Page 1

FLORENCE

RECORDER

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Florence and Union 50¢

THURSDAY, MAY 17, 2012

ELECTION DAY Tuesday, May 22, is Kentucky's primary election day. Voting hours are 6 a.m. to 6 p.m.

BECAUSE COMMUNITY MATTERS

Soldiers given memorial highways Three fallen soldiers honored Community Recorder State Rep. Addia Wuchner, RFlorence, announced that three roadways in Boone County will be named after Boone County fallen soldiers through the passage of House Joint Resolution 23, which passed during the 2012 Regular Session. “Every day around the world our brave men and women in the military put their lives on the line

to protect what our forefathers sought, and defend our liberties and our freedoms,” Wuchner said. “I am humbled to sponsor the naming of Warndorf these roads, which allows us as a community to honor the magnitude of their noble sacrifice and their willingness to serve a cause greater than self.” The following memorial highway designations will be named

Peak

Campbell

in the honor of: » The Cpl. Christopher Tyler Warndorf Memorial Highway, which will be the section of Ky. 237 between Interstate 275 and Ky.18. Warndorf, 21, was killed on Aug. 29, 2006, in AR Ramadi,

Iraq, and was assigned to the 3rd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, II Marine Expeditionary Force at the time he was killed. He was a native of Burlington and attended Conner High School. » The Tech. Sgt. Anthony C. Campbell Memorial Highway, which will be the section of Ky. 842 (Hopeful Road) between U.S. 42 and Ky. 18. Campbell, 35, was serving in the U.S. Air Force’s 932nd Civil Engineering Squadron when he was killed on Dec. 15, 2009, in Helmand, Afghanistan, of wounds suffered from the explosion of an improvised explo-

Budget cuts tally up to $5 million

Florence woman was sixth female jockey

By Justin B. Duke

Patti Bart started racing horses in 1969

jbduke@nky.com

FLORENCE — A steady stream of cuts has lead to big savings. Since 2007, the city of Florence has been slowly making reductions in its budget. Over the next fiscal year, the cumulative savings of the cuts is expected to top $5 million. “It’s something we started doing prior to the economic crisis,” said Mayor Diane Whalen. Some of the largest cuts inWhalen clude eliminating the city’s information technology department in 2008, which will save the city a total of $1.4 million, and cutting funding to the Boone

By Stephanie Salmons ssalmons@nky.com

FLORENCE — Patti Barton Browne of Florence was 24 years, 6 months and 19 days old in when she became the sixth female jockey in the country. Browne, who began horse racing in 1969, discussed her racing career at the Boone County Senior Center May 4 – the day before the Kentucky Derby. During the presentation, she talked about the places she has raced, some experiences as a female jockey, racing against her children and how she was “squished into retirement.” Clips of various interviews, including one with Johnny Carson, were also shown. Browne said afterward she was "galloping horses in New Mexico,” where she was the first woman issued an exercise license, when she decided to try racing because she was “little and fit and why shouldn’t I give it a shot.” “It was after I started racing I really fell in love with it,” she said. Browne raced for more than 15 years before a racing accident forced her into retirement. According to Browne, two horses were head and head for the lead, when one broke both front legs. She went down too, and the two horses behind her, “instead of running over me, they fell on top of me,” she

See BUDGET, Page A2

Patti Barton Browne of Florence was the sixth female jockey in the country. She spoke about her experiences the day before the Kentucky Derby at the Boone County Senior Center. STEPHANIE SALMONS/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER said. “So that is how one gets squished into retirement.” As a result of the accident, Browne said she spent 68 days in the hospital. She had broken bones in six places, a blood clot in the brain and other injuries. Initially, she wanted to return to racing, “but better judgment took over.” Browne says she didn’t have the physical or mental ability to continue racing, “so I had to call it quits.” “You don’t get hurt riding horses,

A FESTIVE SEASON

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IF YOU’RE NOT AT YOUR LAST JOB, YOUR 401(k) SHOULDN’T BE EITHER.

it’s falling off that can be disastrous,” she said. According to Browne, she has raced in 14 states, Canada, Mexico and Brazil. During her racing years, Browne even raced against her own children. That doesn’t mean she took it easy on them. “This is my attitude toward competition,” Browne said. “The only ones you really want to beat are people you dislike and those who are closest to you.”

Teachers choose staff over raises By Justin B. Duke jbduke@nky.com

Teachers are skipping raises to help students. The Boone County Schools Board of Education approved a tentative working budget for the 2012 fiscal year. “We’re $10 million less in revenue than we need,” said Superintendent Randy Poe. The revenue shortfall comes from the district receiving less state and federal funding paired with not raising property taxes rates,

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sive device (IED). Campbell was originally from Florence and graduated from Boone County High School. » The Lance Cpl. Adam Peak Memorial Highway, which will be the section of Ky. 842 (Weaver Road) between U.S. 42 and U.S. 25. Peak, 25, was a native of Florence and died on Feb. 21, 2010, in Helmand, Afghanistan, when he was killed by a roadside bomb while on foot patrol. At the time of his death, Peak was serving with the 2nd Battalion, 2nd Marine Division, II Marine Expeditionary Force.

News ........................283-0404 Retail advertising ......513-768-8196 Classified advertising .......283-7290 Delivery ......................781-4421 See page A2 for additional information

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See TEACHERS, Page A2

Vol. 17 No. 35 © 2012 The Community Recorder ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


A2 • FLORENCE RECORDER • MAY 17, 2012

Budget County Public Safety Communications Center last year, which will save the city a total of $906,000. Other savings come from not filling some positions as they are vacated and not giving employees step raises in 2011. “It’s pretty bare bones,” Whalen said. As cuts have been made along the way, consideration is given to how it will affect city services, she said. “The cuts and changes we’ve made

K1

have not had a direct effect on our residents,” Whalen said. Because residents haven’t felt the pinch of the cuts, many may believe the city hasn’t been reducing its budget, she said. Whalen often hears the city should be making cuts instead of trying to raise revenues, but she believes residents will eventually have to ask themselves what services they want to cut. “That’s the question that needs to be asked when someone wants less tax revenue,” she said. Over the last few

NEWS

• years, Florence has held its property tax bills the same as costs for utilities, fuel and pensions have gone up. “There will come a day of reckoning,” Whalen said. As long as residents demand steady tax rates despite rising costs, eventually the city will either have to cut a significant portion of services or the city will run out of money, she said. “Sooner or later, it will catch up to everybody,” Whalen said.

DINSMORE DERBY PARTY

SALMONS/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Teachers

For more about your community, visit www.NKY.com/ florence

Continued from Page A1

Poe said. “In this budget, there is pain,” he said. To make up for the revenue losses, cuts are needed, Poe said. “We don’t have any money in there for buses, and we’re growing,” he said. Longer bus routes and rides for students are the

up to

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likely result of the cuts, Poe said. In addition, there will be about 10 positions cut across the district. “We are cutting some staff in the area of special needs,” Poe said. The cuts could have been worse, but teachers opted to skip raises to save an additional 46 positions from being cut. “People understand there’s not a lot of resources out there,” said

Rick Jones, president of the Boone County Education Association (BCEA). The BCEA is the district’s teachers’ union. The board of education also approved its 2012-2013 contract with the BCEA, which leaves out raises for the second time in three years. “They’re not here for the money,” Jones said. “They’re here for the kids.” www.NKY.com/boonecounty

FLORENCE RECORDER

Find news and information from your community on the Web Florence • nky.com/florence Boone County • nky.com/boonecounty

News

Nancy Daly Senior Editor ......................578-1059, ndaly@nky.com Justin Duke Reporter ..........................578-1058, jbduke@nky.com Stephanie Salmons Reporter .................578-1057, ssalmons@nky.com Melanie Laughman Sports Editor ............513-248-7573, mlaughman@nky.com James Weber Sports Reporter ................578-1054, weber@nky.com

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Tony Elam Advertising Manager ..............513-768-8196, telam@enquirer.com

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Veronica Thomas, Kathleen Thomas, Pat O'Hara, Christine Henning, all of Florence, Jennifer Reibling of Fort Mitchell, and Janet Schneider of Florence are dressed in their Derby best at the Dinsmore Homestead’s annual Derby party May 5. STEPHANIE

For customer service .........................781-4421 Sharon Schachleiter Circulation Manager .........................442-3464, sschachleiter@nky.com

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Emergency by OnStar In a crash, built-in sensors can automatically alert an OnStar[3] Advisor who is immediately connected into your Cadillac to see if you need help sent to your exact location. Other OnStar emergency services include Injury Severity Predictor and First Assist. All Cadillac models come with 1 year of OnStar service.

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NEWS

MAY 17, 2012 • FLORENCE-UNION RECORDER • A3

By Scott Wartman swartman@nky.com

A tea party leader and a political newcomer have challenged an incumbent in the Republican Primary for the 66th House District in Boone. State Rep. Addia Wuchner, R-Burlington, is running for her fifth term in the Kentucky House and will face Republican challengers Cathy Flaig and William E. Woods in the May 22 primary. Flaig, 65, served for 12 years as a Boone County Commissioner and then ran for county judge-executive in 2010. She also served two years as president for the Northern Kentucky Tea Party and owns Flaig Welding Company. Woods, 24, hasn’t held political office and ran in 2011 for an open seat on Florence City Council. Campaign finance reports show Wuchner raised $20,191 from November 2011 to April 2012 and banked a total of $47,827. Flaig has raised $26,935, all in the first quarter of 2012, and Woods hasn’t raised any money. Wuchner, 56, has worked as a registered nurse, in the administration of multiple hospitals and as a health care consultant. She said she has voted against tax increases in the eight years

she’s been in Frankfort and ranked third among the 100 House members in the 2010 rankings of the nonpartisan Kentucky Club For Growth, which pushes for governments to lower taxes. Wuchner said she will push for tax credits for businesses, including the angel investment tax credit proposed in the past session of the General Assembly and tax credits for the airport, and reforms to the tax and pension systems to help businesses. “As we begin to see jobs moving back to the U.S., we’ve got to make sure Kentucky’s doors are open for business,” Wuchner said. Flaig said she will make term limits a big part of her campaign. She wants to limit members of both the House and Senate to three terms apiece. Flaig said she wants to cut down on career politicians. “I was a county commissioner for 12 years,” Flaig said. “That was three terms. That is all I said I was going to serve. I did

exactly what I said I was going to do.” Flaig also touted her conservative credentials, including her leadership in the petition drive last year to dissolve the Northern Kentucky Area Planning Commission. Woods said he wants to provide another alternative in the race. He won’t raise money and will rely on a door-to-door campaign. Woods works as security guard for a commercial property and said he wants to end partisan politics. “I have no stake in partisan politics,” Woods said. “I’m an average citizen. I’m not a millionaire. I don’t sit on a board of directors. I’m just an average citizen with common sense ideas and want to help the people of my community. I will not accept donations. I personally don’t think asking people for donations is a good way to run for office.” Both Flaig and Wuchner said they think the tea party supporters will help their campaigns. “They will be involved in helping Cathy Flaig,” Flaig said. “I am a tea partier. Always will be.” Wuchner said she’s seen T-shirts with “Tea partiers for Addia.” “I represent a broad base of people,” Wuchner said.

Union community night planned at Florence Freedom

Union Community Night at Florence Freedom will be held Tuesday, May 22. Gates open at 6:05 p.m. and the game is scheduled to begin at 7:05 p.m. Discounted tickets are available for $8 by visiting www.florencefreedom.com and clicking on the “community” tab, then clicking on the “community nights” link.

Concert, dinner planned at St. Timothy

The music and youth ministries of St. Timothy Parish will join together for the parish's annual concert and and spaghetti dinner Sunday, May 20. The concert begins at 5 p.m. in the church. Following the concert, the youth ministry will host a spaghetti dinner in Brodnick Hall. No reservations are needed. St. Timothy is at 10272 U.S. 42, Union.

Hebron Lions Club hosts pancake breakfast

The Hebron Lions Club annual pancake breakfast will be held from 8-11 a.m. Saturday, May 19, at Hebron Lutheran Church,

3140 Limaburg Road, Hebron. Breakfast will include pancakes, goetta, sausages, coffee, milk and juice. The cost is $6 for adults and $3 for children ages 3-12.

PVA inspections set

The Boone County Property Valuation Administrator’s office will inspect Hopeful Heights, Erlanger Heights, Bradford, Fairgrounds, Eagles Landing, Bel Air Estates, Tall Trees, mobile home parks, Plantation Pointe and new construction throughout Boone County the week of May 28. Staff members will be in a marked vehicle and have identification available upon request.

Street fair raises money for Relay

A street fair in Hebron will raise money for Relay for Life. Held Saturday, May 19, on Campaign Drive in Hebron’s Liberty Crossing, the fair will be in memory of Kathy Brennen, who died last fall from complications of Leukemia. A large sale will begin at 9 a.m., featuring furniture, toys, clothes, small appliances, home decorations and more. The street fair will begin at 11 a.m.

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NEWS

A4 • FLORENCE-UNION RECORDER • MAY 17, 2012

Florence plans road repairs for 2012-2013 By Justin B. Duke jbduke@nky.com

FLORENCE — Road re-

pairs are coming to Florence. As part of the city’s budget planning process, city

leaders are figuring out how much they’ll spend on repairs and what streets will get them.

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Part of this process is hosting a public hearing on the city’s use of Municipal Aid Road Funds (MARF). MARF money is received from the state to help cities keep up with their roads. This year, Florence will receive $525,000 in MARF money. Combining money from the city’s general fund and MARF, Florence is planning to spend about $1.7 million on its streets in the coming fiscal year. Of those projects, $200,000 of the work will be handled by city employees and the rest will be contracted out, said Bob Townsend, public services director. The vast majority of the 43 planned projects are mill and overlay projects that will result in new asphalt on the street, but the projects on Virginia Avenue and Lexington Avenue will be complete replacements of the streets.

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Former auto worker finds new life By Justin B. Duke jbduke@nky.com

FLORENCE — Graduation is a symbol of a new life for a Florence woman. Dy’an Marinos just received her bachelor’s degree in criminal justice from Beckfield College in Florence. Before arriving at Beckfield, Marinos, 47, spent almost 23 years working at a parts manufacturer for Ford Motor Co. in Connersville, Ind. “I had fully planned on retiring there,” Marinos said. Marinos’ factory was eventually shut down and she was laid off. Marinos was offered two years of financial assistance for education, and she moved to Florence with her fiance and started looking at different colleges in the area to get into. “I’m a small town girl, and the big campuses were kind of overwhelming to me,” she said. Marinos visited Beckfield’s Florence campus. From her first impression until she graduated, Mari-

nos loved her time at the school. “It’s been like my family since I started there,” she said. Marinos earned an associates degree in 2009, and eventually started working at the Brighton Center as a youth leadership development specialist. “I wanted to work with at-risk youth,” she said. The job is fading away as the school year ends, but thanks to the newly earned bachelor’s degree, Marinos was hired on full-time at the Brighton Center. In the fall, Marinos starts in the University of Cincinnati’s masters of mental health counseling program. Looking back at being laid off, Marinos knows losing her job was a hard situation. “I was one of those people who was really angry that I lost my job through no fault of my own,” she said. But the layoff was a turning point in her life. “I was missing the soul and mental growth I’m getting now,” she said.

STATE OF KENTUCKY COUNTY OF BOONE I, Kenny Brown, County Clerk in and for the County and State aforesaid do hereby certify that the foregoing is a true and correct list of names of persons who are candidates for nomination by their respective political parties, as certified to me by the Honorable Allison Lundergan Grimes, Secretary of State for the Commonwealth of Kentucky; which candidates are to be voted for at the Primary Election to be held in all Boone County, Kentucky, precincts on Tuesday May 22, 2012. Given under my hand and office seal this 17th day of May, 2012. Kenny Brown, Boone County Clerk

NOTE: This ballot to be voted on in all 60 precincts in Boone County. VOTING PRECINCTS AND POLLING PLACES FOR THE PRIMARY ELECTION MAY 17, 2011

Boone Precinct AIRPORT BEAVER BELLEVIEW BULLITTSVILLE BURLINGTON 1 BURLINGTON 2 BURLINGTON 3 BURLINGTON 4 BURLINGTON 5 BURLINGTON 6 BURLINGTON 7 BURLINGTON 8 CARLTON CONSTANCE DEVON #1 DEVON #2 DEVON #3 FLORENCE #1 FLORENCE #2 FLORENCE #3 FLORENCE #4 FLORENCE #5 FLORENCE #6 FLORENCE #7 FLORENCE #8 FLORENCE #9 FLORENCE #10 FLORENCE #11 FLORENCE #12 FLORENCE #13 FLORENCE #14 FLORENCE #15 GLENVIEW GREENVIEW HAMILTON HEARTHSTONE HEBRON # 1 HEBRON #2 HEBRON #3 HEBRON #4 HEBRON #5 HOPEFUL KENSINGTON LIMABURG LINKVIEW OAKBROOK PETERSBURG PLEASANT VAL RICHWOOD SHAMROCK SUMMITVIEW UNION #1 UNION #2 UNION #3 UNION#4 UNION # 5 UNION # 6 VERONA WALTON #1 WALTON #2 Total 60 precincts #%"''''$!''&$

C123 B114 A102 A103 A104 A105 A111 A112 A113 A115 A116 A120 A106 A107 C102 C110 C117 C124 C125 C126 C127 C128 C129 C130 C131 C132 C133 C134 C135 C136 C137 B133 B115 B116 A118 B132 A108 A109 A114 A117 A121 B117 C120 A119 B118 B119 A110 B120 B121 C121 B131 B122 B123 B124 B125 B129 B130 B126 B127 B128

LOCATION

As of 1/20/2006

POINT PLEASANT FIREHOUSE BEAVERLICK BAPTIST CHURCH BELLEVIEW MCVILLE FIREHOUSE CORNERSTONE BAPTIST CHURCH OLD COURTHOUSE BURLINGTON BAPT. FAM. LIFE CENTER STEPHENS ELEMENTARY SCHOOL BURLINGTON FIREHOUSE BOONE CO. MAIN LIBRARY BURLINGTON ELEMENTARY SCHOOL FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST CAMP ERNST MIDDLE SCHOOL RABBIT HASH GENERAL STORE CONSTANCE CHURCH OF BRETHREN FLORENCE FIRE STATION #2 MARKSBERRY MOVING AND STORAGE FLORENCE FIRE STATION # 3 FLORENCE CHRISTIAN CHURCH BOONE CO. LIBRARY (FLORENCE) Florence Elementary-Ralph Rush Center BOONE CO. HEALTH DEPT. BOONE CO. HIGH SCHOOL HILLARD COLLINS ELEM. SCHOOL COLONIAL HEIGHTS RETIRE. CENTER OCKERMAN ELEM. SCHOOL KENTABOO BAPTIST ACTIVITY CENTER R.A. JONES MIDDLE SCHOOL ERPENBECK ELEM. SCHOOL A.M. YEALEY ELEM. SCHOOL PANORAMA PLUS APTS. FLORENTINE RECEPTION HALL SHIRLEY MANN ELEM. SCHOOL BOONE LINKS GOLFCOURSE HOPEFUL LUTHERN CHURCH BIG BONE STATE PARK GARAGE VINEYARD CHRISTIAN CHURCH HEBRON CHURCH OF CHRIST HEBRON FIREHOUSE CONNER MIDDLE SCHOOL NORTH POINTE ELEM. SCHOOL SANDRUN BAPTIST CHURCH HOPEFUL LUTHERN CHURCH RICHWOOD PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH GREENVIEW BAPTIST CHURCH BOONE LINKS GOLFCOURSE CHRIST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH PETERSBURG FIREHOUSE FLORENCE UNITED METHODIST CH RICHWOOD PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH SADDLEBROOK RESERVE CLUBHOUSE FLORENCE ALLIANCE CHURCH NEW UNION FIREHOUSE UNION LIBRARY GRAY MIDDLE SCHOOL RYLE HIGH SCHOOL UNION BAPTIST CHURCH ST. TIMOTHY’S CATHOLIC CHURCH NEW BETHEL BAPTIST CHURCH WALTON VERONA HIGH SCHOOL WALTON FIRE STATION

ADDRESS 3444 TURFWAY RD 11460 U.S. 42 6900 MCVILLE RD 3920 PETERSBURG RD 2988 E. WASHINGTON ST 3031 WASHINGTON ST 5687 NORTH BEND RD 6050 FIREHOUSE DR. 1786 BURLINGTON PIKE 5946 ORIENT ST 6080 CAMP ERNST RD 6515 CAMP ERNST ROAD 10021 LOWER RIVER RD. 4760 RIVER RD 7201 INDUSTRIAL RD 7370 INDUSTRIAL RD 1152 WEAVER RD 300 MAIN ST 7425 HWY 42 103 Center Street 7505 BURLINGTON PK 7056 BURLINGTON PK 9000 SPRUCE DR 6900 HOPEFUL RD. 8250 US 42 7037 CURTIS ST. 8000 SPRUCE DR 9001 WETHERINGTON BLVD 10 YEALEY DR 8510 OLD TOLL RD 8605 HAINES DR 10435 HWY 42 19 CLUBHOUSE DR 6431 HOPEFUL CHURCH RD 3380 BEAVER RD 7101 PLEASANT VALLEY RD 2966 DAMASCUS RD 3120 NORTH BEND RD 3300 COUGAR PATH 875 NORTH BEND RD 1327 NORTH BEND RD 6431 HOPEFUL CHURCH RD. 1070 RICHWOOD RD 1050 BURLINGTON PK 19 CLUBHOUSE DR 1440 BOONE AIRE RD 6517 MARKET ST 8585 OLD TOLL RD 1070 RICHWOOD RD 466 Saddlebrook Lane 980 CAYTON ROAD 9611 U.S HWY 42 8899 US 42 10400 US 42 10379 US 42 1985 Mt. Zion Rd. 10272 HWY 42 2022 VERONA MUDLICK RD 30 SCHOOL RD 12600 TOWNE CENTER DR

CITY ERLANGER UNION BURLINGTON HEBRON BURLINGTON BURLINGTON HEBRON BURLINGTON BURLINGTON ********* BURLINGTON BURLINGTON BURLINGTON BURLINGTON CONSTANCE FLORENCE FLORENCE FLORENCE FLORENCE FLORENCE ********* FLORENCE FLORENCE FLORENCE FLORENCE FLORENCE FLORENCE FLORENCE FLORENCE FLORENCE FLORENCE FLORENCE FLORENCE UNION FLORENCE FLORENCE UNION FLORENCE HEBRON HEBRON HEBRON HEBRON HEBRON FLORENCE WALTON FLORENCE FLORENCE FLORENCE PETERSBURG FLORENCE WALTON FLORENCE FLORENCE UNION UNION UNION UNION UNION UNION VERONA WALTON WALTON


NEWS

MAY 17, 2012 • FLORENCE-UNION RECORDER • A5

First-time candidate takes on Schickel By Scott Wartman swartman@nky.com

A political newcomer has challenged an incumbent senator in Boone County this spring. Joshua Turner, 35, of Florence, will challenge Sen. John Schickel, RUnion, for the Republican nomination for the 11th Senate District that covers Boone and Gallatin counties and a portion of Kenton County. No Democrats have filed. Turner said politics has fascinated him since he was a child. He’s worked in the aerospace field for 14 years, starting as a machine operator and now working as a quality inspector with Meyer Tool in Colerain. He said the tea party movement encouraged him to get more involved in politics. “Ever since I was a child growing up, I was told politics is for the rich people; there’s no reason to get involved because the electoral vote always decided it,” Turner said.

“The more you grow up, the more you realize the positive change you can have.” Schickel, 58, also said he always had an interest in politics and first won election to public office as Boone County jailer in 1987. He served until 2001. After working seven years as a U.S. marshal, Schickel ran for Senate in 2008 and won. “I don’t know of anything in politics that directly affects citizens more than state government,” Schickel said. “We talk about the federal government, but most of what affects people directly, the school system, roads, criminal law, are things that come out of Frankfort.”

Both Schickel and Turner said they want smaller government. For Schickel, that means keeping regulations on businesses to a minimum. As co-chairman of the Senate licensing and occupations committee, he said he’s done just that. He sees regulations as hampering the economy. “Every business regulation in the state comes through the committee,” Schickel said. “One of the most common complaints I hear about is business regulations, everything from OSHA to state regulations.” Turner said he wants to reform the pension system to reduce the costs to the state, audit state agencies and identify duplication and services or resources that could be merged. “I’d like to see the budget and deficit paid down, the budget more balanced and the size of our state government reduced,” Turner said.

Florence eyes future funding By Justin B. Duke jbduke@nky.com

FLORENCE — Florence City Council is preparing for the future following new rules. In 2010, Florence was required to eliminate its capital improvement and equipment replacement funds from its annual budgets. The requirement came from the Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB) Statement No. 54, which said governmental entities couldn’t have special funds without a specific funding source. Formerly the two funds were supported by transfers from the city’s general fund. Because of the new rule, the two funds were rolled into the general fund leading to an inflated general fund. This means the money is technically earmarked for future expenses, but it could be used for anything.

To solve this, Finance Director Linda Chapman recommended City Council create an infrastructure fund in next year’s budget. The new fund will be allowed under the GASB policy because it would be funded from a percentage of what the city collects in payroll taxes, instead of a general fund transfer, Chapman said. “It’s not an increase in taxes,” said Mayor Diane Whalen. Each year, council could decide what percentage of the payroll tax to put into the fund. It would likely be just enough to cover the following year’s needs, plus a little bit more to build up a small cushion, Chapman said. “We’re going to be using a lot of this on an annual basis anyway,” said council member Mel Carroll. Because council will decide how much to put in the fund each year, future

council members won’t be bound to the decision the current council makes, Chapman said. “As you get down the road, I don’t know how future councils will handle it,” she said. The importance of establishing the fund now is to have money set aside for the future and to set the precedent for funding future projects, said council member Pat Wingo. “(Future councils) could change it, but it does add a psychological layer of protection,” Wingo said. City Council is expected to decide on the 20122013 budget and the infrastructure fund by next month so it can go into effect July 1. For more visit www.NKY.com/florence

Laptops from

1599

$

OFFICIAL BALLOT FOR BOONE COUNTY PRIMARY ELECTION HELD ON TUESDAY, MAY 22, 2012 STATE REPRESENTATIVE 66th Representative District (Vote for One) □ William E. WOODS REPUBLICAN PARTY

PRESIDENT of the UNITED STATES (Vote for One) □ Newt GINGRICH □ Rick SANTORUM □ Mitt ROMNEY □ Ron PAUL □ “UNCOMMITTED” UNITED STATES REPRESENTATIVE in CONGRESS 4th Congressional District (Vote for One)

□ Addia Kathryn WUCHNER □ Cathy H. FLAIG BULLITSVILLE, CONSTANCE, HEBRON -1, -2, -3, -4, & -5, BURLINGTON -3, -5, -6, & -7, LIMABURG, GLENVIEW, GREENVIEW, HOPEFUL, LINKVIEW, OAKBROOK, SUMMITVIEW, AIRPORT, FLORENCE -1, -2, -3, -4, -5, -6, -7, -9, & -12 DEMOCRATIC PARTY PRIMARY ELECTION

□ Alecia WEBB-EDGINGTON

DEMOCRATIC PARTY

□ Gary MOORE □ Marc CAREY □ Walter Christian SCHUMM

PRESIDENT of the UNITED STATES (Vote for One)

□ Brian D. OERTHER

□ Barack OBAMA

□ Thomas MASSIE

□ “UNCOMMITTED”

□ Tom WURTZ

UNITED STATES REPRESENTATIVE in CONGRESS 4th Congressional District (Vote for One)

STATE SENATOR 11th Senatorial District (Vote for One) □ John SCHICKEL □ Joshua L. TURNER ALL PRECINCTS $&"((((%!(('#

□ Greg FRANK □ William R. “Bill” ADKINS ALL PRECINCTS

78 weeks

Lease Zone Latonia 859-431-8666 Turfway 859-647-2160

PURSUANT TO KRS 424.290, “MATTERS REQUIRED TO BE PUBLISHED,” THE FOLLOWING RACES WILL APPEAR ON THE VOTING MACHINES AND PAPER BALLOTS IN THE PRECINCTS LISTED IN BOONE COUNTY FOR THE PRIMARY ELECTION, MAY 22, 2012.

REPUBLICAN PARTY PRIMARY ELECTION

per week


SCHOOLS

A6 • FLORENCE-UNION RECORDER • MAY 17, 2012

COMMUNITY

RECORDER

Editor: Nancy Daly, ndaly@nky.com, 578-1059

ACHIEVEMENTS | NEWS | ACTIVITIES | HONORS

CommunityPress.com

PTA grant nets classroom technology By Justin B. Duke

jbduke@nky.com

VERONA — Sweet treats became classroom computers. Classrooms all over WaltonVerona Elementary got some technology upgrades, aided by a grant from the school’s PTA. “We try to donate something big each year,” said PTA president Stacey Alexander.

Last year, the PTA contributed to the school’s playground upgrades. This year the PTA sold baked goods at the school’s annual chess tournament and raised about $1,000. “We decided to put all the money we raised into the technology fund,” Alexander said. Teaming up with the school’s contribution, several classrooms

received document cameras and the kindergarten classrooms each got two new computers. “I was amazed,” said kindergarten teacher Darlene Smith. The PTA is always finding ways to help students and teachers at Walton-Verona Elementary and this is a perfect example of them knowing the needs of the school and finding a way to meet them, Smith said.

GIRLS ON THE RUN

The computers in the kindergarten classrooms were too old to take advantage of a lot of the tools available to teachers and students, like Accelerated Reader, she said. “They were 12 or 15 years old,” Smith said. Computers tended to freeze or crash too often to make them useful, she said. “We couldn’t use them half of

the time,” Smith said. With the new computers in place, students are excited to have new ways to learn, and teachers are just as excited to have new ways to engage students, she said. “It makes our lives a whole lot easier,” Smith said. For more about your community, visit www.NKY.com/walton

Gateway, Thomas More announce partnership Community Recorder

Collins Elementary School’s Girls On the Run Team visited the Florence City Council April 24. They said the program is about health, wellness and fitness, but along with this it is about team building, cooperation and developing positive relationships. The girls presented a team building activity called “skinning the snake.” PROVIDED

Florence students fight cancer with donations Community Recorder Florence Elementary fifth-graders raised $721.70 for the American Cancer Society through donations and ticket sales to a friendly basketball game between their class and school staff members. The students were inspired to raise money because many of them have been affected by cancer, especially one fifth-grader who had a family member diagnosed with cancer near the start of the school year. The project also raised cancer awareness for the students and everyone else involved. Leading up to game day, the fifth-graders worked on research projects about cancer. Performances were held between quarters and at half time. Paula Reyes, Caleb Hampton and Elijah Decker were selected to share their research projects and a variety of students showcased their singing and

Florence Elementary fifth-graders raised $721.70 for the American Cancer Society through donations and ticket sales to a friendly basketball game between their class and school staff members. THANKS TO KATHY KUHN dancing talents. The Florence Elementary Knights cheerleaders cheered on all the participants and presented a half-time show. The teachers won the game. The school invited Lisa Lokesak’s third-grade class from New Haven Elementary to the event because

they had been working at their school to raise cancer awareness as well. The thirdgrade class gave a presentation on a book they had read, “Onward is Best,” that inspired them to help fight cancer.

Gateway Community and Technical College and Thomas More College announced May 3 a new educational partnership that will guarantee qualifying Gateway graduates automatic admission to Thomas More College and an enhanced financial aid package with a value of at least $10,000. Students earning an Associate of Arts or Associate of Science degree at Gateway will be eligible for the new “Four is More Program.” “The Four is More partnership reflects Gateway’s ongoing strategy to provide high-quality transfer education that prepares our students to pursue a bachelor’s degree if they so desire,” said Ed Hughes, Gateway president and CEO. “The program benefits our students by providing a seamless transition into one of region’s premier fouryear colleges,” Hughes added. “Equally important, students will be able to save very substantial sums of money on a four-year degree by completing their first two years at Gateway at our very affordable tuition rates and then having access to a very attractive financial aid package at Thomas More.” According to Sister Margaret Stallmeyer, president of Thomas More College, “There is a growing recognition in our region of the necessity of post-secondary education, and increasing the access to higher education is a primary goal of our partnership with Gateway. I believe the Four is More program addresses that in a most concrete manner by providing a smooth transition from a two-year degree to a four-year degree.” Stallmeyer noted that the partner-

Dr. Ed Hughes of Gateway Community and Technical College and Sister Margaret Stallmeyer, president of Thomas More College, sign a partnership agreement guaranteeing Gateway graduates admission to Thomas More. PROVIDED ship is ideal for students who have begun a two-year degree and realize the potential that a four-year degree could offer. “Gateway students who want to go on to pursue their bachelor’s degree will find that our small class sizes and individualized attention offer them opportunities to fully explore their chosen fields. We’re proud to partner with Gateway on this valuable student benefit.” The partnership guarantees Gateway associate degree graduates who enroll full time at Thomas More a minimum of $10,000 in scholarships and grants from Thomas More. Awards are based on a combination of financial need and grade point average. Students with grade point averages of 3.0 and higher will be eligible for larger awards, up to $14,000 a year for three years. Gateway students interested in the Four is MORE Program should contact Mike Rosenberg at 859-8157681 or email michael. rosenberg@kctcs.edu. For transfer degree information contact the Admissions Office at 859-442-1134.

Adult ed offers GED testing Community Recorder Boone County Adult Education serves anyone over the age of 16 who wants to improve their educational situation. They offer classes to assist individuals preparing for the GED test, as well as for those who want to prepare for enrollment in a post-secondary institution. They also provide English as a second language classes to those in-

dividuals who are not native English speakers, and wish to improve their language skills. Usually, the cost to take the GED test is $60 but through June 30 Kentucky Adult Education, a unit of the Council on Postsecondary Education, is offering free GED testing. Contact Boone County Adult Education at 282-4629 for information on how to get started on earning your GED.

COLLEGE CORNER Boyle named to president’s list

Jordan Boyle of Florence was named to the president’s list for the spring semester at St. Catharine College. The president’s list includes all students who had a 4.0 gradepoint average.

Haggard awarded $11,000 scholarship

Kaitlin N. Haggard, grand-

daughter of Glenn and Lenora Kay Haggard of Florence, has been awarded an $11,000 fouryear Fraternal College Scholarship. The national competition was for students who are members of Modern Woodmen of America, a fraternal benefit society offering financial services. Haggard plans to use the scholarship to attend Transylvania University in Lexington. She is one of 35 regional scholarship

winners chosen this year.

Walden, Reed earn degrees

Jessica Ann Walden of Burlington and Troy Scott Reed of Hebron graduated from Campbellsville University on May 4 and 5, respectively. Walden, daughter of Chris and Stacey Walden of Amity, Ore., received a bachelor of science in biology. She is a graduate of Conner

Senior High School. Reed graduated with a master of arts in special education.

Mollozzi attends leadership conference

Rachel Mollozzi of Hebron attended the National Campus Leadership Council’s Student Leadership Summit in Washington, D.C. April 14-15. The Summit connected student leaders with policymakers

to discuss the most important issues affecting young Americans, including student debt, college affordability and unemployment. Mollozzi, who received a bachelor’s degree in public relations from Eastern Kentucky University May 5, served as president of EKU’s Student Government Association and as student member of the Board of Regents.


SPORTS

MAY 17, 2012 • FLORENCE-UNION RECORDER • A7

By James Weber jweber@nky.com

This Week’s MVP

» Ryle senior Tanner McConvey for scoring the most points to lead Ryle to its first boys team regional track championship in 15 years.

Baseball

» Cooper got what head coach Bob Berger called the biggest win in its four-year history, beating Harrison County 8-4 in eight innings May 11. Harrison County, a perennial state power, is 23-7. Jake Lawhorn drove in the go-ahead run in the seventh and Chris Setzer had a two-run single for insurance, followed by an RBI squeeze bunt from Jaelin Schumacher. Collin Smith got the win on the mound. » Ryle beat Campbell County 6-3 in eight innings May 9. Mark Downs got his seventh win of the year. Thomas Baumann hit a home run. Ryle beat St. Henry 3-2 May 7. Tanner Pulice got the save. Marshall Long had two hits and two RBI. » St. Henry beat Cooper 6-0 May 9. Mitchell Kuebbing drove in two. St. Henry beat Boone County 4-3 May 8, with Kuebbing getting the win and three hits. Elliott Ringo had a two-out walkoff single for the win.

RECORDER

Editor: Melanie Laughman, mlaughman@communitypress.com, 513-248-7573

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | RECREATIONAL

PRESS PREPS HIGHLIGHTS

COMMUNITY CommunityPress.com

Freedom look to bounce back Team enters 10th season as professional team in Florence By James Weber

The Florence Freedom manager Fran Riordan paces the dugout before their opening day game against the Normal Cornbelters at Champion Windows Field in 2011 FILE PHOTO

jweber@nky.com

FLORENCE — Fran Riordan

suffered some rare losing in the Frontier League in 2011. The second-year manager of the Florence Freedom professional baseball team was a three-time league all-star in the Frontier League as a player and the manager of the year in 2008 with Kalamazoo, leading that team to the league title. Riordan, 36, directed a 39-57 season in Florence last year, and will look to lift the Freedom as they enter their 10th season in the league and eighth in their home stadium. They will endeavor to reverse a team history in which they have had two winning seasons and no playoff appearances. “We had a lot of guys with Frontier League experience come in and not perform to expectations, and we had some guys get hurt that we expected to be a big part of the team last year,” Riordan said. “The combination of those two things led to a pretty disappointing sea-

son.” Florence starts the season 7:05 p.m. Thursday, May 17, at home against Traverse City. The 96-game season runs through Sept. 2. Florence has 48 home games, the last being Aug. 26. The Frontier League is independent from Major League Baseball. Its players are a mix of players straight out of college and others who had some time in the lower levels of MLB’s minor leagues. Because

of league rules limiting the amount of experience a team can have, and the general attrition of players retiring from the sport, every team has a lot of turnover in its roster from one year to the next. The Freedom are no different, though a big part of their core returns from last season, with nine players from 2011 on the Opening Day roster as of May 14. The Freedom had to cut five players after Recorder print deadlines. Chief among the returnees is Chris Curley, the former Beechwood standout who led the Freedom last year with 14 home runs, 66 RBI and 60 runs scored. He hit .292. Center fielder Cole Miles (.308), the team’s top hitter, also See FREEDOM, Page A8

FREEDOM FACTS The league has expanded to 14 teams this year from 12, adding the London Rippers, located near Detroit, and the Schaumburg Boomers, a second Chicago-area team. Florence is in the East Division with the Evansville (Ind.) Otters, Lake Erie Crushers (Avon, Ohio), London Rippers (Waterford, Mich.), Southern Illinois Miners (Marion), Traverse City (Mich.) Beach Bums and Washington (Pa.) Wild Things. Evansville and Lake Erie are the closest teams at about 200 miles away. The West Division is Gateway Grizzlies, Joliet Slammers, Normal CornBelters, River City Rascals, Rockford RiverHawks, Schaumburg Boomers and Windy City (Chicago) ThunderBolts. See FACTS, Page A8

Softball

» Ryle beat Walton-Verona 5-4 May 9. Jenalee Ginn had a home run for W-V. Ryle beat Cooper 6-2 May 8. McKell Oliverio had four hits and an RBI. » St. Henry beat Cooper 4-2 May 7. St. Henry picked up a key win over Ninth Region champion Ryle 4-1. Mamee Salzer got the win. » St. Henry shut out Dixie Heights and Notre Dame May 12 in the Strike Out Cancer charity event.

College signings

» Walton-Verona had three signings. Jessica Gregg signed with Bowling Green State University for softball (Division I); Zachary Greene signed with Pikeville University for baseball (NAIA); Matt Hargett signed with Thomas More College (D III)

Coaching moves

» Bishop Brossart needs a new assistant volleyball coach. Call Mel Webster at 859-609-6937 or email mwebster@bishopbrossart.org.

Roller Derby

» The Black-n-Bluegrass Rollergirls will host their season opener Saturday, May 19, at 6 p.m. at the Bank of Kentucky Center on NKU’s campus. Tickets are $12 ahead of time and $15 at the door. Firefighters, police officers and EMTs will receive $3 off admission, and happy hour beer prices are available between 6 and 7 p.m. For more information, visit www.nkyrollerderby.com.

Golf

» Two Ryle golfers competed in the Kentucky Junior Golf Foundation Junior Masters May 5-6 in Nicholasville, Ky. Freshman Nadine Innes finished 14th with a tworound score of 166. Senior Alex Bruce was 18th at 168.

Catching Up

» Ryle 2008 graduate Kirsten Allen and the University of Oklahoma softball team will host one of the NCAA Division I regionals this weekend. The four-team doubleelimination bracket starts May 18. Allen is the third-string pitcher for the Sooners, but pitched in relief May 12 against Iowa State in a game that helped OU clinch the Big 12 title. She also pitched on Senior Day against Texas May 6. Allen holds every major Kentucky pitching record in high school and led Ryle to the 2006 state title. ESPN plans to have major coverage of the NCAA Tournament. Check local listings.

RAIDERS ROLL TO REGIONAL TRACK TITLE

County runners prepare for state

Boone County junior Jessica Jones wins the long jump at the 3A, Region 5 track and field championships. JAMES WEBER/THE COMMUNITY RECORD

By James Weber jweber@nky.com

BOONE COUNTY — The school was less than 5 years old when its boys track team last won a regional championship. As Ryle High School nears the end of its 20th year, the Raiders will put this year on the banner in the gym after the boys track and field team won the Class 3A, Region 5 team championship May 10 at Scott. Ryle had 123 points to 106 for Boone County for its first team regional crown since 1997. “That’s the ultimate goal,” said senior Tanner McConvey, who scored 36 of the points in his four events. “I don’t care how I run, I want the team to win the championship.” Ryle had seven event champions who will lead the state qualifiers for the Raiders into the 3A state meet May 19 in Louisville. The top two finishers in each regional event qualify, plus 10 at-large berths throughout the state. Junior Nick Kennedy won three events, the 100, 200 and long jump. The 200 was one of the most notable races of the entire meet, as he came from the sixth seed to win easily, running in Lane 8. “Nick is a very powerful athlete,” said Ryle head coach Russell Harden. “The eighth lane is a big turn at the end, and he had the power to come from behind.” McConvey, a senior, won the 110 and 300 hurdles and finished second in the pole

Brady Baker of Cooper won the 1,600 race a the 3A, Region 5 tack and field championship.s The top finishers wer, from left, Ben Turner (Conner), Baker, Max McGehee (Dixie), Michael Menkhaus (Dixie) and Jack Gaddie (Conner). JAMES WEBER/THE COMMUNITY RECORD

Ryle’s Nathan Davis triple jumps at the 3A, Region 5 track and field championships May 10 at Scott High School in Taylor Mill. JAMES WEBER/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

vault and triple jump for 36 total points. He medalled at state in the last season in the 110 hurdles. “We only have four or five seniors, so (the team’s) going to be good for a couple of years,” McConvey said. Michael Leone, one of those seniors, won the discus with a throw of 141-10, close to his personal best, and more than 30 feet past his regional mark from last year. A former cross country runner at Ryle before growing to more than 200 pounds, he has been work-

ing in clinics with the University of Cincinnati track team and head coach Susan Seaton, where he will walk on next year. Leone constantly watches videos of top Olympic throwers in slow motion. “I can’t wait to work with her in college,” Leone said. “There is a lot more technique to throwing than it looks.” Also for Ryle, Nathan Davis won the high jump. Ryle was second in the 4x200. In girls, Ryle’s Alexandra Patterson won the 800. Jensen Bales was second in

the 1,600 and Ashlee Howe second in the high jump. Howe also took second in the triple jump. Boone County had five event champions. Tyler Windham won the 400. The Rebels won the 4x200, 4x400 and 4x800. Philip Mensah won the shot put. Denzel Cain was second in the 200 to Ryle’s Kennedy. Austin Howell was second to Ryle’s McConvey in both hurdle events. Boone was second in the 4x100. In girls, Jessica Jones won the 100 hurdles in a photo finish and won the long jump. Conner senior Ben Turner won the 3,200 and Sammy Iles the triple jump. Conner’s Chris Crews was second place See TRACK, Page A8


SPORTS & RECREATION

A8 • FLORENCE-UNION RECORDER • MAY 17, 2012

Sportsman voting ends Friday, May 18

Florence Recorder and Union Recorder readers only have a few more days to vote for the 2012 Sportsman and Sportswoman of the Year, which closes Friday, May 18. To place a vote, go to cincinnati.com/preps. Find the red and blue Sportsman of the Year logo on the right-hand side (you may need to scroll

down) and click on it for a list of newspaper ballots/

links. If you do not already have a cincinnati.com account needed to vote, you can create one the first time you vote. You may also log in using your Facebook account and link that Facebook account to your cincinnati.com account. You may need to clear the cache on your Internet browser for the voting

process to go smoothly for you the first time. Once logged in, you can vote every day up to 150 times until midnight Friday, May 18. Winners will receive a pair of tickets to an upcoming Cincinnati Reds game, courtesy of the club, and a story in the June 20-21 issue. Twitter updates on vot-

Four Raiders to play in state tennis tourney By James Weber jweber@nky.com

UNION — Last year, Maddie Lucas and Harlee Hornsby had a tense threeset win over Calvary Christian to clinch a berth in the state doubles tournament. Although they were facing two different Calvary players this year, the Ryle High School doubles team were facing a similarly thrilling finish May 9 during the Ninth Region tournament. But the Raider pair reached for something extra and closed out this year’s match in two sets to reach the state tourney. Lucas, a senior, and Hornsby, a junior, will start play in the state tourney May 17 in Lexington. They lost in the first round at state last year. “We’ll have a chance to redeem ourselves from last year,” Lucas said. “We’ll know what to expect. We took some notes and we’ll try to learn from what we did.” According to Ryle coaches, it’s the first time the Ryle girls team has had a state qualifier in consecutive years. The Raiders had doubts it would happen for a while as Calvary charged into a comeback in the second set in the do-or-die quarterfinal round. “It was very frustrating after winning 6-1 first set,” Lucas said. “The second set we got caught in the moment, and we said we wouldn’t do that again. It’s

Track Continued from Page A7

in the long jump. Cooper had three regional champions in the girls 3A meet. Jordan Hauck won the 100. Kasey Weinfurtner won the high jump. Cooper won the 4x800 Julia Henderson was second in the 400. In boys, Cooper freshman Brady Baker won the 1,600 and was second in the 3,200. Ethan Brennan was second in the 800, and Cooper was second in the 4x800. Joe Blevins was second in high jump and Dustin Mitchell in shot put. St. Henry won both team championships May 11 in 1A, setting themselves up for another strong state meet. Cameron Rohmann took both the 400 and 800 titles. Zach Haacke won the pole vault. Austin Eibel won the 300 hurdles with Andrew Svec second. Eibel also won the high jump. Craig Aldridge took the triple jump and

Ryle's Maddie Lucas, right, and Harlee Hornsby qualified for state in doubles at the Ninth Region tennis tournament May 7-11. JAMES WEBER/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER just being positive and talking to each other, paying one point at a time. It’s not a short mile run, it’s a long haul.” Ryle went 14-3 in dual matches this year. Juniors Meghan Watson and Sam Zwick reached the regional doubles quarterfinals. Freshman Carley Lucas and senior Erin Bellhorn were singles players. Ryle lost team matches to reDavid Hellmann the discus. Robert Brockman was runner-up in the 800 and Daniel Wolfer in the 3,200. St. Henry won the 4x400 and 4x800 in boys. In girls track, St. Henry’s Laura Felix won the pole vault. Ashley Svec won the 800 and 1,600, with teammates Taylor Connett and Lindsey Hinken finishing second, respectively. Hinken won the 3,200, with Sam Hentz finishing second. Meghan Burke and Celia Eltzroth were 1-2 in the 100 hurdles. Burke also won the 300 hurdles and long jump, with Katherine Munzer finishing second in the latter. Burke was five inches shy of a clean sweep, finishing second in triple jump. The Cru won the 4x800 as well. Sullivan Culbertson was second in both the 100 and 200. Walton-Verona had two automatic state qualifiers in 1A. Madison Peace won the girls high jump. Zach MacAdams was second in the boys 110 hurdles.

gional powers Notre Dame, Beechwood and Highlands. “We’re really young, only a couple of seniors,” said Ryle girls head coach Stephen Collins. “We’d like to keep it going. We have a good tradition going on here.” The Ryle boys team also had a strong regular season and a doubles team going to state. Seniors Michael Savoia and Alex Arnett lost in

the regional semifinals. Savoia had a successful return to the team after five years away. “I feel good about getting to state,” Arnett said. “It’s a good opportunity and it was our goal all year. Michael plays great at the net. He’s really our key to success. He’s a big tall guy. If I can return deep and get him shots at the net, that’s our game plan. We’ll go down and try to have fun.” Said Savoia: “We just have to play as hard as we can. We have great teamwork. We’ve been best friends for 10 years which comes into play when you play tennis.” Ryle was 16-3 in dual matches this year. Senior Chase Hudak had a breakthrough season and lost in the regional quarterfinals last week. Adam Rost lost in the second round of singles. Jake Hudak and David Geis were No. 2 doubles. Avery Williams was the JV singles champion this season. “We had a great season,” said Ryle boys coach Amy Bates. “We were really in a rebuilding year.” Also in the regional, Cooper’s Jake Honschopp lost in the singles quarterfinals. In girls tennis, WaltonVerona’s Haley Kirchner lost in the singles quarterfinals and won the region’s sportsmanship award. Cooper’s Chelsea Nibert lost a three-set match to No. 2 seed Brooke Warden in the singles quarterfinals.

ing trends can be found at #soy12 or by following @PressPrepsMel. Log-in issues can be directed to Jordan Kellogg at jkellogg@nky.com. Further questions can go to Melanie Laughman at mlaughman@nky.com. Here are the students on your ballot:

Boys

Girls

Ashley Cheesman, Ryle Ariel Howell, Boone County Jessica JJ Jones, Boone County Mikayla Rolle, Cooper

SIDELINES Reds baseball camp An Cincinnati Reds baseball and softball camp for boys and girls ages 6-14 will be 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday-Friday June 4-8 at Florence Freedom park. The five-day camp includes 30 hours of instruction, a full Reds uniform (jersey, pants, hat and belt), four tickets to a 2012 Reds game and a graduation certificate commemorating attendance at the inaugural season of the Cincinnati Reds Baseball and Softball Camps. During camp, participants will visit the Great American Ball Park for a VIP behind-the-scenes tour. Campers will receive special instruction from a Reds coach, plus a guest appearance by a current Reds player. Each camper will compete in a skills competition with championships held at Great Amer-

Freedom Continued from Page A7

comes back, as does outfielder/DH John Malloy (.272). Second baseman Junior Arrojo and outfielder Drew Rundle are other returning position players. Lefthanded pitcher Anthony Bello had a 4.24 ERA in 17 starts last year, and Alec Lewis had a 3.21 ERA including three complete games for the team. Closer Brandon Mathes and reliever Mike Hanley also return. “There are a lot of guys who have really opened

Facts Continued from Page A7

River City is in the St. Louis area, as is Gateway. The rest are in northern Illinois. The season will be 96 games long. The two division winners and the two next best teams regardless of division will make the playoffs.

Schedule

Boone County senior Austin Howell runs to second place in the 300 hurdles. JAMES WEBER/THE COMMUNITY RECORD

A.J. Collins, Cooper Chris Froschauer, Ryle Louis Maniacci, Cooper Mikel Reynolds, Boone County

May 17-19 TRAVERSE CITY May 22-24 ROCKFORD May 25-27 at Schaumburg May 29-31 at S. Illinois June 1-3 NORMAL June 5-7 RIVER CITY June 8-10 at Windy City June 11-13 LONDON June 14-16 WASHINGTON June 17-19 at Lake Erie June 20-22 at Washington June 23-24 at Evansville June 27-29 GATEWAY June 30-July 1 LAKE ERIE July 3-5 at Joliet July 6-8 EVANSVILLE July 11 All-Star game July 12-14 at Gateway July 16-18 at Traverse City July 19-21 at River City July 22-23 LAKE ERIE July 25-27 at Washington July 28-29 EVANSVILLE

ican Ball Park. Campers will also have their swing recorded and analyzed by the camp video specialist using the same technology used by the Reds. Visit www.reds.com/camps or call 1-855-846-7337.

Sorority golf outing The Omega Phi Tau Sorority will host a golf outing at 12:30 p.m. Saturday, May 19, at the Kenton County Pioneer Golf Course in Independence. The outing is a four-person, shot-gun start 18-hole scramble. The cost is $65 and includes golf, cart, refreshments, appetizers, dinner, door prizes and specialty hole prizes. All proceeds from the outing will go to local charities, including the Grateful Life Foundation and Peggy Foster Memorial Fund. Call Martha at 859-3314233 or Amy at 859-620-4446.

up our eyes. After just a few days, we already know we are going to have a lot of young, quality arms. And offensively, we have a good mix of new and experienced guys who can really hit,” said Riordan. Only three players of the 29 on the May 14 roster have not had at least some professional experience. While the team has not succeeded on the field, the franchise survived and prospered despite numerous problems in its first two seasons. The Freedom is one of five franchises from their debut 2003 season still in the league. July 31-Aug. 2 SCHAUMBURG Aug. 3-5 at London Aug. 7-9 WINDY CITY Aug. 10-12 at Lake Erie Aug. 14-16 at Rockford Aug. 17-19 S. ILLINOIS Aug. 21-23 JOLIET Aug. 24-26 WASHINGTON Aug. 28-30 at Normal Aug. 31-Sept. 2 at Evansville

Need-to-know info

» Single-game tickets range from $7 to $12. The team has plenty of promotions and group outings available. Visit www.florencefreedom.com. » Start times for home games are 7:05 p.m. Monday through Friday and 6:05 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. » July 8 and 29 (both Sundays) are day-night doubleheaders, start times 1:05 and 6:05 p.m. June 24 in Evansville is also a doubleheader. » May 23 game (Wednesday) is a 11:05 a.m. start. » The most painful trip will be July 12-21. The team will go from St. Louis to Traverse City, about 600 miles, on an off day July 15, then after playing in Traverse City July 18, have to go back to St. Louis to play River City the next day. The Freedom will also make an overnight 500-mile trip from Washington to Evansville June 22.


VIEWPOINTS

MAY 17, 2012 • FLORENCE RECORDER • A9

COMMUNITY

RECORDER

Editor: Nancy Daly, ndaly@nky.com, 578-1059

EDITORIALS | LETTERS | COLUMNS | CH@TROOM

Life, liberty and pursuit of happiness I grew up in Pendleton County on my family’s farm. It was there that I first learned the most important principles for life. I would raise baby calves off of a bucket until I could wean them and then raised them and sold them. Through my work with beef cattle and in tobacco at a young age, when I was 16 I bought my first car, paid for it with cash, no loan, and it was a brand new car. But that’s where I got my work ethic and started running my own small business there when I was Gary Moore 14, 15 years COMMUNITY old. RECORDER GUEST COLUMNIST I then went to work for Wiseway Supply as their fourth employee. We grew that company to what it is today. I worked in the private sector for 20 years before ever seeking public office. Because of my private sector experience and understanding the importance of not putting up barriers to rapid growth and development that we were seeing and by keeping a handle on all departmental spending, we have been able to keep taxes low and government out of the way. I’m not sure others would have been able to do that. I know I have, and the success is in the numbers. Boone County is a great success story with 13,000 jobs created, taxes lowered, and revenues increased all under my tenure. This was done by using my experience in the private sector, listening to businesses and individuals, and taking decisive conservative actions. I have fought vigorously to protect liberty at its earliest stages. As a man of faith, I believe life begins at conception and as the protectors of rights, the government must give a voice to those who cannot speak for themselves. For my actions and convictions, I was humbled to be the only candidate endorsed by Kentucky Right to Life and Northern Kentucky Right to Life. This is a mantle that I take very seriously and will work tirelessly to maintain my flawless pro-life record. There has been much talk over the past few weeks about the involvement of super PACs and endorsements. I want to take this opportunity to say that though I am very proud to have the endorsements of colleagues, respected individuals, and revered organizations, the most important endorsement for me will be that of the people of the Fourth District on May 22. When you go to the polls on Election Day, I ask for your support, your prayers, and your vote. Gary Moore, judge-executive of Boone County, is a candidate for the Fourth District House Republican nomination.

CommunityPress.com

Family values a guiding principle Elections are funny things. They tend to bring out the best in people and, often, the worst. Rumor mills, whisper campaigns, gossip and the politics of personal destruction seem to have become the mother’s milk of politics. I’ve been the recipient of some of those nasty tactics recently. You sent me to Frankfort, so I am used to standing up to the worst bullies! I’d rather keep my campaign focused on the values we share, what we have done, and needs yet to be accomplished, but now I’d like to set the record straight. Yes, I have fought a very public battle against breast cancer. No, I’ve never been on any form of government disability. No, I’ve never contributed to the Susan G. Komen Foundation which has now been found to also fund pro-abortion groups. I am the only candidate endorsed by both of the leading pro-life organizations. If you care to

read my detailed response to the some of the negative gossip, you’ll find it on my website along with my position on imporAddia tant issues: Wuchner addiawuchCOMMUNITY ner.com. RECORDER GUEST COLUMNIST People ask me how I decide my vote on bills before the legislature. The answer is simple. Like the people of the 66th District, my primary guiding principles are a commitment to family values and a belief in the limited role of government. I evaluate every piece of legislation that comes before me with those principles in mind, and ask three essential questions: What is the underlying problem the bill is attempting to solve? Is it the role of state government to solve this problem or is it

addressed best through the private sector? Is it constitutional? As your representative, I worked to lower taxes, repeatedly voted against burdensome regulations, and stood firm against $1 billion in new debt and $300 million in job-killing taxes. I fought for excellence in education, equity funding for our schools, meaningful support for our military families, Second Amendment rights (cosponsored Castle Doctrine), and prevention of child abuse and fatalities from abuse and neglect. I stood against a budget whenever it increased the state debt ratio, or contained irresponsible spending. I hold a 100 percent pro small business voting record. As your representative, I addressed the infrastructure demands of our growing community like roads.

Since I have been in office, we managed to get the state to return 200 percent more in our tax dollars to Boone for county road projects. My next imperative is to push the Kentucky General Assembly to focus budget reform, tax reform and pension reform. Kentucky needs an environment where the private sector can thrive and create jobs for the future. I will continue to work to lead Boone County and Kentucky to a brighter and more prosperous future. I want our children and our grandchildren to believe they are blessed to call Kentucky home and have every opportunity to succeed. Thank you again for your trust in me and God bless. Addia Wuchner, a Republican, is running for re-election for the 66th District in the Kentucky House of Representatives.

Vote for positive change in Senate What do we want in a representative? Throughout my campaign I was confronted with the question, why do I want to run for the State Senate? My answer, the best way to bring about change is to propose it. Who truly wins a battle, the ones on the front line. What makes a good leader, one knows the right direction, takes it, and show others the way. When one sees something moving in the wrong direction should one not intervene? To bring about positive change we need to vote for those who also want positive change. If you haven’t seen it in the past four years why vote the same way twice? I know things could be better but it has to be brought about through hard work, good legislative bills, and gathering

support for those bills. For a legislator to simply wait for another to propose it and then voting for it achieves very little. One Joshua Turner should be agCOMMUNITY gressive, acRECORDER GUEST COLUMNIST tive, and involved. The support needs to come from working with other legislators, and when that fails turning to the people. Allowing their voices to be raised up and heard. Allowing them to take up the call, allowing them to inform those who represent them (in their own district) to know where they stand and what they expect, and thus “We the People” is born

State senator seeks another term For almost four years, it has been my honor to serve as your state senator. Although these have been difficult times for our commonwealth, I have enjoyed the experience. We have been successful in funding a record number of state road projects for our area. I have sponsored legislation to correct the funding inadequacies in our school funding system. And I have stopped legislation that would have cost our school system millions. I am convinced that to revive our economy, small business must thrive again. This is why I have fought any statute or regulation which would impede our small business. I have sponsored and passed regulation which has been signed into law by the governor to assist our small businesses, by reducing red tape and regulations. This is why I received the “Friend of Small Business Award” from the National Federation of Independent Business for my 100 percent probusiness voting record, and why I am endorsed by pro-business groups such as the Home Builders Association of Kentucky and the Kentucky Association of Realtors. I have never voted for a

FLORENCE

RECORDER

A publication of

tax increase, as it is my belief that Frankfort has a spending problem and not a revenue problem. Lastly, I John Schickel have been a tireless adCOMMUNITY RECORDER GUEST vocate for COLUMNIST individual liberty and fidelity to our national and state constitutions. I am pro-life, and the only candidate endorsed by Northern Kentucky Right to Life and Kentucky Right to Life. I am pro-Second Amendment, and am the only candidate endorsed by the National Rifle Association. I have sponsored legislation to strengthen our Second Amendment rights and to protect our individual liberties. With your help, we can continue to make Northern Kentucky the great place we are all proud to call “home.” This Tuesday, I ask for your vote for state senator in the Republican primary. John Schickel, a Republican from Union, is seeking re-election to the State Senate.

again. There are many ways to rally, newspapers (like this one), organizations (tea party), gatherings ( Occupy Wall Street), to name just a few examples. When wanting change one has to demand it or the voice is silent thus leading to just another four years of the same. Our interest: No more tax increases, no new taxes, income tax reform, reintroduce the angel investor’s bill, invest in new and existing companies (tax incentives), place a cap on our state deficit, becoming a state (not a commonwealth), becoming a right to work state, no tolls on individuals on the new proposed 1-75 bridge. I am running for positive change and to protect our interest. I will work toward gather-

ing the support needed and to support our interest. I will work toward gathering the support needed, and when necessary to rally the people to bring about this change. I promise to bring transparency, honesty and integrity to this position, to be active, to work hard and hear your voice and amplify it so we all may have a better tomorrow. We can and will make difference. This is our front line, the right path, and your chances to intervene and let your voice sound out. I cannot express enough how important it is that you vote. On May 22 I ask for you to vote for change, vote for Joshua L. Turner. Josh Turner, of Florence, is a Republican candidate for the 11th District State Senate.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Wuchner is inspirational

I consider myself to be an average woman; I am married, and am about to have my second child. I am a parishioner of Immaculate Heart of Mary Church near my home in Burlington. I have maintained and embraced the conservative values with which I was raised. Until recently, I thought that being pro-life and being a feminist were mutually exclusive. Recently, this opinion changed for me when I met State Rep. Addia Wuchner. I have found, after speaking with her several times, and learning of her voting record, that she is truly 100 percent committed to making the lives of Kentuckians better without hidden personal agenda. Wuchner epitomizes a woman of strength and courage and the empowerment of all people, especially conservative women. I believe that we are blessed to have had Ms. Wuchner as a Kentucky state representative for the past eight years, and while I do not feel that I am entitled to tell anyone else how to vote on Election Day, I want you to know that I will be voting to

228 Grandview Drive, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017 654 Highland Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075 phone: 283-0404 email: kynews@communitypress.com web site: www.nky.com

keep this inspirational and devoted woman in office. Katie Courtney Burlington

Honored to endorse Moore

I count it an honor and privilege to endorse and support the election of Gary Moore to Congress. I have had the opportunity to work with Gary in many activities over the years since I have known him. He is honest, straightforward, determined and resourceful. If all the county judge-executives in the commonwealth were as successful as Gary Moore has been in his several years as judge of Boone County would be the envy of the nation. He has demonstrated that he can prevail for the benefit of his area of responsibility over and over again. He has dealt with the difficult problems in all of Northern Kentucky with the cooperation of the neighboring county judges. He deserves to be elected with his proven leadership over the long term. We can all feel safer with his representSee LETTERS, Page A10

Florence Recorder Editor Nancy Daly ndaly@nky.com, 578-1059 Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday See page A2 for additional contact information.


NEWS

A10 • FLORENCE-UNION RECORDER • MAY 17, 2012

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Continued from Page A9

boards and in schools. Just a few: 1. Founding board member of Boone County’s Success by Six 2. Author of Dyslexia and Response to Intervention Bill 3. Author of Pediatric Abusive Head Trauma (Shaken Baby) Bill 4. Supporter of the Family Friendly Jury Duty Legislation The last one touches me personally in that my doctor had to send a letter to the courts after my request to be dismissed from jury duty was denied. The start date of jury duty was one week after my son’s due date! The dismissal was finally granted and three months later, I gladly fulfilled my civic duty. No new mother should have to go through the experience of what I went through and now they don’t thanks to Addia.

ing us in Congress as he has in Boone County. We have been fortunate in having a long list of superior representation in Congress in the Fourth District, let us continue the list forward with the election of Gary Moore. We all need to get out and vote, and vote for Gary Moore for Congress. Herbert R. Booth, M.D. Boone County

Re-elect Wuchner

Women have a muchneeded place in our Legislature. An experienced woman like Addia Wuchner is even more valuable. Respected by her colleagues for reasoned and careful deliberations, we conservative, pro-life women know we can trust Addia to represent our views. As a seasoned legislator she is the wide choice for men as well. Experience counts. Please vote for my friend and yours on May 22.

Julia Pile Florence

Moore offers vision

Sarah Kahmann Burlington

We know whoever wins the Republican primary for the Fourth Congressional District will win the general. I am supporting Judge Gary Moore this election because he offers the vision of Northern Kentucky economic development that is so needed right now. Judge Moore has successfully led his constituency through a time of economic growth while the rest of the nation floundered. May 22 is quickly approaching and Judge Moore will need every vote to bring Kentucky values to

Wuchner supportive of women

I had an interesting conversation on Twitter the other day when someone posted that State Rep. Addia Wuchner was not supportive of women or kids. I read it to my husband and we both laughed out loud. I cannot list in 200 words all the legislation that Addia has sponsored over her time in office that advocates for women and children and the time she spends on task forces,

D.C.

ABOUT LETTERS AND COLUMNS

Kim Bunger Florence

Schickel a small business champion

Frankly, all our Kentucky members should be so fortunate as those of you who are represented in the legislature by Sen. John Schickel. He has fought daily to protect the bottom line of small businesses. It’s been a rough few years in the Kentucky General Assembly with debates on reforming state taxes, how to bring down the cost of group health insurance, preventing backsliding on the hard fought workers’ compensation reforms of 1996 and ensuring entrepreneurs have a chance at dragging us out of the recession. Small business is gaining ground in Frankfort like never before. Legislators are actively seeking the opinions of small business owners. Schickel has been on the front lines of several of these crucial battles. He understands that "Mom and Pop" know best how to run their businesses and money that stays invested in growing their business is far better for the economy than giving it to bureaucrats in Frankfort to spend. The bottom line is that Schickel is an active crusader for and defender of our free enterprise system. His 100 percent voting record with NFIB on small business issues and his earning the NFIB/KY Guardian of Small Business Award proves his commitment. On behalf of 6,000 mem-

We welcome your comments on editorials, columns, stories or other topics important to you in the Recorder. Include your name, address and phone number(s) so we may verify your letter. Letters of 200 or fewer words and columns of 500 or fewer words have the best chance of being published. All submissions may be edited for length, accuracy and clarity. Deadline: Noon Monday E-mail: kynews@communitypress.com Fax: 859-283-7285 U.S. mail: See box below Letters, columns and articles submitted to the Recorder may be published or distributed in print, electronic or other forms.

bers of NFIB/Kentucky, we thank the people of Senate District 11 for sending John Schickel to Frankfort. John T. (Tom) Underwood NFIB/Kentucky State Director Frankfort

Schickel dedicated to community

As past president of the League of Kentucky Property Owners and editor of the Boone County GOP newsletter, I have known State Sen. John Schickel dating back to his exemplary service as Boone County jailer, and later followed his achievements as U.S. Marshal for the commonwealth of Kentucky. In every role John served, he has represented our community with the utmost dignity and honor. Whether it’s a pro-life rally, prayer gathering, businessmen’s meeting, or charity event, John Schickel can often be found participating and lending support. Unlike many politicians who forget their roots

along the way, John has managed to maintain a strong sense of community service throughout his career. Having also served as spokesperson for Kentucky Taxpayers United, meeting my expectations as a legislator is virtually impossible. I demand a near-perfect voting record with emphasis on reducing taxes and regulations. Consequently, it means a great deal for me to offer this testimonial on behalf of Schickel. Personally, I believe in term limits, and that every incumbent should have a challenger. Nevertheless, I can tell you that the character and voting record demonstrated by John Schickel during his first term as state senator is certainly worthy of your support. Brett Gaspard Walton

Wuchner a conservative pioneer

ANY NEW 2012 JEEP

Addia Wuchner’s opponent tries to paint the incumbent Boone County state representative as part of the GOP establishment, but Wuchner is about as much a part of the establishment as U.S. Sen. Jim DeMint. Like DeMint, she uses her position to push GOP leadership to the right. Trusted conservatives in the House like Joe Fischer, Stan Lee and Jim DeCesare tell us they look to Addia for leadership on constitutional issues and the strategies that can move important bills forward. Addia’s even pushing constitutional leadership on a national level by drafting model legislation that is being adopted by many states. Judy Williams Verona

Attack exposes hypocrisy

Cathy Flaig says she supports term limits and opposes career politicians. Yet Flaig held office in Boone County Fiscal Court for 12 years. She did not step down to honor a commitment to term limits. She did so in order to run for county judge-executive. After losing that race, Flaig wants to run for state representative and says “no one should serve for three terms or four terms at the most.” Hmm, sounds like she’d like to haul in another eight years worth of taxpayerfunded salary. Will the real career politician please stand up? Emily Shelton Burlington

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LIFE

THURSDAY, MAY 17, 2012

COMMUNITY RECORDER

PEOPLE | IDEAS | RECIPES

N. Ky. prepares for festival season By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

Festival-goers have plenty of options to choose from in cities throughout Northern Kentucky. From festivals celebrating holidays and heritage to those that celebrate local foods like Glier’s Goettafest, the Northern Kentucky region offers a wide array of festival fun to residents and visitors. In Newport, where back-toback festivals fill the summer months, festival planning was spurred by the region’s annual Riverfest during Labor Day weekend. City Manager Thomas Fromme said when Riverfest began decades ago, Newport staff saw that their city, particularly Riverboat Row which runs along the Ohio River, was a very viable option for successful festivals. “It’s just such a great venue for festivals,” Fromme said. “There is the riverfront, a view of Cincinnati, easy access and plenty of parking in the area.” The city began hosting its annual Italianfest, celebrating Newport’s rich Italian heritage, in 1991 and has since added several other festivals.

The Zinzinnati Bierband had members of the crowd dancing to the music during Maifest in Covington's Mainstrausse Village in 2011. FILE PHOTO With the location of Newport being in the the center of the Cincinnati region, city staff realized that putting on festivals would be a good way to pro-

mote tourism and the city’s businesses, Fromme said. “These festivals promote the city and cause a ripple effect, benefiting local businesses,”

Fromme said. In Covington, MainStrasse Village is another popular place for festivals and events. The MainStrasse Village As-

sociation administrative coordinator Donna Kremer said through their yearly festivals like Maifest, Oktoberfest, they also hope to promote their city, while giving people a chance to come out and have a good time. Kremer said one reason the association hosts these events is to raise funds for their nonprofit group. “Our mission is to promote Covington,” Kremer said. “We hope to continue to make it a more inviting place to visit.” In Union, the city is already in preparation for their biggest event of the year, Union Celebrates America, held the weekend before the Fourth of July. Karen Franxman, Union’s city events coordinator, said since Union doesn’t really have a core like other areas and instead has neighborhoods scattered throughout the city, she feels it important to bring everyone together for events like Union Celebrates America. “These events give residents a chance to build a community connection and really get that sense of community with each other,” Franxman said. “It’s a great chance for residents and visitors to come out and have some fun together.”

SUMMER FESTIVALS MAY Maifest, May 18-20 5-11:30 p.m. Friday, noon-11:30 p.m. Saturday, noon-9 p.m. Sunday, MainStrasse Village, Main Street, Covington. Arts and crafts booths, German and international foods, music, children’s play area, amusement rides, street chalk art contest and more. Music on four stages. Presented by MainStrasse Village Association. 859-491-0458; www.mainstrasse.org.

JUNE Italianfest, June 7-10 5-11 p.m. (Opening ceremony at 8 p.m.) Thursday, June 7, 5-11 p.m. Friday, June 8, 11 a.m. to 11 p.m., Saturday, June 9, noon-9 p.m. Sunday, June 10, Newport Riverfront. Authentic Italian food and live Italian music, a golf outing, family photo booth, pizza eating contest, cooking contest, games and rides. Daily BB Riverboats harbor cruises noon-3 p.m. Free. 859-292-3666.

tine Church, 1839 Euclid Ave., Covington. Raffles, food, adult games, miniature golf, silent auction and Kiddieland. 859-431-3943.

St. Henry Church Festival, June 15-16 6-11 p.m. Friday, June 15, 5-11 p.m. Saturday, June 16, 4-10 p.m. Sunday, June 17, St. Henry Church, 3813 Dixie Highway, . Food from local restaurants. Games for children in gym. Grand raffle of $4,000 and four prizes of $500 each. 859-727-2035.

MainStrasse Village “Originial” Goettafest, June 15-17 5-11:30 p.m. Friday, June 15, noon-11:30 p.m. Saturday, June 16, noon-9 p.m. Sunday, June 17, Sixth Street Promenade, Covington. Sample pizza, balls, gumbalya, chedda cheese, chili, burgers and more made with goetta. Games, children’s activities, arts and crafts, music and entertainment. www.mainstrasse.org.

Ludlow Fireworks Festival, June 8-9

Mary, Queen of Heaven Funfest, June 22-24

5-11 p.m. Friday and Saturday, June 8-9, Ludlow Park, 500 Elm St., Ludlow. Fireworks at 10 p.m. Saturday. Presented by City of Ludlow and Ludlow Youth Football.

6-11 p.m. Friday, June 22, 4-11 p.m. Saturday, June 23, 4-9 p.m. Sunday, June 24, Mary, Queen of Heaven Church, 1150 Donaldson Highway, Erlanger. Rides, gambling booths, grand raffle, food and drink booths, entertainment and more. Free. 859-525-6909.

Diocesan Catholic Children’s Home Summer Festival, June 9-10 6-11 p.m. Friday, June 8, 4-11 p.m. (Vito’s Fireworks at 10 p.m.) Saturday, June 9, 4-9 p.m. Sunday, June 10, Diocesan Catholic Children’s Home, 75 Orphanage Road, Fort Mitchell. More than 40 booths, rides, games, Noll Family chicken dinners Saturday and Sunday, music nightly, raffle, silent auction and more. Benefits Diocesan Catholic Children’s Home. Free. 859-3312040, ext. 8555; www.dcchome.org.

St. Augustine Church Festival, June 15-16 5-11 p.m. (Spaghetti dinner 5-8 p.m.) Friday, June 15, 5-11 p.m. (Fish dinner 5-8 p.m.) Saturday, June 16, St. Augus-

Independence Celebration, June 30 3-10 p.m. Saturday, June 30, Tower Park in Fort Thomas. Classic Car Show 3-7:30 p.m.; Classic Car Parade 7:45 p.m.; Beer booth 3-10 p.m.; Games, inflatables, food and beverages; How Wax Band 7-10 p.m.; and fireworks at 10 p.m. 859-781-1700, www.ftthomas.org.

JULY Independence Day Celebration, July 3 5-10 p.m. Tuesday, July 3, Florence Government Center, 8100 Ewing Blvd., Florence. Rides, food, a raffle, kids zone, demonstrations, music, concludes

at 10 p.m. with fireworks. Presented by City of Florence. Free.

Park Hills Fourth of July Festival, July 4 2-7 p.m., Sisters of Notre Dame, 1601 Dixie Highway, Covington. Games for children and adults, petting zoo, pony rides, entertainment, flea market, silent auction, food and major raffle of $2,590. Benefits Notre Dame Urban Education Center. Free. 859-392-8228.

Sisters of Notre Dame Fourth of July Festival, July 4 2-7 p.m. Wednesday, July 4, Sisters of Notre Dame, 1601 Dixie Hwy., Park Hills. Games for children and adults, petting zoo, pony rides, entertainment, flea market, silent auction, food, $2,590 raffle. Supports the Notre Dame Urban Education Center and the Sisters Mission in Uganda. 859-392-8228 or 859392-8229.

Independence Celebration, July 6-7 5-11 p.m. Friday, July 6 with a silent auction at the senior center from 5-9:30 p.m. and music by Mike Heile at 7 p.m.; Parade will be at 3 p.m. Saturday, July 7, starting at Summit View Middle School and ending at Memorial Park, Jack Woods Parkway, Independence. Events at the park will be 4-11 p.m. Saturday with music by Seth Michael at 7 p.m. and Fireworks at 10 p.m. Rides, food vendors, music.

Queen City Sausage Festival, July 13-15 5-11 p.m. Friday, July 13, noon-11 p.m. Saturday, July 14, noon-11 p.m. Sunday, July 15, Festival Park Newport, Riverboat Row, Newport. Food vendors, retail sausage shop, daily brat eating contest, games and entertainment. Presented by Queen City Sausage and Provision Inc. Free. 513-541-5581; www.queencitysausage.com.

Kenton County Fair and Horse Show, July 16-21 Erlanger Lions Carnival, July 19-21

6 p.m. to midnight Thursday-Saturday, July 19-21, Erlanger Lions Club, Sunset Avenue in Erlanger. Ride bracelets for all three nights will be $12; $15 each night. Food and refreshments. The How Wax Show Band will perform at 8 p.m. Saturday, July 21. Coolers prohibited. 859-282-9969.

Dogs Day of Summer Art Fair, July 28-29 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, July 28, noon-5 p.m. Sunday, July 29, Rabbit Hash General Store, 10021 Lower River Road, Rabbit Hash. Artists and live music. Free.

AUGUST Glier’s Goettafest, Aug. 2-5 5-11 p.m. Thursday and Friday, Aug. 2 & 3, noon-11 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 4, noon-9 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 5, Newport Riverfront. Goetta prepared in many ways - reubens, omelets, pizza and more. Live music, games and rides. www.goettafest.com.

Boone County Fair, Aug. 4-11 Pre-fair events Saturday, Aug. 4. Rides will be 6 p.m. to close MondayFriday, Aug. 6-10, and 1 p.m. to close Saturday, Aug. 11, at the Boone County Fairgrounds, 5819 Idlewild Road, Burlington. Cost is $8 ages 3 and up and includes parking and unlimited rides. www.boonecountyfair.org.

Great Inland Seafood Festival in Newport, Aug. 9-12 6-11 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 9, 6-11 p.m. (Cincinnati Reds fireworks) Friday, Aug. 10, noon-11 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 11, noon-9 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 12, Newport Riverfront. Premium seafood dishes from Greater Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky restaurants. www.greatinlandseafoodfest.com.

Alexandria Fair and Horse Show, Aug. 29 – Sept. 3

SEPTEMBER Devou Fall Festival, Sept. 1 Sept. 1, Devou Park, 1600 Montague

Keep Addia Wuchner Vot e Tu e s d ay, May 2 2 n d

CE-0000510538

Paid for by Addia Wuchner for State Representative,

Road, Covington.

Riverfest, Sept. 3 Noon-10 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 3, Newport Riverfront. Live entertainment on Riverboat Row from noon-9 p.m., food, beverages and Rozzi’s largest and oldest fireworks display at dark. www.WEBN.com.

Holy Cross High School Indian Summer Festival, Sept. 7-8 6-11 p.m. Friday and Saturday, Sept. 7-8, Holy Cross High School, 3617 Church St., Covington. Northern Kentucky wine tasting 7-8 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Proceeds benefit the high school. 859 431-1335.

MainStrasse Village Oktoberfest, Sept. 7-9 5-11:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 7, noon-11:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 8, noon-9 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 9, MainStrasse Village, Main Street, Covington. Mix of German and international foods, music and arts and crafts. Kinderplatz area with rides for children. Through Sept. 9. Presented by MainStrasse Village Association. Free. 859-491-0458; www.mainstrasse.org.

Newport Oktoberfest, Sept. 28-30 5-11 p.m. Friday, Sept. 28, noon-11 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 29, noon-9 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 30, Newport Riverfront. Each tent will have food, beer and music. 513-477-3320.

Art off Pike, Sept. 30 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 30, Pike and Seventh Sts., Covington. Artists will exhibit and sell their work. artoffpike@gmail.com.

Immanuel United Methodist Church Fall Festival, Sept. 29 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 29, at the Immanuel United Methodist Church, 2551 Dixie Hwy., Lakeside Park. Food, arts and crafts for sale, tickets for bounce houses and games. Craft vendor space available. Free. 859-341-5330.


B2 • FLORENCE-UNION RECORDER • MAY 17, 2012

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD FRIDAY, MAY 18

ABOUT CALENDAR

Business Classes

To submit calendar items, go to www.NKY.com and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to life@communitypress.com along with event information. Items are printed on a space-available basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to www.NKY.com and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page.

Marketing for Your Small Business, 6:30 p.m., Scheben Branch Library, 8899 U.S. 42, Tips and tools to help you achieve marketing goals. Information on free library resources that will help you answer such questions as “What is the State of My Industry?,” “Who is my Competition?” and “Who are my Customers?”. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-342-2665; www.smallbiznku.com. Union.

Music - Latin Latin Groove-Dance, 8:30-11 p.m., Boleros Dance Club, 8406 U.S. 42, Salsa, Cha Cha, Rumba, Merengue, Bachata and Bolero dances. Group class at 8:30 p.m. Soft drinks and water provided. Ages 18 and up. $5. 859-3795143. Florence.

Music - Rock Hogwild, 10 p.m.-2 a.m., Woodies Tavern, 10020 Demia Way, 859-282-1264. Florence.

Nature Stargazers Night, 8:30-11:30 p.m., Creation Museum, 2800 Bullittsburg Church Road, Planetarium/Observatory. On clear nights, use telescopes to view the heavens. On overcast nights, astronomy lesson in planetarium. Designed for older children and adults. Benefits Creation Museum. $15.95, $10.95 ages 12 and under. Registration required. 800-778-3390; creationmuseum.org. Petersburg.

On Stage - Theater River Rat and Cat, 7 p.m., Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Playhouse Off the Hill. Comedy about friendship and cooperation. River Rat and Cat learn they don’t need to be the same or even like the same things in order to be good friends. For ages 4 and up. Free. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-342-2665; www.bcpl.org. Burlington.

Recreation Duplicate Bridge, 6-9 p.m., Panorama Plus, 8510 Old Toll Road, Common Room. Open to all players. Family friendly. $5. Presented by Boone County Bridge Center. Through Dec. 21. 859-391-8639; www.boonecountybridgecenter.com. Florence.

Sports-Registrations & Tryouts Sports of All Sorts Youth Association Basketball Registrations, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sports of All Sorts Mt. Zion, 10094 Investment/Demia Way, Ages 5-18. Each team will practice one hour per week, exact day and time determined by coach. Family friendly. $105. Registration required. Presented by Sports of All Sorts Youth Association. 859-760-7466. Union. Northern Kentucky Girls Recreational Volleyball League Registration, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sports of All Sorts Mt. Zion, 10094 Investment/Demia Way, Forming teams by individual registrations received or by groups of players requesting to play for a coach or other players. Family friendly. $105. Registration required. Presented by Sports of All Sorts Youth Association. 859-760-7466. Union. Lil Strikers Learn to Play Soccer Instruction Registration, 9 a.m.-9 p.m., Sports of All Sorts Mt. Zion, 10094 Investment/Demia Way, Program designed to introduce game of soccer to children. Focus is on all components introducing the game of soccer. Ages 4-6. Family friendly. $95. Registration required. Presented by Sports of All Sorts Youth Association. 859-760-7466. Union.

SATURDAY, MAY 19 Craft Shows Spring Arts and Crafts Show, 10 a.m.-3 p.m., Florence Christian Church, 300 Main St., Activity Center. Jewelry, aprons, pen and ink drawings and more. Free. Presented by Christian Women’s Ministry. 859-6475000, ext. 550; florencechristian.org. Florence.

Education A Taste of Health, 11 a.m.-1 p.m., Remke-bigg’s Florence, 6920 Burlington Pike, Partnership between Remke bigg’s

The opening reception for The Carnegie's "Full of Color" exhibit will be 6-9 p.m. Friday, May 18. The exhibit will run through June 22. Admission is free after opening night. For more information, visit www.thecarnegie.com. Pictured is Suzanne Fisher's "Double Happiness." THANKS TO SHANNON BOYER

Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Beginners and casual gamers welcome. No experience required. Snacks provided. Family friendly. Free. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-342-2665; www.bcpl.org. Burlington.

and St. Elizabeth Healthcare focused on educating community on how to eat and live well. Tips for reducing risk of injury in any sport. Free. Presented by St. Elizabeth Healthcare. 859-3016300; www.stelizabeth.com/ atasteofhealth. Florence.

Sports-Registrations & Tryouts

Literary - Libraries Boone County Preservation Workshop, 1 p.m., Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Hear experts discuss the preservation needs of Boone County. Free. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-342-2665; www.bcpl.org. Burlington. Carnival of Cultures, 1-4 p.m., Florence Branch Library, 7425 U.S. 42, Dance, music and art from around the world. Bring family for snacks, face painting and crafts. Free. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-342-2665; www.bcpl.org. Florence.

Music - Acoustic Saturday Night Music, 7-8:30 p.m. Music by Myles Roberts., Velocity Bike & Bean, 7560 Burlington Pike, Acoustic sets by local musicians. Fresh baked goods, desserts and coffee available. Family friendly. Free. 859-371-8356; www.velocitybb.com. Florence.

Music - Rock Saving Stimpy, 10 p.m., Crew Lounge, 1933 Petersburg Road, $5. 859-586-4482. Hebron.

Nature Stargazers Night, 8:30-11:30 p.m., Creation Museum, $15.95, $10.95 ages 12 and under. Registration required. 800-778-3390; creationmuseum.org. Petersburg.

Recreation Duplicate Bridge, 11:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Panorama Plus, $5. 859-391-8639; www.boonecountybridgecenter.com. Florence. Family Fun Time, 9 a.m.-noon, Boone County Extension Environmental and Nature Center, 9101 Camp Ernst Road, Hike woods or walk trails. Strollers and toddler bikes welcome on paved or stone chip paths. Optional passport for activity available each month. Family friendly. Free. Presented by Boone County Cooperative Extension Service. 859-586-6101. Union. Summer Kick Off Overnight, 3 p.m. Pick-up is at 10:30 a.m. on Sunday at the latest., Ichiban Karate School, 5736 Limaburg Road, Water balloon fights, relay races, obstacle courses, visit from Cincinnati Zoo, movies with popcorn and Subway dinner. $50. Registration required. 859-282-8883. Burlington.

Sports-Registrations & Tryouts Sports of All Sorts Youth Association Basketball Registrations, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sports of All Sorts Mt. Zion, $105. Registration required. 859-7607466. Union. Northern Kentucky Girls

Boo Radley, pictured, will perform 6:30-9:30 p.m. Thursday, May 24, as part of Newport on the Levee's Bud Light's Live at the Levee Thursday night concert series. Performances will be each Thursday through Sept. 27 on the Riverfront Plaza next to the Newport Aquarium. For more information, visit www.newportonthelevee.com. PROVIDED

Lil Strikers Learn to Play Soccer Instruction Registration, 9 a.m.-9 p.m., Sports of All Sorts Mt. Zion, $95. Registration required. 859-760-7466. Union.

The Black-n-Bluegrass Roller will their first home bout of the season at 7 p.m. Saturday, May 19, at The Bank of Kentucky Center in Highland Heights. Doors open at 6 p.m. Tickets are $15 the day of the bout. Pictured, from left, are Smashin' Punk'n, Rosie the Riv-hit-her and Red Emma. For more information, visit black-n-bluegrass.com. THANKS TO RICHELLE DAVIS

Recreational Volleyball League Registration, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sports of All Sorts Mt. Zion, $105. Registration required. 859-760-7466. Union. Lil Strikers Learn to Play Soccer Instruction Registration, 9 a.m.-9 p.m., Sports of All Sorts Mt. Zion, $95. Registration required. 859-760-7466. Union.

SUNDAY, MAY 20 Antiques Shows Burlington Antique Show, 8 a.m.-3 p.m., Boone County Fairgrounds, 5819 Idlewild Road, More than 200 vendors with antiques, vintage jewelry and furniture, primitives, architectural elements, mid-century collectibles, American and memorabilia. Early buying, 6-8 a.m. with $5 admission. $3, free ages 12 and under. Presented by Burlington Antique Show. 513-922-6847; www.burlingtonantiqueshow.com. Burlington.

Pets Pits Rock Northern Kentucky Fun Walk, 4:15-5 p.m., Tractor Supply Co., 5895 Centennial Circle, Open to responsible pit bull owners willing to walk their well-behaved pit bulls together in public parks to show positive side of the breed. Free. Presented by Pawzitive Petz Rescue. 859-746-1661. Florence.

Sports-Registrations & Tryouts Sports of All Sorts Youth Association Basketball Registrations, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sports of All Sorts Mt. Zion, $105. Registration required. 859-7607466. Union. Northern Kentucky Girls Recreational Volleyball League Registration, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sports of All Sorts Mt. Zion, $105. Registration required. 859-760-7466. Union. Lil Strikers Learn to Play Soccer Instruction Registration, 9 a.m.-9 p.m., Sports of All Sorts Mt. Zion, $95. Registration required. 859-760-7466. Union.

MONDAY, MAY 21 Civic Boone County Conservation District Board Meeting, 7-8:30 p.m. Regular board meeting., Boone County Cooperative Extension Service, 6028 Camp Ernst Road, Regular meeting to discuss conservation programs, projects and events. Family friendly. Free. Presented by Boone County Conservation District. 859-586-7903; www.boonecountyky.org/bccd/ default.aspx. Burlington. Tea Party Meeting, 6-8 p.m., Sub Station II, 7905 Dream St., Meet and discuss limited government, free markets and fiscal responsibility. Free. Presented by Grassroots Tea Party of Boone County. 859-746-3573; www.teapartyboonecounty.org. Florence.

Education Word II, 6:30 p.m., Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Learn to create letterhead, form letters, mailing lists, labels and a resume using a template. Family friendly. Free. Registration required. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-342-2665. Burlington.

Exercise Classes Zumba, 6 p.m., Scheben Branch Library, 8899 U.S. 42, Latininspired dance-fitness program blends international music and dance steps. Family friendly. $25 per month. Registration required. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-3422665. Union. Cardio Dance Party, 6-7 p.m., Boleros Dance Club, 8406 U.S. 42, $10 per class. Registration required. 859-379-5143; www.bolerosdanceclub.com. Florence.

Literary - Libraries In the Loop, 10:30 a.m., Florence Branch Library, 7425 U.S. 42, Knit or crochet in relaxed, friendly company. Family friendly. Free. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-3422665; www.bcpl.org. Florence. Open Gaming (Middle and High School), 3:30-5 p.m.,

TUESDAY, MAY 22 Home & Garden Butterfly Gardening, 7 p.m., Walton Branch Library, 21 S. Main St., Learn how to attract butterflies and hummingbirds to your garden. Presented by Judy Burris and Wayne Richards, authors of “The Life Cycles of Butterflies.”. Free. Registration required. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-3422665; www.bcpl.org. Walton.

Free. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-342-2665. Union. Open Gaming (Middle and High School), 3:30-5 p.m., Boone County Main Library, Free. 859-342-2665; www.bcpl.org. Burlington. Spring Tea, 1 p.m., Florence Branch Library, 7425 U.S. 42, Evelyn Hance hosts tea party with spring touch. If you have favorite tea cup or one with history, bring it along. $7. Registration required. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-342-2665; www.bcpl.org. Florence.

Sports-Registrations & Tryouts Lil Strikers Learn to Play Soccer Instruction Registration, 9 a.m.-9 p.m., Sports of All Sorts Mt. Zion, $95. Registration required. 859-760-7466. Union.

THURSDAY, MAY 24 Education

WEDNESDAY, MAY 23

Email Basics, 10 a.m., Florence Branch Library, 7425 U.S. 42, Learn to set up free e-mail account, prevent viruses and pick up some e-mail etiquette tips. Family friendly. Free. Registration required. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-342-2665. Florence. Email Basics, 6:30 p.m., Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Learn basics of Microsoft Excel 2007, including how to sort a list, filter lists and numbers, create a pie chart and more. Free. Registration required. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-3422665; www.bcpl.org. Burlington.

Dance Classes

Exercise Classes

West Coast Wednesdays, 7:30-10:30 p.m., Boleros Dance Club, 8406 U.S. 42, Douglas Beal teaches West Coast Swing group class before open dancing. West Coast Swing, Hustle, Cha Cha and more. $7. 859-379-5143; www.bolerosdanceclub.com. Florence.

Yoga, 6 p.m., Scheben Branch Library, 8899 U.S. 42, Basic/ beginner yoga practice offers holistic approach to maintaining healthy weight with increased flexibility, more stamina and lean muscle. Bring mat. All levels. Family friendly. $25 per month. Registration required. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-334-2117. Union.

Recreation Bridge, 12:30 p.m., Scheben Branch Library, 8899 U.S. 42, Open play. All ages. Family friendly. Free. 859-342-2665. Union.

Sports-Registrations & Tryouts Lil Strikers Learn to Play Soccer Instruction Registration, 9 a.m.-9 p.m., Sports of All Sorts Mt. Zion, $95. Registration required. 859-760-7466. Union.

Dining Events Tasty Vegan Treats, 6:30 p.m., Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Avoid food allergies and go green with these easy food swaps. Sampling and new recipes. Free. Registration required. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-342-2665; www.bcpl.org. Burlington.

Literary - Book Clubs American Girl Book Club, 6:30 p.m., Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Ages 7-10. Family friendly. Free. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-342-2665. Burlington.

Exercise Classes

Recreation

Yoga with Pam Doremus, 6-7 p.m., Boleros Dance Club, 8406 U.S. 42, Drop-ins welcome for $10. Dress comfortably and bring mat. $48. 859-379-5143; www.bolerosdanceclub.com. Florence.

Bridge, 12:30 p.m., Scheben Branch Library, Free. 859-3422665. Union. Bike Night, 6-10 p.m., Florence Elks Lodge 314, 7704 Dixie Highway, Beer, food and cornhole. Ages 21 and up. Free. 859-746-3557. Florence.

Literary - Libraries Chess Club, 7 p.m., Florence Branch Library, 7425 U.S. 42, All ages and levels. Instruction available. Family friendly. 859342-2665. Florence. LinkedIn, 10 a.m., Scheben Branch Library, 8899 U.S. 42, Information on business networking site. Family friendly.

Sports-Registrations & Tryouts Lil Strikers Learn to Play Soccer Instruction Registration, 9 a.m.-9 p.m., Sports of All Sorts Mt. Zion, $95. Registration required. 859-760-7466. Union.


LIFE

MAY 17, 2012 • FLORENCE-UNION RECORDER • B3

Bran muffin batter can be kept in refrigerator

I’ve mentioned before how much I like this cut of meat. It has the tenderness of beef tenderloin and the beefy flavor of chuck, since it is part of the chuck. This method works for flank steak as well. Score steak with knife on both sides. Rub with olive oil, then rub in a bit of garlic on each side. Season with salt and pepper. Broil 4 inches under broiler, about 6 minutes or so on each side for medium.

Always-ready refrigerator bran muffins The batter can be kept tow to three weeks in the refrigerator. Next time I make the batter, I’m going to use part whole wheat flour. My batter lasted two weeks before I used it up. Not a real sweet muffin. I love having this batter on an as-needed basis. 3 cups whole bran breakfast cereal (not flakes) 1 cup boiling water 1 cup brown sugar, packed 1 stick butter 3 large eggs 2½ cups all-purpose flour 1 tablespoon baking soda ½ teaspoon salt 2 cups buttermilk (I used whole buttermilk)

The batter for these bran muffins can be kept in the refrigerator and baked on an as-needed basis. THANKS TO RITA HEIKENFELD

1½ teaspoons vanilla Extra sugar for sprinkling on top (raw sugar is good) optional

Add water to cereal and stir until cereal is moistened. Set aside. Cream brown sugar with butter until smooth. Add eggs and beat until light. Stir in flour, baking soda, salt, buttermilk and vanilla until blended. If not baking at once, transfer to container, cover and refrigerate 2-3 weeks. When ready to bake, spoon mixture, about ¼ cup for each muffin, into buttered or sprayed muffin tins, filling 2⁄3 full. Sprinkle with sugar. Bake in preheated 400 degree oven for 15-20 minutes or so until golden. Variations: Sprinkle one tablespoon of any of these over each muffin before baking: Chopped dried fruit, blueberries, chocolate chips, nuts or a combination of two.

Planting herbs

You can plant different kinds of herbs together in the same container as long as they have the same soil, water and light requirements. Flavors of sweet and savory herbs do not transfer. Basil: Plant basil next to your tomatoes for better tasting, healthier tomatoes. Basil helps keep flies and mosquitoes away. Mint: Really invasive, so

best grown in a container. Mint keeps ants away. Spearmint is sweeter and more mild than peppermint. Thyme: A pretty border herb. Deer generally stay away from areas where thyme is grown. Oregano: A few wet oregano sprigs, placed on grill before grilling red meats, may help block carcinogens that form. Savory: The bean herb, it helps you digest beans. An ingredient in salt-free herb blends. Rosemary: Good for memory and contains anticancer antioxidants. In our area, it is hardy to about 15 degrees outside, so bring indoors in winter.

Update: Brown Hotel Hot Browns

The original recipe contains 1 quart whipping cream. I understand now the recipe can be made with 2 cups, if you like. Someone asked if they could substitute milk. Yes, half-amd-half, whole or regular milk would work fine. The sauce won’t be as rich, so you might want to add a bit more flour. Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator and author. Email her at columns@communitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-248-7130, ext. 356.

Kroger Co. backs breast cancer support program Community Recorder For the fifth year in a row, Cancer Support Community (CSC, formerly The Wellness Community) was honored to receive a generous donation from The Kroger Co.’s Giving Hope A Hand annual campaign for breast cancer support. With the latest gift of $11,500, CSC has received a total of $56,500 from the Giving Hope A Hand program to help fund the free, professionally facilitated cancer support programs for people affected by cancer, including women with breast cancer, their loved ones, and breast cancer survivors. Among the programs offered by CSC are weekly support groups, networking groups, educa-

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tional programs, healthy cooking classes and healthy lifestyle and stress reduction classes such as Tai Chi, yoga, Healthy-Steps: Lebed Movement guided imagery, and art therapy. With the help of key vendor partners, Kroger has made an ongoing commitment to the cause of finding a cure for breast cancer and providing support to those who face it. Each October, in conjunction with National Breast Cancer Awareness month, Kroger coordinates a two-week nationwide promotion to raise money for local organizations and programs that provide breast cancer awareness, treatment, research or support. The most recent campaign featured a store-

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Broiled flat iron steak

Florence United Methodist Church MOMSNext Group, a support group for mothers with school-age children, assemble care packages for soldiers serving in Afghanistan. From left are Ellen Klug, Victoria Pierce, Jill Corkins, Daniele Perry and Julie Southwick. The boxes will be sent to Sgt. Tony Smith whose family lives in Florence. THANKS TO ANNA MERLO

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When the kids were younger and something went haywire in their lives, they would wonder why. I would say “there’s a reason for everything.” Those are what we call “teachable moments.” Well, the same thing happened to me yesterday at suppertime. I asked my husband, Frank, if we had gas in the grill since I had a nice flat iron steak thawed out. The answer was “yes,” Rita so he took Heikenfeld the steak RITA’S KITCHEN out to the grill. Then the answer got switched to “no.” We were out of gas. I didn’t want to use the stovetop grill pan (too messy) so I used the broiler. Oh my gosh, the steak turned out perfect. And I can’t tell you how long it’s been since I broiled any kind of meat. Now I’m a fan of broiling again. So even when you’re older, there are still teachable moments.

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LIFE

B4 • FLORENCE-UNION RECORDER • MAY 17, 2012

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Air-borne fungus disease drops leaves Question: Leaves with brown spots and blotches are falling off my ash and maple trees. Will the trees survive? Answer: The symptoms you describe are referred to as “anthracnose disease,” which is caused by an air-borne fungus during rainy days of spring. The more rainfall, especially at night, the worse the disease will become. The good news is that anthracnose diseases usuMike ally look Klahr worse than HORTICULTURE they really CONCERNS are, and the tree is not usually killed by the disease. Sprays are not usually even needed. Anthracnose diseases occur on many landscape trees; though, in Kentucky, they tend to be most severe on ash, maple, dogwood, oak, and sycamore. They are typically foliar diseases but twigs, branches, and buds may also be affected. Twigs and branches may develop cankers or dead areas that girdle the stem, causing death of some branch tips, especially with dogwoods and sycamores. Premature leaf drop commonly occurs on infected trees. Anthracnose is not fatal (except for dogwoods in

UPCOMING EVENTS Container Gardening and Annual Planters: 1-3 p.m. Thursday, May 17, Boone County Extension Office,. Bring a pack of plants to swap with others. Fee: $10. Registration required by calling 859-586-6101, or enroll online at www.ca.uky.edu/boone Arboretum Plant Sale: 9 a.m. to noon Saturday, May 19, Shelter 1, Boone County Arboretum, 9190 Camp Ernst Road, Union. No registration needed. Plant donations accepted by calling Laura at 859-5866101. Insects and Diseases of Lawns, Gardens, Orchards, Flowers and Landscapes: 1:30-3:30 p.m. Thursday, May 31, Boone County Extension Office. Counts for one general and one specific Kentucky Commercial Pesticide Applicator CEU’s (categories 2, 3, 10, 12, 18, and 20). Free, but register by calling 859-586-6101, or enroll online at www.ca.uky.edu/boone

some circumstances), however, severe defoliation from anthracnose year after year can seriously weaken trees. Dogwood anthracnose or lower branch dieback is one of the most serious types of anthracnose, requiring fungicide sprays in early

spring. The symptoms of anthracnose on ash trees include small, brown circular spots on leaves, plus larger, irregular brown blotches (often along leaf margins) and distortion of leaflets. Infected leaflets frequently drop from the tree. Anthracnose on maple trees results in irregular, brown to black dead areas on the leaf that vary in size and shape. At least two different anthracnose fungi may be involved. On Norway maple, lesions are purple to brown and follow the veins. Leaves of Japanese maple blacken and shrivel up. Brown to reddish brown lesions form along or between veins of sugar maple. In order to control the spread of anthracnose, follow these steps: 1. Prune out and destroy all infected twigs and branches; 2. Gather and destroy fallen leaves and twigs now and again in the fall; 3. Fungicide sprays are generally not needed. However, if the tree is a valuable one or if it has been attacked year after year, a fungicide spray program may be justified. Three sprays should be applied in the spring: at bud break, when leaves are half-expanded, and when leaves are fully expanded. Mike Klahr is the Boone County extension agent for horticulture.

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LIFE

MAY 17, 2012 • FLORENCE-UNION RECORDER • B5

Remke bigg’s, St. Elizabeth to conduct A Taste Health Community Recorder Remke bigg’s and St. Elizabeth will host A Taste of Health: Sports and Nutrition at 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday, May 19, at Remke bigg’s in Florence. St. Elizabeth professionals will provide presentations on sports medicine and nutrition. Guests will learn about Medical Motion, the motion analysis program that can improve performance and reduce the risk of an inju-

ry in any sport. There will be information on St. Elizabeth’s Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing (ImPACT) program. St. Elizabeth is one of only three offices in Kentucky with this computerized test that measures the cognitive and mental changes that occur during a concussion. Finally, attendees will learn about the components of nutrition and

how food and drink choices impact the ability to perform. The free event will include live cooking demonstrations and sampling of healthy foods. Register by 5 p.m. Thursday, May 17, to be entered into a drawing for Remke bigg’s gift cards and pump perks. Contestants must be present to win. To register, call 859-301-6300 or visit www.stelizabeth.com/ ataste ofhealth.

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Spring: It’s time to get moving What is the best exercise for you? The one you will do and spring, with its beautiful flowers and warmer weather, is the perfect time to get active outdoors. Most of us know that regular physical activity can help preDiane vent heart Mason disease EXTENSION and type 2 NOTES diabetes, reduce the risk of some cancers, help you maintain a healthy weight, strengthen muscles and bones, and improve your mental health. Regardless of what we know about the health benefits, most of us do not get the exercise we need. One way you can increase your activity level is by using your built environment, including sidewalks, stoplights, trails and

parks. It may be appealing for those just beginning an exercise program to start by using the built environment because it’s close to home and doesn’t require the costs of a gym membership. You just have to make time to use it. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, adults should aim for 30 or more minutes per day of moderate physical activity on five or more days of the week. Children should aim for 60 minutes of physical activity a day. Additionally, individuals need to engage in musclestrengthening activities that work all major muscles groups two or more days per week. These activities can be done in 10-minute intervals. Aerobic activity is anything that gets you breathing harder and your heart pumping faster. Taking an evening walk on a walking trail

or through your neighborhood can help you reach 2.5 hours a week, as long as you’re walking at a brisk pace. Bicycling or roller skating are also good forms of exercise that can be done in your built environment. If you have a chronic condition or disability, you can still reap the benefits of physical activity, but you should check with your doctor before your start any exercise program. They will be able to give you suggestions for types of physical activities that may work best for you. Diane Mason is county extension agent for family and consumer sciences at the Boone County Cooperative Extension Service.

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Flo Burke, 91, of Florence, and her older brother Frank Menkhaus, 94, of Taylor Mill, enjoyed watching the Kentucky Wildcats beat Louisville in the Final Four. They missed their older sister, Grace Perez, 96, of Covington, who watched the game with her family and was unable to join her younger siblings. THANKS TO P.J. BURKE

“Thank you for allowing me to represent you and your families in Frankfort. Please remember to vote on May 22nd.” - Representative Addia Kathryn Wuchner

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Wife - Mother - Grandmother - Nurse - Businesswoman Don’t miss Cincinnati.com’s Metromix Stage at Taste of Cincinnati 2012! Along with a great band lineup, there will be more than 40 restaurants gathered along 6 blocks of 5th Street in downtown Cincinnati Memorial Day Weekend: Saturday and Sunday, May 26 & 27, Noon – Midnight and Monday, May 28, Noon – 9pm. Cost is FREE!

TOP RANKED FISCAL CONSERVATIVE BY KENTUCKY CLUB FOR GROWTH 100% SMALL BUSINESS VOTING RECORD - UNWAIVERING SUPPORT OF “MOM & POP” BUSINESSES BY NFIB

Before you go, don’t forget to download your Taste of Cincinnati App, coming soon for your iPhone & Android! Create your agenda for the day by browsing menu & drink items with a map of booth locations and entertainment schedules! It’s a must have for Taste of Cincinnati 2012!

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For more inFormation on the metromix Stage, band bioS and photoS viSit cincinnati.metromix.com/taste

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LIFE

B6 • FLORENCE-UNION RECORDER • MAY 17, 2012

Henderson re-appointed to sex abuse commission Community Recorder

Charlene Erler of Hebron, chair of the board of Community Foundation of Northern Kentucky, is shown with her grandson, Jakob Bates of Mason, Ohio, helping with pinwheel planting at Northern Kentucky Children's Advocacy Center. THANKS TO GAIL MYERS

Children play a role planting pinwheels Community Recorder April is Child Abuse Awareness Month. In recognition of the observance, Northern Kentucky Children’s Advocacy Center planted 1,987 pinwheels – 1 for each child abused or neglected in Northern Kentucky during the past year at Florence Freedom and at the NKCAC.

Pinwheels are the national symbol for child abuse prevention. They represent hope, health and safety. The pinwheels were assembled by volunteers, including students at Covington Catholic High School. At Florence Freedom, they were planted by students from Thomas More College. At the Advocacy Cen-

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ment for more than 20 years. Henderson was the first forensic interviewer employed by a Children’s Advocacy Center in Kentucky and has interviewed more than 4,000 children. Under her leadership, the NKCAC was the first children’s advocacy center in Kentucky to earn national accreditation from the National Children’s Alliance. In addition to her service on the Kentucky Multidisciplinary Commission on Child Sexual Abuse, Henderson has lobbied and testified before the state legislature and written children’s ad-

vocacy center-related state statutes. She was one of the founding center directors who drafted legislation that defined children’s advocacy centers in the state and created administrative regulations for centers in Kentucky. Henderson conducts reviews of other children’s advocacy centers as a site reviewer for the National Children’s Alliance and provides frequent training to children’s advocacy centers and professionals throughout the state and around the country. She holds a bachelor of science degree from Northern Kentucky University and a master’s degree in social work from the University of Kentucky. Henderson is a licensed clinical social worker and a member of the National Association of Social Workers. She serves as an educational presenter at Beech Acres in Cincinnati and was a former adjunct professor.

Rising Star Studios hosts summer session for kids Community Recorder Rising Star Studios, a program of New Perceptions in Northern Kentucky, is now enrolling youth (age 3 through teen) and young adults with autism spectrum disorders and other communication

challenges in various classes in arts and life skills for 2012. The sixweek summer session will begin June11, and will run through the week of July 17. Classes will be offered on Mondays and Tuesdays after school in Computers, Art, Indepen-

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ter, they were planted by children and Advocacy Center volunteers. In addition, NKCAC hung 18 T-shirts in remembrance of 18 children killed in Kentucky in 2011 as a result of child abuse. For the second year, the T-shirts were painted by Nancy Pugliano’s art students at The Baker Hunt Art and Cultural Center in Covington. The Northern Kentucky Children’s Advocacy Center is a nonprofit organization that provides services to children who have been sexually abused, severely physically abused and children who have witnessed violent crimes.

Gov. Steve Beshear reappointed Vickie Henderson of Campbell County to the Kentucky Multidisciplinary Commission on Child Sexual Abuse for a four-year term. Henderson, executive director of the Northern Kentucky Children’s Advocacy Center in Florence, has been a member Henderson of the commission since 2000. The commission brings together front-line responders such as law enforcement, prosecutors, children’s advocacy centers and social workers to develop and approve protocols for investigating and prosecuting child sexual abuse for local multidisciplinary teams in Kentucky. She has worked in the field of child abuse treat-

Henderson holds a B.S. degree from NKU and a master’s degree in social work from the University of Kentucky.

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dent Living & Social Skills, Photography, Karate, Yoga, Gardening, Mosaics, and Music Therapy. Classes start at $90 for a six-week term. Students 16 and older may be eligible for the Michelle P. Waiver and should inquire with their caseworker. Later this summer, Rising Star Studios presents a summer music theater camp with Betsey Nuseibeh of Melodic Connections and singer-songwriter, David Kisor from Growing Sound, a program of Children, Inc. The camp is open for all students on the spectrum, ages 8 and up, and will be held 4-6 p.m., MondayFriday, July 30-Aug. 10. Regular attendance is required. Space is limited. Enrollment information for all programs, including class descriptions and registration fees, is on the web at www.risingstarstudios.org or by calling 859344-9322. All classes are held at New Perceptions, 1 Sperti Drive, Edgewood, KY.

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LIFE

MAY 17, 2012 • FLORENCE-UNION RECORDER • B7

YMCA to honor two Boone County teens clubs, and on the track and field team. She has volunteered at more than 30 nonprofits - packing food for children, tutoring elementary students, cleaning homeless shelters and participating in fundraisers. Educators, families, friends, coaches and community organizations impacted by the recipients are invited to help the YMCA pay tribute to the YMCA Character Award recipients. Tickets for the YMCA Character Awards event are $25 for adults, $10 for youth. To purchase tickets, call 513-246-3205.

Community Recorder Connor Hornsby, a student at Heritage Academy, and Boone County High School student Jessica Lee are among 40 teens being honored by the YMCA of Greater Cincinnati for exemplifying the values of caring, respect, honesty and responsibility. Hornsby and Lee will be awarded at the 15th annual YMCA Character Awards on April 17 at the School for Creative and Performing Arts. Hornsby is a leader in the youth group, ministry program and the Drama

Participating in last years RGI River Run are top row: Amy Anderson of Fort Wright, Amber Decker of Erlanger, Kayla Kluemper of Fort Wright and Lora Davis of Villa Hills. Bottom row: Ray Kluemper of Fort Wright, Ben Hail of Fort Wright, Maya Decker of Erlanger, Kate Hail of Fort Wright and Maddie Hyde of Fort Wright. THANKS TO TED KLUEMPER

Kicks for Kids hosts River Run Kicks For Kids will hold its 16th annual RGI River Run at 9:15 a.m. Saturday, May 26. The 5K run/walk will go through Covington, Cincinnati and Newport. Proceeds will support Kicks For Kids’ efforts to “level the playing field” for local children who are challenged physically, mentally or by their environment. A portion of the funds raised will also assist three of Kicks For Kids’ longstanding partners: the Aaron W. Perlman Center and the Division of Child Life, both located at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medi-

NOW THAT I’M HERE, I HAVE TO ASK MYSELF: “WHAT TOOK YOU SO LONG?”

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cal Center, and Covington Partners. Kicks for Kids partners with groups from Newport, Covington, Florence, Dayton, Bellevue, Ludlow, Silver Grove, Fort Mitchell and Southgate. Last year’s event had 1,460 runners and walkers and raised $55,000. Race-day registration and post-race events will occur at the Purple People Bridge near Newport On The Levee. Doghouse will perform, Panera Bread will serve bagels, First Watch will cook pancakes, Starbucks will provide coffee and participants will have the chance to win one of many quality door priz-

Community Recorder

Hornsby Lee Club at school, and a firstgrade teacher’s aide. He gave up a family vacation to help his employer, Chuck E. Cheese’s, host a party for a teen being deployed to Afghanistan. Lee is enrolled in college courses at Northern Kentucky University, is a member of the National Honor Society and French, book and science

Each entrant will receive a “goodie bag” with product samples, free food certificates and a ticket good for free food and drink at the post-event party at Arnie’s on the Levee. Participants may either raise money through pledges or by paying an entry fee. Pre-registration mailed in entries must be postmarked by Monday, May 21. The entry fees are $15 for adults, $10 for children 7-17, free for children 6 and under. Register online by May 23 at www.kicksforkids.org. For more information, call at 859-331-8484.

Not only are the residents of Elmcroft living happy lives, they’re growing in experience – trying new things, making new friends, having fun and going places. Call Jenny at 859.980.7200 to schedule a visit. Assisted Living | Memory Care 212 Street | Florence, KY 41 41042 | elmcroft.com 2112 Main i S l 4 Written information relating to this community’s services and policies is available upon request.

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LIFE

B8 • FLORENCE-UNION RECORDER • MAY 17, 2012

DEATHS Jessie Bass

Florence United Methodist Church. Her husband, Clayton, died previously. Survivors include her sons, Randy Brown of Florence and Tom Brown of Pickerington, Ohio; seven grandchildren; and six great-grandchildren. Burial was in Burlington Cemetery. Memorials: Florence United Methodist Church.

Jessie Marie Hensley Bass, 84, of Florence, died May 7, 2012, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. She was a member of Florence Baptist Church and former volunteer for the Hope House. She was an avid walker and enjoyed bowling. Her son, Phillip Bass, died in 2000. Survivors include her husband, Henry C. Bass; daughters, Jan Burden of Union, Judy Wells of Covington and Kay Markesbery of Burlington; seven grandchildren; and nine great-grandchildren. Interment was at Kentucky Veterans Cemetery, Williamstown. Memorials: Florence Baptist Church, P.O. Box 456, Florence, KY 41022.

Jessica Childs Jessica Jean Childs, 20, of Union, died May 8, 2012. Survivors include her fiancé, Brandon Crooker; daughter, Kyra Elizabeth Crooker; mother and stepfather, Jean and Steve Miller; father, Michael Childs; brothers, Michael Childs, Jason Bourgeois, Jeff Bourgeois and Tyler Childs; and stepbrother, Randall Miller. Burial was at Arlington Memorial Gardens, Cincinnati.

Virginia Brown Virginia Collins Brown, 90, of Florence, died May 8, 2012, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. She loved to garden and cook, and was a member of

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Joseph F. Huhn, 65, of Florence, died May 6, 2012, at his residence. He was an electrical foreman for CSX Railroad. Survivors include his wife, Judy Huhn; daughters, Michelle Wheaton of Florence and Melissa Freking of Burlington; brothers, Robert Huhn, Ronnie Huhn and David Huhn; sisters, Linda Huhn, Beverly Huhn and Helen Slade; seven grandchildren; and 12 greatgrandchildren.

Randall Neal

ABOUT OBITUARIES

Randall G. Neal, 85, of Florence, died May 5, 2012, at St. Elizabeth Hospice. He was a retired auto mechanic, plumber and electrician. A son, Gary Neal, died previously. Survivors include his sons, David Neal, Randall Eugene Neal, Ricky Neal and Terry Neal; daughters, Diana Bryant, Linda Michael Floyd and Patricia Hisle; sister, Loretta Kelly; brother, N.B. Neal Jr.; 13 grandchildren; 21 great-grandchildren; and four great-greatgrandchildren. Burial was in Hill Crest Cemetery, Dry Ridge.

For the most up-to-date Northern Kentucky obituaries, click on the “Obituaries” link at NKY.com. Funeral homes may submit basic obituary information to recorderobits@nky.com. To publish a larger memorial tribute, call 513-242-4000 for pricing details. Burial was at Mother of God Cemetery.

Linda Keeton Linda Joyce Couch Keeton, 61, of Florence, died May 4, 2012, at her residence. She formerly worked as a waitress/cook. She enjoyed flowers, dancing and watching Lifetime movies. Her parents, Charlie and Beulah Couch, died previously. Survivors include her husband, Gary L. Keeton; daughters, Michelle Carnes of Cleves, Ohio, Simone Garland of Batesville, Ind., Tammy Saladin of Fort Wright, Vanessa Keeton of Covington, and Summer Saladin and Crystal Keeton, both of Florence; son, John Saladin of Virginia; brother, Charlie Couch of Ohio; sisters, Judy, Sherry and Libby; 16 grandchildren; and four greatgrandchildren. Burial was in Kentucky Veterans Cemetery North, Williamstown.

Terry Kidwell Terry Kidwell, 31, of Independence, died May 4, 2012, at

POLICE REPORTS

his residence. He was a short order cook and a member of St. Paul Church in Florence. Survivors include his parents, Terry and Judy Kidwell of Union; sisters, Diana Mouring of Liberty Township, Ohio, Sandra Kidwell of Erlanger and Julie Robinson of Crittenden; son, Terry Lynn of Florence; and daughter, Carolyn of Edgewood. Entombment was in Floral Hills Mausoleum.

BOONE COUNTY Arrests/Citations Daniel L. Cochran, 45, public intoxication, disorderly conduct, terroristic threatening at 4900 Houston Rd., March 18. Edward W. Johnson, 22, public intoxication-controlled substance at 1882 Mt. Zion Rd., March 18. Robert A. Abercrombie, 42, public intoxication at Frogtown Connector Road, March 18. Travis W. Clemons, 21, possession of marijuana at 10118 Russwill Ln., March 19. Tasha L. Siebert, 21, inadequate silencer/muffler, failure to maintain required insurance, improper use of dealers plates, unauthorized use of motor vehicle at Burlington Pike and Boone Aire Road, March 20. Joseph M. Ginther, 29, receiving stolen property $10,000 or more, receiving stolen property under $500, operating on suspended or revoked operators license at Brayden Court, March 20. Zachary N. Foote, 24, inadequate silencer/muffler, driving on DUI suspended license, failure to produce insurance card, possession of open alcoholic beverage container at Washington Street and Jefferson Street, March 20. Justeen N. Mcnamara, 22, firstdegree possession of a controlled substance (heroin), first-degree possession of a controlled substance (unspecified) at 2355 Burlington Pk., March 7. Dwayne A. Harrington, 47,

Ernest Stambaugh Ernest Larry Stambaugh, 68, of Florence, died May 3, 2012. He was a U.S. Air Force Vietnam War veteran, and a member of the VFW and St. Paul Church. He was a retired truck driver for Overnite Transportation and part-time driver for Hertz Rent-A-Car. He enjoyed camping and square dancing. Survivors include his wife, Pauline Kerl Stambaugh; daughters, Lisa Winkler and Kellee Etghayi; sons, Eric Stambaugh and Ryan Elmore; sister, Glenda Smith; brothers, William Stambaugh and Allen Stambaugh; and five grandchildren. Burial was at Kentucky Veterans Cemetery North. Memorials: St. Elizabeth Hospice, 483 S. Loop Road, Edgewood, KY 41017 or American Cancer Society, 297 Buttermilk Pike, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017.

Gordon ‘Toke’ Landrum Gordon “Toke” Landrum, 81, of Erlanger, died May 4, 2012, at his residence. He worked for Pepsi-Cola for 41 years and was a member of Beaver Lick Baptist Church. He was an avid drag racer and round track racer. He enjoyed collecting old cars. Two grandchildren, Christian Miller and Greg Landrum, died previously. Survivors include his wife, Betty Jo Landrum; sons, Steve Landrum of Verona and Roy Landrum of Burlington; daughters, Gloria Rogers of Burlington and Christina Miller of Florence; brothers, Pete Capito and Gene Capito; seven grandchildren; and 12 great-grandchildren. Interment was at Forest Lawn Cemetery.

See POLICE, Page B9

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LIFE

MAY 17, 2012 • FLORENCE-UNION RECORDER • B9

POLICE second-degree criminal mischief at 15327 Glencoe Verona Rd., March 9. Terry R. Rose, 50, first-degree criminal mischief, DUI at Conrad Ln., March 9. Jacob E. Smith, 23, receiving stolen property under $10,000 at 4110 Bullitsville Rd., March 10. Kimberly G. Webster, 51, reckless driving, possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia, DUI at 2412 Petersburg Rd., March 10. Matthew T. Hamilton, 24, alcohol intoxication in a public place at 152 Long Leaf Ct., March 10. Josephat Mailos, 25, DUI, reckless driving at Dixie Hwy., March 10. Jessica D. Meyer, 33, DUI, careless driving at Oakbrook Rd. and Grovepoint Dr., March 10. Richard C. Sterling, 22, DUI at Weaver Rd., March 10. James C. Ross, 47, DUI, careless driving at Taylor Dr. and Burlington Pk., March 11. Dwight M. Bell, 45, alcohol intoxication in a public place, possession of marijuana at I-75 southbound, March 10. Dennis W. Craig, 50, alcohol intoxication in a public place at Hunter Rd., March 11. Alison M. Gripshover, 32, alcohol intoxication in a public place at 6250 Streamside Dr., March 11. James S. Clausing, 41, DUI, careless driving at Tessie Cir., March 11.

Robert Craig, 32, operating a motor vehicle on a DUI suspended license, DUI, possession of an open alcoholic beverage in a motor vehicle at Hunter Rd. and Petersburg Rd., March 11. Casey R. Bihl, 30, DUI, reckless driving at I-275 westbound, March 11. Lindsay R. Hester, 34, DUI at Haven Hill Rd., March 11. Robert A. Gossett, 33, possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia, DUI at Camp Ernst Rd. and Pleasant Valley Rd., March 11. Kyle R. Donovan, 20, seconddegree criminal trespassing at 10379 US 42, March 12. Joseph P. Adams, 25, seconddegree criminal trespassing, third-degree criminal trespassing, theft by unlawful taking at 10208 Toebben Rd., March 12. Thomas Padgett, 21, DUI, careless driving at Tanners Ln., March 12. Ryan T. Donovan, 20, seconddegree criminal trespassing at 10379 US 42, March 12. Keith E. Rockey, 30, DUI, theft by unlawful taking, theft by unlawful taking of an automobile at I-275 westbound, March 12. Anthony D. Battista, 36, firstdegree possession of a controlled substance (heroin), possession of drug paraphernalia, careless driving at Garrard St., March 12. Shari L. Haas, 28, first-degree possession of a controlled substance (heroin), possession of drug paraphernalia at Garrard St., March 12.

Incidents/Investigations Arson, first degree Single occupancy dwellings burned at 240 Whitfield Ave., March 19. KY: Assault Second degree at Richwood Rd., March 18. Victim assaulted by known subject at 1100 block of Avon Ct., March 9. Victim assaulted by known subject at 10000 block of Calle Victoria Ln., March 10. Victim assaulted by known subject at Hathaway Rd., March 10. Assault, public intoxication, disorderly conduct Law enforcement equipment and weapons seized at 83 Old Stephenson Mill Rd, March 18. Burglary Money stolen at 2919 Hebron Park Dr., March 18. TV, computer hardware/software stolen at 6685 Emerald Dr., March 20. Residence broken into and items taken at 10993 Kirby Ln., March 8.

Residence broken into and items taken at 2530 Rice Pk., March 8. Residence broken into and items taken at 6246 Woodcrest Dr., March 8. Residence broken into and items taken at 5982 Carlton Dr., March 13. Criminal mischief Buses damaged/vandalized at 5505 North Bend Rd., March 19. Automobiles damaged/vandalized at 5478 Andover Ct., March 19. Automobiles damaged/vandalized at 95 Richwood Rd., March 21. Automobiles damaged/vandalized at 500 Technology Way, March 21. Vehicle vandalized at 15327 Glencoe Verona Rd., March 9. Structure vandalized at 11056 Gato del Sol Blvd., March 9. Structure vandalized at 2223 Bleu Yacht Ln., March 9. Vehicle vandalized at 1161 Crosspointe Dr., March 10. Structure vandalized at 10055 Dixie Hwy., March 10. Criminal mischief, theft Automobiles damaged/vandal-

ized, cell phone stolen at 1985 Mt. Zion Road, March 18. Forgery, theft of identity Personal checks, identity stolen at 4752 River Rd., March 19. Fraud Victim's name forged to fraudulent checks at 2453 Ferdinand Dr., March 12. Inadequate silencer/muffler, failure to maintain required insurances, improper use of dealers plates Automobiles stolen and recovered at 8331 Dixie Hwy., March 20. Incident repeorts Subject used force to take victim's purse at 10000 block of Calle Victoria Ln., March 10. Property lost or stolen from victim at Aviation Blvd., March 11. Narcotics Deputies discovered narcotics on a subject at Washington St., March 12. Shoplifting Consumable goods stolen at 8577 Dixie Hwy., March 21. Terroristic threatening Victim threatened with violence

by subject at 2838 Douglas Dr., March 10. Theft Computer hardware/software stolen at 13700 Walton Verona Rd., March 18. Motor vehicle stolen at 4158 Akin Lane, March 18. Cellphone, purse stolen at 3380 Beaver Rd., March 18. Jewelry stolen at 7839 Pleasant Valley Rd., March 19. Vehicle parts/accessories stolen at 11989 Springcrest Blvd., March 19. Jewelry stolen at 1216 Citation Dr., March 19. Automobile and cell phone stolen and recovered at 1088 Brayden Ct., March 20. Credit/debit cards, identity

See POLICE, Page B10

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As many of you already know our taxes continue to increase: • Property Tax • State Car tax • Tobacco Tax • Alcohol Tax • And On And On... Almost every state bill has a tax included as well. With all of this, our state deficit is in the trillions with no cap. Even though we’ve seen some cuts, we still have short falls. While the size of our state government still grows.

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Why am I telling you all this? This is why I’m running! For change. I understand that unless we have real reform we will continue to see our taxes increase and new taxes arise. We need to boost our economy and the best way to do this is through tax incentives. Tax incentives for all new businesses in there first two years of start-up (the toughest two years of any new business). Tax incentives for existing businesses that increase the size of their workforce and maintain that workforce in Kentucky. To reintroduce the angel investors bill which gives incentives to individuals who are willing to risk their own private money so others can fulfill their dream of starting a new business of their own. This has proven to bring in new revenue.

State pension plan is another area that desperately needs reform. As it stands now a state employee who works only 20 years can retire will a full pension ( and possibly sooner if the individual is given an opportunity to buy time and chooses to do so allowing them to retire after just 15 years). To put this into perspective lets say a person applies at the age of 18 and is lucky enough, and I do mean lucky enough to be hired. At the age of 38 this individual could retire and receive a pension for the rest of their life (possibly 40 plus years). What makes these state employees any more special than the rest of the private sector? I do believe after 20 years of service they are entitled to a pension but should not be able to draw on that pension until reaching the retirement age. The state pension plan as it stands now is severely hurting the commonwealth and is costing all of us dearly. We need to work on reducing the size of our state government. We need to combine certain state agencies so that may share resources and eliminate certain state agencies that are not vital to the function of our state government or vital resources provided to us, the citizens. It will be a hard to achieve, but through your support it can be achieved. Our current state government has become to big, demanding more from us. In these tough economic times I understand that each dollar we earn counts. I promise to work for you, your family, your community, and the Tea Party values. This year is so important. This year lets come together and vote for the change we all know we need so desperately. On May 22nd join me on voting for this change. Please vote for Joshua Turner Thank You (R) State Senate Candidate Joshua L. Turner turner.josh31@yahoo.com Facebook; CandidateJoshuaTurner Paid for by Joshua Turner.

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Candidate for state senator in the 11th district (Boone County, Gallatin County, and a portion of Kenton County ). I am writing this article not only to ask for your vote but to inform you as to why your vote is so important in this primary election May 22nd.


LIFE

B10 • FLORENCE-UNION RECORDER • MAY 17, 2012

POLICE

ABOUT POLICE REPORTS

Continued from Page B9

The Community Recorder publishes the names of all adults charged with offenses. The information is a matter of public record and does not imply guilt or innocence. To contact your local police department: Boone County Sheriff Mike Helmig at 334-2175; Florence Police Chief Tom Szurlinski at 6475420.

documents stolen at 7360 Industrial Road, March 20. Credit/debit cards stolen at 189 Villa Dr., March 20. Metals stolen at 9716 East Bend Rd., March 20. Items stolen from business at 15011 Lebanon Crittenden Rd., March 9. Bicycle stolen from victim at 7964 Kentucky Dr., March 9. Items taken from residence at 4110 Bullitsville Rd., March 9. Services stolen from business at 2919 Hebron Park Dr., March 10.

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Metal stolen from business at 10208 Toebben Rd., March 11. Items stolen from bank at 6081 Limaburg Rd., March 12. Items taken from residence at 413 Deer Trace Dr., March 13. Shoplifting at 7747 Mall Rd., March 9. Vehicle parts stolen at Parkland Pl., March 9. Tax return stolen at 6900 Hopeful Rd., March 10. Theft, criminal mischief Items stolen at 40 Precision Dr.,

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March 15. Theft from auto Vehicle broken into and items taken at 7060 Shenandoah Dr., March 14. Vehicle broken into and items taken at 7541 Mall Rd., March 14. Vehicle broken into and items taken at 7960 Connector Dr., March 13. Vehicle broken into and items taken at 7941 Mall Rd., March 13. Vehicle broken into and items taken at 7214 Buffstone Dr., Feb. 18. Parts stolen off of vehicle at 2750 Earhart Blvd., Feb. 16. Vehicle broken into and items taken at 1334 Rivermeade Dr., Feb. 16. Vehicle broken into and items taken at 3424 Maple Tree Ln., March 9. Items stolen from vehicle at 6080 Camp Ernst Rd., March 13. Items taken from vehicle at 6110 Cedar Hill Ln., March 13. Vehicle stolen and later recovered at 1751 Patrick Dr., March 12. Theft of motor vehicle registration plate Vehicle part/accessory stolen at 1973 Burlington Pike, March 19. Registration plate stolen at 136 Old Mt. Zion Rd., March 21. Theft of auto Vehicle stolen and not recovered at 8510 U.S. 42, March 11. Theft of services Electric usage stolen at 4315 Mudlick Rd., Feb. 29. Theft, criminal mischief Metals stolen, items damaged/ vandalized at 1495 Production Dr., March 19. Unauthorized use of motor vehicle Automobiles stolen at 7086 McVille Road, March 17. Wanton endangerment Firearms seized at 1119 Ashton Ct., March 16.

HEARTY BRUNCH

dunnhumbyUSA employees prepared a hearty brunch with all the fixings for guests at the Ronald McDonald House of Greater Cincinnati. Pictured, from left, back: Kim Keefe, Dawn Shirley, Steve Maltarich , Scott Reeling , Leroy Anthony, Chris Skiba Joe Conte, Matthew Tripepi, Kirk Jackson, of Union, Ky., and Ken Wacker; front: Linsey Knueven and Danielle Hallion. THANKS TO DUNNHUMBYUSA

Rising Star Studios helps kids, adults with autism Rising Star Studios, a program of New Perceptions in Northern Kentucky, is now enrolling youth and young adults with autism spectrum disorders and other communication challenges for classes. The six-week summer session will be June 11 through the week of July 17. Classes will be offered on Mondays and Tuesdays after school in computers, art, independent living and

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social skills, photography, karate, yoga, gardening, mosaics and music therapy. Classes start at $90 for a six-week term. Youth includes ages 3 through teen. Students 16 and older may be eligible for the Michelle P. Waiver and should inquire with their caseworker. Starting July 30, Rising Star Studios will off a summer music theater camp with Betsey Nuseibeh of Melodic Connections and singer-songwriter David Kisor from Growing Sound, a program of Chil-

dren Inc. The camp is open for all students on the spectrum, ages 8 and up, and will be 4–6 p.m. MondayFriday July 30-Aug. 10. Regular attendance is required. Space is limited. Early-registration discounts are offered: $250 by May 22 and $275 by June 29. The cost after June 29 is $300. For more information, visit www.risingstarstudios.org or call 859-344-9322. All classes are held at New Perceptions, 1 Sperti Drive in Edgewood.

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florence-recorder-051712  

AFESTIVE SEASON Peak CampbellWarndorf 50¢ to protect what our forefathers sought, and de- fendourliberties and our free- doms,” Wuchner said...

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