play a single-elimination bracket. Those eight will be the sectional winners. Both Brossart and NewCath will have to win a sectional game first to advance to Lexington. Brossart will play 12th Region champ Danville, and NewCath faces 11th Region champ

Sayre. Neither game has been scheduled as of April 18. If NewCath gets to the state tourney, it would play either Region 1 or 3 at 1:30 p.m. Saturday, May 7. Brossart would play the champ from either Region 13 or 15 11 a.m. Saturday. The semifinals are Saturday evening and the final 12:30 p.m. Sunday. The All “A” state softball tourney is May 14-15 at Skyview Park in Jeffersontown, a Louisville suburb. Saturday, May 14, will feature pool play, with the 16 regional champions divided into four pools and playing each other.

The top two teams in each pool will advance to an eight-team single-elimination bracket to be played on Sunday. The Ninth Region champ will be paired with Regions 3, 7 and 16 in pool play. Region 10 gets 5, 11 and 12. The regional tourneys are the week of April 25. The Ninth tourney is at the Northern Kentucky Sports Complex. Brossart hosts the 10th Region at Pendery Park starting April 26. See more sports coverage at www.cincinnati.com/blogs/pres spreps.

Powers collide at county track championship By James Weber

County results

jweber@nky.com

Even though it was only a seven-team field, it was hard for David Schuh to imagine tougher competition than he had April 12. The head coach of the Bishop Brossart High School girls track team led his squad to the Campbell County championship meet at Campbell County Middle School. Also in the field were all the 2010 team state champions, Newport Central Catholic (1A), Highlands (2A) and Campbell County (3A). All seven county track programs competed. The Mustangs held their own against those powerhouses, finishing second in the county meet to firstplace Highlands. “We’re more competitive this year,” Schuh said. “We have people in most events where last year we didn’t fill some events. It’s a pretty unique meet. I’m sure there’s no place else in the state where they have three champions together like that. But we were right there in the hunt, and I’m proud of that.” Of the 18 girls events, six were won by an individual or relay who won the state title in that event last year, and another eight were won by a state medalist in places two through eight. Among the latter group was Brossart senior Felicity Britt, who won both the shot put and discus at the county meet. She was eighth in disc at state last year. “She’s a senior and she’s got a lot of experience as one of the veterans on the team,” Schuh said. “She’s like an assistant coach, really. She works with our throwers, so she’s a good one to have around.” Brossart won a top-three medal in 11 events. Melanie Fleissner won the 100 hurdles. Sprinter Sarah Klump medalled in all four of her events. Olivia Nienaber was top-three in both distance events. Highlands scored 152 points to beat Brossart by 21.5. Senior Ashley Collinsworth, who recently committed to run track at Harvard, won both the 100 and 200 meters, and led off the 4x200 champion team. Highlands also won the 4x100 relay. Caroline Newman and Maria Weyer were

Boys

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

Bellevue freshman Jackie Sexton clears the high jump April 12 during the Campbell County championship track meet at Campbell County Middle School. Emma Heil of Newport Central Catholic won the event. on both relays. Jordan Earlywine ran the 4x2 and leading off the 4x1 were Lindsey Scaggs and Sydney Watson. Except for the 200, Highlands won all those events at state in 2010. Taylor Rosenhagen won both the long and triple jump and finished second in the high jump and shot put. Scaggs won the pole vault over teammate Laura Geiman, who is the defending state champ. Lauren Ossege won the 3,200. The host Camels finished third, winning the 4x800, 4x400, 1,600 (Taylor Robinson), 800 (Faith Roaden), 400 (Anna Carrigan) and 300 hurdles (Christina Heilman). Carrigan, the Belmont University signee and seven-time state champ, only ran two events, the 400 and 4x400. NewCath finished fourth with 110 points, four behind the Camels. Emma Heil won the high jump in a four-way tiebreaker at 5feet even. She was fourth at state last year. Campbell County won the boys championship with 155 points to 136 for second-place Bishop Brossart. The Camels won eight events. They won the 4x800 with Kurt Bach, Tyler Hubbard, Doug Strange and Ben Rawe. Grant Mahoney replaced Bach and anchored the win in the 4x400. Rawe added a third title in the 800, and Hubbard in the triple jump. William Seiter won the 400. Doug Long won the pole vault, Luke Walerius the discus and Jacob Groneck the shot put. Hubbard, Walerius and Groneck all set personal bests.

Team scores: Campbell County 155, Bishop Brossart 136, Highlands 124, Newport Central Catholic 76, Newport 23.5, Bellevue 14.5, Dayton 13. 4x800: 1. Campbell (Bach, Hubbard, Strange, Rawe) 8:55.30, 2. Highlands (Kruse, Griffith, Hilker, Rosenhagen) 9:10.10, 3. BB (Caldwell, Wolfer, Neltner, Kramer) 9:10.70). 110 hurdles: 1. Clay Elam (BB) 16.3, 2. Michael Froendhoff (NCC) 16.8, 3. Cody Canaday (Campbell) 17.4. 100: 1. Austin Sheehan (High) 11.2, 2. Josh Presley (Campbell) 11.6, 3. Xavier Wilkes (Newport) 11.8. 4x200: 1. BB (Elam, Beckerich, Schwartz, Stover) 1:35.5, 2. Highlands (Bruns, McGurn, Streeter, Fay) 1:36.8, 3. Campbell (Canaday, Long, Mahoney, Strange) 1:38.6. 1,600: 1. Jack Foster (BB) 5:05.4, 2. Austin Bryan (Campbell) 5:06.5, 3. Brian Neltner (BB) 5:06.9. 4x100: 1. Highlands (Compton, Seidl, Gall, Sheehan) 45.7, 2. Campbell (Long, Presley, Seiter, Knaley) 47.2, 3. BB (Hartig, Deller, Schwartz, Landwehr) 48.1. 400: 1. William Seiter (Campbell) 56.6, 2. Kyle McGurn (Highlands) 57.3, 3. Devin Bruns (Highlands) 58.4. 300 hurdles: 1. Brian Gall (Highlands) 43.4, 2. Drake Bruns (Highlands), 3. Clay Elam (BB) 45.0. 800: 1. Ben Rawe (Campbell) 2:06.3, 2. Kurt Bach (Campbell) 2:11.3, 3. Sam Barth (NCC) 2:16.4. 200: 1. Matt Stover (BB) 23.3, 2. Alex Schwartz (BB), 3. Zac Fay (Highlands) 24.0. 3,200: 1. John Michael Griffith (Highlands) 10:25.2, 2. Michael Caldwell (BB) 10:25.2, 3. Brian Neltner (BB) 11:14.8. 4x400: 1. Campbell (Hubbard, Strange, Rawe, Mahoney) 3:40.5, 2. Highlands (Bruns, McGurn, Compton, Rosenhagen) 3:41.4, 3. Bellevue (Askins, Rechtin, Roberts, Placke) 3:50.4. High jump: 1. Ryan Greene (Highlands) 5-6, 2. Justin Romito (NCC) 56, 3. Ron Rice (Newport) 5-4. Pole vault: 1. Doug Long (Campbell) 13-0, 2. Josh Presley (Campbell) 11-6, 3. Sam Schaefer (NCC) 10-0. Long jump: 1. Jake Hartig (BB) 19-9.5, 2. Matt Stover (BB) 18-10, 3. Connor Wiegand (Highlands) 18-5.5. Triple jump: 1. Tyler Hubbard (Campbell) 36-10, 2. Michael Froendhoff (NCC) 36-7.5, 3. Corey Hartig (BB) 35-8. Discus: 1. Luke Walerius (Campbell) 121-11, 2. Jacob Groneck (Campbell) 114-10, 3. Nick Kohrs (NCC) 112-9. Shot put: 1. Jacob Groneck (Campbell), 2. Jay Nellis (Dayton) 39-6.25, 3. Jason Hering (BB) 37-10.

Girls

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

Bishop Brossart senior Jack Foster (front) finished first and junior Brian Neltner (behind) third in the 1,600 meters April 12 during the Campbell County championship track meet at Campbell County Middle School. “We got a lot of points spread out in a lot of areas,” boys head coach Toni McKee said. “Our throwers really came through and our relays really performed well. It was a great team win. Our goal was to try to score at each level in points, maybe not a lot of first-places, but maybe a lot of twos and threes and fours.” Brossart won five events. The 4x200 won with Clay Elam, Josh Beckerich, Alex Schwartz and Matt Stover. Elam won the 110 hurdles and Stover the 200. Jack Foster won the 1,600 and Jake Hartig the long jump. Hartig is ranked first in the state in the 1A long jump, and the Mustangs are ranked first overall. They didn’t have top distance runner Zac Holtkamp or their No. 2 sprinter Brett Evans in the county meet. “We were doing some

Team scores: Highlands 152, Bishop Brossart 130.5, Campbell County 114, Newport Central Catholic 110, Bellevue 20, Newport 15.5, Dayton 2. 4x800: 1. Campbell (Roaden, Robinson, Rose, Dreyer) 10:26.90, 2. NCC (Kruer, Hlebiczki, Niemer, Weyer) 10:49.30), 3. Highlands (Aber, Etherton, Farley, Ossege) 10:53.20. 100 hurdles: 1. Melanie Fleissner (BB) 15.80, 2. Nicole Ridder (BB) 16.3, 3. Ashley Collinsworth (Highlands) 16.5. 100: 1. Ashley Collinsworth (High) 12.3, 2. Maria Weyer (High) 12.8, 3. Chandler Cain (NCC) 13.0. 4x200: 1. Highlands (Collinsworth, Earlywine, Newman, Weyer) 1:51, 2. BB (Brown, Ridder, Fleissner, Klump) 1:51.4, 3. NCC (Dubuc, Cain, Bartels, Muench) 1:51.8. 1,600: 1. Taylor Robinson (Campbell) 5:31.3, 2. Olivia Nienaber (BB) 5:47.9, 3. Mallory Niemer (NCC) 5:57. 4x100: 1. Highlands (Scaggs, Watson, Weyer, Newman) 52.5, 2. NCC (Buller, Cain, Bartels, Muench) 53.1, 3. BB (Martin, Jennings, Brown, Goderwis) 53.9. 400: 1. Anna Carrigan (Campbell) 1:00.7, 2. Sarah Klump (BB) 1:02.4, 3. Morgan Dubuc (NCC) 1:03.6. 300 hurdles: 1. Christina Heilman (Campbell) 48.7, 2. Jamie Kohls (NCC) 50.0, 3. Brooke Buckler (Campbell) 52.3. 800: 1. Faith Roaden (Campbell) 2:39.8, 2. Samantha Nealy (Campbell) 2:42.3, 3. Katrina Hlebiczki (NCC) 2:44.6. 200: 1. Ashley Collinsworth (Highlands) 26.6, 2. Chandler Cain (NCC) 26.9, 3. Maria Weyer (Highlands) 27.6. 3,200: 1. Lauren Ossege (Highlands) 11:54.9, 2. Haylee Rose (Campbell) 12:03.2, 3. Olivia Nienaber (BB) 12:07.3. 4x400: 1. Campbell (Dreyer, Nealy, Heilman, Carrigan) 4:17.6, 2. BB (Martin, Goderwis, Neiser, Klump) 4:23.3, 3. Highlands (Abner, Earlywine, Geiman, Wiseman) 4:39.6. High jump: 1. Emma Heil (NCC) 5-0, 2. Brittany Bohn (Bellevue) 5-0, 2. Taylor Rosenhagen (Highlands) 5-0. Pole vault: 1. Lindsey Scaggs (Highlands) 9-0, 2. Laura Geiman (Highlands) 8-6, 3. Kristen Spahr (Campbell) 7-0. Long jump: 1. Taylor Rosenhagen (Highlands) 16-2.5, 2. Suzi Brown (BB) 14-10, 3. Kiley Bartels (NCC) 14-4.5. Triple jump: 1. Taylor Rosenhagen (Highlands) 33-8.5, 2. Suzi Brown (BB) 32-5.5, 3. Lisa Patterson (Highlands) 31-6. Discus: 1. Felicity Britt (BB) 97-3, 2. Becca Kidney (BB) 90-7, 3. Kristen Rice (Campbell) 89-11. Shot put: 1. Felicity Britt (BB) 30-6.25, 2. Taylor Rosenhagen (Highlands) 29-1, 3. Kristen Rice (Campbell) 29-0.

different events and getting the guys some experience,” Brossart boys head coach Andy Shoneberger said. “Some young guys stepped up nicely and we were really happy about that.”

Highlands was third in boys with 124 points. Highlands won five events. See more sports coverage at www.cincinnati.com/blogs/pres spreps.


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CCF Recorder

April 21, 2011

BRIEFLY More at Highlands

• In girls tennis, Highlands beat Villa Madonna 5-0, April 13. Highlands’ Meredith Laskey beat Saslarski 6-0, 60; Lauren Harrett beat Backscheider 6-0, 6-1; Martz beat Krems 6-1, 6-2; Carrie Laskey and Hannah Laskey beat Plummer and Gersbercht 6-1, 6-0; Abby Herman and Lexi Herman beat Martin and Korem 6-0, 6-0. On April 14, Highlands beat Paris 5-0. Highlands’ Meredith Laskey beat Invergo 6-2, 6-0; Lauren Harrett beat Withrow 6-1, 6-0; Christian beat Patrick 8-0; Carrie Laskey and Hannah Laskey beat Honeycutt and Withrow 6-0, 6-1; Abby Herman and Lexi Herman beat Patrick and Honeycutt 6-0, 6-1.

More at NewCath

• In baseball, NewCath beat Dayton 11-1 in five innings, April 13. NewCath’s Vance Sullivan was 4-4, hit a double and had four RBI. Then, Newport Central Catholic beat Ludlow 13-0 in five innings. Jake Cain was 22 for NewCath, hit a double and a triple and had four RBI. • In boys tennis, NewCath beat Bellevue 4-1, April 13. NewCath’s Gearding beat Burhiemeyer; Neises beat Rosenbaum; Connelly and Devoto beat Blankon and Beam; and Calhoun and Gieman beat Blankon and Isabel. Bellevue’s Thompson beat McGsarr. • The girls tennis team beat Bellevue 5-0, April 13. NewCath’s Strickley beat Tallon; Fields beat Phelps; Lenz beat McSorley; Steffen and Gieman beat Beatsh and Mauser; Wormald and Maire beat Klothpherg and McCantire.

• In softball, Newport Central Catholic beat Newport 9-0, April 14. NewCath’s Meghan Millard was 4-5 and scored three runs. Newport’s Katlyn Hoeh hit a double. • In girls track on April 16, the girls placed second with a score of 92 in the Donnie Carnes Memorial Invitational. NewCath’s Mallory Niemer won the 800 meter in 2 minutes, 29.70 seconds; the relay team won the 4x400 meter in 4 minutes, 19.74 seconds; and Brooke Kuetemeyer won the discus at 96 feet, 7 seconds. • The Newport Central Catholic boys track team placed 12th in the Donnie Carnes Memorial Invitational with a score of 19.

The week at Bellevue

• Dixie Heights beat Bellevue 4-0 in girls tennis, April 14. • The Villa Madonna softball team beat Bellevue 8-4, April 12. Bellevue’s Angel Stafford was 2-3, hit a double and had an RBI.

The week at Dayton

• The Dayton boys track team April 16 placed 17th, tying with Ludlow in the Donnie Carnes Memorial Tournament.

The week at Newport

• The Newport boys track team placed fifth with a score of 23.5 in the Campbell County Championships, April 12. • In girls track, Newport placed sixth with a score of 15.5 in the Campbell County Championships, April 12. • In softball on April 13, Villa Madonna beat Newport 7-5. Katlyn Hoeh was 3-4 with three RBI for Newport. Newport beat Holmes 6-5, April 15. Newport’s Katlyn Hoeh pitched nine strikeouts.

Sports & recreation

Camel seniors make most of final season By James Weber jweber@nky.com

Knowing this may be his last year ever in baseball, Jake Rebholz decided to make it count. As a result, the Campbell County High School senior has been counting a lot of hits this year and helping the Camels add wins so far this season. The Camels are 9-4 after a 3-1 win at Simon Kenton April 13 and a 7-4 home loss to defending state champion Harrison County April 14. The Harrison game snapped a sevengame winning streak. “We’re very strong this year,” Rebholz said after the SK game. “We have a lot of veterans, and we’ve been playing ball since we were little. We’re going to get better as the year goes on.” Rebholz is leading Northern Kentucky in batting average with .684, an outstanding 26 hits in 38 at-bats. He and senior teammate Michael Kremer are tied for second in Northern Kentucky in RBI with 17. Among his hits, Rebholz has 10 doubles and four triples, and hit his first home run of the year against Simon. He and teammate Nate Losey have 10 stolen bases each. “He is absolutely hammering the ball to all fields,” Campbell head coach Scott Schweitzer said. “It doesn’t matter where you pitch him.

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

Campbell County senior right fielder Jake Rebholz throws the ball back to the infield during Campbell’s 3-1 win over Simon Kenton in eight innings April 13 at Simon Kenton High School in Independence. He’s hitting about .700. It’s not a soft .700; it’s lasers left and right.” Rebholz, the No. 3 batter in the order and right fielder, attributes his success to plain hard work. “I have no future in baseball right now, so I have nothing on my shoulders. I’m just out there having fun,” he said. “I just try to clear my mind when I go up there. Every at-bat is a new at-bat. You know you have the skills to do it, you just have to stay within yourself, not try to do too much and just put the bat to the ball.”

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Said Schweitzer: “He worked really hard over the winter and went to a hitting instructor. He dedicated time in the cage on his own and became the player he is. He’s always had great potential. He’s had a great attitude and he’s having a lot of fun.” He’s not alone. Kremer, the catcher and cleanup hitter, is hitting .444. Senior Coy Shepard is batting .417 with 11 RBI and Tyler Walsh .355. “We’re starting to execute, starting to pitch,” Schweitzer said. “Early on we hit, and we hit some

more. Now we’ve had a couple of close games where we haven’t hit, and they started to get the bunts down and do the right things.” The Simon game, for instance, was won with small ball after Rebholz’s home run provided the lone Camel score in regulation. Senior Michael Teegarden beat out an infield hit to start the eighth inning. Junior Logan Kramer put down a perfect sacrifice bunt and reached on an error. After a passed ball, senior Corey Cox and Losey both hit sacrifice flies. “I just figured if I could get something up, that’s what I was looking for,” Cox said. “I knew it would take one run to win.” Campbell started five seniors against Simon, including Losey, Rebholz, Kremer, Shepard, and Teegarden. Senior David Jenkins got the win in relief on the mound. Sophomore Tyler Walsh, who started against Simon, has a 3-0 record and a 2.19 ERA. It has been a key week for Campbell, including the Doc Morris wooden-bat tournament April 16-17. “We find out how well guys execute and play small ball,” Schweitzer said. “The guys love it. It’s a lot of fun and get to swing a wood bat. It’s baseball of old.” See more sports coverage at www.cincinnati.com/blogs/pres spreps.

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Fort Thomas Recorder

April 21, 2011

EDITORIALS

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LETTERS

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COLUMNS

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CH@TROOM

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County Email: kynews@communitypress.com

N K Y. c o m

Editor Michelle Shaw | mshaw@nky.com | 578-1053

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RECORDER

Treat alcoholism as a disease Substance abuse issues affect about one in three Americans, either directly or indirectly, in ourselves or a loved one. One of the most difficult challenges in the field of medicine is the treatment of those with addictions. In many societies, those with addiction problems are pushed to the outer rim of society and considered to be a “lost cause.” However, in modern America we live in a society that places value on people. We have a “never give in” mentality that defines us and is the root of our strength as a nation. As such, we value every life and every potential. And when the person affected is a loved one, our desire to fight naturally strengthens and we want to do everything possible. If we are to treat alcoholism, or any other addiction for that matter, we have to think in terms of what is termed the “Disease Process.” Simply put, we must define it as disease in medical terms so that we can formulate a medical solution. As such, alcoholism as a disease is defined as a physical dependence on alcohol with a pattern of continued use in spite of negative consequences. For the dependence aspect, we think in terms of tolerance, which is the ability to use increasingly larger quantities to achieve the same effect, and withdrawal. Withdrawal can either be psychological, physical or both. It can be described as any unpleasant sensation physically or mentally as a result of cessation of use. Continuing to use a substance in this context and in spite of socioeconomic deterrents signifies an addiction. In our modern medical era, there are a multitude of treatments available, and in regards to alcoholism, there are medications that, used alongside appropriate counseling and treatment, significantly improve success rates. Anyone who thinks that they or a loved one has a problem with alcohol should speak to their doctor. He or she should be able to direct you to the proper resources. If you’re just not sure, you can try a brief questionnaire taught in the medical field called the “CAGE” questions. Simply put, they are: have you

ever felt like you need to CUT down, have you ever been ANNOYED with anyone questioning your drinking, have you ever felt GUILTY about Dr. Mike how much you Kalfas drink, or have you ever had the Community need for an EYE Recorder OPENER in the guest morning (an early columnist morning or afternoon drink to calm a hangover). Answering yes to two or more of these does not diagnose, but should raise suspicion of alcoholism. Many still have their doubts about treating addictions, especially alcoholism, as a disease. The opinion of some of these individuals is that all you need is willpower. I have met many alcoholics who sincerely want to quit. But it takes more than just a strong desire for the majority. The person who can just “set it down and walk away” is rare indeed. But many are able to harness and control this disease with help. And our loved ones deserve the help. A wise patient of mine in recovery set me straight a long time ago when he told me, “You wouldn’t refuse treatment to a heart patient because they clogged their arteries eating fast food” and “you wouldn’t deny treatment to a lung cancer patient because they smoked,” just because they did this to themselves. So why would anyone deny treatment to an alcoholic (or addict)? I would add that this approach does not mean people are not liable for the consequences of their actions just because we can label their problems as a disease. Indeed, the consequences are sometimes the only motivation we have to restore ourselves to health and well being and they must be dealt with. But I hold the opinion that everyone deserves the chance to better themselves. That’s the American dream I grew up with. Dr. Mike Kalfas is medical director of the St. Elizabeth Alcohol and Drug Treatment Center in Falmouth. April is National Alcohol Awareness Month.

One of the most difficult challenges in the field of medicine is the treatment of those with addictions. In many societies, those with addiction problems are pushed to the outer rim of society and considered to be a “lost cause.”

PROVIDED

Anatomy of an atom

Mrs. Kaufman’s fifth-grade class at St. Joseph, Cold Spring have been learning about atoms from the inside out. To have a better understanding of atoms, the students researched an atom of their choice and created their own version of that atom with the proper number and placement of the protons, neutrons, and electrons. Shown: Zach Hamberg and Eric Klear, work on their drawing of a carbon atom as they learn about the anatomy of an atom.

Political double talk We’ve heard politicians talk out of both sides of their mouths for years. I’m all for someone rationally changing their minds. I actually hate the words flip flop. Hypocrisy or political expediency is another matter. When politicians “change their mind” not on principle, but some political pandering reason, voters should be leery of them. There is a big vote coming up on increasing the federal debt ceiling. Pay attention to what politicians said then and now for their reasons for their vote. It will be entertaining. Then there are we lawyers. We are trained to argue both sides of everything. Judge Noah S. “Soggy” Sweat Jr., was a judge, law professor and state representative in Mississippi. He delivered a speech in 1952 on the house floor. He also founded the Judicial College of the University of Mississippi Law Center. Noah S. Sweat in his “Whiskey Speech” did it so well, he actually copyrighted the speech! I thought you would enjoy it so I’m sharing:

“My friends, I had not intended to discuss this controversial subject at this particular time. However, I want you to know that I do not shun controversy. On the contrary, I will take a stand on any issue at any time, regardless of how fraught with controversy it might be. You have asked me how I feel about whiskey. All right, here is how I feel about whiskey. “If when you say whiskey you mean the devil’s brew, the poison scourge, the bloody monster, that defiles innocence, dethrones reason, destroys the home, creates misery and poverty, yea, literally takes the bread from the mouths of little children; if you mean the evil drink that topples the Christian mind and woman from the pinnacle of righteous, gracious living into the bottomless pit of degradation and despair, and shame and helplessness, and hopelessness, then certainly I am against it. “But, if when you say whiskey you mean the oil of conversation, the philosophic wine, the ale that is consumed when good fellows

Eric Deters Community Recorder guest columnist

get together, that puts a song in their hearts and laughter on their lips, and the warm glow of contentment in their eyes; if you mean Christmas cheer; if you mean the stimulating drink that puts a spring in the old gentlemen’s step on a frosty, crispy morning; if you mean the drink, the sale of which enables a man to magnify his joy and happiness, and to forget, if only for a little while, life’s great tragedies, and heartaches, and sorrows; if you mean that drink, the sale of which pours into the treasuries untold millions of dollars, which are used to provide tender care for our little crippled children, our blind, our dead, our dumb, our pitiful aged and infirm; to build highways and hospitals and schools, then certainly I am for it.” ���This is my stand. I will not retreat from it. I will not compromise.” And that, ladies and gentlemen, is a perfect political speech. Eric Deters is an attorney with an office in Independence

About letters & columns

We welcome your comments on editorials, columns, stories or other topics important to you in The Community Recorder. Include your name, address and phone number(s) so we may verify your letter. Letters of 200 or fewer words and columns of 500 or fewer words have the best chance of being published. All submissions may be edited for length, accuracy and clarity. Deadline: Noon Monday E-mail: mshaw@communitypress.com Fax: 283-7285. U.S. mail: See box below Letters, columns and articles submitted to The Community Recorder may be published or distributed in print, electronic or other forms.

THOMAS E. SMITH/STAFF

ReUse-apalooza

Building Value, founded in 2004 by the Easter Seals Work Resource Center, hosted “ReUse-apalooza” in Northside on Friday, April 8. The fundraising event featured live music and performances, split the pot, a silent auction, Minute To Win It competition and cocktails. Cassidy Staver of Eden Park, Trevor Haley Ft. Thomas, Ky., and Megan Mershman of Hyde Park pose for a picture.

A publication of Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Fort Thomas

RECORDER

Fort Thomas Recorder Editor . .Michelle Shaw mshaw@nky.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .578-1053

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Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Friday | See page A2 for additional contact information. 283-0404 | 228 Grandview Drive, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017 | 654 Highland Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075 | e-mail kynews@NKY.com | Web site: www.NKY.com

Email: kynews@communitypress.com Website: NKY.com


A12

CCF Recorder

April 21, 2011

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Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County Email: kynews@communitypress.com

RECORDER

T h u r s d a y, A p r i l 2 1 , 2 0 1 1

SMALL BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT

PEOPLE

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IDEAS

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RECIPES

In Alexandria it’s volleyball time all year By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

John Kremer from M&K Associates, LLC, poses for a picture by one of the Southgate company’s trucks.

Southgate business specializes in debris removal, delivery services By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

From cleaning up yard debris to delivering unwanted and new furniture, M&K Associates, LLC, in Southgate has made a business out of moving and removing various items. The business, which is similar to 1-800-GOT-JUNK, was formed three years ago by Mark Messmer with the help of his cousin, John Kremer, who was 16 at the time. The company does a variety of jobs, including yard and construction debris removal, clearing out foreclosed homes and hauling and moving items like furniture. Messmer said while he still works behind the scenes and helps with jobs, Kremer has pretty much been running the show since he graduated from high school. “He has really taken this business to a new level,” Messmer said. “We went from about $6,000 in gross revenue in 2009 to about

$20,000 in 2010 because of him.” Kremer, an accounting major at Northern Kentucky University, said he got involved in the business because he thought it would be good experience and he could work it around his schedule. “I’m able to make my own appointments and basically be my own boss,” Kremer said. Kremer attributed the success of the growing business to increased advertising, working with more contractors and keeping customers happy and coming back. “I make it a point to not only do a good job, but get it done as soon as possible,” Kremer said. Kremer said his plans for the future of the business are to purchase more trucks and expand their business further into Northern Kentucky and Cincinnati. For more information about the services M&K offers, call 781-1326 or 653-0300.

Inside or outdoors, there’s a sand volleyball match going on at Alexandria’s Southern Lanes Sports Center pretty much any time of year. Many know the Alexandria business for its bowling lanes, but the two indoor sand courts are used every month of the year when the outside courts are not available because of the weather. As the leagues move outside there are leagues forming for Wednesdays, Mondays, Fridays and Sundays. For information visit the website www.southernlanes.com. Denny Robinson, 56, of Alexandria, said he’s been playing in the volleyball leagues at the Alexandria sports center for fun and fitness for 20 years. “It’s exercise, and I love it,” Robinson said. “And the people here are just great. It’s just a great place to play.” Robinson said he plays at least once a week and he used to play in semi-competitive matches two or three times a week. “Everybody here knows who Denny is,” he said. There are leagues that are just for fun, as well as semi-competitive and very competitive formats that play year-round, Robinson said. “The out back (outside) is where you really get into it with the music and everything,” he said. Around September and

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Rodney Strunk of Amelia, Ohio, smacks the ball sending it sailing upwards toward his opponents Wednesday, April 13, at Southern Lanes Sports Center in Alexandria. August they have a luau and a lottery pick tournament where regular players are put on teams randomly, Robinson said. Robinson said his favorite part about the volleyball league is the ability to play in friendly leagues where everybody enjoys a little back-and-forth banter and jokes. “It’s fun that you can actually pick on each other and have fun with it,” he

AT THE LIBRARY

Cold Spring

• Real Men Read Book Club 7 p.m. Thursday, April 28 A discussion of this month’s book “Team of Rivals” by Doris Kearns Goodwin. Visitors welcome.

Fort Thomas

• Worm Farming 4 p.m. Friday, April 22 Celebrate Earth Day by learning the benefits of having a worm bin and how to make one. All ages welcome. Registration required. • Let’s Talk About It: The

Pillars of the Earth by Ken Follett 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 26 Let’s Talk About It is a book discussion and lecture series presented by faculty of Northern Kentucky University. The final book to be discussed is “The Pillars of the Earth” by Ken Follet. Refreshments provided by the Friends. Registration required. • AniManga Club 6 p.m. Thursday, April 28 Come and enjoy Anime films. Ages 12-18. No registration required.

Share your events Go to nky.com and click on Share! to get your event into The Recorder.

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Denny Robinson, left, of Alexandria, high-fives teammate Rodney Strunk of Amelia, after scoring a point during a volleyball match inside the Southern Lanes Sports Center in Alexandria Wednesday, April 13.

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Yvette Nash of Newport returns the volleyball back over the net with a doublehanded strike during a match at Southern Lanes Sports Center in Alexandria Wednesday, April 13.

said. Amanda McGinnis of Mentor, a grade school teacher, said she’s been coming to Southern Lanes to play volleyball for 10 years. It’s a tradition on Wednesday nights to have fun after the matches with karaoke, McGinnis said. “It’s a good group of people, and I like that it’s in Campbell County,” McGinnis said. Yvette Nash of Newport said she also plays volleyball at the armory in Fort Thomas, and has been playing the sport since she was in high school.

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Nash said she plays in matches about twice a week competitively. “It’s a good workout,” Nash said. “I just always loved volleyball.” Jennifer Longo of Independence said she’s been playing volleyball at Southern Lanes for nine years, she loves that the members of the leagues form a family where there’s no bad blood and people get along. “We like to give each other a lot of grief,” Longo said. “We’re just here to have fun.” For more about your community, visit www.nky.com/alexandria


B2

CCF Recorder

April 21, 2011

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD F R I D A Y, A P R I L 2 2

FOOD & DRINK

Lenten Fish Fry Lunch, 11 a.m.-1 p.m., Knights of Columbus 3908, Father Bealer Council, 605 Lytle Ave., Includes fried or baked fish, chicken, shrimp, hamburgers and hot dogs, sides and drinks. Carry-out available. Benefits Charities of Knights of Columbus 3908. $1.50-$7. 859-342-6643. Elsmere. Lenten Fish Fry Dinner, 4:30-8 p.m., Knights of Columbus 3908, Father Bealer Council, 605 Lytle Ave., Includes fried or baked fish, chicken, shrimp, hamburgers and hot dogs, sides and drinks. Carry-out available. Benefits Charities of Knights of Columbus 3908. $1.50-$7. 859-342-6643. Elsmere. Edgewood Fire/EMS Fish Fry, 5-8 p.m., Edgewood Senior Center, 550 Freedom Park Drive, Fried fish, beer-battered fish, baked fish, shrimp, hot dogs or chicken nuggets. Includes choice of two sides: french fries, onion rings, coleslaw or macaroni and cheese. Call 859-331-0033 for carryout orders. Family friendly. Benefits Edgewood Fire/EMS Association. $6.50-$7; children $2-$4. Presented by Edgewood Fire/EMS. 859-341-2628; www.edgewoodky.gov. Edgewood. Drive Thru Fish Fry, 4-7:30 p.m., Dixie Heights High School, 3010 Dixie Highway, Back of concession stand by football field. Dinner No. 1 is fish and a bun. Dinner No. 2 is grilled cheese on Texas toast. Both dinners include macaroni and cheese, French fries and cole slaw. Soft drinks and water available, $1 each. Benefits Dixie Heights High School Marching Band. Benefits Dixie Heights Marching Colonels band. Dinner No. 1 $6; Dinner No. 2 $5. 859-341-7650; www.dixie.kenton.k12.ky.us. Edgewood. Holy Cross High School Fish Fry, 5-8 p.m., Holy Cross High School, 3617 Church St., Alumni Hall. Fish sandwiches, shrimp baskets and cheese pizza. Sides: hush puppies, green beans, macaroni and cheese or French fries and dessert. Drinks available for purchase. 859-431-1335. Covington.

MUSEUMS

In a League of Our Own: Play Ball! Knothole Baseball in Northern Kentucky, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, 1600 Montague Road, Included with admission: $7, $6 seniors, $4 children; free for members. 859-491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

MUSIC - CONCERTS

Fly Union Concert, 8 p.m.-1 a.m., Mad Hatter, 620 Scott St., Fly Union with Big Sean. Includes music by DJ ETrayn. DJ D-LO, Puck, Santino Corleon and Nuk. $12, $10 advance. 859-291-2233; www.cincyticket.com. Covington.

SPORTS-REGISTRATIONS

Adult Co-Ed Volleyball, 9 a.m.-9 p.m., Sports of All Sorts Mt. Zion, 10094 Investment/Demia Way, Competitive and recreational divisions offered. Games start May 6. Family friendly. $300 per team. Registration required. 859-372-7754. Union. Northern Kentucky AAU Basketball Leagues, 9 a.m.-9 p.m., Sports of All Sorts Mt. Zion, 10094 Investment/Demia Way, Boys and girls competitive basketball leagues. Deposit of $100 to hold team’s place required with balance due at first game. Games start May 8. $175. Presented by Sports of All Sorts Youth Association. 859372-7754. Union. Grade and Middle School Basketball Leagues, 9 a.m.-9 p.m., Sports of All Sorts Mt. Zion, 10094 Investment/Demia Way, Games start week of May 9. Grades 6-8 play on Mondays and/or Thursdays. Grades 2-5 play on Tuesdays and/or Thursdays. $475 per team. Presented by Sports of All Sorts Youth Association. 859-372-7754. Union.

Men’s Basketball League, 9 a.m.-9 p.m., Sports of All Sorts Mt. Zion, 10094 Investment/Demia Way, Monday league: register April 3-24, games start May 2. Thursday league: register March 6-April 3, games start April 14. Sunday league: register April 17May 8, games start May 15. $300. Presented by Sports of All Sorts Youth Association. 859-372-7754. Union. Basketball Summer Camp Sign-ups, 9 a.m.-9 p.m., Sports of All Sorts Mt. Zion, 10094 Investment/Demia Way, Camp features former UK basketball stars Troy McKinley, Dickey Beal, Cedric Jenkins, Kyle Macy, Jack Givens, Leroy Byrd, Roger Harden and Tom Heitz. Grades 1-12. Camp held June 13-17. $175. Registration required. Presented by Sports of All Sorts Youth Association. 859-372-7754. Union. S A T U R D A Y, A P R I L 2 3

ART & CRAFT CLASSES

Family Portraits and Screen Prints, Noon-4 p.m., Center for Great Neighborhoods of Covington, 1650 Russell St., Photo opportunities for families as well as exhibiting the youth’s photography and screen printed items. Additionally, attendees may try there hand at screen printing. All ages. Parts of ArtsWave Sampler Weekends. Free. Presented by ArtsWave. 859-547-5542; www.greatneighborhoods.org. Covington.

LITERARY - STORY TIMES

PAWS to Read, 10 a.m., Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Share book with therapy dogs. Ages 5-10. Family friendly. Free. Appointment required for 15-minute slot. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-342-2665. Burlington.

MUSIC - CONCERTS

DLucinda Williams, 8 p.m., Madison Theater, 730 Madison Ave., Doors open 7 p.m. $25. 800-745-3000; www.ticketmaster.com. Covington.

ON STAGE - COMEDY

Guy Torry, 7:30 p.m. and 10 p.m., Funny Bone Comedy Club, $17. Ages 21 and up. 859957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Lilly’s Purple Plastic Purse, 7 p.m., Baker Hunt Art and Cultural Center, 620 Greenup St., Adapted from book by Kevin Henkes. Part of Playhouse Off the Hill series, price varies by location. Family friendly. Presented by Playhouse in the Park. 859-431-0020; www.cincyplay.com. Covington. Best of the Best, 7:30 p.m. and 10:30 p.m., Shadowbox Cabaret, $20-$30. 859-9577625; www.shadowboxcabaret.com. Newport.

RECREATION

Strides for Stars, 9 a.m., Dixie Heights High School, 3010 Dixie Highway, 5K run/walk. Registration begins 8 a.m. Benefits STARS: Grief Support For Kids, free grief support program for children who have experienced death of loved one. $75 family, $30 single; $60 family, $25 single advance by April 15. Presented by St. Elizabeth Healthcare. 859301-3920; www.stridesforstars.com. Edgewood. Blue Ribbon 5K Race and Family Fun Walk, 9-11 a.m., General Cable, 4 Tesseneer Drive, Fund raiser and community awareness event to support child abuse education, prevention and treatment services. Race begins at General Cable, winds through northern Kentucky University Campus. Benefits Family Nurturing Center. $25. Registration required. Presented by Family Nurturing Center. 859-525-3200. Highland Heights.

For more about Greater Cincinnati’s dining, music, events, movies and more, go to Metromix.com.

SHOPPING

Parking Lot Yard Sale, 8 a.m.-2 p.m., Dixie Heights High School, 3010 Dixie Highway, Benefits the Matilda Grace Project, which involves donations to two local shelters and building small animal houses. $15 to reserve spot, $5 additional spots; free for shoppers. Presented by The Matilda Grace Project. 859-628-4560. Edgewood.

SPECIAL EVENTS

Fox19’s X-Factor Audition Pass Contest, 9 a.m., Newport on the Levee, 1 Levee Way, Adjacent to BRIO Tuscan Grille on Valet Circle. Singing auditions for new Simon Cowell TV show. Four categories: boys, girls, over 25 and groups. Up to one of each category sent, all expenses paid, to Judges Audition show in Chicago April 27. Ages 12 and up. Presented by FOX19. 859-291-0550; www.fox19.com. Newport. S U N D A Y, A P R I L 2 4

HOLIDAY - EASTER

Easter Sunrise Service, 7 a.m., Forest Lawn Memorial Park, 3227 Dixie Highway, Service celebrates 69th anniversary. Free. Presented by City of Erlanger. 859-341-7172. Erlanger. Sunrise Easter Service, 7-9 a.m., Grant’s Lick Baptist Church, 941 Clay Ridge Road, Followed by breakfast at 8 a.m. Free. 859635-2444; www.grantslickbc.com. Alexandria.

MUSIC - CONCERTS

Southern Culture on the Skids, 8 p.m., Southgate House, 24 E. Third St., Ballroom. Doors open 7 p.m. $15, $12 advance. 800594-8499; www.ticketfly.com. Newport.

MUSIC - JAZZ

Lee Stolar Trio, 7-11 p.m., Chez Nora, 530 Main St., With Mary Ellen Tanner. Free. 859491-8027; www.cheznora.com. Covington.

MUSIC - ROCK

Matt Cowherd, 10 p.m., Jefferson Hall, 1 Levee Way, Suite 2118, 859-491-6200; www.jeffersonhall.com. Newport. The Billy Rock Band, 1-5 p.m., Newport on the Levee, 1 Levee Way, 859-291-0550; www.newportonthelevee.com. Newport.

SPORTS-REGISTRATIONS & TRYOUTS

Summer Slam Sports Day Camp Signups, 9 a.m.-9 p.m., Sports of All Sorts Mt. Zion, $125. Registration required. 859-3727754. Union. Coach Ken Shields Summer Camp Signups, 9 a.m.-9 p.m., Sports of All Sorts Mt. Zion, $125. Registration required. 859-3727754. Union.

SUPPORT GROUPS

Overeaters Anonymous, 6:30 p.m., Epworth United Methodist Church, 1229 Highway Ave., Fellowship of individuals, who through shared experience, strength and hope, are recovering from compulsive eating. Free. Presented by Greater Cincinnati Overeaters Anonymous Intergroup. 513-509-5066; www.cincinnatioa.org. Covington.

PROVIDED

The Baker Hunt Art and Cultural Center, 620 Greenup St., hosts the Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park’s “Lilly’s Plastic Purple Purse” at 7 p.m. Saturday, April 23. The performance is part of the Playhouse Off the Park series. At 5:30 p.m. there will be an Easter egg hunt for children under 10. The egg hunt and play are free, but reservations are required by calling 859-4310020. Pictured are Colin Gold as Mr. Slinger and Anne Marie Damman as Lilly. M O N D A Y, A P R I L 2 5

BUSINESS MEETINGS

Women’s Initiative: Business Women Connect Happy Hour, 4-7 p.m., Metropolitan Club, 50 E. RiverCenter Blvd., Invite friends and coworkers to mix, mingle and meet new friends while enjoying happy hour drinks and appetizers. Open to all area professional women. Ages 21 and up. Free. Presented by Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce. 859-578-8800; www.nkychamber.com. Covington.

CIVIC

Tea Party Meeting, 6-8 p.m., Sub Station II, 7905 Dream St., Freedom minded citizens meet and discuss limited government, free markets and fiscal responsibility. Free. Presented by Grassroots Tea Party of Boone County. 859-746-3573; www.teapartyboonecounty.org. Florence.

CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS

Voice of Independence Toastmasters Club Meeting, 7-8:30 p.m., William E. Durr Branch Library, 1992 Walton-Nicholson Road, Open to area residents interested in improving speaking, listening and leadership skills in supportive environment. Free. Presented by Voice of Independence Toastmasters. 859-652-3348. Independence.

LITERARY - LIBRARIES

Writers Group, 7 p.m., Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Join local writing enthusiasts. Share work and get feedback. Family friendly. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-342-2665. Burlington.

SENIOR CITIZENS

Yoga, 10:30 a.m., Walton Multipurpose Senior and Community Center, 44 N. Main St., Free. Presented by Senior Services of Northern Kentucky. 859-485-7611; www.seniorservicesnky.org/. Walton. Art Social, Noon, Walton Multipurpose Senior and Community Center, 44 N. Main St., Bring your own supplies. Free. Presented by Senior Services of Northern Kentucky. 859-4857611. Walton.

About calendar

To submit calendar items, go to “www.NKY.com” and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to “life@communitypress.com” along with event information. Items are printed on a space-available basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to “www.NKY.com” and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page. W E D N E S D A Y, A P R I L 2 7

HEALTH / WELLNESS

Weight Loss Class, 5:45-6:15 p.m., Lakeside Christian Church, 195 Buttermilk Pike, $30 per month, $20 per month with three month membership. First class free. Presented by Equipped Ministries. 859-802-8965. Lakeside Park.

LITERARY - LIBRARIES

LinkedIn, 10 a.m., Scheben Branch Library, 8899 U.S. 42, Information on business networking site. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-342-2665. Union. Dr. Who, 6:30 p.m., Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Come dressed as favorite Dr. Who character for journey through space and time. Make gingerbread Tardis. Ages 12 and up. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-342-2665; www.bcpl.org. Burlington.

MUSIC - BLUES

Ricky Nye and Bekah Williams, 7:30-11:30 p.m., Chez Nora, 530 Main St., 859-4918027; www.cheznora.com. Covington. Blues Jam, 8:30 p.m., Midway Cafe, 1017 S. Fort Thomas Ave., Hosted by Dick and the Roadmasters, award-winning blues band. Free. 859-781-7666. Fort Thomas.

SENIOR CITIZENS

Senior Movie Day, 1-2:30 p.m., Erlanger Branch Library, 401 Kenton Lands Road, Free. 859-962-4002. Erlanger. Art Social, 9 a.m., Walton Multipurpose Senior and Community Center, Free. 859-4857611. Walton.

T H U R S D A Y, A P R I L 2 8

BENEFITS

Can You Survive Grade 5?, 6:30-8:30 p.m., The Madison Event Center, 700 Madison Ave., Team TV faces off against Team Radio in battle of the brains. Team TV: Katrine Nero, Alison Montoya and Frank Marzullo. Team Radio: JD Hughes, Q102’s Fritsch and Dig Dave. Benefits Covington Partners in Prevention. $25. Presented by Covington Partners in Prevention. 859-392-3172. Covington.

BUSINESS MEETINGS

Small Business Expo, 8 a.m.-1 p.m., Receptions Banquet and Conference Center Erlanger, 1379 Donaldson Road, Discover small businesses of community, gain knowledge and save your company time and money. Featuring 100 local businesses, two seminars, Taste of NKY and door prizes. $10. Presented by Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce. 859-578-6397; bit.ly/hAMYhL. Erlanger.

EDUCATION

Small Steps to Health and Wealth, 1011:30 a.m., Boone County Cooperative Extension Service, 6028 Camp Ernst Road, Four weekly sessions. Discuss and discover basic information to improve your financial management skills and personal health. Ages 18 and up. Free. 859-586-6101. Burlington.

LITERARY - BOOK CLUBS

Real Men Read Book Club, 7 p.m., Cold Spring Branch Library, 3920 Alexandria Pike, Free. “Team of Rivals” by Doris Kearns Goodwin. 859-781-6166; www.cc-pl.org. Cold Spring.

T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 2 6

BENEFITS

Skyline Nights with the Northern Kentucky Children’s Advocacy Center, 510 p.m., Skyline Chili, 3159 Dixie Hwy., Information on program. Skyline donates 10 percent of each customer’s bill. Benefits Northern Kentucky Children’s Advocacy Center. Presented by Northern Kentucky Children’s Advocacy Center. 859-572-3365; www.nkycac.org. Erlanger.

LECTURES

The Danny Miller Memorial Let’s Talk About It, 6:30 p.m., Cold Spring Branch Library, 3920 Alexandria Pike, Discussion series led by Northern Kentucky University professors. Adults. Registration required. 859-781-6166; www.cc-pl.org. Cold Spring.

LITERARY - CRAFTS

PROVIDED Cirque Du Soleil’s “Ovo” comes to Coney Island under its Grand Chapiteau, Thursday, April 21 through May 15. “Ovo” takes the viewer into a world of insects crawling, fluttering and playing. Performances are 8 p.m. Tuesdays through Thursdays; at 4 p.m. and 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays; and 1 p.m. and 5 p.m. Sundays. No 4 p.m. performances on April 22 and May 7; the May 7 evening performance is at 8:30 p.m.; dark on Tuesday, May 10; there will be a 4 p.m. performance on Wednesday, May 4 and on Thursday, May 12. Tickets are: $45-$350 for adults; $31.50-$275 for ages 2-12; and $40.50-$212.50 for students ages 13 and up, seniors 65 and up and military. For tickets, visit www.cirquedusoleil.com/ovo or call 800-450-1480.

Scrapbooking, 7 p.m., Florence Branch Library, 7425 U.S. 42, Learn to put together two-page scrapbook layout and pick up other scrapbooking tips. Bring own adhesive and scissors. May bring own photos. Registration required. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-342-2665. Florence.

LITERARY - LIBRARIES

Teen Tuesdays, 3-4:30 p.m., Lents Branch Library, 3215 Cougar Path, Xbox 360, Wii, snacks and more. Family friendly. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-3422665. Hebron.

PROVIDED

The Cincinnati Ballet presents “Infamous Love Songs” with the band Over the Rhine, Friday and Saturday, April 29-30, at the Aronoff Center. Over the Rhine performs live with with the contemporary ballet work. Performances are at 8 pm., with an additional show at 2 p.m. Saturday. Tickets are $30-$70. Call 513-6215282 or visit cballet.org.


Life

CCF Recorder

April 21, 2011

B3

Why I believe in Easter’s message: Christ’s and our resurrection Each of us has our own reasons for believing or not believing unprovable religious events like Easter. In spiritual terminology, we basically call our subjective reasons, buffered by God’s grace, our faith. If someone asked for some of my personal reasons, here are a few that sustain my faith that Jesus Christ rose from the dead and promised that we will too. 1. The insufficiency of all that is attainable. All through our lives we yearn for the fulfillment of our dreams, our needs and desires. We are constantly reaching out for what we think will fulfill us, intensify our living, end all our restless searching, and bring us into the arms of a perfect love that is final and lasting. Yet, the longer we live, complete satisfaction appears futile. Yes, our dreams are partially

satisfied at times by dear people and events that occur in our lives. And though pleasing to us, their presence eventually reminds us of the Father Lou more we don’t Guntzelman have. St. Augustine Perspectives noticed this and said: “You have made us for yourself, O God, and our hearts are restless until they rest in you.” So what do we do about life’s insufficiency? One option is that we can become cynics and see our lives as years tinged with a tantalizing sadism – a wanting and needing of that which will never occur. This option is well stated in Shakespeare’s MacBeth, “Life is a tale told by an idiot, full of sound

and fury signifying nothing.” Or, if we believe in the promises of God, we can choose to see the insufficiency of this world and our hunger for sufficiency as a foretaste and prediction of the unimaginable afterlife into which death ushers us. I believe the latter. 2. Which is more difficult: to create or sustain? If we are brought into existence from nothingness by a Creator, isn’t that a greater action than the Creator sustaining us forever as a person already existing? If a characteristic of the Creator is that he is true to his word and says “Yes” to our existence, why would his love ever vacillate and say “No?” 3. The presence of eyewitnesses. The public death of Jesus Christ was witnessed by many people and followers. After his resurrection, he seemed to them changed in some ways and his identity was recog-

nized as valid. He ate with them, spoke with them, permitted a doubter to touch him, etc. His presence was judged so authentic that many were eager to spread the word about him though sometimes it led to their death. 4. My losses of people I’ve loved. When I stood beside my mother’s body just minutes after her death, besides my grief there also surfaced from the core of my being a crucial question. For I am a human who is a priest, not just a priest who is human. My heart and mind are mine, not pages from a “rightanswer book.” My core question was, “Lou, what do you really believe has just happened to your mother? “As she died, did this kindly person merely disintegrate and evaporate into the emptiness of the universe and she is no more? “Or, is her person still living

and existing in a state of beatitude unimaginable to her before this? Is she more alive than she has ever been?” I had to say “Yes” to my final questions. I realized that it would be more difficult for me to believe in her evaporation than her fulfilled and continued existence. Her person was so important to me, what must it be to her Creator? The magnificence of resurrection and an astounding afterlife cannot be scientifically proven. The best summation for such a faith might merely be this:

To those who believe in God, no explanation is necessary. To those who do not believe in God, no explanation is possible. Father Lou Guntzelman is a Catholic priest of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati. Contact him at columns@ communitypress.com or P.O. Box 428541, Cincinnati, OH 45242.

NKU to host second annual Jazz Festival April 29-30 The Northern Kentucky University Department of Music will host the second annual Jazz Festival April 29-30 at 8:00 p.m. in Greaves Concert Hall. The

two-night event will feature the NKU Vocal Jazz and NKU Faculty Jazz, with special guests Kristin Marion, Phillipe Martel, Randy Pennington, William Brian

Hogg, and Phil Burkhead. This year will differ from last year's inaugural festival, in that the focus will shift from adjudicating young musicians to concentrating

squarely on the music. “It's really about promoting America's indigenous musical form,” Hogg explains. “It's not so much about [the musicians] as it is

8:30 J 10:00 J 11:30 a.m.

CE-0000454713

about the music itself.” Tickets are $10 general admission and $5 for students with I.D. per night, or $15 general and $10 student for both nights. Tickets can

be purchased through the Fine Arts box office at 859572-5464.

Marion


B4

CCF Recorder

Life

April 21, 2011

French toast, stuffed peppers are good Easter brunch items In my family, you’re never too old to receive an Easter Basket. All of the little ones get their own and the parents share one between them. Each year I make a promise to myself not to overdo on the candy and each year I break the promise.

But I am getting better – I’ll put some savory items in the baskets, like salted nuts and cheese crackers. And, of course, the colored hardboiled eggs. I guess my idea of an abundant basket goes back to my childhood. No matter how meager Easter Bunny’s budget may

have been, each of us nine kids got a basket overflowing with sweet treats. Granted, there were an awfully lot of generic jelly beans but in the center sat a Papas chocolate-covered egg. Opera cream heaven! I hope you enjoy the holiday with family and friends.

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Remember those folks who may be alone. Give them a call, send a card – or better yet, invite them to your table.

Mitzi Gelter’s baked French toast

I enjoyed this at a brunch daughter-in-law Courtney gave for family and friends. I loved the fact that it can be assembled the night before and asked Mitzi, a Western Hills Press reader and Courtney’s grandma, to share the recipe. Wouldn’t this be an easy addition to for Easter brunch? Now if you don’t like nuts, leave them out. 1 loaf white bread 1 dozen eggs 1 pint half-and-half 2 teaspoons vanilla 1 tablespoon cinnamon 1 ⁄2 cup firmly packed brown sugar 1 ⁄2 cup chopped nuts 4 tablespoons margarine or butter The night before: Break a loaf of bread into pieces and place in a sprayed 9-by-11 baking dish. Whisk eggs, half-andhalf and vanilla in mixing bowl. Pour mixture over bread, Cover and refrigerate until morning. Before baking, mix together brown sugar, cinnamon and nuts. Sprinkle over egg-bread mixture. Dot margarine on top. Bake at 350 degrees for about 35 minutes, until bread is set. Serve just the way it is or sprinkle with powdered sugar or dip in

maple syrup.

Western & Southern cafeteria’s stuffed peppers

I was so excited to receive this recipe. Thornton Kindred and Mary Ann Williams both sent it in for Ann, a Delhi reader who was looking for it. This is what makes this column so fun for me – the community sharing of recipes that everyone thought were long lost. Mary Ann retired four years ago – she worked at the company almost 37 years and found the recipe in their monthly news magazine. Thornton said this recipe was in the magazine back in the 1960s! Seems like everyone enjoyed them.

Meat and rice stuffing:

4 large or 5 medium peppers 11⁄2 lbs ground beef 1 ⁄4 cup chopped onions 1 cup tomato sauce 3 tablespoons flour 1 tablespoon salt added to water to cook rice 1 teaspoon black pepper 1 teaspoon Accent (see tip) 1 ⁄4 cup rice (boil according to package directions, in salted water, until done and stir in pepper and Accent.)

Sauce:

3 cans, 101⁄2 oz. each, condensed tomato soup 24 oz. can tomato juice 2 teaspoons salt Pinch of black pepper

Mix all ingredients and bring to a boil. Note: One cup of this

sauce is to be used in the meat and rice mix. In a h e a v y skillet cook and stir beef Rita u n t i l Heikenfeld c r u m b l y. A d d Rita’s kitchen onions and continue cooking until meat starts to brown. Remove from heat, add flour and mix well. Add seasoned rice and one cup of tomato sauce. Mix and set aside.

Peppers:

Wash and cut peppers in half. Remove seeds. Put in boiling water. Remove from heat and let set for 20 minutes. Drain. Stuff peppers with meat and rice mix. Put in baking pan and pour sauce over peppers. Bake in moderate oven, 350 degrees, about 11⁄2 hours or until peppers are tender. Baste peppers with the sauce during baking.

Tip from Rita’s kitchen

Accent is monosodium glutamate, or MSG, a flavor enhancer. Some people may be allergic to it. If you don’t want to use it, you may want to add a bit more salt. Or substitute seasoning salt. Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator and author. E-mail columns@community press.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-2487130, ext. 356.

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Community

CCF Recorder

April 21, 2011

B5

Sidewalk art contest coming to the Levee PROVIDED

Readers on vacation

Luke Oehrle spent spring break on a seven-day western Caribbean cruise. Here he is in Grand Cayman with the cruise ship in the background.

Blue Ribbon 5K race is April 23 The Blue Ribbon 5K Race and Family Fun Walk is a fundraiser and community awareness event to support the child abuse education, prevention and treatment services provided by Family Nurturing Center. “With more than 9,000 children reported as abused or neglected in the Northern Kentucky Bluegrass Region last year alone, it is clear that our services and the community’s support are very much needed,” said Family Nurturing Center’s executive director, Jane Herms. Family Nurturing Center will host the second annual 5K race on Saturday, April 23. The 5K race begins and ends at General Cable in Highland Heights and travels through Northern Kentucky University’s campus. Registration is $25 and includes a T-shirt. Children 12 and under are free but must be accompanied by an adult. Kids Fun Lane activi-

ties are free and begin at 8 a.m., the Kids Fun Run begins at 8:30 a.m. followed by the race start at 9 a.m. Teams and individuals will enjoy the intermediate level course, which is handicap accessible. Awards will be given for the top three runners and walkers for both men and women. Registration is online at www.familynurture.org. Family Nurturing Center, located in Florence, is a nonprofit organization dedicated to ending the cycle of child

abuse by promoting individual well-being and healthy family relationships. For additional information about the Blue Ribbon 5K Race and Family Fun Walk visit www.familynurture.org or call Tracy Fuchs at 859-525-3200, ext. 30.

Arts Fest at Newport on the Levee is quickly approaching. Arts Fest is a new event at the Levee and features an indoor art show with a street-fair flavor. The event will take place Saturday, April 30, from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Sunday, May 1, from noon to 6 p.m. in the Levee’s Gallery Building. Arts Fest is a collaborative effort between Newport on the Levee and its on-site gallery, Art on the Levee. The event will feature approximately 65 artists displaying their handmade

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nality, skill, and use of color: Grades K-5 (winner receives $25 cash and a $25 Levee gift card), Grades 6-8 (winner receives $50 cash and a $50 Levee gift card), Grades 9-12 (winner receives $125 cash and a $125 Levee gift card) and Adults (winner receives $250 cash and a $250 Levee gift card). The awards will be presented at 4 p.m. For more information about the Newport on the Levee Arts Fest or to register for the Sidewalk Chalk Art Contest, visit www. artonthelevee.com.

H U G E WAREHOUSE SALE

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wares in all different art forms including: Pottery, painting, jewelry, photography, wood-working, candle making, and more. Arts Fest will also feature a unique Sidewalk Chalk Art Contest on the Saturday of the event from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Aspiring artists are encouraged to register for the contest. Registration is $10 for individuals and includes a set of colored chalks and 24” x 32” piece of artist paper. One winner from each of the following categories will be chosen based on creativity, origi-

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Newspapers in Education (NIE) is in need of your support. All proceeds will benefit teachers and students in your community. Call Pam Clarkson at 513.768.8577 to place a bid on the items listed. Bids are accepted by PHONE only Monday - Friday 8:00 am - 3:00 pm. Please provide your contact information and calls will be returned in the order received.

Four (4) tickets to Reds vs Marlins May 1 at 4:10 pm PLUS a Bronson Arroyo autographed baseball

Two (2) Enquirer Comic Umbrellas & $50 Starbucks Gift Card

Two (2) Beach Waterpark Season Passes

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Two (2) Kings Island Season Passes

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Four (4) tickets to Reds vs Astros May 2 at 7:10 pm PLUS view batting practice from the field and be the honorary captain.

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Cincinnati Museum Center Family Membership

Four (4) tickets to Reds vs Astros May 3 at 7:10 pm PLUS $100 American Express Gift Card.

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With our audience expertise and targeting, we can help your business reach more Boomers like Sam. Find out how Enquirer Media’s solutions — enhanced by partnerships with companies like Yahoo! — make us the local leader in online display advertising. To find out how we can make media work for you, contact your sales representative today. Or, visit: EnquirerMedia.com/Yahoo You can also contact Debbie Steiner at dsteiner@enquirer.com or 513.497.8418.

Instructions (please read carefully): Newspapers in Education Auction Block will accept bids from Wednesday 4/13 - Tuesday 4/26. All bids must be placed by 3:00 pm on 4/26 to qualify. Bids must be increased at $10.00 increments. The highest bidder on each item will be declared the Winner, and be notified on Wednesday 4/27, with payment due at that time (all major credit cards are accepted). If payment is not secured by 3:00 pm on 4/27 prize will be awarded to the next highest bidder. Purchases must be picked up in the Customer Service office of the Enquirer building at 312 Elm Street, Cincinnati, OH 45202, between the hours of 8:30 am - 5:00 pm., Monday - Friday.

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B6

CCF Recorder

Community

April 21, 2011

YES Festival recognized with three Acclaim Award nominations Northern Kentucky University’s (NKU) 15th biennial YES Festival has been saluted by Acclaim panelists with three award nominations. They recognize the acting and production design of two of the festival’s world premiere plays. Nominations were given in the following categories:

Brooke Rucidlo, singled out for leading performance by a nonEquity actress, for her portrayal of German dancer turned filmmaker Leni Riefenstahl in Monstrous Beauty. The play tells the story of the innovative director whose propaganda films, including Triumph of the Will, gained infamy

for their glorification of the Nazis; Kieran Cronin, Nathan Tubbs and Chris Bishop were acknowledged in the acting ensemble category for their work in “Marfa, Texas: Based on an Almost True Story.” Twenty-five years after Marfa bathed in Hollywood glamour thanks to the filming there of

the Elizabeth Taylor/Rock Hudson/James Dean classic Giant, the owner of the small town’s only hotel fights off financial ruin via an anniversary gala. But with little interest from Tinsel Town, the cause seems lost until the appearance of a mysterious stranger bearing an uncanny resemblance

to the young Taylor. Ron Kirby, technical director; Brian Robertson, properties designer, and Ron Shaw, scenic designer, were honored collectively for their production design of both Monstrous Beauty and Marfa, Texas. The plays run in repertory in NKU’s Corbett Theatre.

Phone survey to assess health needs Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center is partnering with several organizations to conduct the 2011 Child Health Needs Assessment of Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky. In April, May and June more than 2,000 families in the Greater Cincinnati/ Northern Kentucky area will be contacted to com-

plete a brief telephone survey. The data collected will be used to help health care professionals, policy makers and community leaders plan community-based, childfocused programs and will be made readily available to community members. “We want people to be aware that they may be receiving calls starting this

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month referencing the survey,” said Penny Monday, coordinator for the Child Health Needs Assessment Survey and Program Manager in the Office of Community Relations at Cincinnati Children’s. “We’re collecting important information that will help the organizations involved better serve the community and we need the entire community’s support to ensure the survey’s success,” said Monday. Partners include the Health Foundation, United Way of Greater Cincinnati, University of Cincinnati’s Center for Clinical and Translational Science and Training and Vision 2015 of Northern Kentucky. If you have additional questions about the Child Health Needs Assessment, contact Jessica McAuliffe at Jessica.mcauliffe@cchmc.or g or at 513-803-2109.

Readers on vacation

Stuart Oehrle of Cold Spring on the steps outside of the Igr. Basílica de N. Sr. do Bonfim, “Church of Our Lord of the Good End,” overlooking Salvador, Brazil. Oehrle was visiting Salvador as a speaker at the Latin American Symposium on Environmental Chemistry. PROVIDED

NKU celebrates Audubon’s 226th The Northern Kentucky University Friends of Steely Library and Department of English will celebrate the 226th anniversary of the birth of John James Audubon Tuesday, April 26, at 7 p.m. in the second floor of the library, in the Eva G.

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Farris Reading Room. The event is free and open to the public. It will feature a discussion on the role of a naturalist as it applies to art and poetry with nature artist John A. Ruthven and former Kentucky Poet Laureate Richard L. Taylor. Audubon was America’s foremost ornithologist and illustrator of birds. Ruthven, often called the 20th century Audubon, will compare working as a naturalist and wildlife artist today and in the era of

Audubon. Taylor will read from his forthcoming book, “Rare Bird: Sonnets on the Life of John James Audubon.” A reception will follow the discussion in Steely Library Room 102. Some of Ruthven’s works will be on display across the hall in the Schlachter University Archives. RSVP to specialevents@ nku.edu. For more information on the April 26 event, contact Sandra RodgersWebster at 859-572-5636 or websr@nku.edu.

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The Kentucky Thorough Breasts, Kentucky's First Dragon Boat Racing Team made up of Breast Cancer Survivors and Supporters, head out on AJ Jolly Lake for their first practice of the year on April 9. The team will be at the lake on Saturday mornings through April and will then switch to having practice twice a week. Visit them at www.kythoroughbreasts.org for upcoming events.

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Community

CCF Recorder

April 21, 2011

NKU looking for Spring Stewardship Day volunteers The Northern Kentucky University Center for Environmental Education will present Spring Stewardship Day from 8:30 a.m. to noon, Saturday, April 23, at the Vohlpenhein Natural Area in Boone County. The event, the result of an NKU University-Community Partnership Grant, is presented in partnership with Wildlife Conservation Kentucky, Inc., and Environmentally Concerned Organization of Students. Participants will meet to check-in and car pool

at the Boone/Kenton County Conservation District Office, 6028 Camp Ernst Road, in Burlington. Volunteers will help with invasive species removal and trash pickup as part of the Boone County Parks management plan and will also get a chance to see the spring wildflowers that should be in full bloom. There is an optional registration fee to participate in a prize raffle, with proceeds benefitting the sponsoring organizations. The

Boone/Kenton County Conservation District will also be able to count the volunteer hours as match toward a US EPA 319h Gunpowder Creek Watershed Initiative Grant. The NKU Center for Environmental Education provides professional development for pre-service and in-service teachers through courses, curriculum training and other programs. As part of P-12 outreach, the center loans resources and activity trunks to teachers and personnel lead environmental instruction for

school students. Wildlife Conservation Kentucky, Inc. is a private, nonprofit organization focused on local biodiversity conservation. ECOS works with the NKU faculty and the community to develop projects that will protect the environment while providing essential functions within the university and community. To register to volunteer for the event, contact Ed Wilcox at 859-640-8328 or wilcoxe1@nku.edu.

B7

Distracted driving lesson

Matt McCoy from the K e n t u c k y Tr a n s p o r t a t i o n Cabinet allowed student drivers at Villa Madonna Academy to experience the effects of a variety of distracted driving scenarios through the use of a D2 Simulator. Pictured is sophomore Ben Brewer of Wilder trying to text while driving the simulator and getting involved in an accident scenario. THANKS TO DEBBIE YOUNG

Southbank seeking Founders Award nominees Southbank Partners is accepting nominations for the 2011 Southbank Founders Award. The award honors someone who has had a significant impact in the Southbank area communities of Covington, Newport, Bellevue, Fort Thomas, Dayton and Ludlow. Awards will be given at the 2011 Southbank Awards Ceremony on Sept. 21, at Covington’s Devou Park Drees Pavilion. Nominations are due by July 1. For a nomination form visit www.southbankpartners.com. Mail nominations to Southbank

NOTICE OF BOND SALE

The Southgate (Kentucky) Independent School District Finance Corporation, will until 11:00 A.M., E.D.S.T., on May 3, 2011, receive in the office of the Kentucky School Facilities Construction Commission, Suite 102, 229 W. Main Street, Frankfort, Kentucky 40601,competitive bids for its $1,355,000 School Building Revenue Bonds, Series of 2011, dated May 1, 2011; maturing May 1, 2012 through 2031. Specific information and require Official Bid Form available in POS at www.rsamuni.com from Ross, Sinclaire & Associates, LLC. BQ. 1001632469 LEGAL NOTICE The City of Highland Heights will accept sealed bids for Waste Collection and Recycling Program for all property, residential and city, within the city limits. Specifications are on file at the City Clerk’s office, 176 Johns Hill Road, Highland Heights, KY 41076 between 9AM and 4PM Monday Friday. Sealed bids shall be in an envelope marked "Waste Collection Bids" and must be in the hands of the City Clerk on or before 4 PM, prevailing time, April 28, 2011. Bids will be opened at the regular Council meeting on May 3, 2011 at 7:30PM. No late bids will be accepted for any reason. The city reserves the right to reject any and all bids. Jean Rauf City Clerk/Treasurer 1001633495 LEGAL NOTICE Moreland and Wells Enterprises, LLC, and its members, Jo Wells, Stacey Wells, and Randy Moreland, dba Grants Lick Cafe, have applied for and Entertainment Permit to sell nonintoxicating drinks, intoxicating drinks, food and provide music at the Grants Like Cafe located at 956 Kenton Station Rd., Alexandria, KY 41001. 1632061

Partners, 421 Monmouth St., Newport, KY 41071 or

fax to 859-655-9094. For details, call 859-655-7700.

CITY OF HIGHLAND HEIGHTS, KENT BALANCE SHEET GOVERNMENTAL FUNDS June 30,2010

LEGAL NOTICE The Newport Historic Preservation Commission will conduct a public hearing on Wednesday, April 27, 2011. The meeting will begin at 6:00 p.m. in the Multi-purpose room of the Newport Municipal Complex, 998 Monmouth Street, Newport, Kentucky. The meeting will be held for all interested parties to hear and present evidence relative to the following agenda items: µ Review of COA to install glass block windows at 601 Monroe St. µ Review of 323 E. 7th -Front window replaced with vinyl w/o COA µ Review of 406 Overton -Windows replaced with vinyl w/o COA µ Review of 536 E. 4th -Windows and door replaced with inappropriate materials and w/o COA µ Review of 562 E. 4th-Front door replaced with inappropriate materials and w/o COA µ Review of COA to demolish 714 Washing ton due to neglect Evone Bradley, City Clerk City of Newport, Kentucky

1001635137

LEGAL NOTICE The Fort Thomas Board of Education will accept sealed bids for Audio Visual Installation for the Woodfill Elementary Replacement project. Plans and specifications of the bid may be obtained by contacting Jerry Wissman at 859.815.2018, e-mail at Jerry.Wissman@fortthomas.kyschools.us< mailto:Jerry.Wissman@fortthomas.kyscho ols.us, or on the district’s website at www.fortthomas.kyschools.us<http://www.f ortthomas.kyschools.us. Bids must be mailed or delivered to Jerry Wissman, Director of Operations, Fort Thomas Independent Schools, 28 North Fort Thomas Avenue, Fort Thomas, Kentucky, 41075. Instructions and specifications for bid submission are included in the bid invitation packet. Bids will be opened at 2:00 p.m. on Wednesday, May 4, 2011. The Fort Thomas Board of Education reserves the right to reject any or all bids. 1001633877 NOTICE OF BOND SALE The Secretary of Bellevue Independent School District Finance Corporation, Bellevue, Kentucky, will until 11:30 A.M., E.T., on May 4, 2011, receive at the Office of the Executive Director of the Kentucky School Facilities Construction Commission, 229 West Main St., Suite 102, Frankfort, Kentucky 40601, sealed competitive bids for approximately $640,000 of the Corporation’s School Building Revenue Bonds, Series 2011, dated May 1, 2011. Bonds maturing on or after May 1, 2022, are subject to redemption prior to their stated maturities. Electronic bids may be submitted via the BiDCOMP™/PARITY™ system. The Corporation reserves the right to increase or decrease the amount of Bonds to be purchased by the successful bidder by an amount not to exceed $65,000, in increments of $5,000 at the sale price per $1,000 of Bonds; such increase or decrease to be made in any maturity. Bids must be on Official Bid Form contained in the Preliminary Official Statement, available from the undersigned or Ross, Sinclaire & Associates, LLC, 325 West Main Street, Suite 300, Lexington, Kentucky 40507. Reference is made to the Official Terms and Conditions of Bond Sale contained in the Preliminary Official Statement for further details and bidding conditions. Further information regarding BiDCOMP™ /PARITY™ system may be obtained from BiDCOMP™/PARITY™, 1359 Broadway - 2nd Floor, New York, NY 10018, Telephone: (800) 850-7422. Sale on tax-exempt basis, subject to approving legal opinion of Peck, Shaffer & Williams LLP, Bond Counsel, Covington, Kentucky. The Corporation has designated the Bonds as "qualified tax-exempt obligations" pursuant to Section 265 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended. Right to reject bids or waive informality reserved. BELLEVUE INDEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICT FINANCE CORPORATION By: /s/ Wayne Starnes Secretary 2987

ENDENT AUDITORS’ REPORT

al statements of the governmental activities and the aggregate ighland Heights, Kentucky, as of June 30, 2010, and for the year e City’s basic financial statements as listed in the table of contents. sibility of the City of Highland Heights, Kentucky’s management. Our hese financial statements based on our audit. h auditing standards generally accepted in the United States of nancial audits contained in Government Auditing Standards, issued tates. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to er the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit ce supporting the amounts and disclosures in the general purpose s assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates ng the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our pinion. erred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the respective vities and the aggregate remaining fund information of the City of 2010, and the respective changes in financial position thereof for the ting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. s and budgetary comparison information on pages 1 through 7 and 24 asic financial statements but are supplementary information required d in the United States of America. We have applied certain limited inquiries of management regarding methods of measurement and tion. However, we did not audit the information and express no opinion tandards, we have also issued a report dated February 16, 2010 on eights, Kentucky’s internal control over financial reporting and on visions of laws, regulations, contracts and grant agreements and s to describe the scope of our testing of internal control over financial of that testing and not to provide an opinion on the internal control That report is an integral part of an audit performed in accordance hould be considered in conjunction with this report in considering the

Cash and cash equivalents Investments Receivables, net (note 1) Grant receivable Prepaids Due from other funds Liabilities

ublic Accountants and Kentucky Society of Certified Public Accountants

ASSETS

ents

Total non-current assets Total assets

2010 Governmental Activities

2009 Totals

$279,359 1,575,258 610,175 -________

$477,266 1,605,367 544,125 20,000 ________

2,464,792

2,646,758

1,488,203

4,897,480

3,566,837 1,617,791 1,274,080

349,035 1,695,508 1,237,453

441,357

969,377

8,388,268 9,148,853 $ 10,853,060 $ 11,795,611

LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS

Total current liabilities

Total net assets Total liabilities and net assets ccompanying notes are an integral art of the financial statements.

$ 62,164 681,922 11,564 15,897

$ 190,458 80,105 34,383 15897

335,380 1,106,927

1,429,919 1,750,762

10,783,249 11,890,176

6,028,070 7,778,832

3,052,873

3,027,694

231,031 150,664 4,783 50,821 (4,325,803) 787,600 (1,037,116) 4,016,779 $ 10,853,060 $ 11,795,611

Total assets

General $ 1,761,731 1,575,258 610,175 137,447 $ 4,084,611

$

1 $1

LIABILITIES AND FUND BALANCES Accounts payable Construction payable Accrued liabilities Other payables Due to other funds

$ 61,625 681,922 11,564 15,897 136,938 907,946

1 1

3,176,665 _______3,176,665 $ 4,084,611

$1

Total liabilities

Fund balances Reserved Unreserved, reported in: General fund Special revenue funds Total fund balances Total liabilities and fund balances

Amounts reported for governmental activities in the statement of net assets are different because: Total fund balances Capital assets used in governmental activities are not financial resources and therefore are not reported in the funds. Long-term liabilities, including bonds payable, are not due and payable in the current period and therefore are not Discounts and deferred charges on bond obligations Net assets of governmental activities CITY OF HIGHLAND HEIGHTS, KENT STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITU CHANGES IN FUND BALANCES GOVERNMENTAL FUNDS for the year ended June 30, 201

ircle, Suite 600 • Lexington, Kentucky 40503·3326 • Fax: 859422·1800 • Toll·Free: 1·800·342·7299 www.rfhco.com OF HIGHLAND HEIGHTS, KENTUCKY STATEMENT OF NET ASSETS June 30, 2010

ASSETS

General

REVENUES Taxes Licenses, permits, billings Intergovernmental revenue Fines and forfeitures Charges for service Other revenues Total revenues

$ 539,783 2,653,146 32,550 223,670 144,207 3,593,356

1

EXPENDITURES Current Administration Police Maintenance and public works Waste collection Buildings and grounds Recreation Planning and zoning Capital outlay Debt service Total expenditures

443,033 1,419,258 393,817 202,870 110,593 18,772 74,650 3,227,820 1,551,287 7,442,100

1 __ 1

Excess (deficiency) of revenues over expenditures

(3,848,744)

(4

OTHER FINANCING SOURCES (USES) NKU Construction Project Debt service NKU construction project (478,495) Loan proceeds Bond proceeds Discount on bond issuance

(4,873,262) (478,495) 5,360,000 (155,407)

__

(147,164)

__

(3,995,908)

(4

Total other financing sources and uses Net change in fund balances Fund balances-beginning Fund balances~ending

1

7,172,573 $ 3,176,665

Reconciliation to government~wide change in net assets: Net change in fund balances less: bond proceeds less: loan proceeds add: debt service expenditures less issuance of debt less: amortization on bond discount and deferred charges add: capital outlay expenditures capitalized less: depreciation on governmental activities assets less: cost of assets transferred add: accumulated depreciation on assets transferred less: cost of disposed assets add: accumulated depreciation of dispossed assets less: interest on long term debt Change in net assets Governmental Activities

$


B8

ON

RECORD

CCF Recorder

THE

April 21, 2011

| DEATHS | Editor Michelle Shaw | smhaw@nky.com | 578-1053 BIRTHS

POLICE

|

REAL

Email: kynews@communitypress.com

N K Y. c o m

POLICE REPORTS

ALEXANDRIA

Arrests/citations

Eric R. Sebastian, 25, 223 Demossville Road, DUI - first offense, leaving scene of accident - failure to render aid or assistance, failure to produce insurance card, possession of marijuana at 9274 Alexandria Pike, March 18. Bradley S. Plummer, 19, 14 Breckenridge Drive, first degree arson at 7901 Alexandria Pike, March 21. Justin J. Reed, 25, 4165 Hwy. 467, DUI - aggravated circumstances - second offense, possession of open alcoholic beverage container in motor vehicle, careless driving, improper start from parked position at Alexandria Pike and KY 709, March 27. Christopher Harrison, 31, homeless, theft by unlawful taking or shoplifting, first degree possession of controlled substance - heroin, possession of drug paraphernalia, warrant at 6711 Alexandria Pike, March 26. Amanda Harrison, 27, 409 Chapel St., theft by unlawful taking or shoplifting at 6711 Alexandria Pike, March 26.

Incidents/investigations Theft by unlawful taking

Report of ring taken from residence at 326 Brookwood Drive, March 21.

Third degree criminal mischief

Report of juveniles throwing eggs and stones at home at 6 Broadfield Ct,

March 28. Report of vehicle window broken out at 6711 Alexandria Pike, March 19.

Third degree terroristic threatening

drug unspecified at St. Johns Lane, April 7.

Incidents/investigations Fourth degree assault

Report of man damaged property and verbally attacked residents at 10 Flatwood Court, March 16.

Report of man assaulted another man over road rage incident at 30 Sabre Road, April 7.

COLD SPRING

Reported at at Founders Court, April 2.

Arrests/citations

Bradley E. Johnson, 24, 3518 Brotherton, possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of controlled substance - first offense - drug unspecified at St. Johns Lane, April 7. Richard J. Hill Jr., 24, 1807 Ridgeway Ave., possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia, first degree possession of controlled substance - first offense drug unspecified at St. Johns Lane, April 7. Kristen M. Wood, 18, 1482 Oakland Road, possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia, first degree possession of controlled substance - first offense drug unspecified at St. Johns Lane, April 7. Anna M. Barger, 19, 1100 Ashwood Drive, possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia, first degree possession of controlled substance - first offense -

Fourth degree assault domestic violence

Theft by unlawful taking

Report of power tools taken from residence at 333 Pooles Creek Road, April 3. Report of jewelry taken from home at 5818 Granite Spring Drive, April 5.

Theft by unlawful taking shoplifting

Report of sunglasses taken without paying at 395 Crossroads Blvd., April 8.

Theft of property mislaid or delivered by mistake

Report of purse left in grocery cart not returned at 375 Crossroads Blvd., April 8.

second degree possession of a controlled substance at I-471 north, April 9. Sean Zimmerman, 40, 70 Picketts Charge No. 65, first degree possession of a controlled substance at 70 Picketts Charge, April 9. Trevor Forbes, 21, 17 South Shaw Lane, alcohol intoxication in a public place at Shaw Lane South, April 7. Derrick Baker, 41, 1049 South Fort Thomas Ave. No. 2, failure to comply with sex offender registration at South Fort Thomas Avenue and Alpine, April 12. Stacey Savage, 37, 5316 Mary Ingles Highway No. 1B, warrant at 5316 Mary Ingles Highway, April 8.

Incidents/investigations Fraudulent use of a credit card At 25 Thomas Pointe Drive, April 8.

Second degree burglary

At 311 Military Parkway, April 7.

Theft by unlawful taking

At Deshler Lane, April 10. At North Fort Thomas Ave., April 9. At 85 North Grand Ave., April 6. At 2127 Memorial Parkway, April 4.

Theft of a controlled substance

FORT THOMAS

Arrests/citations

Kelsey Duffy, 21, 12 Woodland Hills Unit 10, warrant at 31 Sunset Ave., April 12. Ronald Rollinson Jr., 47, 63 West Kimberly Drive, DUI at Covert Run Pike, April 10. Scarlet Dimario, 26, 800 East Center St. Lot 53, alcohol intoxication in a public place, first degree possession of a controlled substance,

At 940 Highland Ave., April 11.

Third degree burglary

At 106 South Fort Thomas Ave., April 9.

HIGHLAND HEIGHTS / SOUTHGATE Arrests/citations

Charles Tucker, 19, 258 1/2 Second St., possession of marijuana at

INVITATION TO BID Newport Millennium Housing Corporation III will be accepting sealed bids for the renovation of 1019 Isabella St., located in the City of Newport, Kentucky. Bids are due no later than 12:00 p.m., local time, May 19, 2011, at the offices of NMHC III, located at 30 East 8th. St., Newport, KY 41071 at which time and place all bids will be publicly opened and read aloud. Bids are to be marked "1019 Isabella St. Renovation Project #11-15". Must be a certified Lead Renovator. A copy of certification must be presented with bid.

INVITATION TO BID Date: April 21, 2011 PROJECT: Overlook Drive Water Main Replacement City of Fort Thomas, Campbell County, Kentucky SEALED BIDS WILL BE RECEIVED AT: Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) 2835 Crescent Springs Road P.O. Box 18640 Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 UNTIL:

Copies of Bidding Documents may be purchased beginning April 21, 2011 by Bidders at: Phipps Reprographics, 6920 Plainfield Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45236, Phone: 513-793-1030 Fax: 513-793-1107

The proposed Work is generally described as follows: Construction of approximately 610 linear feet of 6" ductile iron water main on Overlook Drive together with the appurtenances and related work in the City of Fort Thomas, Campbell County, Kentucky.

NMHC III will conduct a pre-bid walkthrough of the building at 10:00 a.m., local time, April 28, 2011. A certified check or bank draft, payable to NMHC III, U.S. Government Bonds, or a satisfactory bid bond executed by the Bidder and acceptable sureties in amount equal to five (5) percent of the bid shall be submitted with each bid. The successful Bidder will be required to furnish and pay for satisfactory performance and payment bonds. All Bidders shall include with their bid a statement from an acceptable surety that if their bid is accepted the surety will furnish to the Bidder the required performance and payment bond or bonds required by the contract documents. Attention of Bidders is particularly called to the requirements as to conditions of employment to be observed and minimum wage rates to be paid under the contract, Section 3, Segregated Facility, Section 109 and E.O. 11246 and Title VI. MBE/WBE firms are encouraged to bid. No bidder may withdraw their bid within 60 days after the actual date of opening thereof. NMHC III reserves the right to waive any informality, irregularity, or defect in any proposal, and to reject any/or all proposals should it be deemed in the best interest of NMHC III to do so. It is the intent of NMHC III to award a contract to the lowest responsible and responsive bidder. NMHC III is an Equal Opportunity Employer. 1001633767 LEGAL NOTICE The Fort Thomas Board of Education will accept sealed proposals on the following items: Property, Fleet, General Liability, Educators’ Legal Liability, Excess Umbrella Liability, Workers’ Compensation, and Student Insurances. Requests for proposal can be obtained from: Jerry Wissman, Director of Operations, Fort Thomas Board of Education, 28 North Fort Thomas Ave., Ft. Thomas, KY 41075, Jerry.Wissman @fortthomas.kyschools.usmailto:Jerry.Wis sman@fortthomas.kyschools.us or on the district’s website at www.fortthomas.kyschools.us<http://www.f ortthomas.kyschools.us.

May 4, 2011 9:00 AM (Local Time)

At said place and time, and promptly thereafter, all Bids that have been duly received will be publicly opened and read aloud.

All Bids must be in accordance with the Instructions to Bidders and Contract Documents on file, and available for examination at: Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) 2835 Crescent Springs Road Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 Or CDS Associates, Inc. 7000 Dixie Highway Florence, Kentucky 41018 Copies of the Bidding Documents may be obtained from the office of CDS Associates, Inc. at the address indicated herein. Charges for all documents obtained will be made on the following basis:

Complete set of Bidding Documents Mailing and Handling (U.S. Mail) (if requested)

RECORDER

About police reports

The Community Recorder publishes the names of all adults charged with offenses. The information is a matter of public record and does not imply guilt or innocence. 100 Meadow Trail Drive, April 7. Mikell Smith, 26, 770 Ravine Circle, warrant at 770 Ravine Circle Apt. 2D, April 6. Charles Croley, 19, 79 Donnelly Drive, possession of marijuana at 2335 Alexandria Pike Apt B, April 6. Douglas Davis, 46, 3901 KY 8, possession of marijuana at I-275 west, April 5. Justin Seibert, 21, 1316 Flour Creek Road, possession of drug paraphernalia at I-471 north, April 4. Carl David Wear, 53, 3782 Regal Ridge 3C, warrant at 3782 Regal Ridge, April 3. Patrick Larison, 26, 430 11th St., warrant at Bluegrass and Electric, April 5. Russell Williams, 25, 212 Main, alcohol intoxication in a public place at 201 Meadow Trail Drive Apt. D, April 3. Ali Benshabal, 28, 148 Hidden Valley Drive, second degree wanton endangerment at 138 Hidden Valley Drive, April 3. Hesham Abdulazi Mehawes, 27, 148 Hidden Valley Drive, alcohol intoxication in a public place at 138 Hidden Valley Drive, April 3. Naeef Alquarashi, 30, 148 Hidden Valley Drive, alcohol intoxication in a public place at 138 Hidden Valley Drive, April 3. Keith Porter, 27, 967 Hollow Creek Drive, possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia at Alexandria Pike and Moock Road, April 2. Monica Tenhover, 21, 6016 Gaines Road, alcohol intoxication in a public place at Alexandria Pike and Nunn Drive, April 2. Tanya Burgin, 47, 599 Rosemont Ave., possession of marijuana at I471 and Alexandria Pike, April 1.

NEWPORT

Arrests/citations

Court No. 104, theft by unlawful taking at 130 Pavilion, April 11. Lawrence Henderson, 32, 5365 Bettman Drive, first degree robbery, first degree wanton endangerment, second degree fleeing, trafficking marijuana, possession of a firearm by a convicted felon at 500 block of West Sixth, April 11. Joshua Arnold, 25, 212 McKinney Ave., alcohol intoxication in a public place, first degree possession of a controlled substance, second degree disorderly conduct at 1 Levee Way, April 9. James Cannon, 26, 36-3 Rio Grande Circle, receiving stolen property, possession of drug paraphernalia at Third and Columbia, April 8. Bobby Lowery, 38, 214 West 13th St., fourth degree assault, warrant at 11th and York, April 8. Dusten Isbel, 22, 3654 Glenway Ave., first degree trafficking a controlled substance at Central and Chestnut, April 7. Dewayne Jerome Brocks, 51, 1227 Parkway, theft by unlawful taking at Fifth and Central, April 7. Jermaine Lamont Beamon, 19, 319 East 12th St. Apt. 1, first degree trafficking a controlled substance at 335 Chestnut, April 4.

Incidents/investigations First degree possession of a controlled substance At Grandview and Main, April 5.

Forgery of a prescription

At 1601 Monmouth St., April 9.

Theft by unlawful taking

At 78 Oberservation, April 8.

Theft of services

At 222 York St., April 4.

Trafficking a controlled substance within 1,000 yards of a school At 703 Monmouth St., April 8.

Brian Garland, 30, 100 Sweet Briar

Bidding Documents may be examined beginning April 21, 2011 at the following locations: Allied Construction Industries, Cincinnati, OH, and the McGraw Hill Plan room, Cincinnati, OH .

Date: Time:

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

ESTATE

Charge $ 60.00 $ 15.00

Charges for Bidding Documents and mailing and handling, if applicable, will not be refunded. Bids will be received on a unit price and/or lump sum basis as described in the Contract Documents. Bid security, in the form of a certified check or a Bid Bond (insuring/bonding company shall be rated "A" by AM Best) in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the maximum total bid price, must accompany each Bid. The Successful Bidder will be required to furnish a Construction Payment Bond and a Construction Performance Bond (insuring/bonding company shall be rated "A" by AM Best) as security for the faithful performance of the contract and the payment of all bills and obligations arising from the performance of the Contract. Contractor and all Subcontractors will be required to conform to the labor standards set forth in the Contract Documents. This project does not fall under the provisions of KRS 337.505 to 337.550 for prevailing wage rates. Evaluation of Bids and the awarding of a final contract are subject to the reciprocal preference for Kentucky resident bidders pursuant to KRS 45A490 to 45A.494 and (KAR 200 5:400). Owner reserves the right to reject any or all Bids, including without limitation the right to reject any or all nonconforming, nonresponsive, incomplete, unbalanced, or conditional Bids, to waive informalities, and to reject the Bid of any Bidder if Owner believes that it would not be in the best interest of Owner to make an award to that Bidder. Owner also reserves the right to negotiate with the apparent qualified Bidder to such an extent as may be determined by Owner. Minority Bidders are encouraged to bid.

All proposals to be considered must be received by 2:00 p.m. on Tuesday, May 3, 2011.

Bids shall remain subject to acceptance for 60 days after the day of bid opening or for such longer period of time to which a Bidder may agree in writing upon request of the Owner. If a Contract is to be awarded, the Owner will give the successful Bidder a Notice of Award during the period of time during which the successful Bidder’s bid remains subject to acceptance.

The Fort Thomas Board of Education reserves the right to reject any or all bids. 1001633879

Richard Harrison, Vice President of Engineering, Water Quality, & Production Northern Kentucky Water District

1001633590

CITY OF FORT THOMAS, KENTUCKY CAMPBELL COUNTY LEGAL NOTICE Sealed proposals will be received at the office of the City Clerk, Municipal Building, City of Fort Thomas, Campbell County, Kentucky, until 1:00 P.M. local time on JUNE 24, 2011, for furnishing all labor, materials, and equipment necessary to complete project known as SALE AND RESTORATION OF V. A. HOMES, and, at said time and place, publicly opened and read aloud. Contract documents, bid sheets, plans and specifications can be obtained at CDS Associates, Inc., 7000 Dixie Highway, Florence, Kentucky 41042 for $100.00 per set, (non-refundable). Plans requested by mail will be an additional $15.00 per set. Checks shall be made payable to CDS Associates, Inc. Specifications will also be on file in the plan room of the Allied Construction Industries, (ACI). Each bidder is required to submit with his proposal a bid bond in the amount of 100% or certified check equal to ten percent (10%) of the base bid. The bidder to whom the contract is awarded will be required to furnish a surety bond in an amount equal to onehundred percent (100%) of the contract amount. Bid security furnished in Bond form shall be issued by a Surety Company or Corporation licensed in the State of Kentucky to provide said surety. Proposals must contain the full name of the party or parties submitting the same and all persons interested therein. It is the intent and requirements of the owner that the abatement portion of this project be completed no later than December 31, 2011. When the total overall project exceeds $250,000, all bidders must comply with the prevailing wage rates in the State of Kentucky. It is anticipated that the Prevailing Wage Law will apply to this project. The successful bidder will be required to have a current occupational license in the City of Fort Thomas before the Contract will be awarded. The Council of the City of Fort Thomas reserves the right to waive irregularities and to reject any or all bids. The Council of the City of Fort Thomas shall authorize acceptance of the bid made by the responsible bidder who, in Council’s judgment, offers the best and most responsive proposal to the City, considering quality, service, performance record, and price; or Council may direct the rejection of all bids. The City may award based on "functional equivalence" concerning specified work or products. By the order of the Council of the City of Fort Thomas. Mary H. Brown Mayor, City of Fort Thomas 1001633766


Deaths Leo Dominic Bezold

Leo Dominic Bezold, 82, of California, died April 9, 2011, at River Valley Nursing Home. He was a U.S. Army Korean War veteran, serving as a drill sergeant, and a retired carpenter. He enjoyed farming and selling his produce at the Campbell County Farmers Markets. He had a passion for music and played with the Kentucky Rhythm Boys and Islanders. He played in the Holy Name Baseball League on Sundays and was a member of Sts. Peter and Paul Church, Order of Foresters 1492 and Senior Citizens. He was a Kentucky Colonel. His sisters, Ruth Bezold and Sally Pelgen, died previously. Survivors include his wife, Tillie “Nee Kramer” Bezold of California; sons, Gary Bezold, Terry Bezold and Brian Bezold, all of California; daughters, Sandy Boesch and Susan Flick, both of California; sister, Betty Seiter of California; 14 grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren. Burial was in Sts. Peter and Paul Church Cemetery. Memorials: Sts. Peter and Paul Music Fund.

John ‘Jack’ Braun

John “Jack” Braun, 84, of California, died April 11, 2011, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. He was a retired tool and die maker, and worked for RCA, Wadsworth Watch Case Company and H.K. Steel Company. He was a bus mechanic for Campbell County Schools, a U.S. Marine World War II veteran and a Purple Heart recipient, serving in the Pacific theater in Guam, Okinawa and China. Laverne Painter Braun, Robert Braun and Rosemary Bloemer, died previously. Survivors include his daughter, Linda Braun Winkler. Interment was in Alexandria Cemetery. Memorials: VA Medical Center, c/o Voluntary Service Office, 3200 Vine St., Cincinnati, OH 45220 or charity of donor’s choice.

Wanda L. Durham

Wanda L. Durham, 76, of Southgate, died April 9, 2011, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. She was a librarian with Frank Steely Library of Northern Kentucky University and a member of the NKU Alumni Association. Survivors include her daughters, Marcella Reeves and Genia Gray,

About obituaries

Basic obituary information and a color photograph of your loved one is published without charge by The Community Press. Please call us at 2830404 for more information. To publish a larger memorial tribute, call 513242-4000 for pricing details. For the most up-to-date Northern Kentucky obituaries, click on the “Obituaries” link at NKY.com. both of Southgate; son, James Durham of Rising Sun, Ind.; sisters, Marcella Branchell of Hamilton, Ohio, and Bonnie Sonderling of Miami, Fla.; brother, Walter K. Wolfe of Albuquerque, N.M.; four grandchildren; and seven great-grandchildren.

James E. Eckerle

James E. Eckerle, 67, of Erlanger, died April 10, 2011, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. He was a roadway truck driver and an active member of AA for 25 years where he cultivated many friendships. He enjoyed spending time with his grandchildren, fishing, training thoroughbred horses and riding his motorcycle. He attended Open Door Community Church and was recently baptized. A sister, Joyce Morris, died previously. Survivors include his wife, Debbie Martin Eckerle; sons, Mike Eckerle of Alexandria, Gail Watson of Goose Creek, S.C., and Bennett Samowich of Seven Valleys, Pa.; daughter, Leah Samowich of Erlanger; sister, Mary Lee Jolly of Alexandria; brother, Bill Eckerle of Fort Thomas; and four grandchildren. Memorials: Charity of donors choice.

David Ferguson

David Ferguson, 89, of Florence, died April 15, 2011, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. He retired as an elevator constructor for Otis Elevator, Cincinnati, was a U.S. Army World War II veteran and a member of Faith Fellowship Baptist Church, Melbourne. Survivors include his wife, Edna Pauline Martin Ferguson; sons, Wayne of Foster, Wesley of Taylor Mill and Leslie Ferguson of Florence; brother, William Ferguson of Galion,

Ohio; six grandchildren; and 13 great-grandchildren. Burial was at Highland Cemetery, Fort Mitchell. Memorials: Faith Fellowship Baptist Church, 5783 Mary Ingles Hwy., Melbourne, KY 41059.

Mary L. Flinker

Mary L. Flinker, 97, of Fort Thomas, died April 9, 2011, at her residence. She was a retired assembler with Cardinal Craftsman Company in Cincinnati. Her husband, Emil B. Flinker, and son, John “Jack” Flinker, died previously. Survivors include her sister, Gladys McCarter of Bellevue; brother, William Rippley of Tampa, Fla.; six grandchildren; nine great-grandchildren; and three great-greatgrandchildren. Burial was in Evergreen Cemetery, Southgate. Memorials: Hospice of the Bluegrass, 7388 Turfway Road, Florence, KY 41042.

Pat Frost

Pat Frost, 79, of Fort Thomas, formerly of Cold Spring, died April 15, 2011, at Fort Thomas. She was a sales person and taught sewing classes at Beach’s Sewing Center in Newport. She was a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution. She was an avid seamstress and made numerous afghans for family and friends. Survivors include her husband, Jim Frost; sons, Steve Frost of Fort Thomas, Brian Frost and Tim Frost, all of Fort Thomas; sister, Joan Hughes of Fort Wright; brother, William Poston of Cincinnati; and five grandchildren. Burial was in St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas.

Evelyn ‘Babe’ Heilman

Evelyn “Babe” Guilfoyle Heilman, 84, of Cold Spring, died April 12, 2011, at University Medical Center, Cincinnati. She was a retired federal treasury agent for the Internal Revenue Service and a member of the Ladies Auxiliary of the Newport Elks Lodge No. 273 B.P.O.E. in Cold Spring and the Alexandria United Methodist Church in Alexandria. Survivors include her husband, Donald Heilman; daughter, Linda McDaniel; sons, Terry Heilman, Glenn Heilman and Casey Heilman; brother, Gene Guilfoyle; nine grandchildren; and six great-grandchildren.

SECTION 001100 - INVITATION TO BID

General Contractors submitting a bid for general construction may obtain a maximum of two (2) complete sets of Contract Documents from Hub + Weber Architects, 542 Greenup Street, Covington, Kentucky, (859) 491-3844 - for a deposit of $100. Checks shall be made out to Newport Millennium Housing Corporation III. Deposit will be refunded with the return of the two sets in good condition. Access to electronic copies of drawings and specs via ftp site will also be available to Contractors submitting deposit. Contract Documents may also be purchased from Phipps Reprographics, 6920 Plainfield Rd, P.O. Box 36172, Cincinnati, OH 45236-0172, Tel: 513.793.1030. Copies of the Contract Documents are open to the public inspection and may be examined at the following offices: FW Dodge Corporation Allied Construction Industries 7265 Kenwood Road Suite 200 1010 Yale Ave. Cincinnati, Ohio 45236 Cincinnati, Ohio 45206 NMHC III will conduct a pre-bid informational meeting at 3pm local time, April 28, 2011 at their offices. Construction would begin within ninety (90) days of execution of contract. A certified check or bank draft, payable to NMHC III, U.S. Government Bonds, or a satisfactory bid bond executed by the Bidder and acceptable sureties in amount equal to five (5) percent of the bid shall be submitted with each bid. The successful Bidder will be required to furnish and pay for satisfactory Performance and Payment bond in an amount equal to one hundred (100) percent of the contract price. All Bidders shall include with their bid a statement from an acceptable surety that if their bid is accepted the surety will furnish to the Bidder the required performance and payment bond or bonds required by the contract documents. Attention of Bidders is particularly called to the requirements as to conditions of employment to be observed, Section 3, Segregated Facility, Section 109 and E.O. 11246 and Title VI. MBE/WBE firms are encouraged to bid. No bidder may withdraw their bid within 60 days after the actual date of opening thereof. NMHC III reserves the right to waive any informality, irregularity, or defect in any proposal, and to reject any/or all proposals should it be deemed in the best interest of NMHC III to do so. It is the intent of NMHC III to award a contract to the lowest responsible and responsive bidder. NMHC III is an Equal Opportunity Employer. 1001632535

Interment was at Evergreen Cemetery, Southgate. Memorials: Scholarship fund at the Newport Elks Lodge No. 273 B.P.O.E., 3704 Alexandria Pike, Cold Spring, KY 41076.

Hazel Hoskins

Hazel Hoskins, 79, of Fort Thomas, died April 11, 2011, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. She was retired from CinPac. Survivors include her daughter, Barbara Ann Tillett of Fort Thomas; sons, Larry Caldwell of Manchester, Ohio, Gary Hoskins of South Lebanon, Ohio, Glenn Hoskins of Dry Ridge and Jeffrey Hoskins of Alexandria; brothers, Dennis, James and Darrell Hoskins; sisters, Mae Roberts, Mildred Brock, Louise Smith, Mabel Morgan and Aliene Jones; 13 grandchildren; and 21 great-grandchildren. Burial was at Alexandria Cemetery.

James R. Kite

James R. Kite, 68, of Alexandria, formerly of Covington, died April 13, 2011, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. He was a member of Grace Baptist Church. Survivors include his son, Joey C. Kite of Kenton County; daughters, Trisha Smith of Alexandria and Michelle Decanter of Wilder; brother, Jerry Kite of Kenton County; sister, Kathy Stephenson of Kenton County; and four grandchildren.

Becky S. Michael

Becky S. Michael, 62, of Bellevue, died April 12, 2011, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. She was a homemaker. Survivors include her daughters, Teri Ridiman and Tami Bishop; son, Joshua Sherlock; sisters, Taffy Gwynn and Jodi Songer; brothers, Mark Morey, Rob and Randy Siemer; and three grandchildren. Memorials: Dobbling Funeral Home, 241 Fairfield Ave., Bellevue, KY 41073.

Kenneth Roberts

Kenneth Eugene Roberts, 87, of Union, died April 10, 2011, at Woodcrest Manor in Elsmere. He was a self-employed remodeler, owner of Roberts’ Remodeling and a U.S. Navy World War II veteran. His wife, Elizabeth Wermeling Roberts, and three sons, Thomas, Terrence and Jeffrey Roberts, died previously.

PROJECT: Asphalt Restoration Milling and Paving for the District’s Service Area SEALED BIDS WILL BE RECEIVED AT: Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) 2835 Crescent Springs Road P.O. Box 18640 Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 UNTIL:

Date: May 5, 2011 Time: 10:00 a.m., local time

At said place and time, and promptly thereafter, all Bids that have been duly received will be publicly opened and read aloud. The proposed work is generally described as follows: Completion of restoration of asphalt surfaces in the District’s service area through issuance of Work Orders over a four-month period. The restoration Work includes milling existing surfaces and paving multiple areas in accordance with specifications prepared by the Northern Kentucky Water District where water main repair work was performed by the District. The areas for Work Order No. 1 be completed within 60 days of the Notice to Proceed are identified by the Asphalt List included in the Bidding Documents. The areas for future Work Orders shall be completed within 30 days of the Notice to Proceed for each future individual Work Order. All Bids must be in accordance with the Bidding Documents on file, and available for examination at: Northern Kentucky Water District, 2835 Crescent Springs Road, Erlanger, Kentucky. Copies of the Bidding Documents may be obtained from the office at the address indicated herein by contacting Denise Manning at (859) 426-2718. Charges for all documents obtained will be made on the following basis: Complete set of Bidding Documents Mailing and Handling (if requested)

Survivors include his sons, Mark Roberts of Union and Ronald Roberts of Visalia; daughters, Elaine Meyer of Florence and Amy Wilson of Erlanger; brother, Dick Roberts of Florence; sister, Joann Linderman of

CCF Recorder

B9

Fort Thomas; 10 grandchildren; and eight great-grandchildren. Burial was at St. John Cemetery, Fort Mitchell.

Deaths continued B10

Invitation for Bids Lawn Care & Snow Removal Services Neighborhood Foundations is currently accepting bids for lawn care and snow removal services at Scattered Site properties. The contract will be for a period of one (1) year and renewable for up to two (2) additional years with satisfactory performance. General work required will be grass cutting of all areas, cleanup of grass clippings from walkways, trimming around the buildings, trees, shrubs, fences, curbs, weed control, snow removal, treatment and other services as described in the bid packet. Bid packets, information for bidders and tours of properties may be obtained by contacting Randy Schweinzger at (859) 5812533, ext. 217. The hearing and/or speech impaired may call our TDD line at (859) 581-3181. Bids are due in the Neighborhood Foundations offices no later than 1:00 p.m., local time, April 28, 2011 at which time and place all bids will be publicly opened and read aloud. Offices are located at 30 East 8th. St., Newport, KY 41071. Bids are to be marked “Lawn Care & Snow Remov al Services Project #11-03”. The Neighborhood Foundations reserves the right to waive any informality, irregularity, in requests for proposals and to reject any/all requests for proposals should it be deemed in the best interest of Neighborhood Foundations to do so. Neighborhood Foundations is an Equal Opportunity Employer. WBE/MBE firms are encouraged to respond to this Request for Proposals. Randy Schweinzger Procurement Director Neighborhood Foundations (859) 581-2533, ext. 217 rschweinzger@neighborhoodfoundations .com 1001632511

CITY OF SOUTHGATE, KENTUCKY CAMPBELL COUNTY LEGAL NOTICE Sealed proposals will be received at the office of the City Clerk, Municipal Building, City of Southgate, 122 Electric Avenue, Southgate, Campbell County, Kentucky until 2:00 P.M. local time on MAY 11, 2011, for furnishing all labor, materials, and equipment necessary to complete project known as EAST WALNUT STREET RECONSTRUCTION, and, at said time and place, publicly opened and read aloud.

INVITATION TO BID April 21, 2011

LEGAL NOTICE The Newport Millennium Housing Corporation III (NMHC III) will be accepting sealed bids for a General Contract for the construction, including mechanical, plumbing and electrical work, of ONE single family style building located at 19th Street in the City of Newport, Kentucky. Bids are due no later than 3:00 p.m., local time, May 19, 2011, at the offices of the Housing Authority of Newport, located at 30 East 8th. St., Newport, KY 41071 at which time and place all bids will be publicly opened and read aloud. Bids are to be marked “Home Ownership Housing Program #11-10”.

April 21, 2011

Charge $ 5.00 $ 5.00

Bids will be received on a unit price basis as described in the Contract Documents. Owner reserves the right to reject any or all Bids, including without limitation the right to reject any or all nonconforming, non-responsive, incomplete, unbalanced, or conditional Bids, to waive informalities, and to reject the Bid of any Bidder if Owner believes that it would not be in the best interest of Owner to make an award to that Bidder. Owner also reserves the right to negotiate with the selected Bidder to such an extent as may be determined by Owner. Evaluation of Bids and the awarding of a final contract are subject to the reciprocal preference for Kentucky resident bidders pursuant to KRS 45A.490 to 45A.494 and (KAR 200 5:400)

Contract documents, bid sheets, plans and specifications can be obtained at CDS Associates, Inc., 7000 Dixie Highway, Florence, Kentucky 41042 for $60.00 per set, (non-refundable). Plans requested by mail will be an additional $15.00 per set. Checks shall be made payable to CDS Associates, Inc. Specifications will also be on file in the plan room of the Allied Construction Industries, (ACI). Each bidder is required to submit with his proposal a bid bond in the amount of one hundred percent (100%) of the base bid or certified check equal in amount to ten percent The bidder to (10%) of the base bid. whom the contract is awarded will be required to furnish a surety bond in an amount equal to one-hundred percent (100%) of the contract amount. Bid security furnished in Bond form shall be issued by a Surety Company or Corporation licensed in the State of Kentucky to provide said surety. Proposals must contain the full name of the party or parties submitting the same and all persons interested therein. It is the intent and requirements of the owner that this project be completed no later than OCTOBER 15, 2011. When the total overall project exceeds $250,000, all bidders must comply with the prevailing wage rates in the State of Kentucky. It is anticipated that the Prevailing Wage Law will not apply to this project. The successful bidder will be required to have a current occupational license in the City of Southgate before the Contract will be awarded. The Council of the City of Southgate, reserves the right to waive irregularities and to reject any or all bids.

Minority Bidders are encouraged to bid.

The Council of the City of Southgate shall authorize acceptance of the bid made by the responsible bidder who, in Council’s judgment, offers the best and most responsive proposal to the City, considering quality, service, performance record, and price; or Council may direct the rejection of all bids. The City may award based on "functional equivalence" concerning specified work or products.

Bids shall remain subject to acceptance for 60 days after the day of bid opening.

By the order of the Council of the City of Southgate.

Richard Harrison, V.P. Engineering and Water Quality & Plant Production Northern Kentucky Water District

1001633625

Jim Hamberg City of Southgate, Mayor 1001633760


B10

CCF Recorder

Community

April 21, 2011

DEATHS From B9

Jack C. Walkenhorst

Jack C. Walkenhorst, 81, of Fort Thomas, died April 11, 2011, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. He was an owner of the Bridgetown Convenience Store, U.S. Army Korean War veteran and a driver for Executive Charters. He was a member of the First Christian Church of Fort Thomas. Survivors include his wife, Barbara Walkenhorst; son, David Walkenhorst of Fort Thomas; daughter, Diane Beach of Fort Thomas; brother, Harry Walkenhorst of Cold Spring; sister, Nancy Walkenhorst Murphy of Grand Rapids, Mich.; and five grandchildren. Memorials: Children’s Hospital, 3333 Burnet Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45229.

THANKS TO BILL THEIS

Arbor Day

The city of Southgate celebrated Arbor Day at the Southgate Community Center on April 15. Tree Board Members (all from Southgate) gathered behind a seedling decorated with breast cancer awareness ribbons in honor of its President Joyce Hamberg and all others who are battling breast cancer and all other serious illnesses. The six year sticker designates that Southgate has earned Tree City USA designation for six straight years and the five year sticker designates it has received the Growth Award for the last five years. Shown: Harold Kremer, Vinnie Rizzo, Nora Williams, Dr. Joyce Hamberg, Juanita Bittner, Bill Theis. Absent when picture was taken: Jean Theis.

Marion Walton THANKS TO BILL THEIS

The city of Southgate celebrated Arbor Day at the Southgate Community Center on April 15. A highlight of the celebration was Luke Saunier of the Kentucky Division of Forestry in Frankfort (right) presenting a six year sticker to Southgate Mayor Jim Hamberg. The six year sticker designates that Southgate has earned Tree City USA designation for six straight years.

Wood Hudson to celebrate 30 years Wood Hudson Cancer Research Laboratory in Newport will celebrate 30 years of cancer research by inviting members of the community to a free open house at 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.

May 22. Wood Hudson is located at 931 Isabella St., Newport. The occasion marks the completion of the Biospecimen Repository Center. This addition to the his-

toric 1922 Newport facilities will house a national caliber collection of 1.6 million tissue samples from area hospitals St. Elizabeth Healthcare and The Christ Hospital. The Biospecimen Repository contains samples from every form of cancer, and it is the foundation for current

and future cancer research projects at Wood Hudson. Guests will delight in complimentary refreshments from Newport restaurant Detroit Joes while enjoying entertainment from local musicians. Visitors will be escorted on a tour of the laboratories where 169 cancer research

discoveries have been made to date. Wood Hudson will be selling the artwork of Northern Kentucky artist Trinett Foote, as well as accepting donations, to complete funding for this vital community resource. All proceeds will directly benefit cancer research.

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CLEARWATER - Indian Rocks Beach 2 BR , 2 BA Gulf Front con do. Heated pool, balcony. Many upgrades. 513-771-1373, 448-7171 www.go-qca.com/condo

Providing skilled and non-medical services to the community

DESTIN. New,nicely furnished 2BR, 2BA condo. Gorgeous Gulf view, pools and golf course. 513-561-4683. Visit arieldunes.us or twcondo.us

Beautiful Seagrove Beach Rent & Relax. Nr Destin, between famous Seaside & Rosemary Beach. Cozy Cottages to Gulf Front Condos. Web Specials. 1-800-537-5387 www.garrettbeachrentals.com

BEST OF SIESTA KEY Gulf front condo. All amenities. Bright & airy. Available April-July at the lowest rates of the year! Cincy owner. 513-232-4854

CLEARWATER TO ST. PETE BEACHES Gulf front & bay side condos. All prices & sizes! Florida Lifestyle VAC. 1-800-487-8953. Jan. 2012, Monthly Discounts • www.ourcondo.com

SEABROOK EXCLUSIVES Villas & Private Homes. Ocean, golf, tennis, equestrian. Pet friendly rentals. Free brochure. Book online! 888-718-7949. www.seabrook-vacations.info

TENNESSEE PANAMA CITY BEACH The Summerhouse - 2B/2B Family Accommodations . Beach side pools, tennis, WiFi & More. 800/354-1122 THE BEST BEACH VACATION VALUE! www.SummerhousePC.com

SANIBEL ISLAND Quality, beachfront condos. Excellent service! Great rates! www.SanibelIslandVacations.com 1-888-451-7277

NEW YORK MANHATTAN--NYC HOTEL $129/2 persons. Singles $124. Suites $139-$159. Lincoln Ctr area, Hudson River views, 18 flrs, kitchenette, 5 mins to midtown, safe, quiet, luxury area. RIVERSIDE TOWER, Riverside & 80th St. Call 1-800-724-3136 or visit: www.riversidetowerhotel.com

NORTH CAROLINA DESTIN. Local owner, 1 or 2 luxury condos. 2 BR, 2 BA overlooking gulf, sugar white beaches. Heated pool, hot tubs & more. 937-767-8449,or visit www.majesticsunindestin.com

HILTON HEAD ISLAND, SC

Plan a stay with Seashore Vacations. Oceanfront condos. Walk to dine and shop. Golf discounts. Free tennis. Call 1-800-845-0077 or book online at www.seashorehhi.com.

EMERALD ISLE. Ocean Front luxury vacation homes with community pool. Call for free brochure. 1-252-354-5555 Spinnaker’s Reach Realty www.SpinnakersReach.com

Marion Catherine Walton, 85, of Fort Thomas, died April 10, 2011, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. She was an office clerk/supervisor with Western Southern Life Insurance and a member of St. Bernard Church. Her husband, Russell Walton, died previously. Survivors include her sisters, Elaine Stillwell of Sharonville, Ohio, and Shirley Hartman of Bellevue; and special friend, Linda Groh. Burial was in St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas. Memorials: Ronald McDonald House, 350 Erkenbrecher Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45229.

Douglas Wilson Sr.

Douglas Lee Wilson Sr., 73, of Alexandria, died April 10, 2011, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He was a retired plumber with Plumbers & Pipe Fitters Local Union No. 392 in Cincinnati. He was a charter member of the life squad for Southgate Volunteer Fire Department, and a member of Knight of Columbus Father DeJaco Council No. 5220 in Alexandria, Super Seniors and Catholic Order of Foresters. Survivors include his wife, Lois Ann Twehues Wilson; daughters, Kim Holthaus and Lisa Burden; sons, Douglas Wilson Jr. and Marc Wilson; sister, Joyce Gumby; brother, Jerry Wilson; and nine grandchildren. Entombment was in Evergreen Mausoleum, Southgate. Memorials: Diocesan Catholic Children’s Home, 75 Orphanage Road, Covington, KY 41017.

MARRIAGE LICENSES Tonya Rieger, 34, of Cincinnati and William Chaffin, 33, of Covington, issued April 4. Trisha Kinman, 25, and Kurt Johnson, 32, both of Fort Thomas, issued April 4. Kourtney Smith, 18, of Fort Thomas and Hugh Green, 26, of Cincinnati, issued April 5. Nicole Arany, 26, and Joseph Simpson II, 33, both of Cincinnati, issued April 6. Bernardita Gamallo, 30, of Phlippines and Colin Tangel, 29, of Memphis, issued April 6. Marcie Allen, 42, of Fort Thomas and Shawn Goodlett, 41, of Lexington, issued April 8. Tiffany James, 30, of Cincinnati and Samuel Adjei, 48, of Ghana, issued April 8. Amanda Szlachta, 25, of Niagara Falls and Jeffrey Matusik, 27, of Buffalo, issued April 8. Carinne Hamant, 29, of Cincinnati and Christopher Harrison, 29, of Dayton, issued April 8. Brittany Dunevant, 26, and Michael Behymer, 26, both of Kettering, issued April 8. Mary Works, 60, of Knoxville and Timothy Harman, 49, of Cincinnati, issued April 8.

1-7 Affordable, Deluxe Chalets & Cabin Rentals. Pigeon Forge in the Smokies. Vacation/Dollywood Specials. Free brochure. Call 1-800-833-9987. www.firesidechalets.com

A Beautiful Cabin Getaway Gatlinburg/Pigeon Forge. Hot tub, jacuzzi, fireplace, gas grill. $85/nt, 5 nt special $375. 800-793-8699. smokymtncrossrdrentals.com

GATLINBURG. April & May Limited Special! 4 nights $333.33, 5 nights $444.44/cpl. Luxurious cabins with hot tubs; on trout streams in parklike setting. Near Dollywood & National park. 800-404-3370 www.countryelegancecabins.com

Attention Realtors To advertise your Open House or Feature Home, call your advertising representative.

513.768.8319


April 21, 2011

CCF Recorder

Is IBS with CONSTIPATION keeping you from your favorite seat?

If you’re not finding overall symptom relief,† ask your doctor if AMITIZA can help. Millions of people suffer from Irritable Bowel Syndrome with Constipation (IBS-C). †Symptoms are defined as abdominal discomfort, abdominal pain, bowel habits, and other IBS symptoms.

AMITIZA (8 mcg) twice daily is approved to treat Irritable Bowel Syndrome with Constipation (IBS-C) in women 18 years of age and older.

AMITIZA may help

• AMITIZA is not for everyone. If you know or suspect you have a bowel blockage, do not take AMITIZA. If you are unsure, your healthcare provider should evaluate your condition before starting AMITIZA.You should not take AMITIZA if you have severe diarrhea.

• AMITIZA is not a laxative or fiber • AMITIZA is the only prescription medicine that is FDA-approved to relieve the overall symptoms of IBS-C in women. Individual results may vary

Get started with the AMITIZA Healthy Savings Program* Just visit AMITIZAsavings5.com or call 1-866-746-9888 [option 5] to learn more about AMITIZA and sign up for the AMITIZA Healthy Savings Program. As a member, you’ll save up to $35 a month on your AMITIZA prescription.* *Must meet Eligibility Requirements. Offer good for up to 12 refills. Offer expires 12/31/11.

Important Safety Information

• AMITIZA has not been studied in pregnant women and should only be used during a pregnancy if the potential benefits justify the potential risk to the fetus. Women should have a negative pregnancy test before beginning treatment with AMITIZA and need to practice effective birth control measures. If you are pregnant or become pregnant while being treated with AMITIZA, talk to your healthcare provider to evaluate the risks to the fetus. • Some patients taking AMITIZA may experience nausea or diarrhea. If nausea occurs, take AMITIZA with food. If your nausea or diarrhea becomes severe, tell your healthcare provider. • Within an hour of taking AMITIZA, a sensation of chest tightness and shortness of breath may occur. These symptoms usually go away within three hours, but may recur with repeated use. Tell your healthcare provider if you experience these symptoms. • The most common side effects of taking AMITIZA (8 mcg) twice daily, pink capsules for IBS-C are nausea, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. These are not all the side effects associated with AMITIZA.

Talk to your doctor. Ask about AMITIZA.

Please see Brief Summary on adjacent page. You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

CE-0000456789

MARKETED BY: Sucampo Pharma Americas, Inc., Bethesda, MD 20814 and Takeda Pharmaceuticals America, Inc., Deerfield, IL 60015. AMITIZA is a trademark of Sucampo Pharmaceuticals, Inc., registered with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and used under license by Takeda Pharmaceuticals America, Inc. ©2011 Takeda Pharmaceuticals North America, Inc. LUB-03096 Printed in U.S.A. 03/11

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B12

CCF Recorder

April 21, 2011

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Initial U.S. Approval: 2006 BRIEF SUMMARY OF PRESCRIBING INFORMATION – Please see package insert for full prescribing information. INDICATIONS AND USAGE Chronic Idiopathic Constipation Amitiza ® is indicated for the treatment of chronic idiopathic constipation in adults. Irritable Bowel Syndrome with Constipation Amitiza is indicated for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome with constipation (IBS-C) in women ≥ 18 years old. DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION Amitiza should be taken twice daily orally with food and water. Physicians and patients should periodically assess the need for continued therapy. Chronic Idiopathic Constipation 24 mcg twice daily orally with food and water. Irritable Bowel Syndrome with Constipation 8 mcg twice daily orally with food and water. DOSAGE FORMS AND STRENGTHS Amitiza is available as an oval, gelatin capsule containing 8 mcg or 24 mcg of lubiprostone. • 8-mcg capsules are pink and are printed with “SPI” on one side • 24-mcg capsules are orange and are printed with “SPI” on one side CONTRAINDICATIONS Amitiza is contraindicated in patients with known or suspected mechanical gastrointestinal obstruction. WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS Pregnancy The safety of Amitiza in pregnancy has not been evaluated in humans. In guinea pigs, lubiprostone has been shown to have the potential to cause fetal loss. Amitiza should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus. Women who could become pregnant should have a negative pregnancy test prior to beginning therapy with Amitiza and should be capable of complying with effective contraceptive measures. See Use in Specific Populations (8.1). Nausea Patients taking Amitiza may experience nausea. If this occurs, concomitant administration of food with Amitiza may reduce symptoms of nausea. See Adverse Reactions (6.1). Diarrhea Amitiza should not be prescribed to patients that have severe diarrhea. Patients should be aware of the possible occurrence of diarrhea during treatment. Patients should be instructed to inform their physician if severe diarrhea occurs. See Adverse Reactions (6.1). Dyspnea In clinical trials conducted to study Amitiza in treatment of chronic idiopathic constipation and IBS-C there were reports of dyspnea. This was reported at 2.5% of the treated chronic idiopathic constipation population and at 0.4% in the treated IBS-C population. Although not classified as serious adverse events, some patients discontinued treatment on study because of this event. There have been postmarketing reports of dyspnea when using Amitiza 24 mcg. Most have not been characterized as serious adverse events, but some patients have discontinued therapy because of dyspnea. These events have usually been described as a sensation of chest tightness and difficulty taking in a breath, and generally have an acute onset within 30–60 minutes after taking the first dose. They generally resolve within a few hours after taking the dose, but recurrence has been frequently reported with subsequent doses. Bowel Obstruction In patients with symptoms suggestive of mechanical gastrointestinal obstruction, the treating physician should perform a thorough evaluation to confirm the absence of such an obstruction prior to initiating therapy with Amitiza. ADVERSE REACTIONS Clinical Studies Experience Because clinical studies are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical studies of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical studies of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice. Chronic Idiopathic Constipation Adverse reactions in dose-finding, efficacy, and long-term clinical studies: The data described below reflect exposure to Amitiza in 1175 patients with chronic idiopathic constipation (29 at 24 mcg once daily, 1113 at 24 mcg twice daily, and 33 at 24 mcg three times daily) over 3- or 4-week, 6-month, and 12-month treatment periods; and from 316 patients receiving placebo over short-term exposure (≤ 4 weeks). The total population (N = 1491) had a mean age of 49.7 (range 19–86) years; was 87.1% female; 84.8% Caucasian, 8.5% African American, 5.0% Hispanic, 0.9% Asian; and 15.5% elderly (≥ 65 years of age). Table 1 presents data for the adverse reactions that occurred in at least 1% of patients who received Amitiza 24 mcg twice daily and that occurred more frequently with study drug than placebo. In addition, corresponding adverse reaction incidence rates in patients receiving Amitiza 24 mcg once daily is shown. Table 1: Percent of Patients with Adverse Reactions (Chronic Idiopathic Constipation) Placebo System/Adverse Reaction1

Gastrointestinal disorders Nausea Diarrhea Abdominal pain Abdominal distension Flatulence Vomiting Loose stools Abdominal discomfort2 Dyspepsia Dry mouth Stomach discomfort Nervous system disorders Headache Dizziness General disorders and site administration conditions Edema Fatigue Chest discomfort/pain Respiratory, thoracic, and mediastinal disorders Dyspnea

N = 316 %

Amitiza 24 mcg Once Daily N = 29 %

Amitiza 24 mcg Twice Daily N = 1113 %

3 <1 3 2 2 <1 <1 <1 <1

17 7 3 3 3 -

29 12 8 6 6 3 3 2 2 1 1

5 <1

3 3

11 3

<1 <1 -

3

3 2 2

-

3

2

Includes only those events associated with treatment (possibly, probably, or definitely related, as assessed by the investigator). 2 This term combines “abdominal tenderness,” “abdominal rigidity,” “gastrointestinal discomfort,” and “abdominal discomfort.”

1

Nausea: Approximately 29% of patients who received Amitiza 24 mcg twice daily experienced an adverse reaction of nausea; 4% of patients had severe nausea while 9% of patients discontinued treatment due to nausea. The rate of nausea associated with Amitiza (any dosage) was substantially lower among male (7%) and elderly patients (18%). Further analysis of the safety data revealed that long-term exposure to Amitiza does not appear to place patients at an elevated risk for experiencing nausea. The incidence of nausea increased in a dose-dependent manner with the lowest overall incidence for nausea reported at the 24 mcg once daily dosage (17%). In open-labeled, long-term studies, patients were allowed to adjust the dosage of Amitiza down to 24 mcg once daily from 24 mcg twice daily if experiencing nausea. Nausea decreased when Amitiza was administered with food. No patients in the clinical studies were hospitalized due to nausea. CE-0000456793

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Diarrhea: Approximately 12% of patients who received Amitiza 24 mcg twice daily experienced an adverse reaction of diarrhea; 2% of patients had severe diarrhea while 2% of patients discontinued treatment due to diarrhea. Electrolytes: No serious adverse reactions of electrolyte imbalance were reported in clinical studies, and no clinically significant changes were seen in serum electrolyte levels in patients receiving Amitiza. Less common adverse reactions: The following adverse reactions (assessed by investigator as probably or definitely related to treatment) occurred in less than 1% of patients receiving Amitiza 24 mcg twice daily in clinical studies, occurred in at least two patients, and occurred more frequently in patients receiving study drug than those receiving placebo: fecal incontinence, muscle cramp, defecation urgency, frequent bowel movements, hyperhidrosis, pharyngolaryngeal pain, intestinal functional disorder, anxiety, cold sweat, constipation, cough, dysgeusia, eructation, influenza, joint swelling, myalgia, pain, syncope, tremor, decreased appetite. Irritable Bowel Syndrome with Constipation Adverse reactions in dose-finding, efficacy, and long-term clinical studies: The data described below reflect exposure to Amitiza 8 mcg twice daily in 1011 patients with IBS-C for up to 12 months and from 435 patients receiving placebo twice daily for up to 16 weeks. The total population (N = 1267) had a mean age of 46.5 (range 18–85) years; was 91.6% female; 77.5% Caucasian, 12.9% African American, 8.6% Hispanic, 0.4% Asian; and 8.0% elderly (≥ 65 years of age). Table 2 presents data for the adverse reactions that occurred in at least 1% of patients who received Amitiza 8 mcg twice daily and that occurred more frequently with study drug than placebo. Table 2: Percent of Patients with Adverse Reactions (IBS-C Studies)

N = 435 %

Amitiza 8 mcg Twice Daily N = 1011 %

4 4 5 2

8 7 5 3

Placebo System/Adverse Reaction

1

Gastrointestinal disorders Nausea Diarrhea Abdominal pain Abdominal distension

Includes only those events associated with treatment (possibly or probably related, as assessed by the investigator). Less common adverse reactions: The following adverse reactions (assessed by investigator as probably related to treatment) occurred in less than 1% of patients receiving Amitiza 8 mcg twice daily in clinical studies, occurred in at least two patients, and occurred more frequently in patients receiving study drug than those receiving placebo: dyspepsia, loose stools, vomiting, fatigue, dry mouth, edema, increased alanine aminotransferase, increased aspartate aminotransferase, constipation, eructation, gastroesophageal reflux disease, dyspnea, erythema, gastritis, increased weight, palpitations, urinary tract infection, anorexia, anxiety, depression, fecal incontinence, fibromyalgia, hard feces, lethargy, rectal hemorrhage, pollakiuria. One open-labeled, long-term clinical study was conducted in patients with IBS-C receiving Amitiza 8 mcg twice daily. This study comprised 476 intent-to-treat patients (mean age 47.5 [range 21– 82] years; 93.5% female; 79.2% Caucasian, 11.6% African American, 8.6% Hispanic, 0.2% Asian; 7.8% ≥ 65 years of age) who were treated for an additional 36 weeks following an initial 12–16-week, double-blinded treatment period. The adverse reactions that were reported during this study were similar to those observed in the two double-blinded, controlled studies. Postmarketing Experience The following adverse reactions have been identified during postapproval use of Amitiza 24 mcg for the treatment of chronic idiopathic constipation. Because these reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to drug exposure. Voluntary reports of adverse reactions occurring with the use of Amitiza include the following: syncope, allergic-type reactions (including rash, swelling, and throat tightness), malaise, increased heart rate, muscle cramps or muscle spasms, rash, and asthenia. DRUG INTERACTIONS Based upon the results of in vitro human microsome studies, there is low likelihood of drug–drug interactions. In vitro studies using human liver microsomes indicate that cytochrome P450 isoenzymes are not involved in the metabolism of lubiprostone. Further in vitro studies indicate microsomal carbonyl reductase may be involved in the extensive biotransformation of lubiprostone to the metabolite M3 (See Pharmacokinetics [12.3].). Additionally, in vitro studies in human liver microsomes demonstrate that lubiprostone does not inhibit cytochrome P450 isoforms 3A4, 2D6, 1A2, 2A6, 2B6, 2C9, 2C19, or 2E1, and in vitro studies of primary cultures of human hepatocytes show no induction of cytochrome P450 isoforms 1A2, 2B6, 2C9, and 3A4 by lubiprostone. No drug–drug interaction studies have been performed. Based on the available information, no protein binding–mediated drug interactions of clinical significance are anticipated. USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS Pregnancy Teratogenic effects: Pregnancy Category C. [See Warnings and Precautions (5.1).] Teratology studies with lubiprostone have been conducted in rats at oral doses up to 2000 mcg/kg/day (approximately 332 times the recommended human dose, based on body surface area), and in rabbits at oral doses of up to 100 mcg/kg/day (approximately 33 times the recommended human dose, based on body surface area). Lubiprostone was not teratogenic in rats or rabbits. In guinea pigs, lubiprostone caused fetal loss at repeated doses of 10 and 25 mcg/kg/day (approximately 2 and 6 times the highest recommended human dose, respectively, based on body surface area) administered on days 40 to 53 of gestation. There are no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women. However, during clinical testing of Amitiza, six women became pregnant. Per protocol, Amitiza was discontinued upon pregnancy detection. Four of the six women delivered healthy babies. The fifth woman was monitored for 1 month following discontinuation of study drug, at which time the pregnancy was progressing as expected; the patient was subsequently lost to follow-up. The sixth pregnancy was electively terminated. Amitiza should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus. If a woman is or becomes pregnant while taking the drug, the patient should be apprised of the potential hazard to the fetus. Nursing Mothers It is not known whether lubiprostone is excreted in human milk. Because many drugs are excreted in human milk and because of the potential for serious adverse reactions in nursing infants from lubiprostone, a decision should be made whether to discontinue nursing or to discontinue the drug, taking into account the importance of the drug to the mother. Pediatric Use Safety and effectiveness in pediatric patients have not been studied. Geriatric Use Chronic Idiopathic Constipation The efficacy of Amitiza in the elderly (≥ 65 years of age) subpopulation was consistent with the efficacy in the overall study population. Of the total number of constipated patients treated in the dose-finding, efficacy, and long-term studies of Amitiza, 15.5% were ≥ 65 years of age, and 4.2% were ≥ 75 years of age. Elderly patients taking Amitiza (any dosage) experienced a lower incidence rate of associated nausea compared to the overall study population taking Amitiza (18% vs. 29%, respectively). Irritable Bowel Syndrome with Constipation The safety profile of Amitiza in the elderly (≥ 65 years of age) subpopulation (8.0% were ≥ 65 years of age and 1.8% were ≥ 75 years of age) was consistent with the safety profile in the overall study population. Clinical studies of Amitiza did not include sufficient numbers of patients aged 65 years and over to determine whether they respond differently from younger patients. Renal Impairment Amitiza has not been studied in patients who have renal impairment. 1

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Hepatic Impairment Amitiza has not been studied in patients who have hepatic impairment. OVERDOSAGE There have been two confirmed reports of overdosage with Amitiza. The first report involved a 3-year-old child who accidentally ingested 7 or 8 capsules of 24 mcg of Amitiza and fully recovered. The second report was a study patient who self-administered a total of 96 mcg of Amitiza per day for 8 days. The patient experienced no adverse reactions during this time. Additionally, in a Phase 1 cardiac repolarization study, 38 of 51 patients given a single oral dose of 144 mcg of Amitiza (6 times the highest recommended dose) experienced an adverse event that was at least possibly related to the study drug. Adverse reactions that occurred in at least 1% of these patients included the following: nausea (45%), diarrhea (35%), vomiting (27%), dizziness (14%), headache (12%), abdominal pain (8%), flushing/hot flash (8%), retching (8%), dyspnea (4%), pallor (4%), stomach discomfort (4%), anorexia (2%), asthenia (2%), chest discomfort (2%), dry mouth (2%), hyperhidrosis (2%), and syncope (2%). PATIENT COUNSELING INFORMATION Dosing Instructions Amitiza should be taken twice daily with food and water to reduce potential symptoms of nausea. The capsule should be taken once in the morning and once in the evening daily as prescribed. The capsule should be swallowed whole and should not be broken apart or chewed. Physicians and patients should periodically assess the need for continued therapy. Patients on treatment who experience severe nausea, diarrhea, or dyspnea should inform their physician. Patients taking Amitiza may experience dyspnea within an hour of the first dose. This symptom generally resolves within 3 hours, but may recur with repeat dosing. Chronic Idiopathic Constipation Patients should take a single 24 mcg capsule of Amitiza twice daily with food and water. Irritable Bowel Syndrome with Constipation Patients should take a single 8 mcg capsule of Amitiza twice daily with food and water. Marketed by: Sucampo Pharma Americas, Inc., Bethesda, MD 20814 and Takeda Pharmaceuticals America, Inc., Deerfield, IL 60015 Amitiza® is a registered trademark of Sucampo Pharmaceuticals, Inc. AMT0509-R1/brf L-LUB-0509-8


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