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Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Fort Thomas E-mail: kynews@communitypress.com

Volume 10, Number 45 © 2010 The Community Recorder ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

T h u r s d a y, A p r i l

RECORDER W e b s i t e : N K Y. c o m

B E C A U S E C O M M U N I T Y M AT T E R S

1, 2010

FT businesses host government forum

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Become a Recorder carrier and earn your own spending money and still have time for other fun activities since delivery is just once a week on Thursday. It’s your own business where your neighbors rely on you to deliver information about their community. You’ll learn valuable business skills and gain experience in customer service and money management. You’ll also be able to earn bonuses, win prizes and participate in special carrier events. Call 781-4421.

Don’t be fooled

Test your knowledge of Campell County with the Recorder’s April Fool’s Day quiz. LIFE, B1

Lane’s End brings spotlight to NKY

Since the early 1970s the Lane’s End Stakes, then called the Spiral Stakes, has been one Northern Kentucky’s most popular sporting events. Aided by sunshine and mid50 degree weather, this year’s $500,000 Lane’s End Stakes once again proved to be the area’s biggest spring party as 21,327 attended the event. NEWS, A5

Spike for a cause

The Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity at Northern Kentucky University will host the ninth annual “Spike for a Cause” sand volleyball tournament 10 a.m. April 3, at Southern Lanes in Alexandria. The majority of the proceeds from the event will benefit St. Jude’s Children’s Research Hospital. For further details, contact chairman, Daniel Damonte, at 757-3649 or damonted1@ nku.edu.

To place an ad, call 283-7290.

renovation of the Midway District has limited access to some businesses and had a short-term negFrom current happenings to ative affect on them, but the future plans, businesses through- forum allowed businesses to find out Fort Thomas now have a bet- out the status of the project and ter idea of what’s going on in their see that there is an end in sight. Representacommunity. tives from the At the Fort Thomas BusiAt the Fort Thomas police, fire, general services and ness AssociaBusiness Association’s recreation departtion’s annual government annual government ments as well as the Fort Thomas forum, various forum, various city Renaissance precity officials at the spoke to associaofficials spoke to sented forum. tion members association members Assistant City about what’s Administrator Jay going on in their about what’s going on Treft also updated departments. “The busiin their departments. the businesses on what’s happening nesses really in the city. enjoy the oppor“The forum provides an opportunity to have this kind of forum,” said association President Tracy tunity for direct communication Davis from State Farm Insurance. between city officials and busi“There is always so much going nesses,” Treft said. “It’s an opporon in the city, like renovations, tunity to share information and have an ongoing dialogue and that impacts the businesses.” The forum provides a chance communication between the two for businesses to voice their con- groups, that before the association cerns and for city officials to started, didn’t really exist.” For more information about the explain things that are being done Fort Thomas Business Associaand why. For example, Davis said the tion, visit www.ftba.biz.

By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

Candidate forum set

A candidate forum for the county commission race and debate for judge-executive hopefuls in Campbell County will be held April 28 at the Southgate Community Center, 301 W. Walnut St. in Southgate. The commission forum is scheduled for 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., followed by the judgeexecutive debate from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. The forums are sponsored by the Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce, Legacy, The Kentucky Enquirer and NKY.com. There is no admission charge for the event.

50¢

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Sticking it out

Judy Lauer of Fort Thomas works the cherry filling into the shell for a chocolate-coated egg she’s making under the direction of Nancy Snodgrass, co-owner of Fantasy In Frosting in Newport, during a personalized half pound candy egg making class at the Newport Branch of the Campbell County Public Library Monday, March 29.

Fort Thomas business still ‘floating’ after 30 years By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

For 30 years one Fort Thomas business has been full of hot air. Balloons Across the River on the corner of North Fort Thomas Avenue is celebrating 30 years in the balloon business Thursday, April 1. The small business that owner Trent Wessling, his wife at the time and his brother started in their garage in 1980 has become main supplier for many organizations in the Tri-state, said manager Vicki Gauspohl. “Trent is very creative and is a hands-on owner,” Gauspohl said. “He does all of our deliveries and really puts business first.” After moving from his garage to one corner of Memorial Parkway and North Fort Thomas

Avenue, Wessling moved his business across the street to its current location at 906 North Fort Thomas Ave., said employee Nancy Parrott. The business supplies decorative balloon displays for corporate events, parties and charity fundraisers like the Relay for Life walks. “There aren’t a lot of balloon businesses around the area,” said employee Pam Hill. “Some of Trent’s decorations are just fabulous.” Joe Rigotti from Accent on Cincinnati, an event planning company, said he has always been happy with the work Balloons Across the River does for him and his clients. “They are really delivering above and beyond what I’d expect from most vendors,” Rigotti said. Gauspohl said she continues to

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Sisters Pam Hill and Nancy Parrott, both part-time employees at Balloons Across the River in Fort Thomas, prepare items for a hospital gift shop. enjoy her job after working there 12 years and appreciates having Wessling as a boss. “I think he deserves some cred-

it because 30 years of dedication is a lot,” Gauspohl said. “Most people aren’t this dedicated day in and day out.”

Class takes on polling through social media By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

Students at Northern Kentucky University are working on a study to test the usefulness of social media Web site Facebook when it comes to a public opinion poll. Students in a Topics in American Politics: Public Opinion class this semester are polling people throughout Campbell, Boone and Kenton counties using two different methods. One method is traditional, mailing polls to randomly selected registered voters, and the other is

online through Facebook. “The goal is to see if Facebook can compete,” said Dr. Shauna Reilly, professor of the class. “I thought this would be a great opportunity to expand the class beyond book learning.” Reilly said this study will give students a chance to compare and contrast the social media method with the standard method and see if Web sites like Facebook can produce similar results. Along with picking the topics for the poll, which include smoking regulations, funding for regional services and the 2010

The study will give students a chance to compare and contrast the social media method with the standard method and see if Web sites like Facebook can produce similar results. Senate race, students also completed a lot of the leg work for the project, including stuffing and mailing 1,500 polls. Student Keshia Theobald said she is amazed at how much work has gone into the project. “We all collaborated together, and we all put in extra time to do this,” Theobald said. While the class is divided on

what the results say, Theobald said she is looking forward to seeing the results of the study. “There hasn’t been a lot of studies on this,” Theobald said. “It will be neat to have some empirical evidence.” The study is being funded by NKU’s Scripps Howards Center for Civic Engagement and is part of the American Democracy Project’s e-Citizenship Initiative, which is meant to expand civic engagement. To see of take part in the poll, search for Northern Kentucky Poll at www.facebook.com.

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Fort Thomas Recorder

News

April 1, 2010

Candidates visiting with Tea Party

By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

Political candidates in Campbell County are responding to requests by the Northern Kentucky Tea Party to share their views at the group’s meetings. Campbell County Tea Party members listened as four candidates for elected office made their case during a candidates forum at the group’s Thursday, March 25 regular meeting in Newport. The candidates in attendance included incumbent Campbell County Judgeexecutive Steve Pendery, a Republican of Fort Thomas; Republican Campbell County Attorney candidate Steve Franzen; Newport Democrat Phill Bartel, a candidate for jailer; and Jeff Kidwell of Cold Spring, an incumbent candidate for an unpaid District 1 constable spot. A March 11 Tea Party meeting had featured Kevin Sell, a Republican challenger to Pendery in the May 18 primary. Sell was in the audience

More candidates

Campbell County Jailer candidate Newport Democrat Phill Bartel said at the March 25 Campbell County Tea Party meeting he didn’t have an answer of what, if elected, he would do to reduce spending and the taxpayers burden, but that given time he would get an answer to the tea party. Bartel is challenging incumbent jailer, Greg Buckler of Mentor in the May 18 primary. Republicans Jim Sawyer of Newport and James “Tom” Sparks Jr. are also vying for the jailer’s job. Bartel also said he wants to try alleviate the lawsuits that are going on at the jail right now, as well as the deaths and escapes that are happening. Republican Jeff Kidwell of Cold Spring, an incumbent candidate for District 1 constable, said the job has very few responsibilities and his role is primarily as a volunteer to assist police agencies and to sometimes serve legal papers. Kidwell is being challenged by fellow Republican David Arthur of Alexandria. March 25, but did not speak during the forum. Leaders of the Campbell County Tea Party chapter, Erik Hermes and JR Roth, questioned the candidates about their experience, what they see the duties of the position they’re seeking and how each candidate plans to save taxpayer money if elected. Pendery said the county already spends one of the lowest amount per resident of almost every county or city government in North-

ern Kentucky. Pendery also defended 4 percent property tax revenue increases allowable under Kentucky law as necessary for the county’s budget to keep up with the rate of inflation. Franzen said his primary idea to save money was for the county to consider becoming self-insured. “Kenton County has been doing this for a long time, it saves Kenton County quite a bit of money,” Franzen said. By Kenton County’s esti-

mates it saves an amount exceeding “six figures” annually, he said. If Campbell County is going to be self-insured it is paramount the county attorney be able to handle that, he said. “And you know, I don’t have to hand it off to an insurance attorney, I’ve handled these things,” Franzen said. “I know how to do it myself.” Franzen and Pendery also both answered questions from tea party members at the March 25 meeting about the process of appointing a county attorney after Democrat Justin Verst retired from the job in December 2008. Pendery, appointed James Daley, a Democrat, as the county attorney. Both Daley and Franzen are seeking election as county attorney in 2010. Pendery said he had a personal and private conversation about the appointment with Franzen. There were two other attorneys who had been recommended by other

Tea Party meeting

attorneys for the position of county attorney before Franzen expressed an interest in the position, Pendery said. Pendery said he had experience working with the two attorneys, but not with Franzen, and knew they would both do a good job. Pendery said the person who was his first choice turned him down, and his second choice accepted the job. Tim Nolan of California asked Franzen if he had expressed his interest to Pendery about in the job prior to the appointment being made. “Well, when I found out about it, I did call Judge(executive) Pendery and told him I was interested in that,” Franzen said. Franzen said he called Pendery before the appointment was made, and said he learned the position was open when Verst told him of his retirement and that Daley had been selected to fill the position. While it was a private

The next meeting of the Campbell County Tea Party will be at 7 p.m. Thursday, April 8 at the Southern Campbell Fire District station, 1050 Race Track Road, Alexandria. Several candidates yet to be announced will speak at the meeting in a continuation of the group’s candidate forum series, said JR Roth, chairman of the Campbell County chapter. For information e-mail JR Roth at jrcca@aol.com. conversation with Pendery, Franzen said he did express his disappointment with the lack of transparency. Franzen said he’s not saying Daley isn’t a good candidate or can’t do the job, and the Republican or Democrat dynamic doesn’t mean much to him when it comes to the position. But a public announcement about the position being open and qualified candidates were being sought before a decision was made was warranted and didn’t happen, Franzen said. “It seems to me the filling of an elected position would be a public process,” he said.

Gateway center helps improve employability

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The Workforce Solutions Division of Gateway Community and Technical College has created a Center for Workforce Development that specializes in helping incumbent workers complete college credentials to improve their employability. “Incumbent workers who have taken customized training courses through our Workforce Solutions Division often are just one three-hour credit course away from completing a credential,” said Angie Taylor, vice president of Workforce Solutions. “One of the services the center offers is identifying those people and meeting with their employers to encourage them to have their employees complete their first college credential, using tuition waivers to cover the cost.” The Workforce Development Center offers a variety of other free career planning services to help people become more secure in their careers. “Career counselors help people create a personalized

Index Huntington is proud to support the Campbell County Camels. When you show your spirit with Huntington School Spirit check program, we’ll show our spirit in return.

Calendar..................................B2 Classifieds.................................C Life...........................................B1 Police reports........................B10 Schools....................................A7 Sports ....................................A10 Viewpoints ............................A12

career action plan based on their aptitudes and interests,” said Center Director Philip Accardi. “We also serve the interests of local and regional employers by providing qualified, jobready individuals.” Services are offered at Gateway’s Boone Campus and are available on-site to local companies with groups of employees who may want to complete credentials or assess their aptitudes before embarking on skill upgrade training. The center is part of a growing number of workforce development initiatives offered by the Workforce Solutions Division, formerly known as Business and Industry Services. As part of the reorganization, Accardi was promoted from workforce development liaison to Workforce Development Center director. Christi Dover, a sevenyear veteran of Gateway and a graduate of Thomas More College, was promoted from staff support associate to workforce development liaison. Barry Wilhite recently joined Workforce Solutions’ staff as a workforce development liaison. Individuals or firms interested in workforce development services may call Regina Schadler at 4421170 or visit The Workforce Solutions Web site at www.gateway.kctcs.edu/W orkforce_Solutions.aspx.

Because every time you order your team’s checks, we’ll donate $3 to your school. Let’s go Camels! For more information, stop by the Cold Spring Banking Office at 136 Plaza Drive, or call 859-441-5690.

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Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Fort Thomas E-mail: kynews@communitypress.com

RECORDER

Find news and information from your community on the Web Fort Thomas – nky.com/fortthomas Campbell County – nky.com/campbellcounty News Michelle Shaw | Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1053 | mshaw@nky.com Amanda Joering | Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1052 | ajoering@nky.com Melanie Laughman | Sports Editor . . . . . . . . 513-248-7118 | mlaughman@nky.com James Weber | Sports Reporter . . . . . . . . . 578-1054 | jweber@nky.com Advertising Debbie Maggard | Advertising Manager. . . . . . 578-5501 | dmaggard@nky.com Michelle Schlosser | Account Rep . . . . . . . . 578-5521 | mschlosser@nky.com Delivery For customer service. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 781-4421 Sharon Schachleiter | Circulation Manager. . 442-3464 | sschachleiter@nky.com Cathy Kellerman | District Manager . . . . . . . . . 442-3461 | ckellerman@nky.com Classified To place a Classified ad. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283-7290 | www.communityclassified.com To place an ad in Community Classified, call 283-7290.


News RELIGION NOTES Community Family Church

First Presbyterian Church

The Community Family Church in Independence will present, “The Witness,” an Easter musical production April 1-4. The musical will be at 7:30 p.m. April 1-3 and at 6:30 p.m. April 4. The presentation will be staged in the Family Life Center at the church at 11875 Taylor Mill Road. The performance is free and open to the public. For more information, visit www.cfcky.com or call 3568851.

First Christian Church

First Christian Church in Fort Thomas will be celebrating its 49th annual Living Portrayal of Leonardo da Vinci’s “Last Supper” April 1. The celebration will begin at 8 p.m. and there is a strong request that all are seated by 7:55 p.m. For more information, call 441-8658. The church is located at 1031 Alexandria Pike.

The First Presbyterian Church in Dayton will hold its annual Spring Rummage Sale April 8 from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. and April 9 from 8:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. For more information, call 261-7896. The church is located at 800 Ervin Terrace.

Fort Thomas First Presbyterian

The community is invited to celebrate Easter Sunday at First Presbyterian Church. Breakfast will be served in the church’s fellowship hall at 9:30 a.m., followed by an Easter Egg Hunt for children. A smaller chapel service is at 8:30 a.m. and the traditional service is at 11 a.m., with special music and concluding with the traditional singing of the Hallelujah Chorus. For more information, call 441-8939. The church is located at 220 S. Ft. Thomas Ave. Have an event at your church? Please send your information to akiefaber@nky.com.

The Campbell Circuit Clerk’s office is extending the hours for its driver’s license kiosk testing system on the last Monday of each month. People wishing to take the test for their driver’s license using the kiosk system outside of normal business hours of 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday

By Regan Coomer rcoomer@nky.com

The Colonel has come home. A bust of KFC-founder Colonel Harland Sanders that was stolen from a Berea, Ky., restaurant in January was found at the home of an Independence man Wednesday March 24. Independence Police Sgt. Mike Thatcher said the department is not releasing the individual’s name at this time. An anonymous informant advised the Berea Police Department that the bust could be found in Independence. Two Independence officers went to the man’s home Wednesday and discovered the bust, Thatcher said. Berea Police Officer David Wagoner said the man will not be charged for the disappearnce of the 18inch or so bronze bust,

PROVIDED

A bust of KFC founder Harlan Sanders, which was stolen from a Berea, Ky. restaurant in January, was found Wednesday at the home of an Independence man. The Independence Police Department discovered the bronze bust and returned it to the Berea Police Department. which had been taken as a “joke.” “We are not going to charge him because he was

willing to turn it over,” Wagoner said. “I spoke with him on the phone and he said he had taken it as a joke. He apologized to me and told me to apologize to the restaurant owner.” Wagoner said the individual was “very glad” to give it up and would have done so sooner but he was “afraid he was going to get in trouble.” The bust’s sentimental value made getting it back the most important thing, Wagoner said. “We got it back. It wasn’t damaged. That’s the main thing,” he said. Kentucky Fried Chicken restaurant owner Jean Anderson bought the bronze bust 38 years ago from Sanders’ daughter. Only 300 were made, and Anderson paid $350 at the time for the statue. “I was so relieved that I about had a heart attack,” Anderson said. “I hugged

The Northern Kentucky Independent District Health Department’s “Produce Man” peels onto the gym floor with St. Mary School students in Alexandria during a visit to kick off Healthy Challenge Week March 15. Produce Man’s goal is to encourage children to eat five servings of fruit and vegetables each day.

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“I replaced my windows — and it was no big to-do!"

and took a picture with him.” The bust, valued at $1,200, was taken Jan. 24 from the front of the restaurant. Employees told police that four young men were eating, and when they left, the statue was gone. The Colonel’s new home will be in the back, said Anderson, who won’t risk losing the Colonel again. “He used to be in the front,” she said with a laugh. “I was showing him off and somebody ripped him off.” The restaurant had offered a $500 reward in grilled chicken to whoever found the statue, but Anderson’s unsure how to repay the Independence Police Department. “We don’t know what to do at this point, but we got it back and we’re terribly grateful to the department up there and Berea,” she said.

Growing an appetite

through Friday must be in the office on the at Monday of each month by 5:30 p.m. The test will be administered at 6 p.m. The goal is to give parents and others testing additional time for after school activities, said Campbell Circuit Clerk Taunya Nolan Jack. For information call the court clerk’s office 292-6314.

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Independence police find the Colonel

BRIEFLY License testing hours added

CCF Recorder

April 1, 2010


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CCF Recorder

April 1, 2010

News

Northern Kentucky Chamber president participates in trade mission to Dubai Steve Stevens, president of the Northern Kentucky Chamber, was part of a delegation of chamber of commerce executives representing communities throughout the United States visiting Dubai, U.A.E. The group traveled there to speak with business and governmental leaders about trade opportunities between the United States and Dubai. A highlight of the trip was for Stevens and other members of the delegation to meet with United Arab

Emirates Vice President, Prime Minister and Ruler of Dubai - His Highness Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum. During the meeting, Sheikh Mohammed exchanged views with the delegation, discussed the current economic conditions in the region and around the world. Among the project sites and business developments visited during the trip were DP World - Dubai’s marine terminal Jebel Ali (Jafcza) and Free Zones, its health

care industry cluster Health Care City and the Dubai Financial Center. The group also visited with American-based businesses who have set up locations in Dubai. A roundtable exchange with the Directors General of the chambers of commerce from each of the United Arab Emarites also took place to discuss roles and functions of chambers of commerce within the region and across the U.S. “It was a great honor for us to be received for a meet-

ing in the palace with Sheikh Mohammed and his sons,” Stevens said. “We Kentuckians have a particular connection with His Highness because of his interest in horses. He is quite familiar with the Commonwealth since owns horse farms and races horses in our state.” During the visit, the Sheikh discussed the upcoming participation of he and his sons as competitors in the 2010 World Equestrian Games to take place in September 2010.

PROVIDED

Director General of the Dubai Chamber of Commerce and Industry Hamad Buamim; Dave Adkisson president of Kentucky Chamber of Commerce; and Steve Stevens, president of Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce, in Buamim’s office.

NKU receives Presidential Community Service award Northern Kentucky University has been named to the 2009 President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll, the highest federal recognition a college or university can receive for its commitment to volunteering, service learning and civic engagement. One initiative that was a key to NKU being named to the Honor Roll was the university’s innovative Mayer-

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son Student Philanthropy Project, which is celebrating its 10th anniversary this academic year. “Our Mayerson classes are a marquee example of public engagement at a university that values public engagement as a way to give back to the community, but also as a teaching tool to enrich our classrooms,” said Mark Neikirk, director of NKU’s Scripps Howard

Center for Civic Engagement, where the Mayerson Project is housed. NKU’s range of public engagement outreach includes coordinated volunteer efforts; assistance with the volunteer-matching Web site NKYhelps.org; recruitment of students to be poll workers; co-sponsorship of the Northern Kentucky Forum to foster public dialogue around public poli-

cy; outreach and support to nonprofits through the Institute for Nonprofit Capacity; profiling of regional businesses growth drivers; regional technology entrepreneurial development; extensive work with the region’s P-12 community; and informative publications such as “NKU: Engaging with Our Region.” The Mayerson Student Philanthropy Program is a

partnership between NKU and the Manuel D. & Rhoda Mayerson Foundation of Cincinnati, and made $13,500 in grants to area nonprofits last fall. It is scheduled to make at least another $25,000 in grants when the current spring semester concludes. That will mean $477,000 has been distributed by NKU students through this innovative,

nationally recognized program. Since the program’s inception, 101 student philanthropy classes have been held at NKU. The classes incorporate the concept of teaching stewardship through a philanthropy experience across disciplines, with courses ranging from music to history, from elementary education to college writing.


News

CCF Recorder

April 1, 2010

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Charity renews ‘Mission’ to offer help to community Mission’s pressing needs

cmayhew@nky.com

Hundreds of people are still being helped meet the necessities of life each month by the Alexandria area’s largest charity. But to reflect a greater role of different area supporting churches, the Caring And Reaching with Encouragement (CARE) Ministry became the CARE Mission in February. The Mission’s warehouse and offices are in a building next to Main Street Baptist Church. It’s open three days a week serving 14 Northern Kentucky counties to disperse food and clothing donations and work with families to connect them with other social services and programs including job training and placement. “Main Street was the founder and is still a major contributor, but the long-term goal is for this to be a community-based facility,” said Sandy Daunt, a volunteer and the director of the CARE Mission. Between groups of volunteers and other churches con-

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Dave Rath, left, of Alexandria, the volunteer delivery truck driver for the CARE Mission, unloads packages of food from a van along with Jeff Daunt, the pantry team leader, and husband of the Mission’s director, Sandy Daunt, Saturday, March 27. tributing directly to fund the Mission, there are about 10 congregations representing multiple denominations assisting with the Mission now, Daunt said. The Mission is having an April 30 open house, inviting about 50 churches to send five mission-minded individuals to see some of the recent changes and how everything operates, she said. There are six new rooms where clients can meet with the volunteer staff in private, and a new kitchenette and bathroom area that’s been opened up inside. The bathroom is especially helpful for the New Hope Center, a pregnancy

Besides monetary donations, to keep up with the demand, the CARE Mission’s current biggest need is to get back to having a box truck to go pick up food for the center three times a week and office furniture for the new offices including filing cabinets and waiting room chairs in good condition, said Sandy Daunt, director. Currently the Mission uses an old van that is hard to unload and is prone to breaking down, Daunt said. “It’s a short term need, but we figure it will take a long time to get it,” she said. To make a donation or for information call the Mission at 694-1222 or visit www.sievechurch.org/getconn ected/care.aspx. A new Web site, www.careministry.net, is still under construction. counseling service open different hours than the food pantry, for private testing, Daunt said. The services offered have been extended recently in what types of assistance is offered, but the guidelines

have become stricter to help the people with the most urgent needs first as more and more people seek assistance, Daunt said. For example, the Mission is offering more prescription drug assistance, but it’s only awarded on a case-by-case basis, she said. Recently an elderly man was having difficulties affording his prescription medications, and there wasn’t enough money left to help him, Daunt said. Although help was eventually found for the man to get his prescriptions filled for the month through another charity, the incident impacted Daunt. “It just killed me to have to turn him away,” she said. Visitors to the Mission are limited to receiving help once every 30 days. Food and clothing are the major issues, Daunt said. Between 50 and 60 families come and receive assistance each Tuesday, it’s about 45 families each Thursday and about 20 families each Saturday. “The economy is forcing people to come in and ask for help that have never been

here before,” Daunt said. Now more than ever the people seeking assistance are grandmothers trying to make it on Social Security with custody of three small children, single mothers and single fathers, and people who are out of work, said Penny Clark, a volunteer since 2008 from Alexandria who works with clients in the office. “It’s very disheartening for them and very humbling

for us,” Clark said. Community groups including students from Campbell County High School already help with food drives and donations, Clark said. “We’re trying to use the Lords’ assets as best as possible,” she said. Clark said donations are always put to good use. “Money turns into food,” Clark said.

By Adam Kiefaber akiefaber@nky.com

Since the early 1970s the Lane’s End Stakes, then called the Spiral Stakes, has been one Northern Kentucky’s most popular sporting events. Aided by sunshine and mid-50 degree weather, this year’s $500,000 Lane’s End Stakes once again proved to be the area’s biggest spring party as 21,327 attended the event. “We love Opening Day for the Reds and I love the Reds and the Bengals, but this is Northern Kentucky’s biggest sport’s day,” Turfway Park CEO and President Bob Elliston said. “The reason is, we get national television coverage through the USA Network and we get the entire horse racing world focused on Turfway Park in Florence.” An issue arose with the USA telecast, as the network lost its feed right before the Lane’s End Stakes. USA was able to pick up a feed from Turfway Park, which didn’t include the audio from track announcer Mike Battaglia. Nonetheless, for a brief moment, the track in Florence had the entire horse racing world’s attention.

The show

The Spiral Stakes began in 1972, the purse was only $10,000 and 7,730 showed up to the race, which was created to become a prep race for the Kentucky Derby. Not until 1976, when Inca Roca won the Spiral, did a horse from the race appear in the Derby. However, the race was gaining attention and the pre-race festivities grew to an unimaginable level. According to “The Tradition Continues: The Story of Old Latonia, Latonia and Turfway Racecourses” by James C. Claypool, a festival was started in light of the success of the pre-race festivities during Derby Week in Louisville. “The two-week festival featured a home tour, a dog show for “mutts,” a beauty pageant, a show featuring classic cars, a big band din-

ner dance, a fish fry, a 5kilometer run, a children’s art show, a golf tournament, a country auction and hoedown, the Call to Post Luncheon, the Spiral Ball, and on race day, a VIP tent party,” Claypool wrote. Today, the Call to Post Luncheon and VIP tent party still exist. The festival concept was dropped in 1992. On the day of this year’s race, the VIP tent was the place to be. For $175 a seat, fans enjoyed a grand buffet, premium open bar and live entertainment. The tent also featured a March Madness lounge where televisions and couches were available for those wanting to follow the NCAA Tournament. Fans in the tent also shopped at booths for custom Kentucky Derby hats, fur coats, jewelry and Lane’s End souvenirs.

The people

Inside the tent and in the grandstand, horse owners, politicians and local celebrities took in Turfway Park on the day of its big race. Some of the notable guests included Secretary of State Trey Grayson’s family, Vice Chairman of the board at Augusta National Joe Ford, Channel 9’s Clyde Gray and representatives from three of the four major Kentucky candidates for the U.S. Senate. “All the reserve seating is sold out and the weather brought a great walk-up crowd,” Elliston said. “There is a “who’s who” in the tent having fun. We have people as distinct as Vice Chairman of the board at Augusta National where The Masters is played … and we have folks out here just enjoying their cold Bud Lights, so everybody having fun.” One of the most famous visitors to the track may have been jockey Calvin Borel, who rode winners in the 2007 and 2009 Kentucky Derby. Borel won the Hansel Stakes aboard Cool Bullet earlier in the day and would ride one of the favorites, Northern Giant, in the Lane’s End Stakes.

ADAM KIEFABER/STAFF

From left: Chris Battaglia, Danielle Battaglia, Maria Murray and Mandy Zumbiel enjoy their time in the VIP tent during the Lane’s End Stakes at Turfway Park March 27. Chris is the wife and Danielle is the daughter of Turfway Park announcer Mike Battaglia, who had to call the day’s races from the press box as well as provide analysis for the USA Network.

The race

When it was time for the main event everyone in attendance had a horse they were rooting for, however the highest stakes were for six local charities. The Saturday before the Lane’s End Stakes six charities gathered at the Turfway Park’s Charity Night at the Tables, the event raised approximately $38,000. After that money was raised, each charity picked a horse at the Call to Post Luncheon. Since it had won the most chips at the charity event, Boone County CASA had the first selection. The other five charities each followed with their selections. The organization whose horse finishes best receives $10,000, second place earns $6,000 and the other four receive $4,000. “It (the race) is extremely intense and exciting, everybody is jumping up an down,” Boone County CASA Director Colleen Bohman said. “I mean you want your horse to win, but last year I think the last person who picked their horse won. It is just exciting to watch. You hope your horse wins, but if not it is not a big deal.” This year, Bohman had the first selection and she picked the morning-line favorite Connemara. Her selection came in third. The $10,000 grand prize went to the Gateway College Foundation after its selection, Dean’s Kitten, won the Lane’s End by 21⁄2 lengths over the Borel-ridden Northern Giant. New Perceptions had selected Northern Giant and won

$6,000. The winning horse, Dean’s Kitten, is expected to race in the upcoming Kentucky Derby May 1. The horse earned $291,000 of the $500,000 purse for winning the Lane’s End Stakes. “We have the best jockeys, the best trainers in the country and who knows, the horse who comes out of here has a legitimate shot to win the Kentucky Derby,” Elliston said prior to the race. “I think that all of that gets Greater Cincinnati excited about today.”

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A6

CCF Recorder

News

April 1, 2010

PROVIDED

Summit Country Day students recently competed in the first 2010 TechOlympics Expo. From left: First row, Alex Finch of Anderson Township, Gabriella Chandra of Colerain Township, Eric Stretcher of Milford, Ty Wahlbrink of Anderson Township; second row, Erica Pierce of Anderson Township, Myles Casanas of Montgomery, Paul Slater of Wilder, Ky.; third row, Expo 2010 Steering Committee member Ken Uckotter, Kyle Gundrum of Cheviot, Logan Nagel of Walnut Hills, Simon Chow of Montgomery, James McLean of Forest Park, Andrew Beckmann of Madeira and Lauren Meister of Hyde Park. Not pictured, Upper School mathematics teacher Cathy Flesch.

Summit students win at first Tech Olympics Expo Summit Country Day students recently won three medals and came in fourth place out of 40 teams in the TechOlympics Expo 2010 held at the Millennium Hotel in Cincinnati. TechOlympics Expo, sponsored by The Kroger Co., P&G and Atos Origin, was hosted by the INTERalliance of Greater Cincinnati, an organization which provides high school students an opportunity to network with local businesses and colleges. The expo gave students interested in careers in information technology (IT) the opportunity to network, have fun in technologyrelated competitions, learn more about IT careers and to learn about undergradu-

ate IT programs in Greater Cincinnati. The events at TechOlympics focused on either computer skills or computer games. Every event had a certain amount of points that were combined for a total school score. Winners in individual events included: A gold medal for Jay McLean in Nintendo Wii Tennis; a silver medal for Paul Slater for speed keyboarding skills; and a gold medal for Slater for the Disaster Recovery Challenge. McLean also received fourth place in the Guitar Hero event. Ty Wahlbrink made it to the finals in Nintendo Wii Bowling. Three Summit students

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did not compete in TechOlympics, but rather took on major roles in organizing, producing materials and staging the Expo. Kyle Gundrum designed the Web site and registration system for the event, Gaby Chandra designed the program and coordinated the event recordkeeping and Andrew Beckmann played a key role in the setup and operation of all the computers and equipment running during the event. Other team members of the Summit TechOlympic 2010 included Myles Casanas, Simon Chow, Alex Finch, Lauren Meister, Logan Nagel, Erica Pierce and Eric Stretcher. Cathy Flesch is the Upper School mathematics teacher.

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In a pickle

Frankie Pickle came to visit students at St. Joseph, Cold Spring in the form of author, illustrator Eric Wight. Wight, the author of the graphic novels “Frankie Pickle and the Pine Run 3000,” and “Frankie Pickle and the Closet of Doom” challenged students to use their imaginations and create their own story lines. Many of his main character’s adventures are based on the author’s own life experience and that of his friends. He told the students that drawing and writing, like any sport or hobby, takes practice.

NKU’s Reeda Hart named outstanding educator Project Learning Tree® (PLT), the environmental education program of the American Forest Foundation, has announced that Reeda Hart, a science outreach specialist at Northern Kentucky University in Highland Heights, was named one of five 2010 National PLT Outstanding Educators. She is a resident of Falmouth. PLT’s Outstanding Educators are selected for their commitment to environmental education, their exemplary use of PLT, and their exceptional teaching skills. Hart will be honored at PLT’s 24th International Coordinators’ Conference in Lake Tahoe, Nevada, May 17-20. Hart has worked at Northern Kentucky University’s (NKU) Center for Integrative Natural Science and Mathematics for the past seven years. Before that, she was an elementary school teacher for 27 years. In her current role as science outreach specialist with NKU, Hart takes PLT into classrooms in six school systems, integrating the environment into academic lessons and modeling teaching practices for teachers. She has created units on topics ranging from water to energy to life

cycles, using PLT as a foundation to provide interactive content that supplements the teaching of core subjects, methods for elaboration, and assessment tools. Over a three-year period during which she worked with six schools, the schools’ Academic Index scores rose significantly. Hart also helps the schools she works with design and develop outdoor classrooms, and emphasizes training for teachers in PLT to ensure the spaces are used as effective teaching tools. Hart is trained as a PLT facilitator, which means that she can train other teachers how to use PLT’s preK-12 environmental education curricula. “If we multiply the number of teachers by the number of students they reach each year, times the number of years they teach, it tells us how powerful it is to be a facilitator,” Hart notes, realizing that her work has touched the lives of thousands of students. Hart helped develop PLT’s new Early Childhood program that was launched nationally Feb. 17. This curriculum resource, designed specifically for early childhood educators, uses developmentally

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appropriate techniques for connecting young students to nature. With Hart’s assistance, NKU is beginning an Early Childhood Alliance to provide PLT training to local preschool teachers. “Her enthusiasm and positive attitude toward science has spread to others,” noted teachers at Dry Ridge Elementary School in Dry Ridge who recommended Hart for the honor. “Students know she makes learning fun, and parents, the school nurse, janitors and other Grant County employees have been found ‘sneaking in’ to hear her lessons, too.” "Project Learning Tree is proud to honor Reeda Hart, whose passion for environmental education is helping students learn about the world around them, and their responsibility for it," said Kathy McGlauflin, director of Project Learning Tree and senior vice president of Education for the American Forest Foundation. “PLT is known for quality environmental education because dedicated educators like Reeda use PLT to engage students in handson learning about the environment, both inside the classroom and outdoors.”

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SCHOOLS

Fort Thomas Recorder

April 1, 2010

ACHIEVEMENTS

Editor Michelle Shaw | smhaw@nky.com | 578-1053

|

NEWS

|

ACTIVITIES

|

HONORS

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

N K Y. c o m

A7

RECORDER

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

“Urinetown” cast members dance during one of the musical numbers.

From left: Beau McGhee pushes Kori Hoge to Lindsey Steller while rehearsing a scene in Highlands High School’s upcoming production of “Urinetown.”

Highlands stirs things up with ‘Urinetown’

By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

A far cry from Highlands High School’s production of “Thoroughly Modern Millie” last year, this year students are doing something a little different. The cast and crew of about 60 students are putting the finishing touches on costumes and sets and squeezing in a few more rehearsals before Thursday, April 8, the opening night of their production of the musical “Urinetown.” A rich versus poor story, the satirical comedy musical is about town where poor people have to pay to use the bathroom and come together to start a revolution, said Director Jason Burgess.

“We wanted to do something completely different this year, and this show is completely hilarious,” Burgess said. Besides it comedic value, Burgess said he choose “Urinetown” because he wanted to challenge the students to really get into their characters. Junior Kori Hoge, who plays a lead role of Hope, said “Urinetown” is unlike any other shows she’s been part of in or out of school. “It’s a different kind of acting and it’s very challenging, but that makes it exciting,” Hoge said. Senior Charles Croley, who plays Bobby, the leader of the revolution, said the preparations and rehearsals for the show are going well, but it has taken a lot of hard

Students practice for their production of “Urinetown,” which opens Thursday, April 8. work. “This is different than anything anyone in the cast has done and there is a lot of music and a lot of lines,” Croley said. “It’s very overthe-top.” Junior Greg Bashford, who plays Officer Lockstock, said the main challenge for him was learning the music, in particular one song he performs alone that has a complex rhythm. Performances at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, April 8; Friday, April 9 and Saturday, April 10 and at 2 p.m. Sunday, April 11 in the school’s Performing Arts Center.

Fort Thomas students’ plans vary for this year’s spring break By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com Students throughout Fort Thomas are enjoying a small taste of summer this week during spring break. From vacations to relaxing at home, students at Highlands High School and Highlands Middle School have a variety of plans for how they are spending their spring break. Here is what some students are doing: • “I am going to Fort Myers, Florida with my family,” said Maddie Seiter, an junior at HHS. • “I am going to Indian Shores, Fla. with my friends,” said Leigh Osterhus, a junior at HHS. • “We have a lot of softball games coming up,” said Allie Conner, a junior and player on HHS’s softball team. • “I’m staying in Fort Thomas and working out for football,” said Cory Compton, a junior and player on HHS’s football team. • “I’m going to Gatlinburg for a couple days, then coming home to work out,” said Donovan McCoy, a freshman and player on HHS’s football team. • “I don’t really know, I’ll prob-

Seiter

Osterhus

McCoy

Lightner

Conner

Compton

Giesey

Lloyd

Darnell

Koehler

ably play some soccer,” said Vadim Lightner, a seventh-grader at HMS. • “I’m going to the Fort Thomas beach where it’s really warm and not rainy,” said Grant Giesey, a seventh-grader at HMS. • “I’m being awesome, and I might learn to become a ninja,” said Ben Lloyd, a seventh-grader at HMS. • “I’m going to Los Angeles to see my cousin,” said Emma Darnell, a seventh-grader at HMS.

• “I’m going to CoCo Key and practicing running for track,” said Kirsten Koehler, a seventh-grader at HMS.

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Highlands Senior Charles Croley and Anna McCafferty act out a scene during rehearsal.

Local vendors brought to CCH By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

Lunch will be a prom preview April 6 at Campbell County High School. The school is bringing in local businesses catering to a diverse range of students’ prom needs for a day so students can see what’s available locally, said Ashley Himes, a teacher, and the sponsor of the underclassman student council planning this year’s April 30 prom. Other area high schools have had prom fairs for their students, but this is the first year for Campbell County, Himes said. The hope is it will become an annual event, she said. The prom fair will be during lunch to give every student a chance to see it, Himes said. Vendors and businesses already confirmed they will attend include: Schrader’s Cleaners and Tuxedo Rentals of Fort Thomas, Four Seasons Florist & Gift Basket Boutique in Alexandria, David’s Bridal of Florence, Susan’s Salon & Spa of Alexandria, OCharley’s in Cold Spring, and Studio 27 Salon in Cold Spring. “We’re trying to stick with all local businesses,” Himes said. Several other businesses, including other hair salons, nail salons and more restaurants have yet to commit to having a booth at

the prom fair, but have been invited, she said. Schrader’s is offering a special service for tuxedos, Himes said. Orders and fittings will be taken at the prom fair, and the tuxedos will be dropped off to the students at school, she said. Most businesses will be offering some kind of coupons or special deals if students make an appointment or order flowers at the prom fair, she said. For students needing financial assistance obtaining a dress for prom, the school’s Youth Service Center staff is meeting with students separately and referring them to Cinderella’s Closet at http://cinderellasclosetusa.org, Himes said. Conversations of many students have turned to asking each other what they’re doing from prom, where they’re going to eat and what their after prom plans are, she said. This year’s prom is the Great American Ball Park to give students who were juniors last year a different prom venue to experience, Himes said. Campbell County’s 2010 Junior/Senior Prom will be from 8 p.m. to midnight Friday, April 30 at Great American Ball Park’s Fox Sports Ohio Champions Club. Tickets are on sale through April 2, and no tickets will be sold after April 2. Call 635-4161.


A8

CCF Recorder

CLASS REUNIONS

SCHOOL NOTES SBDM meeting change

S A T U R D A Y, M A Y 2 2 Campbell County Class of 1985 is holding its 25 year class reunion Saturday, May 22, 2010 from 7:30 p.m. to 11:30 p.m. at Receptions Conference Center in Erlanger. Cost is $70 per couple, $40 per individual ($80/$45 at the door). Price includes hot and cold appetizers, bottled beer, soft drinks, etc. To an invitation, e-mail Valerie Tisa at val_tisa@yahoo.com with a current address. All money should be mailed to CCHS class of 1985 on or before May 1, to 14 Laurel Ridge, Alexandria, KY 41001. Receptions is located at 1379 Donaldson Hwy.

Have a class reunion? Please send your information to akiefaber@nky.com.

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April 1, 2010

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The date of the next meeting of the Reiley Elementary School Based Decision Making Council (SBDM) has been changed. The SBDM Council is the primary governing body of a public school in Kentucky and is led by the principal and includes both elected parent and teacher representatives. Instead of April 5, the meeting will be at 6 p.m. Tuesday, April 13 in the school’s media center, 10631 Alexandria Pike, Alexandria.

Three win essay contest

The Campbell County Historical and Genealogical Society has selected the winners of the group’s annual essay contest. • Senior division winner: Justin Reutter of Southgate for writing “The Civil War in Campbell County.” • The two Junior division winners are both students at

Sts. Peter & Paul School in California. Mariah Bezold won first for writing “My Great Grandmother Is My Hero” and Emily Schoulties placed second for writing “Campbell County 1977 Blizzard.”

Cheer clinics, tryouts

Bishop Brossart High School is having cheerleading clinics April 19-22 followed by tryouts April 24. A cheerleading clinic will be from 6-8 p.m. in the school’s gym each day April 19-22. There will be a mandatory parent’s meeting at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 20 in Hegenauer Hall. The week will culminate in tryouts at 10 a.m. Saturday, April 24. For information e-mail Beth Kramer at bkramer@ bishopbrossart.org. Any girls in grades 6-8 interest in cheering for the Brossart Colts middle school football team are invited to also e-mail Beth Kramer.

Summer institute

Thomas More College’s sixth annual S.T.E.M. (Science Technology, Engineering, & Math Camp) Summer Institute will be held June 11-16. For five days and five nights this July, students can participate in hands-on learning out in the field, on the Ohio River and in the laboratories at the Thomas More College Biology Field Station, Observatory and Science Departments. The Institute is a unique opportunity for high school students to interact with college faculty and undergrads, while spending the week learning science and conducting research. The up close and personal interactions give students a real sense of life as a college student and S.T.E.M. major. Information about these programs and others, including application materials, can be found at www.thomasmore. edu/fieldstation.

SHARE your stories, photos and events at NKY.com/community

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Schools

April 1, 2010

CCF Recorder

A9

Checkmate

Grandview’s Chess Team participated in the Queen City Classic Chess Tournament at Paul Brown Stadium in Cincinnati March 13. The team consisted of (from left to right) Austin Hazeres, Joey Frank, Jacob Day, Gage Veith, Malachi Ashcraft, Adam Hazeres, Ben Cope and Christian Poncio. Now in its ninth year, the tournament includes 750 participants from all over the Midwest. It is one of the largest scholastic chess tournaments in the Midwest. Grandview’s team won a total of 14.5 games during five rounds of chess.

COLLEGE CORNER The University of Louisville recently released its list of students, who graduated in the fall of 2009 and who made the dean’s list. The following students from Campbell County graduated from the school; James Bardgett, Gregory Eaton, Robert Gubser, Patrick Mayer, Stephanie Stavropoulos, Renea Steele and Dustin Wagner. The school also released its dean’s list. Students making the list from Campbell County include Jennifer Adams, Allison Arrowood, Chris

Arrowood, Lauren Baldridge, Caitlin Beck, Jonathan Bender, Lindsey Bogadi, Derek Boyers, Justin Brandt, William Brannon, Kevin Bueter, Laura Bueter, Mitchell Buller, Chad Carius, Kristopher Chalk, Cristyn Collier, Robert Dixon, Mallery Dunn, Daniel Dykes, Michael Eaton, Michael Enzweiler, Cory France, Michael France, Kelsay Froendhoff, Lia Garofolo, Steven Gerl, Robert Gubser, Maria Gurren, Jennifer Hambley, Ian Hamilton, Jared Hatfield, Alyson Hill, Joseph Hill, Megan Hoefker, Philip

Chamber offers work ethic scholarships The Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce, along with the Education Alliance of Northern Kentucky, invites qualifying seniors to apply for the 2010 Northern Kentucky Work Ethic Scholarship. This scholarship was created in 2009 to recognize and honor outstanding students from the region who have earned the Work Ethic Diploma. Each year, two $1000 scholarships are awarded to students from across the region that attend public or private high schools currently implementing the Work Ethic program. Students must be a resident of Boone, Campbell, Kenton, Gallatin, Grant or Pendleton Kentucky counties and successfully meet established criteria for earning the Work Ethic Diploma, as determined by their school’s representative for the program. Additionally, students competing for the scholarship must plan to be enrolled full-time at a Kentucky postsecondary institution, including those offering two-year and four-year degree programs.

“The Northern Kentucky Work Ethic Program was developed to encourage standards in students that were deemed necessary for success in today’s workforce,” says Amanda Dixon, Manager, Education Solutions, at the Chamber. “The 10 standards that were selected are: attendance, tardiness, discipline, grade point average, community service/internship, organization, punctuality, respectfulness and group cooperation. Fostering and developing these traits in our education system will serve to make Northern Kentucky students highly marketable as they enter the job market.” Candidates are evaluated based on a 500 word essay, meeting established criteria for earning the Work Ethic Diploma as determined by their school, financial need, and a commitment to display a positive work ethic as they continue onto postsecondary education or the workforce. To obtain an application or for more information, contact Amanda Dixon at 578-6396 or adixon@nkychamber.com.

Horan, Brandon Johnson, Meredith Johnson, Zachary Kraft, Tony Kremer, Wesley Kruse, Jeffrey Lamb, Shannon Mackenzie, Patrick Mayer, Andrew McGinnis, Shannon McGinnis, Nicole Moran, Kelsey Moss, Lauren Nehus, Emily Nordling, Jennifer Pence, Mirza Popaja, Bridget Quitter, Rachel Redmond, Patrick Roetting, Nicholas Rolf, Scott Rust, Aaron Schklar, Daniel Slater, Jared Stewart, Jason Thiem, Alicia Visse, Deandra Wagner, Michael Walerius, Krista Woltermann and Sally Zimmerman.

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On trial

St. Joseph, Cold Spring fifth-grade students performed the play “What Happened Here? The Salem Witch Trials.” The play allowed the students to ask questions of some of the important characters that played a role in this piece of our nation’s history. Shown: St. Joseph, Cold Spring, fifth grade student Cole Stava interviews Judge Sewell (Jarrett Eilerman) about the Salem witch trials.

Youth leadership class graduates

The Regional Youth Leadership Class of 2010 celebrated its graduation March 7 at The Phoenix. The students recently completed the eight-month program which helps build leadership skills and encourages community involvement among young people. Students were exposed to complex issues and challenges facing the region through interactive sessions with community leaders and decision makers. The sessions covered diversity, local government, economic development, law, arts and culture, money, health care and community service. The Class of 2010 consists of 41 students representing 40 different Northern Kentucky/Greater Cincinnati area high schools. Regional Youth Leadership is a nonprofit program. The title sponsor for this year's program was Ohio National Financial Services; presenting sponsors were KeyBank Foundation, Walmart (Fort Wright, Florence and Alexandria) and Turner Construction. Members of the Class of 2010 are:

Ashley Baker - Campbell County High School Elizabeth Blackburn - Cincinnati Country Day School Eli Brockett - Highlands High School

The Regional Youth Leadership Class of 2010 celebrated its graduation March 7 at The Phoenix. Robin Brundage - Villa Madonna Academy Sarah Bushman - Mt. Notre Dame High School Casey Cadle - Dayton High School Addison Cain - Covington Latin School Michael Danahy - St. Henry District High School Hannah DeJarnette - Calvary Christian School Mylah Edwards - Winton Woods High School Thomas Ernst, III - Indian Hill High School Mollie Ford - Larry A. Ryle High School Kimia Ghazi - Seven Hills School Madeline Greenhalgh - Cooper High School Geno Griffith - Withrow International High School Aissatou Guisse - Gilbert A. Dater High School Lauren Harrett - Notre Dame

He showed us how to care. You showed us how to honor.

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SPORTS

A10

CCF Recorder

April 1, 2010

HIGH SCHOOL | Editor Melanie Laughman | mlaughman@nky.com | 513-248-7118

YOUTH

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RECREATIONAL

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

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RECORDER

Campbell softball teams make pitch By James Weber jweber@nky.com

Softball season has sprung in Northern Kentucky, as games started March 22. Several teams are in their formative stages of fast-pitch, trying to build their competitive level. Here is a look at local teams, other than Brossart, which is featured separately. JOSEPH FUQUA II/STAFF

Bishop Brossart’s Alicia Miller hits a two-run homer in the sixth inning during March 24 game with Highlands. Bishop Brossart won 5 to 1.

Battery powers Brossart softball

By Mark Chalifoux

mchalifoux@communitypress.com

The Bishop Brossart softball team is off to a 2-0 start and head coach Mel Webster’s team could be one of the strongest in the area. “I certainly think we’ll be one of the top teams, if not the top team,” Webster said. “We’ve got a tremendous amount of potential.” So far, Brossart beat Silver Grove 13-0 and beat Highlands 5-1 on the road. The Mustangs are led by pitcher Alicia Miller, who struck out 237 batters last season in 221 innings. She had 10 shutouts and four no-hitters last season, along with one perfect game. So far in 2010, she pitched a no-hit shutout against Silver Grove and a 2-hitter against Highlands. Webster said he has one of the best pitcher-catcher combinations, as catcher

Lindsay Griffith is another standout for Brossart. Griffith was the team’s leading hitter in 2009, batting .434. Both Griffith and Miller are juniors. “We really don’t have a lot of weaknesses. We’re strong up the middle and solid everywhere. It’s hard to score runs on our pitcher so if we get three or four runs a game we’re going to win,” Webster said. Among the team’s other standouts are first baseman Jenna Bezold, a four-year starter who led the team in runs batted in last season. She will hit cleanup this season. Second baseman Molly Williams hit .330 last year as a freshman and shortstop Emily Schubert is a great defensive player. Senior Krista Kennedy is a strong third baseman, adding to the talented Brossart infield. “We feel like we’re pretty solid. We have a lot of lead-

ership and experience,” Webster said. Brossart has won the district for the last four years and the goal this season is to get back to the state tournament. Webster said it would be important for the girls to stay focused. “We have to keep getting better,” he said. “No one does anything perfectly. We have to keep working at the little things and stay ready to play every day.” Brossart has a veteran team with four four-year starters and seven starters returning from 2009 but more important than that, Webster said this is a group that represents the school well. “They are smart and they play hard. They are a firstclass group of young ladies who give 100 percent all of the time. I think everyone would be pleased they represent the school,” he said.

Bellevue

Rick Blevins moves up from the Bellevue assistant ranks to take over as head coach this season for the Tigers. They went 13-9 last year and lost in the 36th District Tournament to Newport Central Catholic. The top players are senior outfielder Catherine Kessen, junior catcher Megan Arnzen, junior shortstop Taylor McIntyre and freshman pitcher Madeline Blevins. The younger Blevins started on the mound as an eighth-grader and had 119 strikeouts for the season. Overall, Bellevue has five returning starters and 11 overall, while enjoying increased competition as 27 girls tried out for the team. “We have a good mix of experience and youth,” Coach Blevins said. “The talent level for the young players is good.”

Campbell County

Walter Lambert takes over as head coach this season. The Camels went 8-11 last season and lost to Scott in the 37th District Tournament. The Camels graduated six seniors from last year’s team but Lambert has a lot of returning talent to build on.

Dayton

Dayton went 10-9 last year under head coach Karen Fuchs, who enters her third season. The top returners are senior outfielder Sammy Powell, senior outfielder Allison Dilts, senior catcher, senior infielder Jennifer Ackerson, sophomore third baseman Shelly Centers and freshman Angela Taylor. “We have some very talented underclassmen who will be starting varsity for the first time,” Fuchs said. “As these players gain valuable varsity playing time, and their skills develop, our team will grow and experience success.”

Highlands

JOSEPH FUQUA II/STAFF

Bishop Brossart’s softball team waits at home plate to congratulate Alicia Miller (20) as she rounds third base after hitting a two-run homer in the sixth inning during the game with Highlands March 24.

Camels place 4th in youth wrestling Campbell County finished fourth in the state youth wrestling tournament Feb. 21 in Frankfort. The following Camel youths won medals at the meet. First place: Trenton Barrett, Matthew Goshorn,

Brett Graziana, Jordan Hodge, Raymond Hodge, Tom Ketchen-Carter, Ryan Moore, Spencer Moore, Casey Rauch, Timmy Rolf, Brady Wells, Tanner Yenter, Luke Youtsey. Second place: Peyton Anderson, Jordan Hahn,

Zach Wells. Third place: Jonah Bowers, Micah Bowers, Jordan Mason, Bryan Spahr, Aaron Stewart. Fourth place: Jordan Boschert, Dakota Lillie, Corey Rauch, Brad Russell.

ADAM KIEFABER/STAFF

Newport senior shortstop Anessa Stamper catches a fly ball in a 13-0 loss to St. Henry March 24. The game was St. Henry’s and Newport’s season openers.

The Bluebirds went 1215 last year and lost to Dixie Heights in the Ninth Region Tournament 2-0. Jessica Donelan returns for her third year as head coach. She has eight returning starters to work with. The top returning players are senior third baseman Alex Sorrell, senior outfielder Devin Bressler, senior first baseman Eden Schlosser, junior catcher Allie Conner, and junior outfielder Jenna Theisen. Conner hit .607 last season to be the top hitter in Northern Kentucky, and she is one of the top defensive

ADAM KIEFABER/STAFF

Newport senior first baseman Anna Miller holds a runner at third base during the Wildcats’ season opener at St. Henry March 24. Miller is one of the team’s returning players from last season. catchers as well. She has a strong arm for throwing out base-stealers. Donelan is excited about her returning defense. “Both of our pitchers from last year are back, and they have improved. But a lot of our success I think will depend on how well they can get the ball over the plate, and let our defense take care of the rest,” she said.

year’s 12-10 unit which fell to Ryle in the Ninth Region Tournament. They are senior Liz Kroger; juniors Hannah Thiem, Stephanie Hardesty, Danielle Hausfeld, and Becky Blanchet; and sophomore Meghan Millard. Fifth-year head coach Denny Barnes said his team’s strengths are young players with potential and a strong battery.

Newport

Silver Grove

The Wildcats went 3-14 last year under head coach Scott Taylor, who returns for his second season at the helm. The team returns all but one player from last year. The top returners are seniors Anessa Stamper (shortstop), Salem Thompson (infield), Anna Miller (first base), Jennifer Crail (outfield) and Felicia Kammerer (outfield).

Newport Central Catholic

The Thoroughbreds return six starters from last

Jane Eltzroth returns as head coach as she transitions the Big Trains to fastpitch. Silver Grove was 6-20 last season and lost to Calvary in the district tournament. The Trains return all nine starters, led by Richelle Walls, Krista Govan, Cindy Miller, Payton Govan and Amber Fancher. Payton Govan is the returning starting pitcher and Eltzroth said she has improved in the offseason. Walls and Krista Govan are co-captains.


Sports & recreation

April 1, 2010

CCF Recorder

A11

Northern Kentucky soccer players earn honors Northern Kentucky soccer awards for the 2009 season:

Boys All State Team

First team: Alec Robbins (Scott), Garrett Justice (CovCath), Jason Lewis (Highlands) Second team: Cole Little (NCC), Jake Hils (St. Henry), Ryan Stadtmiller (Brossart) Honorable mention: Dillon McConvey (Ryle), Zane Hill (Ryle), Evan Talkers (CovCath), Jesse Zilio (St. Henry), Dakota Beerman (Highlands), Matt Kees (Scott)

Boys’ Individual Region Awards

Player of the Year: Alec Robbins (Offensive), Scott; Garrett Justice (Defensive), CovCath Coach Of The Year: Casey Seibert, Scott Ed Lett Sportmanship: Cooper More than a match: Chris Lally, Ryle. First team all region: Alec Robbins (Scott), Cole Little (NCC), Jason Lewis (Highlands), Jake Hils (St. Henry), Christian Green (Boone Co.), Dillon McConvey (Ryle), Garrett Justice (CovCath), Ryan Stadtmiller (Bishop Brossart), Zane Hill (Ryle), Alex Dean (Highlands), Alex Etienne (Highlands). Second team all region: Evan Talkers (CovCath), Steven Leichter (Calvary), Colton Tanner (Campbell), Jesse Zilio (St. Henry), Trey Evans (CovCath), David Braun (Brossart), Ryan Stoker (Conner), Tyler Farrar (St. Henry), Alexx Bernard (Campbell), Grant Kennedy (Ryle), Nick Speier (NCC), Matt Kees (Scott). Third team: Dakota Beerman (Highlands), Austin Juniet (NCC), Eberardo Perez (Conner), Cody Landrum (Dixie), Sam Perkins (Brossart), Matt McDonald (CovCath), Zach Steinkoenig (VMA), Sam Lewis (Highlands), Rob Poehlmann (Ryle), Tyler Kelley (Simon Kenton), Nick Smith (St. Henry). Honorable mention: Colyn Siekman (Conner), Michael Huffmyer (CovCath), Chris Reiger (St. Henry), Michael Walsh (Pendleton), Cameron Baston (Scott), Abhi Mohamed (Boone), Kody Hutchins (SK), Thomas Ortiz (Cov. Latin), Logan Barnett (Grant), Kevin Baeten (St. Henry), Cody Neises (Campbell), Mark Harlow (Cooper), Dylan Lankheit

SIDELINES Spot sought on team

The Althaver family, recently moved to Northern Kentucky from Michigan, is looking for a spot on a basketball team for their 13-year-old son, Austin. Most teams had already selected players by the time they moved. The 5’8” wing player, according to his former coach, averages 8-10 points per game and 8-10 rebounds per game. Contact parents via cell phone at (734) 770-5151 or (734) 735-9784 or by email: jalthaver@insightbb.com or galthaver@insightbb.com .

(Scott), (VMA), (Grant), (Owen).

Alex Schmitt Cody Kearns Justin Davis

Girls soccer

Region player of the Year: Abby Janszen (offense), St. Henry; Anne Marie Dumaine (defense), Campbell County. Coach Of The Year: Sara Raaker (Division I), Notre Dame; Kevin Turnick (Division II), NCC; Jeff Bowers (Division III), Calvary. First team all-region: Abby Janszen (St. Henry), Gabe Enzweiler (Brossart), Kim Neises (NCC), Heather Shelton (Notre Dame), Samantha Bradford (Holy Cross), Lauren Bennett (Walton-Verona), Torrie Lange (NDA), Katie Russo (NDA), Anne Marie Dumaine (Campbell), Megan Berberich (NDA), Alli Ponzer (SK), Chelsea Dietz (Dixie). Second team: MacKenzie Grause (Highlands), Ariel Howell (Boone), Mikayla Turner (Calvary), Kaitlin Bryan (Campbell), Taylor Gamm (St. Henry), Aubrey Muench (NCC), Emily Sanker (Brossart), Allie Lonneman (NCC), Sarah Schock (Calvary), Katie Walz (Brossart), Lindsay Otis (Ryle). Third team: Beth Whitacre (Cov. Latin), Brittany Bowers (Calvary), Sarah Handlon (Scott), Kiley Stoll (VMA), Jillian Russell (SK), Abby Felthaus (St. Henry), Kaysie Worley (St. Henry), MacKenzie Cole (Highlands), Bailey Elder (Boone), Jaclyn Zembrodt (Ryle), Madison Freeman (NCC). Honorable mention: Hillary Miniard (Beechwood), Brittany Bohn (Bellevue), Julia Martin (Brossart), Kayla Scott (Boone), Liz Niehaus (Calvary), Amy Neltner (Campbell), Jenna Hilgefort (Conner), Kendall Sebald (Cooper), Grace Wyatt (Covington Latin), CC Centers (Dayton), Justina Rogers (Dixie), Bekah Towles (Highlands), Raven Freeman (Holmes), Sarah Zembrodt (HC), Morgan Lyon (Ludlow), Jamie Harrison (Newport), Olivia Huber (NCC), Courtney Clark (NDA), Katie Eichinger (Ryle), Courtney Wren (Scott), Ashley Repka (SK), Stephanie Hasken (St. Henry). Chloe Nemann (VMA), Lizzie Hoffa (Walton-Verona).

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Freedom switches divisions for 2010 By James Weber jweber@nky.com

The Florence Freedom will have new division rivals in the 2010 Frontier League baseball season. The baseball team has been moved to the West Division of the league in a new alignment caused by a change with one of the league’s 12 members. The Rockford Riverhawks, located in far northern Illinois, departed to the Northern League. They have been replaced by the expansion Normal Cornbelters from central Illinois. The Freedom’s new division will consist of the River City Rascals, Gateway Grizzlies, Southern Illinois Miners, Evansville Otters and Normal Cornbelters. The Windy City Thunderbolts (Chicago) move to the East, which also features the Washington Wild Things, Lake Erie Crushers, Kalamazoo Kings, Traverse City Beach Bums, and Oakland County Cruisers. The Freedom get a slight travel break with the new alignment. They will make just one trip to Traverse City, the farthest team from Florence at 500 miles away. River City, one of two St. Louis-area teams in the league, is the farthest division foe away at 380 miles. Florence opens the year

at Gateway May 21, and has its home debut May 25. The Freedom are selling tickets for the 2010 season at (859) 594-HITS or online at FlorenceFreedom.com. May 21-23 at Gateway May 25-27 S. Illinois May 28-30 Evansville June 2-3 Oakland Co. June 4-6 at Traverse City June 8-10 Oakland Co. June 11-13 Traverse

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VIEWPOINTS Census important to state

A12

Fort Thomas Recorder

April 1, 2010

EDITORIALS

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LETTERS

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COLUMNS

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CH@TROOM

Editor Michelle Shaw | smhaw@nky.com | 578-1053

Do you know how many people in Kentucky are age 65 or older? In the year 2000, that number was 504,793. How about the number of Kentucky homes that heat with electricity? 38.8 percent. Kentucky’s household size? … 2.47 people. Median age? … 35.9 And the percent of families with children 5 or under who live under the poverty level? 21.6 percent. How do I know all this? The 2000 U.S. Census. Call up the Census Web site and you are quickly overwhelmed with an avalanche of data of all kinds, shapes and sizes. It’s a dream come true for statisticians and a veritable play-

ground for anybody who likes to crunch numbers. But it’s much more than that. It’s also a treasure trove of data whose value goes far beyond Gov. Steve mere trivia. Beshear Census numbers suggest Community trends, describe Recorder demographics and guest help policy makcolumnist ers make thousands of decisions from where to build schools to what size road to build to gauging the need for social services. In a myriad ways, Census figures are useful. That’s why it’s critical that

Kentucky and Kentuckians take seriously the 2010 Census count currently under way. Across the state, Census questionnaires have been mailed to households. Households who don’t return the form should expect to receive a visit from a Census worker. The process is a daunting challenge – but it’s absolutely critical that every Kentuckian be counted. Preliminary estimates show our overall population has increased by more than a quarter of a million people since the 2000 Census. We need to verify and quantify that growth. The reasons are wellknown but they bear repeating: Among other things, Census data decides how many representatives we have in Congress. It helps dictate how big of a

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slice of the pie Kentucky gets when the federal government divvies up some $400 billion in financial aid for states and communities. And it provides the basis for a number of policy and funding decisions on a community and state level related to housing, economic development, social services and infrastructure. “Be Counted in 2010” is the slogan this year, and it’s never been quicker or easier. The questionnaire is short and painless, just some 10 questions. It’s all confidential too. So as governor of a state where every citizen is important, I urge all Kentuckians to fill out their Census questionnaires and return them as quickly as possible. We need accurate data. We

RECORDER

About guest columns

We welcome guest columns on all sides of an issue; however, potential columnists should reserve space in advance with Editor Michelle Shaw by calling 578-1053. Include with your column your name, address, daytime telephone number, and a two-to-three line biography outlining your expertise related to this topic. Either include a color headshot of yourself, or make arrangements when you call to have your photo taken here. We reserve the right to edit for length, accuracy and clarity. Columns may be no more than 500 words. Deadline: Noon Monday for next Thursday’s issue. E-mail: mshaw@community press.com Letters, columns and articles submitted to The Community Recorder may be published or distributed in print, electronic or other forms. need complete data. Let’s get serious about getting it done and making sure every person in our state is counted. Steve Beshear is governor of Kentucky.

CH@TROOM March 25 question

What are your favorite Opening Day traditions? Do you plan to go this year?

Next question: How do you think passage of health care reform will affect the November elections?

“I like the way the city embraces Opening Day. I do not plan to go but will watch. Winning the opener is key to a winning season. Go Reds!” G.G. “Retired folks can’t afford $50 for a ticket, $50 for food, $10 for parking! We are scalped before we even get inside the stadium! The only baseball games we can afford to attend are the Florence Freedom games ... best ballgame entertainment for the money!” Duke “Why go to an Opening Day parade, where I’ll be continuously subjected to some unknown local celebrity perched atop a giant corporate logo, surrounded by drunk, conservative, orthodox meatheads who all think they’re the center of the universe, only to wind up in a stadium plastered with corporate logo’s and full of drunk, conservative, orthodox meatheads who all think they’re the center of the universe, when I can stay home, watch it on TV without the drunk, conservative, orthodox meatheads, and limited commercial interruption?” N.A.B. “I work downtown so it’s fun to watch the parade as it passes by. I watch the parade rain or shine.” S.J.P. “I can remember in the ‘70s that we used to listen to all of the Reds’ games on WLW, and although we never attended an Opening Day game, we did go to a lot of the home games. For some reason, we have pretty much lost interest in baseball – that’s probably a result of aging and the nasty stuff that is going on in the world that distracts us from some entertainment. But our Opening Day tradition was only to listen to the game, and enjoy it. Bring back Pedro Borbon, Davie Concepcion, Johnny Bench, Pete Rose, Joe Morgan, and all those guys and maybe we’ll get interested again!” B.B. “I always plant onion sets on

Send your response to kynews@communitypress.com with “chatroom” in the subject line. Opening Day. It gets my vegetable garden going and growing. I usually go to the game, however this year I have Final Four tickets.” J.J. “We don’t have any Opening Day traditions which we follow. When Opening Day is here we know that the lazy hazy days of summer are not too far off!! Yea!!! Hope the Reds win the opener. That even makes the day sweeter.” M.E.N. “I do not plan to go to Opening Day this year. I work for an accounting firm so Opening Day is always during our busy season. As a firm we celebrate by having our own company cookout and wearing red. I grill burgers, dogs, brats and metts the night before and everyone else brings in side items. We all dine together for lunch and at least one person keeps an ear on the game and supplies the rest of us with updates. Go Reds!” D.M.R.

PROVIDED

Family politics

Sen. John Shickel (R-Union) with Maggie Schlosser and Lauren Schlosser, the daughters of Dave and Pam Schlosser. Maggie, a secondgrader at Southgate Elementary, served as Shickel’s page March 11. Lauren, a student at the University of Louisville, serves as Shickel’s intern for the 2010 regular session.

“Watching the parade and going to ‘Plum Street Cafe’ with my brother for pre-game beers. I did not score tickets this year so, no we will not be attending. Go Reds!” C.A.S. “I worked downtown for many years and we always watched the parade. Don’t think I’ll make it this year.” B.N. “Years ago when the Reds played at Crosley Field we would go to the breweries in Over the Rhine all had free beer and cooked brats and metts in their parking lot. Then we made our way to the game usually sitting in the field seats in center field. All this is gone so I guess I will just have to watch television and reminisce.” L.S.

PROVIDED

Page Foster

Sen. Katie Stine (R-Southgate) with Foster Loesch. Foster, the son of Kevin and Kim Loesch and a fifth-grader at Reiley Elementary, served as Stine’s page March 3.

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Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Friday | See page A2 for additional contact information. 283-0404 | 228 Grandview Drive, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017 | 654 Highland Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075 | e-mail kynews@NKY.com | Web site: www.NKY.com


Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

T h u r s d a y, A p r i l

RECORDER

1, 2010

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PEOPLE

IDEAS

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RECIPES

CATCH A STAR CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

A view from the 18th hole at A.J. Jolly Park & Golf Course in March 2010.

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Highlands High School sophomore Rebekah Agard stands by a German flag during her German class. Agard recently won an all-expenses paid trip to Germany from the American Association of Teachers of German.

Highlands student wins trip to Germany For three-and-a-half weeks this summer, Highlands High School sophomore Rebekah Agard will be immersed in the German language and culture. Agard recently won an all-expenses paid study trip to Germany from the American Association of Teachers of German. Agard was one of about 23,000 who competed for the trip by taking the national German exam and is one of 44 who won. “I’m really excited,” Agard said. “This is a once in a lifetime opportunity.” After scoring in the 90th percentile on the exam, Agard had to fill out an application, which included writing a letter and answer-

ing a series of questions in German. Agard also had to do a telephone interview, mainly in German. “I think her phone interview really showed her skills and personality,” said Linda Zins-Adams, Agard’s German teacher at HHS. “I’m very pleased that she was selected.” At least one student from Zins-Adams’ class has been selected to go on the trip every year for three years. During her trip, Agard will stay with a host family and get to visit different cities in the area. “I’m looking forward to experiencing the culture and meeting new people,” Agard said.

THINGS TO DO

escovedo. com. Tickets are $25 and $20 in advance. To purchase, call 513-7799462. T h e Southgate House is located at 24 E. Third St. in Newport.

The egg hunt

Take part in the traditional Easter egg hunt at Grant’s Lick Baptist Church Saturday, April 3 from noon to 2 p.m. A lunch is scheduled for noon and will be followed by the telling of the Easter story and the Easter egg hunt. The holiday event is free and for children through the sixth grade. For more information, call 635-2444. Grant’s Lick Baptist Church is located at 941 Clay Ridge Road in Alexandria.

Escovedo in Newport

Alejandro Escovedo will perform in the ballroom at the Southgate House Friday, April 2 at 8 p.m. Escovedo began his solo career after stints with The Nuns in the 1970s and with Rank & File in the 1980s. Escoverdo recently released his ninth solo album, “Real Animal,” last June. For more information on Escovedo visit www.alejandro

Cooking for one or two

The Boone County Cooperative Extension Service will host a special class for those who are cooking for one or two people Thursday, April 8 from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. The class will teach two methods of approaching the challenge of cooking for one or two. It will also provide tips for preparing healthy and tasty meals. The class is free and for ages 21 and up. For more information, call 586-6101. The Boone County Cooperative Extension Service is located at 6028 Camp Ernst Road in Burlington.

FILE

A horse-drawn carriage eases down Washington Street during the annual parade for the 152nd Alexandria Fair and Horse Show in 2008. Find out if you’re a fool or not by taking The Community Recorder’s Campbell County April Fool’s Day Quiz. 1. True or False. Newport native Dave Cowens has been voted one of the 50 Greatest Players in NBA History. 2. Wilder was once known as: A. Riverside B. Leitch’s Station C. Steeltown D. Taylor’s Landing 3. Fort Thomas’ Highlands High School’s former mascot before they were known as the Bluebirds was: A. Bluejays B. Hilltopers C. Blue Devils D. Woodpeckers 4. Which one of these well-known people does not live in Campbell County? A. Chris Collinsworth B. Gary Burbank C. Jim Bunning D. John Wooden 5. True or False. Campbell County was once part of Boone County. 6. The 900-acre A.J. Jolly Park & Golf Course was named for: A. A famous golfer B. A former county judge-executive

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C. A movie star D. The person who discovered Campbell County 7. The fastest growing city in Kentucky from 2002 to 2003 was: A. Newport B. Alexandria C. Cold Spring D. Bellevue 8. The Alexandria Fair & Horse Show dates to the year: A. 1902 B. 1848 C. 1877 D. 1856 9. Many of the gambling houses and brothels operated with organized crime connections in Newport’s now infamous “Sin City” heyday were run by the: A. Corleone family B. Cleveland Syndicate C. John Gotti D. The Gambino Family. 10. Northern Kentucky University won the NCAA Division II national championships in 2000 and 2008 in what sport? A. Baseball B. Men’s basketball C. Lacrosse D. Women’s basketball

Answers to the April Fool’s Day quiz: 1. True: In 1996 Dave Cowens was selected by a group of NBA panelists as one of the 50 greatest players for the league’s 50th anniversary celebration.

NBC national sports television broadcaster and former Cincinnati Bengals wide receiver lives in Fort Thomas. Burbank, a longtime radio broadcaster and personality lives in Alexandria. U.S. Sen. Jim Bunning, a Hall of Fame baseball player, lives in Southgate.

2. B. David Leitch of Scotland started the settlement as Leitch’s Station in 1789 and it wasn’t until 1935 the City of Wilder was incorporated. 3. C. Blue Devils. 4. D. John Wooden. The famous college hoops coach whose teams won 10 NCAA championships isn’t a resident of the county, but he did coach Dayton High School’s basketball team from 1932-33 in his first teaching-coaching position. Collinsworth, an |

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7. C. Cold Spring with a 6.16 percent increase in population growth that year according to U.S. Census Bureau estimates. 8. D. 1856. The Alexandria Fair and Horse Show is one of the oldest and longest running fairs in Kentucky.

5. False. Boone County was formed from a portion of Campbell County in 1799 and Kenton County was formed later in 1840 from another part of Campbell County. Campbell County was formed in 1795.

9. B. The Cleveland Syndicate. 10. C. Women’s basketball.

Scoring:

6: B. Andrew J. Jolly was the judgeexecutive of Campbell County when the county set aside the original 600 acres for the park in 1959.

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• 8-10: Genius. • 5-7: Pretty smart. • 3-5: Time to study up. • 1-3: Foolsville.

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Newport's Dave Cowens, at Florida State, prior to joining the Celtics in a 1973 photo.

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CCF Recorder

April 1, 2010

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD F R I D A Y, A P R I L 2

ART CENTERS & ART MUSEUMS

The Art of Food, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, 1028 Scott Blvd. Food sculptures and installations, art inspired by food. Free. 957-1940. Covington.

MUSEUMS

Creation Museum’s Petting Zoo, 10:30 a.m.-8 p.m. Creation Museum, 2800 Bullittsburg Church Road, Outdoors. Children can touch and feed the animals. Included with admission: $21.95 ages 13-59, $16.95 ages 60 and up, $11.95 ages 5-12; $7 planetarium. 888-582-4253; www.creationmuseum.org. Petersburg.

MUSIC - ACOUSTIC

Trees Leave, 9 p.m. Southgate House, 24 E. Third St. Free. 431-2201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport.

MUSIC - BLUES

Chuck Brisbin & the Tuna Project, 10 p.m. Mansion Hill Tavern, 502 Washington Ave. Free. 581-0100. Newport.

MUSIC - CONCERTS

Alejandro Escovedo, 8 p.m. With the Sensitive Boys. Doors open 7:30 p.m. Southgate House, 24 E. Third St. $25, $20 advance. Presented by JBM Promotions, Inc. 513779-9462; www.magus-music.com. Newport. TelluRide, 8 p.m. Doors open at 7 p.m. Madison Theater, 730 Madison Ave. $10. 4912444; www.madisontheateronline.com. Covington.

MUSIC - JAZZ

MUSEUMS

History Unearthed: Archaeology Speaks, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Behringer-Crawford Museum, Included with admission: $7, $6 ages 60 and up, $4 ages 3-17, free for members and ages 2 and under. 491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington. Creation Museum’s Petting Zoo, 9:30 a.m.6 p.m. Creation Museum, Included with admission: $21.95 ages 13-59, $16.95 ages 60 and up, $11.95 ages 5-12; $7 planetarium. 888-582-4253; www.creationmuseum.org. Petersburg.

MUSIC - BIG BAND

Big Band Swing Dance Music, 7:30 p.m.11 p.m. York St. Cafe, 738 York St. Seventeen piece swing and dance band. $10. 380-0032; http://www.yorkstonline.com/. Newport.

MUSIC - BLUES

Sonny’s Solo Blues, 9 p.m.-midnight, Claddagh Irish Pub Newport, One Levee Way, 581-8888; www.claddaghirishpubs.com. Newport.

MUSIC CONCERTS

Henry Rollins: The Frequent Flyer Tour, 8 p.m.-11 p.m. Southgate House, 24 E. Third St. Doors open 7 p.m. $25, $20 advance. Tickets Rollins required, available online. 431-2201; http://bit.ly/93dhFM. Newport.

MUSIC - JAZZ

New Sleepcat Band, 7 p.m. Dee Felice Cafe, 261-2365; www.deefelice.com. Covington.

New Sleepcat Band, 7:30 p.m. Dee Felice Cafe, 529 Main St. Directed by Bill Gemmer and features John Von Ohlen. 261-2365; www.deefelice.com. Covington.

MUSIC - POP

MUSIC - POP

MUSIC - ROCK

Sheer Fantasy, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Dollar Bill Tavern, 8074 U.S. 42, $3. 746-3600; www.dollarbilltavern.com. Florence.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Top Girls, 8 p.m. Stauss Theatre, 101 Fine Arts Center, Northern Kentucky University, A London employment agency’s managing director’s celebration of success becomes an introspective look at the sacrifices she has made on her rise to that success. In repertory. $12, $11 faculty, staff, and alumni, $10 ages 60 and up, $8 students. 572-5464; www.nku.edu/~theatre. Highland Heights. S A T U R D A Y, A P R I L 3

CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS

Kentucky Kuzzins, 8 p.m.-10:30 p.m. Promenade Palace, 3630 Decoursey Pike, Mainstream level Western-style square dance club for experienced dancers. $5. 513-9292427; www.so-nkysdf.com. Covington.

EXERCISE CLASSES

Zumba Class, 9 a.m.-10 a.m. Step-N-Out Studio, 721 Madison Road, Latin dance fitness party. First class free. Packages available. $10. 291-2300. Covington.

FOOD & DRINK

Wine Tasting, 3 p.m.-5 p.m. Party Town, 6823 Burlington Pike, Free. 371-4466; www.partytownky.com. Florence.

HOLIDAY - EASTER

Easter Egg Hunt, noon-2 p.m. Grant’s Lick Baptist Church, 941 Clay Ridge Road, Lunch at noon followed by telling of the Easter story and Easter egg hunt. For children through grade 6. Free. 6352444. Alexandria.

24/7, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Dollar Bill Tavern, 8074 U.S. 42, $3. 746-3600; www.dollarbilltavern.com. Florence. Early Day Miners, 9:30 p.m. Doors open at 8:30 p.m. Southgate House, 24 E. Third St. $10, $8 advance. 431-2201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport.

MUSIC - WORLD

Persian Pop Concert, 7 p.m.-12:30 a.m. Newport Syndicate, 18 E. Fifth St. Ballroom. Shahryar and Nooshafarin, Persian pop singers. Cash bar. Optional dinner available 7-8 p.m. $8.99. Family friendly. $55; $45, $20 ages 6-12, $10 ages 5 and under advance by March 31. Tickets available online. www.cincy-persian.com. Newport.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Omnium Gatherum, 3 p.m. Stauss Theatre, 101 Fine Arts Center, Northern Kentucky University, Pulitzer Prize nominated play takes the audience to a dinner where guests confront the global implications of September 11 and beyond in an urgent, impassioned and hilarious work. $12, $11 faculty, staff, and alumni, $10 ages 60 and up, $8 students. Presented by Northern Kentucky University Theatre and Dance. 572-5464; www.nku.edu/~theatre. Highland Heights. S U N D A Y, A P R I L 4

FOOD & DRINK

Wine Tasting, 3 p.m.-5 p.m. Party Town, Free. 371-4466; www.partytownky.com. Florence.

MUSEUMS

History Unearthed: Archaeology Speaks, 1 p.m.-5 p.m. Behringer-Crawford Museum, Included with admission: $7, $6 ages 60 and up, $4 ages 3-17, free for members and ages 2 and under. 491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington. Creation Museum’s Petting Zoo, noon-6 p.m. Creation Museum, Included with admission: $21.95 ages 13-59, $16.95 ages 60 and up, $11.95 ages 5-12; $7 planetarium. 888-582-4253; www.creationmuseum.org. Petersburg.

For more about Greater Cincinnati’s dining, music, events, movies and more, go to Metromix.com. M O N D A Y, A P R I L 5

BARS/CLUBS

Team Trivia, 7 p.m.-9 p.m. Oakbrook Cafe, 6072 Limaburg Road, Free. 282-8570. Burlington.

MUSEUMS

Creation Museum’s Petting Zoo, 10:30 a.m.-8 p.m. Creation Museum, Included with admission: $21.95 ages 13-59, $16.95 ages 60 and up, $11.95 ages 5-12; $7 planetarium. 888-582-4253; www.creationmuseum.org. Petersburg.

ON STAGE - COMEDY

Fireplace Comedy, 8 p.m.-9:30 p.m. Bean Haus, 640 Main St. Open-mic night for area comedians. Family friendly. Free. Through Jan. 17. 431-2326. Covington.

RECREATION

Church Night, 6:30 p.m.-8:30 p.m. R.E.C.A. Roller Rink, 11 Viewpoint Drive, Skating to Christian music. Includes skate rental. Family friendly. $5. 635-4273. Alexandria.

SUPPORT GROUPS

Adoption Support Group, 6:30 p.m.-8:30 p.m. Cornerstone Church of God, 3413 Hillcrest Drive, Covers adoption topics allowing time to share. Free. Presented by Adoption Support Group. 380-7325. Erlanger. T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 6

MARK STEFFEN/CONTRIBUTOR

The Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center and the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music Department of Drama present Irwin Shaw’s war drama “Bury the Dead” from Thursday, April 8, through Saturday, April 24, in the Otto M. Budig Theatre at The Carnegie, 1028 Scott Blvd., Covington. An open discussion between audience, actors and military experts follows each performance. Tickets are $14 to $18 and are available by calling 491-2030 or by visiting www.thecarnegie.com. Creation Museum’s Petting Zoo, 10:30 a.m.-8 p.m. Creation Museum, Included with admission: $21.95 ages 13-59, $16.95 ages 60 and up, $11.95 ages 5-12; $7 planetarium. 888-582-4253; www.creationmuseum.org. Petersburg.

ON STAGE - COMEDY

ART EXHIBITS

The London Police Ride Again, 1 p.m.-6 p.m. The BLDG, Free. 491-4228; www.bldgrefuge.com. Covington.

COMMUNITY DANCE

Fireplace Comedy, 8 p.m.-9:30 p.m. Bean Haus, 640 Main St. Open-mic night for area comedians. Family friendly. Free. Through Jan. 17. 431-2326. Covington. W E D N E S D A Y, A P R I L 7

About calendar

To submit calendar items, go to “www.NKY.com” and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to “life@communitypress.com” along with event information. Items are printed on a space-available basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to “www.NKY.com” and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page. T H U R S D A Y, A P R I L 8

Line Dancing, 7 p.m.-9 p.m. Lookout Heights Civic Club, 1661 Park Road, Holly and Bernie Ruschman, instructors. Beginners welcome. $6, $3 for first-timers. Presented by H & B Dance Co. Through Dec. 28. 727-0904. Fort Wright.

ART EXHIBITS The London Police Ride Again, 1 p.m.-6 p.m. The BLDG, Free. 491-4228; www.bldgrefuge.com. Covington.

ART EXHIBITS

EDUCATION

BARS/CLUBS

CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS

Living Green.. A Matter of Choice, 6:30 p.m.-8 p.m. Boone County Cooperative Extension Service, 6028 Camp Ernst Road, Discover 10 basic concepts you can employ to have more environmentally friendly home and lifestyle. Ages 21 and up. Free. 5866101; ces.ca.uky.edu/boone. Burlington. Spring Break Archaeology Camps, 9 a.m.4 p.m. Concludes April 7. Behringer-Crawford Museum, 1600 Montague Road, Ages 8-12. Discover world of archaeology by doing what real archaeologists do, dig in the field. $75 future members, $50 members. 491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

FOOD & DRINK

Wine Tasting, 6 p.m.-7 p.m. Party Town, Free. 371-4466; www.partytownky.com. Florence. Fish Fry, 2 p.m. With fries and coleslaw. $7.99. Dollar Bill Tavern, 746-3600; www.dollarbilltavern.com. Florence.

KARAOKE AND OPEN MIC

Karaoke, 8:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. Shimmers, 1939 Dixie Highway, 426-0490. Fort Wright.

MUSEUMS

History Unearthed: Archaeology Speaks, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Behringer-Crawford Museum, Included with admission: $7, $6 ages 60 and up, $4 ages 3-17, free for members and ages 2 and under. 491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

Team Trivia, 9 p.m.-11 p.m. Keefer’s Irish Pub, 902 Madison Ave. Free. Through Dec. 29. 261-5333. Covington/Mainstrasse. Live Team Trivia, 7 p.m.-10 p.m. Dollar Bill Tavern, 8074 U.S. 42, Use knowledge to win prizes. With host. 746-3600; www.dollarbilltavern.com or lastcalltrivia.com. Florence.

CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS

Boone County Jaycees Meeting, 7 p.m.8:30 p.m. Florence Government Center, 8100 Ewing Blvd. Information on ways for people ages 20-40 to get involved in the community while meeting new friends. Free. Presented by Boone County Jaycees. 7509445. Florence. Hex Squares, 7:30 p.m.-9:30 p.m. Promenade Palace, 3630 Decoursey Pike, Western square dance club specializing in hexagon style for experienced dancers. $5. Presented by Southwestern Ohio/Northern Kentucky Square Dancers Federation. 513-929-2427. Covington.

The London Police Ride Again, 1 p.m.-6 p.m. The BLDG, Free. 491-4228; www.bldgrefuge.com. Covington.

Tri-State Artists Meeting, 7 p.m.-9 p.m. Florence Government Center, 8100 Ewing Blvd. Meet with local artists to exchange ideas and see what is going on in the art community. Call to confirm meeting location. Ages 18 and up. Free. Presented by Boone County Visual Arts Association. 992-1857; www.bcvaa.org. Florence.

COMMUNITY DANCE

SwinGallery, 8 p.m.-11:30 p.m. Step-N-Out Studio, 721 Madison Road, All ages. No partner required. Free beginner East Coast Swing lesson 8-9 p.m. Dancing to music by DJ 9-11:30 p.m. Ages 18 and up. $5. Presented by SwinGallery. 513-290-9022; www.swingallery.com. Covington.

COOKING CLASSES

Cooking for One or Two, 6:30 p.m.-8 p.m. Boone County Cooperative Extension Service, 6028 Camp Ernst Road, Learn about two methods of approaching challenge of cooking for one or two. Discover tips for preparing healthy and tasty meals. Ages 21 and up. Free. 586-6101; ces.ca.uky.edu/boone. Burlington.

HEALTH / WELLNESS

Runner’s Injury Clinic, 5 p.m.-6:30 p.m. St. Elizabeth Edgewood Sports Medicine, 830 Thomas More Parkway, Receive assistance from local medical providers, including physical therapists, athletic trainers, physicians and registered dietician. Free. Registration required. Presented by Bob Roncker’s Running Spot. 301-6300; www.stelizabeth.com/sports_medicine. Edgewood.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Bury the Dead, 7:30 p.m. Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, 1028 Scott Blvd. Six slain soldiers arise from graves and refuse to be buried, inciting international intrigue. With the UC College-Conservatory of Music Department of Drama. $18, $16 members, $14 students. 957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

HEALTH / WELLNESS

Seizure Recognition and First Aid, 2:30 p.m.-4:45 p.m. Mental Health America of Northern Kentucky, 513 Madison, In-depth discussion of issues regarding seizure disorders, changes in lifestyle and self-esteem. Free. Registration required. 431-1077; www.mhanky.org. Covington.

KARAOKE AND OPEN MIC

Karaoke, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Shimmers, 426-0490. Fort Wright.

MUSEUMS

History Unearthed: Archaeology Speaks, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Behringer-Crawford Museum, Included with admission: $7, $6 ages 60 and up, $4 ages 3-17, free for members and ages 2 and under. 491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington. Creation Museum’s Petting Zoo, 10:30 a.m.-8 p.m. Creation Museum, Included with admission: $21.95 ages 13-59, $16.95 ages 60 and up, $11.95 ages 5-12; $7 planetarium. 888-582-4253; www.creationmuseum.org. Petersburg.

MUSIC - BLUES

PROVIDED

Catch the beginnings of spring with the Krohn Conservatory’s “Spring Floral Show: Glorious Spring,” featuring lilies, hydrangeas and other spring favorites in full bloom. The show is on display through April 11. The Krohn is open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Special Easter Sunday hours are 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. April 4. Location is 1501 Eden Park Drive. Visit www.cincinnatiparks.com.

Ricky Nye and Bekah Williams, 7:30 p.m.11:30 p.m. Chez Nora, 530 Main St. 4918027; http://www.cheznora.com/. Covington. Original Wed Blues Jam, 6 p.m.-1 a.m. Mahogany’s Coffee House and Bar, 3715 Winston Ave. Hosted by Dick and the Roadmasters award winning blues band. Burgers & Blues Dinner starts 6 p.m. 261-1029; www.mahoganyslive.com. Latonia.

PHOTO BY SANDY UNDERWOOD

Megan McGinnis is Jerusha Abbott and Robert Adelman Hancock is Jervis Pendleton in the Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park’s production of “Daddy Long Legs.” This lighthearted new musical about an orphan whose life is changed forever, runs through April 10 in the Playhouse’s Robert S. Marx Theatre. For tickets call 513-421-3888 or visit www.cincyplay.com.


Life

CCF Recorder

April 1, 2010

B3

Celebrating the destruction of a bully Most of us, or our children, have at some time experienced being bullied. A bully seeks to intimidate, induce fear, taunt, or control someone considered weaker than they. What a relief it is when a bully is overcome or deposed. Death is a bully! All though our lives it elicits fear in us. Like a threatening vulture awaiting its time, the specter of death (death anxiety) sits on the branches of the tree of life. Its presence leads us to have unhealthy fears about dying, losing people we love, or being deprived of everything we enjoy and value. In fact, the fear of death paralyzes some people so much it can lead to an overcautious living of life (life anxiety). “Why love anyone if someday I’ll lose them?” “Why try to enter fully into life if it will someday come to a screeching halt?” whis-

pers fearful minds too afraid of the bully. A cartoon depicts the opening to a dark cave and a set of two eyes peering out of the darkFather Lou ness. Guntzelman The caption Perspectives u n d e r n e a t h says: “If you’re very careful today, nothing good or bad will happen to you.” The bottom line of Christianity is our faith in the resurrection of Jesus Christ and the deposing of the bully Death. Paul states the audaciousness of our faith, “For if Christ did not rise, then your faith is futile and your sins have never been forgiven... and we, of all people, are the most to be pitied,” (1 Corinthians 15:17-19)

Easter is the day we Christians celebrate Christ’s rising and his promise that we will rise, too. So we sing our Alleluias and celebrate. We take to heart the advice early Christians gave that it’s not right to be anything but joyful on Easter Day. We can go on fostering our fondest dreams of life and love, knowing our lives will eventually be transformed for the better and forever. The funeral liturgy affirms: “In him rose from the dead, our own hope of resurrection dawned. And now, the sadness of death gives way to the bright promise of immortality.” Poet John O’Donohue echoes the same point: “Regardless of how we configure the eternal, the human heart continues to dream of a state of wholeness, a place where everything comes together, where loss is made good, where

blindness will transform into vision, where damage will be made whole, where the clenched question will open in the house of surprise, where the travails of a life’s journey will enjoy a homecoming.” How timidly we state our triumphs and good health by the superstition of knocking on wood. We knock because it allegedly drowns out our boast. We fear that it we enjoy life too much the dreaded bully will return and wreak havoc on us. It’s as though we find it dangerous to hope for too much. Scripture does not yield to such superstition. Since God destroyed the biggest bully of ours, death, scripture doesn’t knock on wood. It has no hesitation in announcing it loud and clear. In fact, scripture taunts the bully of Death that still frightens God’s people so much.

It shouts: “Death is swallowed up in victory! “So where, O Death, is your victory? Where, O Death, is your sting?” (1 Corinthians 15:54-55) Furthermore, some people, such as the mystic poet Rilke, see Death being so totally vanquished it now serves us – almost as a friend. He writes, “Death is our friend precisely because it brings us into absolute and passionate presence with all that is here, that is natural, that is love. … This life always says Yes and No simultaneous. Death is the true Yea-sayer. It stands before eternity and says only: Yes.” Father Lou Guntzelman is a Catholic priest of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati. Contact him at columns@ communitypress.com or P.O. Box 428541, Cincinnati, OH 45242.

Protect elderly parents against telemarketers Doug said his father told h i m , “They got me to give them my credit card umber Howard Ain nand then I Hey Howard! tried to call and cancel and they said there’s no cancellation policy.” So Doug called the company himself, but was also told he couldn’t cancel without paying a substantial penalty – $699. The company sold Adrian six magazines for

Despite laws designed to protect them, seniors can still end up signing up for items they neither want nor need. So it’s important for their children to keep an eye on things. $49.90 a month for a total cost of nearly $1,000. The company charged his father’s credit card before receiving a written confirmation from Adrian. Doug immediately disputed the charge and then canceled the credit card altogether to prevent any future charges. With no credit card to charge, the company next sent a bill to Adrian – a bill for nearly $155.

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to numerous complaints. I called the company and was told his account is now canceled and he has a zero balance. Bottom line, despite laws designed to protect them, seniors can still end up signing up for items they neither want nor need. So it’s important for their children to keep an eye on things. Howard Ain answers consumer complaints weekdays on WKRC-TV Local 12. Write to him at 12 WKRC-TV, 1906 Highland Ave., Cincinnati 45219.

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Then the magazines started arriving. He received two issues of “Golf Digest” and one issue of “The Family Handyman.” Doug immediately called the publishers of these two magazines and said, “They were very upset about this. They have canceled the subscriptions.” Doug said the publishers told him they’ve received

similar complaints about other such magazine sales firms and they try not to accept business from them. Doug said this is a lesson for everyone. “Go back and check their credit cards… and work with your parents,” he said. Doug said his father not only didn’t sign anything for these magazines, he should never have been called by that telemarketer because he’s on the national Do Not Call Registry. The company in question has an “F” rating from the Better Business Bureau due

ar tis ts

As the nation’s population continues to get older, it’s more important than ever for children to look after their elderly parents. A local man learned this after finding his father had ordered magazines he neither needs nor wants. Doug Herberger of Forest Park keeps watch on his father, Adrian, who is nearly 80 years old. In January, Doug checked the mail and saw something that disturbed him. “I found a letter from a company that said, ‘Here’s the magazine confirmation for the magazines you ordered,’ ” Doug said.

Bring A Friend! Spring Break 1301 Western Avenue Cincinnati, OH 45203 (513) 287-7000 www.cincymuseum.org

Enquirer Media is proud to support the Fine Arts Fund.

CE-0000386317.INDD


B4

CCF Recorder

Life

April 1, 2010

Entertain with a parade of Easter recipes Buddy is just that kind of caring person). T h i s helps augment the a r i s h ’s Rita pneeds. I’m Heikenfeld s h a r i n g Rita’s kitchen the recipe but do know that the dough is a large quantity one. Feel free to use your own dough, or purchase it, and use the homemade topping. I wish those of you who celebrate Easter the best ever. I hope you have a day filled with family, friends and food. And whether your table is abundantly laid out or in a more meager fashion, remember that it’s not just about the food but who shares it with you, so if you have a neighbor or someone

Remember the request for the San Antonio parish pizza recipe from Mike, a Glendale reader? This church, located at the corner of Queen City and White Street, has a long and storied history. I thought my chances were slim to none that I’d get such a recipe, considering it was from the 1960s. I should have known better, as two readers came through. Tony Caminiti, who had no association with the parish but who had the cookbook, and Terrie Evans, the sister of Buddy LaRosa who is a member of the parish and who told wonderful stories to me about the parish and this annual festival where the pizza making took place. “Buddy still brings bread in to bake every week and we sell it for $2 a loaf,� she told me. (I’m not surprised –

who may be alone, give them a call, send a card or better yet, invite them to share your blessings.

Pretty Easter nests

You can make mini nests if you like. Yield will be greater. A bit messy to make but fun. 7.5 oz. Marshmallow Fluff 3 cups Rice Krispies 1 â „2 cup chocolate, white chocolate, or peanut butter chips 8 regular-size paper cupcake liners Flake coconut for garnish, colored or not Melt fluff until soft and pliable. Stir in cereal and chips. Remove from heat and arrange liners on work surface. When cool enough to handle, mist hands with cooking spray. Gather small

amount of mixture and shape to fit liner. Add more cereal; to make rim around top. Let cool. Top with coconut, a few colored almonds or jelly beans.

Strawberry Romaine salad with poppyseed dressing

This is nice served alongside Easter ham or lamb. Enough greens for six salad plates 1 pint strawberries, sliced 1 red onion, sliced thin

Dressing: 1

â „2 cup mayonnaise, 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar or more to taste 1 â „3 cup sugar or equivalent 1 â „4 cup milk 1 tablespoon poppyseeds Blend. After you top the greens with the berries and onion, drizzle dressing over.

Cranberry cocktail sauce for ham

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Mix yeast, sugar and 2 cups of water together. Set aside until frothy, about 15 minutes. Mix flour with salt and make a well in the center, add shortening, yeast mixture and remaining water. Mix well. Let rise, knead dough and let rise again until doubled. Break off a piece of

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dough and spread in greased pan. Poke dents in dough with fingertips. This makes several doughs, depending on the size of the pizza pans. Top with any sauce and add favorite toppings.

Topping for one pizza

Be careful when you cook this, as it sputters up. Use a nonstick pan if you have it and lower heat so mixture doesn’t burn. 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 large can crushed tomatoes (Terrie says use 28-oz. size) 3 chopped garlic cloves (I would use large) Fresh basil chopped Fresh parsley chopped Grated Parmesan Cook olive oil, garlic, and tomatoes until liquid is reduced and mixture thickens. Spread over dough, sprinkle with fresh herbs and cheese. Bake pizza at 400 degrees or until golden brown. Rita Nader Heikenfeld is Macy’s certified culinary professional. E-mail columns@community press.com with “Rita’s kitchen� in the subject line. Call 513-2487130, ext. 356.

Federal employees hold state convention The National Active and Retired Federal Employees (NARFE) will be holding the Kentucky State Convention at the Holiday Inn Airport April 13-15. All federal and postal employees, retirees and spouses from the Tristate area are invited to attend. NARFE is a nonprofit organization committed to promoting and protecting federal employees earned benefits including health care and retirement programs. The three-day event will include workshops, and a nonpartisan political forum featuring four of the leading candidates running for the U.S. Senate seat from Kentucky. Registration is $15 at the door. Registration starts at 10 a.m. April 13, with the convention starting at 1 p.m. For more information call 859-283-9688.

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Community

CCF Recorder

April 1, 2010

B5

Tips for getting your plants off to a good start By Ron Wilson Community Press/Recorder Gardening Columnist

If you’re thinking about starting seeds indoors this winter, good for you! Here are a few tips to help make you a bit more successful with your seed starting adventure. First of all, you’ll need the right seed starting supplies: 1) Use a soil-less potting mix or seed starting mix. This mix is extremely important as it actually helps to hold moisture for the new

seedlings yet is airy and allows them to dry properly with less chance of dampening or rotRon Wilson off, ting. S o m e In the garden mixes may include a slow release fertilizer to help feed the seedlings very slowly and gently as they grow. Be sure to pre-moisten your potting mix before planting the

seeds. 2) Something to grow your seedlings in – small clay or plastic pots, Jiffy Cubes, peat pots, Cow Pots, or trays with cell packs are wonderful for starting your seeds. 3) Some type of shop light with regular fluorescent tubes will be needed to help supplement the much-needed sunlight to keep your seedlings from stretching. Remember to keep the lights within 3 inches of the tops of the new seedlings. You may need to keep the lights on 12-14 hours a day, even in

sunnier windows. 4) A misting bottle. This is one of the best ways to water your new seedlings, especially when they’re very young. Misting the soil is not so invasive and is easier to control the water flow. 5) A small inexpensive fan, and trust me, this fan is one of the key ingredients for starting seeds indoors. Placed away from the seedlings, it provides constant air movement around the plants, which helps reduce disease and rotting, and it also helps to promote stockier plants.

And here’s the most important thing to remember: Read the back of the seed packs for additional germinating information (do the seeds need to be covered, spacing, soil temps – generally 70-75 degrees during the day, etc.?), as well as how long it takes for seed germination and growing time before transplanting outdoors. Count backwards from our frost free date (May 15 or so), and that’s when you should start those seeds indoors. For tomatoes it takes

about 6 weeks (peppers 8 weeks), which means starting time would be right around late March/early April. Remember, it’s always better to start your seeds a little late, rather than way too early. Have fun growing your plants from seeds, indoors. Talk to you next time, in the garden. Ron Wilson is marketing manager for Natorp’s Inc. Garden Stores and is the garden expert for 55KRC-AM and Local 12.Reach him at columns@communitypress.com.

Buckhout named executive director of Community Foundation of N. Ky. Charlene Erler, Chairman of the Board of the Community Foundation of Northern Kentucky, announced the appointment of Carol Buckhout as Executive Director of the Foundation, effective March 1. In that role, Buckhout will be responsible for administration of the Foundation, which provides oversight and financial and operational support for the Northern Kentucky Children’s Advocacy Center, as well as other

Foundation programs and funds related to health, social services and education. “Carol has Buckhout made significant contributions to the Foundation’s mission, first through her contributions to our marketing and communications programs and more recently, as our interim executive director,” Erler said.

“Carol’s experience and dedication will be essential as the Foundation pursues its goal to become the Northern Kentucky region’s principal resource and advocate for children and our community’s well-being.” Buckhout has served as interim director of the Community Foundation of Northern Kentucky since October 2009. She was the Foundation’s communications director under former Chief Executive Officer, Nancy Barone,

who left the Foundation to serve as a senior executive at University Hospital and remains on its Board of Directors. Previously, Buckhout held several positions in marketing, communications and fundraising for health care and educational institutions. Most recently, she was the communications director of Beechwood Independent Schools and executive director of the Beechwood Educational Foundation. She has

also given many hours as a community volunteer in the areas of health and education. The Community Foundation of Northern Kentucky supports and enhances health, social and educational programs that benefit Northern Kentuckians, including the Northern Kentucky Children’s Advocacy Center. The Advocates, a group of civically engaged volunteers, recently formed to lead fundraising efforts on

the Center’s behalf. For information about these events or to donate online, go to www.cfnky.org.

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B6

CCF Recorder

Community

April 1, 2010

FISH FRIES IN NKY Cost $3-$7, carryout available. For more information, call 360-2046 or visit www.bellevuevets.com. Bellevue. Fort Wright Civic Club, 5 p.m.-8 p.m., 115 Kennedy Road. Includes sandwich meals and dinners. Carryout available. Benefits Local charities. $4-$7. For more information call 331-1150. Fort Wright. Knights of Columbus, 4 p.m.-8 p.m., Father Bealer Council, 605 Lytle Ave. Fish, chicken, jumbo shrimp, popcorn, hot dogs, hamburgers and sides. Carryout available. $1.50-$7. Presented by Knights of Columbus 3908, Fr. Bealer Council. For more information call 589-342-6643. Elsmere. Knights of Columbus, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., Father Bealer Council, 605 Lytle Ave. Fish fries and hushpuppies, fish sandwich fries or coleslaw. $1.75-$5. Presented by Knights of Columbus 3908, Fr. Bealer Council. For more information call 342-6643. Elsmere. Edgewood Senior Center, 5 p.m.-8 p.m., 550 Freedom Park Drive. Fried fish, beerbattered fish, baked fish, shrimp, hot dogs or chicken nuggets. Includes choice of two sides; french fries, onion rings, coleslaw or macaroni and cheese. Children’s meal available. Call 331-0033 for carryout orders. $6.50-$7. Presented by Edgewood Fire/EMS. For more information, call 3412628. Edgewood. Ryland Heights Fire Protection District, 4 p.m.-8 p.m., 10041 Decoursey Pike. Fish, chicken strips and shrimp along with side items and desserts. Carryout available. $7. For more information call 356-7970; www.rylandheightsfire.org. Ryland Heights.

F R I D A Y, A P R I L 2

FISH FRIES Wilder Fire Department Fish Fry, 4 p.m.- 8 p.m., will be hosted every Friday during Lent at the Wilder City Building, 520 Licking Pike. Dinner will include fish, shrimp, chicken, desserts and more. Eat in or carry out is available. For more information call 4315884. Wilder. Silver Grove Volunteer Fire Department, 4 p.m.-7:30 p.m., 5011 Four Mile. Includes fish, shrimp, chicken tenders, frog legs, hush puppies, macaroni and cheese and coleslaw. Carryout available, call ahead. Benefits Silver Grove Volunteer Fire Department. $4.75$6.50, 25 cents carryout fee. For more information call 441-6251. Silver Grove. Holy Trinity Junior High School, 4 p.m.-7 p.m., 840 Washington Ave. Fish, shrimp, grilled cheese, fries, hush puppies, coleslaw, macaroni and cheese, and drink. Carryout available. 75 cents-$7. For more information call 491-7612. Newport. Knights of Columbus, 4 p.m.-8 p.m., Father DeJaco Council 5220, 11186 Licking Pike. Fish dinners and sandwiches, baked fish, shrimp, fries, cheese pizza, macaroni and cheese, hush puppies, and coleslaw. Carryout available. 75 cents-$6.50. For more information call 635-9863. Alexandria. Bellevue Veterans Club, 5. p.m. 24 Fairfield Ave. Menu includes fish, fish sandwich, shrimp, cheese sticks, hush puppies, fries, slaw and macaroni and cheese. Children’s meal includes chicken nuggets and fries.

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BUSINESS NOTES Fort Thomas resident joins Metro

Jill Dunne of Fort Thomas has joined Metro as public affairs manager. In this role, Dunne will be responsible for media relations, public relations, social media and community relations efforts and will serve as a Metro spokesperson. Before joining Metro, Dunne was Senior Account

Executive for O’Keeffe Public Relations and worked with c l i e n t s including Cincinnati Dunne Habitat for H u m a n i t y, Fischer Homes, Champion Windows, the Village of Greenhills and Montgomery

Inn. During her career, she has established relationships with local and national media. As spokesperson for the Newport Aquarium, she was interviewed on The Today Show, Good Morning America and for The New York Times. Dunne is involved in social media. She created the Newport Aquarium’s YouTube page, which was featured on

CNN’s “American Morning� program twice in 2007. Metro is a nonprofit, taxfunded public service of the Southwest Ohio Regional Transit Authority, providing about 20 million rides per year. Metro supports the economy, protects the environment, encourages energy independence, and improves the quality of life in Greater Cincinnati.

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Community

CCF Recorder

April 1, 2010

B7

Caring for a honey of a bunny I’d like to see your photos and hear your stories. Send them to me at: marsolete@insightbb.com with your name, your pet’s

By Marsie Hall Newbold marsolete@insightbb.com

fan of Marsie’s Menagerie on Facebook. Come join in the fun, but always remember, no nipping!

FIND THE HELP YOU NEED IN NORTHER WAY TO N KEN T S E T U CK AST F E Y Business & Professional TH

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(Left to right) Marsie Hall Newbold, Hopper the Bunny (in her pink convertible) and Barbara Nagel.

Barbara Nagel’s top five ‘Hare-Raising’ tips

To place an ad call 859-578-5509, fax 859-578-5515 or email bkrosnes@nky.com.

1.) Keep your pet bunnies inside in a large cage. Outdoors there is the weather to worry about and cats and too many other dangers to name. 2.) Make sure you have all the right supplies. Besides a cage, you need food, a bowl, water bottle, litter, storage containers and cleaning equipment. 3.) Give your bunny lots of attention. They have to play for at least a half hour a day. You can teach them tricks if you find out what they really like, like a special food treat. (Hopper, for example, can balance on a ball, hop down the stairs, play a keyboard and drive a pink plastic convertible.) 4.) Feed your rabbit a good diet. This means rabbit pellets, but can also include carrots, Timothy hay, apples (with the seeds removed, because they are poisonous to rabbits) and radishes. Do not feed your bunny lettuce since that gives them gas. 5.) Always love your bunny because after all, they deserve it!

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Easter is upon us and the temptation is there to buy children bunnies as holiday gifts. But, don’t do it, pleads Mark Kerley of Bellevue, a graphic designer and owner of Lucky Rabbit Studio (www.luckyrabbitstudio.com). Kerley, who owns Sophie, a rescue rabbit, is an active member of the House Rabbit Society (www.rabbit.org), an international nonprofit organization that rescues rabbits from animals shelters and educates the public on rabbit care and behavior. He is so committed to the cause that he donates 5 percent of Lucky Rabbit Studio’s profits to the group. “Unlike chocolate Easter bunnies,” he says, “Rabbits can live up to 10 years. And being naturally skittish and not to mention, fragile, they aren’t the best choice for young children.” He suggests that a better choice might be a stuffed toy because, “Rabbits aren’t holiday gifts, they are live animals that need caring owners who will cater to their needs.”

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folio. “She got a good grade on it,” her mother added, proudly. “I thought it would be super-easy to keep a bunny,” Barbara recalled. “And I found out that it’s not! There’s a lot to it. The truth is, they poop a lot and you have to keep their cage really clean. I do it at least once a week with a little shovel. First, I scoop out everything then take the tray from underneath and scrub it and put fresh lining around the cage. She throws a lot of litter and I have to replace that a lot.” The little girl flinches. “Oooh, stop that,” she gently rebuked the errant bunny, placing her finger gently on its nose, explaining, “She doesn’t bite hard, just nibbles. I call it a love nibble.” “Now, now, Hopper,” she coos, placing a kiss on the tip of one of its ears, “Be good, we have guests around. Bunnies are very loving animals. It just takes them awhile to get used to you.” Rabbits also shed, Barbara said, especially in the Spring and Fall. “That’s when they change their fur, so you have to keep them brushed. They are very clean animals and lick themselves so you don’t have to give them baths.” “The vet cuts her toenails once a year,” she added, “And checks her teeth to make sure that they are OK.” To ensure that her rabbit’s teeth don’t get too long, Barbara gives her chew sticks to gnaw on. This past Christmas, Hopper received several in the shape of pizza, burgers and soda bottles. But, she believes that all the hard work is worth it because, “She‘s the best rabbit in the whole wide world!”

Publishes every Tuesday in The Kentucky Enquirer, every Thursday in The Community Recorder. Search ads online any day, any time at NKY.com.

CUSTOM REMODELING

“What in the world is that?” Nipper asked, sniffing my sweater suspiciously. His tail stopped mid-wag and stiffened. “Were you out playing with another animal?” “Maybe,” I replied hesitantly, feeling a bit like I’d been caught with my hand in the cookie jar. “Out with it you twotimer,” he said, heaving a sigh, then moving his nose onto my pants leg. “Don’t lie to me, that’ll just make it worse.” “Alright, it was a rabbit,” I admitted. “A rabbit,” he repeated, sarcasm dripping from his voice. “I see. Now I’ve heard it all. I can’t turn my back on you for five minutes.” “It was a social petting,” I offered, lamely. “It didn’t mean anything.” Well, actually it did, but Nipper doesn’t need to know that. I held a rabbit, cuddled it, even gave it a kiss or two because it was so darned cute. The bunny in question was Hopper, a dark grey, lop-eared rabbit owned by Barbara Nagel of Fort Thomas, a fifth-grade student at Johnson Elementary School. “Bunnies are cute,” Barbara explained, “But they need a lot of care if you are going to keep one as a pet.” The 10-year-old is an expert rabbit keeper, having acquired Hopper from neighbors two years ago. “They got a dog that was part retriever,” she said, rolling her eyes, “And they didn’t play very well together. So they had to find another home for the rabbit.” Barbara’s mother, Sandy, said that before Barbara could take on the responsibility of a bunny, she had to do some research. “I don’t know nothing about birthin’ no bunnies,” she quipped. “Seriously, though, I wanted this to be a learning experience for Barbara. The bunny was going to be her sole responsibility, so I wanted to make certain that she was prepared.” So the little girl headed to the library and checked out a half dozen books on rabbits and their care. She took the opportunity to write a report for school which then went into her writing port-

name, age, breed and a short explaination and I’ll post them on my Web site: www.marsiesmenagerie.com. You can also become a

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To advertise contact Brenda Krosnes at 859-578-5509, fax 859-578-5515 or bkrosnes@nky.com


B8

CCF Recorder

April 1, 2010

PUBLICATION SUMMARY ORDINANCE NO. 0-03-2010 AN ORDINANCE CONFIRMING THE CITY ENGINEER’S ESTIMATE OF THE COST OF THE IMPROVEMENT AND CERTIFICATE OF APPORTIONMENT FOR THE IMPROVEMENT OF AUDUBON PLACE FROM ITS INTERSECTION WITH SOUTH FORT THOMAS AVENUE TO ITS INTERSECTION WITH ST. NICHOLAS PLACE; MANOR LANE FROM ITS INTERSECTION WITH SOUTH FORT THOMAS AVENUE TO ITS TERMINUS; MONTVALE COURT FROM ITS INTERSECTION WITH SOUTH FORT THOMAS AVENUE TO ITS TERMINUS; NEWMAN AVENUE FROM ITS INTERSECTION WITH CHURCHILL DRIVE TO ITS INTERSECTION WITH KYLES LANE; WOODLAND PLACE FROM ITS INTERSECTION WITH HIGHLAND AVENUE TO ITS TERMINUS; AND SWEETBRIAR AVENUE FROM ITS INTERSECTION WITH HIGHLAND AVENUE TO ITS TERMINUS; ALL IN THE CITY OF FORT THOMAS, CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY, AND ALL IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE PLANS AND SPECIFICATIONS THERETO AS SUBMITTED BY THE CITY ENGINEER AND AS APPROVED BY THE BOARD OF COUNCIL; APPROVING AND LEVYING A SPECIAL ASSESSMENT AGAINST THE ABUTTING PROPERTY OWNERS AND PROVIDING FOR ITS PAYMENT; DIRECTING THE CITY CLERK TO PUBLISH AN ABSTRACT OF THIS ORDINANCE, DIRECTING THE CITY TREASURER TO PREPARE AND DISTRIBUTE THE ASSESSMENT BILLS REQUIRING ALL ABUTTING PROPERTY OWNERS TO PAY THE IMPROVEMENT ASSESSMENT. That the Public Works Committee and the City Engineer recommend the acceptance of the improvement of the streets listed in the title of this Ordinance. The work is completed and the City Engineer’s estimate of the cost and the Certificate of apportionment are hereby accepted. SECTION II That special assessment rates as set out below per linear foot and fronting on listed streets, be and the same is hereby apportioned, levied, and assessed against said real estate and the owners thereof (see attached Exhibit “A”) at the stated cost per foot, as set out as follows: STREET Audubon Place (25’) Audubon Place (28’) Manor Lane (20’) Manor Lane (28’) Montvale Court Newman Avenue Sweetbriar Avenue Woodland Place

FRONT FT COST CITY PORTION

FRONT FT COST PPTY OWNR PORTION

$ 4.71 $ 6.80 $ 6.78 $ 9.54 $ 6.42 $ 5.37 $ 7.29 $ 8.06

FINAL COST

$ 4.71 $ 6.80 $ 6.78 $ 9.54 $ 6.42 $ 5.37 $ 7.29 $ 8.06

$ 4,315.54 $ 10,129.66 $ 18,936.19 $ 20,151.69 $ 17,082.36 $ 46,174.11 $ 32,674.47 $ 23,507.04

SECTION III Payments for all improvements shall be due within forty-five (45) days of the publication of the Ordinance of Apportionment and any assessment levied that is not paid when due shall bear a penalty of five percent (5%). An additional ten percent (10%) penalty will be levied thirty-one (31) days after the due date, and any unpaid assessment shall accrue eight percent (8%) per annum interest, except for those property owners participating in the Installment Payment Plan, as outlined below, and shall continue to accrue and be liable as provided by law. The City’s portion of the entire improvement cost shall be paid within thirty (30) days from the acceptance of said work under the contract. INSTALLMENT PAYMENT PLAN A property owner may have the option to finance the payment of their assessment bill over a specified period of time subject to the total amount of their assessment. Property owners with assessment bills of more than $400, but less than $1,000 may finance their bill over a three (3) year period with equal payments. Property owners with assessment bills of more than $1,000 may finance their bill over a five (5) year period with equal payments. The total amount of the assessment to quality for the improvement installment plan shall not be less than $400. An interest rate of eight per cent (8%) per annum shall be levied on the unpaid portion of the balance. The first annual installment shall become due and payable on July 1, following the year in which the project was completed. Any interested property owner qualifying for the improvement Installment Payment Plan shall initiate this process by completing an Installment Agreement Form with the City’s Director of Finance within thirty (30) days of the publication of the Ordinance of Apportionment. A non-refundable administrative fee of thirty-five dollars ($35) shall be required to process the Installment Agreement Application Form. Installment payments shall be made to the Finance Office on or before July 31 of each year as outlined in the Agreement. If any property owner fails to make their installment payment by July 31 of each year as outlined in the Agreement, the entire unpaid balance will become due immediately and payable in full with no recourse. The City shall exercise its rights to proceed to collect all amounts in default of improvement assessment bills by initiating appropriate legal action. The City Treasurer shall, within one week after the Ordinance is published, send the assessment bills requiring all property owners to pay the improvement tax levied. I, Jann Seidenfaden, City Attorney for the City of Fort Thomas, Campbell County, Kentucky, and an attorney licensed to practice law in the Commonwealth of Kentucky, do hereby certify that this Summary was prepared by me at the direction of the Mayor and Board of Council, and that this Summary is a true and accurate summary of the contents of the Ordinance. ___________________________ Jann Seidenfaden, City Attorney

PROVIDED

On air

Northern Kentucky University Internet Student Radio Norse Code announcer Michael Willis interviews Bobby Mackey of Highland Heights.

NKY SPRING AND SUMMER CAMPS W E D N E S D A Y, A P R I L 1 4

SUMMER CAMP MISCELLANEOUS

Miss Julia’s Camp for Young Ladies, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Daily through June 18. Dinsmore Homestead, 5656 Burlington Pike, Embroidery, dancing, elocution, art of conversation, hiking, picnic and tea party. Snacks and water provided. Lunch will not be included. For Ages 11 and up. $100, $85 members. Registration required. 586-6117. Burlington. S U N D A Y, A P R I L 2 5

Name RICHARDSON, EDMOND II & SARAH CLAY, GREENE B. & BARBARA LUTKENHOFF, ERIC & JULIA KRAMER, RUSTY J. & AMANDA PCK INVESTMENTS LLC WINBURN, MELBA MASTERS, JIM & LISA WARD, MYRNA GERL, LOUISE M. HIGHLAND HILLS PROPERTIES LLC VOGELSANG, JOAN LABER, MICHAEL & PATRICIA SCHROER, ELEANOR B. PENDERY, P. STEVEN & DANA MORRIS, DAVID B. & TERI BUSCHLE, MARK & KRISTEN HENGELBROK, EDWIN JR. & HARRIET CITY OF FT.THOMAS HAROLD, MICHAEL & EVALENE TRAUTH, JAMES A. & SHARON L. TRAUTH, JAMES A. & SHARON L. JANSEN, GERALD K. & MERLIN MERRIFIELD, JOAN E. CAUDILL, JOHN L. & MARIA A. JANI, DARSHAN P. & SONIA D. DEINLEIN, CHRISTOPHER & JONI PIERATT, EDWARD & LAURA ROLF, KEVIN J. & SANDRA G. SCHELL, DARREL G. JR. & ANDREA GERL, GEORGE J. & LOUISE M. KINSMAN, DONALD V. & DOROTHY M. CONNIFF, PATRICK J. & CATHERINE ENGLAND, ROBERT & DEBRA A. BOTTO, MARK D. & KIMBELL D. BUECKER, DUSTIN J. & SUZANNE W. SEWARD, GARY L. & DENISE M. PLUNKETT, JIM & JOAN MARTIN,WILLIAM P. II & CHRISTIN BANKENPER, JOHN A. PSC HERDINA, STEPHEN A. & KAREN F. BORNE, PATRICIA C. ARNZEN, NATHANIEL EYER LAROSA,WALTER A. NEAB LLC FT.THOMAS ENTERPRISES INC. DOEPKER, JAMES A. & DARCY M. HESCH, ROBERT L. & BETTIE R. LESTER, CHARLES T. & KATHLEEN R. UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST BANKENPER, JOHN A. PSC GUARDIAN SAVINGS BANK DRAKE, ROBERT J. & JERLYN WILDER, FRAN TRUST SCHRODER, JUANITA & HELEN KLARE, JOS. N. & LINDA E. LEMBKE, RAYMOND WM. GRONECK, KEVIN J. & DAWN GRONECK, KEVIN J. & DAWN MCGINNIS, MARK & JEANNIFER KEY WUEST INVESTMENTS NESTHEIDE, ROBERT R. & KATHY KEY WUEST INVESTMENTS SEILER, JOHN A. THOMAS, MICHAEL & ROBIN THOMAS, MICHAEL & ROBIN MCCAUSEY, JAMES N. JR. & ARVIN J. WENZEL, RUTH E.TRUST CITY OF FT.THOMAS THIRTY DAV JO LTD LIABILITY

MailingAddress 24 MIDWAY CT. 12 MIDWAY CT. 200 KENTUCKY DR 20 MIDWAY CT. 1098 BLOSSOM DR. 28 MIDWAY CT. 400 VATER RD. 1035-1037 S. FT THOMAS AVE. 15 MANOR LN. APT. B 122 S. FT THOMAS AVE. 2 MANOR LN. 23 MANOR LN. 33 MANOR LN. 39 MANOR LN. 4 MANOR LN. 90 MANOR LN. 96 MANOR LN. R-O-W234 S. FT. THOMAS AVE. 104 MANOR LN. 104 MANOR LN. 105 MANOR LN. 106 MANOR LN. 108 MANOR LN. 110 MANOR LN. 111 MANOR LN. 119 MANOR LN. 120 MANOR LN. 123 MANOR LN. 124 MANOR LN. 128 MANOR LN. 132 MANOR LN. 134 MANOR LN. 138 MANOR LN. 141 MANOR LN. 145 MANOR LN. 147 MANOR LN. 150 MANOR LN. 26 AUDUBON PL. 37 AUDUBON PL. 45 AUDUBON PL. 49 AUDUBON PL. 29 AUDUBON PL. 11 AUDUBON PL. P.O. BOX 388 12 HIGHLAND AVE. 21 AUDUBON PL. 25 AUDUBON PL. 15 S. FT. THOMAS AVE 26 AUDUBON PL. 2774 BLUE ROCK RD. 36 MONTVALE CT. 25 MONTVALE CT. 39 MONTVALE CT. 46 MONTVALE CT. 679 LOCUST CORNER RD. 45 MONTVALE CT. 45 MONTVALE CT. 30 MONTVALE CT. 609 MONTEREY LN. 33 MONTVALE CT. 609 MONTEREY LN. 17 MONTVALE CT. 52 MONTVALE CT. 52 MONTVALE CT. 41 MONTVALE CT. 26 MONTVALE CT. R-O-W 835 YORK STREET

City, State, Zip FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 NEWPORT, KY 41071 FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 COLD SPRING, KY 41076 FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 BUTLER, KY 41006 FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 CINCINNATI, OH 45239 FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 CINCINNATI, OH 45245 FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 COLD SPRING, KY 41076 FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 COLD SPRING, KY 41076 FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 NEWPORT, KY 41071

AssessedAddress 24 MIDWAY CT. 12 MIDWAY CT. 16 MIDWAY CT. 20 MIDWAY CT. 15 MIDWAY CT. 28 MIDWAY CT. 1031 S. FT. THOMAS AVE. 1035 S. FT.THOMAS AVE. 15 MANOR LN. 19 MANOR LN. 2 MANOR LN. 23 MANOR LN. 33 MANOR LN. 39 MANOR LN. 4 MANOR LN. 90 MANOR LN. 96 MANOR LN. ALLEY MANOR LN. 104 MANOR LN. 104 MANOR LN. 105 MANOR LN. 106 MANOR LN. 108 MANOR LN. 110 MANOR LN. 111 MANOR LN. 119 MANOR LN. 120 MANOR LN. 123 MANOR LN. 124 MANOR LN. 128 MANOR LN. 132 MANOR LN. 134 MANOR LN. 138 MANOR LN. 141 MANOR LN. 145 MANOR LN. 147 MANOR LN. 150 MANOR LN. 26 AUDUBON PL. 37 AUDUBON PL. 45 AUDUBON PL. 49 AUDUBON PL. 29 AUDUBON PL. 11 AUDUBON PL. 11 S. FT. THOMAS AVE. 17 AUDUBON PL. 21 AUDUBON PL. 25 AUDUBON PL. AUDUBON PL. 26 AUDUBON PL. 11 MONTVALE CT. 36 MONTVALE CT. 25 MONTVALE CT. 39 MONTVALE CT. 46 MONTVALE CT. 22 MONTVALE CT. 45 MONTVALE CT. 45 MONTVALE CT. 30 MONTVALE CT. 21 MONTVALE CT. 33 MONTVALE CT. 19 MONTVALE CT. 17 MONTVALE CT. 52 MONTVALE CT. 52 MONTVALE CT. 42 MONTVALE CT. 26 MONTVALE CT. MONTVALE CT. 106 S. FT. THOMAS AVE.

U.S.P.S. (EXEMPT)

24 S. FT. THOMAS AVE.

FT. THOMAS, KY 41075

24 S. FT. THOMAS AVE.

BILTZ,THOMAS & BARBARA TURNER, DAVID C. & JENNIFER M. BURKART,WM. H. JR. & RITA M. AHEARN, DANIEL T. & MARGARET A. DUNHAM, ROBERT F. & CHRISTIE M. GABBARD FAMILY TRUST FORD, MARY P. SANOW, PAUL & ZELEZNIK, M. GILLES, KEITH E. & LESLIE P. HILLS,THOMAS G. & AMY G. HOLMES,WM. G. & CAROLE S. FENNELL, KENT D. & HANNAH E. TAYLOR REVOCABLE TRUST LILES, JAMES D. MACKE, MARY C. MALONE, DAVID B. & TRACIE B. POMPILIO, JASON & AMANDA PENDERY,THOMAS & AMY

84 SWEETBRIAR AVE. 55 SWEETBRIAR AVE. 33 SWEETBRIAR AVE. 69 SWEETBRIAR AVE. 63 SWEETBRIAR AVE. 37 SWEETBRIAR AVE. 92 SWEETBRIAR AVE. 48 SWEETBRIAR AVE. 66 SWEETBRIAR AVE. 25 SWEETBRIAR AVE. 54 SWEETBRIAR AVE. 60 SWEETBRIAR AVE. 34 SWEETBRIAR AVE. 16 SWEETBRIAR AVE. 49 SWEETBRIAR AVE. 73 SWEETBRIAR AVE. 43532 CLIVEDON CT. 78 SWEETBRIAR AVE.

Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 ASHBURN, VA 20147 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075

84 SWEETBRIAR AVE. 55 SWEETBRIAR AVE. 33 SWEETBRIAR AVE. 69 SWEETBRIAR AVE. 63 SWEETBRIAR AVE. 37 SWEETBRIAR AVE. 92 SWEETBRIAR AVE. 48 SWEETBRIAR AVE. 66 SWEETBRIAR AVE. 25 SWEETBRIAR AVE. 54 SWEETBRIAR AVE. 60 SWEETBRIAR AVE. 34 SWEETBRIAR AVE. 16 SWEETBRIAR AVE. 49 SWEETBRIAR AVE. 73 SWEETBRIAR AVE. 22 SWEETBRIAR AVE. 78 SWEETBRIAR AVE.

CE-1001546414-01.INDD

Community

PIDN 12-872.00 12-906.00 13-443.00 16-089.00 16-430.00 17-367.00 14-693.00 15-724.00 17-291.00 16-133.00 15-652.00 14-838.00 16-356.00 15-710.00 15-421.00 15-803.00 14-175.00 15-879.00 16-944.00 16-944.00 14-461.00 12-744.00 12-855.00 14-369.00 17-182.00 13-530.00 16-087.00 12-980.00 13-739.00 14-663.00 12-977.00 13-382.00 12-579.00 13-084.00 16-469.00 32.215.00 13-616.00 12-318.00 13-512.00 12-571.00 13-679.00 14-213.00 12-779.00 13-642.00 13-222.00 14-224.00 14-938.00 36-399.00 12-318.00 12-866.00 13-314.00 13-861.00 14-521.00 14-680.00 14-923.00 15-192.00 15.193.00 15-194.00 15-514.00 15-529.00 16-435.00 16-456.00 16-893.00 16-894.00 17-168.00 17-251.00 13-216.00 12-497.00 12-622.00 12-758.00 13-205.00 13-297.00 13-658.00 13-575.00 13-625.00 13-784.00 14-258.00 14-318.00 14-519.00 14-595.00 14-962.00 15-060.00 15-079.00 15-187.00 15-699.00

% of Project 3.18% 4.32% 4.32% 3.88% 12.50% 2.83% 9.05% 9.93% 4.26% 3.86% 5.92% 2.37% 6.20% 1.92% 3.73% 3.17% 5.75% 0.81% 6.57% 5.45% 2.15% 4.37% 2.15% 2.15% 2.15% 4.29% 4.29% 2.15% 2.68% 2.15% 2.15% 2.15% 2.15% 2.15% 3.06% 3.40% 3.07% 3.36% 22.82% 15.83% 5.46% 5.89% 0.67% 3.06% 8.85% 3.36% 3.36% 4.03% 20.76% 5.91% 2.44% 1.88% 2.07% 2.82% 2.82% 2.04% 2.82% 0.73% 1.88% 2.07% 1.88% 2.07% 2.07% 0.75% 1.48% 2.82% 2.04% 0.63% 10.02%

Frontage 29.45 40.00 40.00 36.00 115.80 26.19 83.90 92.00 90.00 81.50 125.00 50.00 131.02 40.46 78.70 67.03 121.33 17.04 138.75 115.00 60.00 122.12 60.00 60.00 60.00 120.00 120.00 60.00 75.00 60.00 60.00 60.00 60.00 60.00 85.50 95.00 85.79 93.90 209.10 145.10 50.00 54.00 10.00 45.60 131.77 50.00 50.00 60.00 309.12 88.00 65.00 50.00 55.00 75.00 75.00 54.25 75.00 19.47 50.00 55.00 50.00 55.00 55.00 19.85 39.27 75.00 54.25 16.69 266.75

PerFoot 5.61 5.61 5.61 5.61 5.61 5.61 5.61 5.61 9.33 9.33 9.33 9.33 9.33 9.33 9.33 9.33 9.33 9.33 9.33 9.33 6.48 6.48 6.48 6.48 6.48 6.48 6.48 6.48 6.48 6.48 6.48 6.48 6.48 6.48 6.48 6.48 6.48 6.48 8.84 8.84 8.84 8.84 10.01 10.01 10.01 10.01 10.01 10.01 10.01 10.01 6.73 6.73 6.73 6.73 6.73 6.73 6.73 6.73 6.73 6.73 6.73 6.73 6.73 6.73 6.73 6.73 6.73 6.73 6.73

Total 165.21 224.40 224.40 201.96 649.64 146.93 470.68 516.12 839.70 760.40

4.70%

125.00

6.73

841.25

2.16% 1.67% 1.80% 1.67% 1.67% 1.68% 1.20% 1.67% 1.67% 1.58% 1.67% 1.67% 1.72% 1.17% 1.67% 2.23% 2.24% 1.74%

96.60 75.00 80.86 75.00 75.00 75.38 53.60 75.00 75.00 70.78 75.00 75.00 77.03 52.25 75.00 100.12 100.49 78.00

9.75 9.75 9.75 9.75 9.75 9.75 9.75 9.75 9.75 9.75 9.75 9.75 9.75 9.75 9.75 9.75 9.75 9.75

941.85 731.25 788.39 731.25 731.25 734.96 522.60 731.25 731.25 690.11 731.25 731.25 751.04 509.44 731.25 976.17 979.78 760.50

466.50 377.49 734.27 625.39 158.98 388.80 791.34 388.80 388.80 388.80 777.60 777.60 388.80 486.00 388.80 388.80 388.80 388.80 388.80 554.04 615.60 555.92 608.47 442.00 477.36 100.10 456.46 500.50 500.50 600.60 880.88 437.45 336.50 370.15 504.75 504.75 365.10 504.75 131.03 336.50 370.15 336.50 370.15 370.15 133.59 264.29 504.75 365.10 112.32

SUMMER CAMP - YMCA Open House, 1 p.m.-4 p.m. Camp Ernst, Free. 586-6181; www.myYcamp.org. Burlington. M O N D A Y, M A Y 2 4

SUMMER CAMP - YMCA

R.C. Durr YMCA Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. School’s Finally Out. Daily through May 28. R.C. Durr YMCA, 5874 Veterans Way, Themed weeks. Scholarships and care available. State child care assistance accepted. Ages 5-11. $170, $125 members. Registration required. 534-5700. Burlington. R.C. Durr YMCA Preschool Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-noon Part-day. At the Beach. Daily through May 28. R.C. Durr YMCA, 5874 Veterans Way, Themed weeks. Scholarship and daycare available. State child care assistance accepted. Ages 3-5. $170, $125 members; part-day: $105, $75 members. Registration required. 534-5700. Burlington. R.C. Durr YMCA Teen Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through May 28. R.C. Durr YMCA, 5874 Veterans Way, Themed weeks. Scholarships available. State child care assistance accepted. Ages 11-15. $175, $130 members. Registration required. 5345700. Burlington. R.C. Durr YMCA Summer Camp Leadership in Training Program, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through May 28. R.C. Durr YMCA, 5874 Veterans Way, Assist staff wit activities. Participants are selected through an interview process. Ages 13-16. $60, $30 members. Registration required. 534-5700; www.myy.org. Burlington. T U E S D A Y, J U N E 1

SUMMER CAMP - YMCA R.C. Durr YMCA Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Prorated super Sports Fan. Daily through June 4. R.C. Durr YMCA, $170, $125 members. Registration required. 5345700. Burlington. R.C. Durr YMCA Preschool Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-noon Part-day. Prorated Wild, Wild West. Daily through June 4. R.C. Durr YMCA, $170, $125 members; part-day: $105, $75 members. Registration required. 534-5700. Burlington. R.C. Durr YMCA Teen Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through June 4. R.C. Durr YMCA, $175, $130 members. Registration required. 534-5700. Burlington. Kenton County YMCA Traditional Day Camp, 8:45 a.m.-4 p.m. Schools Out. Daily through June 4. Kenton County YMCA, 10987 Marshall Road, Weekly-themed activities. Scholarship assistance available. Ages 5-11. $120, $100 members; registration fee: $40 family, $25 child. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County YMCA. 781-1814. Independence. Advanced Camping Experience Camp, 8:45 p.m.-4 p.m. Daily through June 4. Kenton County YMCA, 10987 Marshall Road, Learn about leadership development, cultural awareness and self-worth. Scholarship assistance available. Ages 13-16. $120, $100 members; registration fee: $40 family, $25 child. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County YMCA. 356-3178. Independence. Traditional Day Camp, 9 a.m.-4 p.m.

School’s Out. Daily through June 4. Campbell County YMCA, 1437 S. Fort Thomas Ave. Swimming, environmental education, arts and crafts, service learning, science, literature, free time and more. Extended hours available. Financial assistance available. Ages 5-10. $140, $110 members. Registration required. 781-1814; www.myy.org. Fort Thomas. Campbell County YMCA Adventure Camp, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through June 4. Campbell County YMCA, 1437 S. Fort Thomas Ave. Teen Camping. Themes, activities, swimming and fun traditional day camp. Ages 11-12. $140, $110 members. Registration required. 572-3063. Fort Thomas. Campbell County YMCA A.C.E.S. Camp, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through June 4. Campbell County YMCA, 1437 S. Fort Thomas Ave. Work on learning projects in surrounding communities and participate in several team building experiences. Financial assistance available. Ages 13-16. $140, $110 members. Registration required. 572-3063. Fort Thomas. Campbell County YMCA Pre and post Camp, 6:30 a.m.-8:45 a.m. Pre-camp care. Daily through June 4. Campbell County YMCA, 1437 S. Fort Thomas Ave. Extended care for any family available. Ages 5-16. Pre: $35, $25 members; post: $30, $20 members. Registration required. 781-1814; www.myy.org. Fort Thomas. R.C. Durr YMCA Summer Camp Leadership in Training Program, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through June 4. R.C. Durr YMCA, $60, $30 members. Registration required. 5345700; www.myy.org. Burlington. M O N D A Y, J U N E 7

SUMMER CAMP - ARTS

Newport Central Catholic Summer Drama Program, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Grades 5-8. Monday-Friday. Continues through June 24. Performances at 7:30 p.m. on June 25-26. $200. Newport Central Catholic High School, 13 Carothers Road, Black Box Theatre. Lunch, acting, dancing and music. With drama coach and assistants. Each session limited to 30 students. Registration required. 292-0001; www.ncchs.com. Newport. Camp Claymation, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through June 11. Behringer-Crawford Museum, 1600 Montague Road. Ages 8-12. Work in teams to create clay figures, make visual story boards and create story to bring clay figures to life. $230 future members, $175 members. 491-4003. Covington.

SUMMER CAMP - HORSES

Little Britain Stables Horse Camp, 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Daily through June 18. Little Britain Stables, 5309 Idlewild Road, Horse care, riding instruction, leading, lunging, ground driving, driving and riding. Ages 7-16. $300. Registration required. 586-7990; ww.LittleBritainStable.com. Burlington.

SUMMER CAMP - NATURE

Young Stewards of the Earth, 8 a.m.-noon, Northern Kentucky Montessori Center, 2625 Anderson Road, Montessori-based camp. Learn to recycle, compost and reduce waste; importance of local farming and the origins of the food we eat; and importance of nutritious food and sustainable packaging. Twoweek sessions culminate with field trip including Turner Farms, the Cincinnati Zoo and Gorman Heritage Farm. Children may attend any number of weeks. Ages -1-0. $150-$180 per week. Registration required. 331-3725. Crescent Springs.

SUMMER CAMP - YMCA

R.C. Durr YMCA Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Back to the Future. Daily through June 11. R.C. Durr YMCA, $170, $125 members. Registration required. 534-5700. Burlington. R.C. Durr YMCA Preschool Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Part-day. Journey to Space. Daily through June 11. R.C. Durr YMCA, $170, $125 members; part-day: $105, $75 members. Registration required. 534-5700. Burlington.

NKY.com/community


Community

CCF Recorder

April 1, 2010

B9

Town & Country’s wraps up ‘Biggest Loser’ competition Participants in the third annual Town & Country Biggest Loser Healthy Lifestyle Program shed an amazing 1,755 pounds. The 198 participants braved the cold weather and snow this January and February trying to earn the coveted “Biggest Loser” title that is awarded at the conclusion of Town & Country Sports & Health Club’s annual eight-week group training Biggest Loser Healthy Lifestyle Competition.

The program consisted of weekly group training sessions with certified fitness trainers, an online nutrition component and weekly “homework” exercises. Each of the nearly 200 contestants lost weight. The average weight lost per person during the eightweek program was 8.1 pounds. “Working out with our group was fun, we motivate and encourage one another, having the guidance and support of our trainer each

week keeps us on the right track,” said Rebecca Russell, Fort Wright, first time participant. “I look forward to coming to Town & Country for the weekly sessions and we are all enjoying our weight loss success. Exercising as part of this competition has been great; I would definitely do it again next year.” The Tangerine team with members: Leigh Nassano, Valerie Harmon, John Harmon, Dave Nassano, Rocky Nassano, Kelsey McCaffrey,

Lori Gulley, Pat Gulley, Lisa Nassano, JoAnn Nassano and were lead by trainer, Karen Brackman, were the overall winning team with a total of 153.5 pounds lost and 13.14 percent body fat decrease. Bob Gerde of Alexandria was the Top Individual Winner. He lost 27 pounds and reduced his overall body fat by 25.98 percent. Rocky Nassano of Alexandria came in second place, losing 21 pounds and improving his body fat by

PROVIDED

Tangerine team members: Leigh Nassano, Valerie Harmon, John Harmon, Dave Nassano, Rocky Nassano, Kelsey McCaffrey, Lori Gulley, Pat Gulley, Lisa Nassano, JoAnn Nassano. The team was led by trainer Karen Brackman. 25.45 percent. The top female was Kristy Voorhees of Edge-

wood. Kristy lost eight pounds and decreased her body fat by 21.8 percent.

each participant with the tools they need for weight loss and maintenance. Healthy Directions sessions are offered at St. Elizabeth Florence, 4900 Houston Road in Florence. The cost is $250 for the 10-week session. The free introduction is April 5 and weekly sessions run from April 12 through June 14, 6:30 - 7:30 p.m. Call 859-212GOAL (4625) to register.

a.m. to noon. The Fort Thomas Fire and Police departments, Mt. Lookout Chiropractic, Dr. Rider (a pediatric dentist), and Fun For All Clowns will be among the community partners. There will also be a Taekwondo demonstration. YMCA Healthy Kids Day will be celebrated across the country at more than 1,500 YMCAs. It’s part of the YMCA’s national Activate America initiative that encourages people of all ages to lead healthy lifestyles. The Campbell County YMCA is located at 1437 S. Fort Thomas Ave in Fort Thomas. For updated information, the public can call 859-781-1814.

BRIEFLY Relay for life

“For Our Angels,” a Campbell County Relay for Life team, is hosting a fundraising concert from 6 p.m. to midnight Saturday, April 10 at VFW Post 3205, 8261 Alexandria Pike, Alexandria. There will be a DJ at the family-oriented event from 69:30 p.m. and local band Derrick Allen & Southern Junction will perform country and Southern rock from 9:30 p.m. to midnight. A $10 cover charge includes food and two drink tickets. $5 for kids. There will also be raffles for an additional charge. All proceeds benefit The American Cancer Society. “For Our Angels” is one of several teams participating in

FOSTER, PHILIP A. & CAROL D. LILES, JAMES D. ROY, JAMES DALE & MARCIA H. COMBS, KELSON M. & JOANIE L. BENTON,WILLIAM R. SIMONS, MITCHELL E. WATSON,ALFRED P. DIANE P. ST.ANDREWS EPISCOPAL CHURCH PETERSON, MARLENE BEZOLD, DONALD W. & JAMIE O. MAINES, DIANA L. DEDMAN, RICHARD TODD PAGLIAMINTO,THOMAS P. COSTA,ANTHONY & JOYCE P. DEDMAN, FAMILY REV LIV TRUST BARTON, BRIAN R. MUHLBERGER, MARC & RAMONA PAQUIN, GARY W. & CHARLOTTE M. GARRY, JANE M. LANDWEHR, HILARY W. HUDEPOHL, PATTI A. MARX, LEONARD F. & MILDRED NOBLE, JOHN & CHANELLE EVERETT, JOYLEE C. EMPOWERMENT UNLIMITED LLC WEYER, JOSEPH A. & KIMBERLY N. FRINK, PAUL & CARYN NEWMAN, ROBERT & SUSAN NEWMAN, DOROTHY WEYER, JOSEPH A. & KIMBERLY N. PAGLIAMINTO,THOMAS & DELORES RANSON, JOHN H. & SANDRA A. ROMITO,ANNA LUCILLE TTE WELSCHER, DAVID J. & REGINA M. SUDKAMP, CATHERINE M. & JEFFERY GARDNER, JASON & MINDI JMG INVESTMENTS LLC CITY OF FORT THOMAS CITY OF FORT THOMAS BUECHEL CARMELLA A. RAY JOHN & HOLLI BIAS MASON & RAMONA D. DIXIUS JAMES R. JORDAN DONNA GAMMON, ROBERT F. & ELIZ. GIBSON, SUZANNE JACOBS, EDWARD L. JACOBS, EDWARD L. HERRICK, EDITH V.TRUST HOGAN, MICHAEL D. & JUDY JACOBS, ED CONST. CO. INC. LW LIMITED - NORTHAMERICAN PROP SHAEFER, ROBERT C. & MELANIE WADE, MARLELE L. MACMILLAN,ALEX & JOYCE HEMPLEMAN,ALAN C. & KIM OLDIGES,THOS.A. & PATRICIA PLAVSIC, IRVIN C. & MARY E. BROWN, CHARLES A. SCHAEFER,KENNETHW.&THERESA HOGAN, GERALD & SHEILA STRATMAN, PATRICIA STRATMAN, PATRICIA MCDERMOTT, BETTY & GREGORY FT.THOMAS PARTNERS LLC CARRIAGE HOUSE CONDO ASSOC. NORAN, DAVID WELCH, MICHAEL & KERI DONELAN, JAMES & JESSICA HERZOG, FRANCIS MORGAN,VICKI & JONES, MARY FRANK, MARY FRANCES WEDGEWOOD CONDO HOA BOARDWALK R-O-W HUNTEMANN LN. R-O-W JENNIFER CT. R-O-W CHURCHILL RD. R-O-W KYLES LANE R-O-W CE-1001547799-01.INDD

72 SWEETBRIAR AVE. 16 SWEETBRIAR AVE. 45 SWEETBRIAR AVE. 28 SWEETBRIAR AVE. 85 SWEETBRIAR AVE. 81 SWEETBRIAR AVE. 15 SWEETBRIAR AVE. 44 SWEETBRIAR AVE. 331 HIGHLAND AVE. 403 HIGHLAND AVE. 30 WOODLAND PL. 5 WOODLAND PL. 39 WOODLAND PL. 40 WOODLAND PL. 22 WOODLAND PL. 13 WOODLAND PL. 44 WOODLAND PL. 9 WOODLAND PL. 51 WOODLAND PL. 47 WOODLAND PL. 26 WOODLAND PL. 38 WOODLAND PL. 48 WOODLAND PL. 5090 TEBBE LN. 33 WOODLAND PL. 56 WOODLAND PL. 43 WOODLAND PL. 55 WOODLAND PL. 59 WOODLAND PL. 56 WOODLAND PL. 35 WOODLAND PL. 52 WOODLAND PL. 21 WOODLAND PL. 25 WOODLAND PL. 57 WOODLAND PL. 17 WOODLAND PL. 9 HIGHLAND AVE. R-O-W R-O-W 334 NEWMAN AVE. 333 NEWMAN AVE. 352 NEWMAN AVE. 330 NEWMAN AVE. 326 NEWMAN AVE. 360 NEWMAN AVE. 18 CLARA’S VIEW 8250 BLOME RD. 8250 BLOME RD. P.O. BOX 75103 462 NEWMAN AVE. 184 HIGHLAND AVE. 212 E 3RD ST. STE 300 430 NEWMAN AVE. 422 NEWMAN AVE. 332 NEWMAN AVE. 426 NEWMAN AVE. 442 NEWMAN AVE. 332A NEWMAN AVE. 332 NEWMAN AVE. 456 NEWMAN AVE. 446 NEWMAN AVE. 446 NEWMAN AVE. 355 NEWMAN AVE. 12 GUNPOWDER RIDGE 1407 GRAND AVE. P.O. BOX 75272 3 PATRICIA CT. 7 PATRICIA CT. 13 PATRICIA CT. 5 BOARDWALK PL. 8 KYLES LN. 1730 WEDGEWOOD CR. 130 N.FT.THOMAS AVE. 130 N.FT.THOMAS AVE. 130 N.FT.THOMAS AVE. 130 N.FT.THOMAS AVE. 130 N.FT.THOMAS AVE.

this year’s Campbell County Relay for Life, an all-night event which raises money for the American Cancer Society. This year’s relay will be held from 6 p.m. to 6 a.m. May 2122 at the Newport High School football field. To register, or for more information, visit http://relayforlife.org/campbellky.

Card party

The St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas Auxiliary will host its annual spring fling card party and luncheon Tuesday, April 13 at the Fort Thomas Community Center at Tower Park with doors opening at 11 a.m. The theme for this year's card party is “Spring is in the Air.” The cost to attend this

Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 HAMILTON, OH 45013 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 NO FRONT FOOTAGE Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 CINCINNATI, OH 45243 CINCINNATI, OH 45243 FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 NEWPORT, KY 41071 FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 FT. THOMAS, KY 41075

72 SWEETBRIAR AVE. 0 SWEETBRIAR AVE. 45 SWEETBRIAR AVE. 28 SWEETBRIAR AVE. 85 SWEETBRIAR AVE. 81 SWEETBRIAR AVE. 15 SWEETBRIAR AVE. 44 SWEETBRIAR AVE. SWEETBRIAR AVE. SWEETBRIAR AVE. 30 WOODLAND PL. 5 WOODLAND PL. 39 WOODLAND PL. 40 WOODLAND PL. 22 WOODLAND PL. 13 WOODLAN PL. 44 WOODLAND PL. 9 WOODLAND PL. 51 WOODLAND PL. 47 WOODLAND PL. 26 WOODLAND PL. 38 WOODLAND PL. 48 WOODLAND PL. 29 WOODLAND PL. 33 WOODLAND PL. 56 WOODLAND PL. 43 WOODLAND PL. 55 WOODLAND PL. 59 WOODLAND PL. 0 WOODLAND PL. 35 WOODLAND PL. 52 WOODLAND PL. 21 WOODLAND PL. 25 WOODLAND PL. 57 WOODLAND PL. 17 WOODLAND PL. 9 HIGHLAND AVE. LODGE LN. UNIMPROVED ROW 334 NEWMAN AVE. 333 NEWMAN AVE. 352 NEWMAN AVE. 330 NEWMAN AVE. 326 NEWMAN AVE. 360 NEWMAN AVE. 468 NEWMAN AVE. 370 NEWMAN AVE. 383 NEWMAN AVE. 327 NEWMAN AVE. 462 NEWMAN AVE. 380 NEWMAN AVE. 379 NEWMAN AVE. 434 NEWMAN AVE. 430 NEWMAN AVE. 422 NEWMAN AVE. 332 NEWMAN AVE. 426 NEWMAN AVE. 442 NEWMAN AVE. 332A NEWMAN AVE. 332 NEWMAN AVE. 456 NEWMAN AVE. 446 NEWMAN AVE. 485 NEWMAN AVE. 355 NEWMAN AVE. 100 HUNTEMANN LN. NEWMAN AVE. 1913 MERCER WAY NEWMAN AVE. NEWMAN AVE. NEWMAN AVE. NEWMAN AVE. NEWMAN AVE. NEWMAN AVE. NEWMAN AVE. NEWMAN AVE. NEWMAN AVE. NEWMAN AVE. NEWMAN AVE.

event is $20 per person and proceeds from the event will benefit the St. Elizabeth Skilled Nursing Unit. Also featured at this year's card party will be large raffle tables and door/table prices. For more information or to register for this event, contact Doris Watts at 859-635-2734.

Skyline fundraising

The Northern Kentucky Children’s Advocacy Center is partnering with Skyline Chili for a fundraiser during April. The center, located in Florence, works to provide support to children who have been victims of abuse. Skyline will donate a percentage of their sales on Tuesday nights in April to the center.

15-754.00 15-878.01 16-151.00 16-198.00 16-221.00 16-531.00 17-172.00 33-526.00 15-878.00 12-483.00 12-305.00 12-647.00 12-989.00 12-999.00 13-126.00 13.427.00 13-515.00 13-737.00 14-008.00 14-214.00 14-379.00 15-124.00 14-687.00 14-840.00 15-077.00 15-115.00 15-395.00 15-535.00 15-538.00 15-538.01 15-656.00 15-890.00 16-104.00 16-105.00 16-799.00 17-402.00 16-597.00 12-734.00 12-431.00 12-485.00 13-210.00 13-165.00 13-678.00 13-763.00 14-200.00 14-201.00 14-212.00 14-306.00 14-438.00 14-833.00 14-897.00 14-910.00 15-055.00 15-203.00 15-612.00 15-771.00 15-781.00 16-237.00 16-238.00 16-768.00 16-769.00 17-321.00 14-914.01 15-569.01 15-569.00 14-426.00 16-297.00 14-220.00 12-430.00 13-599.0 37-139.00 00-000.00 00-000.00 00-000.00 00-000.00 00-000.00

1.67% 0.33% 1.67% 1.80% 1.78% 1.67% 2.37% 1.67% 2.91% 3.19% 1.89% 2.00% 1.72% 1.37% 3.77% 1.72% 1.37% 1.61% 1.72% 1.72% 1.72% 2.16% 1.72% 1.72% 1.72% 1.72% 1.72% 1.72% 0.86% 0.00% 1.72% 1.72% 1.72% 1.72% 0.86% 1.72% 5.72% 0.34% 0.60% 0.97% 0.79% 1.51% 0.18% 1.32% 1.20% 1.30% 2.73% 1.11% 0.94% 0.72% 0.87% 4.98% 0.74% 0.73% 1.07% 0.18% 0.75% 1.13% 0.18% 0.18% 1.13% 1.58% 2.83% 0.84% 3.24% 5.47% 0.59% 0.84% 0.86% 0.42% 1.29% 1.23% 3.78% 0.32% 0.32% 0.32% 1.05% 0.32%

75.00 15.00 75.00 80.64 79.98 75.00 106.15 75.00 130.45 143.16 55.00 58.25 50.00 40.00 110.00 50.00 40.00 47.00 50.00 50.00 50.00 63.00 50.00 50.00 50.00 50.00 50.00 50.00 25.00 0.00 50.00 50.00 50.00 50.00 25.00 50.00 166.69 10.00 17.48 86.20 70.00 134.36 16.20 116.93 106.20 115.26 242.43 98.56 83.41 63.70 77.69 442.39 65.87 65.00 95.39 16.20 67.00 100.00 16.20 16.20 100.00 139.92 251.46 74.37 288.25 486.24 52.39 74.22 76.78 37.26 115.00 109.60 335.93 28.00 28.00 28.00 93.16 28.00

The fundraiser will run from 5-10 p.m. at the Erlanger location on Dixie Highway on April 6, at the Turfway Road location on April 13, at the Mall Road location on April 20 and at the Highland Heights location on April 27. For more information, contact the center at 442-3200 or visit www.nkycac.org.

St. E weight program

The St. Elizabeth Weight Management Center is offering Healthy Directions, a 10week adult weight-management program, beginning Monday, April 12, from 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Healthy Directions is a program designed to provide

9.75 9.75 9.75 9.75 9.75 9.75 9.75 9.75 9.75 9.75 9.50 9.50 9.50 9.50 9.50 9.50 9.50 9.50 9.50 9.50 9.50 9.50 9.50 9.50 9.50 9.50 9.50 9.50 9.50 9.50 9.50 9.50 9.50 9.50 9.50 9.50 9.50 9.50 9.50 8.10 8.10 8.10 8.10 8.10 8.10 8.10 8.10 8.10 8.10 8.10 8.10 8.10 8.10 8.10 8.10 8.10 8.10 8.10 8.10 8.10 8.10 8.10 8.10 8.10 8.10 8.10 8.10 8.10 8.10 8.10 8.10 8.10 8.10 8.10 8.10 8.10 8.10 8.10

731.25 146.25 731.25 786.24 779.81 731.25 731.25 522.50 553.38 475.00 380.00 475.00 380.00 446.50 475.00 475.00 475.00 598.50 475.00 475.00 475.00 475.00 475.00 475.00 237.50 0.00 475.00 475.00 475.00 475.00 237.50 475.00 95.00 166.06 698.22 567.00 131.22 947.13 860.22 933.61 798.34 675.62 515.97 629.29 533.55 526.50 772.66 131.22 542.70 810.00 131.22 131.22 810.00 602.40 424.36 601.18 621.92 301.81 931.50 887.76 226.80 226.80 226.80 754.60 226.80

Healthy kids event

The Campbell County YMCA is inviting families to come play while learning about important health and safety information at YMCA Healthy Kids Day. The April 17 event is free and will run 10

SUMMARY PUBLICATION OF ORDINANCE O-2-2010 AN ORDINANCE AMENDING THE "FORT THOMAS POLICE DEPART MENT POLICY AND PROCEDURES MANUAL" BY ADDING POLICIES PERTAINING TO FOOT PURSUIT, SAFE INFANT ACT, GOLDEN ALERT, MISSING PERSONS, AND LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENCY; AND AMENDING POLICIES PERTAINING TO EVIDENCE AND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND FIREARMS CARE, USAGE AND MAINTENANCE. The Manual is amended to include new policies in regard to each topic listed in the title of Ordinance 0-2-2010. The text of this Ordinance is on file in the office of the City Clerk where it may be inspected. I, Jann Seidenfaden, City Attorney for the City of Fort Thomas, Campbell County, Kentucky, and an attorney licensed to practice law in the Commonwealth of Kentucky, do hereby certify that this Summary was prepared by me at the direction of the Mayor and Board of Council, and that this Summary is a true and accurate summary of the contents of the Ordinance. _________________________ Jann Seidenfaden, City Attorney 6418 LEGAL NOTICE Campbell County Fire Protection District Number One will hold an election for the position of property owner representative on the Fire Protection District Board on Saturday, June 26, 2010. The election will begin at 11:00 A.M. and end at 2:00 P.M. The election will be held at Campbell County Fire Protection District Number One, Main Fire Station, 6844 Four Mile Road, Melbourne, Kentucky 41059. Only property owners who are over eighteen (18) years old, own property, pay taxes on that property in Campbell County Fire Protection District Number One and who reside inside the Fire District may be eligible to run for the position of property owner representative on the Fire District Board. This is a four (4) year term on the Fire District Board. Anyone interested in running for this position must submit their name, and a list of property or properties located within Campbell County Fire Protection District One’s boundaries on which you pay taxes, along with the signature of two (2) other property owners who live in the District to the Fire District Board no later than 4:00 P.M., on April 15, 2010. All applications must be delivered to Fire District One Fire Station, 6844 Four Mile Road, Melbourne, Kentucky 41059. Anyone who has questions can contact the Fire District Attorney, Thomas A. Wietholter, (513) 621-2666.

INVITATION TO BID April 1, 2010 PROJECT: Asphalt Restoration for the District’s Service Area SEALED BIDS WILL BE RECEIVED AT: Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) 2835 Crescent Springs Road P.O. Box 18640 Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 UNTIL:

Date: April 22, 2010 Time: 1:00 p.m., local time

At said place and time, and promptly thereafter, all Bids that have been duly received will be publicly opened and read aloud. The proposed work is generally described as follows: Restoration of asphalt surfaces in the District’s service area in accordance with specifications prepared by the Northern Kentucky Water District. Bids are to cover the estimated quantities of asphalt restoration for a one year period. The estimated quantities are not guaranteed and payment to the Successful Bidder shall be based on the actual quantities of work actually requested by the District and successfully completed. The bid prices shall remain in effect for the full term of the contract, regardless of the quantity of work. The contract will be in effect during the period starting when the successful Bidder gets the Notice to Proceed and ending on May 1, 2011. All Bids must be in accordance with the Bidding Documents on file, and available for examination at: Northern Kentucky Water District, 2835 Crescent Springs Road, Erlanger, Kentucky. Copies of the Bidding Documents may be obtained from the office at the address indicated herein by contacting Denise Manning at (859) 426-2718. There is no charge for these documents. Bids will be received on a unit price basis as described in the Contract Documents. Owner reserves the right to reject any or all Bids, including without limitation the right to reject any or all nonconforming, non-responsive, incomplete, unbalanced, or conditional Bids, to waive informalities, and to reject the Bid of any Bidder if Owner believes that it would not be in the best interest of Owner to make an award to that Bidder. Owner also reserves the right to negotiate with the selected Bidder to such an extent as may be determined by Owner. Minority Bidders are encouraged to bid. Bids shall remain subject to acceptance for 60 days after the day of bid opening. Richard Harrison, V.P. Engineering Northern Kentucky Water District 1001548537


B10

ON

RECORD

CCF Recorder

THE

April 1, 2010

| DEATHS | Editor Michelle Shaw | smhaw@nky.com | 578-1053 BIRTHS

POLICE

|

REAL

ESTATE

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

N K Y. c o m

E-mail: k

ws@

unit

POLICE REPORTS

FORT THOMAS Arrest

Thomas Brown, 36, 3947 Herbert Ave., warrant at U.S. 27 at Grandview, March 20. Celia Dischar, 25, 5548 Weaver Lane, second degree possession of a controlled substance, controlled substance not in the proper container, open container of alcohol in a motor vehicle at Memorial Parkway at I-471, March 21. Elysha Elliot, 23, 6836 Stewart Road, DUI, second degree possession of a controlled substance at Memorial Parkway at I-471, March 21. Jeremy Wigger, 24, 2151 Memorial Parkway, warrant at 2151 Memorial Parkway, March 24. Michael Harris, 36, 53 West Southgate Ave., warrant at Taylor Ave., March 11. Mark Collins, 37, 2400 Orchard Lane, DUI at 19th and Monmouth, March 13. Robert Williams, 49, 514 York St., first degree possession of a controlled substance, possession of

drug paraphernalia at Summit and Avon, March 13. Aaron Haegle, 20, 945 York St., DUI at I-471, March 14. Brittney Hidenrite, 20, 714 Main St., DUI, carrying a concealed deadly weapon at Memorial Parkway at I471, March 16. Jocelyn Benson, 28, 1310 Greenup St., possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia, warrant at Southview at Shawnee, March 16. Antonio Hooper, 50, 4136 River Road Apt. 5, careless driving, possession of marijuana at South Fort Thomas Avenue and Shawnee, March 16. Robert Murphy, 48, 24 Chalfonte, warrant at Highland Avenue at Edwards, March 17. Clarence Haubner, 51, Homeless, warrant at 1901 Monmouth St., March 18.

Incidents/reports Fraudulent use of a credit card

Reported at 1041 South Fort Thomas Ave., March 18. Reported at 703 Inverness Place, March 23.

Theft by unlawful taking

HDTV’s from

$

1599

per week

104 weeks

Leas e Z one 7303 Turfway Road

Reported at 44 Hollywoods Drive no. 4, March 20. Reported at Rossford Avenue, March 20. Reported at 1437 South Fort Thomas Ave., March 24.

Theft of services

Reported at 96 Alexandria Pike, March 22.

Third degree criminal mischief

Reported at 22 Carriage House Drive, March 21.

HIGHLAND HEIGHTS/ SOUTHGATE Arrest

Steven Pritchard, 37, 1359 Grand Towers, warrant at I-471 at I-275, March 24. Pamela McClure, 25, 2229 Berry Road No. 3, DUI at I-275 bridge, March 24. David Ilg, 31, 131 Aspen Court, warrant at Moock and Ravine, March 23. Michael Cody Wayson, 19, 313 Main Ave., warrant at 313 Main Ave., March 22. Matthew Herald, 18, 211 Knollwood Drive, possession of marijuana, prescription controlled substance not in proper container at 211 Knollwood Drive, March 21. Brady Huenefeld, 22, 1331 McHenry St., theft of services at 2625 Alexandria Pike, March 20. Jonathan Baker, 22, 2422 Stonewall Terrace, theft of services at 2625 Alexandria Pike, March 20. Jessie O’Toole, 19, 3603 Pleasant Hill, alcohol intoxication in a public

859-647-2160

AN ORDINANCE OF THE BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS OF THE CITY OF NEWPORT, K E N T U C K Y A M E N D I N G SECTION 32.004(A) OF THE CODE OF O R D I N A N C E S CONCERNING THE MEMBERSHIP COMPOSITION OF THE CODE ENFORCEMENT BOARD BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY OF NEWPORT, KENTUCKY: SECTION I That Section 32.004(A) of the Code of Ordinances of the City of Newport, Kentucky shall be and is hereby amended to read, as follows: CODE ENFORCEMENT BOARD §32.004 COMPOSITION. (A) The Board shall consist of 3 5 members who shall be appointed by the Mayor with the approval of the Board of Commissioners. Each member shall have been a resident property owner of the City for at least 1 year prior to appointment. SECTION II That this Ordinance shall be signed by the Mayor, attested to by the City Clerk, recorded, published and effective upon publication. PASSED: First reading 3-08-2010 PASSED: Second reading 3-22-2010 MAYOR JERRY PELUSO ATTEST:

Joseph “Jay” Hill Ashbaugh III, 63, of Erlanger, formerly of Fort Thomas, died March 24, 2010, at his home. Survivors include his wife, Gloria Honchell Ashbaugh of Erlanger; sons, Joseph Ashbaugh IV of Fort Mitchell, John Hill Jr. of Florence and Brian Wolfe of Union; daughter, Debbie Davis of Fishers, Ind.; sister, Joette Garman of Southgate and nine grandchildren. Memorials: Fort Thomas Education Foundation Annual Fund , 28 N. Fort Thomas Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075 (www. ftef.org); or Dr. Thomas G. Day Jr., Chair in Gynecologic Oncology, University of

Louisville Foundation, 132 E. Gray St., Louisville, KY 40202.

Rosemary Bamberger

Rosemary Emark Bamberger, 93, Cold Spring, a homemaker, died March 21, 2010, at Hospice of the Bluegrass Care Center, Fort Thomas. Her husbands, Edward Emark and Frank Bamberger, died previously. Survivors include her daughters, Georgia Greis of California, Ky., Karen and Sharon Clark, both of Cold Spring; 11 grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. Burial was n St. Joseph Cemetery, Cold Spring.

SECTION 001100 INVITATION TO BID LEGAL NOTICE Newport Millennium Housing Corporation III will be accepting sealed bids for a General Contract for the construction, including mechanical, plumbing and electrical work, of ONE single family style building located at 302 Thornton Street in the City of Newport, Kentucky. Bids are due no later than 3 p.m., local time, Friday, April 23, 2010, at the offices of the Housing Authority of Newport, located at 30 East 8th. St., Newport, KY 41071 at which time and place all bids will be publicly opened and read aloud. Bids are to be marked “Neighborhood Stabilization Program Construction Project #10-11”. General Contractors submitting a bid for general construction may obtain a maximum of two (2) complete sets of Contract Documents from Hub + Weber Architects, 542 Greenup Street, Covington, Kentucky, (859) 491-3844 - for a deposit of $100. Checks shall be made out to Newport Millennium Housing Corporation III. Deposit will be refunded with the return of the two sets in good condition. Contract Documents may also be purchased from Queen City Reprographics, 434 Scott Avenue, Covington, Kentucky (513) 326-2300. Copies of the Contract Documents are open to the public inspection and may be examined at the following offices: FW Dodge Corporation 7265 Kenwood Road Suite 200 Cincinnati, Ohio 45236

Allied Construction Industries 3 Kovach Drive Cincinnati, Ohio 45215

Newport Millennium Housing Corporation III will conduct a pre-bid informational meeting at 2pm local time, Monday, April 12, 2010 at the offices of the Housing Authority of Newport.

Fraudulent use of a credit card Reported at 2335 Alexandria Pike Apt. 28A, March 22.

Memorials: Autism Society of Greater Cincinnati, P.O. Box 43027, Cincinnati, Ohio 45243.

Allen Collins

Allen E. “Rip” Collins, 92, Highland Heights, died March 20, 2010, at his home. He was a World War II Army Air Corps veteran, a firefighter, electrician, farmer and senior Olympian. His wife, Lillian H. Collins, died previously. Survivors include his son, Joseph Collins of Cincinnati; daughters, Debbie Collins of Highland Heights and Nancy Rizzo of Alpine; six grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. Burial was in Spring Grove Cemetery, Spring Grove Village. Memorials: Fireman’s Protective Association, P.O. Box 58161, Cincinnati, OH 45258.

Larry Dedden

Larry Dedden, 64, Covington, died March 26, 2010, at St. Elizabeth, Edgewood. He retired from Kroger in Fort Mitchell and was an avid fisherman who loved the Ohio River. He was preceded in death by his parents, John and Roselyn Dedden. Survivors include two brothers, John R. Dedden of Fort Wayne, Ind., and Richard W. Dedden of Fort Wright; and a sister, Kathleen Pfetzer of Fort Thomas. Burial was at Mother of God Cemetery, Fort Wright. Memorials: Scleroderma Foundation, 300 Rosewood Drive, Suite 105, Danvers, MA, 01923.

Marc Diemar

Marc Diemar, 59, of Cincinnati, formerly of Erlanger, died March 22, 2010, at his home.

The Community Recorder publishes the names of all adults charged with offenses. The information is a matter of public record and does not imply guilt or innocence.

NEWPORT

Arrest

Robert Hillis, 42, 908 Central Ave., theft by unlawful taking at 130 Pavilion, March 24. Ladonna Sams, 37, 30 Licking Pike, theft by unlawful taking, giving officer false name at 1771 Monmouth St., March 20. Mendnile Warren, 34, 2037 Madison No. 2, falsely reporting an accident, resisting arrest, second degree disorderly conduct, DVO violation at Ninth and Ann Streets, March 18. Nathan Stephens, 19, 1111 Central Ave., theft of a controlled substance at 1004 Liberty St., March 18. Ryan Barrett, 18, 408 West 12th St., first degree possession of a controlled substance at 12th and Columbia, March 16. Mike Braden, 49, 1020 Third Ave., first degree possession of a controlled substance, third degree possession of a controlled sub-

CITY CLERK

Newport Millennium Housing Corporation III reserves the right to waive any informality, irregularity, or defect in any proposal, and to reject any/or all proposals should it be deemed in the best interest of Newport Millennium Housing Corporation III to do so. It is the intent of Newport Millennium Housing Corporation III to award a contract to the lowest responsible and responsive bidder. Newport Millennium Housing Corporation III is an Equal Opportunity Employer. 1183043/1548648

Donald Eviston

Donald Francis Eviston, 66, Fort Thomas, died March 26, 2010, at Cardinal Hill Specialty Hospital at St. Elizabeth Health Care, Fort Thomas. He was a member of St. Therese Church in Southgate and had retired from the Cincinnati Stage Employees Local #5. He was preceded in death by his parents, Edward W. and Kathryn Ann Eviston, and two brothers, Paul Eviston and Dave Eviston. He is survived by his wife, Denise Berger Eviston; sons Brian Eviston and Eddie Eviston of Cold Spring; Sean Eviston of Fort Thomas; daughters Jennifer Jacob of Erlanger and Malia Jackson of Lexington; brothers Kevin Eviston and Thomas “Tuck” Eviston, both of Wilder, Edward “Eddie” Eviston of Muncie, Ind., and Robert “Bob” Eviston of Fort Wright; three sisters, Mary Kay Hehman of Woodlawn, Ky., and Pam Grout and Terri Carl, both of Villa Hills; and six grandchildren. Burial was in St. Stephen Cemetery in Fort Thomas. Memorials: Newport Central Catholic High School, c/o Tuition Assistance, 13 Carothers Drive, Newport, KY 41071.

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The successful Bidder will be required to furnish and pay for satisfactory performance and payment bonds. All Bidders shall include with their bid a statement from an acceptable surety that if their bid is accepted the surety will furnish to the Bidder the required performance and payment bond or bonds required by the contract documents. Attention of Bidders is particularly called to the requirements as to conditions of employment to be observed and minimum wage rates to be paid under the contract, Section 3, Segregated Facility, Section 109 and E.O. 11246 and Title VI. MBE/WBE firms are encouraged to bid.

He was a service technician for Service Solutions Group. Survivors include his sons, Richard Diemar of West Chester and Randolph Diemar of Tempe, Ariz.; brothers, Lee Diemar of Alexandria and Skip Diemar of Union; sisters, LaVerne Mulligan of Alexandria, Barbara Fries of Edgewood, Kathy Garner of Middletown, Ohio, Judy Younger of San Antonio, Texas and Teresa Harmeling of Covington and three grandchildren. Memorials: American Heart Association, 5211 Madison Road, Cincinnati, OH 45277.

“I Love My...

A certified check or bank draft, payable to the Housing Authority of Newport, U.S. Government Bonds, or a satisfactory bid bond executed by the Bidder and acceptable sureties in amount equal to five (5) percent of the bid shall be submitted with each bid.

No bidder may withdraw their bid within 60 days after the actual date of opening thereof.

CE-1001547986-01.INDD

Reported at 2335 Alexandria Pike Apt. 116d, March 21. Reported at 90 Alexandria Pike, March 19. Reported at 70 Hidden Valley Drive apt. 73, March 18.

Construction would begin within ninety (90) days of execution of contract.

Q. EVONE BRADLEY, CKMC PUBLISHED: In full in the Campbell County Recorder the 1st day of April, 2010.

Incidents/reports Fourth degree assault

About police reports

stance at Cowans and Park, March 16. Aaron Cole, 19, 1024 Orchard St., third degree burglary at 1004 York St., March 14. John South, 20, 2101 Monmouth St. No. 1, third degree burglary at 1004 York St., March 14. Josephine Janson, 18, 323 Washington Ave., theft by unlawful taking at 1301 Monmouth St., March 13. Kendra Janson, 22, 323 Washington Ave., theft by unlawful taking, warrant at 1301 Monmouth St., March 13. Eugene Dubose, 40, 2508 St. Leo Place, theft by unlawful taking at 130 Pavilion Parkway, March 13. Rodney Baker, 42, 830 Isabella St., receiving stolen property at Sixth and York, March 11. Jerry George, 21, 104 Southwind Drive, first degree possession of a controlled substance, possession of marijuana at 222 York St. Room 216, March 12.

DEATHS Joseph Ashbaugh III

COMMISSIONERS ORDINANCE NO. O-2010-005

place at 500 Louie B Nunn Drive, March 19. Jerry Beckenmeir, 24, 4 Fifth Ave., alcohol intoxication in a public place at 2315 Alexandria Pike, March 19. Jenni Soard, 25, 511 Miller St., warrant at I-471, March 19. Corey Schlosser, 21, 248 Evergreen Ave., warrant at 90 Alexandria Pike, March 18. Forest Wright, 61, 2335 Alexandria Pike 96C, DUI at 2401 Alexandria Pike, March 17. James Riley, 28, 162 Grand Ave. No. 34, second degree disorderly conduct at 7 Renshaw Road, March 17. Joshua Ray Wolfe, 21, 1806 Asbury Way, possession of marijuana at 2820 Alexandria Pike, March 17. William Christopher, 19, 1311 Highland Ridge, possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia at 1311 Highland Ridge, March 21.

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Frank Haas Jr.

Frank Edward Haas Jr., 68, Bellevue, died March 24, 2010, Hospice of the Bluegrass Care Center, Fort Thomas. He was a machinist and custodian for Grandview School and Bellevue High School. Survivors include his wife, Jackie Haas; daughter, Cindy Hall of Bellevue; sons, Frank Haas III and Allen Haas, both of Bellevue and two grandchildren. Burial was in Evergreen Cemetery, Southgate. Memorials: Hospice of the Bluegrass Northern Kentucky, 7388 Turfway Road, Florence, KY 41042.

Edward Hicks

Edward F. “Buddy” Hicks, 85, Independence, died March 20, 2010, at his home. He was a locomotive engineer for Chesapeake & Ohio Railroad and a World War II Army veteran. Survivors include his wife, Doretta Kohrs Hicks; son, Phillip Hicks of Erlanger; daughters, Sallie Heitsman of Anderson Township, Kathy Waters of Taylor Mill, Julie Stacks of Bellevue, Debbie Lynn of Erlanger and Sandi Scott of Severna Park, Md.; sister, Alma Drews of Latonia; 10 grandchildren; 13 great-grandchildren and one great-great-grandchild Middendorf Funeral Home, Fort Wright, handled the arrangements. Memorials: St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, 501 St. Jude Place, Memphis, TN 38105.

William Humphreys

William Robert Humphreys, 52, Alexandria, died March 25, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. He worked for 20 years with Progress Rail. Survivors include his wife, Karen Humphreys; sons, Jeff Humphreys of Alexandria and David Humphreys of California, Ky.; daughter, Marcie Humphreys of Alexandria; and brother, Michael Humphreys of Alexandria. Burial was in Alexandria Cemetery. Memorials: American Cancer Society, 297 Buttermilk Pike, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017.

Ruth Langenbahn

Ruth M. Langenbahn, 87, Fort Thomas, died March 22, 2010, at Hospice of the Bluegrass Care Center, Fort Thomas. She was homemaker, member of St. Catherine of Siena Church in Fort Thomas and the Thomas More Women’s Society. Her husband, John W. Langenbahn, died previously. Survivors include her sons, John E. Langenbahn of Durango, Colo., Thomas Langenbahn of Dallas, Texas, Jay and Mark Langenbahn of Cincinnati; seven grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren. Burial was in the St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas. Dobbling Funeral Home, Fort Thomas, handled the arrangements. Memorials: Hospice of the Bluegrass-Northern Kentucky, 7388 Turfway Road, Florence, KY 41042.

Deaths continued B11 NKY.com/community


On the record DEATHS From B10

Henry Long

Henry Phillip Long, of Alexandria, formerly of South Shore, Ky., died March 27, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. He served in the Army during World War II, was a maintenance man for a church campground and a school bus driver in central Ohio. He is survived by his wife of 64 years, Betty Ruth Barber Long; three sons, Phillip Long of Alexandria, Patrick Long of Union, and Michael Long of Napoleon, Ohio; two daughters, Jane Butler of Dayton, Tenn., and Christina Thacker of Washington Court House, Ohio; 12 grandchildren and three greatgrandchildren. Burial was at Alexandria Cemetery in Alexandria. Memorials: American Bible Society, 1865 Broadway, New York, NY 10023.

Betty Sue Poe

Betty Sue Poe, 65, Brooksville, died March 22, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. Survivors include her husband, James H. Poe; daughters, Lisa Sandbothe of Cincinnati, Peggy Pollitt of Newport, Tammy Redden, Samantha Cummins, Linda Poe, Danielle Askin, all of Brooksville and April Traylor of Foster; step-children, Karen Dotson, Cheryl Hamilton, Sharon Napier, Ricky Poe, Candy Poe, and Carol Mess; Sherlene Edginton of Falmouth, Norma Catterton, of Cincinnati and Judy England of Louisville; brothers, Sharky Hamilton of Carrollton, Stroud, Jimmy and Alvin Hamilton, all of Pendleton County; 16 grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren. Burial was at Johnsville Cemetery.

Cheylia Price

Cheylia Jade Marie Groneck Price, stillborn, Cold Spring, on March 13, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Hospital, Florence. She is survived by her mother, Crystal Groneck, of Cold Spring; father Colton Price of Alexandria; grandparents, Linda Price of Alexandria, Carissa and Jonathon Manning of Southgate; great-grandparents, Yvonne and Dennis Groneck of Cold Spring, Debbie and Bill Hauenstein of Alexandria. Graveside services were held Friday, March 19 at St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas.

Jerome Quitter

Jerome A. Quitter, 88, Cold Spring, died March 25, 2010, at Hospice of St. Elizabeth Healthcare, Edgewood. He was a district sales manager for 38 years with Coca Cola Co., World War II Navy veteran, member of St. Joseph Church in Cold Spring, Campbell County Social Seniors, Bluegrass Seniors, Father DeJaco Knights of Columbus Council 5220 in Alexandria, Bishop Flaget Assembly and Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3205 Alexandria Post 3205. His son, Jerome A. Quitter Jr., died previously. Survivors include his wife of 59 years, Irma Feldmann Quitter; daughter, Karen Marie Henson; brother, Ralph Quitter of Wilder; sister, Beatrice Menning of Alexandria; and two grandchildren. Burial was in the St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas. Dobbling, Muehlenkamp & Erschell Funeral Home, handled the arrangements. Memorials: St. Joseph Church Capitol Campaign, 4011 Alexandria Pike, Cold Spring, KY 41076.

Kendall Ray Jr.

Kendall E. Ray Jr., 69, Mentor, died March 23, 2010, at his home. He worked for the Fort Thomas Public Works Department and was an army Veteran.

Survivors include his wife, Peggy Ray; sons, Randy Ray of Mentor and Todd Ray of California, Ky.; daughter, Barb Penick of Mentor; brother, John Ray of Mt. Sherman, Ky.; sisters, Peggy Racke of Florence, Jerry Hayhurst of Weston, Ohio, Jaunita Smith of Falmouth and Anna Youtsey of Alexandria; eight grandchildren and one greatgrandchild. Burial was in Grandview Cemetery, Mentor.

Virgil Rush Sr.

Virgil Joseph “Sonny” Rush Sr., 82, Alexandria, died March 26, 2010, Baptist Convalescent Center, Newport. He was an electrician, owner of Rush Sign Service, member of the Grants Lick Baptist Church, International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers 212, Alexandria Masonic Lodge and a Navy veteran. Survivors include his wife, Barbara Cooper Rush of Alexandria; sons, Sonny Rush of Grants Lick and J.D. Cooper of California; daughters, Carla Jean of Cincinnati, Joann Hensley of Owensboro and Jackie Reisert of Connersville, Ind.; sister, Margaret Houser of Cincinnati; eight grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. Burial was in Grandview Cemetery, Mentor. Memorials: Newport Baptist Convalescence Home, 120 Main St., Newport KY 41071; or St. Peter & Paul Building Fund, 2160 California Crossroads, California KY 41007.

Carolyn Booth of Ross, Ohio, Lois Marlow and Joann Trapp, both of Alexandria; brother, Orlan Holiday of Independence; eight grandchildren; 12 great-grandchildren and two great-great grandchildren. Burial was in Evergreen Cemetery, Southgate.

Donald Stretch

Donald G. Stretch, 74, Alexandria, died March 22, 2010, at his home. He was an accountant with Turnbull Concrete Co. and also worked for RCA in Indianapolis for more than 20 years, an Army veteran, member of University of Cincinnati Alumni Association and SAE Fraternity. Survivors include his wife, Barbara Weber Stretch; daughter, Cynthia Stretch of West Haven, Conn., Laura Stretch of Fort Collins, Colo.; mother, Nina Stretch of Madeira, brothers, Robert Stretch of Cincinnati and Thomas Stretch of West Chester Township, Ohio, and one grandson. Burial was in Evergreen Cemetery, Southgate. Memorials: Hospice of St. Elizabeth Healthcare, 483 S. Loop Road, Edgewood, KY 41017; or National Association of Free Clinics, 1800 Diagonal Road, Suite 600, Alexandria, VA 22314.

Emery Spencer

Emery Jane Spencer, 89, Alexandria, a homemaker, died March 24, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Florence. Her husband, Glen R. Spencer and son Eugene Spencer, died previously. Survivors include her son, John Spencer of Alexandria; daughters,

Lillian Turner

Lillian Turner, 89, Newport, died March 19, 2010, at St. Elizabeth

Bernice Rust

Bernice Rust, 87, of Covington, formerly of Cold Spring, died March 23, 2010, at Hospice of the Bluegrass - Northern Kentucky Care Center in Fort Thomas. She was a teacher and spent over 20 years educating students at St. Williams School, Price Hill, and St. Joseph School, Cold Spring. She was a member of St. Joseph Church, Cold Spring, and active with the Society of Mary and the Bereavement Committee at the church. She was very involved with the special needs community; actively serving as a volunteer with NKAR, currently known as The Point/ARC of Northern Kentucky, Her husbands, Harry B. Roedersheimer and Edward Jacob Rust, and son, Kenneth Rust, died previously. Survivors include her sons, Harry J. Roedersheimer of Fort Thomas and Gregory Rust of Butler; daughter, Mary Jo Schreiber of Cold Spring; sister, Eileen Connor of Highland Heights; six grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. Burial was in St. Joseph Cemetery, Cold Spring. Memorials: St. Joseph School “Adopt a Student” Fund, 4011 Alexandria Pike, Cold Spring, KY 41076.

Mary Schmidt

Mary Lou Schmidt, 85, Fort Thomas, died March 19, 2010, at Hospice of the Bluegrass - Northern Kentucky Care Center in Fort Thomas. A Realtor and the owner of Enos Realty in Newport, she was a member of the Northern Kentucky Board of Realtors, the Newport High School Alumni Association, and she was a Kentucky Colonel. Her husband, Richard Schmidt, died previously. Survivors include her daughter, Cathie Goodwin of Fort Thomas; son, Rick Schmidt of Fort Thomas; and two grandchildren. Burial was in Evergreen Cemetery, Southgate. Memorials: Newport High School Alumni Association, C/O Lois Gore, 148 Hidden Ridge, Cold Spring, KY 41076.

Carl Shell

Carl Shell, 80, of Butler, formally

MARRIAGE LICENSES Amanda West, 21, of Cincinnati and Seth Brashear, 21, of Fort Thomas, issued March 3. James Skeene, 21, and Christopher Burgin, 24, both of Fort Thomas, issued March 8. Diane Seller, 25, of Cincinnati and David Pertuset, 25, of Newport, issued March 8. Allison Donovan, 21, of Cincinnati and Justin Myers, 20, of Fort Thomas, issued March 8. Barbara Krogman, 74, of Cincinnati and Joseph Grimes, 84, of Owensboro, issued March 8. Katherine Groh, 24, of Cincinnati and Gregory Duell, 28, of Covington, issued March10. Kristine Smith, 44, of Fort Thomas and Arnold Cornelius, 40, of Berry, issued March 10. Danielle Sebastian, 21, of Highland Heights and Levi Gallagher, 21, of Dover, issued March 10.

of Visalia, died March 26, 2010, at River Valley Nursing Home. He was an engineer for 38 years with Cincinnati Milacron, Korean War Army veteran, member of the Grassy Creek Christian Church in Demossville, Colonel Clay Lodge 159 F. & A.M. in Covington, Campbell County Coonhunters Association, where he held offices of secretary and Master of Hounds. His daughter, Deborah Lynn Shell and granddaughter, Katie Shell, died previously. Survivors include his wife, Carol Robinson Shell; daughters, Carla Belcher of Grants Lick and Kim Moore of California; sons, Glenn Shell of Butler and David Gregory Shell of Sharonville, Ohio; sister, Geneva Sipple of Covington and Imogene Martin of Melbourne; brother, William Shell of Bay Village, Ohio; nine grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren. Burial was in Gardnersville Cemetery, Pendleton County. Memorials: Hospice of Hope, 909 Kenton Station Drive, Maysville, KY 41056.

Jill Hamski, 24, and Matthew Wetenkamp, 29, both of Newport, issued March 12. Tracy Meac, 25, of Covington and Kevin Stave, 26, of New Jersey, issued March 12. Amber Goins, 29, of Fort Thomas and Charles Chadderton IV, 29, of Covington, issued March 13. Joyce Hutslar, 47, of Indiana and James Dees, 51, of Fort Thomas, issued March 13. Ashley Trimnell, 25, and James Moore, 29, both of Fort Thomas, issued March 3. Shannon Reisig, 31, and Christopher Sparks, 38, both of Fort Thomas, issued March 3. Bonnie Dougherty, 34, and Brian Ormes, 39, both of Fort Thomas, issued March 5. Aime Roa, 40, of Cincinnati and Steven Scheider, 36, of Fort Thomas, issued March 5.

CCF Recorder

April 1, 2010

B11

About obituaries

Basic obituary information and a color photograph of your loved one is published without charge by The Community Press. Please call us at 283-0404 for more information. To publish a larger memorial tribute, call 513-242-4000 for pricing details. For the most up-to-date Northern Kentucky obituaries, click on the "Obituaries" link at NKY.com. Fort Thomas. She was a homemaker and a member of the Melbourne United Methodist Church. Survivors include her daughter, Olivia Turner of Newport; brother, Lester Turner Jr. of Dayton; four grandchildren and one great-grandchild. Burial was in Peach Grove Cemetery.

Henry Wallace

Henry Thomas Wallace, 87, Fort Thomas, died March 23, 2010, at Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Cincinnati. He was a watchmaker, precision instrument repairman, a World War II Army veteran who received a Purple Heart and member of Community Faith Presbyterian Church in Covington. Survivors include his wife of 53 years, Evelyn Kalb Wallace; daughters, Janet Grayson and Joyce Wainscott and five grandchildren. Burial was in Napoleon Cemetery. Memorials: Veterans Affairs Nursing Home, 1000 S. Fort Thomas Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075.

Joyce Webster

Joyce Luretha Webster, 69, Dry Ridge, died March 22, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. Survivors include her husband, Terry David Webster; daughters, Pamela Wells of Kingston Heights, Fla. and Pamela Andrews of Daytona Beach, Fla.; sisters, Grace Byrd of Mesa, Ariz., Bertha Kenney of Lake City, Fla., Lola Stone of Lakeland, Fla., Ruby Burton of Petersburg, Lara Myers of Florence and Deborah Dalton of Dry Ridge; brothers, Ned Maxwell of Webster, Fla. and Kim Maxwell of Cold Spring and three grandchildren. Burial was in Kentucky Veterans Cemetery North, Williamstown.

If you’re looking for buyers, you’re in the right neighborhood. To place an ad call 513.242.4000 or 859.283.7290, or visit CommunityClassified.com

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The Doolin House Bed & Breakfast

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Somerset, Kentucky’s Premiere Inn Located Just Minutes from Lake Cumberland

There is a joke among friends here, “It’s a Phoenix that has risen from the ashes. ”When Charles and Allison Hahn Sobieck purchased the property at 502 North Main Street (in Somerset, Kentucky), there was a lot of work to be done, to say the least. With the vision of a B & B and a home in ruins, there were little choices. The dilapidated structure was removed, then reconstructed as it had been in the 1850’s. It’s a brand new home. A bit of an unusual concept for a bed and breakfast. “We reconstructed the home from scratch. This gave us the benefit of designing every amenity possible along the way, ”said Allison Sobieck, owner. Every room is equipped with many amenities you don’t often find in a traditional bed and breakfast, but rather a fine hotel. Every room has a full sized closet with a pair of micro-fiber robes hanging in them, 400- count Egyptian cotton sheets, cable TV with DVD players, queen sized beds, and a host of other things. For instance, 2 rooms have gas fireplaces and 3 rooms have whirlpool tubs. We even offer many add on amenities such as massage, dinner, flowers, etc…

The rooms are only half of the reason to come to The Doolin House. Owners Charles and Allison just happen to both be chefs. Some of the breakfast specialties include Caramel Banana French Toast and Southern Eggs Benedict (2 fried green tomatoes topped with 2 slices of smoked bacon, 2 eggs over easy and Hollandaise). Chuck is usually in charge of breakfast and tries to do new and different things every day. Chef Chuck pointed out, “It’s fun to experiment with breakfast. It’s the one meal that encompasses all foods. It’s perfectly acceptable to see smoked salmon or a pork cutlet at the breakfast table. ”For those in no rush to rise and shine, breakfast in bed is served at no additional charge. When you need a weekend get away that’s not too far from home or you are planning your summer vacation to beautiful Lake Cumberland, remember that The Doolin House Bed and Breakfast is only a phone call away.

For more information, Visit the website at: www.doolinhouse.com or call 606-678-9494

CE-1001545946-01.INDD

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B12

CCF Recorder

PUBLIC NOTICE Northern Kentucky Community Action Commission’s Community Services program is funded in part by the Cabinet for Health and Family Services through the Community Services Block Grant. The Budget Plan and Proposal for the current State Fiscal Year can be viewed at our County Neighborhood Centers during normal business hours or at our Administrative Offices at 717 Madison Avenue, Covington, KY 41011. You can also contact the Deputy Director at (859) 581-6607 for more information. Campbell County Neighborhood Center 437 West 9th Street Newport, KY 41071 Phone: (859) 431-4177 1001547691

COMMONWEALTH OF KENTUCKY COUNTY OF CAMPBELL CITY OF COLD SPRING ORDINANCE NO. 10- 963 AN ORDINANCE AMENDING THE ZONING MAP OF THE CITY OF COLD SPRING, COUNTY OF CAMPBELL, KENTUCKY FOR AN APPROXIMATE .33ACRE AREA LOCATED ON THE SOUTH SIDE OF CHAPMAN LANE, APPROXIMATELY 900 FEET EAST OF ALEXANDRIA PIKE CHANGING THE DESCRIBED AREA FROM R-RE (A RESIDENTIAL RURAL ESTATE ZONE) TO R-1C (A DETACHED SINGLE-FAMILY RESIDENTIAL ZONE WITH A MAXIMUM DENSITY OF 3.5 DWELLING UNITS PER NET ACRE) WHEREAS, a request for a map amendment was submitted to the Cold Spring Planning and Zoning Commission by Nancy Andersen and Gary Steffen on behalf of Maurice and Geneva Steffen, to change the described area from R-RE (a residential rural estate zone) to R-1C (a detached single-family residential zone with a maximum density of 3.5 dwelling units per net acre); and WHEREAS, the NKAPC staff reviewed the application and recommended that the proposed map amendment be approved; and WHEREAS, the Cold Spring Planning & Zoning Commission, upon reviewing the NKAPC staff recommendations and after holding a public hearing, voted to approve the map amendment on the basis that map amendment is generally consistent with the Goals and Objectives Element of the 2005 Cold Spring Comprehensive Plan. NOW THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY OF COLD SPRING, COUNTY OF CAMPBELL, COMMONWEALTH OF KENTUCKY: Section I That the Cold Spring City Council hereby approves said Zoning Map Amendment for the following area: .33 acres (approximately 14,300 square feet), located on the south side of Chapman Lane, approximately 900 feet east of Alexandria Pike from RRE (a residential rural estate zone) to R-1C (a detached single-family residential zone with a maximum density of 3.5 dwelling units per net acre) The aforementioned map amendment, as recommended by the Cold Spring Municipal Planning & Zoning Commission is adopted and amended on the following bases: 1. The proposed map amendment from RRE to R-1C is consistent with the Land Use Element of the 2005 Cold Spring Comprehensive Plan, which identifies the site in question as being part of a larger area extending to the south, west, and east of the site in question, for Residential Development at a density ranging from 2.1 to 4.0 dwelling units per net acre. The proposed R-1C Zone will permit residential development at a maximum density of approximately 3.5 dwelling units per net acre. 2. The proposed map amendment from RRE to R-1C is consistent with the Goals and Objectives/Policies of the 2005 Cold Spring Comprehensive Plan. .

Section II

That should any section or part of any section or any provision of this Ordinance be declared invalid by a Court of competent jurisdiction, for any reason, such declaration shall not invalidate, or adversely affect, the remainder of this Ordinance. Section III That this Ordinance shall take effect and be in full force when passed, published and recorded according to the law. Adopted this 22nd day of March, 2010. 1st Reading-February 22, 2010 Vote: 6 Yes, 0 , No 2nd Reading- March 22, 2010 Vote: 6 , Yes, 0 , No City of Cold Spring County of Campbell Commonwealth of Kentucky By: /s/Mark Stoeber, Mayor Attest: /s/ Rita Seger, Clerk 1201137/1548943

April 1, 2010 LEGAL NOTICE All schools in the Fort Thomas Independent district will provide access to their respective Comprehensive School Improvement Plan for public review and comment. The district has designated April 12 through April 23, 2010 for this review process. Comprehensive School Improvement Plans will be available in each principal’s office. The Fort Thomas Independent Schools 2008-2009 school and district report cards are now available for review at http://applications.ed ucation.ky.gov/school reportcardarchive/ . Upon request, printed copies will be supplied at the school or district office. 1001548769

LEGAL NOTICE Crown Castle is proposing to modify the tower at the following site: St Stephens #815994 - 1801 Alexandria Pike, Highland Heights, KY. Crown invites comments from any interested party on the impact of the proposed towers on any districts, sites, buildings, structures or objects significant in American history, archaeology, engineering or culture that are listed or determined eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places. Specific information regarding the project is available by calling Sabrina Noplis at 724-4162000 during normal business hours. Comments must be received by April 22, 2010. 1001547659

To place your

BINGO ad call 513.242.4000

To place your BINGO ad call 513.242.4000

Official Notice Owen Electric Cooperative Corporation, with its principal office at 8205 Hwy 127 N., Owenton, KY 40359 intends to file a new nonrecurring rate with the Kentucky Public Service Commission. This filing will result in a new rate applicable to customers facing disconnection. The rates proposed in this application are the rates proposed by Owen Electric Cooperative Corporation. However, the Kentucky Public Service Commission may order rates to be charged that differ from these proposed rates. Such action may result in rates for consumers other than the rates in this application. Any corporation, association, body politic or person may by motion within thirty (30) days after publication or mailing of notice of the proposed rate changes request leave to intervene. The motion shall be submitted to the Public Service Commission, 211 Sower Boulevard, P.O. Box 615, Frankfort, Kentucky 40602, and shall set forth the grounds for the request including the status and interest of the party. Intervenors may obtain copies of the application and testimony by contacting Mr. Michael Cobb, Owen Electric Cooperative, 8205 Hwy 127 N, Owenton, KY 40359. A copy of the application and testimony is available for public inspection at the utility’s offices. The amount and percent of increase are listed below: Increase Rate Class Dollar Percent Nonrecurring Charges Automatic Meter Reading (AMR) Remote Disconnect or Connect $30.00 100% The effect of the proposed rate on the average monthly bill by rate class is provided below Increase Rate Class Dollar Percent Nonrecurring Charges Automatic Meter Reading (AMR) Remote Disconnect or Connect $30.00 100% The present and proposed rate structure of Owen Electric Cooperative are listed below Rates Rate Class Present Proposed Nonrecurring Charges Automatic Meter Reading (AMR) Remote Disconnect or Connect $0.00 $30.00

INVITATION TO BID PROJECT: Purchase of Storage Area Network (SAN) DATE: April 1, 2010 SEALED BIDS WILL BE RECEIVED AT: Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) P.O. Box 18640 2835 Crescent Springs Rd Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 UNTIL:

Date: April 22, 2010 Time: 10:00 a.m., local time

At said place and time, and promptly thereafter, all Bids that have been duly received will be publicly opened and read aloud. The proposed purchase is generally described as follows: Purchase of a Storage Area Network (SAN) and support/maintenance. All prospective bidders should understand that Owner’s purchase is exempt from sales tax. All Bids must be in accordance with the Instructions to Bidders and the Contract Documents on file, and available for examination at: Northern Kentucky Water District, 2835 Crescent Springs Rd, Erlanger, Kentucky 41018. Copies of the Bidding Documents may be obtained from the office at the address indicated herein by contacting Chris Bryant at (859) 426-2708. There is no charge for these documents. Bids will be received on a lump sum basis as described in the Bidding Documents. Owner reserves the right to reject any or all Bids, including without limitation the right to reject any or all nonconforming, non-responsive, incomplete, unbalanced, or conditional Bids, to waive informalities, and to reject the Bid of any Bidder if Owner believes that it would not be in the best interest of Owner to make an award to that Bidder. Owner also reserves the right to negotiate with the selected Bidder to such an extent as may be determined by Owner. Minority Bidders are encouraged to bid.

Section 00020 INVITATION TO BID Date: March 24, 2010 PROJECT: Kenton Lands Tank Coating Rehabilitation SEALED BIDS WILL BE RECEIVED AT:

INVITATION TO BID Newport Millennium Housing Corporation III will be accepting sealed bids for the construction of ONE single family style building located at 420 W8th. St., in the City of Newport, Kentucky. Bids are due no later than 3:00 p.m., local time, April 23, 2010, at the offices of Newport Millennium Housing Corporation III, located at 30 East 8th. St., Newport, KY 41071 at which time and place all bids will be publicly opened and read aloud. Bids are to be marked “420 W8th St. Construction Project #10-08”. Beginning April 5, 2010 the information for Bidders, Form of Bid, Form of Contract, Plans, Specifications and Forms of Bid Bond, Performance and Payment Bond, and other contract documents may be obtained at the NMHC III offices or by contacting Randy Schweinzger at (859) 581-2533, ext. 217. The hearing and/or speechimpaired may call our TDD line at (859) 581-3181. NMHC III will conduct a pre-bid conference at 10:00 a.m., April 12, 2010 at its’ offices. A certified check or bank draft, payable to Newport Millennium Housing Corporation III, U.S. Government Bonds, or a satisfactory bid bond executed by the Bidder and acceptable sureties in amount equal to five (5) percent of the bid shall be submitted with each bid. The successful Bidder will be required to furnish and pay for satisfactory performance and payment bonds. All Bidders shall include with their bid a statement from an acceptable surety that if their bid is accepted the surety will furnish to the Bidder the required performance and payment bond or bonds required by the contract documents. Attention of Bidders is particularly called to the requirements as to conditions of employment to be observed and minimum wage rates to be paid under the contract, Section 3, Segregated Facility, Section 109 and E.O. 11246 and Title VI. MBE/WBE firms are encouraged to bid. No bidder may withdraw their bid within 60 days after the actual date of opening thereof. NMHC III reserves the right to waive any informality, irregularity, or defect in any proposal, and to reject any/or all proposals should it be deemed in the best interest of NMHC III to do so. It is the intent of NMHC III to award a contract to the lowest responsible and responsive bidder. NMHC III is an Equal Opportunity Employer. 1185226/1548941 INVITATION TO BID April 1, 2010 PROJECT: Asphalt Restoration Milling and Paving for the District’s Service Area SEALED BIDS WILL BE RECEIVED AT: Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) 2835 Crescent Springs Road P.O. Box 18640 Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 UNTIL:

Date: April 22, 2010 Time: 2:00 p.m., local time

At said place and time, and promptly thereafter, all Bids that have been duly received will be publicly opened and read aloud. The proposed work is generally described as follows: Completion of restoration of asphalt surfaces in the District’s service area in accordance with specifications prepared by the Northern Kentucky Water District. The restoration Work includes milling existing surfaces and paving multiple areas where water main repair work was performed by the District. These areas are identified by water main repair work orders furnished in the Bidding Documents. The Work shall be completed within 60 days of the Notice to Proceed. All Bids must be in accordance with the Bidding Documents on file, and available for examination at: Northern Kentucky Water District, 2835 Crescent Springs Road, Erlanger, Kentucky. Copies of the Bidding Documents may be obtained from the office at the address indicated herein by contacting Denise Manning at (859) 426-2718. There is no charge for these documents. Bids will be received on a unit price basis as described in the Contract Documents. Owner reserves the right to reject any or all Bids, including without limitation the right to reject any or all nonconforming, non-responsive, incomplete, unbalanced, or conditional Bids, to waive informalities, and to reject the Bid of any Bidder if Owner believes that it would not be in the best interest of Owner to make an award to that Bidder. Owner also reserves the right to negotiate with the selected Bidder to such an extent as may be determined by Owner.

Bids shall remain subject to acceptance for 90 days after the day of bid opening.

Minority Bidders are encouraged to bid.

Ron Lovan, President/CEO Northern Kentucky Water District 1001547896

Richard Harrison, V.P. Engineering Northern Kentucky Water District 1001548545

Bids shall remain subject to acceptance for 60 days after the day of bid opening.

INVITATION TO BID Newport Millennium Housing Corporation III will be accepting sealed bids for the construction of Hamlet Row, five (5) new homeownership buildings, located on Hamlet St. in the City of Newport, Kentucky. Bids are due no later than 12:00 p.m., local time, April 30, 2010, at the offices of NM HC III, located at 30 East 8th. St., Newport, KY 41071 at which time and place all bids will be publicly opened and read aloud. Bids are to be marked "Hamlet Row Construction Project #10-04". Contract Documents may be purchased from Phipps Reprographics, 6920 Plainfield Rd., Cincinnati, OH (513) 793-1030. Copies of the Contract Documents are open to public inspection and may be examined at the following office: Allied Construction Industries 3 Kovach Drive Cincinnati, Ohio 45215 NMHC III will conduct a pre-bid conference at the offices of NMHCIII at 10:00 a.m., local time, APRIL 15, 2010. A certified check or bank draft, payable to NMHC III, U.S. Government Bonds, or a satisfactory bid bond executed by the Bidder and acceptable sureties in amount equal to five (5) percent of the bid shall be submitted with each bid. The successful Bidder will be required to furnish and pay for satisfactory performance and payment bonds. All Bidders shall include with their bid a statement from an acceptable surety that if their bid is accepted the surety will furnish to the Bidder the required performance and payment bond or bonds required by the contract documents. Attention of Bidders is particularly called to the requirements as to conditions of employment to be observed and minimum wage rates to be paid under the contract, Section 3, Segregated Facility, Section 109 and E.O. 11246 and Title VI. MBE/WBE firms are encouraged to bid. No bidder may withdraw their bid within 60 days after the actual date of opening thereof. NMHC III reserves the right to waive any informality, irregularity, or defect in any proposal, and to reject any/or all proposals should it be deemed in the best interest of NMHC III to do so. It is the intent of NMHC III to award a contract to the lowest responsible and responsive bidder. NMHC III is an Equal Opportunity Employer. 1177812/1548163

LOST & FOUND Ads are FREE!! 513.242.4000

Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) 700 Alexandria Pike Ft. Thomas, Ky. 41075 UNTIL:

Date: Time:

April 15, 2010 2:00 p.m. EDT

At said place and time, and promptly thereafter, all Bids that have been duly received will be publicly opened and read aloud. The proposed Work is generally described as follows: Removal of the existing interior coating; recoating of the tank interior and exterior; and other miscellaneous repairs and improvements. All Bids must be in accordance with the Instructions to Bidders and Contract Documents on file, and available for examination at: Northern Kentucky Water District, 2835 Crescent Springs Road, Erlanger, Kentucky, 41018; or HDR Engineering, Inc., 2517 Sir Barton Way, Lexington, KY, 40509. A non-mandatory pre-bid meeting will be held on April 8, 2010 at 10:00 a.m. EDT at the Kenton Lands Tank site, 25 Kenton Lands Road, Erlanger, Kentucky. Copies of the Bidding Documents may be obtained from QCR Imaging & Supply, located at 2456 Fortune Drive, Suite 120, Lexington, Kentucky 40509 (859-699-5105 and www.qcrepro.com). Charges for all documents obtained will be made on the following basis: Charge Complete set of Bidding Documents $65.00 Mailing and Handling (if requested) $15.00 A report entitled "Coating System Evaluations" may be purchased for a charge of $20.00. This report is not part of the Contract Documents; it is made available solely for review. Charges for Bidding Documents and mailing and handling, if applicable, will not be refunded. Prospective Bidders may address written inquiries to Robert H. Williams, P.E. with HDR Engineers at R o b . H . W i l l i a m s @hdrinc.com or fax (859) 223-3150 or for information telephone (859) 223-3755. Bids will be received on a lump sum basis as described in the Contract Documents. Bid security, in the form of a certified check or Bid Bond in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the maximum total bid price, must accompany each Bid. The Successful Bidder will be required to furnish a Construction Performance Bond and a Construction Payment Bond as security for the faithful performance of the project and the payment of all bills and obligations arising from the performance of the Contract. The Successful Bidder and all Subcontractors will be required to conform to the labor standards set forth in the Contract Documents. This project does not fall under the provisions of KRS 337.505 to 337.550 for prevailing wage rates. Owner reserves the right to reject any or all Bids, including without limitation the right to reject any or all nonconforming, nonresponsive, incomplete, unbalanced, or conditional Bids, to waive informalities, and to reject the Bid of any Bidder if Owner believes that it would not be in the best interest of Owner to make an award to that Bidder. Owner also reserves the right to negotiate with the apparent Successful Bidder to such an extent as may be determined by Owner. Owner will provide each Bidder access to the site to conduct such investigations and tests as each Bidder deems necessary for submission of a Bid. Arrangements for site visits should be scheduled at least 48 hours in advance through the District’s website at www.nkywater.org. Questions about site visits or cancellations with less than 48 hours notice should be directed to Jim Dierig. The Owner reserves the right to deny access to Bidders arriving at the site without an appointment. Minority Bidders are encouraged to bid. Bids shall remain subject to acceptance for 60 days after the day of bid opening or for such longer period of time to which a Bidder may agree in writing upon request of the Owner. If a Contract is to be awarded, the Owner will give the Successful Bidder a Notice of Award during the period of time during which the Successful Bidder’s bid remains subject to acceptance. Bari L. Joslyn, V.P. Water Quality & Production Northern Kentucky Water District 1001548435

NOTICE OF ADOPTION AND SUMMARY OF ORDINANCE

Cruise into car-shopping The undersigned City Clerk of the City of Newport, Kentucky hereby states that confidence.

on March 22, 2010, the City of Newport, Kentucky adopted the following OrdiGo to Cars.com and nance entitled: become a more confident Commissioners Ordinance car shopper. Read up on expert and consumer No. O-2010-004: AN ORDINANCE OF THE BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS OF THE CITY OF NEWPORT, KENTUCKY AMENDING SECTION 32.076 OF THE CODE OF ORDINANCES OF THE CITY OF NEWPORT, KENTUCKY CONCERNING THE DESIGNATION OF LANDMARK AND SITES BY THE HISTORIC PRESERVATION COMMISSION TO ELIMINATE THE REQUIREMENT OF REVIEW BY THE PLANNING AND ZONING COMMISSION. The City Clerk of the City of Newport, Kentucky hereby certifies that the above summary is true and correct and written in a way calculated to inform the public of its content. Q. EVONE BRADLEY, CITY CLERK The undersigned, an attorney licensed to practice law in the Commonwealth of Kentucky, hereby certifies that he prepared the Summary of Ordinance referred to above and that the summary represents an accurate depiction of the contents of the Ordinances adopted by the City of Newport, Kentucky on March 22, 2010. DANIEL BRAUN, CITY SOLICITOR

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