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FORT THOMAS

RECORDER

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Fort Thomas 75¢

THURSDAY, APRIL 18, 2013

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First Presbyterian Church celebrates 90th anniversary By Amanda Joering ajoering@nky.com

FORT THOMAS — Almost 90 years ago, eight local Presbyterians gathered in the Poyntz family home for the first meeting of what was to become the

First Presbyterian Church of Fort Thomas. Now, the 250-member church is celebrating that anniversary and taking a look back at its history. Member Tim Harrah, who spearheaded the effort to share

the church’s history and celebrate the milestone, said after he began writing the church’s newsletter about a year ago and realized they were coming up on 90 years, he saw it as an opportunity to celebrate and reflect.

“When you look at our church’s history, you can see that our congregation really persevered through a lot of difficult times,” Harrah said. From starting a church from scratch and finding a place to meet to dealing with the hard-

ships of the Great Depression, Harrah said the congregation always showed a lot of dedication to the church and making it work. Frank Sower, who has been a See 90 YEARS, Page A2

The ‘art of gifting’ coming to Fort Thomas New gift shop, Fort Thomas Central, set to open this summer By Amanda Joering ajoering@nky.com

FORT THOMAS — For Fort Thomas resident Barb Thomas, giving a gift is about more than just spending money on someone. The thought and consideration that goes into picking out the perfect item is what Thomas refers to as the “art of gifting.” This summer, Thomas is bringing that art to Fort Thomas by opening Fort Thomas Central, a one-stop gift connection offering a variety of items for all occasions. With a name playing off of it’s location, Fort Thomas Central will be located in the center of the city, 3 North Fort Thomas Avenue, the former home of the Candy Cottage. “I’ve always had a passion for picking out the right gift for someone,” said Thomas, who has a background in home decor, culinary arts, business and marketing, and moved to Fort Thomas from South Carolina last June. “I’m really into the community vibe here, and this is my way of being part of this community.” At the shop, Thomas will of-

ON A ROLL Rita shares a simple yeast roll recipe for beginning bakers. B3

fer various gift items, unique home decor, and gourmet items made by vendors that she hand-picked especially to cater to the Fort Thomas community, she said. Thomas said the shop will reflect her style, classic with a whimsical creative side, which she feels will be a great fit for Fort Thomas. The offerings will include items for all occasions, from birthdays and baby showers to retirements and graduations. “I’m literally going to have something for everyone,” Thomas said. For those on the hunt for the perfect gift, those just browsing or those looking for a place to relax or catch up with friends, Thomas said Fort Thomas Central will have that covered too with a cozy lounge room in the back of the shop. “(The lounge room) is sort of my gift to everyone,” Thomas said. “If they are going to come to my shop, I want them to enjoy it, I want customers to enjoy their gifting experience in an inviting atmosphere where they may relax and also enjoy a selection of artisan baked good that will be available for purchase.” For those whose busy schedules may not permit adequate time to browse in-store, Thomas said she plans to offer online ordering, which will be available when the shop opens in late June or early July.

Highlands students Ryan Schalk and Michaela Fetting check out some of their classmate's artwork on display at Fort Thomas Coffee. AMANDA JOERING/COMMUNITY RECORDER

HHS students display artwork

Artwork by Highlands High School students was put on display during an exhibit at Fort Thomas Coffee. The exhibit featured the work of 60 of the school’s art students.

Highlands High School students' art work lines the walls of Fort Thomas Coffee. AMANDA JOERING/COMMUNITY RECORDER

SPRING CLEANING Diane encourages readers not to leave the fridge off their spring cleaning list. B5

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Vol. 13 No. 47 © 2013 The Community Recorder ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


NEWS

A2 • FORT THOMAS RECORDER • APRIL 18, 2013

New ruling could cut tax rate

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Hey kids! Become a Fort Thomas Recorder carrier and earn your own spending money and still have time for other fun activities since delivery is just once a week on Thursday. It’s your own business where your neighbors rely on you to deliver informa-

By Chris Mayhew

tion about their community. You’ll learn valuable business skills and gain experience in customer service and money management. You’ll also be able to earn bonuses, win prizes and participate in special carrier events. Call 7814421. Find out more about the junior carrier program at NKY.com/carrier.

FORT THOMAS RECORDER

Find news and information from your community on the Web Forth Thomas • nky.com/fortthomas Campbell County • nky.com/campbellcounty

News

Michelle Shaw Editor ..........................578-1053, mshaw@nky.com Chris Mayhew Reporter .......................578-1051,cmayhew@nky.com Amanda Joering Reporter ....................578-1052, ajoering@nky.com Melanie Laughman Sports Editor ............513-248-7573, mlaughman@nky.com James Weber Sports Reporter ................578-1054, jweber@nky.com

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Lisa Lawrence Sales Manager ...............................513-768-8338, llawrence@enquirer.com

Delivery

For customer service .........................781-4421 Sharon Schachleiter Circulation Manager ..442-3464, sschachleiter@nky.com Cathy Kellerman District Manager ...........442-3461, ckellerman@nky.com

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Campbell Circuit Court Judge Julie Reinhardt Ward has ruled a state law requiring a petition of 51 percent of voters to raise library property taxes has not been followed by the Campbell County Public Library. If the ruling is upheld, the library tax rate will be decreased from the 2012 level of 7.7 cents per $100 of assessed property value to the 1978 rate of 3 cents per $100 of assessed property value. Ward’s summary judgment relates to one portion of the class action lawsuit filed by Charlie Coleman, John P. Roth Jr. and Erik Hermes against the Library’s Board of Trustees in January 2012. The suit, filed on behalf of taxpayers, also seeks a refund to Campbell County property owners. The next scheduled hearing in the case before Judge Ward is April 25. Both sides presented arguments in Campbell Circuit Court in February 2013. The library’s Board of Trustees released a statement April 2 stating they “respectfully disagree with Judge Ward’s opinion.” The judge’s ruling is counter to the library’s

position that a 1979 law, House Bill 44, gave libraries the authority as special taxing districts to set new tax rates. Ward’s seven-page ruling, issued March 29, stated both sides had asked through their legal filings or “motions” for a declaratory judgment on which statute governs the library tax rate. Ward, in her ruling, argued accepting the library’s view of the law “would render KRS 173.790 meaningless,” under which Campbell County’s library system was established by petition in 1978. “Pursuant to KRS 173.790, a library tax created by a petition of the people can only be changed by a petition of the people of that county,” wrote Ward in her ruling. “There is a certain logic to this procedure and there is no manifest indication that the Kentucky State Legislature intended that House Bill 44 take this power away from the people.” Attorney Brandon Voelker, representing the plaintiffs in the case against the library, said Judge Ward’s decision makes it clear the people, and not a board of unelected officials, get to set the tax rate. “She pointed out that

these libraries were created by a petition of the people, and they control the size and scope of the library,” Voelker said. Voelker has also also filed a similar suit in Kenton Circuit Court in January 2012 on behalf of Garth Kuhnhein against the Kenton County Public Library Board of Trustees. Voelker said he has not received any ruling, or news of a ruling, from Kenton Circuit and Chief Regional Circuit Judge Patricia M. Summe, who heard the arguments of in the two library cases in February 2013, at the same time as Ward. In an April 2 Enquirer article, library district attorney Jeff Mando argued that House Bill 44 made libraries taxing district and that the ruling could set a dangerous precedence for all libraries in the state if it is upheld. “The state department of libraries and archives told libraries across the state they were subject to the provisions of that bill, and that’s what they would have to follow,” said Mando in the Enquirer article. “It is not a situation where my library board, in particular, and other library boards just went out and willy-nilly set a tax rate pulled from the air.” Campbell County’s li-

brary released a statement from board chairperson Rebecca Kelm on behalf of the board April 2, expressing that they are “gravely disappointed and respectfully disagree with Judge Ward’s opinion.” “We firmly believe we have legal standing that supports our position,” said Kelm on behalf of the board in the statement. “This decision ignores the fact that we have been operating as instructed, according to the same formulas and procedures as other taxing entities and as libraries all across the state have done, for the past 35 years. This ruling jeopardizes funding for maintaining the current level of library services. If funding is reduced to 1978 levels, the impact on library services countywide will be severe and significant.” The next step will be meeting with Judge Ward April 25 for a status conference to establish a time line for executing her decision, according to the board’s statement. “Meanwhile, the Board of Trustees will be working with our attorney to discuss an appeal to ensure that statutes intended by the Kentucky legislature to govern libraries and other special taxing districts are followed,” continued the statement.

the moving truck in his driveway and came over to welcome him and his family to the city and invite them to the church. Once they got there and met more of the members and staff, they knew it was the church for them, Sower said. “It’s really all about the people,” Sower said. “The people are what make the church.” Sower said the church, and the people in it, have made a big impact on his life and the lives of family, including his son, who now brings his wife and children to First Presbyterian and serves as the church’s treasurer. Seeing his son raise his family in the church and

interact with the congregation has been a blessing, Sower said. Using the church’s archive and stories shared by some of the church’s older members, Harrah has been sharing the history with the congregation through the newsletter. “I just think we can take for granted what we have today unless we really remember that somebody had to work hard to establish it,” Harrah said. “I think learning the history of the church gives us perspective on why we are where we are today.” Pastor Terry Webster said the church has changed a lot over the years, even in the 13 years

he’s been there, through increased mission work and community involvement. Over the years Webster said the church has lost of lot of its older members, who will be remembered during the anniversary celebration at 5:30 p.m. Saturday, April 20. “Part of our event is going to be remembering the people that got us where we are today,” Webster said. “We’ve lost a lot of our elderly members that just added so much to our church, but we are fortunate to have younger members who are stepping up and taking on leadership roles.”

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90 years Continued from Page A1

member of the church since 1974, has seen over the decades how much the congregation of the church cares. Sower said when he moved into Fort Thomas that year, the pastor saw

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NEWS

APRIL 18, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • A3

Schools offered incentive to raise dropout age The Community Recorder FRANKFORT — Kentucky is offering $10,000 planning grants to the first 57 school districts to adopt policies forbidding students from dropping out until they are 18 years old. The current legal dropout age is 16 in Kentucky. Local school boards are allowed to approve a resolution starting July 1 raising the age to 18, according to a news release from the Ken-

tucky Department of Education. Education Commissioner Terry Holliday urged local school boards “to be courageous” and adopt the policy to raise the compulsory school attendance age to 18 effective for the 2015-16’ school year. The Kentucky Board of Education approved its own resolution April 10 encouraging districts to be early adopters of the policy “in order to send a strong message

that completing high school is essential to ensuring that every student graduates college- and career-ready,” according to the news release. According to Senate bill 97, passed by the Kentucky General Assembly this year, within four years of 55 percent of Kentucky’s school districts raising the dropout age to 18 – all school districts in the state will be required to raise the age to 18. The $10,000 being

made available to the first 57 school districts to raise the dropout age is for planning grants. The money “can be used to develop a required plan for implementation that would include integration of career and technical education, engagement of the community and the use of community resources,” according to the news release. Rep. Jeff Hoover, RJamestown, the House Republican Floor leader, sent a letter to Gov. Steve

Beshear expressing his concerns for KDE’s offer of $10,000 to school districts in planning grants in exchange for raising the dropout age early. “I find it disturbing the Commissioner of the Department of Education is offering more than $500,000 in public education funds to advance this agenda while tens of thousands of children in Kentucky are desperately in need of textbooks,” Rep. Hoover wrote to the Governor,

according to a news release from the House Republican Leadership. “My questions are this, where is the money coming from? If KDE has, all the sudden, $500,000 dollars for this graduation initiative, how much other money is ‘laying around’ over there? If there is $500,000, all of a sudden, why hasn’t the money been used previously for essential expenditures and unmet needs such as textbooks?”

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Highlands parents host Prom to Dawn event

Highlands High School junior’s parents are hosting the 2013 Prom to Dawn event from 12:30-4:30 a.m. Sunday, April 21 after the school prom. For the event, the high school will be transformed to feature New York attractions such as the Statue of Liberty, Times Square, Broadway, Fifth Avenue, Central Park and Coney Island. The Prom to Dawn event has been a tradition at the school since 1991 and statistics showed that student casualties associated with after prom parties have declined significantly since schools now sponsor these events. Those interested can visit the HHS Prom to Dawn walk through from 9-10 p.m. Saturday, April 20.

The Campbell County Public Library will celebrate National Library Week April14-20 with special giveaway chances and a llama straight out of a storybook. The library has worked with nine retailers to offer $25 gift cards to select patrons throughout the week. Adult and teen patrons will receive an entry form with each item they check out during the week for a chance to win. Each entry will also be entered in a grand prize drawing for a NOOK HD. There library is also offering a special reason to hoof it to any one of the three branches in the system Saturday, April 20 when a costumed “Llama Llama” will be at each of the three library branches wearing his red pajamas. Each branch will also offer a chance to win a copy of the book “Llama Llama Red Pajama.” The Llama Llama visit schedule is: » 11 a.m. at the Carrico/ Fort Thomas Branch,1000 Highland Ave. » 1 p.m. at the Cold Spring Branch, 3920 Alexandria Pike. » 3 p.m. at the Newport Branch, 901 E. Sixth St. Visit the library’s Facebook page for information about the different giveaways for each day.

St. John UCC hosts rummage sale

St. John United Church of Christ in Bellevue is hosting a rummage sale from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, May 11. Donations for the sale are currently being accepted on the stage in the basement of Fellowship Hall at the church, located at 520 Fairfield Avenue. Volunteers are needed from 6-9 p.m. Monday, May 6 through Friday, May10 for sorting and setting up. Contact Dale Clark at portbreak@roadrunner.com or 513-673-4290

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NEWS

A4 • CCF RECORDER • APRIL 18, 2013

Art students draw on gallery experience By Karen Meiman Enquirer contributor

Brian McHugh, left, and James Abrams, Newport High School students, work on a mural of a Wildcat on the wall of the cafeteria at Newport Intermediate School. Their artwork will be displayed in a gallery on Monmouth Street. THE ENQUIRER/PATRICK REDDY

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NEWPORT — Among the rustic picture frames, vintage soda bottles and other time-worn treasures at the Monmouth Street Antique Gallery , owner Steve Strain plans to showcase a burst of something new – the art of high school students. Newport Independent High School artists such as Sarah Willoughby, James Abrams and Deko Idle, will display the work they have completed under the guidance of their art teacher Teresa McHugh starting this weekend. Acrylic sunsets, framed photographs and colored-pencil drawings, scratch art and comic book creations are among the pieces the public can view and buy. “This is a wonderful way to let the community see and recognize the talent the high school students have,” McHugh said. “It also allows students to get experience working and talking with the public. Each student’s work will be featured in the store for a month. On the second Saturday of the month, the student featured will be there to answer questions and some for demonstrations.” The antique gallery is the perfect settin to illustrate James Abrams’ spin on vintage 33-rpm records. “I use acrylic to paint on records,” said Abrams, a senior. “Wildcats, Tom and Jerry, Tweedy Bird and Elvis Presley are some of the stuff I have painted on

STUDENT ART SHOWS Student art shows will be held at the Monmouth Street Antique Gallery, 822 Monmouth St. in Newport, between noon and 2 p.m. on the second Saturday of each month. The artwork will be displayed for the rest of the month. » Sarah Willoughby will be on hand today to showcase her sketches. » James Abrams’ work on records will be featured in May. » Other students to be featured are: Deko Idle, Josh Turner, Brian McHugh, Will Wolfe, Marah Jones, Kelsi Heckler, Kylie Evans, Caitlin Greer and Angie Roldan.

Sarah Willoughby, a Newport High School student, works on a colored pencil drawing of an owl in art class. Her art work will be displayed in a gallery on Monmouth Street. THE ENQUIRER/PATRICK REDDY

“Art is a way for me to express my feelings. I love to photograph still life,” she said. “I think I want to pursue photography after high school. Maybe I will focus on portraits.” Deko Idle, a senior, is the third student who wil be featured at the gallery. She is a painter. “Art also allows me to express my feelings, mostly happy,” she said. And the exposure at the gallery will also help, she said. “I am kind of shy,” she added. Strain has owned the gallery for several months But as the owner of Absolute Fire Protection, he has enjoyed preparing students for realworld situations for many years. Strain has volunteered and sponsored through 4-H, FFA (Future Farmers of America) and Boy Scout projects. “It does help build self-confidence and I enjoy helping out the students and school,” he said.m

them.” Abrams said he will likely work on cars after graduation. But for now, he’s enjoying time in the art classroom. “I love art,” he said. “It is calm and relaxing. It relieves a lot of stress.” Abrams and junior Brian McHugh are currently painting a Wildcat on a cafeteria wall at the Newport Independent Intermediate School. That effort is another way of showcasing the students’ artistic talents to the public. Sarah Willoughby is the first art student to greet the public this Saturday from noon to 2 p.m. “I have framed sketches, one of a Wildcat with an Aztec theme,” she said. “I also have framed photographs.”

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NEWS

APRIL 18, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • A5

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SCHOOLS

A6 • CCF RECORDER • APRIL 18, 2013

COMMUNITY

RECORDER

Editor: Michelle Shaw, mshaw@nky.com, 578-1053

ACHIEVEMENTS | NEWS | ACTIVITIES | HONORS

CommunityPress.com

St. Thomas academic teams celebrate success, learning Junior high team has undefeated season

By Amanda Joering ajoering@nky.com

Though St. Thomas School is small, their academic teams had some big wins this season and at the Kentucky Association for Academic Competition’s Governor’s Cup tournament. The junior high team, who had an undefeated season in the Northern Kentucky Academic League, came in second overall at district and regional levels, and had students place in ninth and 12th out of 130 students in written categories at the state competition in March. The Sixth Grade Showcase team saw success at their tournament in December, placing second place overall and receiving medals in several categories. “I think it’s really great to see such a little school do so well,” said Principal Barry Thomas. “It’s great that our students have this opportunity to really blossom and be recognized for it.” Thomas said the success of the teams wouldn’t be possible without the dedication of parent volunteers like Andrea Bunch, who coached the students. Bunch, who has two daughters on the teams, said she sees the importance of offering the students this opportunity. “This is important because it gives the kids a chance to see the value of academics and have that passion for learning and knowledge,” Bunch said. Sixth-grader Gabriel Powell said when the academic team came into his class in fourth grade to tell them about the competitions, he knew right away it was something he wanted to be a part of. “The quick recall is very challenging since you only have a few seconds to answer, but in the course of it you learn so much,” Powell said. Thomas said the students on

St. Thomas School's Sixth Grade Showcase team poses for a picture with the medals they won for coming in second during the quick recall competition during the Kentucky Association for Academic Competition's Governor's Cup tournament in December. PROVIDED

the teams are very dedicated, practicing once a week after school. “I think it says a lot about the kids that they are willing to give up their time after school,” Thomas said. For eighth-grader Eileen Bunch, the academic team has been a big part of her life for the past four years. Eileen said she has always loved learning, and the academic team really gave her a way to increase and use her knowledge. “In fourth grade, I learned that there was a sport for me,” Eileen said. “Not a sport where I ran around failing miserably at whatever I was supposed to be accomplishing with a ball or net or something, a sport that exercised my brain was what I needed, and that’s what I discovered.” Beyond learning and com-

Eighth-grade student Andrea Bunch receives a trophy from Governor Steve Beshear after coming in ninth in arts and humanities at the state Governor's Cup competition. PROVIDED

peting, being part of the team offered even more to Eileen, she said, and that’s the memories and friendships she made over the years.

St. Thomas's junior high team competes during the state Governor's Cup competition. PROVIDED

SCHOOL NOTES Fundraiser will give weight room a lift

ALEXANDRIA — The Campbell Athletic Boosters are inviting people to an upcoming fundraiser to boost the weight lifting facilities for Campbell County Schools. ‘Weight’ and See will be at the Alexandria Firehouse from 7-11 a.m. Saturday, April 20. The event will feature a pasta bar dinner, beverages and music. Tickets are being sold in advance for $30 per person until April 13. Tickets will be available at the door for $35 per person. For information or advance tickets call Dawn Gray at 859448-1081 or Scott Guy at 513-3177111. Tickets are also available through the Campbell County High School Athletics Office by calling Steve Hensley at 859448-4896.

Tech students place first in state competition

ALEXANDRIA — Students from C.E. McCormick Area Technology Center showed they have first place in the state

skills. Six different Campbell County High School students received first place in state SkillsUSA competition in April and qualified to advance to the national competition in Kansas City June 24-28. The competition awards received by Campbell County High School students at C.E. McCormick included: » Aaron Orth, Cameron Annas and Ryan Tromm: first place in Teamworks. » Austin Enzweiler and Justin Walerius: first place in masonry. » Jesse Hoff and Nick Malas: second place in masonry. » Keith Sebastian: third place in auto technology.

Campbell FFA club brings in awards crop

ALEXANDRIA — Campbell County High School Future Farmers of America members harvested some top honors in state Agricultural Proficiency Awards competition in March. The awards enable students to demonstrate their proficiency in one of 49 different agricul-

ture subject areas using real life projects they worked on with supervision. The idea is to show they have developed a career skill, according to a news release from Campbell County agriculture teacher Andrew McCubbins. Each competition has a placement and entrepreneurship category. Campbell County students received awards in the following proficiency areas: » Sophomore James Wilbers received third place with a superior rating in goat proficiency placement. » Junior Lacee Crail received third place with a superior rating in horse proficiency placement, and a superior rating in the chapter scrapbook category. » Sophomore Luke Trapp received second place with a superior rating in veterinary science proficiency placement. » Junior Sidney Boots received third place with a superior rating in agriculture education proficiency placement, and was elected the Northern Kentucky FFA Region President for the 2013-14’ school year. » Senior Pat McCord re-

ceived first place with a superior rating beef production entrepreneurship. » Junior Nick Sinclair received first place with a superior rating in tobacco essay. » Senior Danny Honaker received a superior rating in chapter treasurers book. » Senior Erin Penick received a superior rating in chapter secretaries book.

Baker Hunt offers youth and adult classes

COVINGTON — The Baker

Hunt Art & Cultural Center in Covington is offering more than 60 classes and workshops this year as part of an “Enjoy Summer Daze at Baker Hunt” series starting June 10. The deadline to register for any of the classes is May 25 to avoid any late fees. Art classes and one day workshops at Baker Hunt are designed for both beginning and more experienced adult artists, according to a news release from Baker Hunt. There are also workshops and youth camps for ages four and older. Classes for children

include Classes painting, cooking, Manga, preschool art, sculpture, writing, clay, guitar and movie making. The center also offers programs designed specifically for home-schooled children. For a schedule of classes or to register call Baker Hunt Art at 859-431-0020 or visit http://www.bakerhunt.org. A limited number of youth scholarships are also available.

Free kindergarten readiness fair offered

COLD SPRING — Campbell County Schools will have a firstever Kindergarten Readiness Fair for parents at Crossroads Elementary School in Cold Spring from 9-11:30 a.m. Saturday, April 20. The event, titled “Is your child ready for kindergarten?,” will feature readiness stations hosted by district kindergarten teachers and counselors. Register for the free event by contacting Marion Kilmer at 859-635-2173 or http://marion.kilmer@campbell.kyschools.us.


SPORTS

APRIL 18, 2013 • FORT THOMAS RECORDER • A7

Editor: Melanie Laughman, mlaughman@communitypress.com, 513-248-7573

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | RECREATIONAL

COMMUNITY

RECORDER

CommunityPress.com

Newport Central Catholic’s Michaela Ware is tagged out by Highlands’ Kendell Turner as she tries to get back to first base by during their softball game. JEFF SWINGER/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

BLUEBIRDS IMPROVE TO 6-4 Highlands softball beat Newport Central Catholic 4-3 April 9 and is 6-4 entering play April 16. Highlands hosts Newport Friday, April 19, and Cooper Tuesday, April 22.

Highlands’ Shelby Graybill rounds second on a triple against Newport Central Catholic. JEFF SWINGER/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Newport Central Catholic’s Casey Kohls beats out the throw as Highlands’ Kendell Turner can’t come down with the ball at first base. JEFF SWINGER/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Newport Central Catholic’s Sarah Neace winds up to pitch against Highlands. JEFF SWINGER/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Bluebird boys track setting records By James Weber jweber@nky.com

FORT THOMAS — While their depth is improving, the Highlands track and field teams showed they had plenty of star power in the Campbell County championship meet April 9. The Highlands boys team set four meet records in a county meet that always has plenty of stars. The boys team was third in the team standings and the girls team fourth. The Highlands boys team followed that up by finishing second in the Donnie Carnes Memorial meet, also at Campbell County Middle School. “We’ve had probably our best week ever in my tenure,” said boys head coach Ryan Swope. “We did great at the Donnie Carnes, finishing sec-

ond. It was a big step for us. We have the numbers up and that allows us to do some things.” Trevor Kraft won both the shot put and discus, breaking his own record in the shot and a 2009 mark in the discus. John Michael Griffith set a new mark to win the 3,200, and Ryan Greene won the 400 in record time. All three of those Bluebirds won events at the Donnie Carnes meet as well. “Trevor Kraft is dominating the shot and disc,” Swope said. “(Griffith) is dominating in distance and Ryan Greene has cut a second and a half off his time. We have two freshman runners on our distance relays. All that stuff definitely helps. We’re getting points in everything. Last year we didn’t have a pole See TRACK, Page A8

Brossart sophomore Chris Loos, right, edged Highlands freshman Ethan Shuley by 0.04 seconds to win the 1,600. The Campbell County championship track meet was April 9 at Campbell County Middle School in Alexandria. JAMES WEBER/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

NCC senior Kyle Simon runs to victory in the 110 hurdles. The Campbell County track championships were April 9 at Campbell County Middle School. JAMES WEBER/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER


SPORTS & RECREATION

A8 • FORT THOMAS RECORDER • APRIL 18, 2013

SCHAEFER AN ALL-STAR

PRESS PREPS HIGHLIGHTS By James Weber jweber@nky.com

Highlands senior Leah Schaefer was on the Kentucky All-Star Team for the Ohio-Kentucky All-Star basketball series April 13 at Thomas More College. She helped Kentucky win 113-78.

SOY voting: May 1

The fifth-annual Community Press and Recorder Sportsman and Sportswoman of the Year Award voting period for the 2013 award will run Wednesday, May 1, through Tuesday, May 22. When it’s time to vote, you’ll go to cincinnati.com/preps. Click on the Sportsman of the Year item on the right-hand side of the page. Readers will be able to vote once a day for their favorite athlete per paper. Neither the articles nor ballots will count against the meter, so you do not have to be a Cincinnati Enquirer/nky.com subscriber to vote on your

Highlands senior Leah Schaefer passes the ball up the court. Kentucky beat Ohio 113-78 in the Ohio-Kentucky All-Star basketball series April 13 at Thomas More College.

Track

JAMES WEBER/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

SIDELINES

Continued from Page A7

Euchre tournament

ley@ubs.com, or 859-572-0203.

Church softball

The Hornets 21-and-older baseball team is having a euchre tournament 6:30 p.m. to midnight Saturday, April 20, at the Beech Grove Clubhouse, 955 Clubhouse Drive, Independence. Cost is $20 per player. All proceeds go to the Hornets baseball team. RSVP to Todd Schoulties at tschoulties@yahoo.com or 859-496-6378 for confirmed table reservation.

Hoops camp

Kenton County Parks and Recreation needs one more softball team for Monday Men’s Church League play. The season begins Monday, April 29. League fees for a 10-game season, plus a single-elimination tournament, are $250 per team. Umpires fees are an additional $15 per team. Games will be played at 6:15 and 7:15 p.m. Monday nights at Lincoln Ridge, Pioneer, and MiddletonMills parks. Teams compete for a league champion trophy, T-shirts, and tournament seeding, and then a winning team trophy and T-shirts in the tournament. Call 525-PLAY if interested.

Junior high football Newport Central Catholic High School invites all boys entering the sixth, seventh, or eighth grade in the fall of 2013 to play on its junior high football team. Contact coach Jeff Brauley at Jeffrey.Brau-

Registration is open for the NewCath 2013 Hoops Camp. The girls session is 9 a.m. to noon, June 3-6, for girls in grades 3-8. The boys session is 9 a.m. to noon, June 10-13 for boys in grades 3-8. For more information, visit ncchs.com or call 859-292-0001.

AAU basketball tryouts The Kentucky Warriors AAU basketball organization will have tryouts in April for the spring and summer AAU basketball season – boys and girls, grades 3-12. Contact Ben Coffman at Ben@KentuckyWarriors.com or 859-640-6458 for specific grades tryout date. Visit KentuckyWarriors.com.

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vaulter or anyone in hurdles and now we have people in those events.” Greene also helped Highlands win the 4x200 with Devin Dupont, Blake Myers and Jared Pulsfort. “We’re looking to move forward and keep getting better as the year goes on,” Swope said. “Hopefully with the weather

favorite candidate. Email mlaughman@nky.com with questions and follow the hashtag #SOY2013 for updates on Twitter.

Baseball

» Highlands beat Newport 14-0 April 8. Joey Cochran improved to 3-0 on the mound. Hector Molina had three hits. Highlands beat Boone County 2-0 April 9. Ben Vermeil got the win. Quentin Murray had a double. Highlands ended the week with a key 4-2 win over Covington Catholic April 13. Mitchell Jones improved to 3-1 on the season. » NewCath beat St. Henry 12-2 April 8. NewCath senior catcher Kevin Hoffstedder was 3-for-4 with an RBI, and sophomore second baseman breaking for us, we’ll get some good quality times.” In girls, Sydney Ossege won the 1,600, Molly Mearns the 3,200 and Hannah Schenck the triple jump. Schenck won the long jump at the Donnie Carnes meet. Newport Central Catholic finished second to Brossart in both team events. Abbie Lukens of NewCath set new records to win the shot and disc. Chandler Cain won the100

CAMPBELL COUNTY CHAMPIONSHIP MEET RESULTS Boys Team scores: Brossart 152, Newport Central Catholic 98, Highlands 95, Campbell County 89.5, Newport 83.5, Dayton 21, Bellevue 19. 100: Jake Zabonick (Campbell) 11.86, Alex Schwartz (Brossart) 12.13, Jacob Hartig (Brossart) 12.35. 200: Alex Schwartz (Brossart) 24.43, Gualt Nolan (NCC) 24.70, Jacob Hartig (Brossart) 24.78. 400: Ryan Greene (Highlands) 50.57, Grant Mahoney (Campbell) 50.58, Graeham Heil (NCC) 53.19. 800: Sam Barth (NCC) 2:06.91, Mark Goller (Brossart) 2:10.22, Ryan Meyer (Dayton) 2:10.92. 1,600: Chris Loos (Brossart) 4:43.95, Ethan Shuley (Highlands) 4:43.99, Ronny Smith (Brossart) 5:10.05. 3,200: John Michael Griffith (Highlands) 10:00.49, Chris Loos (Brossart) 10:45.52, Mark Chaplin (Campbell) 10:55.48. 110 hurdles: Kyle Simon (NCC) 17.37, Jashawn Stanley (Newport) 17.66, Mohamed Bayaari (Campbell) 18.01. 300 hurdles: Kyle Simon (NCC) 43.32, Drew Berkemeyer (Brossart) 44.06, Mohammed Bayaari (Campbell) 44.37. 4x100: Campbell (Canaday, Mahoney, Strange, Zabonick) 45.67, Newport (Bailey, Guilkey, Stanley, Whaley) 47.46, Brossart (Landwehr, Brugger, Miller, Schwartz) 47.74. 4x200: Highlands (Greene, Dupont, Myers, Pulsfort) 1:36.76, NCC (Simon, Freppon, Heil, Nolan) 1:37.73, Brossart (Schwartz, Landwehr, Miller, Brugger) 1:39.66. 4x400: NCC (Simon, Freppon, Heil, Barth) 3:37.50, Newport (Bailey, Billings, Stanley, Whaley) 3:45.20, Highlands (Dupont, Grey, Myers, Greene) 3:45.26. 4x800: Brossart (Caldwell, Goller, Smith, Donnelly) 8:36.94, Highlands (Grey, Griffith, Kruse, Shuley) 8:52.04, NCC (Schwarber, Johnson, Allen, Barth) 9:01.14. High jump: Aroyal Wright (Newport) 6-2, Graeham Heil (NCC) 6-0, Ryan Greene (Highlands) 5-6. Pole vault: Benjamin See (Campbell) 10-0, Austin Frey (Brossart) 9-6, William Seiter (Campbell) 9-6. Long jump: Jacob Hartig (Brossart) 20-8.75, Aroyal Wright (Newport) 19-11, Deion Conley (Dayton) 18-6. Triple jump: Jacob Hartig (Brossart) 40-7.5, Jashawn Stanley (Newport) 389.75, Drew Berkemeyer (Brossart) 38-9.5. Shot put: Trevor Kraft (Highlands) 51-11, Dominick Joseph (Newport) 44-1, Andre Anderson (Newport) 40-4.5. Discus: Trevor Kraft (Highlands) 138-0, Dominick Joseph (Newport) 127-7, Andre

Zack Pangallo went 3for-3 with a double, a triple and an RBI.

Softball

» Junior right-hander Taylor Burkart tossed her first-ever no-hitter for Newport Central Catholic, who beat Scott 14-0 April 3. Sophomore third baseman Loren Zimmerman drove in three runs to lead the Thoroughbreds. NewCath senior left fielder Christina Enzweiler added two RBI.

Girls tennis

» Highlands beat NewCath 5-0 April 9 with wins from Martz, H. Laskey/ Hoffman and Herman/ Herman. Highlands is 11-1 after beating Campbell County and Montgomery County April 13.

and long jump. In boys, senior Kyle Simon won the 110 hurdles and the 300 hurdles, and helped the 4x400 win with Noah Freppon, Graeham Heil and Sam Barth. Barth also claimed the 800. Newport senior Aroyal Wright won the high jump in 6-foot-2, breaking a meet record.

Follow James on Twitter @RecorderWeber and look for more photos from the county meet at nky.com/preps.

Anderson (Newport) 116-3. Girls Team scores: Brossart 164, NCC 137, Campbell 112, Highlands 108, Dayton 17, Bellevue 12, Newport 2. 100: Chandler Cain (NCC) 13.03, MiKayla Seibert (NCC) 13.32, Molly Kitchen (Campbell) 13.47. 200: Brooke Buckler (Campbell) 27.88, Molly Kitchen (Campbell) 28.04, MiKayla Seibert (NCC) 28.41. 400: Nicole Goderwis (Brossart) 59.92, Chandler Cain (NCC) 1:02.64, Shelly Neiser (Brossart) 1:06.71. 800: Madison Bertram (Brossart) 2:35.07, Sarah Klump (Brossart) 2:37.06, Abby Vandergriff (Campbell) 2:38.70. 1,600: Sydney Ossege (Highlands) 5:37.77, Olivia Nienaber (Brossart) 5:38.70, Paige Dauer (Highlands) 6:00.79. 3,200: Molly Mearns (Highlands) 11:58.78, Jennah Flairty (Campbell) 12:18.17, Lauren Ossege (Highlands) 12:29.45. 100 hurdles: Brooke Buckler (Campbell) 17.03, Nicole Goderwis (Brossart) 17.74, Suzi Brown (Brossart) 17.76. 300 hurdles: Rebecca Cline (Campbell) 48.63, Suzi Brown (Brossart) 50.14, Nikki Buller (NCC) 51.30. 4x100: Brossart (Patterson, N. Goderwis, Brown, L. Goderwis) 51.77, NCC (Swope, Buller, Davenport, Seibert) 52.12, Highlands (Kappasser, Reynolds, McDermott, Rath) 56.51. 4x200: Brossart (L. Goderwis, Klump, Martin, Patterson) 1:51.08, Highlands (Kappasser, Etherton, Reynolds, Schenck) 1:58.44, Campbell (Orth, Macke, Lauer, Donoghue) 1:58.57. 4x400: Brossart (Klump, Neiser, L. Goderwis, N. Goderwis) 4:15.33, Campbell (Kitchen, Steele, Buckler, Cline) 4:24.23, NCC (Swope, Schack, Otten, Buller) 4:26.77. 4x800: Brossart (Bertram, Klump, Klocke, Neiser) 10:22.35, Highlands (Gastright, Tracy, L. Ossege, S. Ossege) 10:29.75, NCC (Buller, Lewis, Schack, Lankheit) 10:35.74. High jump: Madison Bertram (Brossart) 5-0, Keyaira Lankheit (NCC) 4-10, Hannah Schenck (Highlands) 4-6. Pole vault: Angela Lauer (Campbell) 8-0, Kristen Spahr (Campbell) 8-0, Chelsea Schack (NCC) 7-6. Long jump: Chandler Cain (NCC) 15-4.5, MIKayla Seibert (NCC) 15-4.25, Hannah Schenck (Highlands) 14-10. Triple jump: Hannah Schenck (Highlands) 33-4.75, Suzi Brown (Brossart) 31-10, Keyaira Lankheit (NCC) 29-2. Shot put: Abbie Lukens (NCC) 36-5, Emily Powell (Brossart) 28-6.5, Larken Laur (25-7.5). Discus: Abbie Lukens (NCC) 105-11, Brooke Kuetemeyer (NCC) 91-2, Larken Laur (Highlands) 72-3.


VIEWPOINTS

APRIL 18, 2013 • FORT THOMAS RECORDER • A9

COMMUNITY

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Editor: Michelle Shaw, mshaw@nky.com, 578-1053

EDITORIALS | LETTERS | COLUMNS | CH@TROOM

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Briede Bill keeps murders in prison

I am responding to a letter to the editor, April 11 issue of the Community Recorder, written by Barbara Briede regarding the death penalty. Once again Mrs. Briede is re-living the terror and loss surrounding the murder of her daughter. She has suffered 20plus years after her daughter’s death. She lost everything that day and very soon – too soon her killer will be up for parole. I stand with Mrs. Briede’s family and friends hoping her killer will never be released. This shows no remorse for what he has done. We can all be selfrighteous about the death penalty but you can’t talk the talk if you haven’t walked the walk. Thanks to Mrs. Briede’s tireless efforts we have the Briede Bill which keeps murderers in prison where they belong, for a very long time. Thank you, Barbara. Carol Wolking Park Hills

Inmates shouldn’t be roaming streets

I can’t believe what I read in a recent Community Recorder. The city of Crestview Hills, a community with almost no crime, will soon have county jail inmates “cleaning up the city, picking up litter.” Starting in May, Kenton County convicted criminals will be receiving a guided tour of Crestview Hills and other communities. The article stated that only non-violent offenders would be used. Shockingly, burglary and breaking and entering are classified as non-violent offenses. As a retired state trooper with more than two decades of law enforcement experience, I know that this decision will affect the safety and security of Crestview Hills and any other residential community involved with the program. I wish our elected officials would think things through before making decisions like this in the name of “saving money.” Call or email Crestview Hills City Hall or local city council members and say “No, I don’t want inmates roaming our streets!” Ric Robinson Crestview Hills

Sad time for library users

Judge Ward’s recent ruling against Campbell County Public Library and Judge Summe’s recent ruling against the Kenton County Public Library leaves citizens, including library patrons, with important questions: Will the judges force the libraries to operate according to a budget set decades ago? Will they force the libraries to lock up their present operating funds and thereby cripple library operations by closing branches and laying off staff? This would be very sad for adults and children who regularly use our libraries. Will those who are associated with Taxed Enough Already be successful with crippling the Boone County Public Library? And after that what will stop them from doing the same in other Kentucky counties or going after other services such as public schools, health services, public transit and supports for seniors and disabled? Final question: Do Recorder

readers have the intestinal fortitude to rescue our libraries by contacting their state legislators and the governor? Steve Roth Highland Heights

Library taxes money well spent

Kenton County Circuit Court Judge Patricia Summe has recently ruled that the Kenton County Public Library has improperly raised its tax since its creation in 1967. My family and I have benefited greatly from this library for some 60 years and consider every one of the tax dollars we paid for the library to have been money very well spent. I urge all Kenton County citizens to let their state representative and senator know the value the library provides to all of us and insist they ensure the Kenton County Public Library is properly funded to continue the excellent work they have been doing. We can only dream of the day when other public agencies provide such valuable services for so few dollars. Ralph Arnsparger Crestview Hills

Outsourcing would be irresponsible

It has been brought to my attention that Villa Hills has plans to outsource the police force to other local cities. As a sevenyear resident of Villa Hills, I have noticed an increase in burglaries and other crime in the past few years. In that same span of time, I have only seen law enforcement a handful of times. Due to the overwhelming amount of crime in our city, I feel that this is an irresponsible decision to outsource our safety to another city. As you know, Villa Hills is known for being affluent and a prime place to live.. My wife and I moved here expecting this to be a “safe” neighborhood to raise our children. Outsourcing our police department will no longer satisfy the comfort and protectiveness that we feel. We rarely see patrols through our neighborhoods, and outsourcing their duties will only add to the problems that have developed in Villa Hills. My own neighbors are already using their own money to fortify their homes with fences, surveillance equipment and security systems. If and when our police duties have been sent to another city, how quickly will it take someone to respond to an emergency when one arises? How often would a patrol be through my neighborhood to deter crime and thefts? As a local resident and voter, my vote will be against the expansion of our police department any further than our current city limits. What I would vote yes on is to see more personnel added to the force to further protect our reputation, and most importantly our families. Lastly, with outsourcing our police to other cities, where would that money go? Would those tax dollars be used for improvements in other areas of Villa Hills? I can think of no better use for that money than to strengthen our own Villa Hills police force. Anthony Izquierdo President of the Orchard Hills Home Owner’s Association

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CommunityPress.com

Library Board good stewards of tax dollars? In a recent article about the ruling in the lawsuit against the Campbell County library board, the attorney for the library stated that the “library board members have been good stewards of taxpayers’ dollars.” I tend to disagree. According to the Campbell County PVA website, beginning in 2007 the Campbell County library board began purchasing parcels of property for a south library branch. In 2007, they purchased 2.254 acres for $450,000 In 2008, they purchased 1.280 acres for $255,000 In 2011, they purchased 1.141 acres for $355,000. That’s a total of $1,060,000 for 4.675 acres of property in southern Campbell County at an average cost of $226,737.96 per acre. In 2002, just five years prior to the libraries’ first purchase of the property, 18.463 acres located directly across the street from the proposed south library branch location, sold for $400,000 or $21,664.95 per acre. The library board paid $205,000.00 more per acre than the property located right across the street. On top of the $1,060,000

that they have paid for the property, the library board has spent thousands on engineering and surveying expenses. They have spent thousands for interior designs for the new building, tens of Kenneth thousands in Moellman Sr. attorney fees COMMUNITY and thousands RECORDER GUEST COLUMNIST more for the reprinting of the property tax bills which had to be reprinted after the proposed 27 percent library tax increase ballot issue failed. They have paid nearly $100,000 to a firm that solicits donations from potential donors. And for the nearly $100,000 fee they paid, they have received only around $140,00 in mostly uncollected pledges. Has the library board really been good stewards of our tax dollars? A number of colleges and universities recently announced that they have recognized the need to change their business models. Their boards have determined that purchasing property and constructing buildings with all of the associated costs are no

longer affordable options. Therefore, they have begun to forgo purchasing property and building new structures and have instead begun to offer degree courses via the Internet. The library board should initiate the process of reducing the number of buildings and employees they currently have and begin to focus on a new business model that improves electronic access to books, publications etc. Activities such as Lego building contests and cupcake baking classes are all fine activities but when did they become the responsibility of public libraries? The library board will become good stewards of our tax dollars when they begin to focus on a future that does not include the construction of another library building and all of the associated costs, both present and future. Another library building is not only unnecessary, it is something that the majority of citizens of Campbell County voted against, do not want and can no longer afford. Kenneth C. Moellman Sr. is a resident of Alexandria.

Library a valuable part of the community You may have heard that Campbell County Circuit Court Judge Julie Reinhardt Ward ruled recently that the library has been improperly adjusting its tax rate since 1979. This issue stirs strong passions with good reason; there simply is a lot is at stake. People on both sides have opinions and are expressing them in forceful language. It’s important to have productive conversations about what the community thinks is valuable. The library has not done anything illegal. We have followed the law and adjusted our tax rate and tax revenues using the same law that all other taxing districts use. The Tea Party and others affiliated with them believe the library has been following the wrong law. On April 1, 2013, Judge Ward ruled in their favor. We plan to appeal that decision. While the Tea Party has raised questions about tax rates, other questions have surfaced that, truthfully, are more important. It’s good to discuss what’s valuable in our communities. We, as taxpayers, should be talking about what’s important to us as individuals, and to us as part of a community. Stripping our communities of what should be valuable is a community decision. Some have said the library’s actions in trying to expand services to southern Campbell were the source of this problem. It was no secret when the library purchased land in 2007 to build a new branch. At the time, the only public input was positive. Times changed, howev-

er. When the national economy deteriorated, the library’s board decided to halt construction. JC Morgan In 2011 when we returned COMMUNITY RECORDER GUEST to the deciCOLUMNIST sion, we held public meetings, and ultimately asked the voters to approve the construction. Sentiments had changed drastically and the people voted no. We, the taxpayers and voters, make these decisions. I can’t see that putting the matter before the public unveils any wrongdoing. You can agree or disagree with the Tea Party’s stance, but they still get to be a part of the conversation. And so do you. Do you think libraries are valuable to your community? Do you think that a library having programs to encourage library usage and literacy is “too much” library? Are having videos and music CDs “too much” library? Are computers and wireless Internet connections “too much” library? The voters said no to the South Branch, but did they say no to having any libraries? The decisions reached this month by the circuit court judges have impact far beyond tax rates. For many communities in Kentucky, library service could simply disappear. For our library, the loss of revenue in returning to a 1978 tax rate would mean a severe and significant loss of services. That’s not rhetoric. It’s a fact.

228 Grandview Drive, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017 654 Highland Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075 phone: 283-0404 email: kynews@communitypress.com web site: www.nky.com

ABOUT LETTERS AND COLUMNS We welcome your comments on editorials, columns, stories or other topics important to you in the Community Recorder. Include your name, address and phone number(s) so we may verify your letter. Letters of 200 or fewer words and columns of 500 or fewer words have the best chance of being published. All submissions may be edited for length, accuracy and clarity. Deadline: Noon Monday E-mail: mshaw@community press.com Fax: 283-7285. U.S. mail: See box below Letters, columns and articles submitted to the Community Recorder may be published or distributed in print, electronic or other forms.

For me, libraries are important. Sure, I work in one, but I also bring home books, videos, music CDs, and download all kinds of e-stuff because the library exists – whether I work in one or not. I go to programs and enjoy them greatly. I take a day off and will hole up in a library space somewhere and just read, listen to music and write. Having easy access to a library is important to me. What does a strong public library mean to you? The Tea Party has their answer. You have the right to yours. JC Morgan has been director of the Campbell County Public Library since 2003. He lives in Cold Spring with his wife Alison and their twin daughters.

Fort Thomas Recorder Editor Michelle Shaw mshaw@nky.com, 578-1053 Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday See page A2 for additional contact information.


A10 • CCF RECORDER • APRIL 18, 2013

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LIFE

THURSDAY, APRIL 18, 2013

COMMUNITY RECORDER

PEOPLE | IDEAS | RECIPES

CVG’S MCGRAW

★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★

★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★

IS ‘BEST BOSS’

By Stephanie Salmons ssalmons@nky.com

H

EBRON — Candace McGraw,

the CEO of Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport since 2011, has, according to employees, created a true family atmosphere at the airport. McGraw was voted Northern Kentucky’s overall top employer by participants in the Community Recorder’s first online Northern Kentucky Best Boss competition. Winners were also named in each of Boone, Campbell and Kenton counties. “She doesn’t just talk the talk, she walks the walk,” McGraw’s nomination letter reads. During her tenure leading CVG, McGraw has overseen the redesign of Concourse A, the relationship with DHL and the arrival of Frontier Airlines, while the airport been recognized for safety and efficiency and was named best regional airport two years in a row, the nomination reads. “All of this is wonderful news for the Cincinnati region, but Candace deserves to be ‘best boss’ not because of these accomplishments, but because of the way she treats her fellow employees,” the letter reads. “She preaches a ‘family’ atmosphere and she backs it up with actions." Staff members say McGraw brings flowers to her assistants or will treat employees to an occasional breakfast

or lunch. McGraw discovered she was nominated after the fact. “It was really a tremendous honor,” she said. “I think the staff here are fabulous. I love working with my colleagues. They are so dedicated to CVG’s mission, dedicated to the community. They treat this airport like their home and that’s the feeling we want to have our passengers feel when they come here.” When she learned she took the top honors, McGraw said she was thrilled. It was meaningful “because I really respect the people with whom I work.” McGraw said she tries to be collaborative in her management. “The folks here are the ones that do all the heavy lifting. I sort of view my job as being a blocker, trying to take any impediments out of their way so they can do their job.” Born and raised in Pittsburgh, McGraw, who lives in Villa Hills, has been at CVG since 2009. The airport, she said, has gone through a “tremendous” amount of change over the last few years. “I think it’s important to let people know their work is valuable and that they are valued in doing that work and that as we’re going through the changes here, we have a goal in sight and they’re a part of that and they’re critical to it, particularly in times of change. Folks need a steadying influence.”

NKY’s

BEST BOSS

Candace McGraw, CEO of Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport, was voted Best Boss of Northern Kentucky in the Recorder’s online contest. AMY SCALF/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

FOUR QUESTIONS WITH CANDACE MCGRAW Candace McGraw, CEO of Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport, was voted Northern Kentucky’s Best Boss in the Community Recorder’s inaugural Best Boss competition. She answered a few questions for the Recorder. Q: Describe your management style in one word. A: Collaborative. Q: What do you think makes you a good boss? A: I try to have good listening skills. I also try to pick up on what’s not being said. I really try to pay attention. I know that we spend the bulk of our quality hours of our day here at work. We spend more time with our colleagues than we do with our families and you want to make it a good working environment. Q: What do you enjoy most about working at CVG? A: I love the people here. We take our work very seriously, but we don’t take each other very seriously. We laugh a lot. We try to make it relaxed, even though it’s very serious work we do in terms of safety, in terms of security, in terms of customer service levels, but we try to have fun doing it. Q: If you weren’t doing this, what would you be doing? A: I’m a lawyer by background and I had worked in Cleveland’s airport system before I came here, but in my next life, if I had to do it all over again, I would open up a gelato stand in Italy, by the Mediterranean.

Dayton principal voted county’s ‘Best Boss’ By Amanda Joering ajoering@nky.com

DAYTON — Rick Wolf, princi-

Dayton High School Principal Rick Wolf is the winner of the Community Recorder's NKY Best Boss competition in Campbell County. AMANDA JOERING/COMMUNITY RECORDER

pal at Dayton High School, has a passion for education and helping his students be successful. This passion is evident to the school’s staff members like Beth Fields-Hunt, who nominated Wolf in the Community Recorder’s first Northern Kentucky Best Boss competition. “Our boss is the glue that holds our school together,” Fields-Hunt said in her nomination letter. Wolf, who oversees the school’s 40 faculty and staff members, has been voted the best boss in Campbell County, a recognition Fields-Hunt thinks is well deserved. As the leader of the school, Fields-Hunt said Wolf is very hands-on when it comes to improving the school and helping the students succeed, even going as far as letting students duct tape him to a wall and shave his head to urge them to do well. He is also very supportive of the school’s teachers, FieldsHunt said.

FOUR QUESTIONS WITH RICK WOLF Rick Wolf, Principal at Dayton High School, was voted as the best boss in Campbell County in the Community Recorder’s inaugural Best Boss competition. He answered a few questions for the Recorder. Q: Describe your management style in one word. A: Supportive. Q: What do you think makes a good boss? A: I would say being someone that listens and sees everyone’s perspective on things. Q: What do you enjoy most about your job? A: Definitely working with the students and making decisions that will benefit them and are in their best interest. Q: If you weren’t doing this job, what would you be doing? A: You mean besides playing shortstop for the Reds? Honestly, I would probably be teaching and coaching.

“I personally love working for Rick because he is never judgmental and is willing to help you improve instead of pointing the finger,” FieldsHunt said. “Rick is truly in it for the kids and makes that evident every morning when he arrives at school.” Wolf, who spent nine years teaching and serving as the school’s dean of students and athletic director before becoming principal four years ago, said Dayton High School was his first job after graduating from Thomas More College. Wolf said right from the

beginning, he enjoyed being at the school so much, he’s never wanted to work elsewhere. “I love this community, the students, the parents, the staff,” Wolf said. “I love seeing the kids grow and be successful.” Wolf said while he is humbled and honored by being voted as the county’s best boss, he feels he is only doing what every principal should, and that’s doing their best to help their staff and students succeed. “I try to give our students every opportunity they can have to be successful and really go to bat for them,” Wolf said.


B2 • CCF RECORDER • APRIL 18, 2013

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD FRIDAY, APRIL 19

ABOUT CALENDAR

Art Exhibits The Life and Works of Harlan Hubbard, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, 1600 Montague Road, Collection of artwork created by local artist and author. Included with admission. 859-491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington. Chris Felix, 11 a.m.-10 p.m., Art on the Levee Gallery, Newport on the Levee, More than 100 paintings with stories of baseball from Cincinnati native and artist. Through May 31. 859-2615770; www.artonthelevee.com. Newport.

To submit calendar items, go to www.NKY.com and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to life@ communitypress.com along with event information. Items are printed on a spaceavailable basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to www.NKY.com and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page.

Civic Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky Freedom Expo 2013, 5:30-9 p.m., Northern Kentucky Convention Center, 1 W. RiverCenter Blvd., Speakers: Brian Thomas, K. Carl Smith and Congressman Thomas Massie. Expo tables include NRA, Young Americans for Liberty, home school groups, authors, patriotic retailers and more. Free, ticket required. Presented by Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky Tea Party. 859-653-2556; cincinnatifreedomexpo.com. Covington.

Drink Tastings

THURSDAY, APRIL 25 Art Exhibits Chris Felix, 11 a.m.-9 p.m., Art on the Levee Gallery, 859-2615770; www.artonthelevee.com. Newport.

Civic

Dogwood Days Dash, 9 a.m., Boone County Arboretum at Central Park, 9190 Camp Ernst Road, 5K run/walk. Registration begins 7:30 a.m. Presented by Boone County Arboretum. For more information, call 859-586-6101 or visit www.finishspot.com. THANKS TO LAURA WOODRUFF Chris Felix, noon-6 p.m., Art on the Levee Gallery, 859-261-5770; www.artonthelevee.com. Newport.

Friday Night in the Aisles Wine Tasting, 4-8 p.m. Feature: Sauvignon Blanc., Party Source, 95 Riviera Drive, Flight of four wines, free of charge. Ages 21 and up. 859-291-4007; www.thepartysource.com. Bellevue. The Turkeys, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., JerZee’s Pub and Grub, 708 Monmouth St., Free. 859-4913500; www.jerzeespub.com. Newport. The Ragbirds, 7 p.m., The Thompson House, 24 E. Third St., $10. 859-261-7469; www.thompsonhousenewport.com. Newport.

On Stage - Comedy Lavell Crawford, 8 p.m. 10:30 p.m., Funny Bone Comedy Club, Newport on the Levee, AfricianAmerican stand-up comedian and actor from St. Louis. Special engagement. No coupons or passes accepted. $25. 859-9572000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

Special Events Spring White Fling Party, 8 p.m.-1 a.m., Newport Syndicate, 18 E. Fifth St., Ballroom. Wear all white apparel. With drink specials. Music by Natural Progression and DJ Vader. $20, $15 advance. 513-226-0316; www.springwhiteparty-eventbrite.com. Newport.

SATURDAY, APRIL 20

Music - DJ Devout Wax, 8 p.m.-1:30 a.m., The Southgate House Revival, 111 E. Sixth St., The Lounge. Vinyl night. Margaret and Jonathan spin eclectic wax. Including an all spin-by-request set, bring your own records. Also, local/regional-only set. Ages 21 and up. Free. 859-4312201; www.facebook.com/ DevoutWax. Newport.

Music - Country

Music - Indie

Music - Rock

Adam Ezra Group, 8 p.m. With Sam Brenner. Doors open 7 p.m., The Southgate House Revival, 111 E. Sixth St., Boston-based roots rock band. $10, $8 advance. 859-431-2201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport.

The Moms, 7 p.m., The Thompson House, 24 E. Third St., $10. 859-261-7469; www.thompsonhousenewport.com. Newport.

On Stage - Student Theater

jams and public performances. Other instruments played include the harmonica, mandolin, ukulele, banjo, guitar, hammer dulcimer and drum. Free. Presented by Hills of Kentucky Dulcimers. 859-654-5678. Cold Spring.

859-652-3849; www.footlighters.org. Newport.

Runs / Walks

New Vega, 7 p.m. With Mama’s Porch., The Thompson House, 24 E. Third St., $10. 859-261-7469; www.thompsonhousenewport.com. Newport.

Family Nurturing Center Blue Ribbon 5K Race, 9-11 a.m., General Cable, 4 Tesseneer Drive, Race to end child abuse. Benefits Family Nurturing Center. $25-$35. Registration required. Presented by Family Nurturing Center. 859-525-3200; www.familynurture.org. Highland Heights. American Heart Association Newport Heart Chase, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Newport on the Levee, 1 Levee Way, To promote healthy living. Families, friends and coworkers uncover clues, solve puzzles and complete challenges. Includes T-shirt, promotional bags with gifts and materials from sponsors, post party and awards ceremony. $50 or $25 with fundraising goal of additional $25. Registration required. Presented by American Heart Association. 859-8151389; honor.americanheart.org/ NewportHC. Newport.

On Stage - Comedy

Schools

Lavell Crawford, 7:30 p.m. 10 p.m., Funny Bone Comedy Club, $25. 859-957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

Knights of Northern Kentucky Scholastic Chess Tournament, 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. price is $25 at the door, may not play first round, Scott High School, 5400 Old Taylor Mill Road, Five-game tournament open to rated and new players. Ages -1-12. $10-$25. Food available for purchase. 859-630-2694; www.knightschess.org. Taylor Mill.

Music - Blues Charlie Parr, 7 p.m., The Southgate House Revival, 111 E. Sixth St., Country blues singer-songwriter and musician. Ages 21 and up. $18, $15 advance. 859431-2201; www.charlieparr.com. Newport.

Music - Indie The Word Alive, 6:30 p.m., The Thompson House, 24 E. Third St., $12. 859-261-7469; www.thompsonhousenewport.com. Newport.

Music - Pop

On Stage - Student Theater

Chris Felix, 11 a.m.-10 p.m., Art on the Levee Gallery, 859-2615770; www.artonthelevee.com. Newport.

Anything Goes, 7:30 p.m., Newport Central Catholic High School, 13 Carothers Road, $8. Registration required. Through April 27. 859-907-0178; www.ncchs.com. Newport.

Clubs & Organizations

On Stage - Theater

Hills of Kentucky Dulcimers Coffeehouse, 1-5 p.m., Immanuel Baptist Church, 1237 Rocky View Drive, Goal of group is to promote mountain dulcimer via instruction, meetings,

And Then There Were None, 8-10 p.m., Monmouth Theatre, $17, $14 students and seniors. 513-479-6783; falcontheater.net. Newport. School House Rock, Live!, 8 p.m., Stained Glass Theatre, $20.

Art Exhibits

Music - Rock Matt Cowherd, 10 p.m., Jefferson Hall, 1 Levee Way, Suite 2118, 859-491-6200; www.jeffersonhall.com. Newport. Lavell Crawford, 7:30 p.m., Funny Bone Comedy Club, $25. 859-957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

The Harlem Globetrotters perform an all-ages show 7 p.m. Friday, April 19, at the Bank of Kentucky Center. Doors at 6 p.m. For more information, visit bankofkentuckycenter.com. GETTY IMAGES

SUNDAY, APRIL 21 Art Exhibits The Life and Works of Harlan Hubbard, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, Included with admission. 859491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

Spaghetti Dinner, 11 a.m.-7 p.m., St. John’s United Church of Christ - Newport, 415 Park Ave., Spaghetti and meatballs, salad, dessert and beverage. Benefits Newport Optimist Club. $7, $3 children. Presented by Newport Optimist Club. 859-815-1389. Newport.

Crawfish/Crab Leg Boil, 2-6 p.m., Bayou Fish House, 527 York St., Authentic Louisianastyle boil. $10.99 per pound for crawfish, $12.99 per pound for crab legs; with corn on the cob, potatoes and sausage. Full menu available. With Gapper from the Cincinnati Reds and music by Lagniappe. Through May 18. 859-491-3474; www.bayoufishhouse.com. Newport.

On Stage - Comedy

On Stage - Theater And Then There Were None, 8-10 p.m., Monmouth Theatre, 636 Monmouth St., Classic murder mystery in the great English style. $17, $14 students and seniors. Presented by Falcon Theater. Through April 20. 513-479-6783; falcontheater.net. Newport. School House Rock, Live!, 8 p.m., Stained Glass Theatre, 802 York St., A pop culture phenomenon takes the stage. Emmy Award-winning Saturday morning cartoon series that taught history, grammar, math, science and politics through clever, tuneful songs is now a stage musical. $20. Presented by Footlighters Inc.. Through May 4. 859-652-3849; www.footlighters.org. Newport. The Sisters of Rosenweig, 8 p.m., Village Players, 8 N. Fort Thomas Ave., By Wendy Wasserstein. Sara Goode, an enormously successful American woman working as the British representative of a major bank is about to celebrate her 54th birthday and she isn’t exactly happy about it. $15. Through April 27. 859-392-0500; www.villageplayers.biz. Fort Thomas.

Benefits

Dining Events

Purses 4 a Purpose, 6:30-10 p.m., Marquise Banquet and Conference Center, 1016 Town Drive, Fundraiser with goal of having more than 300 designer and designer-inspired handbags. Wine and cheese served. Ages 18 and up. Benefits Purses 4 a Purpose, which raises awareness and funds for those charities who are a model for all nonprofits. $20. Presented by Purses 4 a Purpose. 859-491-9191; www.purses4apurpose.com. Wilder.

Dining Events

Music - Rock

Newport.

Campbell County Tea Party Meeting, 7-9 p.m., Campbell County Fiscal Court, 1098 Monmouth St., Open to all political persuasions. Free. Presented by Campbell County Tea Party. 859-781-7591. Newport.

Anything Goes, 7:30 p.m., Newport Central Catholic High School, $8. Registration required. 859-907-0178; www.ncchs.com. Newport.

On Stage - Theater School House Rock, Live!, 2 p.m., Stained Glass Theatre, $20. 859-652-3849; www.footlighters.org. Newport. The Sisters of Rosenweig, 3 p.m., Village Players, $15. 859392-0500; www.villageplayers.biz. Fort Thomas.

MONDAY, APRIL 22 Art Exhibits The Life and Works of Harlan Hubbard, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, Included with admission. 859491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington. Chris Felix, 11 a.m.-9 p.m., Art on the Levee Gallery, 859-2615770; www.artonthelevee.com. Newport.

Karaoke and Open Mic Open Mic, 9 p.m.-2 a.m., The Southgate House Revival, 111 E. Sixth St., The Lounge. Awardwinning open mic features singer-songwriters, comedians, marimba players, storytellers and more. Ages 21 and up. 859-431-2201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport.

Music - DJ Cincinnati DJ Battles, 9 p.m.-2 a.m., Toro on the Levee, 1 Levee Way, Drink specials. Open to all DJs. DJs must register. Ages 21 and up. Free. 859-652-7260; www.torolevee.com. Newport.

TUESDAY, APRIL 23 Art Exhibits The Life and Works of Harlan Hubbard, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, Included with admission. 859491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington. Chris Felix, 11 a.m.-9 p.m., Art on the Levee Gallery, 859-2615770; www.artonthelevee.com.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24 Art Exhibits Chris Felix, 11 a.m.-9 p.m., Art on the Levee Gallery, 859-2615770; www.artonthelevee.com. Newport.

Civic Northern Kentucky Tea Party Special Event, 6:30-8 p.m., Erlanger Branch Library, 401 Kenton Lands Road, Meeting rooms A and B. Speaker: Larry Grathwohl, only FBI informant known to have successfully penetrated the Weather Underground. The Weathermen were group in ’60s and ’70s whose goal was to bring down America. Ages 18 and up. Free. Presented by Northern Kentucky Tea Party, Kenton County. 859-912-0849; www.nkyteaparty.org. Erlanger.

Dining Events Civil War Blue-Gray Benefit Dinner, 6 p.m. Keynote speaker David Mowery presents “Morgan’s Great Raid: The Remarkable Expedition from Kentucky to Ohio.”, Gardens of Park Hills, 1622 Dixie Highway, Cocktail hour and silent auction 6 p.m. Dinner 7 p.m.Benefits James A. Ramage Civil War Museum. $320 table of eight; $80 couple, $45 person. Reservations required. Presented by James A. Ramage Civil War Museum. 859-261-3045. Park Hills.

Music - Pop Clemency, 8 p.m. With the Newbees., The Southgate House Revival, 111 E. Sixth St., $10, $8 advance. 859-431-2201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport.

Music - Cabaret Don Fangman, 6:30-9 p.m., Knotty Pine On The Bayou, 6302 Licking Pike, Don Fangman sings Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, Tony Bennett, Neil Diamond, Michael Buble and Andrea Bocelli. Free. 859-781-2200. Cold Spring. Original Hillbilly Thursdays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m., The Southgate House Revival, 111 E. Sixth St., The Lounge. Country, bluegrass, Americana and old fashioned hillbilly music. Different artist each week. Includes 50 cents off Jack Daniels. Ages 21 and up. Free. 859-431-2201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport.

On Stage - Student Theater Anything Goes, 7:30 p.m., Newport Central Catholic High School, $8. Registration required. 859-907-0178; www.ncchs.com. Newport.

On Stage - Theater School House Rock, Live!, 8 p.m., Stained Glass Theatre, $20. 859-652-3849; www.footlighters.org. Newport. The Sisters of Rosenweig, 8 p.m., Village Players, $15. 859392-0500; www.villageplayers.biz. Fort Thomas.

Recreation Aerial Fitness, 6-7 p.m., Locomotion on the Levee, 1 Levee Way, Work on core body strength and endurance and use aerial equipment for workout. Rigorous course suitable for all fitness levels. Ages 18 and up. $15. Presented by Cincinnati Circus Company. Through July 31. 513-921-5454; www.cincinnaticircus.com. Newport.

Schools NKY/Greater Cincinnati UK Alumni Club Scholarship Recognition and Spring Dinner, 5:45-8:30 p.m., Fort Mitchell Country Club, 250 Fort Mitchell Ave., Guest speaker, Dean Dan O’Hair, senior vice provost for student success, charged with looking at entire student experience and ensure that UK provides best environment for everyone. Scholarship recipients from Northern KY/ Greater Cincinnati to be recognized. $40, $35 members. Registration required. Presented by Northern KY/Greater Cincinnati Alumni Association. 859-8025400; www.ukalumni.net/ annualdinner. Fort Mitchell.


LIFE

APRIL 18, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • B3

Simple yeast roll recipe is great for beginners Mother Nature is letting me know that spring is really here. Looking out my kitchen window into the woods, I see trees budding out and the forsythia is in bloom. That tells me the ground and air are warmer, about 50 degrees or so. My husband Frank got the garden plowed and also plowed gardens for our neighbors, so everyone is eager to start planting. We got most of our root veggies planted, Rita including Heikenfeld potatoes, RITA’S KITCHEN radishes and onions. The salad greens are already popping up, as are the peas. I worked in my herb garden for days hoeing out the chickweed, which is in fact a winter annual. I gave as much to the chickens as they would eat, and I also put some in our salads. Chickweed contains calcium, zinc, iron, vitamins A and C and some B vitamins. Plus it’s an appetite suppressant! Our ancestors happily picked chickweed and dandelion leaves to replace vita-

mins and minerals lost during a meager winter diet devoid of fresh greens. As long as you have a positive identification and the plants are “clean," enjoy them while they are young and tender.

Preheat oven to 375 and bake until light golden, about 11-15 minutes. Brush with butter.

Yeast 101

Regular yeast: For the most part, this needs to be proofed in warm water (105-115 degrees) for several minutes until it starts to foam. Fast/rapid rise/quick yeast: A more aggressive strain that can be mixed in with dry ingredients. It also tolerates higher heat. Step by step photos for rolls: Check out my blog.

Simple yeast rolls

I was trying to make rolls similar to the Hawaiian sweet yeast rolls that you buy. I didn’t quite make it texture wise, but the taste is similar. If you’re new to baking or intimidated by it, try these. I think you’ll be pleased with results. I’m using fast/rapid rise yeast here, not regular yeast. 21⁄4cups flour 1 ⁄4cup sugar 1 package (1⁄4oz.) fast/rapid rise/quick-rise yeast 1 ⁄2teaspoon salt 3 ⁄4cup warm water (120-130 degrees) 3 tablespoons butter, melted, plus extra for brushing on rolls

Combine 11⁄2 cups flour, sugar, yeast and salt. Add water and 3 tablespoons butter and beat on medium speed until smooth, a few minutes. Blend in rest of flour to form soft dough. Knead a few minutes. This makes dough

Andre’s Jarlsberg cheese spread

Give Rita’s simple yeast rolls a try if you are a beginner or intimidated by making homemade rolls. THANKS TO RITA HEIKENFELD

smooth and develops gluten for texture. (Bless the dough by making a cross with your hand. It’s a way to thank the Lord for your abundant blessings). Cover, let rest for 10 minutes. Roll to a 1 ⁄2-inch thick or so, cut with biscuit cutter or glass. You’ll get nine circles of dough if you

use a 21⁄2-inch biscuit cutter. Place 2 inches apart on sprayed cookie sheet. Brush with butter. Cover and let rise in warm place until doubled, about 40-50 minutes.

Bruce Slusher, nationally known equine clinician brings his techniques of equine communication and horsemanship to the Kentucky Cowtown Arena on April 20. Slusher promotes his “Partner-up Horsemanship” with horses, based on respect, safety, confidence and understanding. Slusher is also known for using his horsemanship

skills in major motion pictures and will be featured in the upcoming movie “When the Storm God Rides.” The Northern Kentucky Horse Network is bringing Slusher to the Northern Kentucky area to work with horses and riders. A limited number of horses and riders can participate in group and one-on-one sessions with Slusher at a cost of $115. Spectators are also

welcome at a fee of $25; Northern Kentucky Horse Network members, $15. Join other area horsemen as they learn better communication skills with their equine partners at the facilities of the Kentucky Cowtown Arena, 210 Wainscott Road, Williamstown. The clinic begins at 10 a.m. Registration opens at 9 a.m. Info: 859-240-1749 or 859-742-1116.

MARRIAGE LICENSES Autumn Cassity, 25, of Portsmouth and Brian Crabtree, 24, of London, issued March 11. Deborah Poole, 47, of Cincin-

nati and Russell Bolser Jr., 50, of Hamilton, issued April 3. Tiffany Reinzan, 34, of Cincinnati and James Parker, 36, of

Fort Thomas, issued April 4. Angela Gilbert, 39, of Fort Thomas and Anthony Stewart, 38, of Cincinnati, issued April 5.

10 oz. or so Jarlsberg cheese 1 ⁄2large red onion, 1⁄4-inch dice Mayonnaise to taste

en

Tip from Rita’s kitch-

Jarlsberg is mild, buttery, nutty and slightly sweet.

Can you help?

Eddie Merlot’s “Eddie’s potatoes.” Linda would like a clone for this recipe from this Montgomery, Ohio, restaurant. “Creamy and delicious,” she said.

Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator and author. Find her blog online at Cincinnati.Com/blogs. Email her at columns@communitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-248-7130, ext. 356.

Website Celebration Event

Slusher to share equine techniques Community Recorder

You are the best readers and once again, came to the rescue. If you recall, Kim Martin wanted to make Kroger’s Jarlsberg cheese spread at home. Gail C., a Burlington reader, told me she had asked one of Kroger’s deli employees a couple years ago about the spread and was told it contained just shredded Jarlsberg, mayo and red onion. Andre, another reader, forwarded his version and I’m sharing

that today. He said he and others in his family agree “it is just as good as store bought." Andre grates the cheese with the Cuisinart grating blade. He chops the onion fine (about a 1/4 inch) by hand since Andre feels like hand dicing will result in less liquid onion. Smart tip! Blend together

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LIFE

B4 • CCF RECORDER • APRIL 18, 2013

On your mark, get set ... mow

Question: I overseeded some bare patches in my lawn in March. How soon should I mow the new grass? How high and how often should I mow my lawn? Answer: Mow new grass as soon as it reaches normal mowing height. Generally speaking, mow all lawn grasses often enough to remove no more than onethird to one-half of the grass height. If your mower is set for 2 inches, mow again when grass height reaches approximately 3 inches. Be sure not to scalp the lawn by mowing off most of the green leaves. For tall fescue lawns, a rule of thumb is to mow at five-day inter-

vals during the spring, and at sevenday intervals the rest of the year. If you have a Mike Kentucky Klahr bluegrass HORTICULTURE lawn, a CONCERNS seven-day interval usually is sufficient at a 2.5-inch mowing height. You probably can extend that interval during hot, dry weather. Don’t mow by the calendar. Instead, watch the grass grow, and mow frequently enough to remove no more than one-third to one-half of grass height in any one mowing. The first mowing

makes the lawn look spring-like and very attractive. Subsequent regular mowing hardens the grass for drought and heat stresses later on. So when the first clump of grass grows above the mowing height, mow, even if a lot of the yard doesn’t need to be mowed yet. Not all grasses start growing at the same time. Grass on northern slopes, or in heavy clay soil, will start growing several days later than normal. Grass that wasn’t fertilized in the fall or early spring also has a delayed growth. Following recommendations for mowing height and frequency will make your lawn-

COMING UP » Best Deciduous Trees & Shrubs for Northern Kentucky: 1:30-3:30 p.m. Thursday, April 18, Boone County Extension Office, Burlington. Free, but please call 859-586-6101 to register, or enroll online at www.ca.uky.edu/boone » 5K Run/Walk Dogwood Dash: 9 a.m. Saturday, April 20, Boone County Arboretum, 9190 Camp Ernst Road, Union. Visit www.bcarboretum.org for details.

care duties easier and result in a more attractive yard. If your mower has a fixed, all-year height, set it at 2.5 inches.

However, if you can easily vary the height, set it at 1.5 to 2 inches for the first several times you mow this spring. The shorter mowing height will help remove a lot of the winter-burned, brown grass blades. And by exposing more dark green growth, it will transfigure your lawn into the most uniform, attractive in the neighborhood. Move the height up to 2.5 inches after you mow the grass several times. To protect your grass from summer heat and drought injury, raise the mower height to 3 or 3.5 inches after the weather turns hot. However, remember that high grass, especially tall fescue, tends to fall over and

mat down during hot summer weather, causing increased summer disease problems. In the fall, lower the mowing height to 2.5 inches. For the winter, you might want to lower it again to 1.5 to 2 inches. This shorter height improves the turf’s winter and early spring color. Never let grass go through the winter at a height of 4 or more inches, because it will mat down and become diseased. For tips on how to sharpen your mower blade, search “BooneHortNews” on Facebook. Mike Klahr is the Boone County extension agent for horticulture.

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Community Recorder

The Northern Kentucky University Board of Regents recently approved recommendations to add two new bachelor degrees to its curriculum, bringing the number of offerings at NKU to 62 undergraduate, 19 graduate, 27 graduate certificate, a post-masters in educational leadership, two doctoral programs and a juris doctor. A new B.S. in data science will be initiated this fall through the NKU

College of Informatics. A new B.A. in special education will be offered through the NKU College of Education and Human Services beginning in fall 2014. Both of the new degrees will require 120 classroom hours for completion. Eight new classes will be developed for the data-science degree, and classes for the special education degree are already in place as part of an existing special education certification program.

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Big Sister Barb Deal, of Bellevue, with her Little Sister Ke’Zarah, of Covington, along with Little Sister Briana, of Newport, with her Big Sister Sue Ochsner, of Cold Spring. Deal and Ochsner are paired with the girls through Big Brothers Big Sisters of Greater Cincinnati, and helped them make dresses for young girls as part of the international effort – “Dress A Girl Around The World.” PROVIDED

Big Sisters help Little Sisters help others Community Recorder

When a mutual friend introduced Barb Deal and Sue Ochsner, one of the first things they learned about each other is that they’re both volunteers with Big Brothers Big Sisters of Greater Cincinnati. Deal is from Bellevue and is a Big Sister to 10year old Ke’Zarah, who lives in Covington. Ochsner, of Cold Spring, is Big Sister to 11-year old Briana of Newport. Deal and Ochsner thought it would be a good idea to get the girls togeth-

er and find something meaningful they could all work on. They decided to be part of an international project called “Dress A Girl Around The World.” The idea is to make a dress for a little girl in a foreign country. The quartet made dresses from pillowcases and Ochsner says it may be the only dress the girls who receive them will ever have. “Briana and Ke’Zarah picked the pillowcases, the trim and the pocket design by themselves,” Ochsner said.

“We started off by looking at a CD with pictures of girls in Africa in pillowcases dresses and talked about choices. A person can stand back and do nothing or stand up and do something positive. “We got to work sewing, knowing we were choosing to do something positive.” For Ke’Zarah and Briana, it was a lesson, not just in sewing, but in life. For information about Big Brothers Big Sisters of Greater Cincinnati, go to bigsforkids.org or call 513-421-4120.

Silver Grove church hosts revival

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Community Recorder

Brown Mackie College is a system of over 25 schools. See BMCprograms.info for program duration, tuition, fees and other costs, median debt, federal salary data, alumni success, and other important info. © 2013 Brown Mackie College 3113 Accredited Member, ACICS AC 0150 Licensed by the Kentucky Council on Postsecondary Education, 1024 Capital Center Drive, Suite 320, Frankfort, KY 40601. Licensed by the Ohio State Board of Career Colleges & Schools, 30 East Broad Street, 24th Floor, Suite 2481, Columbus, OH 43215-3138, 614.466.2752. OH Registration #0603-1781T Brown Mackie College – Northern Kentucky is authorized by the Indiana Board for Proprietary Education, 101 West Ohio Street, Suite 670, Indianapolis, IN 46204-1984, 317.464.4400 Ext. 138, 317.464.4400 Ext. 141. NP0413 *The Occupational Therapy Assistant program is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA), located at 4720 Montgomery Lane, Suite 200, Bethesda, MD 20814-3449. ACOTE’s telephone number c/o AOTA is (301) 652-AOTA. Graduates of the program will be eligible to sit for the national certification examination for the occupational therapy assistant administered by the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT). After successful completion of this exam, the individual will be a Certified Occupational Therapy Assistant (COTA). In addition, most states require licensure in order to practice; however, state licenses are usually based on the results of the NBCOT Certification Examination. Note that a felony conviction may affect a graduate’s ability to sit for the NBCOT certification examination or attain state licensure. Brown Mackie College does not guarantee third-party certification/licensing exams. Outside agencies control the requirements for certification/licensing and are subject to change without notification to the College.

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The First Baptist Church of Silver Grove will host a revival Sunday, April 21 through Wednesday, April 24. The Sunday morning service will begin at 10:45 a.m., with a Kids Extravaganza scheduled for 6 p.m., before the evening

service at 7. Evening services Monday through Wednesday will begin at 7 p.m. The evangelist is Bro. Mike Jones of Big Bone Baptist Church; the music leader Jerry Adamson of Leitchfield. Additionally, First Baptist Church celebrates its100th anniversa-

ry, Nov. 17, and as part of its year-long centennial celebration, a centennial tree-planting event is planned for Sunday, April 21, immediately following the morning service. The church is located at 5082 Four Mile Pike. For more information, call 859-250-6130.


LIFE

APRIL 18, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • B5

Clean your fridge Homebuilders name new 2013 officers inside and out

When was the last time you pulled your refrigerator away from the wall to clean behind, beside and under it? Spring is a great time to do some regular cleaning tasks. The refrigerator works 24 hours a day. Your refrigerator is one appliance that uses a lot of energy. Help it work more efficiently by cleaning the dust and grime from the coils. Improve the air circulation around the outside of the appliance by cleaning the space. The coils may be located on the back or under your refrigerator. Carefully clear away the dust, dirt and grime. The coils are designed to remove the heat from the appliance. When they are blocked or clogged they do not work as well and can cause the appliance to work harder. When the refrigerator has to work harder it uses more

appliance to its space, be sure there is plenty of room around and behind it to allow for good air circulation. This will allow the appliance to work more efficiently. Take some time to look what foods and supplies you have stored in the refrigerator and freezer. Is it still useable? Is it out of date? Is it time to toss? Consider purchasing and installing thermometers in both the refrigerator and freezer sections. This handy device will help you keep you food safe. It will also help you know if your appliance is set at the optimal temperatures. The refrigerator should be between 34 and 39 degrees. The freezer should be set at 0 degrees or below.

electricity – adding to your energy bill. Unplug the unit before cleaning Diane the coils. Mason Don’t EXTENSION forget the NOTES extra refrigerator or freezer you have stashed in the basement or garage. It probably needs to be cleaned, too. While you are cleaning, take some time to clean the inside of the refrigerator and freezer. Remove all items from the appliance. You may want to place some items in a cooler if you think they will be out of the refrigerator for very long. Remove the racks and drawers. Wash them and all interior spaces with warm soapy water. Rinse and dry them well before returning them to their space. When returning the

Diane Mason is county extension agent for family and consumer sciences at the Boone County Cooperative Extension Service.

Dulcimer group hosts coffeehouse Hills of Kentucky Dulcimers invites the public to their annual coffeehouse at 1-5 p.m. Saturday April 20, at Immanuel Baptist Church, 1237 Rocky View, Cold Spring (just off the AA Highway

past Alexandria Pike). Hills of Kentucky Dulcimers has approximately 150 members whose goal is promote the mountain dulcimer, Kentucky’s official state instrument, via instruc-

tion, meetings, jams and public performances. Other instruments played include harmonica, mandolin, ukulele, banjo, guitar, hammer dulcimer and drum.

Community Recorder

The Home Builders Association of Northern Kentucky has announced its 2013 officers and directors. The leaders were installed at a Dec. 14 ceremony at the Newport Syndicate. “We are excited about what 2013 holds and what our leadership can do to guide our association as the housing recovery gains steam,” said Brian Miller, executive vice president of the Home Builders Association of Northern Kentucky. “We have accomplished a lot in 2012 including restructuring our board, executive leadership and a good deal of our governance. We have been redesigning the HBA for the 21st century and on top of that are in the midst of drafting our 2013-2016 strategic plan. This group of outstanding leaders is bringing new ideas to the table to make sure that our HBA continues to be one of the

largest, most relevant HBA’s in the nation,” Miller said. Officers for 2013 are: President, Adam Chaney, Terrace Holdings, LLC Vice president, James Kegley, The B.O.L.D. Co. Inc. Secretary/treasurer, Jason Yeager, Ashley Building Immediate past president, Bill Butt, Bill's Remodeling & Electric Inc. Associate president, Desiree Webster, NuVo Technologies Associate vice president, Walt Dunlevy, Forge Lumber The board of directors are: Phil Drees, Terrace Holdings Tom Spille, Spille Builders and Developers Diana DeVore, Guardian Savings Bank Art Fischesser, AllRite Ready Mix Anita Kosco, The Newport Syndicate Patrick Townsend, Patrick’s Custom Hard-

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wood Flooring Inc. Paul Metzger, Land Development Council president, Fischer Homes Pat Parshall, Sales and Marketing Council President, NKY Publishing The mission of the Home Builders Association of Northern Kentucky is to promote and enhance the integrity and visibility of the construction industry and the members of the organization through advocacy, communication, education and political action.

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LIFE

B6 • CCF RECORDER • APRIL 18, 2013

Bring on the rain

NPR favorite coming to the big screen

LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF SPECIAL MEETING OF THE SANITATION DISTRICT NO. 1 BOARD OF DIRECTORS and THE JOINT FISCAL COURTS OF BOONE, CAMPBELL AND KENTON COUNTIES PLEASE TAKE NOTICE of a special meeting of the Sanitation District No. 1 Board of Directors and the Joint Fiscal Courts of Boone, Campbell and Kenton Counties for an orientation session to be presented by SD1 staff to the Fiscal Court members. This meeting will begin at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, April 30, 2013 at Sanitation District No. 1, 1045 Eaton Drive, Ft. Wright, KY 41017. Dinner will be served to Fiscal Court members at 5:30 p.m. The program and orientation will begin at 6 p.m. This meeting is being held for informational purposes only; no action will be taken by the SD1 Board or Fiscal Courts. Chuck Heilman - SD1 Board President Boone County Judge Executive Gary Moore Campbell County Judge Executive Steve Pendery Kenton County Judge Executive Steve Arlinghaus 1757726

There is no more noticeable difference in the world around us than when we have gone without rain for more than a few days. The flowers in our yards can no longer produce the beautiful blooms they were created to produce, the shrubs lose their ability to create solid root systems, and as for the grass, it becomes like straw; colorless and hard. It’s painful to even walk on. For some of us, our lives are like the world around us without rain; we no longer produce the beauty we were created for, we are colorless, hardened, and

including AMC Newport on the Levee and Rave Cinemas Florence. For advance tickets, go to www.wvxu.org. Now in its 15th season, the Peabody Award-winning “Wait Wait…” has an audience of more than 3.2 million listeners weekly on nearly 630 NPR Member public radio stations.

Community Recorder

The National Public Radio news quiz show, “Wait Wait… Don’t Tell Me!” will be broadcast live in select movie theaters, 8 p.m. Thursday, May 2. Cincinnati’s 91.7 WVXU is hosting the event at six local theaters,

LEGAL NOTICE The Dayton Planning & Zoning Commission will hold a public hearing on Wednesday, May 1, 2013, 7:00 P.M. at the Dayton City Building, 514 Sixth Avenue, Dayton, Ky. for the purpose of hearing testimony for the following: FILE NUMBER: 120-13-TXA-01 APPLICANT: City of Dayton REQUEST: Proposed text amendment to the City of Dayton Zoning Ordinance Section’s 154.090 C.1, 154.092 C.1 & 154.093 A: To modify sections of the Zoning Ordinance that restrict the retail sale of firearms. Persons interested in this case are invited to be present. Information concerning this case is available for public inspection at the Campbell County & Municipal Planning & Zoning Office, 1098 Monmouth Street, Suite 343, Newport, KY Monday-Friday during normal business hours. Dennis Redmond /s/__ Date: April 11, 2013 Dennis Redmond Published: April 18, 2013 City Administrator Campbell County Recorder 1001757368 NOTICE OF BOND SALE The Secretary of Fort Thomas Independent School District Finance Corporation, Fort Thomas, Kentucky, will until 11:00 A.M., E.T., on May 1, 2013, receive at the Office of the Executive Director of the Kentucky School Facilities Construction Commission, 229 West Main St., Suite 102, Frankfort, Kentucky 40601, sealed competitive bids for approximately $3,310,000 of the Corporation’s School Building Revenue Bonds, Series 2013, dated May 1, 2013, maturing as to principal in varying amounts on May 1 in the years 2014 through 2033. Bonds maturing on or after May 1, 2024 are subject to redemption prior to their stated maturities on or after May 1, 2023. Electronic bids may be submitted via the BiDCOMP™/PARITY™ system. The Corporation reserves the right to increase or decrease the amount of Bonds to be purchased by the successful bidder by an amount not to exceed $330,000, in increments of $5,000 at the sale price per $1,000 of Bonds; such increase or decrease to be made in any maturity. Sale on tax exempt basis, subject to approving legal opinion of Peck, Shaffer & Williams LLP, Bond Counsel, Covington, Kentucky. Right to reject bids or waive informality reserved. FORT THOMAS INDEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICT FINANCE CORPORATION By: Gene Kirchner, Secretary 1001756781

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Lord. Let us press on to know him. He will respond to us as surely as the arrival of dawn or the coming of rains in early spring.” (Hosea 6:3) There are times in our lives when God knows that only he can satisfy. Times when only he can “rain down” and breathe life back into us. It’s this kind of satisfaction that breathes life back into us and offers hope for the coming days. Are you missing something in your life? Do you need the “rain?” The darkest and driest times in our lives are not the times to call on family, self, friends, drugs, sex, and alcohol (or all the above.) They simply drain and dry us up even more. During the darkest times of life, we are to call out to God, call out to Him and pray for his spirit to “rain down” and saturate our lives. “I pray that God, the source of hope, will fill you completely with joy and peace because you trust in him. Then you will overflow with confident hope through the power of the Holy Spirit.” (Romans 15:13) May you experience a fresh spring “rain” from the Holy Spirit this week.

maneuvering our day to day lives is painful. We are dried Julie House out. Too COMMUNITY much RECORDER GUEST COLUMNIST has been taken from us. Too much has been asked of us. We are used up, worn out, and run down. We can even describe it as feeling dead on the inside. So much has happened in our lives that we feel as though we no longer have the capacity to grow and thrive. Regardless of our ability to grow and thrive, this state of being dead on the inside is still painful, and there is only one thing that can saturate that dry land and bring it back to life. The Bible uses the analogy of spring rain to describe the power and presence of the Holy Spirit in our lives: “Oh that we might know the

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Julie House is a resident of Independence, and founder of Equipped Ministries, a Christian based health and wellness program with a focus on weight loss. She can be reached at 802-8965.

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LIFE

APRIL 18, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • B7

Mudathlon course slated for May 11 Community Recorder

General Butler State Resort Park will host its second Mudathlon – a 3mile, 40-obstacle course

seeking as much natural and muddy terrain as possible – 7:45 a.m. Saturday, May 11. The course is designed for all ability levels.

The advance registration fee is $80, which includes parking, post-race cookout, medal, T-shirt, chip-timed event and much more. Participants

Foundation elects new board chair Community Recorder

After serving the Community Foundation of Northern Kentucky and its predecessor organization for more than 16 years as president and board chair, Charlene Erler, of Hebron, has turned over the gavel to Steve Crawford, of Highland Heights, who is a longtime board member and previously served as treasurer of the board. The Community Foundation provides financial and administration oversight to the Northern Kentucky Children’s Advocacy Center and Adult Day Care of Northern Kentucky. “Charlene has set some high standards to live up to,” Crawford said. “She has done a stellar job as chair, and we’re happy that she is remaining on the board to help guide our future path.” Crawford is managing director for Crawford Insurance, one of the area’s largest independent insurance firms. Crawford is a graduate of Northern Kentucky University and Thomas More College with an MBA from Xavier University. He has achieved insurance industry designations of Certified Insur-

mains as secretary. Two new members joined the board: Mary Rafferty, of Fort Thomas, president and CEO of the Good Samaritan Hospital Foundation, and Rick Daniels, CEO of Furniture Fair. For more information, visit www.cfnky.org.

ance Councilor and Charter Property and Casualty Underwriter. “I am leaving the leadership in very good hands,” Erler said. “Steve will do an outstanding job, and has excellent board and staff support to help him.” During Erler’s 30 years on the board, she guided the organization through its transition from a hospital foundation to a foundation supporting the community as well as providing administrative oversight to services for abused children and disabled adults. Other officers elected at the annual meeting were Dorothy Air, Ph.D., vice chairperson, and Lee Scheben, of Union, treasurer. Nancy Barone, Ed.D., of Melbourne, re-

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LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN BY PROPER ORDER OF THE CAMPBELL DISTRICT COURT THAT THE FOLLOWING WERE APPOINTED FIDUCIARIES OF THE ESTATES LISTED BELOW FOR THE MONTH. ALL PERSONS HAVING A CLAIM AGAINST THE ESTATE SHALL PRESENT THEM VERIFIED ACCORDING TO LAW TO THE FOLLOWING FIDUCIARIES NO LATER THAN SIX MONTHS FROM THE DATE OF OPENING. FIDUCIARY ATTORNEY DECEASED MADELINE WRIGHT PAUL WRIGHT JOHN FISCHER 710 NORWAY PL 308 6TH AVE. OSWEGO, IL 60543 DAYTON, KY 41074 WM. RAPPOLD JOYCE HARDEN GREG KRIEGE 2 PINE HILL DR. 3699 ALEXANDRIA PK. CRESTVIEW, KY 41076 COLD SPRING, KY 41076 DIANE CRISTOFIELD GEORGE CRISTOFIELD PAT WALSH 15 WOODLAWN 319 YORK ST. NEWPORT, KY 41071 NEWPORT, KY 41071 HELEN BARBARA MARY NIEPORTE JANN SEIDENFADEN 3723 RIDGEWOOD CT 122 N FT THOMAS AVE ALEXANDRIA, KY 41001 FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 MICHAEL MAKRAS RENE MAKRAS JANN SEIDENFADEN 4221 LANGLEY AVE. 122 N FT THOMAS AVE. CINCINNATI, OH 45217 FT THOMAS, KY 41075 MILDRED BASTON RICHARD WAAG GREG KRIEGE 1094 RAINTREE DR. 3699 ALEXANDRIA PK MILFORD, OH 45150 COLD SPRING, KY 41076 SHIRLEY PLUMMER STEVEN PLUMMER JENNIFER MCKENZIE 1871 FARMHOUSE WAY 2734 CHANCELLOR DR. ATE 101 ERLANGER, KY 41042 CRESTVIEW, KY 41071 CYNTHIA BRUCATO 763 WOODVIEW CT. EDGEWOOD, KY 41017 TAUNYA NOLAN JACK CAMPBELL CIRCUIT CLERK BY: CK. WASSER, DEPUTY CLERK CAMPBELL DISTRICT COURT PROBATE COURT 1757205

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LIFE

B8 • CCF RECORDER • APRIL 18, 2013

POLICE REPORTS ALEXANDRIA Arrests/citations Tyrone Hopkins, 40, 16 Panorama Drive, DUI - aggravated circumstances - first offense at 16 Panorama Drive, March 15. Kayla M. Pursell, 18, 933 State Route 133, theft by unlawful taking or shoplifting at 6711 Alexandria Pike, March 11. Melissa D. Campbell, 40, 635 Turner Road, DUI - second offense, operating on suspended or revoked operators license, possession of drug paraphernalia at 5710 Alexandria Pike, March 16. William K. McCormick, 24, 696 Clay Ridge Road, failure to produce insurance card, rear license not illuminated, DUI aggravated circumstances second offense at Pete Neiser St., March 13.

Holley R. Smith, 23, 19 Maysville Ave., speeding, failure to produce insurance card, operating on suspended or revoked operators license, first degree possession of controlled substance - cocaine, possession of drug paraphernalia at AA Highway, March 14.

Incidents/investigations Fourth-degree assault domestic violence, second-degree unlawful imprisonment, theft by unlawful taking, third-degree terroristic threatening Reported at at Apple Blossom Lane, March 6. Missing persons Report of juvenile Campbell County Day Treatment student seen running away after stepping of school bus at 51 Or-

ABOUT POLICE REPORTS The Community Recorder publishes the names of all adults charged with offenses. The information is a matter of public record and does not imply guilt or innocence.

chard Lane, March 5. Second-degree burglary Report of hardware store forcibly entered while closed and six chainsaws taken at 8235 Alexandria Pike, March 7. Theft by unlawful taking Report of satchel with passports and credit cards taken from vehicle at 7 Saddle Ridge Trail, March 9. Report of copper pipe taken from foreclosed building at 9261 Alexandria Pike, March 8. Report of iPod reported taken found in juvenile's possession at 8000 Alexandria Pike, March 15. Theft by unlawful taking -

gasoline Report of gas drive-off without paying at 9242 Alexandria Pike, March 5.

BELLEVUE Arrests/citations Andrea Hunt, 21, 4 Kuchle Drive, first-degree possession of a controlled substance, tampering with physical evidence, possession of drug paraphernalia at Fairfield Avenue, March 30. Orville Brown, 41, 1637 Hughes St., Apt. 910, first-degree possession of a controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia, first-degree trafficking a controlled substance at Fairfield Avenue, March 30. Kevin Walters, 20, 920 1/2 Washington Ave. No. 12, thirddegree burglary, third-degree unlawful transaction with a minor at 10 Donnermeyer Drive, March 31. Roger Brewer Jr., 30, 11 Bustetter Drive, fourth-degree assault, possession of drug parapherna-

INVITATION TO BID Date: April 18, 2013 PROJECT: Columbia, Prospect, & E. 2nd Street Water Main Replacement City of Newport, Campbell County, Kentucky SEALED BIDS WILL BE RECEIVED AT: Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) 2835 Crescent Springs Road P.O. Box 18640 Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 UNTIL:

Date: May 2, 2013 Time: 9:00 AM (Local Time)

At said place and time, and promptly thereafter, all Bids that have been duly received will be publicly opened and read aloud. The proposed Work is generally described as follows: Construction of approximately 530 linear feet of 8" PVC water main, 330 linear feet of 6" PVC water main, and 255 linear feet of 4" ductile iron water main together with the appurtenances and related work along Columbia Street {9th to 10th St.}, Prospect Street, and E. 2nd Street {Park Ave. to the east end} in the City of Newport, Camp bell County, Kentucky. All Bids must be in accordance with the Instructions to Bidders and Contract Documents on file, and available for examination at: Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) 2835 Crescent Springs Road Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 Or James W. Berling Engineering, PLLC 1671 Park Road, Suite One Fort Wright, Kentucky 41011 Phone: (859) 331-9191 Copies of the Bidding Documents may be obtained from the office of James W. Berling Engineering, PLLC at the address indicated herein. Charges for all documents obtained will be made on the following basis: Charge Complete set of Bidding Documents $ 40.00 Mailing and Handling (U.S. Mail) (if request ed) $ 15.00 Charges for Bidding Documents and mailing and handling, if applicable, will not be refund ed. Bids will be received on a unit price and/or lump sum basis as described in the Contract Documents. Bid security, in the form of a certified check or a Bid Bond (insuring/bonding company shall be rated "A" by AM Best) in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the maximum total bid price, must accompany each Bid. The Successful Bidder will be required to furnish a Construction Payment Bond and a Construction Performance Bond (insuring /bonding company shall be rated "A" by AM Best) as security for the faithful performance of the contract and the payment of all bills and obligations arising from the performance of the Contract. Contractor and all Subcontractors will be required to conform to the labor standards set forth in the Contract Documents. This project does not fall under the provisions of KRS 337.505 to 337.550 for prevailing wage rates. Evaluation of Bids and the awarding of a final contract are subject to the recipro cal preference for Kentucky resident bidders pursuant to KRS 45A490 to 45A.494 and (KAR 200 5:400). Owner reserves the right to reject any or all Bids, including without limitation the right to reject any or all nonconforming, nonresponsive, incomplete, unbalanced, or conditional Bids, to waive informalities, and to reject the Bid of any Bidder if Owner believes that it would not be in the best interest of Owner to make an award to that Bidder. Owner also reserves the right to negotiate with the apparent qualified Bidder to such an extent as may be determined by Owner. Minority Bidders are encouraged to bid. Bids shall remain subject to acceptance for 60 days after the day of bid opening or for such longer period of time to which a Bidder may agree in writing upon request of the Owner. If a Contract is to be awarded, the Owner will give the successful Bidder a Notice of Award during the period of time during which the successful Bidder’s bid remains subject to acceptance. Richard Harrison, Vice President of Engineering, Water Quality, & Production Northern Kentucky Water District 7498

INVITATION TO BID April 18, 2013 PROJECT: Waterworks Road and U.S. 27 Pump Stations Variable Frequency Drive (VFD) Replacement Project SEALED BIDS WILL BE RECEIVED AT: Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) 2835 Crescent Springs Road P.O. Box 18640 Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 UNTIL: Date: May 7, 2013 Time:due by: 10:00 a.m., local time. At said place and time, and promptly thereafter, all Bids that have been duly received will be publicly opened and read aloud. The proposed Work is generally described as follows: Removal of two existing 500 HP, 480 volt variable frequency drives at the Waterworks Road Pump Station and furnish and install two new variable frequency drive units to match existing equipment ready for service and the removal of one existing 350 HP, 480 volt motor starter at the U.S. 27 Pump Station and furnish and install one new variable frequency drive unit to match existing equipment ready for service. The work shall also include the successful startup and testing of each unit and all necessary operational training to Northern Kentucky Water District staff. All Bids must be in accordance with the Documents on file, and available for examination at: Northern Kentucky Water District 2835 Crescent Springs Road Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 Copies of the Bidding Documents may be obtained from the Water District’s office at the address indicated herein by contacting Denise Manning at (859) 426-2718. There is no charge for these documents. For inspection of the site and any questions on the Waterworks Road VFD Replacement Project please contact Dave Enzweiler, Pumping Supervisor at (859) 547-3265. Bids will be received on a lump sum basis as described in the Contract Documents basis as described in the Contract Documents. Bid security, in the form of a certified check or a Bid Bond (insuring/bonding company shall be rated "A" by AM Best) in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the maximum total bid price, must accompany each Bid. The Successful Bidder will be required to furnish a Construction Payment Bond and a Construction Performance Bond (insuring/bonding company shall be rated "A" by AM Best) as security for the faithful performance of the contract and the payment of all bills and obligations arising from the performance of the Contract. Contractor and all Subcontractors will be required to conform to the labor standards set forth in the Contract Documents. This project does not fall under the provisions of KRS 337.505 to 337.550 for prevailing wage rates. Evaluation of Bids and the awarding of a final contract are subject to the reciprocal preference for Kentucky resident bidders pursuant to KRS 45A.490 to 45A.494 and (KAR 200 5:400). Owner reserves the right to reject any or all Bids, including without limitation the right to reject any or all nonconforming, non-responsive, incomplete, unbalanced, or conditional Bids, to waive informalities, and to reject the Bid of any Bidder if Owner believes that it would not be in the best interest of Owner to make an award to that Bidder. Owner also reserves the right to negotiate with the apparent qualified Bidder to such an extent as may be determined by Owner. Minority Bidders are encouraged to bid. Bids shall remain subject to acceptance for 60 days after the day of bid opening or for such longer period of time to which a Bidder may agree in writing upon request of the Owner. If a Contract is to be awarded, the Owner will give the successful Bidder a Notice of Award during the period of time during which the successful Bidder’s bid remains subject to acceptance. Richard Harrison, Vice President of Engineering, Water Quality & Production Northern Kentucky Water District 7378

lia at 114 Memorial Parkway, March 13. Cheryl Kleinfelter, 24, 8510 West Tr. 96, DUI at I-471 north ramp, March 14. Andrew Bowman, 27, 1622 Vine St., alcohol intoxication in a public place, second-degree disorderly conduct at I-471 north ramp, March 14. Heather Veeneman, 20, 6753 Eleck Place, DUI at I-471 north ramp, March 15. Donald Akers, 40, 114 Memorial Parkway No. 5, second-degree disorderly conduct at 114 Memorial Parkway, March 16. Lauren Doyle, 21, 831 Gilcrest Lane, careless driving, DUI at Sixth Avenue, March 21. Timothy Ashcraft, 37, 1208 Fifth Ave., possession of marijuana at Fairfield Avenue, March 22. Alicia Turner, 35, 1204 Seventh Ave., Apt. 2, operating a motor vehicle on a suspended license, second-degree disorderly conduct at Berry Avenue, March 23. Darrin Becker, 51, 10917 Pleasant Ridge Road, DUI at 600 block of Fairfield Avenue, March 29. Sarah Thaxter, 31, 2545 Cleinview Ave. Floor 1, DUI at Fairfield Avenue, March 30. Joshua Howard, 31, 233 Washington St., warrant at 233 Washington St., March 15. Axel Dance, 30, 314 West 12th St., warrant at Fairfield Avenue, March 22. Alicia Turner, 35, 1204 Seventh Ave. Apt. 2, warrant at Berry Avenue, March 23. Eric Allen Jourdan, 45, 711 Fairfield Ave. No. 203, warrant at 200 block of Eighth, March

25. Christopher McGovney, 25, Homeless, warrant at 616 Poplar St., March 25.

CAMPBELL COUNTY Arrests/citations Misty D. Daulton, 34, 442 Gilbert Ridge Road, warrant at 442 Gilbert Ridge Road, March 8. Matthew D. Nelson, 31, 9565 Washington Trace Road, warrant at East Alexandria Pike, March 8. Anthony C. Campbell, 31, 1101 Monterey Lane, Unit 301, warrant at Martha Layne Collins Blvd., March 9. Michael E. Morency, 29, 316 Brookwood Drive, failure to or improper signal, DUI - aggravated circumstances - first offense at Alexandria Pike and Trapp Court, March 9. Benjamin D. Malott, 36, 8039 Shelby St., warrant at KY 9 and Washington Trace, March 10. Rhonda M. Wilson, 39, 2872 Montana Ave. Unit 37, DUI aggravated circumstances - first offense, license to be in possession at 9700 Alexandria Pike, March 11.

Incidents/investigations Harboring a vicious animal Report of man harboring vicious dog that bit woman at Herringer Road, March 10. Theft by unlawful taking theft of service Report of apartment burglarized and electric service used without authorization at 1045

See POLICE , Page B9

INVITATION TO BID April 18, 2013 PROJECT: Asphalt Restoration Milling and Paving for the District’s Service Area SEALED BIDS WILL BE RECEIVED AT: Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) 2835 Crescent Springs Road P.O. Box 18640 Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 UNTIL:

Date:May 2, 2013 Time: 10:00 a.m., local time

At said place and time, and promptly thereafter, all Bids that have been duly received will be publicly opened and read aloud. The proposed work is generally described as follows: Completion of restoration of asphalt surfaces in the District’s service area through the issuance of Work Orders over a six-month period. The restoration Work includes the milling and paving of approximately 12,000 square feet of areas where water main repair work was performed by the Northern Kentucky Water District in accordance with specifications prepared by the District. Approximately 30,000 additional square feet of Work is expected to be added to this contract, but is not guaranteed. Payment to the Successful Bidder shall be based on the actual quantities of work requested by the District and successThe bid prices shall refully completed. main in effect for the full term of the contract, regardless of the quantity of work, beginning June 1, 2013. All Bids must be in accordance with the Bidding Documents on file, and available for examination at: Northern Kentucky Water District, 2835 Crescent Springs Road, Erlanger, Kentucky. Copies of the Bidding Documents may be obtained from the office at the address indicated herein by contacting Denise Manning at (859) 426-2718. There will be no charge for these documents. Questions concerning the Work should be directed to Rusty Collinsworth at (859) 547-1263. Bids will be received on a unit price basis as described in the Contract Documents. Owner reserves the right to reject any or all Bids, including without limitation the right to reject any or all nonconforming, non-responsive, incomplete, unbalanced, or conditional Bids, to waive informalities, and to reject the Bid of any Bidder if Owner believes that it would not be in the best interest of Owner to make an award to that Bidder. Owner also reserves the right to negotiate with the selected Bidder to such an extent as may be determined by Owner. Evaluation of Bids and the awarding of a final contract are subject to the reciprocal preference for Kentucky resident bidders pursuant to KRS 45A.490 to 45A.494 and (KAR 200 5:400). Each Bid must contain evidence of Bidder’s qualifications to transact business in the State of Kentucky or covenant to obtain such qualifications prior to award of the Contract. The Bidder’s Organization Number from the Kentucky’s Secretary of State and principal place of business as filed with Kentucky’s Secretary of State must be included where applicable. Minority Bidders are encouraged to bid. Bids shall remain subject to acceptance for 60 days after the day of bid opening. Richard Harrison, V.P. Engineering and Water Quality & Production Northern Kentucky Water District

7434


LIFE

APRIL 18, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • B9

POLICE REPORTS Continued from Page B8 Rockyview Drive, March 7. Theft by unlawful taking, third-degree assault of a school employee or volunteer, third-degree assault of police or probation officer Report of juvenile took counselor's electronic thumb drive and kicked officer and teacher while attempting to flee at 909 Camel Crossing, March 8.

FORT THOMAS Arrests/citations Timothy Varney, 36, 3460 Ridgewood Drive, warrant at I-471, April 8. Roberto Mendoza, 44, 30 Ohio Ave. Apt. 1, warrant at 900 Highland Ave., April 8. Michael Turpin, 21, 3611 Dell St., warrant at Alexandria Pike, March 29. Joshua Hughes, 21, 1512 Highway 177 West, warrant at Waterworks Road, March 31. Anthony Osborne, 25, 422 Berry Ave., DUI, possession of open alcohol container in a motor vehicle at I-471, March 29. Patrick Kunkel, 54, 825 Saratoga Apt. 2, warrant at North Fort Thomas Avenue, March 29. Michael Kuhr, 41, 503 Covert Run Pike, third-degree assault, alcohol intoxication in a public place at Grand Avenue, April 1. Amber Graves, 29, 13 Southview, DUI, leaving the scene of an accident, third-degree criminal mischief, failure to maintain insurance at Grandview Avenue at South Fort Thomas Ave., April 1. Kellie Stinson, 38, 2520 Harrison Ave. Apt. 8, first-degree possession of a controlled substance, possession of marijua-

na, possession of drug paraphernalia at 2611 Alexandria Pike, April 2. Eddie Butts Jr., 37, 112 Glenwood Drive, possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia, trafficking in marijuana, first-degree trafficking a controlled substance, first-degree possession of a controlled substance, possession of a firearm by a convicted felon at 2611 Alexandria Pike, April 2. Kelly Noble, 39, 36 Woodland Hills Drive No. 3, warrant at Moock Road, March 28.

Incidents/investigations Theft by failure to make required disposition of property At 97 Crescent Ave. South, April 5. Theft by unlawful taking At 30 Cemetery Ridge, April 6. At 2517 Alexandria Pike, April 9. At 5 Riverview Ave., March 29. At 880 Alexandria Pike, March 30. At 1025 South Fort Thomas Ave., March 29. Theft of identity At 220 North Fort Thomas Ave., April 7.

NEWPORT Arrests/citations Adan Benjamin Simon De Leon, 20, 417 West 11th St., seconddegree criminal possession of a forged instrument at 1102 Columbia St., April 7. Ashley Mitchell, 27, 4338 Shady Hollow Lane, first-degree possession of a controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia, public intoxication, third-degree possession of a controlled substance at 130 Pavilion Parkway, April 7. Matthew Best, 20, 2068 Dean

DEATHS Road, first-degree possession of a controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia at 160 Pavilion Parkway, March 30. Artnisha Jones, 23, 650 Neave St. Apt. 625, second-degree criminal possession of a forged instrument at 110 Pavilion Parkway, March 29. John Phillips Jr., 35, 842 Patterson, theft by unlawful taking at 100 East Fifth St., March 27. Ryan Moffitt, 28, 280 Secretariat Court, first-degree possession of a controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia at I-471 north ramp, April 2. Margarite Cordova, 23, 53 Bluegrass Ave., first-degree possession of a controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia at I-471 north, April 2. Randy Gunn, 39, 319 West 10th St. Apt. 2, first-degree possession of a controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia at I-471 north, April 2.

Incidents/investigations Fourth degree assault At 301 Riverboat Row, March 16. Theft by unlawful taking At 501 West 11th St., March 27. Theft of motor vehicle registration plate At 1 Levee Way, April 5.

Richard Baker Richard I. “Dick” Baker, 80, of Highland Heights, died April 7, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. Baker was an Air Force veteran of the Korean War, member of the 1st Baptist Church in Cold Spring, and a Kentucky Colonel. His granddaughters, Jacqualine and Jennifer, died previously. Survivors include his wife, Rose Baker; daughter, Pamela Dollens; son, Johnny Apadaca; sister, Marcia Romines; brother, Louis Baker; four grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.

Mary Bloemer Mary Lou Jolly Bloemer, 82, of Covington, died April 10, 2013, at Rosedale Green Manor in Latonia. She was a retired sales clerk for Ideal Shoe Store in Covington, former sales clerk for Covington Car Barn, member of Flemmingsburg Christian Church, a Kentucky Colonel, and enjoyed betting on and attending horse races, and playing the lottery. Her husband, Franklin A. Bloemer, and daughter, Brenda Ashcraft, died previously. Survivors include her son, Frankie Bloemer of Covington; daughters, Chena Campbell of Covington, and Anita Baker of Independence; three grandchildren and three great-grand-

A Public Hearing will be conducted by the City of Highland Heights Council on Tuesday, May 07, 2013 at 7:00 p.m., at the Civic Center 176 Johns Hill Road for the purpose of obtaining written or oral comments of the citizens regarding possible use of Municipal Aid Road Funds. The City expects to receive approximately $160,000.00 during Fiscal Year 20132014. All interested person/s and organizations in Highland Heights are invited to the Public Hearing to submit oral or written comments on the possible use of the Municipal Aid Road Funds. These funds will be used for the construction, re-construction, maintenance or repair of City streets. Any person/s, especially senior citizens, who cannot submit a written statement or attend the Public Hearing, should call the City Building at 859-441-8575 so arrangements can be made to secure their comThe City Building is open from ments. 9:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday. Immediately following the Public Hearing, the regular monthly Council meeting will begin. Gregory V. Meyers Mayor

INVITATION TO BID April 18, 2013 PROJECT: Portable/Mobile Cellular Type Phone Equipment and Service

Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) 2835 Crescent Springs Road P.O. Box 18640 Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 UNTIL: Date: May 2, 2013 Time: 10:30 a.m., local time

INVITATION TO BIDDERS LEGAL NOTICE SEALED PROPOSALS will be received by the City of Newport, Kentucky, in the Office of the City Clerk located at 998 Monmouth Street, Newport, Kentucky, 41071, until two o’clock (2:00) p.m., on Wednesday May 1, 2013 and then publicly opened and read aloud in the Multi-Purpose Room, 1st Floor of the Newport Municipal Building for the: "Annual Supplies Bid 2013". Copies of the Specification Documents may be obtained or examined in the Office of the City Clerk, 998 Monmouth Street, Newport, Kentucky 41071. Pursuant to specifications on file in the Office of the City Clerk of the City of Newport two copies of proposals are to be submitted in a sealed envelope labeled as follows: "Annual Supplies Bid 2013". Successful vendor must be an Equal Employment Opportunity Employer, which prohibits discrimination because of race, creed, color, national origin, sex, age, handicap, political affiliation or beliefs. The City of Newport is an Equal Employment Opportunity Employer. In addition, the successful vendor must obtain an Occupational License from the City Finance and Administration Department prior to commenc ing work. The City of Newport will award the contract to the lowest responsible vendor. The City reserves the right to reject any or all proposal and to waive any informalities or irregularities in the proposals received. Any and all questions dealing with this proposal should be reduced to writing and faxed to Amy Able, City Clerk at (859) 292-3668 or emailed to aable@newportky.gov.

At said place and time, and promptly thereafter, all Bids that have been duly received will be publicly opened and read aloud. The proposed services are generally described as follows: The Northern Kentucky Water District is interested in receiving bids for approximately 141 cellular type phones and related service for a 12-month period beginning August 1, 2013 with the option to renew annually up to a total of 60 months. The District’s service area is Campbell and Kenton Counties in Kentucky in their entirety and portions of eastern Boone County, Kentucky. Coverage will primarily be needed within the service area but travel to the north and south of the service area is common. As part of their Bid, Bidders shall submit three (3) phones/batteries of the exact make and model specified in its bid for testing of coverage area. These phones will be returned to the Bidders upon completion of the test which will not exceed 14 calendar days after the Bid Opening. The District will pay the rate specified in the bid for all minutes used during testing. The District currently has 141 lines and uses approximately 40,000 peak minutes per month. All Bids must be in accordance with the Instructions to Bidders and the Contract Documents on file, and available for examination at: Northern Kentucky Water District, 2835 Crescent Springs Rd., Erlanger, Kentucky 41018. Copies of the Bidding Documents may be obtained from the office at the address indicated herein by contacting Denise Manning at (859) 426-2718. There is no charge for these documents. Questions concerning this bid should be directed to Chris Bryant at (859) 426-2708. Bids will be received on a unit price basis as described in the Contract Documents. Owner reserves the right to reject any or all Bids, including without limitation the right to reject any or all nonconforming, non-responsive, incomplete, unbalanced, or conditional Bids, to waive informalities, and to reject the Bid of any Bidder if Owner believes that it would not be in the best interest of Owner to make an award to that Bidder. Owner also reserves the right to negotiate with the selected Bidder to such an extent as may be determined by Owner. Evaluation of Bids and the awarding of a final contract are subject to the reciprocal preference for Kentucky resident bidders pursuant to KRS 45A.490 to 45A.494 and KAR 200 5:400. Each Bid must also contain evidence of Bidder’s qualifications to transact business in the State of Kentucky or covenant to obtain such qualifications prior to award of the Contract. The Bidder’s Organization Number from the Kentucky’s Secretary of State and principal place of business as filed with Kentucky’s Secretary of State must be included where applicable. Minority Bidders are encouraged to bid. Bids shall remain subject to acceptance for 60 days after the day of bid opening.

CITY OF NEWPORT, KENTUCKY Amy Able, City Clerk 1001756858

Jack Bragg, C.F.O . Northern Kentucky Water District 1757425

PUBLISH: CAMPBELL COUNTY RECORDER 04-18-2013

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June Bridges June Youtsey Bridges, 85, of Fort Thomas, and Fort Myers, Fla., died April 6, 2013. She graduated from Highlands High School in 1945 as class valedictorian, was active in

the Miami University Delta Gamma Sorority, graduated from the University of Cincinnati in 1958, taught four years at Campbell County High School, taught 24 years at Highlands High School, and was an avid golfer. Her husband, William “Bill” Clark Bridges Jr., and sisters,

See DEATHS, Page B10

ABOUT OBITUARIES Basic obituary information and a color photograph of your loved one is published without charge by The Community Press. Please call us at 283-0404 for more information. To publish a larger memorial tribute, call 513-2424000 for pricing details. For the most up-to-date Northern Kentucky obituaries, click on the “Obituaries” link at NKY.com.

INVITATION TO BID Date: April 18, 2013 PROJECT: Pleasant Ridge Avenue Phase II Water Main Replacement City of Fort Mitchell, Kenton County, Kentucky SEALED BIDS WILL BE RECEIVED AT: Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) 2835 Crescent Springs Road P.O. Box 18640 Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 UNTIL: Date: May 1, 2013 Time: 10:00 AM (Local Time)

SEALED BIDS WILL BE RECEIVED AT:

CITY OF HIGHLAND HEIGHTS, KY PUBLIC HEARING MUNICIPAL AID ROAD FUND PROPOSED USE HEARING

children. Memorials: Alzheimer’s Association, 644 Linn St., Suite 304, Cincinnati, OH 45203.

At said place and time, and promptly thereafter, all Bids that have been duly received will be publicly opened and read aloud. The proposed Work is generally described as follows: Construction of approximately 1,350 linear feet of 8" PVC water main together with the appurtenances and related work along Pleasant Ridge Avenue {house #100 to house #152} in the City of Fort Mitchell, Kenton County, Kentucky. All Bids must be in accordance with the Instructions to Bidders and Contract Documents on file, and available for examination at: Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) 2835 Crescent Springs Road Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 Or Bayer Becker, Inc. 209 Grandview Drive Fort Mitchell, Kentucky 41017 Phone: (859) 261-1113 Copies of the Bidding Documents may be obtained from the office of Bayer Becker, I n c . at the address indicated herein. Charges for all documents obtained will be made on the following basis: Charge Complete set of Bidding Documents $ 35.00 Mailing and Handling (U.S. Mail)(if requested $ 15.00 Charges for Bidding Documents and mailing and handling, if applicable, will not be refunded. Bids will be received on a unit price and/or lump sum basis as described in the Contract Documents. Bid security, in the form of a certified check or a Bid Bond (insuring/bonding company shall be rated "A" by AM Best) in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the maximum total bid price, must accompany each Bid. The Successful Bidder will be required to furnish a Construction Payment Bond and a Construction Performance Bond (insuring/bonding company shall be rated "A" by AM Best) as security for the faithful performance of the contract and the payment of all bills and obligations arising from the performance of the Contract. Contractor and all Subcontractors will be required to conform to the labor standards set forth in the Contract Documents. This project does not fall under the provisions of KRS 337.505 to 337.550 for prevailing wage rates. Evaluation of Bids and the awarding of a final contract are subject to the reciprocal preference for Kentucky resident bidders pursuant to KRS 45A490 to 45A.494 and (KAR 200 5:400). Owner reserves the right to reject any or all Bids, including without limitation the right to reject any or all nonconforming, non-responsive, incomplete, unbalanced, or conditional Bids, to waive informalities, and to reject the Bid of any Bidder if Owner believes that it would not be in the best interest of Owner to make an award to that Bidder. Owner also reserves the right to negotiate with the apparent qualified Bidder to such an extent as may be determined by Owner. Minority Bidders are encouraged to bid. Bids shall remain subject to acceptance for 60 days after the day of bid opening or for such longer period of time to which a Bidder may agree in writing upon request of the Owner. If a Contract is to be awarded, the Owner will give the successful Bidder a Notice of Award during the period of time during which the successful Bidder’s bid remains subject to acceptance. Richard Harrison, Vice President of Engineering, Water Quality, & Production Northern Kentucky Water District 7490


LIFE

B10 • CCF RECORDER • APRIL 18, 2013

DEATHS Continued from Page B9 Mildred Downard and Evelyn Baker, died previously. Survivors include her son, W. Charles Bridges of Naples, Fla. and Marblehead, Mass.; and granddaughters, Courtney Bridges and Sarah Bridges of Marblehead, Mass. A memorial service will be 9:30 a.m. Saturday, May 25, at the chapel at Evergreen Cemetery in Southgate Kentucky. Memorials: Hope Hospice HealthCare Services, 9740 HealthPark Circle, Fort Myers, FL 33908.

Geneva Field Geneva Frances Yelton Field, 80, of Alexandria, died April 11, 2013, at Highland Spring Nursing Home in Fort Thomas. Her brother, William Yelton

Jr., died previously. Survivors include her husband, Donald; daughters, Deborah Wilson and Denise Hisel; son, Douglas Field; brother, Robert Yelton; sister, Carolyn Wright; five grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. Interment was at Alexandria Cemetery. Memorials: Main Street Baptist Church, 11093 Alexandria Pike, Alexandria, KY 41001.

Elizabeth Frentzel Elizabeth J. “Betty” Frentzel, 89, of Fort Thomas, died April 8, 2013, at the Baptist Convalescent Home. Her husband, Theodore, died previously. Survivors include her children, Bonita Frentzel, Ted Frentzel, and Don Frentzel; brother, Paul Stratton; special friend, Mildred

INVITATION TO BID Date: April 18, 2013 PROJECT: Morris Place & Glazier Road Water Main Replacement City of Fort Wright, Kenton County, Kentucky SEALED BIDS WILL BE RECEIVED AT: Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) 2835 Crescent Springs Road P.O. Box 18640 Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 UNTIL:

Hedger; six grandchildren and 12 great-grandchildren. Memorials: Shriners Hospital, 3229 Burnet Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45229-3095.

Caroline Giglia Caroline Stroetz Giglia, 92, of Fort Thomas, died April 7, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. She was an accomplished musician, playing the clarinet with many Big Bands and the Northern Kentucky Symphony Orchestra, and was a member of the Prince of Peace Lutheran Church where she directed and sang with the choir. Her husband, James Giglia, died previously. Survivors include her daughters, Susan Giglia Carroll and Carol Giglia Williams; five grandchildren and two greatgrandchildren. Burial was at St. Stephen Cemetery in Fort Thomas. Memorials: ROSAS Rescue, P.O. Box 99, Alexandria, KY 41001; or Juvenile Diabetes Association J.D.R.F., 8050 Hosbrook Road, Suite 314, Cincinnati, OH 45236.

Richard Hartman Richard L. “Mother” Hartman, 89, of Ludlow, died April 5, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He was a retired electrician with IBEW Local 212, a Navy veteran of World War II, member of Mother of God Church in Covington, member of Kelly Furnish VFW Post 7099, past

president of Fraternal Order of Eagles No. 280, and former member of Ludlow Drum and Bugle Corp. His wife, Mary Emma Hartman, died previously. Survivors include his sons, Richard Hartman of Southgate, Daniel Hartman of Burlington, Lawrence Hartman of Ludlow, and John Hartman of Florence; daughters, Diane Hartman of Ludlow, Mary Lee Conway of Villa Hills, Deborah Deaton of Covington, Ruth Ellen Hartman of Ludlow, Patricia Hartman of Ludlow, and Donna Hartman of Ludlow; nine grandchildren and 10 great-grandchildren. Memorials: Ludlow Fire Department, 234 Oak St., Ludlow, KY 41016.

William Mayer Jr. William “Butch” Mayer Jr., 72, of Alexandria, died April 7, 2013, at the Baptist Convalescent Center in Newport. He was a veteran of the Marine Corps, who served during the Cuban Missile Crisis, and a member of Mentor Baptist Church. Survivors include his wife, Charlotte “Charly” Mayer; sons, Steve Mayer, Dennis Mayer, Bryan Leigh, Darryl Leigh, and Darrin Leigh; daughters, LeeAnn Kersey and Christine Leigh; sister, Karen Mayer; 19 grandchildren and one greatgrandchild.

Wanda Miner Wanda J. Miner, 82, of Cali-

Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) 2835 Crescent Springs Road Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 Or CDS Associates, Inc 7000 Dixie Highway Florence, Kentucky 41042 Phone: (859) 525-0544 Copies of the Bidding Documents may be obtained from the office of CDS Associates, Inc. at the address indicated herein. Charges for all documents obtained will be made on the following basis: Charge Complete set of Bidding Documents $35.00 Mailing and Handling(U.S. Mail)(if requested) $15.00 Charges for Bidding Documents and mailing and handling, if applicable, will not be refunded. Bids will be received on a unit price and/or lump sum basis as described in the Contract Documents. Bid security, in the form of a certified check or a Bid Bond (insuring/bonding company shall be rated "A" by AM Best) in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the maximum total bid price, must accompany each Bid. The Successful Bidder will be required to furnish a Construction Payment Bond and a Construction Performance Bond (insuring/bonding company shall be rated "A" by AM Best) as security for the faithful performance of the contract and the payment of all bills and obligations arising from the performance of the Contract. Contractor and all Subcontractors will be required to conform to the labor standards set forth in the Contract Documents. This project does not fall under the provisions of KRS 337.505 to 337.550 for prevailing wage rates. Evaluation of Bids and the awarding of a final contract are subject to the reciprocal preference for Kentucky resident bidders pursuant to KRS 45A490 to 45A.494 and (KAR 200 5:400). Owner reserves the right to reject any or all Bids, including without limitation the right to reject any or all nonconforming, non-responsive, incomplete, unbalanced, or conditional Bids, to waive informalities, and to reject the Bid of any Bidder if Owner believes that it would not be in the best interest of Owner to make an award to that Bidder. Owner also reserves the right to negotiate with the apparent qualified Bidder to such an extent as may be determined by Owner. Minority Bidders are encouraged to bid. Bids shall remain subject to acceptance for 60 days after the day of bid opening or for such longer period of time to which a Bidder may agree in writing upon request of the Owner. If a Contract is to be awarded, the Owner will give the successful Bidder a Notice of Award during the period of time during which the successful Bidder’s bid remains subject to acceptance. Richard Harrison, Vice President of Engineering, Water Quality, & Production Northern Kentucky Water District 7479

Margaret Pfister Margaret (Mo) Pfister, 89, of Fort Thomas, died April 10, 2013, at the Baptist Convalescent Center in Newport. She was a homemaker, graduate of the University of Cincinnati, member of the Highland Country Club, the Marco Island Country Club, the Garden Club of Fort Thomas, the University Club in Cincinnati, and the St. Luke Ladies Auxillary. Her husband, Dr. Glenn Louis Pfister, died previously. Survivors include her sons, Fredrick Charles Pfister, and Richard Glenn Pfister; daughter, Maggie Grefer; eight grandchildren and 13 great-grandchildren. Interment was at Evergreen Cemetery in Southgate. Memorials: Baptist Convalescent Center, 120 Main St., Newport, KY 41071.

Anthony Roland Jr.

Date: April 30, 2013 Time: 1:00 PM (Local Time)

At said place and time, and promptly thereafter, all Bids that have been duly received will be publicly opened and read aloud. The proposed Work is generally described as follows: Construction of approximately 1,170 linear feet of 6" PVC water main together with the appurtenances and related work along Morris Place and Glazier Road in the City of Fort Wright, Kenton County, Kentucky. All Bids must be in accordance with the Instructions to Bidders and Contract Documents on file, and available for examination at:

fornia, died April 6, 2013, at the her home. She was a member of Flagg Springs Baptist Church, and volunteer at Grant’s Lick Elementary School. Her husband, Gene Miner, died previously. Survivors include her daughter, Toni James; granddaughter, Meghann Andrew; grandson, Justin James; and great-granddaughter, Elizabeth Caroline Andrew. Memorials: Flagg Springs Baptist Church, 12204 Flagg Springs Pike, California, KY 41007.

LEGAL NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION: ARC/BEACON STORAGE FRIDAY APRIL 20,201311:00 am The following persons are hereby notified that their goods stored at Arc/Beacon Storage under self storage rental agreements will be sold at Public Auction, terms-Absolute/No Reserve, on at Arc/Beacon Storage, located at 7 Beacon Drive, Wilder, Ky 41076. The items to be sold are described as household goods, boxes, bags, appliances, bedding, equipment, bikes, luggage, mattresses, fumiture, clothing, toys, trunks, and personal goods. Phyllis Lawson 13, Greg Simms 19, Roger Steffen c/o Richard Jarvis 41, Roger Steffen c/o Richard Jarvis 58, Wendy Harris 62, Wendy Harris 64, Wendy Harris 86. Contact Preston (859) 441-7161 for additional information. 1754209

Audit Services - Invitation to Bid The City of Cold Spring Kentucky is requesting bids for Financial Audit services for the fiscal years ending June 30 of 2013, 2014 and 2015, with an option for additional years. All audit services to be provided in accordance with generally accepted audit standards for national and state requireBid specifications can be picked ments. up at City Of Cold Spring Municipal Building 5694 East Alexandria Pike, Cold Spring Ky. 41076, 9 A.M to 4 P.M Monday thru Friday. In order to be considered all bids need to be received by 3:00 P.M., May 10, 2013 at the following address: City of Cold Spring, ATTN: Audit Services Bid, 5694 East Alexandria Pike, Cold Spring, Kentucky 41076. All Bids will be reviewed by the City Finance Committee with recommendation to Council by end of June 2013 with winning firm notification in July of 2013. For questions regarding the audit service bid, please contact Steve Taylor, City of Cold Spring Administrative Officer, at 8591757328 441-9604. CLOSE-OUT PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE PUBLIC NOTICE This notice is intended to inform residents of Campbell County, Kentucky that the County is in the process of closing out the Campbell County EOC Generator Project. The project was funded by the Kentucky Community Development Block Grant Program. A public hearing will be held at the Alexandria Courthouse, 8352 E. Main Street, Alexandria, KY 41001, on May 1, 2013 at 7:00 p.m. The purpose of this hearing is to review past use of funds and program performance. If there are any questions or comments about the project, please direct them to the following: Steve Pendery, Judge/Executive Campbell County Fiscal Court 1098 Monmouth Street Newport, KY 41071

Anthony “TJ” Roland Jr., 35, of Latonia, died April 5, 2013, in Williamstad, Curacao. He was a Master Sergeant in the Air Force, and was a member of the 912th Air Refueling Squadron. His grandparents, Charlene and George Roland, and Helen C. and January Buck Sr., died previously. Survivors include his mother, Frankie Dawson of Latonia; father, Anthony Roland Sr. of Cincinnati; wife, Heather Roland of Panama City, Fla.; children, Gianni, Brianna, and Donovan Roland; siblings, Qiana Buck of Cincinnati, James V. Roland of Independence, Damon C. Roland of Batavia, Ohio; and stepbrothers, Weldon I. Dawson Jr. of Springfield, Ohio, and Dion M. Dawson of Goodman, Miss. Memorials: Newport High School, 900 E. 6th St., Newport, KY 41071.

Floyd Siry, 72, of Grant’s Lick, died April 5, 2013. Survivors include his sisters, Karen Taulbee and Nancy Fay Miller; nephew, Christopher Taulbee; and niece, Sherry Whitaker.

Phoebe Stahl Phoebe Marie Stahl, 72, of Alexandria, died April 5, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. She retired from the Internal Revenue Service, was a member of Church of Christ of Alexandria, past Worthy Matron of the Alexandria Order of the Eastern Star No. 337, and past Grand Guardian of Job’s Daughters of Ky. Her husband, Samuel Gayle Stahl, and brother, Charles Mays, died previously. Survivors include her daughter, Lisa Napier; sister, Emma Shipp; brothers, Robert Mays and Don Mays; and three grandchildren. Interment was at Mount Auburn Cemetery. Memorials: Milestone LLC, 12372 Riggs Road, Independence, KY 41051; or the Church of Christ of Alexandria, 1054 Poplar Ridge Road, Alexandria, KY 41001.

George Taylor George Taylor, 88, of Butler, died April 10, 2013. His brother, Bob Taylor, died previously. Survivors include his wife, Dorothy M. Taylor of Butler; daughters, Pat Taylor of Butler, and Pamela Manker of Cold Spring; and two grandchildren. Burial was at the Lenoxburg Cemetery in Bracken County. Memorials: Butler United Methodist Church; or to the American Heart Association.

Frank Wurzbacher Frank William Wurzbacher, 82, of Alexandria, died April 6, 2013, at his residence. He was an Army veteran. His wife, Margaret Anne Wurzbacher, three brothers, and three sisters, died previously. Survivors include his sons, Steve Wurzbacher and Desi Wurzbacher; brothers, Edward Wurzbacher and Joseph Wurzbacher; sister, Roselyn “Rosie” Van Lue; one grandchild and one great-grandchild. Burial was at Kentucky Veterans Cemetery in Williamstown.

Floyd Siry

CITY OF FORT THOMAS, KENTUCKY CAMPBELL COUNTY LEGAL NOTICE Sealed proposals will be received at the office of the City Clerk, Municipal Building, City of Fort Thomas, 130 N. Ft. Thomas Avenue, Campbell County, Kentucky, until 11:00 A.M. local time on MAY 8, 2013, for furnishing all labor, materials, and equipment necessary to complete project known as FORT THOMAS 2013 STREET PROGRAM, and, at said time and place, publicly opened and read aloud. Contract documents, bid sheets, plans and specifications can be obtained at the General Services Department, City of Fort Thomas, 130 N. Ft. Thomas Avenue, Fort Thomas, Kentucky, 41075, for $25.00 per set, (non-refundable). Plans requested by mail will be an additional $15.00 per set. Checks shall be made payable to the City of Fort Thomas. Specifications will also be on file in the plan room of the Allied Construction Industries, (ACI). Each bidder is required to submit with his proposal a bid bond in the amount of one hundred percent (100%) of the base bid or certified check equal in amount to ten percent (10%) of the base bid. The bidder to whom the contract is awarded will be required to furnish a surety bond in an amount equal to one-hundred percent (100%) of the contract amount. Bid security furnished in Bond form shall be issued by a Surety Company or Corporation licensed in the State of Kentucky to provide said surety. Proposals must contain the full name of the party or parties submitting the same and all persons interested therein. It is the intent and requirements of the City of Fort Thomas that this project be completed no later than OCTOBER 1, 2013. When the total overall project exceeds $250,000, all bidders must comply with the prevailing wage rates in the State of Kentucky. It is anticipated that the Prevailing Wage Law will apply to this project.

Discrimination Clause The Campbell County Fiscal Court does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, religion or disability, and provides, upon request, reasonable accommodation, including auxiliary aids and services, to afford an individual with a disability an equal opportunity to participate in all services, programs and activities. Any persons requiring special needs assistance should contact the office of the Judge/Executive at 859-547-1803 at least five days prior to the meeting. The Kentucky Relay Service/TDD number for the hearing impaired is 1/800-648-6057.

By the order of the Council of the City of Fort Thomas.

Written comments will be received until the date of the hearing. 1757344

________________________________________ Mayor, City of Fort Thomas

The successful bidder will be required to have a current occupational license in the City of Fort Thomas before the Contract will be awarded. The Council of the City of Fort Thomas reserves the right to waive irregularities and to reject any or all bids. The Council of the City of Fort Thomas shall authorize acceptance of the bid made by the responsible bidder who, in Council’s judgment, offers the best and most responsive proposal to the City, considering quality, service, performance record, and price; or Council may direct the rejection of all bids. The City may award based on "functional equivalence" concerning specified work or products.

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