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FOREST HILLS

JOURNAL

CELEBRATING

120 YEARS page 3A

Your Community Press newspaper serving Anderson Township, California, Mount Washington, Newtown

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 11, 2017

$1.00

BECAUSE COMMUNITY MATTERS

Macaron Bar in Anderson? Students share their hopes for the future Sheila Vilvens svilvens@communitypress.com

If a Macaron Bar shows up in Anderson Township, residents might have a Sherwood Elementary School student named Sophie to thank. She and her classmates recently wrote letters to township leadership sharing their visions for future development needs in their community. Sophie suggested a Macaron Bar would be good for everyone in Anderson. “Instead of people going downtown or to Hyde Park they can just come up to the Anderson Towne Center and get some delicious Macarons,” she wrote. She received no disagreement from Trustee President Josh Gerth. “A Macaron Bar in Anderson Township sounds like a sweet idea,” he replied to her. Gerth, Trustee Andrew Pappas, Trustee Vice President Dee Stone, Fiscal Officer Ken Dietz and many township department heads are in the process of responding to about 60 student letters that arrived at the township offices shortly before the Forest Hills School District’s winter break. The student ideas ranged from the delicious to the serious. All students detailing what they would like to see in Anderson Township and why. An amusement park was the suggestion of a student named Tommy. “I think that an amusement park in Anderson should have big rides and roller coasters,” he wrote. In his letter, Evan suggested that local businesses be allowed to create an ad in order to help them to sell their products and services. It’s an idea See FUTURE , Page 2A

SHEILA VILVENS/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Anderson Township Administrator Vicky Earhart reviews a stack of letters mailed to the township by Sherwood Elementary School students.

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PROVIDED

Artist rendering of the lobby and lounge area of the Carmike Ovation Cinema Grill 9.

5

things to know ahead of Anderson cinema debut

Sheila Vilvens

svilvens@communitypress.com

T

he wait is about to end for folks eager to get their first glimpse inside of the new Carmike Ovation Cinema Grill 9 in Anderson Township. The cinema, at 7490 Beechmont Ave., threw open its doors for a soft opening Thursday, Jan. 5. According to the cinema’s Facebook page, movies from 2016 were showed: “Finding Dory,” “The Secret Life of Pets,’ “Girl On A Train” and “Jason Bourne.” Starting Jan. 16 new releases will be available. If you plan on going, here are five things to know: » Arrive early in order to get a parking space. With all of the development in and around Anderson Towne Center, parking can be tight. And with the start of the New Year, business is booming at the nearby Crunch Fitness. A new parking garage is under construction but isn’t expected to be open until spring. » To see what’s playing or to score tickets in advance visit Fandango. » Seat-side service is available with the push of a button throughout the movie. Guests can choose from a menu featuring more than 100 food and beverage selections. » The cinema has nine auditoriums, all with over-sized, electric reclining chairs. One auditorium has a Big D premium large screen format featuring a screen that’s over 70 feet wide and three stories tall. » The lobby includes a cocktail lounge with a full-service bar.

SHEILA VILVENS/THE CINCINNATI ENQUIRER

The Carmike Ovation Cinema Grill 9 hosted a soft opening starting Jan. 5, showing popular movies from 2016. New releases will begin showing Jan. 16.

Contact us News ..........................248-8600 Retail advertising ..............768-8404 Classified advertising .........242-4000 Delivery ........................576-8240 See page A2 for additional information

Vol. 56 No. 42 © 2017 The Community Press ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


NEWS

2A • FOREST HILLS JOURNAL • JANUARY 11, 2017

AROUND YOUR COMMUNITIES CINCINNATI

Withrow assistant coach accused of stealing cash registers An Evanston man accused of stealing cash registers from local business appeared in court Jan. 2. Timothy Cottingham, 41, is charged with four counts of robbery. Cottingham has been removed from his position as an assistant coach for the men’s varsity basketball team at Withrow High School, pending an investigation by the school system. Janet Walsh with Cincinnati Public Schools

said all potential CPS employees are subject to a background check, but they didn’t find anything of any significance prior to his hiring. The crimes allegedly occurred over a threeday period. On New Year’s Day, Cottingham is accused of stealing the cash register from the Delta Snack Shack store on Delta Avenue in Columbia Tusculum. Court documents state that he confessed to the robbery and threatening an employee. According to court records, he ripped a cash register from the counter at Marco’s Pizza at 4004 Edwards Road in

FOREST HILLS JOURNAL

Oakley on New Year’s Eve. He’s also accused of threatening an employee. Criminal complaints state that he stole the cash register from the Subway at 3008 Madison Road in Oakley Dec. 30. He’s accused of threatening the employee in that incident as well. In court, Cottingham’s lawyer argued that the basketball coach suffers from acute depression. The attorney claimed he was having “some type of a mental health issue at the time of the offenses.” Cottingham is also accused of stealing a car Dec. 30. In addition, he faces drug charges for

News Richard Maloney Editor ..................248-7134, rmaloney@communitypress.com Jeanne Houck Reporter ...................248-7129, jhouck@communitypress.com Forrest Sellers Reporter ..................248-7680, fsellers@communitypress.com Sheila Vilvens Reporter ...................248-7139, svilvens@communitypress.com Melanie Laughman Sports Editor .......768-8512, mlaughman@communitypress.com Scott Springer Sports Reporter ..........576-8255, sspringer@communitypress.com Twitter: @sspringersports

Advertising To place an ad ............................513-768-8404, EnquirerMediaAdvertising@enquirer.com

Delivery For customer service ....................576-8240 Stephen Barraco Circulation Manager ....................248-7110, sbarraco@communitypress.com Tracey Murphy District Manager ........248-7571, tamurphy@communitypress.com Janice McGinnis District Manager .......248-7576, jmcginnis2@communitypress.com

Classified To place a Classified ad .................242-4000, www.communityclassified.com

Content submitted may be distributed by us in print, digital or other forms To place an ad in Community Classified, call 242-4000.

school in any other capacity. “The district’s Human Resource department today removed Cottingham from his position pending an investigation by the school system.”

HAMILTON COUNTY

What to do with your Christmas tree Hamilton County residents are invited to compost their Christmas trees and holiday greenery by bringing these materials to one of the county’s three yard trimmings drop-off sites. Hamilton County Recycling and Solid Waste District’s free program will accept

these organic materials from noon to 3 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 14. Trees and greenery will be composted. Locations for the yard trimmings drop-off sites are: East: Bzak Landscaping, 3295 Turpin Lane (off state Route 32) in Anderson Township West: Kuliga Park, 6717 Bridgetown Road in Green Township North: Rumpke Sanitary Landfill, 3800 Struble Road (and Colerain Avenue) in Colerain Township For more information, call 946-7766 or visit HamiltonCountyRecycles.org.

Anderson raising funds for Veterans Memorial Sheila Vilvens

Find news and information from your community on the Web Cincinnati.com/communities

allegedly throwing crack cocaine and drug paraphernalia out of a car window at the time of his arrest. CPS released the following statement Jan. 2: “Cincinnati Public Schools was notified today of the arrest and arraignment of a high school assistant coach on allegations of committing a series of recent robberies. “The employee, Timothy Cottingham, an assistant basketball coach at Withrow High School, had cleared criminal background checks prior to his employment. He had coached at Withrow for two seasons and was not employed by the

svilvens@communitypress.com

Anderson Township is looking for a few big donors in order to complete the community’s Veterans Memorial. The township is a little over $10,000 away from its goal of $25,000, Trustee President Josh Gerth said. Late in 2016 he and

Index Calendar ................A6 Classifieds ................C Food ......................3B Life ........................1B Police .................... 6B Schools ..................5A Sports ....................B1 Viewpoints .............8A

Trustee Andrew Pappas turned to social media to promote gifting to the memorial and two other projects. Since then the township has received about $15,000 from businesses and families, Gerth said. He’s hopeful a few more large donors will step up, making it possible for the township to complete the memorial in time for Veteran’s Day this November. The Anderson Veterans Memorial was a project conceived in 2008, Anderson Administrator Vicky Earhart said. Fundraising for the project began in earnest in 2011. The project received a

tremendous financial boost a few years ago thanks to a $50,000 donation from Belterra Park Gaming and Entertainment Center and a $10,000 gift from the Kroger Co., Gerth said. A more public campaign, perhaps through GoFundMe, is being planned for February which will make it easier for people to make contributions of any denomination, Gerth said. Money from this campaign will provide the needed funding to maintain and make ongoing improvements to the memorial, he said. Gerth and Pappas are hopeful of receiving a few larger gifts of $1,000 or

more. Individuals at this level or higher will get their names on a donor wall at Anderson Center, Gerth said. Any businesses or individuals interested in making a large gift to the memorial can contact Gerth at jgerth@andersontown ship.org. Gifts can also be made by mailing checks, payable to the Anderson Township Veterans Memorial to the attention of Earhart at 7850 Five Mile Road, Anderson Township, 45230-2356. Funds will be deposited with the Greater Anderson Township Betterment Commission under a separate line item designated for the Veterans Memorial.

Future

one,” Allison wrote. “For one thing, it would give people something to do other than illegal activities. A drive-in movie also encourages family time because young children cannot drive, so their parents must take them.” Pappas said that he and many others in the township would probably agree and perhaps recall the days when Anderson was home to the Forest Drive-In Theater. “While I can’t promise a drive-in theater, I can tell you that the new Carmike Ovation Cinema at the Anderson Towne Center will be opening in a few weeks,” Pappas wrote in reply. Some students suggested the township needs a homeless shelter.

Other suggestions were for additional athletic fields, a zoo, and even road improvements benefiting pedestrians and motorists. “I absolutely love the fact that these students are thinking about the community and that they were comfortable in reaching out to the elected officials to share their thoughts,” Anderson Administrator Vicky Earhart said. In their responses to the letters, Earhart said she and others with the township tried to convey the message that there times it makes sense for Anderson to do something stand alone, but there are times when it makes sense to collaborate and work with others.

Continued from Page 1A

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Stone applauded. In a letter of reply, Stone wrote that advertising is important to local businesses. “Income from ads also helps newspapers continue to operate,” she wrote. The environment was on the mind of Evelyn who suggested that the township needs a Pollution Control Center in order to keep the community cleaner and as a way of creating jobs and saving the environment. A drive-in movie theater in Anderson was the recommendation of Allison and other students. “A drive-in movie would be good for every-

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NEWS

JANUARY 11, 2017 • FOREST HILLS JOURNAL • 3A

Remke Markets Makes Online Grocery Shopping Convenient Pat Iasillo Over the past decade our world has become more accustomed to shopping online for the products we want. It makes sense not to waste time and effort shopping if we can just as easily click a few buttons to accomplish the same thing. However, there has been some reluctance when it comes to products we like to feel and touch before we buy. We don’t mind purchasing a book online or the latest toy, but some of us like to try on a pair a shoes before we buy them or like to feel the material on an article of clothing. The same thing is even more true when it comes to shopping for food. We want to be

in control when we pick our apples or our lettuce, or a beef roast. Therefore, shopping online for our groceries has met with some resistance. It can also be painful to sort through over 30,000 products to find what we want. That is all changing. Remke Markets has carefully thought through these issues before we offered an online solution to our customers. After all, we have been in business for almost 120 years, partly because we keep the wants and needs of our customers at the top of the list on our approach to the grocery business. That is why we offer something a little different; a personal shopper. Our personal shoppers

are carefully chosen to be as picky as our pickiest customers when it comes to choosing what to put in the basket. They also are people who are anxious to learn just what you like, how you like it, and if they don’t know, they will call you and ask before they choose. We feel confident you will be pleased that your shopper will far exceed your expectations. Couple a personal shopper with the ease of the Remke Mobile Markets website and you have a means of shopping for your groceries that is second to none. With your registration of your Remke Rewards card on our website, you now have access to the top 100 items you normally purchase at your fingertips. You may also like to shop our weekly ad. Now all you need do is click on an item when viewing our ad and presto, it

is on your shopping list. In addition, we have made it simple to shop for anything in our store by using our search bar, or by searching through every department and category. We even have an app available for download on your Apple or Android mobile device, and you can use it to scan the UPC barcodes of the items in your house to add them directly to your list. Once you finish your order, you may choose a pick up time even on the same day! Drive to the store, call or text the phone number on the sign posted in our designated pick up spot, and your order will be brought out and loaded into your car. Scan your credit card and you are on your way. The fee is waived on your first four orders so you have nothing to lose to give Remke Mobile Markets a try!

Now available at Buttermilk, Hyde Park, Skytop, and Turkeyfoot locations. Visit www. remkes.com.

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NEWS

4A • FOREST HILLS JOURNAL • JANUARY 11, 2017

Get your brunch on in Oakley Station at Wild Eggs Sarah Brookbank sbrookbank@communitypress.com

PHOTOS BY FORREST SELLERS/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Students in Pat Pritz’s gourmet cuisine class at Indian Hill High School recently joined with La Soupe to prepare soup for lower income families. Students in the class include Kate Vollmer, left, Kenyah Canady and John Carnesi, who are with Pritz.

Students in gourmet class serve up soup for the needy Forrest Sellers fsellers@communitypress.com

Preparing soup has just gained an added level of importance. Students in the gourmet cuisine class at Indian Hill High School have partnered with La Soupe in preparing soup for students in need. “It was for other people, so we wanted to do it right,” said junior Kate Vollmer, of Indian Hill. Typically the students in the class make dishes for classmates or staff in the school. This was one of the first times food prepared in the class has been distributed through a charity organization. La Soupe, which is in Anderson Township, is a nonprofit organization that “rescues” food that would otherwise be disposed of and creates nutritious meals for families where nutritious meals may not necessarily be available.

Cauliflower soup that will be given to lower income families was made by students in an Indian Hill High School gourmet cuisine class. Forty quarts of soup was prepared by the students.

Family and consumer sciences teacher Pat Pritz suggested working with the organization. “I knew La Soupe was going into schools with a crock pot program,” Pritz said. “I contacted them to see if we could (help) expand what they’re doing.” Pritz said her class was also looking for a way to have an impact on Tristate communities where access to nutritious and

healthy food is more limited. La Soupe provided Pritz’s class with nearly 50 pounds of potatoes and vegetables that had been rescued. In turn, the class prepared 40 quarts of soup using the ingredients that were provided and mixed with broth and herbs and spices. Each small group of students in the cuisine

class, which has about 15 students, had an opportunity to prepare the soup in their own way. The students said they had a chance to get creative. “I paid particular attention to how it was made,” said junior John Carnesi, of Indian Hill. “I wanted to make sure the recipe was right because I knew who (the soup) was going to.” Senior Kenyah Canady, of Kenwood, said it was a learning experience beyond just food preparation. “After college, I want to start my own nonprofit organization,” she said. “I learned a lot that I (can) use in the future.” This particular batch of soup will go to students in the West End. The frozen soup is given to the students who can then reheat it. Pritz said her class will likely continue to prepare soup for La Soupe at least once a month.

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Wild Eggs, a breakfastfocused chain, opened in Oakley Jan. 9, giving Cincinnatians a taste of what's to come. The restaurant is in Oakley Station at 3240 Vandercar Way. This is the first of three Wild Eggs to open in the Cincinnati area. Wild Eggs will also open a restaurant in Kenwood at 7677 Montgomery Way, near Buffalo Wild Wings and in the Queen City Tower in the spring. The Oakley Station Wild Eggs location is 4,200 square feet, holds 136 seats and has an outdoor patio. According to a press release, each location will employ around 40 people and about half of those positions will be full time. In addition to a buildyour-own omelet section with a variety of meats, cheeses and vegetables, Wild Eggs will have items such as the Calamity Katie, named after Rothberg’s daughter. The Calamity Katie is a corn cake with green chili, a poached egg and other ingredients. Other unique items include a Kentucky Kelsey Hot Brown, which is made up of sourdough with turkey, smoked bacon and Mornay sauce. Six different eggs Benedict dishes will be available. Traditional waffle

FILE PHOTO

Oakley Station’s Wild Eggs location opened Jan. 9. They serve the Calamity Katie Border Benedict, green chili cheddar corn cakes, topped with chorizo, two poached eggs and queso fundido, pico de gallo, sour cream, green onion and fresh avocado.

and pancake dishes will also be served. Wild Eggs is based in Louisville and has been operating since opening in 2007. Wild Eggs offers custom-blended coffee made exclusively for the restaurant, as well as an espresso bar. Bloody Mary’s and Mimosas made with in-house fresh squeezed orange juice are among the drinks served at the cocktail bar. Wild Eggs is open daily for breakfast and lunch from 6:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. weekdays and 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. on weekends. For more information, visit www.wildeggs.com or call 502-409-7848. Wild Eggs is a portfolio company of Patoka Capital.

Watch for these developments in 2017 Bowdeya Tweh btweh@enquirer.com

Nearly a decade removed from the Great Recession, local governments continue to struggle to find money for high-priority development visions. Big private projects often still need partnerships from the public sector in order to move forward. That isn’t likely to change in 2017, but officials say they’re ready to step upto create jobs, attract new residents and change community perceptions. “We have to think about making those investments so we do remain relevant in the region,” said Neil Hensley, Blue Ash’s director of economic development, told The Enquirer. Here are some real estate developments that could make a big impact.

Anderson Twp.: Continue redefining main commercial corridor Vision: Continue executing the Downtown Anderson Plan that will help guide public and private investment decisions within a half-mile of the Anderson Towne Center. Location: Beechmont Avenue near Five Mile Road, Anderson Township Key players: Anderson Township, Kroger, Victory Developers What could happen: The “main and main” of Anderson is expected to see continued investment in public infrastructure

and private property in 2017. Among the biggest developments expected to wrap up is the expansion of the Kroger at Beechmont and Town Center Way into the company’s largest supermarket in the nation. Currito, The Eagle and McAlister’s Deli are expected to open by fall 2017 in a development at Beechmont Avenue and Wolfangel Road. Township officials said between mid-2015 and early 2018, the area could see more than $165 million of investment, which includes the $74 million expansion of Mercy Health’s Anderson hospital completed this past fall.

Wasson Way: Seeking greener pastures through abandoned corridor Vision: Transform an idle railroad corridor into a hike and bike trail that could eventually connect to the Little Miami trail. Location: Along the Norfolk Southern’s Wasson rail line stretching from Victory Parkway through 12 neighborhoods and communities. Key players: Wasson Way nonprofit organization, city of Cincinnati, multiple local governments, MKSK and Norfolk Southern What could happen: Construction on the trail’s first phase – Tamarack Avenue to Madison Road – is expected to start in June. Cost estimates for the 4.1mile path range from $14 million to $20 million.


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6A • FOREST HILLS JOURNAL • JANUARY 11, 2017

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD THURSDAY, JAN. 12 Art & Craft Classes Fundamentals of Drawing and Painting for Adults with Mary Lou Holt, 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Woman’s Art Club Cultural Center, 6980 Cambridge Ave., The Barn. Learn line drawing techniques, basic eye/hand coordination and how to identify positive and negative shapes. Light, shadow, tonal values and perspective taught using simple shapes. Runs Jan. 12-March 2. Ages 18 and up. $220 for 8-class session. 226-3833; www.artatthebarn.org. Mariemont. Sharp Art: Stained Glass Classes, 6:30-9 p.m., Brazee Street Studios, 4426 Brazee St., Learn basic glass cutting, wet grinder, foil wrap and solder. Ages 12-80. $35 and up. Presented by Sharp Art. 389-6742; sharpartstainedglass@yahoo.com. Oakley.

Literary - Bookstores ManaBabies with Miss Alicia, 10:30-11 a.m., Blue Manatee Children’s Bookstore, 3054 Madison Road, Fun introduction to language for smallest ManaBabies. Ages 0-1. Free. 731-2665. Oakley.

Literary - Story Times Story Time with Miss Alicia, 10-10:30 a.m., Blue Manatee Children’s Bookstore, 3054 Madison Road, Free. 731-2665; www.bluemanateebooks.com. Oakley.

Nature Astronomy Night, 7-8:30 p.m., Cincinnati Observatory Center, 3489 Observatory Place, Short talk, astro Q&A, tour and stargazing. $5 suggested donation. Reservations required. 321-5186; www.cincinnatiobservatory.org. Mount Lookout.

On Stage - Theater Morning’s At Seven, 7:30 p.m., Walton Creek Theater, 4101 Walton Creek Road, Comedy by Paul Osborn features 4 sisters and their 3 husbands living near each other. $20. Presented by Mariemont Players Inc. 6841236; www.mariemontplayers.com. Columbia Township.

Recreation Preschool Open Gym, 9:3011:30 a.m., Beech Acres Park RecPlex, 6915 Beechmont Ave., Parents and preschoolers can burn off steam during unstructured playtime. Parents must remain on-site and supervise children at all times. Ages 0-4. $2 per child per date. Presented by Anderson Township Park District. Through March 30. 388-4515; www.andersonparks.com. Anderson Township.

FRIDAY, JAN. 13 Drink Tastings Wine Tasting, 5:30-7 p.m., Wine World, 7737 Five Mile Road, Taste 4 different wines. Ages 21 and up. $1 per two-ounce taste. 232-6611; www.basketsgourmetwineworld.com. Anderson Township.

Literary - Story Times ManaTots, 10-10:30 a.m., Blue Manatee Children’s Bookstore, 3054 Madison Road, Stories and songs for children up to age 4. Free. 731-2665; www.bluemanateebooks.com. Oakley.

Music - Hip-Hop Aesop Rock, 8 p.m., 20th Century Theater, 3021 Madison Road, With Rob Sonic and DJ Zone and Homeboy Sandman. $25, $20 advance. 731-8000; www.the20thcenturytheater.com. Oakley.

Nature Astronomy Night, 7-8:30 p.m., Cincinnati Observatory Center, 3489 Observatory Place, Short talk, astro Q&A, tour and stargazing. $7, $5 ages under 18. Reservations required. 321-5186; www.cincinnatiobservatory.org. Mount Lookout.

ABOUT CALENDAR To submit calendar items, go to Cincinnati.com/share, log in and click on “submit an event.” Send digital photos to kynews@communitypress.com along with event information. Items are printed on a space-available basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to Cincinnati.com/calendar.

Center, 6980 Cambridge Ave., Explore use of fibers to enhance art with wet felting process. Monthly workshops offered for next 6 months exploring process. Leave with beautiful piece of art. Ages 8-88. $80 plus supply kit $20. 6 person maximum. Presented by The Woman’s Art Club of Cincinnati. Through March 11. 885-2781; www.artatthebarn.org. Mariemont. Charcoal Drawing Boot Camp with Charlie Berger, 1-4 p.m., Woman’s Art Club Cultural Center, 6980 Cambridge Ave., The Barn. Pursue full range of possibilities from powdered and liquid charcoal to charcoal chunks, sticks and bars and more. Runs Jan. 14-Jan. 28. Ages 18 and up. $80 for 3 classes. Registration required. 272-3700; www.artatthebarn.org. Mariemont. Drawing Fundamentals: Content, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Manifest Drawing Center Studio in Madisonville, 4905 Whetsel Ave., Floor 2. Class covers strategies for understanding role content plays in drawing and all art making, and provides various methods for deepening content of works. Runs Saturdays Jan. 14-March 18. $350, $250 students, 10-week course. Registration required. Presented by Manifest Drawing Studio Madisonville. 861-3638; bit.ly/2innY61. Madisonville.

Art Exhibits Signature Show by the Woman’s Art Club of Cincinnati, 1-4 p.m., Woman’s Art Club Cultural Center, 6980 Cambridge Ave., The Barn. Some of region’s most accomplished artists present work for public viewing and for purchase. Free. 2723700. Mariemont.

Dining Events New Years Light the Tower Spaghetti Dinner, 4-7 p.m., Yeatman Masonic Lodge, 6124 Campus Lane, Spaghetti and meatball dinner includes salad, bread, dessert and drinks. Proceeds help operate and maintain LED lighting for Mount Washington Water Tower. $5. 884-8326. Mount Washington.

Literary - Story Times ManaTots, 10-10:30 a.m., Blue Manatee Children’s Bookstore, Free. 731-2665; www.bluemanateebooks.com. Oakley. Spanish Story Time, 10:30-11 a.m., Blue Manatee Children’s Bookstore, 3054 Madison Road, Learn simple Spanish vocabulary through stories and songs. Free. 731-2665; www.bluemanateebooks.com. Oakley.

Music - Latin Sabado Noche Movimiento, 10 p.m. to 2:30 a.m., Inner Circle, 4343 Kellogg Ave., $10, ladies free until 11 p.m. 828-8317; innercirclecincy.com. East End.

Music - Rock The Remains Band, 8-11 p.m., American Legion Post 318, 6660 Clough Pike, Cash bar all beverages. Table snacks provided. Appetizers and finger food may be brought in. Doors open at 7 p.m. Ages 21 and up. $12.50, $10 in advance. Reservations recommended. 231-6477; www.post318.org. Anderson Township.

Music - Singer-Songwriter Live music with Josh, 7-10 p.m., Kidd Coffee & Wine Bar, 3664-B Edwards Road, Free. Presented by Kidd Coffee and Wine Bar. 871-5111; kiddcoffee.com. Hyde Park.

On Stage - Theater

On Stage - Theater

Morning’s At Seven, 8 p.m., Walton Creek Theater, $20. 684-1236; www.mariemontplayers.com. Columbia Township.

Morning’s At Seven, 8 p.m., Walton Creek Theater, $20. 684-1236; www.mariemontplayers.com. Columbia Township.

SATURDAY, JAN. 14

SUNDAY, JAN. 15

Art & Craft Classes

Art Exhibits

Wet Felting Workshop with Therese Holt, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Woman’s Art Club Cultural

Signature Show by the Woman’s Art Club of Cincinnati, 1-4 p.m., Woman’s Art Club Cultural Center, Free. 272-3700.

Mariemont.

Auditions May Festival Youth Chorus, 12:30-2:30 p.m., Knox Presbyterian Church, 3400 Michigan Ave., By appointment only. Required: 1 prepared solo and basic sight reading. Free. Reservations required. Presented by Cincinnati May Festival. Through Jan. 29. 744-3229; rwetzel@mayfestival.com. Hyde Park.

Dining Events Community Dinner, 6-7 p.m., Mount Washington Presbyterian Church, 6474 Beechmont Ave., Doors open at 5:45 p.m. Free. 231-2650; communitymeal@mwpc-church.org. Mount Washington.

On Stage - Theater Morning’s At Seven, 2 p.m., 7 p.m., Walton Creek Theater, $20. 684-1236; www.mariemontplayers.com. Columbia Township.

Recreation Red Hot Dancing Queens Zumbathon, 2-4 p.m., Carnegie Center of Columbia Tusculum, 3738 Eastern Ave., 2 hours of non-stop fun with 4 instructors and taste of Mardi Gras style parading. Feel free to sport Mardi Gras flavor. Best Nolastyle guest wins prize. Doors open 1:45 p.m. Benefits Red Hot Dancing Queens Mardi Gras Parade Fund. $10 plus can of food for Freestore Foodbank. Presented by The Red Hot Dancing Queens. 382-0104; bit.ly/2hWErRR. Columbia Tusculum.

Sports Just Flippin’ Tumbling and Trampoline Meet, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Gymnastics Central, 8485 Broadwell Road, Over 200 athletes from 6 states compete in tumbling, trampoline, and double mini trampoline. All levels of USTA competition present including several USTA Elite National team members. Benefits Gymnastics Central T and T Boosters. $5, $3 seniors and children, free ages under 3. 442-2861. Newtown.

FILE PHOTO

The New Years Light the Tower Spaghetti Dinner is 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Jan. 14, at Yeatman Masonic Lodge, 6124 Campus Lane, Mount Washington. The spaghetti and meatball dinner includes salad, bread, dessert and drinks. Proceeds will help operate and maintain the lighting for Mount Washington Water Tower. Cost is $5. Call 884-8326.

2692 Madison Road, Meet driving force behind JANCOA Janitorial Service, who autographs copies of book. Free. 396-8960; www.josephbeth.com. Norwood.

Literary - Story Times ManaTots, 10-10:30 a.m., Blue Manatee Children’s Bookstore, Free. 731-2665; www.bluemanateebooks.com. Oakley.

Recreation Preschool Open Gym, 9:3011:30 a.m., Beech Acres Park RecPlex, $2 per child per date. 388-4515; www.andersonparks.com. Anderson Township. Trivia With a Twist, 8-10 p.m., Arthur’s Cafe, 3516 Edwards Road, Prizes offered every round for winners. First, second and third place prizes overall. Ages 18 and up. Free admission. Presented by Trivia with A Twist. 607-644-4433; www.triviatwist.com. Hyde Park.

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 18 Art & Craft Classes

MONDAY, JAN. 16

Oil Painting with Jan Boone, 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., 1:15-4:15 p.m., Woman’s Art Club Cultural Center, 6980 Cambridge Ave., The Barn. For beginning and intermediate painters. Instruction covers basic painting techniques, good drawing and creative use of color. Ages 18 and up. $80 for four classes. Registration required. 791-7044; www.artatthebarn.org. Mariemont.

Art & Craft Classes

Education

Sharp Art: Stained Glass Classes, 6:30-9 p.m., Brazee Street Studios, $35 and up. 389-6742; sharpartstainedglass@yahoo.com. Oakley.

Home Alone, 6:30-8 p.m., Beech Acres Park RecPlex, 6915 Beechmont Ave., 2-day course instructs children how to handle real-life situations and everyday hazards that may arise when staying home alone. For Ages 9.5 to 11. $40, $30 residents. Registration required. Presented by Anderson Township Park District. 388-4513; www.andersonparks.com. Anderson Township.

Exercise Classes Zumba Fitness with Sue, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Clough United Methodist Church, 2010 Wolfangel Road, Burn calories, sculpt your body and have a blast. $5. 379-4900; www.zumbasue.net. Anderson Township.

Literary - Bookstores Story Time with PJ Library, 10:30-11 a.m., Blue Manatee Children’s Bookstore, 3054 Madison Road, PJ Library is Jewish family engagement program for children ages 8 and under. Each month, families are sent free books and music. Hear stories about Jewish tales, holidays, life cycle events and more. Free. 731-2665. Oakley. Spend the Day the MLK Way, 2-3 p.m., Blue Manatee Children’s Bookstore, 3054 Madison Road, Read about MLK and create dream piece. Ages 4-7. Free. Registration required. 731-2665; www.bluemanateebooks.com. Oakley.

TUESDAY, JAN. 17 Health / Wellness HMR Healthy Solutions Weight Management Free Informational Sessions, 6-7 p.m., Cincinnati Sports Club, 3950 Red Bank Road, Free. Reservations recommended. 527-4000; www.cincinnatisportsclub.com. Fairfax.

Literary - Signings Mary Miller: Changing Direction: 10 Choices That Impact Your Dreams, 7 p.m., JosephBeth Booksellers-Rookwood,

Madison Road, $20. 731-8000; www.the20thcenturytheater.com. Oakley.

Support Groups Overeaters Anonymous, 7:30-8:30 p.m., Knox Presbyterian Church, 3400 Michigan Ave., See sign by elevator from parking lot or ask at Michigan Ave info desk. Overeaters Anonymous offers a program of recovery from compulsive eating using 12 Steps and 12 Traditions of OA. No dues or fees and no weigh-ins. Free. Presented by Overeaters Anonymous Cincinnati. 871-6194; www.cincinnatioa.org. Hyde Park. Caregiver Support Group: Marjorie P. Lee, 3-4:30 p.m., Marjorie P. Lee Retirement Community, 3550 Shaw Ave., Lee Library. Support group for caregivers caring for elderly or disabled loved one. For seniors. Free. Registration recommended. Presented by Caregiver Assistance Network. 869-4483. Hyde Park.

Literary - Story Times

Sharp Art: Stained Glass Classes, 6:30-9 p.m., Brazee Street Studios, $35 and up. 389-6742; sharpartstainedglass@yahoo.com. Oakley.

Story Time with Miss Alicia, 10-10:30 a.m., Blue Manatee Children’s Bookstore, Free. 731-2665; www.bluemanateebooks.com. Oakley.

Clubs & Organizations

Music - Jazz

Eastside Democratic Club, 7:30-9 p.m., St. Timothy’s Episcopal Church, 8101 Beechmont Ave., Enjoy meeting other like-minded individuals whose mission is to foster a progressive presence in Southeast Cincinnati. Ages 18 and up. Free. Presented by Eastside Democratic Club. 232-4154. Anderson Township.

CCJO Big Band: Night in BrasÃl, featuring Bruno Mangueira, 7:30 p.m., Redmoor, 3187 Linwood Ave., $15. Presented by Cincinnati Contemporary Jazz Orchestra. 280-8181; www.cincinnatijazz.org. Mount Lookout.

Dining Events Dinner Club, 7 p.m. Spice: Northern India, Nectar, 1000 Delta Ave., Themed dinners. $47 for 4 courses. Reservations required. 929-0525. Mount Lookout. Home Alone, 6:30-8 p.m., Beech Acres Park RecPlex, $40, $30 residents. Registration required. 388-4513; www.andersonparks.com. Anderson Township.

How Lucky We Are to Have Winnie the Pooh Day, 11 a.m. to noon, Blue Manatee Children’s Bookstore, 3054 Madison Road, Stories, craft and honey stick. Ages 2-5. $2. Registration required. 731-2665; www.bluemanateebooks.com. Oakley.

Literary - Story Times ManaTots, 10-10:30 a.m., Blue Manatee Children’s Bookstore, Free. 731-2665; www.bluemanateebooks.com. Oakley.

Music - Concerts The Devil Makes Three, 8 p.m., 20th Century Theater, 3021

Literary - Signings

Art & Craft Classes

Christian Yoga, 6-7:30 p.m., Lutheran Church of the Resurrection, 1950 Nagel Road, Fellowship Hall. Sarah Pritts leads class. Participants encouraged to see yoga as way of connecting with the spiritual. Bring mat. Free, donations accepted. 478-3226; lcresurrection.org. Anderson Township.

Literary - Bookstores

ManaBabies with Miss Alicia, 10:30-11 a.m., Blue Manatee Children’s Bookstore, Free. 731-2665. Oakley.

THURSDAY, JAN. 19

Education

Free Blood Pressure and Stress Screenings, 9 a.m. to noon, Owens Chiropractic and Rehabilitation Center, 3930 Edwards Road Ste.1, Free. 7840084. Norwood.

Literary - Bookstores

Veronica Roth: “Carve the Mark”, 7 p.m., Joseph-Beth Booksellers-Rookwood, 2692 Madison Road, Bestselling author in conversation with First Draft podcast’s Sarah Enni, discussing new book. Free. 396-8960; www.josephbeth.com. Norwood.

Exercise Classes

Health / Wellness

p.m., Cincinnati Sports Club, 3950 Red Bank Road, Physical therapist Dr. Vic Troha offers screening. Reserve 20-minute appointment at least 24 hours prior to screening. Free. Registration required. 527-4000. Fairfax. HMR Healthy Solutions Weight Management Free Informational Sessions, noon to 1 p.m., Cincinnati Sports Club, Free. Reservations recommended. 527-4000; www.cincinnatisportsclub.com. Fairfax.

Health / Wellness Hip Alignment and Pain, 4:30-6

Nature Astronomy Night, 7-8:30 p.m., Cincinnati Observatory Center, $5 suggested donation. Reservations required. 321-5186; www.cincinnatiobservatory.org. Mount Lookout.

On Stage - Theater Morning’s At Seven, 7:30 p.m., Walton Creek Theater, $20. 684-1236; www.mariemontplayers.com. Columbia Township.

Recreation Preschool Open Gym, 9:3011:30 a.m., Beech Acres Park RecPlex, $2 per child per date. 388-4515; www.andersonparks.com. Anderson Township.

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NEWS

JANUARY 11, 2017 • FOREST HILLS JOURNAL • 7A

Bone broth, purple food trending for new year Broccoli cheddar soup like Panera It was a request I had to fill. “Do you have a recipe for cheddar broccoli soup like Panera?” I looked up a bunch of recipes and found a few that sounded promising. I tried out a couple and adapted only slightly to suit my taste. I used my chicken bone broth. Find a step-by-step photo primer on my abouteating.com site for both the bone broth and this recipe. 2 tablespoons butter 3/4 to 1 cup finely diced onion (not sweet or red) 4 tablespoons melted butter 4 tablespoons flour Dijon mustard - to taste, start with a little and go from there 2 cups half & half 2 cups low sodium, fat free, chicken broth Heaping 3 cups broccoli, chopped - I used frozen, thawed 1 nice carrot, cut into matchsticks, a heaping cup Nutmeg to taste - I grated a whole nutmeg and used a generous 1/4 teaspoon 8 oz. extra sharp or sharp grated cheddar plus extra for garnish Salt and pepper to taste THANKS TO RITA HEIKENFELD

This copycat Panera broccoli and cheddar soup can be made with nutritious bone broth.

Yesterday I walked across the field to I have to chuckle when I read trends. check on my elderly neighbor, John, and Heck, I’ve been trending way before the saw lots of grass-like blades poking through trends hit the news - we’ve been growing the soil. Farmer Bruner sowedhow rye elderberries and Indian/purple corn for right after he harvested pumpkins from the years! same field and that’s what was popping up. There are lots of more interesting food Husband Frank told me it’s called “winter and drink trends for 2017. I’ll be talking rye” since it can germinate through the more about them as we segue into the New snow. I look forward to early spring when it Rita Year. Heikenfeld becomes a field of wavy green. Tip from Rita: why this recipe is Since we’re beginning a new year, let’s RITA’S KITCHEN good for you talk trends for 2017. Guess what one is? Bone broth! Now I’ve been making super nutriBlack rice is whole grain, and used to be called tious bone broth for years the same way my Mom “forbidden rice” since it was eaten only by Empedid. Just basically cooking up a lot of bones with riors and commoners were not allowed to eat it. aromatics to make a healthful stock. No waste was Curry powder contains turmeric, a spice with her motto. anti-inflammatory qualities. The trend is to embrace the “no waste” philosoCinnamon helps lower blood sugar. phy. From root to seed is how chefs are cooking Garlic is good for your heart. now, using everything from the plant in some Cloves contain magnesium, calcium and iron, nutritious way. great for bone and overall health. Another trend is purple veggies and fruit, like Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educaeggplant, purple cauliflower, black rice (yes, it’s tor, Jungle Jim’s Eastgate culinary professional dark purple), elderberries, and even purple corn. and author. Find her blog online at The reason is that the anthocyanin (makes the Abouteating.com. Email her at purple color) in purple plants holds huge amounts rita@communitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchen” of nutrients, fiber and antioxidants. in the subject line.

Cook onion in butter on medium until translucent . Set aside. Make a roux: whisk melted butter and flour over low heat until bubbly and a bit golden, not brown. Whisk in mustard. Whisk in half & half and broth and cook to a simmer about 10 minutes. Add broccoli, carrots and onions. Cook over low heat about 20 minutes. Add nutmeg, salt and pepper to taste. Take off heat and stir in cheese until melted.

Barbara’s Indian-inspired rice The Indian spices elevate this to a new level. Thanks to Barbara D. for sharing. A good recipe to sub in black rice for white. 1/4 cup water 1 (14.5 ounce) can chicken broth 1 cup long grain rice or black rice 1 teaspoon curry powder 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/8 teaspoon paprika 1-2 pinches ground cloves 1 small onion, coarsely chopped

Bring water and chicken broth to a boil. Combine rice, curry powder, garlic powder, cinnamon, paprika, and cloves in a bowl; stir to mix. Add spiced rice and onion to the boiling broth. Cover and cook until rice is tender, about 25 minutes.

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8A • FOREST HILLS JOURNAL • JANUARY 11, 2017

VIEWPOINTS

FOREST HILLS Editor: Richard Maloney, rmaloney@communitypress.com, 248-7134

EDITORIALS | LETTERS | COLUMNS | CH@TROOM

It was the unusual morning traffic jam I sat in Inearned state terstate 275 traftested nursing fic on my way to assistant, patient work. This wasn’t care assistant, or a new occurrendental assisting ce...this is a busy certification or a stretch of highnursing license at way. For some Great Oaks, or reason this mornused a surgical ing I looked at my Harry Snyder technology profellow motorists COMMUNITY PRESS gram as a startwith a new appre- GUEST COLUMNIST ing point for ciation. medical school. First of all, rush- hour The auto mechanics, traffic means that people graphic designers, fire are working. They are fighters, veterinary assisheading to jobs, supporttants, aviation techniing families, and keeping cians, engineers, robotic the economy going. programmers and teachThen I looked closer at ers sitting in traffic the drivers and their around me are living vehicles. I realized that examples of the kinds of many of them could be upstanding young men among the thousands of and women who walk the Great Oaks graduates halls each day. They know who earned professional what they want, and they certifications and have are willing to put in the successful careers. The time needed to earn proman in the suit next to me fessional certification. may have started his These individuals buy business career in a marhomes, raise families, pay keting program offered taxes and contribute to by Great Oaks at several their communities. high schools. The earthIt was an ordinary moving equipment on the traffic jam, but I had a flatbed may be destined new perspective on how it for a construction job represents the outstandwhere a Live Oaks gradu- ing region in which we ate will use the latest in live and my neighbors GPS technology to prewho are all pursuing the cisely prepare a good site American Dream. for a new hospital. And Harry Snyder is presispeaking of hospitals, I dent/CEO of Great Oaks see several people in Career Campuses. He scrubs. They may have lives in Batavia.

JOURNAL

Cincinnati.com/communities

CH@TROOM Jan. 4 question What should be the priorities for President-elect Trump during his first 100 days?

“I believe he will be pretty much unable to set priorities until overcoming the obstacles being thrown in his path as quickly as the outgoing administration can. The efforts to deligitimize everything in his opening decisions will be heralded by the ‘no longer necessary’ press, media blogs and testing by the other world powers. “To start with a $20 trillion debt, repairing damage of the last-minute spitefulness of John Kerry with Israel, and the demand to return to Cold War status with Russia, as proclaimed by Obama, will create a very legitimate possibility of the No. 1 priority to be figuring out how to get out of this job, that he foolishly, but thankfully, sought. So far, his cabinet picks seem to have all been tested in the ‘fires of the unknowns.’ He now must seek counsel. This job is way to ‘Yuuuge’ to go alone or to believe there are easy solutions. I believe in prayer and know we all need to have real hope.” D.B.

“Trump should get his replacement plan for the Affordable Care Act, which he has claimed will be better, through Congress. “He should end his bromance with Russian President Putin. As a former top level KGB agent, Putin’s beliefs are what the U.S. fought against and continually denounced during the Cold War portion of the Reagan administration.

THIS WEEK’S QUESTION What are you most looking forward to in your community in 2017? Every week we ask readers a question they can reply to via email. Send your answers to rmaloney@communitypress.com with Ch@troom in the subject line.

“Finally, he should cancel his Twitter account or have someone monitor his Tweets so they don’t consistently create controversy, anger or panic among the American people.” C.S.

“Overhaul of the personal and corporate tax code. Nominee for the Supreme Court. Fill the 100 vacancies on the federal courts. Determine what our military should look like going forward, then get it there. Do a comprehensive review of government regulations and get rid of those that are not needed. School vouchers. Fix Social Security. Obamacare - come up with a better system.” R.B.

“President Trump (still have trouble with that, but who thought Reagan would do a more than credible job?) should focus on getting his cabinet right. I don’t believe it is currently, and I fully expect some key ‘You’re fireds’ to hit the news circuits in the coming months. I fervently hope he will get it correctly populated. “Next he must get some sanity around his platforms. Build a wall that Mexico will pay for? Doubtful. Perhaps a fence and we all know who will be paying for it.

Better yet, streamline the legal process for immigration into this country so they don’t have to do it illegally. “Better trade deals? You betcha and Donald can accomplish this one. However, we all know who will be paying for it. Relations with Russia? The talk of boosting our and their nuclear arsenals is just plain crazy talk. But demonstrating that America still has a backbone after the wimp-in-the-oval finally departs, will be paramount to future success. Yet, even backbone costs large sums of money and we all know who will pay for that. “ISIS? This one makes me triply glad that I am not sitting at the head of the table in the White House. “Godspeed President Trump. Please make us proud and pretty please don’t blow us up. After all, we have a lot of stuff to pay for.” M.J.F.

“Even before his first 100 days, he should release his tax information. There is no legal reason not to and this way we will be assured he’s always acting in the American people’s interests and not his own business interests. As Ronald Reagan said, ‘Trust but verify.’ “In his first 100 days, he should go on a diet. With all the stress, he needs to be healthy. “He needs to stop tweeting. A president needs more than the limits of a tweet to fully communicate with America and the world. “Get Mexico to pay for a real wall, not some lame ‘fence.’ He promised this. Now make it happen.”

513-268-1186 FOREST HILLS JOURNAL

A publication of

7700 Service Center Drive, West Chester, Ohio, 45069 phone: 248-8600 email: foresthills@communitypress.com web site: Cincinnati.com/communities

Forest Hills Journal Editor Richard Maloney rmaloney@communitypress.com, 248-7134 Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday See page A2 for additional contact information.

G.H.


JANUARY 11, 2017 • FOREST HILLS JOURNAL • 1B

SPORTS

FOREST HILLS

JOURNAL

Editor: Melanie Laughman, mlaughman@communitypress.com, 513-248-7573

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | RECREATIONAL

CommunityPress.com

PHOTOS BY ALEX VEHR FOR THE ENQUIRER

PHOTOS BY BRANDON SEVERN FOR THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Ellie Holt of Turpin works the Anderson defense on Jan. 7.

Teagan Vogel drives along the baseline for the Anderson Redskins, Jan. 7.

Turpin girls create early court confidence Adam Baum abaum@communitypress.com

ANDERSON TWP. - When Pete Hopewell took over this season as the head girls basketball coach at Turpin High School, he knew the Spartans had talent, but not even he expected his young team to put it together so quickly. Especially in an Eastern Cincinnati Conference that looks loaded this year. “We’re starting three sophomores and we lost a pretty high percentage of our scoring from last year,” Hopewell said. “I thought we had some talent, but I didn’t think things would come together as quick as they did with the kids. Which is just a testament to their work ethic and their basketball IQ.” Turpin has sprinted to a 9-2 start (6-1 in the ECC) and it’s largely been a product of team defense and shot selection. One of the things Hopewell was worried about going into the season was his team’s ability to defend as a team. “I was worried about the principles of our team defense,” he said. “Well, if you go and you look, we’re giving up the least amount of points in the league (36.7 per game) …

Natalie Dorsten of Anderson puts up a shot from under the basket Jan. 7.

that’s really clicked for us. We will defend you. “The other thing we do really well is we take really good shots. That hasn’t meant the greatest field goal percentage but we’ve taken a lot of good shots and our field goal percentage has steadily climbed and I think a lot of that’s based on our decision making. We don’t just throw it up there; I’m really impressed with the shot

McNick’s Ryan Belmont runs a play for the Rockets Jan. 6 against Badin.

Rockets bow to Badin

selection.” Seniors Kaitlyn Workman and Charlotte Kerregan have really set the pace for the Spartans. Workman, a guard, leads the team with 11.5 points, 2.6 assists and 1.4 steals per game. Hopewell said of Workman, “She’s the energizer bunny, always on the go. We ask her to do a lot for us. She’s handling the ball probably 90 percent of the time and defending the other team's top guard.” Kerregan, a 6-foot center, has been a difference-maker at both ends of the floor, averaging 10.2 points, 9.9 rebounds and 1.3 blocks per game. Her rebound total ranks second in the ECC. Hopewell called her impact “extremely beneficial” to what they’re trying to do offensively and defensively. Sophomore Ellie Holt has been Turpin’s third-leading scorer with 8.0 points per game, as has junior Savanna Hazenfield with 6.5 points a game. And sophomore Lindsey Viel, at 6-foot-1, gives the Spartans another big presence in the paint alongside Kerregan. But, the biggest surprise for Turpin has been 6-foot sophomore Elise Schulok

The McNicholas High School boys basketball team bowed to Badin 55-44 Friday, Jan. 6.

See TURPIN, Page 2B

Nathan Brunot scored for McNick.

McNick’s Cam Haynes scores against Badin Friday night.

SHORT HOPS Scott Springer and Adam Baum Community Press staff

Boys basketball » Summit Country Day defeated Winton Woods 51-39 on Jan. 3 as senior Sam Martin led with 17 points. » Walnut Hills beat Anderson 66-53 on Jan. 3. Senior Kenny Thompson led with 21 points. Walnut got by Milford 63-55 Jan. 6. Senior Malcolm Moffett had 17 points. » Miami Valley Christian Academy got by School for the Creative and Performing Arts 28-25 on Jan. 4. » Anderson topped Loveland 67-65 on Jan. 6. Jay Tiemeyer led all scorers with 30 points, while Jake Newton added 22 and Ben Sommer had 14. On Jan. 3, the Redskins lost to Walnut Hills 66-53. Sommer had 25 points in the loss. » Turpin topped Milford 52-47 on Jan. 3. Nick Haddad led the Spartans with 20 points off the bench. On Jan. 6, the Spartans lost to Kings 43-20. Haddad had 11 points.

Girls basketball » Walnut Hills defeated Loveland 59-

44 on Jan. 4. Kennedi Myles led the Lady Eagles with 27 points. » Michelle Lee scored her 1,000th career point in Miami Valley Christian Academy’s win over Oyler Jan. 6. » St. Ursula edged Highlands 47-41 on Jan. 3. Cate Massa led the Bulldogs off the bench with 12 points and six rebounds. Clara Morrissey added 10 points and 10 boards. On Dec. 30, St. Ursula beat Ross 47-26 behind a game-high 17 points from Riley Jerow. » Turpin bested Withrow 58-33 on Jan. 4 behind 16 points and 13 rebounds from senior Charlotte Kerregan. » Anderson fell to Glen Este 48-32 on Jan. 4. Natalie Dorsten led Anderson with 15 points and nine boards.

Boys swimming and diving » Mariemont 135, Summit Country Day 35 on Jan. 4. 200 MR–Mariemont 1:46.51; 200 free– Comer (M) 2:02.61; 200 IM–Seeger (M) 2:22.34; 50 free – Overbey (M) 24.69; 100 Fly – Mikesell (M) 58.61; 100 free – Comer (M) 54.13; 500 free – Mikesell (M) 5:17.87; 200 FR – Mariemont 1:41.79; 100 Back – Cox (M) 1:12.09; 100 Breast – Overbey (M) 1:11.99; 400 FR – Mariemont 3:35.98; 1 Me-

Boys bowling » Summit Country Day 1,785, Wyoming 1,715 on Jan. 3. High series: SCD– Sutkamp 314. W–Sinigaglia 305.

Running symposium

GEOFF BLANKENSHIP FOR THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Jackson Gear, top, of McNicholas works a first-round pin at 195 pounds against Norwood’s Noah Cook, Jan. 6.

ter–Schooler (M).

Girls swimming » Mariemont 115, Summit Country Day 70 on Jan. 4. 200MR–Mariemont 1:57.87; 200 free – Stanbauer (SCD) 2:11.71; 200 IM – Zaring (SCD) 2:18.01; 50 free – Dupre (M) 23.89; 100 Fly – Miller (SCD) 1:06.92; 100 free– Newman (M) 57.23; 500 free – Overbey (M) 5:28.57; 200 FR – Mariemont 1:46.33; 100 Back – Bonnell (M) 1:07.11; 100 Breast – Dupre (M) 1:07.87; 400 FR – Mariemont 3:55.16.

» Mercy Health Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine, Anderson, is hosting the 2017 Runner’s Symposium from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 14, at its office at 7575 Five Mile Road, Suite B, Cincinnati, OH 45230. Presented with Tri-State Running Co., the symposium invites running community members of all ages and experience levels to learn how to achieve their running goals, avoid injury and understand the importance of maintaining an active schedule. Experts will present running strategies based on evidence, best practices and experience that integrate anatomy, physiology and injury prevention and will also discuss when and how runners should reach out to professionals for help when they need it. The symposium will conclude with three interactive breakout sessions designed to have an immediate impact on participants’ runSee SHORT HOPS, Page 2B


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Turpin Continued from Page 1B

working her way into the starting lineup. “In the preseason, I initially just had (Schulok) dressing varsity,” said Hopewell. “A JV kid who would dress and maybe get a few minutes here and there. Our last few scrimmages she really started to stand out, particularly on the defensive end. She’s really long; a really smart defender. We’ve put her in almost every game on the opponent’s best offensive player whether it’s a big or a guard. She’s able to defend in the paint and out on the perimeter. She’s a weapon for us — not one that I saw in the summer.” Turpin’s been able to parlay

some confidence after a challenging first half of the season. Looking at its schedule, Turpin had a lot of its toughest games in the early part of the season. Getting through those games has left the Spartans believing in themselves. “Our schedule was pretty top heavy quick,” Hopewell said. “I think most people thought Glen Este and Walnut Hills (would be two of the ECC’s top teams) and we had them back-to-back in a week where we had three games. “We beat Glen Este at Glen Este in overtime and then we beat Walnut at our place in overtime. Two unbelievable games that we’d actually dug ourselves into a hole in both of them. I think we were down 12 to Glen Este and 13 to Walnut. “I think that week our girls kind of thought, ‘Wait a minute, maybe

we’re a little better than what we’re giving ourselves credit for.’ At least you know you’ve got a shot at this thing. We’ve tried to tame that down, with as young as we are, anybody that we play if we don’t bring our best, we’re gonna be in a dogfight. But I think if we defend the way we’re defending we can give ourselves a chance in every game.” There are plenty of things Hopewell said his team needs to clean up as they prepare for the second round of ECC competition. “I think things are wide open right now,” he said. “There’s a lot of really good teams (in the ECC) and I’m really impressed with the coaching.” Coming up, Turpin travels to Loveland Jan. 14, then hosts Sycamore Jan. 16 and Glen Este on Jan. 18.

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Retiring Turpin coach Stoll taught players about life Adam Turner prepsports@enquirer.com

After leading the Turpin Spartans to another undefeated regular season on the gridiron, Rob Stoll decided it was time to step down. The 15-year veteran head coach resigned on Monday. The winningest coach in program history, Stoll finishes with a record of 122-48. Seventeen of those losses came in Stoll’s first three seasons. He is responsible for more than half of all wins in Turpin football history. Stoll confirmed that he is not leaving for another coaching job. He just felt that it was time. He will remain in his position as history and social studies teacher at Turpin. “What a blessing it has been to be able to coach at Turpin the past 15 years,” said Stoll. The Spartans made the playoffs in nine of Stoll’s 15 seasons, including this year. The Spartans had undefeated regular seasons at the varsity, junior varsity, and freshman levels in 2016. The varsity run was snapped by eventual three-time state champion La Salle. The team finished ranked second in the final regular season AP Division II state poll. After disappointing back-to-back 4-6 seasons, the Spartans won 21 games over the past two years. Turpin won the outright ECC title this season. He was named the ECC Coach of the Year in 2012, 2015, and 2016. His influence has been felt throughout the athletic department at Turpin. An avid proponent of weightlifting, Stoll has directly impacted the conditioning of student-athletes. “Coach Stoll has had a tremendous impact on the Turpin community. Rob is a great football coach, but an even better person. He is a true example of what a leader and a mentor should be,” said Turpin athletic director Eric Fry. “He is the most humble, calculated, and thoughtful coach that I have ever encountered during my time in athletics. His teams were prepared, his teams were tough, and his players wanted to perform for him. Coach Stoll has always gotten the best from his athletes, but what he teaches them about brotherhood, unity, and how to act as gentlemen are life lessons that our football players take with them once they leave.” Under Stoll’s guidance, the Spartans sent dozens

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ning success. Keynote speakers include: » Laurah Lukin, assistant dean and professor of medical education at the University of Cincinnati and an athlete and coach who works to inspire an active lifestyle and encourage other women to be engaged in their own health. Dr. Lukin has participated as an elite athlete in numerous road races, marathons and triathlons including Ironman 70.3

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FILE PHOTO

Turpin High School head football coach Rob Stoll announced his retirement after an undefeated regular season in 2016.

of players to the college ranks. Senior running back Luke Bohenek will play for Air Force next year. Andy Cruse played for Miami University, then played in the NFL and AFL. He followed Stoll’s footsteps into teaching and coaching and spent 2015 on the Spartans staff. “He is a great man. He has been so dedicated to the game of football over the years. He focused on teaching his players more than just football and taught them a lot about life,” said Cruse, now the receivers coach at Moeller. Before Turpin, Stoll was an assistant at Beechwood and Indian Hill. He shaped much of his coaching philosophy from his mentor at Beechwood, Mike Yeagle. During Stoll’s five seasons on Yeagle’s staff in the ‘90s, the Tigers won four Kentucky state championships. In addition to earning the respect of his players and assistants, Stoll earned the respect of his competitors. He restored the Forest Hills rivalry with Anderson and turned the tide in favor of the Spartans. Nearly every individual and team record in the Spartans’ record books was set during Stoll’s tenure. In his 15 years, the Spartans posted 12 nonlosing seasons and won at least a share of six conference championships. Three of his teams—2006, 2007, and 2012—share the school record for singleseason victories. “He is a great coach to play for because he always wanted your best,” said Cruse. “Personally, I left Turpin a better man because of Coach Stoll.” The search for his replacement is underway. Whoever earns the position will inherit a program defined by hard work and success, thanks to Stoll.

SHORT HOPS World Championships. » Harvey Sweetland Lewis, an American ultrarunner, social studies and economics teacher, world traveler and public speaker who won the Badwater Ultramarathon near Death Valley, California, in July 2014 in just under 23 hours and 53 minutes. Lewis is one of the most popular local, ultra-marathoners. To register, click here or visit www.tristate running.com/Runners_ Symposium.html. Tickets are $20, $15 for students.


LIFE

CE-0000666897

JANUARY 11, 2017 • FOREST HILLS JOURNAL • 3B


LIFE

4B • FOREST HILLS JOURNAL • JANUARY 11, 2017

BRIEFLY Dance team clinic Jan. 16 The Anderson High School will host a Martin Luther King Day dance clinic for first-graders thriugh eighth-graders. Attendees can learn a hip hop/ jazz routine to be performed with the dance team during halftime of the halftime of theboys varsity basketball game vs. Harrison, Tuesday, Jan. 17. The clinic is 9 a.m. to noon Monday, Jan. 16, at the Anderson High School gymnasium,, with registration beginnign at 8:30 a.m. Pre-registration is not necessary. Cost is $25; cash or checks made out to AHS Boosters/Dance Team This is not a school-sponsored event. Participation in this event is not mandatory.

Barn presents first film in its 2017 Artflix season: ‘Art and Craft’ Art expert and teacher Dave Laug of Terrace Park will host a relaxing and educational evening of film and discussion at The Barn in Mariemont on Thursday, Jan. 12. “Art and Craft,” (a documatary) is a about one of the most

prolific art forgers, Mark Landis, in U.S. history. The 130-minute feature, which was nominated for the News and Documentary Emmy Award for Outstanding Arts and Cultural Programming in 2014, is free and open to the public. Drinks and snacks are available at no cost. BYOB. By hosting a monthly film,the Barn hopes to expand its vision for promotion of the arts, as well as provide a sense of community among its enthusiasts, according to Laug. The January event is the first of a series of classic films at The Barn running through June. They include “Basquiat, “Georgia O’Keefe,” “Gaugin: The Full Story,” “Frida” and “Local Color.” Laug, a member of the Board of Directors for The Barn, will present each movie on the second Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. Doors open at 6:30 p.m.

Patriot Center band schedule The Patriot Center, 6660 Clough Pike, has released its 2017 winter-spring schedule of bands: Jan. 14 - The Remains Band. Jan. 28 - The Last Caballeros. Feb. 11 - Celebrate Valentines

Day with The Cincy Rockers. Feb. 25 - The Slow Burn Band. March 18 - A St. Patrick’s Day Dance brings back The Cincy Rockers. April 1 - April Fools Day Dance. April 15 - The Last Caballeros. April 29 - The Slow Burn Band. May 13 - Spring fling dance with music provided by The Cincy Rockers. All of the dances will be from 8 p.m. to 11 p.m., with doors opening at 7 p.m. Reservations are recommended as many of the dances sell out in advance. The tickets for all of the above band/dance events continue to be $10 per person, in advance, and include an evening of dancing, table snacks, and a full service cash bar available for your beverage desires. Since this is a license permit premise, no beverages of any kind may be brought in, and you must be 21 years of age to attend. Should there still be any available tickets on the evening of the event, they will be $12.50 each at the door. Tickets are available on-line by visiting the Anderson Post 318 website at www.post318.org.

THANKS TO AMY SULLIVAN

Bett Kooris, Pam Shooner, Ann Barfels and Karen Zaugg rehearse a scene from “Mornings at Seven” at Walton Creek Theater.

Mariemont Players present ‘Mornings at Seven’

RELIGION Episcopal Church of the Redeemer The upcoming Music in the Chapel season, directed by Dr. L. Brett Scott, director of music, Episcopal Church of the Redeemer, and associate professor of ensembles and conducting, College-Conservatory of Music, University of Cincinnati is scheduled as follows: » 2 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 22 – Jazz, American song book and Latin styles of Brazil. Featuring the Bobby Sharp Trio, Dan Karlsberg on keyboard, vocalist Jennifer Ellis, flutist and saxophone player Sandy Suskind and Bobby Sharp on the drums. » 7:30 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 26 – Musikalische Exequien and Heinrich Schutz. Featuring

the CCM Collegium Vocale and Matthew Swanson. » 2 p.m. Sunday, March 19 – “Job for Organ” by Petr Eben. Featuring Ted Gibboney and a narrator. Concert series is open to the public. Donations of $10 are suggested. The church is at 2944 Erie Ave., Cincinnati; 321-6700; www.redeemercincy.org.

Jesuit Spiritual Center The first of a four-part series called “Spiritual Conversations for Women in the Ignatian Tradition” begins Thursday, Jan. 19, and includes time for input, reflection, faith sharing and journaling.. This year’s theme is “Living in the Moment: An Igna-

Wednesday Bible Study & Kids Program ~ 7pm Nursery provided for all Services CE-0000664031

BATAVIA BAPTIST TEMPLE

770 South Riverside, Batavia OH 45103 Raymond D. Jones, Pastor

732-2739

7341 Beechmont Avenue (Near Five Mile Road) Email: csandersontownship@gmail.com

2 Traditional Worship Services in our Newly Renovated Sanctuary TRADITIONAL WORSHIP SUNDAY Sunday8:158:30 & 11 am & 11:00

231-1020 christiansciencecincinnati.com

Sunday Service & Sunday School 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Testimonial Meeting 7:30 p.m. In Church Reading Rm/Bookstore Open after all services. Downtown Reading Rm/Bookstore 412 Vine Street, Cincinnati Open Monday - Friday 10 a.m. - 3 p.m.

3 Contemporary Worship Services CONTEMPORARY WORSHIP in our Contemporary Worship Center SATURDAY9:30 & SUNDAY Sunday 11 am 5:30

9:30 & 11:00

Children’s programs and nursery & toddler care available at 9:30 and 11:00 services. Plenty of Parking behind church.

7515 Forest Road Cincinnati, OH 45255 513-231-4172 • www.andersonhillsumc.org

Sunday School 10am; Morning Worship 11am; Sunday Evening Service 6pm; Reaching the Heart of Clermont County

GLEN ESTE CHURCH OF CHRIST 937 Old State Route 74 (Behind Meijer) 513-753-8223 www.gecc.net

Sunday Worship: 8:30 & 10:30am Bible Study: 9:30am & 6:00pm Youth Groups: 6:00pm

Community HU Song

2nd Sunday, 10:00 - 10:30 am

Everyone is welcome! Weekend Worship Saturday: 5 p.m. Sunday: 9 & 10:30 a.m.

ECK Worship Service 11:00 am - Noon Second Sunday of Each Month Anderson Center Station 7832 Five Mile Road Cincinnati, OH 45230 1-800-891-7713 EckankarOhio.org Worldwide 1-800 LOVE GOD ECKANKAR.org

SUNDAY: Sunday School (all ages) Worship Service Children’s Worship (Age 4 - 5th Grade) Evening Activities for Children, Youth, & Adults Handicapped Accessible

9:30 am 10:30 am

6:00 pm

MONDAY: Ladies’ Bible Study/Prayer Group

10:00 am

WEDNESDAY: Choir Youth Group (Grades 6-12) Children (Age 4 - 5th Gr.)

6:30 pm 6:30 pm 6:30 pm

S. Charity & E. Water Streets Bethel, Ohio 45106 - 513-734-4204 Office: M-F 10:00 am - 2:00 pm E-mail: bethelnazarenechurch@gmail.com www.facebook.com/BNC4me

Wednesday Eve. Prayer Service & Bible Study, 7:00pm

Experience the Light and Sound of God You are invited to the

Scott Wade, Senior Pastor Chris Shallenberger, Youth & Connections Pastor Amber Davies, Children’s Pastor Dale Noel, Congregational Care Pastor Lana Wade, Worship Director

Nursery, Children’s & Youth available 6635 Loveland-Miamiville Rd. Loveland, OH 45140 513.677.9866 • www.epiphanyumc.org

GOSHEN UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

CE-0000663973

513-474-3884 www.forestvillebaptist.com Sunday Services: Discovery Groups ~ 10am Morning Service ~ 11am Evening Service ~ 6pm Youth Group ~ 6pm

Religion news is published at no charge on a space-available basis. E-mail announcements to areeves@communitypress.com.

First Church of Christ, Scientist, Anderson Township

CE-0000664026

(Across from Anderson Post Office)

About religion

EMAIL: cin-classifieds@enquirer.com CALL: 513.768.8184 or 513.768.8189 TO PLACE YOUR AD

DIRECTORY

Forestville Baptist Church 1311 Nagel Rd

tian Experience.” The evening is conducted in the Loyola Building, and begins with dinner at 6 p.m., followed by the program from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. The cost is $25 for dinner and program. To register, call 248-3500, ext. 10, or e-mail reservations @jesuitspiritualcenter.com by Jan. 13. The center is at 5361 S. Milford Road, Milford; www.jesuitspiritualcenter.com

Saint Mary Church, Bethel 3398 Ohio SR 125 Phone 734-4041 Rev. Michael Leshney, Pastor Saturday Mass – 4:00 PM Sunday Mass – 10:30 AM ccc.city

CLOUGH PIKE BAPTIST CHURCH 1025 CLOUGH PIKE

Sunday School 9:30am Morning Worship 10:45am AWANA Ministry Wednesday 6:45 - 8:15pm Bible Study 7:00 - 8:00pm Youth grades 6-12 7:00 - 8:00pm Nursery provided for all services

www.cloughpike.com

752-3521

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513-722-2541

Come, connect, grow & serve

TO PLACE AN AD:

513.768.8400

Sunday Worship: 9:00 & 10:15 AM with

Childrens Ministry & Nursery PASTOR MARIE SMITH

www.cloughchurch.org

CE-0000664151

2010 Wolfangel Rd., Anderson Twp. 513-231-4301

Sunday School - 9:30 a.m. Worship Service - 10:30 a.m. GUM Youth - 5:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m. Every Sunday: 6 - 12th grades JR. GUMY - 5:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m. 2nd Sunday of month: 3rd - 5th grades Email: goshenumc@fuse.net Follow us on

TO PLACE AN AD: 513.768.8400

Mariemont Players presents “Mornings at Seven,” a comedy by Paul Osborn at the Walton Creek Theater, 4101 Walton Creek Road (just east of Mariemont), throgh Jan. 22. A charming, heartwarming comedy about four sisters and their three husbands who live in close proximity to each other, “Mornings at Seven” centers around Homer, one of the sister’s 40 year-old son, bringing a girl to dinner. Will this lead to a proposal and, if so, how will it affect the lives and future plans of the sisters and their husbands? “Mornings at Seven” is directed by Dennis Murphy and features the talents of Arny Stoller, Bett Kooris, Pamela

Shooner, Ann Barfels, Art Kibby, Doug Tumeo, Richelle Rose, Karen Zaugg and Harold Murphy. Performances will be: 8 p.m. Friday, Jan. 6; 8 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 7; 2 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 8; 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 12; 8 p.m. Friday, Jan. 13; 8 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 14; 2 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 15; 7 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 15; 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 19; 8 p.m. Friday, Jan. 20; 3 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 21; 8 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 21; 2 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 22. To order tickets for “Mornings at Seven,” calll Betsy at 513-684-1236 or order online at www.mariemontplayers.com. All seats are reserved and $20 each. For more information, contact Dan at maloneykd@gmail.com.

Cleanest county kitchens in third quarter When selecting a place to dine, how do you know if the facility implements proper sanitation and food safety practices? One way is to tour the kitchen, which is usually not practical for diners. Another is to view inspection reports prior to venturing out. A third and perhaps faster method is to look for a Hamilton County Public Health Clean Kitchen Award. Has the facility received the award and if not, why, are fair questions for management. “The Hamilton County Public Health Clean Kitchen Award represents the gold standard in maintaining safe food service operations,” Kesterman adds. “The award is not easy to receive. When you see one on display, it points to an operator that takes the responsibility very seriously. When choosing a place to eat, make sanitation a priority. You can view inspection data for all food service facilities and listings for all Clean Kitchen Award winners

on the Hamilton County Public Health website at www.HCPH.org. The Clean Kitchen Award reflects inspection data from the previous two years and is not necessarily indicative of current conditions. The requirements for receiving a Clean Kitchen Award are stringent. To be considered, facilities must: » have three or fewer violations in the previous two years prior to applying; » have no “critical” or repeat violations in the previous two years; » maintain at least two staff members with Level I Food Handler certification or at least one staff member with a current ServSafe certificate; » submit applications along with corresponding documentation; » have a minimum of two years of inspection data on file with Hamilton County Public Health. Winning operators for the third quarter: Stump’s Boat Club, 1 Stumps Lane, Terrace Park.


LIFE

JANUARY 11, 2017 • FOREST HILLS JOURNAL • 5B

Sorry, Old Man Winter... We have Gilkey Windows!

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LIFE

6B • FOREST HILLS JOURNAL • JANUARY 11, 2017

Lip sync battle raises funds for CCDD The Clermont County Board of Developmental Disabilities hosted a Lip Sync Battle at Paradise Pavilion inside Jungle Jim’s Eastgate. Five acts performed, raising $3,500 for the Clermont DD Empowers Me non-profit board, and showing the audience that you can have fun while raising funds for a local cause. Jeff Weir, superintendent of the Clermont County Educational Service Center and vice president of the Clermont DD Empowers Me Board, was the master of ceremonies. Audience members enjoyed games with Weir before the Lip Sync Battle. Although the audience was give one free vote, they wereallowed to buy votes for $1 each. Votes were also sold by performers up to two weeks prior to the event. All proceeds from ticket sales, voting and raffle tickets were given to the

Clermont DD Empowers Me Board for the Gift of Time Respite Cooperative. This cooperative assists families of children and adults who have disabilities in hosting two structured days per month at a Clermont DD facility, while family members can take care of other needs and know their child/adult is being cared for. Jana Beal of Park National Bank and Monika Royal-Fischer of UC Clermont performed as the Hip Hop Cupcakes. They are both members of the Clermont Chamber’s LEAD Clermont class and raised l money for Clermont DD by askingfellow class members to vote on their song choice to perform. The song that won was “Ice Ice Baby,” which they performed at the Lip Sync Battle. The second act was Got That Rite, made of up three Masons who were representing the

PROVIDED

CCDD Lip Sync Battle performers are, from left: seated or kneeling, David Limbacher, Heather Frye, Julie Wood, Brad Toft and Daniel Banium; standing, Liz Ottke, Dan Ottke, Don Bock, Jana Beal, Monika Royal-Fischer, Amy Brewer, Heather Krenwinkel and Jack Lennon.

Valley of Cincinnati Scottish Rite. Brad Toft, Clermont DD Empowers Me Board Member, and his friends Daniel Bainum and Jack Lennon performed “Man of Constant Sorrow” from the movie

“O Brother Where Art Thou.” Beards, hats, and overalls were required for their costume. Don Bock, the owner of Minuteman Press, stepped out of his shell to sell votes for his perfor-

mance, which was Madonna’s “Like a Virgin.” His costume was complete with wig, wedding veil, and lots of makeup. “It Takes a Village” was a group effort made up of several local celeb-

rities. Heather Frye from the Clermont Chamber of Commerce led the group, which performed “YMCA” by the Village People. David Limbacher of TQL joined her, along with Amy Brewer of the City of Milford, Heather Krenwinkel of the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities, and Julie Wood, Clermont DD Empowers Me board president. The Awkward Ottkes was a duo made up of CCDD Superintendent Dan Ottke and his wife, Liz. Their performance won the competition with “What Does the Fox Say.” Sponsors were Ohio Valley Goodwill Industries and Park National Bank. The event was presented by Paradise Pavilion with food by Eastgate Brew and View. For information on the 2017 Lip Sync Battle, contact Suzanne Diesel, Clermont DD fundraiser, at 513-732-5028 or sdiesel @clermontdd.org.

15 years of hope delivering more than $1 million in aid The Aubrey Rose Foundation has been helping struggling families all over Greater Cincinnati and the US since 2001. Their mission is, and always has been, to help families that are caring for medically- fragile children suffering from life-threatening illnesses, while maintain-

ing a focus on family unity. The 100 percent volunteer driven non-profit organization was founded in memory of Aubrey Rose Hollenkamp, who passed away suddenly in 2000, just before her third birthday. Aubrey’s parents, Jerry and Nancy Hollenkamp, started the foundation in Au-

brey’s honor and to carry on her spirit. “Aubrey was always a very happy baby, throughout everything she endured, and she smiled continuously. She brought a great light into the world…we wanted to pass that light along.” Jerry Hollenkamp, Aubrey Rose Foundation founder

PROVIDED

2016 ARF “Doctor of the Year” award winners, from left: Dr. Ilias Illiopoulos, Dr. Marc Richardson, Dr. Paul Rupp, Dr. Stephanie Ware and Dr. Kenneth Zwergel.

ASSISTED LIVING 8 MEMORY CA CARE INDEPENDENT LIVING

On Nov. 11, the Aubrey Rose Foundation celebrated 15 years of giving back during their annual “Let’s Dance for the Heart of It!” An Evening in Paris celebration at the Hilton Cincinnati Netherland Plaza. More than 500 Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentuckians joined the foun-

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COME SEE US TODAY! Simply Phone Us: 513-583-5170

dation’s board and volunteers. The foundation also honored fivea pediatric care physicians that were of the many nominatedfor the foundation’s prestigious “Doctor of the Year” award, with one being honored as “Above & Beyond” in pediatric care excel-

lence. The 2016 Aubrey Rose Foundation Doctor of the Year Award Winners were: Dr. Ilias Illiopoulos (Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center) Dr. Marc Richardson (Pediatric Associates, Fairfield) Dr. Paul Rupp (Mercy Health) Dr. Stephanie Ware (Indiana University Medical Center – Genetics) Dr. Kenneth Zwergel (Tri Health Pediatrics) Dr. Paul Rupp was named “Above and Beyond” in his field. To date, the Aubrey Rose Foundation has gifted well more than $1 million to those in need. To learn more about the Aubrey Rose Foundation, visit www.aubreyrose.org.

22/3

COLUMBIA TUSCULUM 3450 Golden Ave.: $300,500; Dec. 19.

HYDE PARK 4138 Allendale Drive: $215,000; Dec. 16. 3664 Ashworth Drive: $149,900; Dec. 21. 3574 Burch Ave.: $365,000; Dec. 20. 3315 Menlo Ave.: $200,000; Dec. 22. 1292 Michigan Ave.: $215,000; Dec. 19. 3311 Monteith Ave.: $290,000; Dec. 16.

2861 Observatory Ave.: $421,500; Dec. 22. 3616 Parkline Ave.: $259,500; Dec. 19. 3615 Shaw Ave.: $320,000; Dec. 21. 3522 Vista Ave.: $399,900; Dec. 21.

LINWOOD 4584 Eastern Ave.: $60,770; Dec. 20. 4588 Eastern Ave.: $60,770; Dec. 20. 4598 Eastern Ave.: $60,770; Dec. 20.

MADISONVILLE 6008 Dahlgren St.: $687,500; Dec. 21. 5522 Madison Road: $650,000; Dec. 22. 5524 Madison Road: $650,000; Dec. 22. 5540 Madison Road: $650,000; Dec. 22. 5019 Stewart Ave.: $650,000; Dec. 22. 5023 Stewart Ave.: $650,000; Dec. 22. 5027 Stewart Ave.: $650,000; Dec. 22. 5113 Stewart Ave.: $650,000; Dec. 22. 5516-6020 Whetsel Ave.: $687,500; Dec. 21.

MARIEMONT 3900 West St.: $1,075,000; Dec. 19.

540 Delta Ave.: $285,000; Dec. 22. 766 Delta Ave.: $60,000; Dec. 20. 1221 Halpin Ave.: $490,000; Dec. 19. 3119 Lookout Circle: $428,000; Dec. 20. 624 Rushton Road: $185,000; Dec. 21.

MOUNT WASHINGTON 1550 Brandon Ave.: $149,000; Dec. 22. 1536 Burney Lane: $95,000; Dec. 22. 6059 Colter Ave.: $94,900; Dec. 19. 1299 Mayland Drive: $237,500; Dec. 21. 1924 Sutton Ave.: $160,000; Dec. 21. 6020 Virbet Drive: $145,000; Dec. 16.

NEWTOWN 6702 Crull St.: $12,000; Dec. 22.

OAKLEY 4226 Brownway Ave.: $327,300; Dec. 21. 2738 Madison Road: $225,000; Dec. 19. 3557 Madison Park Ave.: $247,500; Dec. 21. 3843 Mount Vernon Ave.: $147,537; Dec. 22. 3913 Oakpark Place: $185,000; Dec. 21. 3335 Sterling Way: $146,222; Dec. 20.

MOUNT LOOKOUT

TERRACE PARK

3456 Arnold St.: $350,000; Dec. 16. 1355 Custer St.: $725,000; Dec. 20.

101 Fieldstone Drive: $275,000; Dec. 19.


LIFE

JANUARY 11, 2017 • FOREST HILLS JOURNAL • 7B

Contact lenses may be easier to buy, thanks to FTC rule Demand for venient refills. contact lenses Many people have has been growing switched from over the past one-year lenses to decade and there daily disposable are more places lenses. than ever for Prices for lensconsumers to es can vary wideshop for them. A Howard ly, but without a Federal Trade Ain prescription it’s Commission inhard for consumHEY HOWARD! vestigation found ers to shop around many consumers are not for the best price, serable to take advantage vice and convenience. of all that competition In fact, without the because of actions taken pressure of comparison by some lens prescribshopping, the FTC says ers. retail sellers are less The FTC is proposing likely to compete on a rule amendment to price. make sure patients reThe FTC says the ceive a copy of the conContact Lens Rule tact lens prescription makes manufacturers once the contact lens more likely to develop a fitting is completed. range of products that The proposed amendconsumers want and can ment requires lens preafford. It says there’s scribers to get a signed also a health and safety acknowledgment from risk to less competition. the patient after provid“When replacement ing a copy of the prelenses and other prodscription. The prescribucts are too expensive er would have to keep a or difficult to obtain, copy of the signed acmore people tend to knowledgment for at over-use their old lenses least three years. and solutions in ways The Commission that can lead to eye insays, based on evidence fections,” the FTC says. reviewed by its staff, The FTC says it is too many prescribers seeking comments on its have failed to follow the proposed rule amendlaw and provide porment and will have more table prescriptions. It information on it in the says more than 40 milcoming months. In the lion U.S. consumers can meantime, it’s important benefit from contact to remember the Conlens competition. tact Lens Rule in effect Consumers can get now does require pretheir contact lenses scribers to give you a in-person, from eye-care written copy of your providers, optical prescription so you can chains, wholesale clubs, take it and shop around. and online as well. This Howard Ain appears rule makes sure conas the Troubleshooter on sumers have the option WKRC-TV Local 12 to shop around for betNews. Email him at hey ter prices or more conhoward@local12.com.

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One More Thing POLICE REPORTS ANDERSON TOWNSHIP Incidents/investigations Domestic violence Female attacked/struck at 8200 block of Riovista Drive, Dec. 12. Identity fraud Credit card/victims name at 7900 block of Meadowcreek Drive, Dec. 14. Theft Left without paying at 7400 block of Beechmont Ave., Dec. 19. Miscellaneous $85 at 7400 block of Beechmont Ave., Dec. 17. Miscellaneous $492 at 7400 block of Beechmont Ave., Dec. 12. Left without paying at 7400 block of Beechmont Ave., Dec. 16. Bag missing at 7400 block of Beechmont Ave., Dec. 14. Left without paying at 7400 block of Beechmont Ave., Dec. 13. $298/purse at 7400 block of Beechmont Ave., Dec. 13. Miscellaneous $116 at 7400 block of Beechmont Ave., Dec. 11. Left without paying at 7500 block of Beechmont Ave., Dec. 12. Miscellaneous $248 at 7400 block of Beechmont Ave., Dec. 11.

ABOUT POLICE REPORTS Community Press publishes incident records provided by local police departments. All reports published are public records. To contact your local police department, call: » Anderson Township, Hamilton County Sheriff's Office, District 5, 8252280 » Cincinnati District 2, California and Mount Washington, 979-4400 » Newtown, 561-7697 or 825-2280

FAIRFAX INCIDENTS/ INVESTIGATIONS

COLUMBIA TOWNSHIP

Fraud Check $800 at 5800 block of Wooster Road, Dec. 12. Theft Miscellaneous $19 at 4000 block of Red Bank Road, Dec. 12. Miscellaneous $181 at 4000 block of Red Bank Road, Dec. 13.

Incidents/investigations

MARIEMONT

Assault Reported at 4200 block of Plainville Road, Nov. 20. Theft Items removed from 8200 block of Ridge Ave., Nov. 22.

Incidents/investigations Drug abuse Property found at 6900 block of Wooster Pike, Dec. 13.

Some parts of the evaluation include the use of a familiar voice, so if you are married, please bring your spouse with you. Call us today to confirm your appointment time!

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LIFE

8B • FOREST HILLS JOURNAL • JANUARY 11, 2017

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE

ANSWERS ON PAGE 6A

No. 0108 THE DOWNSIZING OF NATHANIEL AMES

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Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 4,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year).

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91 Nickname for Louise 93 Feast 94 Sail support 95 In unison 97 Echo effect 99 El operator in the Windy City, briefly 100 Hat for pop singer Corey? 103 Anthem contraction 104 “Uhh …” 105 Show what you know, say 107 “In all probability” 109 Regular 111 Obstinate one, astrologically 112 Two-time Best Actor winner arriving early? 115 Four-star rank: Abbr. 116 Monopoly purchase 117 Singer/songwriter Laura 118 Little foxes 119 Slump 120 ____ cosa (something else: Sp.) 121 Wanders (about) 122 They begin in juin DOWN

1 Original airer of “The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy” 2 Pop competition 3 Something smoked by comic Chris? 4 Hang on to 5 Org. against doping

ort No mf

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RELEASE DATE: 1/15/2017

29 1950s prez 31 “Charlie Hustle is my name/I am banned from Hall of Fame,” e.g.? 33 Fist bump 34 “Yes, ____!” 36 Put a coat on 37 “Eureka!” moments 40 Press

42 Cloth colorist 43 Feature of Africa 44 ____ oil 46 Televangelist Joel 48 Alternative to “News” and “Maps” in a Google search 50 Road restriction 51 Pugnacious Olympian 53 Relative of a ferret 54 Cold and wet 55 F.B.I.’s div. 56 Hoopster Steph not playing at home? 60 Riffraff 62 Japanese watchmaker 64 Like Granny Smith apples 65 Endless chore 66 Dickens’s Uriah 68 Sega Genesis competitor, in brief 69 Radiant 71 Intersect 73 The sport of boxing in the 1960s and ’70s, essentially? 75 “Nothing to write home about” 76 Groups with co-pays, briefly 78 Jockey strap 80 “Star Trek: T.N.G.” role 81 Installment 83 Personalized gifts for music lovers 85 Valet in P. G. Wodehouse stories 89 Contemporary hybrid music genre 90 Sots’ sounds

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72 Arm muscle, informally 58 Underhanded use 73 ____ drop of someone else’s 74 Miney follower domain name 77 “Idomeneo” 59 Troubles composer 61 Cherry for talk show 79 “All My ____ Live host Chelsea? in Texas” 63 Glimpsed 82 U.N.C. student 67 Forswear 83 Figure at the center 70 Genius of a maze 57 Imprisoned

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84 Tahoe, for one 86 Entourage of a 1990s white rapper? 87 Musical intermission 88 Continuous 90 Flamboyantly successful sort 92 Trampolinist’s wear 96 Start to -scope 97 Cincinnati squad 98 Dude, in British lingo

101 Smallish batteries 102 Long spear 105 Makes “it” 106 Zone 108 “Dark Sky Island” singer 110 Drink sometimes served hot 113 “Snowden” org. 114 ____, cuatro, seis, ocho …

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6 Spindly limbed 7 Shakespeare villain 8 Photo of Canada’s former prime minister Stephen? 9 “Stay ____” 10 Aardvarks, by another name 11 Enter surreptitiously 12 Press lightly, as the brakes 13 He was buried in 1915 and died in 1926 14 Dressage gait 15 Invoice figs. 18 ____ lily 19 Fulminating 21 Dwarf planet more massive than Pluto 22 Atypical 23 Summer hrs. in Phila. 27 Literary device used to address plot inconsistencies 30 Nephrologists study them 32 Spies, informally 35 M.L.K.’s title: Abbr. 38 “Today” personality 39 Shark’s home 41 Close by 43 Egg producer 45 Arctic fliers 47 Blow it 49 Like a handyman’s projects, for short 50 “Anything! Anything at all!” 52 Shade of pink 54 Sword fight, e.g. 56 Filament sites, in botany

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Classifieds

JANUARY 11, 2017 µ EAST - COMMUNITY µ 1C

cincinnati.com

JOBS

PETS & STUFF

RIDES

HOMES

To place your ad visit: cincinnati.com/classifieds or search: classifieds

Real Estate

great places to live...

Kenndey Hgts/Silverton Beautiful Hardwood flrs, liv rm, din. rm, eat-in kit., 2BR, c/a, enclosed porch, Fplace, ceilings fans, no pets., $875/mo + dep. 513-984-3070

Real Estate Clinton County Community Action is accepting applications for Blanchester Senior Villas which is housing for individuals 55+. The complex is located off of Pansy Pike at 100 Madalyn Loftin Drive in Blanchester, Ohio T he units consist of two bedrooms, two baths, microwave, oven, refrigerator and dishwasher and an attached garage. The rent is $525 per month and includes water, trash and sewage. The complex also has a community room for resident use which includes exercise equipment, computers, pool table and big screen television. The property also has a shelter house for resident use. Income Limit for Household of 1 is $25,680 Income Limit for Household of 2 is $29,340 Interested individuals, should contact Jane or Carol at 937-382-8886, OH TDD 800-750-0750 or visit our website at clintoncap.org “This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer”

AMELIA: 1BR, All Utilities furnished. No pets. $575/mo. 513-797-8474 FELICITY Garrison Place Senior Apts. 62 and over, Rent Subsidized Free Utilities, Secure Building On-site laundry Pets Allowed 513-876-3590 TTY 800-750-0750 EHO LOVELAND-2BR+GAR, 55 & OVER, SECURE QUIET NEWER BLDG, 1,100 SQ FT, LRG ROOMS, DECK, VERY NICE!, $875. 513-891-0623 MILFORD- SEM Villa Rent subsidized. Voted Best of the East Senior apts. 55 + older Newly renovated apts. Secure building. Service Coordinator Visiting physicians. 513-831-3262 tty 1-800-750-0750

Milford Village Spacious, 1BR, updated, redecorated, quiet, clean, ht/wtr pd, wooded setting, walk to stores, $695. 513-519-8512

Homes starting fresh... Brick Apt Bldg, 2 Apts & Commercial Space., May be converted in to 4 apts. 504 Nowlin Ave, Greendale, IN, $178,500. 812-537-2956, No Realtor Solicitations please

Careers

Jobs new beginnings...

Former Pre-School Teacher will provide child care in my home. Infant to 5 years. Blue Ash area, 513-518-2202

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT

Westwood psychiatrist seeking part-time administrative assistant with flexible availability. Rate of pay is highly competitive and negotiable. Email resume to keggerman@fuse.net DEUFOL Industrial Crating, Warehousing, Logistics Sales, and Business Leader The main purpose of this position is to introduce Deufol in the US market, interact with major industrial, manufacturing and engineered products clients to establish business opportunities and then to work with Deufol to meet the demand within existing sites or by expansion through greenfield or acquisition growth. 10+ years of Industrial Packaging, Warehousing and/or Supply Chain experience. Experience in designing, developing, and delivering technical demonstrations of software solutions, with understanding of existing prospect / client infrastructure, current and future needs, motivation, and timelines. Possess top sales skills as well as modern operational and management skills in industrial export packaging, warehousing and logistics. Demonstrate exemplary verbal and written communication, and presentation skills; ability to tailor communications for technical and non-technical audiences. Strong command presence for both internal and external stakeholders. Qualified candidate send resume to: amber.haas@deufol.com or Mail to 924 S Meridian St. Sunman, In 47041

Batavia2 BR, 1.5 BA, eqpt kit, LR w/WBFP & cathedral ceil, balc, w/d hkup, water furn. $675-7250 + dep. 513-658-5766, 513-831-5959

Attn: Amber Haas No Phone Calls Please

Destin, FL, Gulf front, 2BR, Condo Rentals, in Beautiful Destin, Local owner. 513-528-9800 Office., 513-752-1735 H

Halperns Steak and Seafood

EASTGATE Area- 2&3 BR, 2.5 BA, bsmt or gar, Milford Schs or W. Clermont Schs. 2BR -$950/mo. 3BR,$1195/mo. 513-752-2888

EASTGATE NR 275. Spacious 2BR, 2BA, walk-in closets, W/D hkup, Cath. ceil., Balc., storage, $725; 513-943-7800

Experienced Meat Cutters Needed - Apply at Halperns Steak & Seafood 13151 Apex Dr. Walton, KY

LIBRARIAN Indian Hill Historical Society Hours are flexible 10 hours per week

Please call 891-1873 or Email: ihhist@cinci.rr.com

Homes for Sale-Ohio

Homes for Sale-Ohio

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968 which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, national origin, handicap or familial status or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newpaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Kentucky Commission on Human Rights 800-292-5566 H.O.M.E. (Housing Opportunities Made Equal) 513-721-4663

OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY - EFNEP PROGRAM SPECIALIST EFNEP Program Specialist – Ohio State University – Job Number 423566 Program Specialist will implement and manage the components of the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) in Hamilton County, Located in Cincinnati, Ohio. Provide functional and administrative supervision over paraprofessional and support EFNEP staff; work with the EFNEP Program Director and County Extension Director to supervise core responsibilities of EFNEP Program Assistants. MS/MA degree in Nutrition, Family and Consumer Sciences, Public Health, or Education is required, or an equivalent combination of education and experience; experience in program planning and administration. OSU is an EEO employer. Applications/Resumes are due by January 15, 2017. Quick Link: http://www.jobsatosu.com/postings/74819

PRODUCTION ASSOCIATES NEEDED Honda Manufacturing of Indiana APPLY NOW AT:

Indiana.Honda.com/Job-Opportunities PROSPECTIVE APPLICANTS SHOULD:

Mechanic / Maintenance Worker City of Loveland The City of Loveland will be holding a civil service examination for the full-time position of Mechanic/Maintenance Worker. For a full position announcement, employment and test applications and info on the position, visit www.lovelandoh.com/employment , or pick up copies at City Hall, 120 W. Loveland Avenue, Loveland OH 45140. No phone calls, please. Loveland is an equal opportunity employer.

The Cincinnati Enquirer has carrier routes available in the following areas:

Central St. Bernard @ Walnut Hills @ Wyoming @ Avondale East Amelia / Batavia @ Bethel @ Brown County @ Goshen @ Hyde Park @ Madeira/Indian Hill/Milford/Loveland @ Montgomery / Silverton @ Oakley West Colerain Twp. @ Groesbeck @ Harrison Monfort Heights @ Northside Western Hills / Westwood @ Wyoming North Fairfield @ Liberty Township @ Maineville @ Morrow Mason @ Sharonville @ West Chester Kentucky Cold Spring @ Crescent Springs Edgewood Erlanger Florence / Burlington Independence / Taylor Mill Park Hills / Ft. Mitchell Union @ Walton / Verona @ Warsaw Indiana St. Leon @ Lawrenceburg @ West Harrison Must be 18 with a valid drivers license and proof of insurance. If interested please call: 1-855-704-2104 deliveryopportunities.gannett.com/

www.carespring.com/employment

Rentals

HIRING FOR FT

Housekeeping Positions $350 Sign On Bonus After 60 Days of Employment. Apply online to join our team!

LPN/RN Full Time & Part Time Days ALF, Excellent Pay Visit terracecommunity.com Contact Tina at 513-471-3491

AUTOMOTIVE MECHANIC Open Exam sign up ends 2/4/17 Makeup to $53,753.31 annually and substantial benefits package. The city of Cincinnati , Fleet Services is seeking Automotive Mechanics to troubleshoot / repair automobiles, Trucks, construction equipment, Fire Pumpers, and nonautomotive equipment. Must have 3 years paid experience in automotive repair work. Valid Ohio class A CDL , OR obtain one during probation period. ASE Automotive certifications preferred. May be required / willing to work shifts other than normal business hours including nights , weekends , holidays. Application and test date details available at the link below. http://agency.governmentj obs.com/cincinnati/default. cfm

Tractor-Trailer Mechanic 2nd shift, Full-Time needed, light repairs and PM services Sharonville, Oh area Call 513-910-7146

Driver: CDL-A Truck Driver Great Local Route! Get Home Daily, 100% No-Touch Freight Call for Details 844-303-9802 Drivers: $5,000.00 Orientation Completion Bonus! Dedicated! Get Home Weekends! Platinum Orientation flight, with upscale lodging and meals.1 year Class-A Call Today: 855-450-2267 Drivers:, CDL-A: LOCAL Lawrenceburg, IN!! Regional & OTR Home Weekends! Sign-On Bonus!! Excellent Pay, Benefits! Drue Chrisman Inc.: 877-346-6589 x103 Drivers: OPEN HOUSE HIRING EVENT! Dedicated Routes! Home Weekends!! $5,000.00 Orientation Completion Bonus! Platinum Orientation flight, with upscale lodging and meals. 1 year Class-A Come & Apply with Koch Trucking: Fri 1/13 or Sat 1/14 8a-6p Homewood Suites by Hilton 9226 Schulze Dr, West Chester Township, OH 45069 Or Call 855-450-2267 Driver Wanted Highly safe and dependable driver needed in the Eastgate area to transport military applicants to Columbus for processing. Applicants must have a valid operating license with clean driving record, able to pass D.O.T. physical and drug screen, and criminal background check. Being a vet is preferable, but not necessary. Must work well with Military recruiters and applicants. Schedule is Wednesday-Friday, starting pay is $10/hr. Resumes can be faxed to 937-898-5951, or emailed to: msmith@chartervans.com

Community

Announce announcements, novena...

• Be committed to working in a fast-paced environment • Be flexible and open-minded • Have the ambition to succeed and build products that exceed customers’ expectations • Be motivated to actively seek new challenges • Have the ability to take initiative • Be committed to safety and quality • Be committed to open communication and teamwork REQUIREMENTS: • Be willing to work 2nd shift • Be eighteen (18) years of age • Provide proof of a High School Diploma or GED • Reside in one of the 31 counties listed on our website We are committed to recruiting candidates from diverse backgrounds. Honda is an equal opportunity employer. CE-0000664364

BOONE COUNTY SHERIFF MICHAEL A. HELMIG

P.O. BOX 198 BURLINGTON, KY. 41005-0198 Phone: 859-334-2175 FAX: 859-334-2234

Boone County Sheriff’s Department Deputy Sheriff Position

The Boone County Sheriff’s Department is now accepting applications for the position of deputy sheriff. Applicants must be at least 21 years of age and be capable of passing a physical agility, written, and oral interview testing. Applicants must have a high school diploma (or equivalent), be a citizen of the United States, possess a valid driver’s license, have no felony convictions, have not been prohibited from carrying a firearm and have the physical strength/agility to perform the duties of a peace officer. Candidates must pass post-offer medical and psychological examinations, polygraph testing, drug testing, and an in-depth background investigation. As a condition of employment, recruits must successfully complete an extensive twenty-three (23) week training course in Richmond, Kentucky where they will obtain their Peace Officer Professional Standards (P.O.P.S.) certification. Applications are available for pickup at the Boone County Sheriff’s Department located at 3,000 Conrad Lane in Burlington, Kentucky 41005 Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. & Saturday 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. Completed applications must be returned to the Sheriff’s Department by Friday, February 17, 2017 by 5:00 p.m. The Boone County Sheriff’s Department is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

CE-0000667030

Special Notices-Clas ATTENTION GE EVENDALE (1961-70) & Fernald (FMPC) (1951-83) FAMILIES. Did you, your spouse or your parent become ill after working @ GE or Fernald? You maybe entitles to up to $400,000 from the United States. For more information call Attorney Hugh Stephens at 1-800548-4494, even if your claim has been accepted or denied. We assist with claims, dose reconstructions, appeals, impairment ratings, wage loss, health care and home care. No Recovery-No Fee. 2495 Main St, Buffalo, NY.

Assorted

Stuff all kinds of things... Looking to buy porcelain and painted advertising signs, I buy advertising signs. I am looking for large or small signs that are original. Please only signs older than 1970 , $Any . (513)265-4334 filcallc @gmail.com

WE SERVICE ALL APPLIANCES Also Selling Washers & Dryers w/ 1 year warranty. 513-429-1091

FIREWOOD CLEARANCE 3/4 cord all split seasoned wood. Thrown off only; $100. 513-218-7291

LOW PRICED Seasoned & Split Firewood WITH FREE DELIVERY 513-574-3950

Special Notices-Clas ! ADOPTION: ! Loving Home with Successful Professionals; Laughter, Music, Celebrations await Miracle Baby. Expenses Paid ! 1-800-563-7964 !

CHECK OUT CLASSIFIED online at cincinnati.com

CASKETS $300 & URNS $99 ALL CASKETS 16 & 18 gauge metal only $300 & Solid Wood only $500 All funeral homes must accept our caskets. IT"S THE LAW! Buy ahead save thousands, churches, police, firemen, businesses. 8455 Winton Rd in Brentwood shopping Center Call Today 513-383-2785 thecasketcompany.com

Dining room set and cabinet with hutch, Drexel seating for 4-10. Hutch with cabinets, drawer space and display shelving, $$1,495.00. (865)368-6497 jjnowiski@aol. com GRAND OPENING Lowest Prices In Cincinnati Great floor model discounts Living Room, Dining Rooms, Mattresses, Bunkbeds, Futons, Electric Adjustable Beds w/ memory foam mattresses. REALLY HOT MATTRESS PRICES 100’s of premium king sets Lots of floor model specials. SHOP US TODAY! First Come---First Served Lowest Prices--Highest Quality 8455 Winton Rd* Brentwood Plaza Call me, BILL, w/ your questions513-383-2785! Mattress & Furniture Express mattressandfurnitureexpress.com Apply online everyone approved. Guaranteed financing, No Credit Check

Queen Pillowtop Mattress, w/ adjustable motorized frame, by Stern & Foster, Almost new, downsizing, Asking $1,300. 513-774-7209

HANDYMAN Experienced, Reasonable, No Job Too big or Too Small. Call Steve 513-491-6672

BUYING CHINA, Crystal, Silverware, Stemware, Estate 513-793-3339 BUYING-RECORD ALBUMS & CDs, METAL, JAZZ, BLUES, ROCK, RAP, INDIE, R&B & REGGAE. 513-683-6985


2C µ EAST - COMMUNITY µ JANUARY 11, 2017

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JANUARY 11, 2017 Âľ EAST - COMMUNITY Âľ 3C

Larry T. Richey 4303 Beachmont Dr. Cincinnati, OH 45244 Household Goods/Furniture Michael Moulden 1070 Bethel-New Richmond Apt. 30 New Richmond, OH 45157 Household Goods/Boxes Kim Thornberry 8 Queens Creek Batavia, OH 45103 Household Gregory Donovan 6006 Dry Fork Rd Cleves, OH 45002 Household Goods/Furniture, Tools/Appliances Dawn Penrod 304 S. 4th Street Williamsburg, OH 45176 TVâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s/Stereo Equipment, Tools/Appliances, Boxes Candace Eglian 526 Old State Rt 74 Cincinnati, OH 45244 Household Goods/Furniture

LEGAL NOTICE ANDERSON TOWNSHIP ELECTRIC AGGREGATION PROGRAM PLAN OF OPERATION AND GOVERNANCE The Board of Township Trustees of Anderson Township, Hamilton County, OH will hold two public hearings on January 19, 2017, regarding the proposed Plan of Operation and Governance (â&#x20AC;&#x153;Planâ&#x20AC;?) for the Anderson Township Electric Aggregation Program (â&#x20AC;&#x153;Programâ&#x20AC;?). The hearings will be held in the Boardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s meeting room, located at 7850 Five Mile Road, Cincinnati, OH 45230, at noon and at 6:00 P.M. A majority of Anderson Township electors voting at the general election on November 8, 2016, approved the authority of the Board to aggregate the retail electric loads located in the Township, such aggregation to occur automatically except with respect to mercantile customers and to any other person who elects by a stated procedure to opt-out of the Program, all pursuant to Section 4928.20 of the Ohio Revised Code. The Plan, which may be obtained at the Township offices, describes services provided, professional assistance used, determination of rates, opt-out procedures, customer billing procedures, credit procedures and customer account enrollment/termination procedures. If the Plan is approved, all eligible customers in the Township who receive electric supply service from Duke Energy Ohio will be included automatically in the Program unless they opt-out. If an acceptable electric supply offer is received by the Board, eligible customers will receive a notice by mail of the Program rates, terms and conditions and of their right to, and the process by which they might, opt-out of the Program. By Order of the Board of Township Trustees Anderson Township, Hamilton County, OH: Kenneth G. Dietz, Fiscal Officer FH,Jan4,11,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;17#1823481

CASH PAID for unopened unexpired Diabetic Strips. Up to $35 per 100. 513-377-7522 www.cincytestrips.com

$$$ PAID for LPs,CDs, CASSETTES-ROCK, BLUES, INDIE, METAL, JAZZ, ETC + VINTAGE STEREO EQUIP, DVDs & MEMORABILIA. 50 YRS COMBINED BUYING EXPERIENCE! WE CAN COME TO YOU! 513-591-0123

Steven Carlotta 4564 Ireton Rd Williamsburg, OH 45176 Household Goods/Furniture, TV/Stereo Equipment, Tools/Appliances Christopher Ballou 3304 Huntsman Cincinnati, OH 45245 Household Goods/Furniture James M Neff 4622 Shepherd Rd Batavia, OH 45103 Household Goods/Furniture William A. Cox 653 Arlington Dr Cincinnati, OH 45244 Household Goods/Furniture, Tools/Appliances 404CJC,Jan,11,18,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;17#1840340

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WANTED: KENNER STAR WARS AND OTHER VINTAGE TOYS. We pay CASH for toys made in the 1980s,1970s & earlier. Seeking STAR WARS, Transformers, GI JOE, Alien, He-Man, and most pop culture toys older than 1990. ***WE ARE LOOKING FOR EX-KENNER EMPLOYEES & FAMILY MEMBERS of EX-KENNER EMPLOYEES who have KENNER ITEMS*** WE BUY ALL YEAR LONG, so please save this ad! Call or text 513.477.2557 or 513.324.6563 or email us at cincystarwarscollector@ gmail.com. WANTED Used Furniture Antiques, Estate & Moving Sale Items, Old Toys. 513-821-1604

PUBLIC SALE The following Mobile Home will be offered at Public sale on January 26, 2017 11:00 am @1560 Alexis Rd, Toledo OH 43612 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; For more details call Tom Dodge at 248-618-7357*** 1999 Oakwood 64 X 28 Ref #74449415 Minimum Bid $20,000.00 404CJC,Jan11,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;17#1844563)

Wanted: Vintage books, photoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, slides, 16mm films, comics, sterling silver. 513-562-7651 Want to Buy Antique Leather Sofa, I am looking for a specific type of sofa that is leather. Has brass buttons and lots of buttons throughout. Please let me know if you have one. It needs to be antique not a newer one. , $Any. (513)265-4334 filcallc@ gmail.com

WAR RELICS US, German, Japanese Uniforms, Helmets, Guns, Swords, Medals Etc, Paying Top Dollar Call 513-309-1347

Toro Zero turn Z441 Z Master 52" cut, 430 hrs, Exc Cond $3,250. JD 285 Riding mower, snow blade & 42" cut deck-$450. 513-877-2875

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VISIT: cincinnati.com/classifieds TO PLACE YOUR AD

Blue Ash OH Estate Sale 5492 Kenridge Dr, Blue Ash, OH 1/13, 1/14 & 1/15 Fri - 9-4, #â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s @ 8:45; Sat & Sun 9-4 Contents of Home, Garage & Out building. Large 3 Day Sale! Lots of Misc. Collectibles, Antiques, Old Toys, Old Radios, Old Phonographs, Electronics, Cameras, Stereo viewers, Old Books, Records, Clocks, Lamps, Painted China Hutch, Old Chairs, Drop Leaf Table, Desks, Carpenter Bench Coffee Table, Cast Iron, Violins, Accordion, Key board, Guitar, Lift Chair, Oliver Typewriter & Case, Old P & G items, Popcorn maker, Lots of office supplies, lots of Holiday, Linens, Crafts, Antique tables, Stain Glass, Leaded Glass, Ladders, Garden Tools, Hand Tools, Patio Furniture, Lots of Kitchen Items and Smalls. Still unpacking boxes! Too Much to list, All priced to sell! Info & pics hsestatesales.com or 859-468-9468 Directions - Kenwood Rd Kenridge Dr or Meyers Ln (Parking on Meyers Ln,house is at the end of Meyers Ln)

Lawrenceburg IN Estate Sale 19753 Ventura Dr Lawrenceburg, IN 1/14 & 1/15 Sat. 9-4, #â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s @ 8:45; Sun. 9-4 Contents of home & garage. Walnut Dining Table & Hutch, Curio cabinet, glass door bookshelf, rattan glass top table & chairs, bookshelf, large oak & glass door entertainment center, electronics, barstools, patio bench, electric grill, gas grill, carpet cleaner, leaf blower, Power, hand & yard tools, exercise bike, coll. of adv. signs, mirrors, lamps, nautical theme items, scuba equipment, air compressor, tablesaw, snowblower, misc. kitchen items, too much to list all priced to sell! Info and pics â&#x20AC;&#x201C; hsestatesales.com or 859â&#x20AC;&#x201C;992-0212. Directions â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Route 50 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Stateline Road â&#x20AC;&#x201C; L on Alpine Dr â&#x20AC;&#x201C; L on Ventura Dr (Hidden Valley Lake)

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Pets find a new friend... ADOPT- Animal Rescue Fund. Open Mon-Sat 11-5; Closed Sun & Holidays 513-753-9252 www.petfinder.com

AUSSIEDOODLES, F1B, chocolate and blue merles, C on FB- Cincinnati Labradoodles, vet ch, shots, taking deposits, Ready 1/24/17. CKC, $800 513-831-9292 Chocolate Shih-Tzu Puppy, color liver male, 6 weeks, AKC, Vet checked, $ 8 0 0 ; Maureen 812-637-2494 DOG, Mini Schnauzers, 2 males, 4 females, $1000, 7 weeks , salt pepper, black, white, calm Full AKC (513)526-3138 mpartinlpn@g mail.com Doxi-Poo Puppies, Cream color 7 weeks, Males, vet ckâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d, full of personality, $500, Ready to Go! 513-868-1746 French Bulldog Pups $1700. AKC, 6wks, vet ckd/1st sht. (740)289-9625, Satchcornett @gmail.com German Shepherd Pups, AKC reg., POP, blk/tan, blk, sable, vet chk, 1st shots & wormed. $675. 765-265-0233 German Shepherd Pups White, AKC reg, vet checked, shots, POP, $550 513-797-7537 POODLE PUPPIE S, TOY, chocolate colored, Males Only, very tiny, vet checked, tails docked, $800 Cash Only 937-768-5541 PUG PUPPY AKC, Adorable & Energetic, (2) M. Fawn $700; (2) F. Fawn $800; (2) M. Black $800. 513-305-5528 Schnauzer Puppies, Mini - AKC, 9 weeks, shots, wormed, black & silver, Males only. $375. Call 937-205-2305

Yorkie Pups, M-$500 & F-$600; Regular Size, black & gold, UTD, Can be CKC Reg, 937-587-3024

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Audi 2015 A4, Coupe, 58000 mi., 4 dr., Automatic, Black ext., Black int., VIN#WAIJAFAFL2FN042611, 04 Cylinders, FWD, A/C: Front, A/C: Rear, Airbag: Driver, Airbag: Passenger, Airbag: Side, Alarm, Alloy Wheels, Anti-Lock Brakes, CD Player, Cruise Control, Fog Lights, Leather Interior, Moonroof, Power Locks, Power Seats, Power Steering, Power Windows, Premium Sound, Rear Window Defroster, Sunroof, Tinted Glass, Driven 800 expressway miles per week for management position. One owner--all records at Audi dealership. Oil changed every 5000 miles. New radial tires w/ less than 100 miles.-Showroom condition. Email contact for photos, $22,900. Jim Eveslage (513)926-1351

1 9 3 0 â&#x20AC;&#x2122; s & up Muscle Cars, Classics & Vettes wanted. Paying Top Market Value 513-500-1828

Wanted: Porsche 356 or 911, Jaguar XK or XKE, 1950-70 Mercedes, Austin Healey 3000, Alfa Romeo. Any Condition Call anytime 330-428-5457. $1000 Finders fee paid if we buy the car.

2014 BMW C 650 GT, Like New, 875 miles, Silver, includes matching full face helmet, cover, and Battery Tender, $7,250. Edward Strauss (740)645-3172

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HANDYMAN No job too big or small incl. electrical. Call Bob & compare. 513-248-2130

Killing time while at the airport? On the train? Waiting in line? Find and apply for jobs on the go. Download CareerBuilder.comâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mobile app today.

PUBLIC NOTICE In accordance with the provisions of State law, there being due and unpaid charges for which the undersigned is entitled to satisfy an owner and/or managerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lien of the goods hereinafter described and stored at the Uncle Bobâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Self Storage location(s) listed below. And, due notice having been given, to the owner of said property and all parties known to claim an interest therein, and the time specified in such notice for payment of such having expired, the goods will be sold at public auction at the below stated location(s) to the highest bidder or otherwise disposed of on Monday, January 30, 2017 at 3:00 PM 1105 Old State Rt 74 Batavia, OH 45103 513-752-8110 Esther D. Miller 450 Craig Rd. Cincinnati, OH 45244 Household Goods/Furniture

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4C µ EAST - COMMUNITY µ JANUARY 11, 2017

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