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OUR NEIGHBORHOOD B1

Wilbers Lane residents Jackson Smith, Jake Ryan and Seth Ryan.

FORT THOMAS

RECORDER THURSDAY, MARCH 1, 2012

Messy art Children ages 4-6 slathered their hands in paint and got messy during the Feb. 22 Play Art program at the Newport Branch of the Campbell County Public Library. Play Art programs at the Newport Branch are at 4 p.m. each Wednesday, said Sara Relojo, a children’s program coordinator at the library. Life, B1

Celebrating 60 It’s been 60 years since New Perceptions opened and in that time the Edgewood organization that helps people with disabilities gain independence has helped children achieve new highs in their lives. News, A5

Share your news Have a great photo from your kid’s latest field trip? Trying to drum up publicity for your group’s event?Visit NKY.com/ Share to submit your photos, news and events. It’s a one-stopshop for submitting information to The Community Recorder, The Kentucky Enquirer, NKY.com and our other publications and websites.

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Renovation project brings new light to St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

FORT THOMAS — Patients and visitors to St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas will notice a difference in the hospital’s main entrance and Cancer Care Center. As part of an initiative designed to improve convenience and overall experience, St. Elizabeth Healthcare recently spent approximately $4 million renovating the spaces. Tom Saalfeld, the senior vice president and chief operating officer of the hospital, said hospital officials listened to patients, visitors and staff when planning the improvements, which include 13 infusion bays for treatment in the Cancer Care Center, which also now has a healing garden and private parking area and entrance. The new infusion bays, which include 10 open bays and three closed bays, allow for patients to receive treatments more comfortably, either in private or in a more open area where

Nature talks Kentucky Fish and Wildlife conservation educator Ron Browning hooks student interest in the outdoors during talks at almost every elementary in Campbell County. Browning spent an hour speaking to fourth- and fifthgraders at Grants Lick Elementary School Tuesday, Feb. 21. Schools, A6

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Fort Thomas

Barista Lisa Morgan serves some St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas emmployees at the hospital's new bistro. AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/COMMUNITY RECORDER

The new information desk and registration area at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas is located right inside the main entrance. AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/COMMUNITY RECORDER they can visit with other patients depending on their preference. Saalfeld said the response to the new bays has been very positive, with one patient even bringing in a camera to take pictures to show family and friends. “The patient response has just been great,” Saalfeld said. The center, along with the front lobby of the hospital, also features new large windows to allow more natural light in the spaces and earth-toned decor to make the areas more open, comfortable and inviting. The lobby also features a more conveniently located information desk and registration area, renovated gift shop and chapel, and a new bistro that offered snacks, coffee and other beverages.

The surgery waiting areas near the lobby have also been improved. “There is just no comparison between what these areas are like now versus what they where like before,” Saalfeld said. Margie Kuechler, the hospital’s volunteer coordinator who has been working at the Fort Thomas location since 1985, said she has received a lot of positive feedback about the renovations. “The ease and flow of getting care here has really improved,” Kuechler said. “The design is all about the patients and families and making their visit here more convenient and comfortable.” Other recent projects at the hospital include renovating the hospice, skilled nursing facility units and the Women’s Wellness

Center, which opened last April. Saalfeld said they are working to improve the hospital piece by piece. In a month or two, work will begin on renovating the emergency room waiting area. The emergency room will continue to operate throughout the renovations, which are expected to be complete by December. Saalfeld said St. Elizabeth is dedicated to continuing to invest money in the Fort Thomas location. Improvements are also being made to the landscaping around the hospital, including near the Grand Avenue entrance. “The landscaping will really make this location more inviting and will be a nice entrance into the city of Fort Thomas,” Saalfeld said.

Fort Thomas twins share leap year birthday By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

FORT THOMAS — For Fort Thomas twins Jane Petracco and Ellen Turner, birthdays are a big deal. That’s because the sisters, born during a leap year on Feb. 29, 1956, only have a “real” birthday once every four years. This year the women, who are 56, are celebrating their 14th leap year birthday. “It’s weird since we don’t have a real birthday most years, but it’s always been kind of fun to do something extra special every four years,” said Turner. While they usually celebrate their birthdays together on Feb. 28, on leap years the sisters do more than other years by doings things like going to an extra fancy restaurant for the birthday dinner, Turner said. The twins are daughters of

Twins sisters Jane Petacco and Ellen Turner. PROVIDED

Wilma Graves of Fort Thomas poses for a picture for the newspaper with her twin daughters, Jane and Ellen, born on Leap Day Feb. 29, 1956. PROVIDED

Jim and Wilma Graves of Fort Thomas, who said they hadn’t realized it at the time that there

was a chance their daughters would be leap year babies. “The thought had never entered my mind,” Wilma said. The women were born about five minutes apart around 2 a.m. on Leap Day, and Wilma said the hospital recognized the significance of the birth. “I was hardly awake after giving birth and they put the girls in my arms and starting

taking pictures,” Wilma said. As if having twins on leap day wasn’t rare enough, Jim’s cousin also had twin boys the same day. Wilma said when the children were about 10, a local newspaper came and took pictures of the four of them for a feature on leap year babies. Both sisters are currently working as kindergarten teaching assistants at Johnson Elementary School. Turner said their rare birthday has confused many students over the years. “We tell them that we are going to be 14 this year, and you should see the confused look on their faces,” Turner said. ‘We just love to kid them like that.” Their birthday has also been used to test the students’ math skills when one of the sisters poses the question of how old they really are if they’re having their 14th birthday this year, but only have a real birthday every four years.

Attention Teachers & Principals

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NEWS

A2 • FORT THOMAS RECORDER • MARCH 1, 2012

Fort Thomas schools superintendent retires By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

FORT THOMAS — Fort Thomas Superintendent John Williamson is retiring from the district effective Monday, March 12. Williamson, who is taking a position with The College Board in New York City, has been employed with the district since 1999, first as assistant superintendent for teaching and learning, then as superintendent since 2007. School Board Chair Karen Allen said Williamson will be missed in Fort Thomas Schools. “I’m very sad to see him go, but this is an amazing opportunity and I’m so very happy for him,” Allen said. Since 2007, Williamson has implemented new programs, provided stronger fiscal stability and modernized the physical infra-

structure of the district. “I have been blessed to work with such a professional, Williamson talented, giving team of board members, administrators, teachers, parents students and, most importantly, community members,” Williamson said in a press release. “Our work together has enabled students to achieve at greater levels, helping to continue the rich tradition of educational excellence in Fort Thomas.” Allen said Gene Kirchner, the district’s assistance superintendent for teaching and learning, has

Index Calendar .................B2 Classfieds .................C Food ......................B4 Life ........................B1 Police .................... B5 Schools ..................A6 Sports ....................A7 Viewpoints .............A8

been appointed as the interim superintendent and will serve throughout the superintendent selection process. To select a new superintendent, the district has to identify a screening committee made up of a board member, principal, parent, two certified employees and one classified employee. Allen said the committee will be collecting applications until Monday, March 19. Allen said they are trying to move as fast as possible with the selection process, partly because there are currently 15 other districts in Kentucky hiring superintendents. The new superintendent will start with the new fiscal year July 1.

FORT THOMAS RECORDER

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More than 100 attend meeting By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

More than 100 supporters of Rand Paul filled Alexandria’s Calvin Perry Community Center for a mid-day town hall meeting with the Republican senator Friday, Feb. 24. The meeting, sponsored by the Northern Kentucky Tea Party, included a speech by Paul and a chance for attendees to ask questions about a variety issues. During his speech, Paul touched on some major points including the urgency to balance the nation’s budget, stop going further into debt, cut back or eliminate foreign aid and to limit the control the government has over American citizens. The crowd cheered as Paul pointed out that the control the government has on everything from what kind of light bulbs people buy to what chil-

Rand Paul speaks at a town hall meeting in Alexandria Friday, Feb. 24. AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/COMMUNITY RECORDER

dren can bring to school for lunch is out of control. “We’re a nanny state from the cradle to the grave,” Paul said. Attendees at the meeting questioned the senator about a variety of state and national issues, including regulating the federal reserve, giving sanctions to Iran and limiting or eliminating the presence of the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) in local airports. Florence resident Jim Burkhardt asked the senator how he feels about the recent law that was passed allowing the military to arrest anyone, including US citizens, who are suspected of terrorism without due process or a trial. “It sounds terrible,” Burkhardt said. “It sounds like it puts every person in the United States in some sort of jeopardy.” Paul agreed, saying he voted against passing the

News

Michelle Shaw Editor ..........................578-1053, mshaw@nky.com Chris Mayhew Reporter .......................578-1051,cmayhew@nky.com Amanda Joering Reporter ....................578-1052, ajoering@nky.com Melanie Laughman Sports Editor ............513-248-7573, mlaughman@nky.com James Weber Sports Reporter ................578-1054, weber@nky.com

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Paul Johnson of Walton raises his hand to ask a question during Rand Paul's visit to Alexandria. AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/COMMUNITY RECORDER

law, which he feels may lead to the arrests of innocent people just because some legislators are so fearful of terrorists. Alexandria resident Mary Runyon brought up the state’s problem with pill mills and prescription pill abuse, and asked what can be done about it, and how the state can get funding to help people get off drugs. Paul said he feels that doctors who prescribe the narcotics sold on Kentucky’s streets, need to be policed to ensure they aren’t over-prescribing the medicine. Walton resident Paul Johnson asked for Paul’s solution to the $4 and $5 gas prices drivers face at the gas pump. Paul said everyone needs to remember that the rising prices are occurring due to the shrinking value of the dollar, which he said is being caused by the debt the nation is facing, and that President Barack Obama’s stand against off-shore drilling and fracking for natural gas is prohibiting the country from getting the supply it needs. During the event, Paul also touched on his opposition to Obama’s health care reform and to so many federal agencies, including the department of agriculture, being armed. Paul also thanked the tea party members for their support, saying he couldn’t have won the primary election without their support.

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NEWS

MARCH 1, 2012 • CCF RECORDER • A3

Unified dispatch long way from done By Cindy Schroeder cschroeder@nky.com

COVINGTON — Leaders in Boone, Kenton and Campbell counties are likely “at least two years away” from deciding the fate of a regional 911 emergency dispatch system, Kenton Judge-executive Steve Arlinghaus predicted. “We’re still probably, I’d say, at least two years away from having some kind of a solid proposal about how to move forward, about what the best idea is,” Arlinghaus told the fiscal court at Tuesday’s informal caucus meeting. For months, county government staff and public safety officials have held separate meetings – one group discussing the logistics involved in a joint emergency dispatch system for the three Northern Kentucky counties and another studying the possible consolidation of the three dispatch centers within Kenton County. Currently, Erlanger, Covington and

Kenton County have their own dispatch centers. Next week, Kenton County should move another step closer to figuring out whether to combine its three dispatch centers. Finance directors from Covington, Erlanger and Kenton County will review the data on the costs of a Kenton County-wide center. “We believe that we have formulated 95 percent to 98 percent of the true costs of the complete operation of a single dispatch center (within Kenton County),” Arlinghaus said. “...Basically we’re looking for all three entities to bless the numbers.” In the past, disputes about ever-changing cost estimates for a countywide dispatch center and distrust about those figures “have been a big part of the problem” in reaching agreement on consolidation of the three 911 dispatch centers within Kenton County, Arlinghaus said. “That being said, I’ve in-

structed (retired treasurer) Ivan (Frye) from the very beginning to nail this thing down as solidly as possible with the numbers ... so that we’re comfortable presenting those,” Arlinghaus said. If the three finance directors agree on the costs, county officials will then present that information to the mayors at the next regular meeting of the Kenton Mayors Group on March 17. After Tuesday’s meeting, Arlinghaus said that he doesn’t expect an immediate answer from the mayors when the costs are presented. Even so, he’s confident a county-wide 911 dispatch system could be operational by fall The proposed costs for a Kenton County-wide 911 dispatch system would offer a number of options, should some cities opt out of a countywide system. “If one city or two cities or three cities or whatever should decide to opt out of a single dispatch center

(within Kenton County) we could take those line items out and delete those individual cities and we could then move forward with what the costs would be for the remaining cities,” Arlinghaus said. Once the numbers “are on the table,” then the various government leaders can decide how to proceed, he said. In any consolidation of dispatch service, the goal is to save taxpayers money without compromising safety. The declining popularity of land-based telephone lines has left many local governments with decreasing revenues, but increasing 911 service costs. “One of the things that’s no secret in the proposal is that each entity has been subsidizing their (dispatch) system,” Arlinghaus said. “The county, we estimate by the time we plug in all the real numbers ... (has) probably operated at a loss of about $600,000 to $650,000 annually. The city of Covington’s operat-

ing loss is in the neighborhood of $850,000 annually.” In the Kenton County suburbs. Erlanger recently gave leaders of the governments it serves “a catch-up bill” to make up for the difference in the cost of operating its dispatch center, Arlinghaus said. “I don’t know all the cities’ breakdowns of who has to come up with how much money, but I know the city of Fort Mitchell, for example, was $14,000 or $15,000 low,” Arlinghaus said. As the governments within Kenton County move forward on a 911 dispatch center, County Commissioner Kris Knochelmann suggested that an oversight board be formed representing all entities involved. “I’d like to see us with an oversight board that’s not Kenton County, that’s not Erlanger, that’s not the city of Covington,” Knochelmann said. “If we do that, I really think we could get past some of the past challenges.”

caucus are: Sen. John Schickel, Sen. Damon Thayer, Sen. Jack Westwood, Sen. Katie Kratz Stine, Sen. Ernie Harris; Rep. Rick Rand, Rep. Sal Santoro, Rep. Royce Adams, Rep. Alecia WebbEdgington, Rep. Thomas R. Kerr, Rep. Arnold Simpson, Rep. Addia Wuchner, Rep. Dennis Keene, Rep. Joseph Fischer and Rep. Adam Koenig.

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Session of the General Assembly. The format for those wishing to speak will require signing in on a firstcome, first-served basis, with the amount of time allotted for each speaker determined by the number of sign-ups. Multiple individuals talking on the same topic may be required to select one spokesperson for the entire group. The members of the

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Arlinghaus said he’s put together a few proposals for membership on an oversight board that would include all of the key players. “I’ve looked at a couple of different alternatives, and I’ll share it with you when we get to that point,” he told Fiscal Court. Regarding a three-county 911 dispatch system, Arlinghaus said all of the parties first will have to agree on what’s needed, how it will be handled and how it will operate. “It’s not that we don’t want to do it,” he said after the meeting. “We do. But when you start talking about a system that will cost you up in the millions of dollars, you’d better determine what all your needs are first and how we’re all impacted and get a handle on the true cost.”

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NEWS

A4 • CCF RECORDER • MARCH 1, 2012

Friends of A.J. Jolly group forms cmayhew@nky.com

ALEXANDRIA — A.J. Jolly Park has some new friends who will examine ways to enhance the park by engaging support from the community and working with the county. The "Friends of A.J. Jolly Park" is a group of individuals forming from the community to come up with proposals for park improvements, said Campbell County Commissioner Brian Painter during a speech at the Feb. 16 Alexandria Council meeting.

The group will consider things like a reception center that has always been "dreamed about" since the park was created in the 1960s, Painter said. "I think that's the prize that these folks have their eye on in developing this into more of a quality experience," he said. The group will dream big, but also look at small ways to improve the park, Painter said. The park, at 1,000 acres, is one of the largest county parks in the state, he said. The idea is not only to improve the park for camping

and recreation, but also to add enhancements for children and people that are fun, possibly including a "zip line," Painter said. A zip line is a pulley and wire system where people glide downward through the air. Another idea is to rent kayaks and canoes on the lake at the park, he said. "Maybe we can make this something that's more of a destination for folks," Painter said. Linda Bray-Schafer, of Grants Lick, is one of the members of the active steering committee forming the Friends of A.J. Jolly

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Park. Kevin Hanson, a vice president at Cardinal Engineering Corporation in Wilder and an Alexandria resident, is chairing the group. The group will be a 5013c nonprofit, and while they will work with the Campbell County Fiscal Court, they are a separate entity, BraySchafer said. Bray-Schafer has already worked with the county as part of the Northern Kentucky Horse Network to rebuild and expand horse trails in the park. The county also secured grant money for a new horse barn, trailer parking and campground area last fall. Bray-Schafer said people decided on their own to start a friends group and brought the idea to Fiscal Court. "A number of us saw just that the park was underutilized," she said. The friends group wants to put together a plan, starting with the 2002 park plan approved by Fiscal Court, to improve the park and use that as a basis to engage with the community, Bray-Schafer said. "Brian (Painter) is right, we're going to dream big, but we realize we're going through some tough economical times too," she said.

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Boehmker dribbles onto the court to help the team with drills. He started as a ball boy with NKU but now helps run the equipment team. LIBBY CUNNINGHAM/ THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Sweet 16 for NKU equipment manager Danny Boehmker grew up with team By Libby Cunningham Lcunningham@nky.com

FORT

MITCHELL

Sometimes 16 can be bittersweet. After spending most of his lifetime with the Northern Kentucky University basketball team, head equipment manager Danny Boehmker is graduating, leaving an uncommon legacy for a 21-year-old. “It almost doesn’t seem like it’s going to happen,” said NKU head coach Dave Bezold. “Doesn’t seem like he’s leaving. He’s grown up before our eyes.” But upon meeting Boehmker, of Fort Mitchell, it seems like he must have graduated years ago, with his prompt professional email responses and easygoing attitude, he makes everyone feel as at home as he does at Bank of Kentucky Center. “It’s definitely a fulltime job,” he said, adding the school pays him with a scholarship. “It’s not 9-to-5. Sometimes it’s 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.” That’s the usual schedule on game day, he said, his responsibilities marking different points of the day, every day. “On a daily basis I come in 1 1/2 to two hours before, and turn the lights on, make sure the floor’s clean and get the ball out,” he said. “During practice I help with drills. On game day I

Danny Boehmker has been with the Northern Kentucky University basketball team for 16 years and currently serves as head equipment manager. He graduates in May. LIBBY CUNNINGHAM/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

come in early for the other teams, get the uniforms out and schedule the pregame and post game meal.” Before he was a manager though, Boehmker started out as a ball boy. He also interned one summer at the Cincinnati Bengals training camp in Kentucky. “I was a shy kid growing up,” he said. “Any little 5year-old or 6-year-old who gets attention from college athletes, that’s huge.” Sixteen years after starting with NKU, Boehmker heads into practice, hours after returning from an away game the night before. He’s only missed one game in his tenure, he said. Boehmker hopes to use what he’s learned and that it could land him a job in the future. “Ultimately, I’ve always loved equipment and then there’s athletic training,” he said. “I’d love to incorporate them both.” After all, he’s been integral in getting NKU’s team ready to play. “I do everything but coach,” he jokes.

Senator makes nominations Community Recorder U.S. Sen. Rand Paul has announced his nominations to the U.S. service academies, consisting of 30 individuals from across Kentucky. “I commend each of these students for their dedication to the U.S. military, and wish them the best through the remainder of the selection process,” Paul said in a Feb. 8 statement. Paul nominated the following Northern Kentucky individuals to the U.S. Military Academy, the U.S. Air Force Academy, the U.S. Naval Academy and the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy:

U.S. Military Academy Carl Agner, Florence Cole Garriott, Villa Hills

U.S. Air Force Academy

Michael Kelly, Fort Thomas Brendan Dooley, Hebron Carl Agner, Florence

U.S. Naval Academy

Cole Garriott, Villa Hills Kenneth Padgett, Lakeside Park Kelsey Pendleton, Burlington

U.S. Merchant Marine Academy

Michael Kelly, Fort Thomas Quincy Page, Walton


NEWS

MARCH 1, 2012 • CCF RECORDER • A5

Event held for Special Spaces By Amy Scalf ascalf@nky.com

CRESTVIEW HILLS — A special fundraiser will take place on Sunday, March 4, at Charming Charlie on Town Center Boulevard. The Crestview Hills Town Center accessories store will host a fundraiser for Special Spaces Cincinnati beginning at 6:30 p.m. Attendees will pay $5 admission, receive 20 percent off purchases and will be eligible for giveaways. Special Spaces Cincinnati is the local chapter of a national nonprofit organization that provides one-day bedroom makeovers for children facing life-threatening illnesses. More information on Special Spaces and its 21 local chapters can be found at www.specialspaces.org. The Cincinnati chapter was formed in October 2011 and has already com-

Two-year-old kidney cancer survivor Maverick Delape of Independence enjoys his custom-made truck bed as part of a room makeover by Special Spaces Cincinnati in October 2011. THANKS TO SPECIAL SPACES CINCINNATI pleted rooms for four children in the Greater Cincinnati-Northern Ken-

tucky area, including 2year-old Maverick Delape, who lives with his

dad, Steve, in Independence. The organization

New Perceptions celebrating 60 years

ented and we are basically raising funds one room at a time. Our goal is to receive grant, corporate and ongoing community contributions in order to fill our schedule with kids and not have to worry about having enough money to make their dream bedroom come to life,” said Chamberlin. “There is no other organization like Special Spaces in the Cincinnati area,” she said. “Realizing that these children need comfortable and inspirational private spaces while they go through rigorous treatment, appointments and emotional stress, our mission is to provide them with that special space where they can truly rest and not think about being sick.” During the makeover, the child and his or her family are sent out for the day, and the child’s siblings each receive a care package.

turned Maverick’s room into a vintage car service garage in October. His bed appears to be part of a truck pulling into the service station. The toddler is recovering from kidney cancer, has had one kidney removed and endured treatments including chemotherapy. “Upon entering the room, Maverick’s eyes got very wide, and his dad said, ‘I knew it was going to be great, but this is so much better than I expected,’” said Special Spaces Cincinnati director Jennifer Chamberlin. She said each bedroom costs about $3,000, including new paint, furniture, trimwork, lighting, closet systems, custom-made bedding and window treatments and decor funded solely by contributions from supporters. “As a newer nonprofit organization in the area, our fundraising efforts are very grass-roots ori-

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SCHOOLS A6 • CCF RECORDER • MARCH 1, 2012

COMMUNITY

RECORDER

Editor: Michelle Shaw, mshaw@nky.com, 578-1053

ACHIEVEMENTS | NEWS | ACTIVITIES | HONORS

CommunityPress.com

Nature lesson hooks Grants Lick students By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

GRANTS LICK — Kentucky Fish and Wildlife conservation educator Ron Browning hooks student interest in the outdoors during talks at almost every elementary in Campbell County. Browning spent an hour speaking to fourth- and fifth-graders at Grants Lick Elementary School Tuesday, Feb. 21. At one point Browning pulled out what he called a “shark hook” as big around as a person’s head to explain how the barb on a bee’s sting works. Browning told students they needtoletanadultknowwhenthey are stung by a bee in case of allergies. He then showed the students how to use a business card or piece of paper to ease a stinger out without squeezing more venom from the barb into their skin.

The lesson, accompanied by projected photos of bees, spiders and a summer camp experience evoked ‘oohs and aahs’ from the students, seated on the floor of the cafeteria. Browning said he talks to students about conservation in about 50 schools in Campbell, Kenton, Grant, Pendleton and Harrison counties. In addition to visiting every elementary in Campbell County Schools, Browning said he goes to public schools in Fort Thomas, Newport, Silver Grove and Southgate and almost every Catholic school in the county. Talking about mammals, birds, and wildlife conservation in Kentucky are typical topics, he said. Browning said he talks to about 68 different classes a month. “It is to tell them what is out and around in nature and get them moreinterestedinnature,”hesaid.

Ron Browning, a conservation educator for the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources, points during a Tuesday, Feb. 21, vist to Grants Lick Elementary School to a photo of the abdomen of a honey bee as he uses a giant hook to explain how the bee's sting lodges with a similar hook-like barb into a person's skin upon being stung. CHRIS MAYHEW/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Browning gave Grants Lick students a peek into the annual summer Camp Robert C. Webb in Grayson, Ky., during the end of the lesson. It’s an opportunity for children to experience the outdoors, and transportation to and from Campbell County Middle School in Alexandria is part of the package, he said. The camp is open to boys and girls enrolled in grades 4-6

across Kentucky, and each region has a set week to come to the camp. Campbell County’s week is June 25-29. Thecampteacheshunting,fishing, swimming, general outdoor skills and to be better stewards of the land and Kentucky’s wildlife, Browning said. Each year, the camper who catches the most fish for the week

wins a fishing pole to take home, he said. Sitting in the audience of Grants Lick students was Anthony Goins, a fifth-grader who won the prizebycatching30fishduringthe 2011Campbell County Camp Webb week. Goins said he knew how to fish before going to camp, but he learned other skills including how to hold and shoot a gun safely. Overall, Goins said he had fun at camp and spending time with friends and the camp counselors. “I enjoyed the people and the food the most,” he said. For information about Camp Webb visit the “For Kids” section Kentucky’s fish and wildlife website www.fw.ky.gov or call 800-8581549. There is an April 15 application deadline, and some scholarships are available for the $200 camp fee, Browning said.

Kindergarten students, teacher Sharon Gramann and teacher assistant Balbina Maniet pose for a picture with Eddie Smith from CSI Waste Services, who donated bins to be used in the school's Terra-Cycle fundraising project. PROVIDED

Students announce the next act during the variety show. AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/COMMUNITY RECORDER

Variety show highlights students’ talents By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

FORT THOMAS — Woodfill Elementary School students took to the stage to showcase their talents Friday, Feb. 24, during the school’s “Proud to be an American” variety show. The show, held at Highlands High School, featured students performing in a variety of ways for fellow students, family and friends.

Woodfill kindergarteners perform their kindergarten call during the show. AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/COMMUNITY RECORDER

KeAvier Turner performs "Somebody to Love" during the variety show. AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/COMMUNITY RECORDER

Students Madison Gillman, Campbell Smith, Averill Hoover and Emma Gillman perform a dance during Woodfill Elementary School's variety show Friday, Feb. 24. AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/COMMUNITY RECORDER

School turns trash to cash By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

BELLEVUE — Students at Grandview Elementary School are bringing more than just their books and homework to school. For the past year, students, faculty and staff have been bringing in their garbage as part of the school’s TerraCycle fundraising program. Through the program, the school earns money for used items including drink pouches like Capri Sun, lunch kits like Lunchables and empty personal care bottles. Kindergarten teacher Sharon Gramann, who spearheaded the schoolwide project, said she learned about TerraCycle when one of her students brought in a box of Capri Suns to share for his birthday and she happened to read about the program on the back of the box. “I saw something about a way to get money for your school, and I thought it seemed like something we could do here at Grandview,” Gramann said. Starting last February, Gramann’s students partnered with their fourthgrade “buddies” and made posters to spread the word about the program. “We were able to get the whole school involved and excited about it,” Gramann said.

Since they started the program, Grandview has collected about 12,500 drink pouches, 2,000 lunch kits and 800 personal care product bottles, earning the school more than $300. Gramann said the response has been great and a lot of the students bring in items. While they only had one collection bin at first, which meant Gramann had to sort through and separate the trash, the school recently received a donation from CSI Waste Service of more bins to make the collection easier. Through the program, Gramann said the items collected are recycled and used to make a variety of products. Principal Candice Simpkins said all the money raised goes into the student activities fund, meaning it goes to pay for extras and activities for the students. “This program is not just about raising money for the school, its about saving landfill space,” Simpkins said. “It lets the kids see that everything doesn’t need to go in the garbage.” Gramann said the school is going to continue participating in the TerraCycle program, and residents are welcome to drop off participating items to the school. For more information about the program, visit www.terracycle.net.


SPORTS

MARCH 1, 2012 • CCF RECORDER • A7

Editor: Melanie Laughman, mlaughman@communitypress.com, 513-248-7573

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | RECREATIONAL

COMMUNITY

RECORDER

CommunityPress.com

Camels win first title in 10 years By James Weber jweber@nky.com

ALEXANDRIA — Head coach Aric Russell challenged Nate McGovney to be more aggressive in the locker room at halftime. McGovney, the Campbell County High School junior, had eight points and his team had a five-point lead. But, he took the message from Russell to heart. McGovney scored 14 points in the third quarter and 31 for the game as the Camels beat Scott 51-40 in the 37th District championship game Feb. 24 at Campbell County Middle School. The Camels (18-12) won their first district title since 2002 and snapped Scott’s four-year streak of winning the crown. McGovney, one of the top scorers in the 10th Region, was tournament MVP. “Last year we were up at halftime and they came back at us and they won,” McGovney said. “This year, I wasn’t going to let them get back. We’re ready to start a trend of Campbell County winning the next few years.” Russell, a former Camel player and graduate, enjoyed the milestone. “We haven’t done it in a long time, and for me to come home where I played and get a district title, it is really special to me and something I will never forget.” The 10th Region is at Montgomery County this year. The Camels will play Deming 7:30 p.m. Friday, March 2. They would play Clark County or Augusta in the semis with a win, 8:30 p.m. Saturday. The final is 7 p.m. Tuesday, March 6. Against Scott, Campbell led by five, 22-17, at halftime when Russell had his talk with his star forward. McGovney then scored all but two of his team’s points as the Camels outscored the Eagles 16-4 in the third period. McGovney led the team off the court as well, reminding his teammates to stand up and applaud Scott as it accepted its runner-up trophy. After he took his

Campbell County celebrates with its district title. Campbell County beat Scott 51-40 in the 37th District boys basketball final Feb. 24, at Campbell County Middle School in Alexandria. JAMES WEBER/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Campbell County sophomore Corey Holbrook goes to the hoop. Campbell County beat Scott 51-40 in the 37th District boys basketball final Feb. 24, at Campbell County Middle School in Alexandria. JAMES WEBER/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

MVP trophy, he went and highfived every teammate before returning to center court. “We told him he had to start taking it to the basket and be more aggressive,” Russell said. “They didn’t have anyone who could guard him real well. He’s one of the best players in the region and he works real hard. He’s a good kid and I’m real happy for him tonight.” Scott had beaten Campbell by seven in the regular season. Russell said his Camels played a lot of zone defense in that first game. Sophomore Corey Holbrook was all-tournament with senior Dalton Griffin. Griffin guarded Brossart’s 6-foot-8 center Joe Jennings in the semifinals and

PRESS PREPS HIGHLIGHTS By James Weber jweber@nky.com

This week’s MVP

Campbell County junior center Kaytlin Siegmundt for her big game in helping the Camels win the 37th District championship.

Boys basketball

» Bellevue lost to Highlands in the 36th semis, 58-44, Feb. 22. Bellevue finished 1416. Branden Hoffmann led Bellevue with 23 points and Zach Poinsett 10. Seniors are Hoffmann, Jordan Fogelman, Jacob Hatter, Justin Huitte and Adrian Rodriguez. » Dayton lost 57-53 to Highlands in the 36th quarterfinals. Seniors are Henry Horsley, Thomas Rogg, Ben Schoultheis, T.R. Smith, Danny Sparks and Mark Tumler. Dayton finished 14-13. » Newport lost 68-38 to NCC Feb. 21 in the 36th semifinals. Newport finished 15-14. Seniors are Stefan Dunn, Robert Engram, James Holbrock, Andrew Merrill, Austin Merrill and Craig Richardson. » Silver Grove lost to Calvary 59-58 in the 37th District quarterfinals Feb. 20. Christian Pollitt had 16 points. Marcus Kidwell was the lone senior. SG finished 9-25.

Girls basketball

» Bellevue lost 98-28 to

Highlands in the 36th semis Feb. 22. Jennifer Sexton had 13 points for Bellevue, who finished 10-19. Seniors are Kaylynn Dill, Kayla Tatum and Briana Taylor. » Dayton lost 81-27 to Highlands in the 36th quarterfinals to finish 10-13. Seniors are Shelly Centers, Julia Kilburn, Charlissa Smith and Heather Wayman. » Newport lost to NCC 5825 Feb. 21 in the 36th semifinals. Jaimie Watts was the lone senior for Newport (11-18). » Silver Grove lost 68-28 to Scott in the 37th quarterfinals to finish 2-26. Payton Govan was the lone senior.

Bowling

» Newport beat Dayton 7-0 (2,636-1,824) in boys action Feb. 16. Jarrod Elliott had a 450 series. Newport won 6-1 in girls (1,984-1,154). Katlyn Hoeh shot 205 and 195. » Campbell County beat Cooper 6-1 in boys action Feb. 16. (2,694-2,473). Campbell won 6-1 in girls as well (2,3491,891). Brianne Vogelpohl had a 215. » NCC beat Brossart 4-3 (2,332-2,356) in boys action Feb. 16. Darren Quinn shot a 247 for NCC. Brossart won the girls match 5.5-1.5 (2,0881,855). » James Tucker of Highlands shot a 285 in a 5-2 loss to Simon Kenton Feb. 16.

played strong defense. “He told me to push him off the blocks, and I was one of the bigger kids,” Griffin said. “It was really hard to push him. He’s really heavy. It was a good challenge.” Campbell had to come from behind and beat its crosstown rival Brossart 46-40 in the semis. Newport Central Catholic (20-8) beat Highlands (10-18) 4944 in the 36th District final Feb. 25. It was the fourth year in a row NCC has won the title. NCC was to play Covington Catholic Wednesday in the second quarterfinal. The winner gets Cooper or Dixie Heights in the first semifinal 1 p.m. Saturday, March 3. Highlands drew Lloyd 7:30 p.m. Thursday, March

Newport Central Catholic Jake Schulte (33) shoots and lost control of the ball against Newport Austin Merrill (24) in the second period. Newport High School battles Newport Central Catholic High School in the 36th district semifinal at Dayton High School Tuesday, Feb. 21, in Dayton, Ky. THE ENQUIRER/ JOSEPH FUQUA II 1. The winner plays Holmes or Boone County 2:30 p.m. Saturday. The final is 1 p.m. Sunday, March 4. The tourney is at Northern Kentucky University. “We have to knock down some shots, that’s going to be key in the Bank of Kentucky Center with the different shooting backgrounds,” Brannen said. “These kids have experience there the past couple of years. Our defense is going to have to step up and you have to knock down

shots.” Brannen’s wife was still expecting their second child as he attended the draw Sunday morning. She was due during the district tournament. Freshman center Drew McDonald returned to action in the district tournament after spraining an ankle two weeks prior. Brannen said he isn’t 100 percent. Senior guard Brady Hightchew enters the regional with 976 career points.

Breds, Camels roll to district titles By James Weber jweber@nky.com

CAMPBELL COUNTY — They have been good at payback in recent weeks. Ron Dawn hopes his Newport Central Catholic girls basketball team gets plenty of opportunities to avenge losses during the Ninth Region Tournament. That means his Thoroughbreds are making a run at repeating their 2011 regional championship. NCC (19-10) beat Highlands (17-15) 59-27 in the 36th District final Feb. 24 to win its fourth straight district championship. NCC was set to play Boone County Monday in a rematch of last year’s regional final. A win pits the Thoroughbreds against St. Henry or Holmes in the first semifinal 6 p.m. Friday. The final is 7 p.m. Saturday, March 3. “We couldn’t get a good draw,” said NCC head coach Ron Dawn. “Any way you do it, you’re going to have to play two of the top eight teams in the state (Boone, Ryle and Notre Dame). It could have been worse. We don’t have to play all three of them.” The Breds are just 5-5 since falling to Walton-Verona in overtime in the All “A” Classic state championship game Jan. 29. NCC avenged that loss three days later against W-V, winning by a whopping 29 points, 54-25. Two weeks later, NCC beat Conner 68-51 after losing by six to Conner during

St. Henry's Libby Leedom (10) is surrouned by Newport Central Catolic's Aubrey Muench (23) during their girls basketball game Wednesday, Feb. 15. TONY TRIBBLE FOR THE ENQUIRER

the holidays. “We played real well, especially against Highlands,” Dawn said. “We’re playing like we were in the ‘A,’ so I’m really happy.” The Ninth Region field is filled with teams who have beaten the Breds this season, especially in recent weeks. NCC has lost to Notre Dame, Ryle and St. Henry since Feb. 11. Sophomore Nicole Kiernan, NCC’s leading scorer for the year, was MVP of the district tourney. She had 19 points, 15 in the first half. Senior Aubrey Muench had 17 points, 14 in the first half as the Breds ran over the Bluebirds. Jamie Kohls was all-tourney for NewCath as well, bolstering the

team’s defense and rebounding. Highlands (17-15) was led by Jesse Daley with 10 points. She and Leah Schaefer were named to the all-tourney team. By rule, Highlands is on the other side of the regional bracket and was set to play Notre Dame Tuesday. The winner gets Ryle or Dixie Heights in the second semifinal Friday. In the 10th Region, Campbell County has been looking up at crosstown rival Bishop Brossart all season. This season, like in recent years, the Camels proved they still own the 37th District in the postseason. Campbell (20-10) beat Brossart (25-7) 53-48 in the district championship game Feb. 23 at Campbell County Middle School. The Camels won their fourth district crown in the past five years, avenging a regularseason loss to the Mustangs. The Camels were set to play George Rogers Clark Monday in the first round. The winner gets Mason or Deming Wednesday in the semifinals. The final is 3 p.m. Sunday, March 4 at Campbell County Middle School. Junior Kaytlin Siegmundt led Campbell with17 points and16 rebounds. Junior guard Taylor Robinson had 13 points and five steals. She converted two steals into her own layups on back to back possessions in the third quarter to give the Camels the lead.


VIEWPOINTS A8 • FORT THOMAS RECORDER • MARCH 1, 2012

COMMUNITY

RECORDER

Editor: Michelle Shaw, mshaw@nky.com, 578-1053

EDITORIALS | LETTERS | COLUMNS | CH@TROOM

CommunityPress.com

Enquirer editor explains subscription model This week, Gannett announced that its news organizations, including the Enquirer, will move to a paid subscription model in Carolyn the next year. Washburn It is imporEDITOR, VP OF tant to change ENQUIRER MEDIA our business model as technology and your behavior changes. You have been accustomed to paying for a daily print newspaper, and that circulation revenue has been an important part of the business model, in combination with advertising. But as more of you move to the web and smartphones and tablets, print subscribers and advertisers are now paying for content that digital readers are getting for free. It doesn’t take a Fortune 500 chief financial officer to see that isn’t sustainable. Some of you commented this week that you can get content elsewhere. Well, the most impor-

Here are a few examples of things you know or understand because an Enquirer journalist was on the job: » That Cincinnati police often start police chases that violate their own policies. » More school districts than ever are closing school buildings because of the recession. They used to only close buildings if enrollment fell. » About half the companies that received state tax money didn’t create the jobs they promised. » The biggest pot of federal stimulus money for our region paid for the new Duke Energy electric meter system. The stimulus program here protected thousands of jobs for a couple years but it’s unclear that it created many. I could go on and on. I hope the community never takes for granted the Enquirer storytellers who touch our consciences and prompt people to act - journalists like Krista Ramsey and Michael Keating.

PAGE FOR A DAY

CAMPBELL COUNTY REPRESENTATIVES AND CONTACT INFO Local address: 21 Fairway Drive, Southgate KY 41071 Frankfort address: 702 Capitol Ave. Annex Room 236, Frankfort, KY 40601 Local phone: 859-781-5311 Frankfort phone: 502-564-3120 Email: katie.stine@lrc.ky.gov Website: http://www.lrc.ky.gov/ legislator/S024.htm

Representative Joseph Fischer – District 68

Local address: 126 Dixie Place, Fort Thomas, KY 41075 Frankfort address: 702 Capitol Ave., Annex Room 429D, Frankfort, KY 40601 Local phone: 859-781-6965 Frankfort phone: 502-564-8100 ext. 742Email: joe.fischer@lrc.ky.gov Website: http://www.lrc.ky.gov/ legislator/H068.htm

Representative Dennis Keene – District 67

Local address: 1040 Johns Hill Road, Wilder, KY 41076 Frankfort address: 702 Capitol Ave. Annex Room 358, Frankfort, KY 40601 Local phone: 859-441-5894 Frankfort phone: 502-564-8100 ext. 626 Email: dennis.keene@lrc.ky.gov Website: http://www.lrc.ky.gov/ legislator/H067.htm

Representative Thomas McKee – District 78

Local address: 1053 Cook Road, Cynthiana, KY 41031 Frankfort address: 702 Capitol Ave. Annex Room 332B, Frankfort, KY 40601 Local phone: 859-234-5879 Frankfort phone: 502-564-8100 ext. 667 Email: Tom.McKee@lrc.ky.gov

FORT THOMAS

RECORDER

you get it easier or faster. You can go to cincinnati.com to find a fish fry. Well, you can do some of that through word of mouth or a flier at church. Or you can can see dozens using our interactive map. You can find things to do this weekend in a lot of places. But if you don’t want to miss music that Janelle Gelfand knows or the new restaurant that Polly Campbell knows or you want to see many more options than your usual choices, cincinnati.com’s entertainment section is packed. Here are key points about how this will work: » Your subscription to the Enquirer will always include full access to the web, mobile site, iPhone and Android apps, a tablet product and the e-newspaper, which is an exact replica of the daily print newspaper that you can page through online. » The home page, section fronts, obituaries and classified sections like cars.com will remain free. » You can read a limited num-

ber of articles for free before you are asked to subscribe. That doesn’t charge the infrequent reader but does ask regular readers to pay. » If you receive a weekly community newspaper like this one and want to regularly read digital content, you will buy a digital subscription. I know we must give you important, unique content that helps you speak up to your elected officials, know how school changes will affect your kids, plan your weekend and participate in efforts to improve quality of life in your neighborhood. We balance that with inspiring and beautiful stories and photography. I think that’s worth paying for. Let me know when you see us do something you value, to help us keep doing it. And let me know what else you need from us. Carolyn Washburn is the editor and vice president of news for Cincinnati Enquirer, Community Press and Community Recorder.

Taking steps to protect against identity theft

Silver Grove School fifth-grader served as page to Senate President Pro Tem Katie Stine, R-Southgate, on Feb. 8. Sophie is the daughter of Jill and Michelle Turner. THANKS TO LRC PUBLIC INFORMATION

Senator Katie Kratz Stine – District 24

tant work we do for you is not something others are producing. And nobody does this work for free. We pay well more than 100 journalists to do things no one else does. To be at city hall and with county commissioners every day, meeting or no meeting. To be with the Reds and Bengals and UC and Xavier virtually every day, game or no game. To cover more than 70 communities in our region, every day. To methodically track and read boring but important documents and budgets. To get to know the decision makers and understand their personalities and motivations and relationships. We do this work so you don’t have to. You can watch city council meetings on public access TV but most of you don’t. And even if you did, that often is not where the real news happens. We are there when you aren’t, we are where the news happens. Reliably and consistently, for you. Even when you could get information elsewhere, we help

A publication of

Recently, a hacker gained access to the names, addresses, email addresses, phone numbers and partial credit card numbers of 24 million Zappos.com customers, who now risk having their identities stolen and personal financial accounts compromised. I am currently working with the attorneys general from nine other states to find out more information about the Zappos.com security breach, adequacy of their security practices and efforts to protect consumers in the wake of the attack. The average out-of-pocket cost for an individual who is a victim of identity theft is $631, according to Javelin Strategy & Research. Identity theft remains one of the fastest-growing crimes in the U.S. Last year, more than 30 million records containing sensitive personal information were involved in data breaches as a result of hacking, malware, or lost or stolen equipment, according to the national Privacy Rights Clearinghouse. In addition to the cost to consumers, the average cost

of a data breach for a business is $7.2 million. As Attorney General, I want to ensure that businesses and consumers are doing all they Jack can to protect Conway personal data on the Internet. COMMUNITY RECORDER GUEST The following COLUMNIST steps can help ensure that you don’t unintentionally compromise your personal information and your safety. » Don’t store credit card information online. What you give up in convenience, you will gain in security. » Only do business with companies that offer secure payment processing. » Check your privacy settings on social networking sites, such as Facebook. » Configure your wireless router to encrypt data. » Be sure to have a firewall installed and enabled on your

computer. » Don’t assume public hot spots are secure. » Think before you post and never post information about your vacation plans. Zappos customers affected by the data security breach, should change passwords or login IDs for other accounts, beware of “phishing scams,” which may come in the form of emails that look like they are from Zappos, and monitor financial accounts, billing statements and credit reports for accuracy. Unfortunately, Kentucky is one of four states without security breach notification laws. I pushed for identity theft protection legislation during my first term and will continue to support efforts to bring Kentucky laws up-to-date with our modern law enforcement challenges. For more information on protecting yourself online, please visit my “Cybersafety in Kentucky” website at ag.ky.gov/ cybersafety. Jack Conway is the Kentucky Attorney General.

WHEN THEY MEET Campbell County Fiscal Court

Cold Spring

5694 East Alexandria Pike 859-441-9604 7:30 p.m. the second and fourth Monday www.coldspringky.com

Address: 1098 Monmouth St., Newport, KY 41071 Phone: 859-292-3838 Website: www.campbelcountyky.org Meets: 7 p.m. the first Wednesday of the month at the Alexandria Courthouse, 8352 E. Main St. And meets at 5:30 p.m. the third Wednesday of the month at the county administration building, 1098 Monmouth St., Newport.

Crestview

Alexandria

Dayton

8236 W. Main St. 859-635-4125 7 p.m. the third Thursday www.alexandriaky.org

Bellevue

616 Poplar St. 859-431-8888 7 p.m. the second Wednesday www.bellevueky.org

14 Circle Drive 859-441-4620 7:30 p.m. the first Tuesday www.crestviewky.com

514 Sixth Ave. 859-491-1600 7:30 p.m. the first and third Tuesdays www.daytonky.com

Fort Thomas

130 North Fort Thomas Ave. 859-441-1055 7 p.m. the first and third Mondays www.ftthomas.org

228 Grandview Drive, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017 654 Highland Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075 phone: 283-0404 email: kynews@communitypress.com web site: www.nky.com

Highland Heights

176 Johns Hill Road 859-441-8575 7:30 p.m. the first and third Tuesdays www.hhky.com

Melbourne

502 Garfield Ave. 859-781-6664 7:30 p.m. the second Tuesday Website: NA

Newport

998 Monmouth St. 859-292-3687 7 p.m. the second and fourth Mondays www.newportky.gov

Silver Grove

308 Oak St. 859-441-6390 7 p.m. the first Tuesday Website: NA

Fort Thomas Recorder Editor Michelle Shaw mshaw@nky.com, 578-1053 Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday See page A2 for additional contact information.


L IFE A 'dirty day' of artful play COMMUNITY RECORDER

THURSDAY, MARCH 1, 2012

PEOPLE | IDEAS | RECIPES

By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

NEWPORT — Children ages 4-6 slathered their hands in paint and got messy during the Feb. 22 Play Art program at the Newport Branch of the Campbell County Public Library. Play Art programs at the Newport Branch are at 4 p.m. each Wednesday, said Sara Relojo, a children’s program coordinator at the library. Relojo started off the afternoon by leading children in a dance to use up some of their energy before starting two different art activities. Children used strands of orange and lime green yarn to make flowers, dinosaurs and other shapes on the library’s floor. Next, Relojo broke out trays of washable paint for the day’s “messy art” featured activity. Children were given scrapers, rollers and stamps to paint with – but many ended up just using their fingers and hands. Amanda Mackison, 5, of Newport, wearing a bib that didn’t quite protect her dress from getting paint on it jumped up and down as she smeared her hands in paint singing “Dirty day, dirty day.”

Jack Fisher, 5, of Newport, holds up his paint-covered hands during the Wednesday, Feb. 22, Play Art program for children ages 4-6 at the Newport Branch of the Campbell County Public Library. CHRIS MAYHEW/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Susan Yelton of Newport encourages her grandson Owen Yelton, 5, as he uses a roller to make paint designs on a tablecloth paper canvas during Play Art at the Newort Branch of the Campbell County Public Library Wednesday, Feb. 22. CHRIS MAYHEW/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Amanda Mackison, 5, of Newport, squishes and swirls paint on a paper tablecloth canvas as she gleefully sings out "dirty day" during the Wednesday, Feb. 22, Play Art program for children ages 4-6 at the Newport Branch of the Campbell County Public Library. CHRIS MAYHEW/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Ella Neurohr, 4, of Newport, finishes a yarn design on the floor of the Newport Branch of the Campbell County Public Library during the Play Art program Wednesday, Feb. 22. CHRIS MAYHEW/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Chloe Crisler, 4, of Newport, left, points at her 5-year-old sister Chelsea's paint-coated hands during the Wednesday, Feb. 22, Play Art program for children ages 4-6 at the Newport Branch of the Campbell County Public Library.

Mikiyah Johnson, 7, of Newport, makes a flower shape using yarn as part of the Play Art program activities at the Newport Branch of the Campbell Count Public Library Wednesday, Feb. 22. CHRIS MAYHEW/THE

CHRIS MAYHEW/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

COMMUNITY RECORDER

OUR NEIGHBORHOOD

Neighbors form lifelong friendships on 'The Lane' By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

FORT THOMAS — The residents on Wilbers Lane in Fort Thomas don’t have to look far to find someone they know they can count on. On the small, one-way street, referred to by its residents as “The Lane,” neighbors are more than just people who live next to each other. Debbie Reker, who has lived on Wilbers for about 35 years, said the street’s residents share a close bond. “I have lived there long enough to see the

children grow into fine adults, graduating, getting married, having their own children and forming their families, lives, careers, et cetera,” Reker said. “Plus, I have aged with these friends, sharing stories of joint replacements and wishing we had bathrooms on the first floor.” Reker said throughout the years, the residents have seen ups and downs and have been there for each other regardless of the situation. “There is one thing you can bank on 100 percent of the time and that

is the fact that you do not have to go through these issues alone,” Reker said. “As I grow older, I know that I can depend on my neighbors if I need help, but on The Lane, no one retires from being a good neighbor, friend and from helping in any way they can.” Greg Brinkman, who moved to the street with his wife in 1977, said he has always enjoyed the family-friendly atmosphere on Wilbers. Shortly after moving in, the Brinkmans started the street’s annual block party, which is

still held every summer. “We just thought it would be fun to get everyone together and have an all-day picnic,” Brinkman said. “It’s just a great way for everyone to spend time together.” Reker said she is proud and honored to be part of a special neighborhood like Wilbers Lane. “In today’s world, where communication is done electronically and talking means e-mail, it is so refreshing to talk and spend time with my neighbors, my friends,” Reker said.

Wilbers Lane residents Jackson Smith, Jake Ryan and Seth Ryan head to school Monday, Feb. 27. AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/COMMUNITY RECORDER


B2 • CCF RECORDER • MARCH 1, 2012

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD FRIDAY, MARCH 2 Art Openings The Art of Food, 6-9 p.m., Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, 1028 Scott Blvd., Culinary inspired works of art by artists Eric Brass, Leah Busch, Marisa Dipaola, Sayaka Ganz, Sandra Gross, Jeffrey Hayes, Matt Kotlarczyk, Pam Kravetz, Jim Merz, Carla Morales, Sara Pearce, Kim Shifflett and Jacquelyn Sommer. Opening reception includes culinary creations by some of the area’s top chefs. Exhibit continues through April 13. $60, $45 members at door; $50, $35 members advance. Reservations recommended. 859-957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

Dining Events Shrimp and Fish Fry, 4-7:30 p.m., St. Joseph Church - Camp Springs, 6833 Four Mile Road, Features Mr. Herb’s baked or fried fish, fried catfish, salmon, deep-fried shrimp, crab cakes, a sampler platter and sides. Dinners and sandwiches. Carryout available. $8-$11. Through March 30. 859-635-5652. Camp Springs. Fish Fry, 4-8 p.m., St. Thomas School, 428 S. Fort Thomas Ave., Hand breaded cod filets, homemade macaroni and cheese, shrimp, french fries, cheese pizza, coleslaw, etc. Fish & Shrimp setups. Child and Senior discounts. Homemade desserts. Benefits St. Thomas School activities.. $5. Presented by St. Thomas Mothers Club and Boosters. 859-572-4641; www.sttschool.org. Fort Thomas. Fish Fry, 4-7:30 p.m., Silver Grove Volunteer Fire Department, 5011 Four Mile, Fish, shrimp, frog legs, macaroni, green beans, hush puppies, fries, onion rings, chicken strips and desserts. Benefits Silver Grove Volunteer Fire Department. 859-441-6251. Silver Grove. St. Catherine of Siena Fish Fry, 4:30-7 p.m., St. Catherine of Siena Church, 1803 N. Fort Thomas Ave., Fish is handdipped cod provided by Green Derby Catering. Dinner also includes homemade macaroni and cheese or french fries or salad, coleslaw or applesauce, fresh hush puppies made on site and dessert. 859-442-8529; www.stcatherineofsiena.org. Fort Thomas. Newport Elks Lenten Fish Fry, 4:30-8 p.m., Newport Elks Lodge, 3704 Alexandria Pike, Fish, steak and shrimp dinners, hamburger, chicken nuggets hush puppies and sides. Carryout available 4-7:30 p.m. Benefits Newport Elks Lodge 273. $2.25-$8.50. 859-441-1273. Cold Spring. St. Therese Fish Fry, 5-7:30 p.m., St. Therese Church, 11 Temple Place, Fabulous Fish Fry featuring Baked or Fried Cod, Breaded shrimp, Tuna Melt, dinners with your choice of Mac ’n’ Cheese, fries, seasoned green beans and coleslaw. Fish, shrimp or tuna melt dinners $7. A la carte grilled cheese, cheese pizza and hush puppies. Dine in

or carry out. Curbside Service available. 859-441-9137. Southgate.

Music - DJ UNION, 5 p.m., Powerhouse Factories Inc., 33 E. Ninth St., Celebrating the shop’s expansion with new services. Onenight showcase with sets from DJ Skeleton Hands and DJ Empirical. Free. 859-491-0444; www.phfdesign.com. Newport.

Music - Rock Pete Dressman Trio, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., JerZee’s Pub and Grub, 708 Monmouth St., Free. 859-4913500; www.jerzeespub.com. Newport.

On Stage - Comedy Guy Torry, 8 p.m. $17., 10:30 p.m. $17., Funny Bone Comedy Club, Newport on the Levee, 859-957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport. Live Bait Comedy, 8 p.m. With comedians Leah McBride, Ray Price, Wayne Strickland, John Bernard, James Wisdom, Gene Sell and Rob Wilfong., Newport Syndicate, 18 E. Fifth St., 859491-8000. Newport.

On Stage - Theater Rent, 8 p.m., Stained Glass Theatre, 802 York St., Jonathan Larson’s Pulitzer-prize winning Broadway musical based loosely on Puccini’s opera La Boheme. $20. Presented by Footlighters Inc.. Through March 3. 513-4748711; www.footlighters.org. Newport.

Seminars After Hours at the Library with Dave Ramsey Speaker Christy Brown, 7-9 p.m., Newport Branch Library, 901 E. Sixth St., Brown expands upon philosophies taught in Financial Peace University classes and offers common sense principles about time, money management and what’s important in life. Audience members enter to win Dave Ramsey product giveaways. Ages 18 and up. Free. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 859-572-5035; www.cc-pl.org. Newport.

Saturday, March 3 Karaoke and Open Mic Super Bowl of Karaoke, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Super Bowl Bellewood, 1211 Waterworks Road, $12 buckets, $3 domestics, $2 jello shots. With DJ Love MD. No cover. Presented by Super Bowl. 859-781-1211. Newport.

Music - Rock Danny Frazier Band, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., JerZee’s Pub and Grub, 708 Monmouth St., Free. 859-4913500; www.jerzeespub.com. Newport.

On Stage - Comedy Guy Torry, 7:30 p.m. $17., 10 p.m. $17., Funny Bone Comedy Club, 859-957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

On Stage - Theater Rent, 8 p.m., Stained Glass Theatre, $20. 513-474-8711; www.footlighters.org. Newport.

Recreation Open Paintball Games, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Diehard Paintball, 4936 Mary Ingles Highway, Play on a total of four fields, plus target range. All ages and levels during open games and groups according to skill set. Includes field pass, paint, rental equipment and unlimited CO2. Experienced players can bring their own gear and play on the PSP Air Ball field. Rain or shine. $39 per player. 859-781-7486; www.diehardpaintball.com. Campbell County.

Youth Sports Become a Soccer Referee, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Bridge course for grade 9 licensed referees to upgrade to a grade 8 patch., Thomas More College, 333 Thomas More Parkway, Recertification for 2012 or become new referee. $65. Reservations required. Presented by KY Soccer Referee Association Inc.. 859-282-0222; www.kyreferee.com. Crestview Hills.

SUNDAY, MARCH 4 Benefits Ladies Night Out, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Charming Charlie, 2787 Town Center Blvd., All attendees receive 20 percent off purchases Includes giveaways and shopping from 6-8 vendors. benefits Special Spaces Cincinnati. $5. Presented by Special Spaces Cincinnati. 513-518-8814; www.facebook.com/ events/266969283356293/. Crestview Hills.

Films Good, Bad, Ugly in NKY: Land Use and Sustainability, 2-4 p.m., Erlanger Branch Library, 401 Kenton Lands Road, Also presented by the Sierra Club. Focus: using our resources wisely. Film festival includes portions of four films and three local speakers. Free. Presented by Kentuckians for the Commonwealth: Northern Kentucky Chapter. 859-291-2976. Erlanger.

On Stage - Comedy Guy Torry, 7:30 p.m. $15., Funny Bone Comedy Club, 859-9572000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

Youth Sports Become a Soccer Referee, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Entry-level grade 9 one-day course., Thomas More College, $65. Reservations required. 859-282-0222; www.kyreferee.com. Crestview Hills.

MONDAY, MARCH 5 Art Centers & Art Museums The Art of Food, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, Free. 859-491-2030; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

Recreation Duplicate Bridge, 11:30 a.m.-3 p.m., Elsmere Senior Center, 179 Dell St., Lower Level. Open to all players. Family friendly. $5. Presented by Boone County Bridge Center. 859-391-8639; www.boonecountybridgecenter.com. Elsmere.

Support Groups Spouse Loss Support Group, 6-7:30 p.m., Hospice of the Bluegrass - Northern Kentucky, 7388 Turfway Road, Workshop for those who have experienced the loss of a significant other. Explore full scope and dimension of loss: physiological, psychological and spiritual symptoms of grief, changes in relationship with family, as well as social change, dating and the possibility of a new partner. Free. Registration required. 859-441-6332; www.hospicebg.org. Florence.

TUESDAY, MARCH 6 Clubs & Organizations Triangle Toastmasters Meeting, 7-8:30 p.m., Campbell County Fiscal Court, 1098 Monmouth St., Become a confident, more effective speaker. Family friendly. Free. Presented by Triangle Toastmasters. 859-6523348; www.speak2lead.org. Newport.

Real-life local grandfather and grandson Mike Moskowitz, Mr. Green, and Joshua Steele, Ross Gardiner, will perform in "Visiting Mr. Green" at the Monmouth Theatre, 636 Exhibits Monmouth Street in Newport, March 3, 4, 10 and 11. Performances will be at 7:30 p.m. on Saturday and 3 p.m. Our Rivers’ Fury: Past and Present Ohio Valley Floods, Sunday. Presented by Falcon Theatre. Tickets are $14 for 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Behringeropen seating. To purchase tickets, visit Crawford Museum, $7, $6 www.falcontheatre.net or call 513-479-6783. THANKS TO SHANNAN BOYER

seniors, $4 children. 859-491-

Kristen Simmons, formerly of Louisville, will make two local stops for her book tour on Monday, March 5. She will be at the Boone County Public Library in Burlington at 3:30 p.m. and Joseph-Beth Booksellers in Crestview Hills at 7 p.m. to discuss her new book, "Article 5," the first in a young-adult dystopian trilogy that takes place in Kentucky, Tennessee and West Virginia. THANKS TO ALEXIS SAARELA 4003. Covington.

Wednesday, March 7 Art Centers & Art Museums The Art of Food, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, Free. 859-491-2030; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

Clubs & Organizations Pioneer Toastmasters 65th Anniversary Party, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Holiday Inn Riverfront, 600 W. Third St., John Lomax of Local Channel 12 News will receive club’s Communication and Leadership Award for his speaking skills and leadership status in the area. Club members participate in Pioneer Trivia Team Challenge, based upon humorous moments from Pioneer’s history. Ages 18 and up. $15. Reservations required. Presented by Pioneer Toastmasters. 513-541-9319; www.pioneertoastmasters.org. Covington.

Exhibits Our Rivers’ Fury: Past and Present Ohio Valley Floods, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., BehringerCrawford Museum, $7, $6 seniors, $4 children. 859-4914003. Covington.

Health / Wellness Bones for Life, 6-7:15 p.m., Kula Center for Movement Arts, 110 E. Eighth St., Learn safe, weightbearing movements that challenge bones to be strong and sturdy while improving balance and coordination. Ages 18 and up. $85 series, $20 drop-in. Presented by Future Life Now. 513-541-5720; www.futurelifenow.com. Newport. NAMI Family-to-Family Class, 6-8:30 p.m., First Christian Church, 1031 Alexandria Pike, Class to help family and friends understand and support individuals with serious mental illness. Covers Major Depression, Bipolar Disorder (Manic Depression), Schizophrenia, Schizoaffective Disorder, Borderline Personality Disorder, Panic Disorder, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Co-Occurring Brain and Addictive Disorders. 12-week class. Ages 18 and up. Free. Registration required. Presented by National Alliance for the Mentally Ill of Northern Kentucky. 859-261-4080; www.naminky.org. Fort Thomas.

ABOUT CALENDAR To submit calendar items, go to www.NKY.com and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to life@communitypress.com along with event information. Items are printed on a space-available basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to www.NKY.com and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page. Free. 859-431-3456. Covington.

Thursday, March 8 Art Centers & Art Museums The Art of Food, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, Free. 859-491-2030; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

Dining Events Cincinnati International Wine Festival Winery Dinner, 6:30 p.m., Bouquet Restaurant and Wine Bar, 519 Main St., Visiting winemakers from around the world join area’s finest chefs in own restaurants to create multi-course dining and winetasting experience. Ages 21 and up. $150. Registration required, available online. Presented by Cincinnati International Wine Festival. 859-491-7777; www.winefestival.com. Covington. Cincinnati International Wine Festival Winery Dinner, 6:30 p.m., Sidebar, 322 Greenup St., Visiting winemakers from around the world join area’s finest chefs in own restaurants to create multi-course dining and wine-tasting experience. Ages 21 and up. $150. Registration required, available online. Presented by Cincinnati International Wine Festival. 859-431-3456; www.winefestival.com. Covington.

Exhibits Our Rivers’ Fury: Past and Present Ohio Valley Floods, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Behringer-

Crawford Museum, $7, $6 seniors, $4 children. 859-4914003. Covington.

Karaoke and Open Mic Thirsty Thursday Karaoke, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Birk’s Bar, 912 Monmouth St., Drink specials include: $2 bottles, $2 wells and $2 shots. With Jay and DJ Love MD. No cover. 859-491-0007. Newport.

Literary - Libraries Fort Thomas Writing Group, 7-9 p.m., Fort Thomas-Carrico Branch Library, 1000 Highland Ave., Get encouragement, feedback and ideas at monthly writing group. All genres and skill levels welcome. Free. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 859-221-3584. Fort Thomas.

Music - Acoustic The Turkeys, 10 p.m.-2 a.m., Zola, 626 Main St., Folk rock. Free. 859-261-7510. Covington. Bob Cushing, 8 p.m., Geez’l Pete’s, 508 Madison Ave., 859261-1030; www.geezlpetes.com. Covington.

Recreation Bridge, 12:30-3 p.m., Scheben Branch Library, Free. 859-3422665. Union.

Shopping Thrift Sale, 7 a.m.-noon, United Christian Volunteers of Elsmere, 15 Kenton St., Weekly thrift sale. Family friendly. 859-727-4417. Elsmere.

Music - Blues Ricky Nye and Bekah Williams, 7:30-11:30 p.m., Chez Nora, 530 Main St., 859-4918027; www.cheznora.com. Covington.

Music - Jazz Mike Darrah, 7 p.m., Dee Felice Cafe, 859-261-2365; www.deefelice.com. Covington.

Music - Rock Birdbrain Crash, 10 p.m.-1 a.m., Sidebar, 322 Greenup St., Country/rock music. Ages 21 and up.

The opening reception for The Art of Food exhibit will be 6-9 p.m. Friday, March 2, at The Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, 1028 Scott Blvd. in Covington. Reception admission is $60 for non-members and $45 for members at the door. The exhibit will be on display through April 13 and free to view after the opening reception. The exhibition will be closed March 3. Pictured is cast glass toast by Leah Busch and Sandra Gross. PROVIDED


LIFE

MARCH 1, 2012 • CCF RECORDER • B3

Maple syrup spices up chunky granola mix

Rita’s Can’t-Quit-Eating Chunky Maple Granola For years I’ve been trying to make chunky granola, adding dry milk, extra honey, you name it, without success. Leave it to Cook’s Illustrated to develop a technique that works. Here’s my adaptation. Don’t get timid about adding flax and chia seeds. They’re optional, but huge sources of Omega 3, the chia in particular, and are really tasty. It’s

Registration open for NKU Relay for Life Community Recorder

Northern Kentucky University faculty, staff and students will take steps toward a world with less cancer and more birthdays during Relay for Life of NKU on April 13 at 6 p.m. on the Griffin Hall Lawn. Relay For Life takes place overnight, from 6 p.m. to 6 a.m. Individuals and teams arrive at Relay For Life with the goal of keeping at least one team member on the track at all times. Prior to the event, teams organize fundraisers to raise money. Fundraising may also take place at the campsites during the event. Funds raised from Relay For Life support the American Cancer Society’s mission to create a world with more birthdays by helping people stay well, by helping people get well, by finding cures and fighting back. Since its beginning in 1985, the American Cancer Society’s Relay For Life has developed from one man running around a track for 24 hours to a full-fledged international event taking place in more than 5,000 communities and 20 countries across the globe with nearly 4 million walkers in the United States alone. Relay For Life is a communitybased, volunteer-driven event fighting against cancer and the world’s largest grassroots fundraising movement. To register for Relay For Life of NKU, contact Courtnie McKinney at 859-372-7881 or courtnie.mckinney@cancer.org. For additional information about Relay for Life of NKU visit relayforlife.org/nku. To learn more about Relay For Life, visit relayforlife.org.

easy to eat, being chunky and all, thus the name. I’m going to try this technique with my other Rita granola Heikenfeld recipes. RITA’S KITCHEN Check out my blog at Cincinnati.com for step-by-step photos. Coating:

⁄3 cup pure maple syrup (I used Kroger Private Selection) 1 ⁄3 to ½ cup packed dark brown sugar ¼ teaspoon salt 1 tablespoon vanilla ½ teaspoon almond extract ¼ cup soybean or canola oil ¼ cup olive oil 1

Granola: Mix together 5 cups old-fashioned rolled oats 2 tablespoons flax seeds (optional) ¼ cup chia seeds (optional) 2 cups sliced or slivered almonds

Add after baking:

2 cups dried cherries (optional)

Line a large cookie sheet with parchment paper or spray with cooking spray. Preheat oven to 325. Whisk syrup, sugar, salt and extracts together, then whisk in oils. Pour over oat mixture and mix. Pour onto cookie sheet with sides in thin, even layer and press mixture down until very compact. That’s the key to chunky granola. Bake 35-40 minutes, rotating pan halfway through. Remove and cool to room temperature. Break into desired chunks. Stir in fruit. Tips: Use favorite nuts and fruit, or no fruit. Use light brown sugar, and all canola or soybean oil. Omit almond extract and increase vanilla to 4 teaspoons.

Coming soon

Heritage restaurant’s signature dressing Cream horns, hopefully like Busken’s Naturally colored East-

Thanks to Rita Heikenfeld. Rita finally cracked the code for making chunky granola. This one uses maple syrup. THANKS TO RITA HEIKENFELD.

er eggs

Can you help?

Le Boxx Café’s chicken chili for Thelma and several other readers who can’t get enough of this spicy chili. I stopped and talked with Dave Armstrong, proprietor, who couldn’t share the recipe. His chef, Franklin, makes 10 gallons about every other day. It’s that popular. “Lots of chicken breast, canned black-eyed peas, chili powder, chicken base, heavy cream, celery, onions, yellow and red bell peppers, and jalapeños,” he said. His roux is butter and flour, and olive oil. Have a similar recipe?

Please share. Check out the chili – see how thick it is. I can attest to its “yummy factor.” I’m now addicted, too. Their Caribbean chicken is a close second. Like O’Charley’s broccoli cheese casserole for Sharon. Like Subway cookies. Easy punch recipes for Charlene, who made my punch recipe with ginger ale and iced tea. “Everyone loved it.” She needs easy ones like this for a women’s club. Cinnamon coffecake like Thriftway grocery for Rose of Cold Springs. “Also roll recipes with coconut or peanuts and icing.” Substitution for almond or rice milk in baking for Carol, who is lactose intolerant. “These milks don’t work well,” she said. Like Mount Washington Bakery & Creamy Whip cinnamon squares. I get requests for items from this iconic bakery all

the time. The squares have been topping the list. For a reader who thought this bakery closed. The reader said: “I’ve tried Graeter’s and other bakeries, but they just don’t taste the same.” I spoke with Nick Ganim, owner, and he assured me they are still operating but closed until April (it's a combo bakery and creamy whip) and when he re-opens in April the cinnamon squares, along with all cookies, etc., will be available. Call ahead to set some aside. Nick uses yeasted Danish dough for cinnamon squares, so if you have a similar recipe, please share. Otherwise, you can always enjoy them at this Mount Washington treasure. Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator and author. Email her at columns@communitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-248-7130, ext. 356.

Celebrating 100 years FLORIDA

Dottie Kling celebrated her 100th birthday, Feb. 23. Dottie, a lifelong resident of Newport, was born at home and was one of four children - two sisters and one brother. She married Mathias Kling, a WWII veteran. During the war, she lived at E. 9th Street in Newport with her sister, whose husband was also serving in WWII. Rent-To-Own Dottie worked at Union Central. Dottie currently iPad per resides at The Barrington $ 99 week (78 wks) of Fort Thomas. THANKS TO VICKI PRICHARD

CE-0000491938

It’s maple syrup time! When our boys were little we drilled a hole in one of our sugar maples, put a homemade spile in it, and hung a bucket to gather what we knew would be gallons of sap. Well, something wasn’t right with our process and we got just dribbles. After that experience, I decided the grocery was my best source for pure maple syrup. Since I have so many reader requests, I’m using column space for those instead of several recipes.

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LIFE

B4 • CCF RECORDER • MARCH 1, 2012

Jim Jenkins: A life well spent By Vivian Kappas Contributor

How many people wake each morning looking forward to going to work? Jim Jenkins did; he was an educator all of his life and truly loved what he did. Jenkins, who died Feb. 21, would have turned 80 on March 15 and often remarked what a fortunate life he had lived. After being diagnosed with incurable cancer in August, the Fort Thomas resident remained positive, often reflecting that he couldn’t believe he had lived almost 80 good years. He and his wife, Mary Ann, would have been married 20 years. Mary Ann often said she wished they could have known each other when they were both young, but actually, the way it turned out, the “winter” years of their lives were truly the “golden years,” spent enjoying holidays with their five children and six grandchildren and surrounded by friends who became central to their lives. Jenkins was an excellent golfer and on any

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at a Bellevue 50th Class Reunion. One former student, Mike Lochner, said after his passing, “I was a student at Bellevue in 1961 and played both basketball and baseball under Coach Jenkins. I’ve had many coaches throughout the years, and Coach Jenkins was the best and most honorable man I ever played for. It’s been said ‘an honorable gentleman puts more into the world than he takes out.’ That was Coach Jenkins. He was my favorite coach, a special friend that I will miss.” When Jim Jenkins came to Kenton County Schools to teach at Simon Kenton High School, he was responsible for initiating the first football program and held the best win/loss record until recently. The last 13 years, his “autumn” of life, were spent at Dixie Heights High School where he was principal. Kim Banta, former Dixie Heights High School principal and presently assistant superintendent of Kenton County Schools, expressed her sadness at his passing and said, “Several years and two other principals preceded my becoming principal at Dixie. However, even after that length of time, he remained an icon in the memory of those who knew him. He will be remembered for his kindness and ability to inspire his students.” A memorial Mass will be held at 11 a.m. Saturday, March 3, at St. Thomas Church, 26 East Villa Place.

pleasant day, he and Mary Ann could be found on the golf course. This past exceptionally mild Jenkins winter was truly a gift as they played almost once a week and the doctor said it was the perfect therapy. Shortly after his diagnosis, he joined a group of his golfing buddies for their yearly golf outing through the Southern states, following the Robert Trent Jones Trail. The “summer” of his life was spent in New Albany, Ind., where he grew up in the 1930s and ‘40s in a close family of six brothers and sisters. He attended New Albany High School and lettered in five sports. After graduation he played football at Georgetown College in Kentucky. He then spent two years in the Army and a short stint playing baseball for a minor league team with the Brooklyn Dodgers. But his interest was always in teaching and sports so it was no surprise he began his teaching career coaching at Bellevue High School in 1957. In recent years he reconnected with many former students

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Community Recorder It is a rare opportunity to enjoy the musical gifts of a Julliard-trained pianist as he plays the works of a great composer. It is far rarer for the same virtuosic performer to delight his audience with a full psychiatric profile of that composer, and how it influenced the evolution of his cherished music. Renowned pianist and psychiatrist Dr. Richard Kogan takes the stage of the Otto M. Budig Theatre at The Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, March 8, pairing the seminal works of Ludwig van Beethoven with observations about the relationship between the composer’s mind, his creative motivations and his music. Praised by the New York Times for his “eloquent, compelling, and

exquisite playing,” Dr. Kogan offers a program for arts patrons and the intellectually Richard curious. Kogan “No composer exerts a more powerful hold on the imagination than Ludwig van Beethoven,” Dr. Kogan said, “and no one has surpassed his extraordinary ability to express the full range of human experience in musical terms – anxiety and aggression as well as triumph and transcendence.” Kogan will explore the impact of significant aspects of Beethoven’s biography (his brutal childhood, the onset of his deafness, his thwarted quest for the "Immortal Beloved," his crusade to

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gain guardianship of his nephew) on his artistic development. Tickets for The Mind and Music of Beethoven with Dr. Richard Kogan are $25; $19 for Carnegie members, WVXU Perks and Enjoy the Arts Members and students. Tickets can be purchased through The Carnegie Box Office or by phone at 859-957-1940. Tickets are also available online at www.thecarnegie.com. The Mind & Music of Beethoven with Dr. Richard Kogan is co-produced with The Cincinnati Psychoanalytic Institute, a training center for postgraduate mental health practitioners who want to incorporate psycho-dynamic techniques in their therapy work with clients and patients. The 20112012 Carnegie in Concert Series is sponsored by the Otto M. Budig Family Foundation.

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cially important when using short-lived materials and organic controls such as summer oils, insecticidal soaps, and Bacillus thuringiensis. Phenology is the science dealing with the effects of climate on seasonal biological events, including plant flowering and insect emergence. Insects are cold-blooded, and like plants, their development will be earlier or later depending on spring temperatures. Since both plant and insect development are temperaturedependent, seasonal appearance of particular insect pests should and does follow a predictable sequence correlated with the flowering of particular landscape plants.

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ON THE

RECORD

MARCH 1, 2012 • CCF RECORDER • B5

COMMUNITY

RECORDER

Editor: Michelle Shaw, mshaw@nky.com, 578-1053

BIRTHS | DEATHS | POLICE | REAL ESTATE

CommunityPress.com

POLICE REPORTS Bellevue Arrests/citations Steven Hughes, 31, 206 Ninth Ave., leaving the scene of an accident, receiving stolen property at Poplar at Foote, Feb. 8. Corey Schneider, 19, 216 Prospect, warrant at 400 Ward, Feb. 8. Jaime Morton, 35, 225 Memorial Parkway, theft by unlawful taking at 53 Donnermeyer Drive, Feb. 17. Richard Whitlock, 46, 329 Taylor Ave., warrant at 329 Taylor Ave., Feb. 19. Donald McCulley, 35, 240 Center, second-degree burglary at 240 Center, Feb. 19. Brandon Noe, 21, 126 Park Place No. 2, careless driving, DUI at Fairfield at Berry, Feb. 19. Crawford Schwed, 37, 323 Ward, alcohol intoxication in a public place, disorderly conduct at 323 Ward, Feb. 20. Barbara Dill, 53, 115 Bellepoint Commons, DUI at 647 South Ward, Feb. 20. Tonisha Lawerence, 27, 417 Center No. 1, DUI at 417 Center St. no. 1, Feb. 13.

ABOUT POLICE REPORTS The Community Recorder publishes the names of all adults charged with offenses. The information is a matter of public record and does not imply guilt or innocence.

FORT THOMAS Arrests/citations Joseph Gramer, 23, 724 Covert Run Pike Lot 74, possession of burglary tools, second-degree burglary at Newman Ave., Feb. 21. Rick Todd, 39, 110 Gettysburg Apt. 109, warrant at Churchill Drive at Newman, Feb. 21. Brandon Morris, 35, 408 West 12th St., warrant at 1538 Alexandria Pike, Feb. 16. Jeffrey Tharp, 49, 78 South Grand Apt. 4, DUI at 20 North Grand Ave., Feb. 17. Margaret Hughes, 53, 321 Overton St., alcohol intoxication in a public place at 85 North Grand Ave., Feb. 19. Joshua Horvath, 20, 1321 Alexandria Pike Apt. 3F, DUI, operating

on a suspended license at Highland Avenue at Deschler, Feb. 10. Michael Hunley, 25, 1708 Scott Street No. 5, warrant at Alexandria Pike at Moock, Feb. 9. Anthony Massey, 22, 1321 Alexandria Pike 4F, warrant at Alexandria Pike at Grandview, Feb. 10. Randall Thompson, 26, 44 Hollywoods Apt. 3, warrant at U.S. 27 at Highland, Feb. 9. Angela Powers, 33, 10914 Tangleberry Court, warrant at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas, Feb. 12. Taylor Ford, 18, 38 Holmes Ave., warrant at 130 North Fort Thomas Ave., Feb. 4. Daniel Davenport, 30, 1335 Grey Stable Lane, DUI at I-471, Feb. 6. Sara Moreton, 27, 26 Leathers Road, warrant, leaving the scene of an accident at Clover Ridge Ave., Feb. 3. Mohanned Rashed Alqahtani, 23, 245 Meadow Trail Drive,

DUI at 100 block of North Grand, Feb. 4.

Incidents/investigations Fraudulent use of a credit card At 145 Park Place, Feb. 21. Second-degree burglary At 527 Waterworks Road, Feb. 21. At 150 Chesapeake Ave., Feb. 17. At 21 Meadow Lane, Feb. 7. Theft by deception At 30 Overlook, Feb. 11. Theft by unlawful taking At Highlands Nursing Home, Feb. 14. At 831 Grand Ave. No. 101, Feb. 10. At 60 Gettysburg Square Road,

Feb. 9. At 40 Pleasant Ave. No. 107, Feb. 21. Theft by unlawful taking, third-degree criminal mischief At 30 Cemetery, Feb. 17. Theft of identity At 233 Scenic View Drive, Feb. 10. Third-degree burglary At 50 Devils Den no. 216, Feb. 14.

Terrill Goods, 34, 601 York St., first-degree trafficking a controlled substance, tampering

See POLICE, Page B6

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LIFE

B6 • CCF RECORDER • MARCH 1, 2012

DEATHS Edna S. Estepp, 89, of Fort Thomas, died Feb. 20, 2012, at Highlandspring of Fort Thomas. Survivors include her son, Leland Estepp; sister, Myrtle Lee Cadle; two grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren. Burial was at Evergreen Cemetery.

Jacob Gubser Jacob Henry Gubser, 81, of Alexandria, died Feb. 19, 2012, at his residence. He was a member of the Knights of Columbus, Foresters and Teamsters Local No. 100. He enjoyed the outdoors and was

an avid fan of University of Kentucky and baseball. Survivors include his wife, Velma Gubser; son, Larry Gubser; daughters, Vickie Dunn, Sandy Croley and Julie Rath; eight grandchildren; and 10 greatgrandchildren. Interment was at St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas. Memorials: Conductive Learning Center, 325 W. 19th St., Covington, KY.

Fazilet Gultekin Fazilet Gultekin, 89, of Cold Spring, formerly of Louisville and Tarsus, Turkey, died Feb. 9, 2012, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas.

CITY OF SOUTHGATE SUMMARY PUBLICATION OF: ORDINANCE NO. 12-02 AN ORDINANCE AMENDING CHAPTER 35 OF THE SOUTHGATE CODE OF ORDINANCES TO ESTABLISH A SEPARATE CLASSIFICATION OF REAL PROPERTY KNOWN AS "ABANDONED URBAN PROPERTY" FOR PURPOSES OF AD VALOREM TAXATION.

Her husband, Muharrem Gultekin, died in 2002. Survivors include her son, Ahmet R. Gultekin of Prospect; daughter, Ebru K. Gultekin of Cold Spring; and sister, Adalet Dogruoz of Mersin, Turkey. Memorials: American Heart Association or charity of donor’s choice.

Mildred Landell Mildred Mary Baldorff Landell, 95, of Fort Thomas, died Feb. 22, 2012, at Highlandspring of Fort Thomas. She was a retired real estate agent and a member of the Order of the Eastern Star, Dora Chapter No. 2 and the Ladies Auxiliary of the Lawler-Hanlon VFW Post No. 5662 in Newport. Her husband, Jack Landell; a son, Dale Landell; a grandchild, Jaime Long; her sister, Martha Ellis; and brother, George A. Baldorff, died previously. Survivors include her son, Gary Landell of Melbourne; two grandchildren; eight greatgrandchildren; and two greatgreat-grandchildren.

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Section I of the Ordinance provides: "That Chapter 35 of the City of Southgate Code of Ordinances is hereby amended as indicated herein: § 35.22 ABANDONED URBAN PROPERTIES TAX

The meetings will be held for all interested parties to hear and present evidence relative to the following applications:

If there is a need for the City to be aware of a specific disability, you are encouraged to contact the City Building at 859-4418575 so that suitable arrangements can be considered prior to the date of the meeting. The City Office is open MondayFriday 9:00am to 5:00pm. The City will make every reasonable accommodation to assist a qualified disabled person in obtaining access to the meeting. Immediately following the Public Hearing, the regularly scheduled Planning and Zoning meeting will begin. Jean A. Rauf, Clerk/Treasurer CMC Secretary to Planning and Zoning 1001691789

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P&Z CASE #04-2012 An application for a possible text amendment to SECTION 14 – SIGN REGULATIONS of the City of Highland Heights Zoning Ordinance. Proposed changes include setting the time limits for advertising Charitable Events, adding allowable signage for Conditional Uses, adding Rental/Management Office signage in multi-family zones (R-RE through R-3) and proposed changes to Section 14.6 to more clearly show the type of signage allowed in each zone classifications.

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The City of Highland Heights Planning and Zoning Commission will conduct a Public Hearing on Tuesday, March 13, 2012 at 7:00pm, at 176 Johns Hill Road.

In accordance with KRS 82.083(3)(d), the City of Newport, Kentucky hereby announces the sale of surplus vehicles by electronic, online auction. The vehicles listed below will be sold through w w w . p u b l i c surplus.com<http://w ww.publicsurplus.co m> with the electronic auctions ending at noon on Friday, March 9, 2012. All bids must be submitted through www.pub l i c s u r p l u s .com<http://www.publ icsurplus.com>. Items to be sold: 2006 Mazda 6; 2004 Acura RSX type S; 2009 Mitsubishi Lancer GTS; 1996 Crown Victoria; 1999 Ford Taurus. Details and photos of the vehicles are available at the above referenced site. 1691906

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(A) "Abandoned urban property" shall have the same meaning as in KRS 132.012. (B) Abandoned urban property is hereby established as a separate classification of real property for the purposes of ad valorem taxation. (C) The rate of taxation levied upon abandoned urban properties shall be $0.75 on each $100.00 of assessed value, or such higher amount as is hereafter constitutionally authorized. (D) Prior to November 30 of each year, the City shall determine which properties in the City are abandoned urban properties and shall prepare and furnish a list of abandoned urban properties located in the City to the Treasurer and to the Campbell County Property Valuation Administrator. (E) A property classified by the City as abandoned urban property as of November 30th shall be taxed as such, at the rate set forth in § 35.22(C). (F) If the owner repairs, rehabilitates, or otherwise returns the property to productive use, he or she shall notify the City to reevaluate whether the property meets the definition of abandoned urban property for the following tax year. If the City finds that the property no longer meets the definition of abandoned urban property, it shall notify the Treasurer and the Campbell County Property Valuation Administrator to strike the property from the list of abandoned properties for the following tax year. (G) No later than December 15 of each year, the City shall mail, by regular first-class mail, to the owner(s) of each abandoned urban property, as those name(s) are listed in the records of the Property Valuation Administrator, a notice that this property has been classified as abandoned urban property. The owner of any abandoned urban property who believes that his or her or its property has been incorrectly classified may appeal the classification to the City’s Vacant Properties Review Commission. The appeal shall be in writing and shall be made no later than March 1 of the year. The Vacant Properties Review Commission shall afford the owner the opportunity for a hearing. If the Vacant Properties Review Commission finds the property was incorrectly classified as abandoned urban property, it shall cause the property to be removed from the list of properties so classified. The Vacant Properties Review Commission shall develop policies and procedures for conducting such appeals." Section II of the Ordinance establishes that any ordinances that are in conflict with this Ordinance are repealed to the extent of the conflict. Section III of the Ordinance establishes the effective date of the Ordinance. The first reading of this Ordinance occurred on 1/4/2012, and the second reading occurred on 1/18/2012, whereby the Ordinance was passed, and signed by the Mayor, attested by the Clerk, filed and indexed as provided by law. CERTIFICATION I, Mary Ann Stewart, attorney for the City of Southgate, Kentucky, certify that the above constitutes a summary of Ordinance No. 1202 as prepared by myself, pursuant to KRS 83A.060(9). Mary Ann Stewart, Esq 1001691572

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WHATEVER YOUR BUSINESS OR SERVICE — LIST IT IN THE NORTHERN KENTUCKY BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL SERVICE DIRECTORY! To advertise contact Terri Gilland at 513.768.8608, fax 513.768.8632 or email tgilland@enquirer.com

ABOUT OBITUARIES Basic obituary information and a color photograph of your loved one is published without charge by The Community Press. Please call us at 283-0404 for more information. To publish a larger memorial tribute, call 513-2424000 for pricing details. For the most up-to-date Northern Kentucky obituaries, click on the “Obituaries” link at NKY.com. Burial was in Evergreen Cemetery, Southgate. Memorials: Visiting Nurse Association, 2400 Reading Road, Cincinnati, OH 45202.

Brenda ‘Sissy’ Martin Brenda “Sissy” Lucas Martin, 55, of Newport, died Feb. 17, 2012, at her home. She formerly worked at Willis Music and a was a traffic controller for the City of Newport. She was a member of the Lawler Hanlon VFW Ladies Auxiliary. Survivors include her parents, Leon and Edie Lucas; brother, Tim Lucas; aunt, Mildred Powell; nephew, Tyler Lucas; and nieces, Jeanette Simpson and Cara Tolle. Burial was in Wesley Chapel Cemetery, California.

Wayne ‘Flash’ Moeller Wayne A. “Flash” Moeller, 73, of Alexandria, died Feb. 17, 2012, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He was a salesman with the Pepsi Co. in Cincinnati and a member of St. Joseph Church in Cold Spring and the Loyal Boosters Club in Bellevue. He was recently inducted into the Newport Catholic Sports Hall of Fame for coaching. A son, Tony Moeller; and his sister, Joyce Wilson, died previously. Survivors include his wife, Audrey Smith Moeller; daughter, Tina Sizemore; son, Tim Moeller;

and two grandchildren. Burial was in St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas. Memorials: St. Jude Cancer Research Hospital, 501 St. Jude Place, Memphis, TN 38105 or Alzheimer’s Association, 644 Linn St., Suite 1026, Cincinnati, OH 45203.

Emma Morgan Emma P. Morgan, 87, of Wilder, died Feb. 21, 2012, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. She was a bookkeeper with the gift shop at Jewish Hospital in Cincinnati. She was a charter member of the Highland Hills Baptist Church in Fort Thomas where she taught Sunday school and was a teachers aid for the Rainbow Nursery School. She loved to sing. Her husband, Clarence Alfred Morgan; a son, Keith Morgan, died previously. Survivors include her children, Charles Morgan and Kathleen Morgan, both of Wilder. Burial was in Evergreen Cemetery, Southgate. Memorials: Baptist Life Communities c/o Northern Kentucky Baptist Association, 3001 Riggs Ave., Erlanger, KY 41018 or Kentucky Baptist Homes for Children, Triad East 200, 10200 Linn Station Road, Louisville, KY 40223.

William Mullins William Thomas Alexander

Mullins, 4 months old, of Newport, died Feb. 14, 2012, at his residence. Survivors include his parents, Jessica Richmond and Terry Alan Mullins; sisters, Sharon and Dorothy Mae Mullins; maternal grandparents, Tammy Richmond and Gary Miller, and John Jacks; paternal grandparents, Allan Mullins and Robyn Metz; and maternal great-grandfather, Robert W. Sparks. Burial was at Evergreen Cemetery.

John Mumme John E. Mumme, 92, of Fort Thomas, died Feb. 16, 2012, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. He was a retired commercial photographer with McHale’s Studio in Cincinnati. His wife, Aurelia Marie Wolfzorn Mumme; and twin brother, Carl Albert Mumme, died previously. Survivors include his son, John S. Mumme of Fort Thomas; granddaughters, Gina Gaerke of Loveland, Ohio, and Andrea Mumme of Lexington; two great-grandsons; and dear friend, Audrey Herald of Newport. Entombment was in Evergreen Cemetery, Southgate.

Sr. Mary O’Neill Sr. Mary M. O’Neill, 69, of Fort Thomas, formerly of Hudson, Wis., died Feb. 15, 2012, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. She was a graduate of Catholic Central High School in Springfield, Ohio, and entered the Carmelite Order on July 1, 1960. Her first vows were May 13, 1962 in Allentown, Pa., and her final vows were May 23, 1965 in Hudson, Wis. She was prioress

See DEATHS, Page B7

POLICE REPORTS Continued from Page B5 with physical evidence at 222 York St., Feb. 20. Chad Gibson, 30, 2236 South Lick Branch, first-degree possession of a controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia, warrant at 130 Pavilion, Feb. 19. Christina Cole, 37, 102 Horizon Circle, first-degree possession of a controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia at Fourth and York, Feb. 19. Patricia Hoover, 50, 221 East 10th St. No. 3, second-degree assault at 221 East 10th St. No. 3, Feb. 18. Lindzy Finn, 24, 1224 Bladeston Drive, possession of drug paraphernalia, first-degree possession of a controlled substance at Memorial Parkway at I-471, Feb. 17. Deshawna Benson, 19, 229 Retreat St., first-degree possession of a controlled substance, possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia at Ninth at Brighton, Feb. 17. Raymond Colvin, 42, homeless, violation of DVO at Ninth and Monmouth, Feb. 16. Sandra Pruitt, 32, 10963 Washington Trace, receiving stolen property at 123 Chesapeake Ave., Feb. 16. Jason Berkshire, 35, 4655 Corinth Road, first-degree trafficking a controlled substance, first-degree wanton endangerment, first-degree fleeing, tampering with physical evidence, third-degree trafficking a controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia at 901 East Sixth St., Feb. 15. Kevin Shay, 32, 4321 Michigan St., theft by unlawful taking at 82 Carothers Road, Feb. 14. Kevin Solar, 41, 10828 Sawgrass Court, first-degree possession of a controlled substance, possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia at 222 York St., Feb. 15. Tony Gordon Jr., 25, 3235 State Ave., first-degree trafficking a controlled substance at 10th and Monmouth St., Feb. 14. Gary Shively, 20, 907 Common Drive, first-degree possession of a controlled substance at 1900 Monmouth St., Feb. 14. Charles Conner, 34, 4061 Sunshine, first-degree possession of a controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia at I-471 south, Feb. 13. Kathleen Sue Wuest, 40, 530 Carlton Drive, first-degree possession of a controlled substance at 222 York St., Feb.

11. Sandra Pruitt, 32, 123 Chesapeake, unauthorized use of a motor vehicle, suspended license, possession of synthetic cannaboid at 400 block of East 10th St., Feb. 13. Laura Isabelle Armanios, 23, 621 West Mehring Apt. 201, theft by unlawful taking, public intoxication at 130 Pavilion, Feb. 11. Anthony Jackson, 44, 1326 Carolina Ave., first-degree possession of a controlled substance, possession of marijuana at Fourth and Isabella, Feb. 10. Leonard Hinton, 42, 4108 Vinedale Ave., first-degree possession of a controlled substance at 400 block of Isabella, Feb. 10. Thomas Howard, 37, 716 East Eighth St., first-degree possession of a controlled substance at 400 block of West Ninth St., Feb. 7. Joshua Hartzel, 28, 632 South Fort Thomas Ave., first-degree possession of a controlled substance at 400 block of West Ninth St., Feb. 7. Jordan Klink, 18, 916 Hamlet, possession of marijuana, firstdegree possession of a controlled substance at 11th Street Bridge, Feb. 6. Jason Decker, 38, 304 East Third St., theft by unlawful taking at 130 Pavilion Parkway, Feb. 6. Brandy Johnson, 22, 4812 Hawaiian Terrace, first-degree possession of a controlled substance, possession of marijuana at 300 block of Saratoga, Feb. 5. Ethan Clark, 31, 511 Montgomery St. No. 1G, leaving the scene of an accident, firstdegree fleeing, DUI at 118 West Fifth St., Feb. 5. Mark Carter, 43, 1113 Waterworks Road, alcohol intoxication in a public place, theft by unlawful taking at Ninth and Monmouth, Feb. 3. Donta Emanuel Black, 35, 2 Woolum Lane, first-degree possession of a controlled substance at 2 Woolum Lane, Feb. 3. Ebony Bean, 30, 420 Chestnut Way, first-degree trafficking a controlled substance at 420 Chestnut Way, Feb. 2. Dave Lowe, 34, 806 Park Ave., warrant, theft by unlawful taking at 402 East 10th St., Jan. 31.

Incidents/investigations First degree burglary At 314 East Seventh St., Jan. 13.

First degree criminal possession of a forged instrument, forgery of a prescription At 1601 Monmouth St., Jan. 15. First-degree robbery At 613 Monmouth St., Jan. 30. First-degree wanton endangerment, second-degree criminal mischief At 1 West Fifth St., Feb. 14. Fourth-degree assault At 834 Patterson, Feb. 5. Fraudulent use of a credit card At 640 Grandview, Feb. 13. Second degree burglary At 905 Hamlet St., Jan. 11. Second degree fleeing or evading, first degree trafficking a controlled substance At 10th and York streets, Jan. 19. Theft by unlawful taking At 82 Carothers Road, Feb. 15. At 1150 Waterworks Road, Feb. 13. At 1779 Monmouth St., Feb. 12. At 703 Monmouth St., Feb. 11. At 1 Levee Way, Feb. 10. At 82 Carothers Road, Feb. 6. At 819 Monmouth St., Feb. 10. At 420 East Third St., Feb. 3. At 101 East 10th St., Jan. 19. At 130 Pavilion Way, Jan. 18. At 1771 B Monmouth St., Jan. 18. At Ninth and Central, Jan. 30. At Fifth and Saratoga, Feb. 5. At 700 Monmouth St. No. 2, Feb. 4. At 82 B Carothers Road, Feb. 1. Theft by unlawful taking, third-degree criminal mischief At Fourth and Saratoga streets, Feb. 15. At 703 Monmouth St., Feb. 15. At Eighth and Columbia, Feb. 12. At 628 Monmouth St., Feb. 10. Theft of identity At 1777 Monmouth St., Feb. 14. Third-degree burglary At 841 Brighton St., Feb. 9. At 69 19th St., Feb. 13. At 1305 John St., Feb. 11. At 1301 Central Ave., Feb. 1. At 701 Washington, Feb. 1. At 23 East Eighth St., Jan. 10. Third-degree burglary, second-degree criminal mischief At 814 Liberty St., Feb. 11. Third-degree burglary, theft by unlawful taking At 232 Clifton, Jan. 26. Third-degree criminal mischief At 703 Monmouth St., Feb. 16. At 401 Keturah St., Feb. 14. At 620 Roberts St. A, Feb. 11. At 820 Saratoga, Feb. 12. At 400 block of Keturah, Feb. 4.


LIFE

MARCH 1, 2012 • CCF RECORDER • B7

DEATHS Continued from Page B6 from 1999-2005 and longtime secretary for the Carmel of the Sacred Heart in Hudson, Wis. Survivors include her sister, Phyllis A. Kearney of Covington, Catherine Jane O’Neill and Nancy R. McPhillips, both of Cold Spring, Mitzie O’Neill and Susan M. O’Neill, both of Fort Wright, and Judy O’Neill of Springfield, Ohio; brother, John R. O’Neill of Kettering, Ohio; and dear friends, Karen Shaffer, Linda and Jim Letourneau, Dora Marie Rohl and Barbara Rohl. Burial was at Calvary Cemetery in Springfield, Ohio. Memorials: Carmel of the Sacred Heart, 430 Laurel Ave., Attn: Sister Lucia LaMontagne, O. Carm., Hudson, WI 54016 or Carmel Manor Nursing Home, 100 Carmel Manor Drive, Attn: Sister Teresa Kennedy, O. Carm., Fort Thomas, KY 41075-2300.

Katherine Short Katherine “Katie” Short, 30, of Homosassa, Fla., formerly of Bellevue, died Feb. 10, 2012, in Florida. Her mother, Sherri Huff Short, died previously. Survivors include her father, Chuck Short; siblings, Christopher Short and Robin Caraway; and sons, Christopher, Quentin, Quincy and Isiah. Memorial service will be 11 a.m. Saturday, March 10, at Immanuel Baptist Church in Cold Spring.

F.R. ‘Butch’ Shoupe Jr. F.R. “Butch” Shoupe Jr., 64, of Fort Thomas, died Feb. 14, 2012, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. He was an electrician with Local No. 212, an active member of Promises Inc. in Newport for 19 years and attended Fort Thomas Baptist Church as a youth. Survivors include his daughter, Brooke Shoupe; brother, Kevin Shoupe; sister, Kathryne Diedenhofer, all of Fort Thomas; and longtime mentor, Frank Brusehaber of Alexandria. Burial was in Calvary Cemetery in Siler, Ky. Memorials: Promises Inc., 116 W. 9th St., Newport, KY 41071.

Jerry Smith Jerry Dean Smith, 66, of Silver Grove, died Feb. 16, 2012, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. He was a retired meat cutter for Winn-Dixie Stores and served in the U.S. Army during the Vietnam War. He was an avid golfer. Survivors include his daughter, Scottie Smith, and grandchildren, Steven Frazier and Katie Smith, all of Knoxville, Tenn.

Robert Stubbs Robert L. Stubbs, 73, of Newport, died Feb. 22, 2012, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. He was a retired supervisor and former underground electric worker with the Cincinnati Gas & Electric Co. He volunteered for more than 30 years to work in the concession stand at Newport High School games. He was a former member of the Alexandria Masonic Lodge No. 152 F.&A.M. and served in the U.S. Air Force from 1958-1962. Survivors include his wife, Betty L. Bradbury Stubbs; daughter, Karyn StubbsTippenhauer of Fort Thomas; sons, Robert A. Stubbs of Fort Thomas and Steven A. Stubbs of Olive Hill; brother, Donald Stubbs of Dayton; and four grandchildren. Memorials: St. Paul’s United Church of Christ, 1 Churchill Drive, Fort Thomas, KY 41075 or charity of donor’s choice.

NOTICE OF ADOPTION AND SUMMARY OF ORDINANCE

Invitation for Bids Lawn Care & Snow Removal Services Neighborhood Foundations is currently accepting bids for lawn care and snow removal services at the Peter G. Noll, Grand Towers and Corpus Christi properties. The contract will be for a period of one (1) year and renewable for up to two (2) additional years with satisfactory performance. General work required will be grass cutting of all areas, cleanup of grass clippings from walkways, trimming around the buildings, trees, shrubs, fences, curbs, weed control, snow removal, treatment and other services as described in the bid packet. Bid packets, information for bidders and tours of properties may be obtained by contacting Randy Schweinzger at (859) 581-2533, ext. 217. The hearing and/or speech impaired may call our TDD line at (859) 581-3181. Bids are due in the Neighborhood Foundations offices no later than 1:00 p.m., local time, March 16, 2012 at which time and place all bids will be publicly opened and read aloud. Offices are located at 30 East 8th. St., Newport, KY 41071. Bids are to be marked "Lawn Care & Snow Removal Services Project #12-06". The Neighborhood Foundations reserves the right to waive any informality, irregularity, in requests for proposals and to reject any/all requests for proposals should it be deemed in the best interest of Neighborhood Foundations to do so. Neighborhood Foundations is an Equal Opportunity Employer. WBE/MBE firms are encouraged to respond to this Request for Proposals. Randy Schweinzger Procurement Director Neighborhood Foundations (859) 581-2533, ext. 217 rschweinzger@neighborhoodfoundations.com

1001690554

NOTICE OF ADOPTION, TITLES AND SUMMARIES OF ALEXANDRIA ORDINANCES 2012-01 AND 2012-02 I hereby certify that the following is the Title and Summaries of Ordinances 2012-01 and 2012-02 of the City of Alexandria, in Campbell County, Kentucky, which were adopted by City Council on January 19, 2012: ORDINANCE NO. 2012-01: AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF ALEXANDRIA, IN CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY, APPROVING A RECOMMENDATION OF THE ALEXANDRIA PLANNING COMMISSION PURSUANT TO KRS 100.209, TO ESTABLISH ZONING AND OTHER LAND USE REGULATIONS FOR THE ACOTTINGHAM@ PROPERTY PROPOSED TO BE ANNEXED, CONSISTING OF 17.8931 +/- ACRES OF LAND LOCATED AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE AA HIGHWAY (KY STATE ROUTE 9) AND THE AA CONNECTOR (KY STATE ROUTE 709), ALL AS MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AND DEPICTED IN THE EXHIBITS TO THIS ORDINANCE; AND WHICH PROPERTY IS RECOMMENDED TO BE ZONED ‘CITY’ HIGHWAY COMMERCIAL (HC) ZONING CLASSIFICATION UPON ITS ANNEXATION INTO THE CITY LIMITS. This Ordinance approves the recommendation of the Alexandria Planning Commission to zone the Cottingham property Highway Commercial once it is annexed into the City of Alexandria. ORDINANCE NO. 2012-02: AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF ALEXANDRIA, IN CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY, ANNEXING CERTAIN REAL ESTATE LOCATED AT OR NEAR THE NORTHERN AND EASTERN BOUNDARY OF THE CITY AND BEING THE ACOTTINGHAM@ PROPERTY, CONSISTING OF 17.8931 +/- ACRES OF LAND LOCATED AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE AA HIGHWAY (KY STATE ROUTE 9) AND THE AA CONNECTOR (KY STATE ROUTE 709), ALL AS MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AND DEPICTED IN THE EXHIBITS TO THIS ORDINANCE. This Ordinance annexes the Cottingham property into the city limits of the City of Alexandria, with Highway Commercial zoning pursuant to Ordinance 2012-01. A map showing the real estate which is the subject of these Ordinances is included. *************************************** I, Michael A. Duncan, an attorney licensed to practice law in the Commonwealth of Kentucky, for Ziegler & Schneider, P.S.C., City Attorneys for the City of Alexandria, in Campbell County, Kentucky, do hereby certify that this Notice of Adoption, Titles and Summaries of Ordinances 2012-01 and 02 was prepared by me, and that it represents an accurate description of the summaries of the contents of the Ordinances. The full text of the Ordinances, and other information relative to the Ordinances, are on file at the office of the City Clerk/ Treasurer, 8236 West Main Street, Alexandria, Kentucky 41001. /s/ Michael A. Duncan Michael A. Duncan, attorney For Ziegler & Schneider, P.S.C., City Attorneys

AN ORDINANCE APPROVING A LEASE AGREEMENT WITH REPUBLIC BANK & TRUST COMPANY FOR THE REFINANCING OF THE ACQUISITION, CONSTRUC TION AND INSTALLATION OF THE WILDER CITY BUILDING IN A MAXIMUM PRINCIPAL AMOUNT NOT TO EXCEED $1,300,000; PROVIDING FOR THE PAYMENT AND SECURITY OF THE LEASE AND DEPOSITS TO A SINKING FUND; AUTHORIZING THE EXECUTION OF VARIOUS DOCUMENTS RELATED TO SUCH LEASE; AND MAKING CERTAIN DESIGNATIONS REGARDING SUCH LEASE. It is hereby certified that the foregoing Ordinance provides for approval of a lease with Republic Bank & Trust Company in an amount not to exceed $1,300,000, to refinance the acquisition, construction and installation of the Wilder City Building; provides a general obligation pledge to assess sufficient taxes to comply with the obligations to pay Lease payments; contains additional sections relating to designation as a qualified tax-exempt obligation, expectations regarding the Lease, incorporating the preambles to the Lease, severability, inconsistent actions, open meetings, laws, and effective date. The full text of the section relating to the pledge to levy and assess a tax to pay the Lease obligation is: "Section 2. General Obligation Pledge. Pursuant to the Constitution of the Commonwealth and KRS Chapter 66, the obligation of the City created by the Lease shall be a full general obligation of the City and, for the payment of the Lease Payments, the full faith, credit and revenue of the City are hereby pledged for the prompt payment thereof. During the period the Lease is outstanding, there shall be and there hereby is levied on all the taxable property in the City, in addition to all other taxes, without limitation as to rate, a direct tax annually in an amount sufficient to pay the Lease Payments when and as due, it being hereby found and determined that current tax rates are within all applicable limitations. Said tax shall be and is hereby ordered computed, certified, levied and extended upon the tax duplicate and collected by the same officers in the same manner and at the same time that taxes for general purposes for each of said years are certified, extended and collected. Said tax shall be placed before and in preference to all other items and for the full amount thereof provided, however, that in each year to the extent that the other taxes of the City are available for the payment of the Lease Payments and are appropriated for such purpose, the amount of such direct tax upon all of the taxable property in the City shall be reduced by the amount of such other taxes so available and appropriated. Amounts shall be transferred from the Sinking Fund to the Lessor at the times and in the amounts required by the Lease. There is hereby established, or it is acknowledged that there has heretofore been established, a sinking fund (the "Sinking Fund") with the Lessee in accordance with the requirements of the Act, which is hereby ordered to be continued and maintained as long as the Lease shall remain outstanding. The funds derived from said tax levy hereby required or other available taxes shall be placed in the Sinking Fund and, together with interest collected on the same, are irrevocably pledged for the payment of all bonds issued under KRS Chapter 66 and Tax Supported Leases, as defined in KRS Chapter 66, including the Lease, when and as the same fall due." A complete copy of the Ordinance may be reviewed at the office of the Clerk of the City of Wilder, 520 Licking Pike, Wilder, Kentucky 41071. /s/ Tracy Gibson Clerk, City of Wilder 1691514 Legal Notice The Newport Board of Adjustments will hold a public hearing on Thursday, March 15, 2012 at 4:30 p.m. in the Newport Municipal Complex, 998 Monmouth Street, Newport, Kentucky. The hearing will be held for interested parties to hear and present evidence relative to the following agenda items: BA-12-06 806 Park Avenue, Newport, Kentucky The applicant is requesting a rear yard variance to construct a garage Requested by: Rick Sims BA-12-07 401 Keturah Street, Newport, Kentucky The applicant is requesting a conditional use Requested by: Newport Church of God

Nancy Young Nancy Young, 70, of Cold Spring, died Feb. 17, 2012, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. She worked as a waitress. Survivors include her sons, Ty Young and Ed Chambers; sisters, Mina Lee, Barbara Goines and Linda Raleigh; brothers, Junior Raleigh and Morrell Raleigh; four grandchildren; and five greatgrandchildren. Burial was at St. Stephens Cemetery.

The City Council of the City of Wilder, Kentucky, at a meeting held on February 21, 2012, adopted the following Ordinance:

BA-12-08 649 York Street, Newport, Kentucky The applicant is requesting a parking variance and conditional use Requested by: Dave and Sun Properties LLC

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Inquiries regarding this public hearing should be addressed to: J. Gregory Tulley AICP Planning and Development Director City of Newport 998 Monmouth Street Newport, Kentucky 41071 859-292-3637 1001691558

CITY OF HIGHLAND HEIGHTS, KENTUCKY SUMMARY PUBLICATION OF ORDINANCE NO. 01-2012 I hereby certify that the following is the title and a summary of Ordinance No. 01-2012 of the City of Highland Heights, Kentucky, as adopted on 2/21/2012. AN ORDINANCE AMENDING ORDINANCE NO. 16-83, THE CITY OF HIGHLAND HEIGHTS ZONING ORDINANCE BY CHANGING THE PREMISES KNOWN AS 515 MAIN AVENUE IN HIGHLAND HEIGHTS FROM RESIDENTIAL (R1G) (SINGLE FAMILY) TO RESIDENTIAL 3 (PUD) (MULTI-FAMILY). Said Ordinance grants Zone Change. I, Steven J. Franzen, an attorney licensed to practice law in the Commonwealth of Kentucky, acting as an attorney for the City of Highland Heights, Kentucky, do hereby certify that this summary was prepared by me at the direction of the Highland Heights City Council and is a true and accurate summary of the contents of Ordinance No. 01-2012

Publish: CCR 3/3/12

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INVITATION TO BID March 1, 2012 PROJECT: For Cold Water Meters SEALED BIDS WILL BE RECEIVED AT: Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) 2835 Crescent Springs Road P.O. Box 18640 Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 UNTIL:

Date: Time:

March 20, 2012 9:00 a.m., local time

At said place and time, and promptly thereafter, all Bids that have been duly received will be publicly opened and read aloud. The proposed work is generally described as follows: The Purchasing of Cold Water Meters for a one-year period beginning May 1, 2012 with an optional one-year extension at the same unit prices Bid. All Bids must be in accordance with the Bidding Documents on file, and available for examination at: Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) 2835 Crescent Springs Road Erlanger, Kentucky, 41018 Questions on the Cold Water Meter Specifications should be referred to Chris Wetherall at (859)-426-2742. Copies of the Bidding Documents may be obtained from the office of the Northern Kentucky District at the address indicated herein by contacting Denise Manning at (859) 426-2718. There is no charge for these documents. Bids will be received on a Unit Price basis as described in the Bidding Document. Bids submitted may be on any one item or all of the items advertised. All bids must be unit price, as set out in the specifications and must be submitted on the appropriate proposal forms. As part of the bid package, the Bidder shall submit to the District (1) – 5/8” Meter with outside type touch pad. This meter will be the type to be supplied under this contract. Evaluation of Bids and the awarding of a final contract are subject to the reciprocal preference for Kentucky resident bidders pursuant to KRS 45A490 to 45A.494 and (KAR 200 5:400). Each Bid must contain evidence of Bidder’s qualifications to transact business in the State of Kentucky or covenant to obtain such qualifications prior to award of the Contract. The Bidder’s Organization Number from the Kentucky’s Secretary of State and principal place of business as filed with Kentucky’s Secretary of State must be included where applicable. Owner reserves the right to reject any or all Bids, including without limitation the right to reject any or all nonconforming, non-responsive, incomplete, unbalanced, or conditional Bids, to waive informalities, and to reject the Bid of any Bidder if Owner believes that it would not be in the best interest of Owner to make an award to that Bidder. Owner also reserves the right to negotiate with the apparent qualified Bidder to such an extent as may be determined by Owner. Minority Bidders are encouraged to bid. Bids shall remain subject to acceptance for 60 days after the day of bid opening or for such longer period of time to which a Bidder may agree in writing upon request of the Owner. If a Contract is to be awarded, the Owner will give the successful Bidder a Notice of Award during the period of time which the successful Bidder’s bid remains subject to acceptance. Jack Bragg, Vice President of Finance & Support Services , Northern Kentucky Water District 1001691552


LIFE

B8 • CCF RECORDER • MARCH 1, 2012 CITY OF SOUTHGATE SUMMARY PUBLICATION OF: ORDINANCE NO 12-03 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF SOUTHGATE, KENTUCKY, IN CAMPBELL COUNTY, CREATING CHAPTER 97 OF THE SOUTHGATE CODE OF ORDINANCES IN ORDER TO REQUIRE PROPERTY OWNERS TO OBTAIN LICENSES BEFORE RENTING DWELLING UNITS Section I of the Ordinance creates Sections 97.01 through 97.19 and 97.99 of the Southgate Code of Ordinances, which are part of Chapter 97 of the Code. Chapter 97 is a new chapter pertaining to the licensing of rental dwellings in order to establish reasonable and uniform regulations concerning same. Section 97.01 defines the terms used in Chapter 97. Section 97.02 provides that Chapter 97 applies to all rental dwellings except for the following: rental dwellings that are owned or operated by governmental agencies as public housing; rental dwellings that are operated by any entity recognized as a non-profit corporation or exempt under the provisions of 26 U.S.C. § 501(c) of the Internal Revenue Code; rental dwellings in which one or more of the occupants is the grandparent, parent, child, grandchild, aunt or uncle of the owner; hotels; motels; apartments or dormitories that are owned by a college or university; jails; convents; monasteries; nursing homes; parsonages; parish houses; rectories; hospitals; or orphanages. Section 97.03 requires the owner of a rental dwelling to apply for a rental dwelling license prior to allowing the rental dwelling to be occupied. Section 97.04 sets forth the application procedure and associated fees. Specifically: (A) The owner of a rental dwelling shall apply to the Treasurer or his or her designee for a rental dwelling license prior to allowing that unit to be occupied. (B) The application shall be accompanied by a non-refundable application processing fee of $40, which will be applied to the licensing fee upon approval. If the application is denied or voluntarily withdrawn by the owner, the application fee shall be retained by the City. (C) The owner of two or more residential dwelling units that share the same street address (for example, the owner of a duplex or multi-family apartment building) may use a single application to apply for licenses for all of the units that share that address. In that event, the application shall be accompanied by a non-refundable application-processing fee of $40 per unit for which licenses are applied. (D) Application shall be made on a form furnished to the owner by the City and shall set forth the following information: (1) The name, address, and telephone number of the owner of the rental dwelling or unit thereof. If the owner is a partnership, the name of the partnership and the name and residence of the managing partner shall be included. If the owner is a corporation, the name and address of the corporation, the name of the chief operating officer and its agent for service of process in Kentucky shall be included. (2) If the owner has appointed an agent authorized to maintain and manage the property, the name, business, or residence address and telephone number of such agent. (3) Every applicant, whether an individual, partnership or corporation, must identify in the application by name, residence or business street address and telephone number, the person who is actively involved in, and responsible for the maintenance and management of the premises. That person shall, if other than the owner, affix his or her notarized signature to the application, thereby accepting joint and several responsibility with the owner (including any potential criminal, civil or administrative liability) for the maintenance and management of the premises. A post office box or commercial mail receiving service is not acceptable as an address for such person. (4) The street address (including any applicable apartment, room or unit numbers) of the rental dwelling unit or unit(s) to which the application pertains. (E) In the event that any of the information required to be provided herein should change either before or after the rental dwelling unit license is issued, the applicant or licensee shall, within 14 days of such a change, notify the Treasurer or his or her designee, in writing, of the change. (F) After he or she has applied for a rental dwelling license, and pending the approval of his or her application, an owner may allow the rental dwelling unit to which the application pertains to be occupied, so long as the unit complies with all applicable fire, zoning, life safety, property maintenance and/or building codes of the City. (G) The owner of any rental dwelling which has a valid occupational license upon the effective date hereof shall be deemed to have been issued a rental dwelling license hereunder, provided that such owner shall be required to apply for a rental dwelling license the year after this ordinance becomes effective. Section 97.05 sets forth the fees for a rental dwelling license and the renewal procedure, as follows: (A) The license fee for each rental dwelling license shall be $40 per license period. (B) The license period shall be one full year, beginning on July 1 of each calendar year and ending on June 30 of the following calendar year. (C) There shall be no proration of or reduction in the license fee for the first year in which a rental dwelling license is issued. (D) A licensee must apply to renew his or her license on or before June 1 of each year if the unit will be occupied in the following license period. A non-refundable application fee of $40 must accompany the renewal application, and will be applied toward the applicant’s license fee for the new license period if the application is approved. If the application is not approved or if the licensee voluntarily withdraws his renewal application, the non-refundable application fee shall be retained by the City. (E) There shall be a grace period for renewals, such that a license may be renewed if an application is received after June 2 and on or before June 30 for the following license period. However, such applications must be accompanied by the payment of a late fee of $20 per unit. (F) Any license not renewed on or before June 30 for the following license period will be deemed lapsed and, if the rental dwelling unit is occupied, Section 97.99 shall apply. Sections 97.06 and 97.07 pertain to the standards and conditions that determine whether or not a rental dwelling license will be granted, revoked or suspended. Among other things, the applicant must have paid the fees set forth above; the unit must comply with all provisions of the City fire, zoning, life safety, property maintenance, zoning, building and other codes adopted by the City; if the unit is one of three or more in a single building, it is subject to a fire inspection; the applicant must maintain a current register of all tenants and other persons with a lawful right of occupancy to any rental dwelling; there must not be any delinquent property taxes, assessments, unpaid code enforcement citations, or liens on the rental dwelling; and there must not be any adverse license action pending against the rental dwelling unit. Section 97.08 requires a licensee to display the rental dwelling license on the premises of the rental dwelling unit to which the license applies and to provide certain notices to a prospective buyer of the rental dwelling unit. Under Section 97.09, notice of non-compliance with licensing standards and conditions must be sent to the owner of the rental dwelling unit, posted on the rental dwelling unit and provided to tenants of the unit. If the owner of the rental dwelling unit does not correct the non-compliance within 30 days, action may be taken to deny, refuse to renew, revoke or suspend the rental dwelling license. Section 97.10 requires a rental dwelling license to be suspended when the rental dwelling unit to which it applies has been condemned. Section 97.11 requires the City’s Civil Citation Officer to inspect all rental dwelling units periodically to determine whether the unit complies with all provisions of the City Code; whether the owner of the rental dwelling unit is delinquent in paying taxes; and whether the rental dwelling is in violation of the criminal nuisance ordinance or other city ordinances. Section 97.12 imposes an obligation on the licensee to prevent the use of the premises for any purpose that is contrary to state law or City ordinance. The failure to do so is grounds for the revocation or suspension of any rental dwelling license. Section 97.13 provides for the revocation, suspension or termination of a rental dwelling license upon a determination that the rental dwelling fails to comply with any of the licensing standards or conditions set forth in Chapter 97, and sets forth the procedure under which revocation, suspension or termination may occur. Section 97.14 requires tenants to vacate a rental dwelling unit when a rental dwelling license has been denied, revoked or suspended for that unit. Section 97.15 provides: "A fee of $500 must accompany any application for reinstatement of any rental dwelling license revoked or suspended. The reinstatement fee shall be in addition to the regular rental dwelling license fee imposed herein. Such fee however shall not apply to rental dwellings condemned because of destruction by an act of God or casualty for which the licensee is not responsible." Section 97.16 sets forth a procedure for a licensee to appeal the revocation or suspension of a rental dwelling license. Section 97.17 permits the City to avail itself of other remedies not specifically set forth in Chapter 97 with respect to rental dwelling units that fail to meet licensing standards and conditions. Section 97.18 allows the Civil Citation Officer, with the approval of the City Council, to promulgate rules and regulations necessary for the administration of Chapter 97. Section 97.19 sets forth the effective date of Chapter 97. Section 97.99 sets forth the penalties for violating the provisions of Chapter 97. Section II of the Ordinance repeals any conflicting ordinances to the extent of the conflict. Section III of the Ordinance sets forth its effective date. The first reading of this Ordinance occurred on 1/4/2012, and the second reading occurred on 1/18/2012, whereby the ordinance was passed, and signed by the Mayor, attested by the Clerk, filed and indexed as provided by law. CERTIFICATION I, Mary Ann Stewart, attorney for the City of Southgate, Kentucky, certify that the above constitutes a summary of Ordinance No. 12-03 as prepared by myself, pursuant to KRS 83A.060(9). Mary Ann Stewart, Esq. 1001691575

SUMMARY PUBLICATION OF: Ordinance No. 12-01-An Ordinance Adopting A Civil Nuisance Code and Creating The Southgate Civil Code Enforcement Board For Enforcement Thereof. Section I of the Ordinance creates Sections 32.50 through 32.54 of the Southgate Code of Ordinances. Section 32.50 creates the Civil Code Enforcement Board of the City of Southgate ("the Board"). Section 32.51 sets forth the composition of the three-member Board, the qualifications of Board members, and the procedures for appointment and removal of Board members. Section 32.52 describes the organization of the Board, its meetings, and its quorum. The Board shall meet at least once per quarter. The presence of two members constitutes a quorum. There shall be a secretary, who shall keep minutes of the Board’s meetings. Section 32.53 provides the Board with the authority to enforce any ordinance, including but not limited to, any nuisance, building, or zoning ordinance or regulation, adopted by the City so long as the violation of the ordinance is classified as a civil offense or the ordinance establishes civil fines as the penalty to be imposed on any person who violates the ordinance. In so doing, the Board may conduct hearings; issue subpoenas; hear testimony under oath; make findings of fact; issue orders necessary to remedy any violation; impose civil fines against any person found to be in violation of an ordinance that the Board is authorized to enforce; impose enforcement costs; order liens for the collection of fines, charges, costs, penalties and fees, including attorneys fees; order the demolition of dangerous and structurally unsafe buildings at the cost of the owner; and order tenants to vacate the premises of unsafe buildings and structures. Section 32.54 establishes the position of Civil Citation Officer, who shall be appointed by the Mayor and serve at the Mayor’s pleasure. The Civil Citation Officer is empowered to investigate alleged violations of City ordinances that constitute civil offenses, and to issue citations and notices of violation. Section II of the Ordinance repeals the former Sections 90.01 through 90.07, 90.09, 90.10, 90.99, 91.99, 92.99, 94.99 and 152.99 of the Southgate Code of Ordinances. Section III of the Ordinance creates new Sections 90.01 through 90.07, 90.99, 91.99, 92.99, 94.99 and 152.99 of the Southgate Code of Ordinances, pertaining to nuisances. The new Section 90.01 defines certain terms used in Chapter 90. The new Section 90.02prohibits public nuisances, which include, but are not limited to: the overgrowth of weeds or grass on property; trees, bushes or other vegetation that interfere with public sidewalks; trees, bushes or other vegetation that interfere with the public right-of-way; the accumulation of trash; dumping refuse on public or private property; criminal activity, as defined in the new Section 90.03; open burning without a permit; and loud and unnecessary noise. Under the new Section 90.03, a public nuisance exists on a property when police officers have issued criminal citations, made arrests, or executed warrants three times in the preceding 12month period for activities or behavior on that property that involve the crimes set forth in Section 90.03. Under Section 90.04 the Civil Citation Officer may initiate proceedings to enforce the provisions of Chapter 90 by issuing a notice of violation or a civil citation. If the Civil Citation Officer chooses to issue a notice of violation, the person in charge of the property will have a reasonable time to abate the nuisance without being issued a citation. Upon the failure of such a person to abate the nuisance in accordance with the notice of violation, the Civil Citation Officer will issue a civil citation. The Civil Citation Officer may also initiate enforcement by issuing a civil citation without first issuing a notice of violation. A person who receives a citation must respond to it within seven days by either paying the fine it imposes or by requesting a hearing to challenge the citation. Section 90.04 also provides that: "If a hearing is requested, the cited person shall pay an administrative hearing fee in the amount of $50 when he submits his written request for the hearing." Section 90.05 sets forth the hearing procedure. Section 90.06 sets forth an appellate procedure. Section 90.07 provides that the City may take immediate action to abate a nuisance when there is reason to believe that the violation presents a serious threat to the public health, safety and welfare. In such an event, the City Attorney may initiate a summary closure proceeding in the Campbell Circuit Court without first following the procedures set forth in Sections 90.04 through 90.06. Section 90.99 sets forth the penalty for violating any provision of Chapter 90. Section 90.99 provides: (A) The violation of any provision of this Chapter is a civil offense and shall be enforced in the same manner as Sections 90.04 through 90.07 of this Code. (B) Any person, firm or corporation who violates any provision of this Chapter shall be subject to a civil fine of not less than $50 violation, but not more than $500. Each date that a violation of this Chapter continues after a Notice of Violation or Citation has been served in accordance with the terms of this Chapter shall be deemed to constitute a separate offense subject to a separate fine, up to a maximum of $10,000 per citation. (C) In addition to the civil fines set forth in (B), any violator who violates any provision of the City Nuisance Code relating to the same property within a 12-month period may be assessed additional civil penalties of $500 per day per violation to a maximum of $20,000 per citation. (D) The City shall possess a lien on property for all fines, penalties, charges, attorneys’ fees, abatement costs if the City has incurred them, and all other reasonable costs associated with enforcing this Chapter, including the costs of placing a lien on a parcel of real property pursuant to this provision. The lien shall take precedence over all other subsequent liens, except state, county, school, and city taxes, and may be enforced by judicial proceedings. Section IV of the Ordinance creates a new Section 91.99, which sets forth a penalty and enforcement mechanism for violating any provision of Chapter 91 of the Southgate Code of Ordinances. Section 91.99 provides: (A) The violation of any Section contained in this Chapter is a civil offense and shall be subject to enforcement in the same manner as in Sections 90.04 through 90.07 of this Code. (B) Any person, firm or corporation who violates any provision of this Chapter shall be subject to a civil fine of not less than $50, but not more than $100 per day per violation. Each date that a violation of this Chapter continues after a Notice of Violation or Citation has been served in accordance with the terms of this Chapter shall be deemed to constitute a separate offense subject to a separate fine, up to a maximum of $5,000 per citation. (C) In addition to the civil fines set forth in (B), any violator who violates any provision of this Chapter more than once within a 12-month period may be assessed additional civil penalties of $200 per day per violation to a maximum of $5,000 per citation. (D) The City shall possess a lien on property for all fines, penalties, charges, attorneys’ fees, abatement costs if the City has incurred them, and all other reasonable costs associated with enforcing this Chapter, including the costs of placing a lien on a parcel of real property pursuant to this provision. The lien shall take precedence over all other subsequent liens, except state, county, school, and city taxes, and may be enforced by judicial proceedings. Section V of this Ordinance creates a new Section 92.99, which sets forth a penalty and enforcement mechanism for the violation of any provision of Chapter 92 of the Southgate Code of Ordinances. Section 92.99 provides: A) The violation of any Section contained in this Chapter is a civil offense and shall be enforced in the same manner as Sections 90.04 through 90.07 of this Code. (B) Any person, firm or corporation who violates any provision of this Chapter shall be subject to a civil fine of not less than $50, but not more than $100. Each date that a violation of this Chapter continues after a Notice of Violation or Citation has been served in accordance with the terms of this Chapter shall be deemed to constitute a separate offense subject to a separate fine, up to a maximum of $5,000 per citation. (C) In addition to the civil fines set forth in (B), any violator who violates any provision of this Chapter more than once within a 12-month period may be assessed additional civil penalties of $200 per day per violation to a maximum of $5,000 per citation. (D) The City shall possess a lien on property for all fines, penalties, charges, attorneys’ fees, abatement costs if the City has incurred them, and all other reasonable costs associated with enforcing this Chapter, including the costs of placing a lien on a parcel of real property pursuant to this provision. The lien shall take precedence over all other subsequent liens, except state, county, school, and city taxes, and may be enforced by judicial proceedings. Section VI of the Ordinance creates a new Section 94.99, which sets forth a penalty and enforcement mechanism for the violation of any provision of Chapter 94 of the Southgate Code of Ordinances. Section 94.99 provides: (A) The violation of any section in this Chapter is a civil offense and shall be enforced in the same manner as Sections 90.04 through 90.07 of this Code. (B) Any person, firm or corporation who violates §§ 94.01, 94.02, 94.03 or 94.04 shall be subject to a civil fine of not less than $50, but not more than $100. Each false alarm in excess of three in any 365-day period shall constitute a separate offense. (C) The City shall possess a lien on property for all fines, penalties, charges, attorneys’ fees, abatement costs if the City has incurred them, and all other reasonable costs associated with enforcing violations of §§ 90.01, 90.02, 90.03 or 90.04, including the costs of placing a lien on a parcel of real property pursuant to this provision. The lien shall take precedence over all other subsequent liens, except state, county, school, and city taxes, and may be enforced by judicial proceedings. (D) The violation of §§ 94.20 through 94.23 shall be fined in an amount of not less than $10, nor more than $100, imprisoned not more than 90 days, or both fined and imprisoned. Each day of violation shall constitute a separate offense. Section VII of the Ordinance creates a new Section 152.99, which sets forth a penalty and enforcement mechanism for the violation of any provision of Chapter 152 of the Southgate Code of Ordinances. Section 152.99 provides:(A) The violation of any Section contained in this Chapter is a civil offense and shall be enforced in the same manner set forth in §§ 90.04 through 90.07of this Code.(B) Any person, firm or corporation who violates any provision of this Chapter other than § 152.35 shall be subject to a civil fine of not less than $50, but not more than $500. Each date that a violation of this Chapter continues after a Notice of Violation or Citation has been served in accordance with the terms of this Chapter shall be deemed to constitute a separate offense subject to a separate fine, up to a maximum of $5,000 per citation. (C) Any person, firm or corporation who violates § 152.35 shall be subject to a civil fine of not less than $250, but not more than $500. Each date that a violation of this Chapter continues after a Notice of Violation or Citation has been served in accordance with the terms of this Chapter shall be deemed to constitute a separate offense subject to a separate fine, up to a maximum of $5,000 per citation. (D) In addition to the civil fines set forth in (B), any violator who violates any provision of this Chapter more than once within a 12-month period may be assessed additional civil penalties of $200 per day per violation to a maximum of $5,000 per (E) The City shall possess a lien on property for all fines, penalties, charges, attorneys’ fees, abatement costs if the City has incurred them, and all other reasonable costs associated with enforcing this Chapter, including the costs of placing a lien on a parcel of real property pursuant to this provision. The lien shall take precedence over all other subsequent liens, except state, county, school, and city taxes, & may be enforced by judicial proceedings. Section VIII of the Ordinance repeals any conflicting ordinances to the extent of the conflict. Section IX of the Ordinance sets forth its effective date. The first reading of this Ordinance occurred on1/4/2012, & the second reading occurred on12/18/2012, whereby the ordinance was passed, and signed by the Mayor, attested by the Clerk, filed & indexed as provided by law. Certification I, Mary Ann Stewart, attorney for the City of Southgate, Ky, certify that the above constitutes a summary of Ord. No. 12-01 as prepared by myself, pursuant to KRS 83A.060(9). Mary Ann Stewart, Esq.

CITY OF HIGHLAND HEIGHTS, KENTUCKY ORDINANCE NO. 02-2012 AN ORDINANCE AMENDING THE TEXT OF ORDINANCE NO. 16-83 COMMONLY REFERRED TO AS THE CITY OF HIGHLAND HEIGHTS ZONING ORDINANCE SECTION 1012.1 BY CHANGING THE MINIMUM ACREAGE FOR PUD OVERLAY FROM 25 ACRES TO 5 ACRES. BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY OF HIGHLAND HEIGHTS, KENTUCKY AS FOLLOWS: Section I That a public hearing was held on January 10, 2012 to consider lowering the minimum acreage requirement for a PUD overlay zone in the City of Highland Heights from 25 acres to 5 acres. Section II That following the public hearing on this matter the City’S Planning and Zoning Commission recommended to the city council that the zoning ordinance be amended as provided below. Section III Section 10.12: I. AREA REQUIREMENTS: No PUD overlay zone shall be permitted on less than five (5) acres of land. However, development of a smaller tract adjacent to an existing PUD overlay zone, may be permitted, if the proposed development conforms to and extends the original development as if the new area had been a part of the original development. Section IV That this Ordinance shall be signed by the Mayor, attested by the City Clerk/ Treasurer, recorded and published. Same shall be in effect at the earliest time provided by law. First reading of this 17 day of January, 2012. Second reading of this 21 day of February, 2012.

Ord12.02

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INVITATION TO BID March 1, 2012 PROJECT: Material Bid – Copper SEALED BIDS WILL BE RECEIVED AT: Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) 2835 Crescent Springs Road P.O. Box 18640 Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 UNTIL:

Date: March 13, 2012 Time: 10:00 a.m., local time

At said place and time, and promptly thereafter, all Bids that have been duly received will be publicly opened and read aloud. The proposed purchase is generally described as follows: to supply the Northern Kentucky Water District with 40,000 feet of ¾inch type K soft copper (100’ coils) and 5,000 feet of 1-inch type K soft copper (100’ coils), as described in the Bid Form and other Documents prepared by the Northern Kentucky Water District. Freight shall be included in the bid price. All deliveries are to be made to the Northern Kentucky Water District at 2835 Crescent Springs Road, Erlanger, Kentucky. All Bids must be in accordance with the Bidding Documents on file, and available for examination at: Northern Kentucky Water District, 2835 Crescent Springs Road, Erlanger, Kentucky 41018. Copies of the Bidding Documents may be obtained from the office at the address indicated above by contacting Denise Manning at (859) 426-2718 and questions regarding the bid directed to Ed Prather at (859) 426-2701. There is no charge for these documents. Bids will be received on a unit price basis as described in the Bidding Documents. Bids may be submitted for any one item, multiple items, or all of the items listed in the Bid Form. Owner reserves the right to reject any or all Bids, including without limitation the right to reject any or all nonconforming, non-responsive, incomplete, unbalanced, or conditional Bids, to waive informalities, and to reject the Bid of any Bidder if Owner believes that it would not be in the best interest of Owner to make an award to that Bidder. Owner also reserves the right to negotiate with the selected Bidder to such an extent as may be determined by Owner. Also if, in Owner’s opinion, a particular product and/or supplier offer distinct advantages over other Bidders, the Owner may award to a Bidder that is not the lowest. Distinct advantages may include shipping time, standardization or ultimate economy. Owner reserves the right to have separate awards for individual bid items from different Bidders. Owner further reserves the right to reject all bids, to waive any informalities and to negotiate for the modification of any bid, or to accept a bid which is deemed the most desirable and advantageous from the standpoint of customer value and service and concept of operations, even though such bid may not, on its face, appear to be the lowest price. Evaluation of Bids and the awarding of a final contract are subject to the reciprocal preference for Kentucky resident bidders pursuant to KRS 45A.490 to 45A.494 and (KAR 200 5:400). Minority Bidders are encouraged to bid. Bids shall remain subject to acceptance for 7 days after the day of bid opening. Jack Bragg, CFO Northern Kentucky Water District 1001691692

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50¢ Contactus ThenewinformationdeskandregistrationareaatSt.ElizabethFortThomasislocatedrightinsidethemain entrance. AMANDAJOERINGALLEY/COMMU...

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