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Heather Russell and Sarah Chambers.

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Florence Email: kynews@communitypress.com Website: NKY.com

Volume 16 Number 34 © 2011 The Community Recorder ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

T h u r s d a y, M a y 1 2 , 2 0 1 1

RECORDER B E C A U S E C O M M U N I T Y M AT T E R S

Couple cycling Death Valley

Can you guess the Mystery Photo?

This week’s “Mystery Photo” is shown here. Can you identify the building along with the community where it is located? The third person to identify this location will be mentioned on May 19. Please do not call until noon Thursday, May 12. E-mail your answer to ndaly@nky.com. You may also call 859-578-1059. We will accept only calls and emails after noon Thursday. Results of this week’s Mystery Photo will be published on May 19.

PATRICIA A. SCHEYER/CONTRIBUTOR

Farmers Market in full swing

Erin Halenkamp, of Hebron, and Gail Rieger, of Florence, purchase flower baskets from Fay Daughters of Kinman Farms May 7 at the Farmers Market in Burlington. The flower baskets were for Mother’s Day.

Senior center bid over budget By Justin B. Duke jbduke@nky.com

Dinsmore celebrates Derby

The Dinsmore Homestead celebrated with its ninth annual Derby Day party on Saturday, May 7. Attendees enjoyed mint juleps and Kentucky burgoo, listened to music and watched a televised broadcast of the Kentucky Derby. There was a hat and costume contest for men and women. PHOTOS, A5

Sportsman of Year nominations open The Community Press and Community Recorder is accepting nominations for its third annual Sportsman and Sportswoman of the Year online contest. The nomination period is May 4 through Monday, May 16. The ballots will be online Friday, May 20, and run until midnight Monday, June 6. For more details, see the story in this week’s sports section.

FLORENCE - Bids for the Florence senior center came in lower than last time, but not as low as some hoped. A new round of bids came in for the senior center. The lowest bid cut the price $166,000, but it is still nearly $900,000 over the $2 million budget originally planned. The lowest bid came in from Mark Spaulding Construction at $2.3 million, but that doesn’t include furniture or kitchen equipment. Public Services Director Bob Townsend recommends a total budget of $2.9 million for the project. Two grants will cover $605,000 of the project. Last November, bids for the project came in $1 million over budget, due to scrapping the original two-story plan for a singlestory plan that cost more, but was highly favored by seniors. In February, council decided to send the project out for a rebid with environmentally friendly amenities like triple-pane windows and a

Rain, rain go away

The after-effects of the area’s soggy April can still be seen around the county. Several homeowners in Union approached their City Council May 2 with concerns about storm water runoff. This photo show flooding along Whispering Trails in Union. Story, A2.

THANKS TO BARRY BURKE

To place an ad, call 283-7290.

50¢

green roof removed. Council hoped that would cut $350,000 of the price. Despite removing the amenities, the bids didn’t come back as low as hoped, likely due to rising costs in fuel and goods, Townsend said. “It’s a trickle down effect,” he said. “I think we need to almost start over,” council member Larry Brown said. While in favor of the senior center, the city should build a building according to the budget and not a “wish list,” he said. “Private businesses don’t operate like this; individuals don’t operate like this,” Brown said. Starting over may not save Florence that much money, said Mayor Diane Whalen. “There are significant dollars tied up in design, redesign and engineering fees,” Whalen said. If the city doesn’t move forward with the project, they’ll still owe Hub & Weber Architects around $180,000, Townsend said. After paying those fees, paying for another design and rising construction costs, there may not be

noticeable savings, Whalen said. “The cost has gone up, which is not going to stop,” she said. When money was set aside for the project a few years ago, $2 million was a rough estimate for the building, and holding to that number now doesn’t make sense because so much has changed, said council member Julie Metzger Aubuchon. “The original budget was based on another type of building,” said council member Mel Carroll. The purpose of the rebid was to see if a better price was possible, said Vice Mayor Mike Apgar. “We did get a better price. It wasn’t what we hoped,” Apgar said. Florence did their “due diligence” in investigating a lower price and it is probably time to move forward, he said. Council has not accepted a bid yet, because they want to pass a budget amendment before entering into a construction contract. Budget amendments often come at the end of the city’s fiscal year, which is June 30.

Ride for Cure aids juvenile diabetes research By Justin B. Duke jbduke@nky.com

FLORENCE – Jason Bright hasn’t cycled seriously since college, but he’s preparing to ride 105 miles through the desert. Bright is riding in the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation’s Ride for a Cure through Death Valley. “I’ve been diabetic since I was 19,” Bright, now 39, said. During college, Bright would ride 20 miles a day to keep his insulin and blood sugar under control, but since then he’s dropped the habit. A commercial banker for PNC, Bright has several clients who’ve done JDRF rides. “They’ve been pressing me to do it for years,” Bright said. In February, Bright bought a bike and decided this was the year. JDRF has rides in several locations around the country, but the Death Valley ride is known for being the hardest, he said. “I’m going to ask people for money, I’m going to do the big ride,” Bright said. Bright is hoping to raise $7,000 for JDRF. After years of not riding, Bright knows he’s facing a big challenge in riding 105 miles in temperatures that push near 110 degrees. “I’m probably going to die,” Bright joked. While the race isn’t until October, Bright’s hoping to train as much as possible – an effort a rainy April has hindered. “I’ve been waiting for the weather to break,” he said. Bright looks toward two major motivators to help him prepare. First, he cares about the cause. “It’s obviously a cause that’s near and dear to my heart,” he said. Second, his wife, Tracey, will join him for the trip and riding the 30-mile ride through Death Valley in California’s Mojave Desert. Tracey has never been a serious cyclist and there’s one aspect of Death Valley she’s not looking forward to. “I don’t like hot weather,” she said. To learn more about the Brights, their ride or to donate, visit Jason’s site at http:// tinyurl.com/JBrightride or Tracey’s at http://tinyurl.com/TBrightride.


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Florence Recorder

News

May 12, 2011

Heavy rains cause damage countywide By Stephanie Salmons ssalmons@nky.com

The rain may have – temporarily at least – stopped, but the after-effects of the area’s soggy April can still be seen around the county. Several homeowners in Union approached their City Council May 2 with concerns about storm water runoff. Carolyn Bosh, who lives in the Gunpowder Greens

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neighborhood, said the flooding problem becomes more pronounced each time it rains. Houses above hers don’t have their runoff water hooked to the sewer, so runoff water from their neighbors’ roofs runs through their yard and down to their driveway carrying debris and clogging their drains. They have one drain at the top of their driveway and another by the mailbox, but it’s not enough to accommodate the excess water. “It’s coming in our yard, but it’s not our water,” she said. “I think everyone should fix this problem. I

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THANKS TO NANCY WOOD

Crews are working on repairing Ky. 8 (Mile Hill Road) in Hebron after a slide. The work will take about two weeks.

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know years ago, it was up to code, but it’s not up to code anymore. We are getting drowned.” A proposal for upgrades approved by city officials

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calls for about 106 feet of 12-inch pipes and two single-gutter catch basins to be installed as well as extend a smaller 6-inch slide drain that will drain into the double catch basin. George Raybourne and Jon and Jennifer Campbell who live on Whispering Trail have also seen waterrelated issues. Culvert pipes under their driveways were collapsing and sinking due to lateApril storms, City Engineer Barry Burke said. The Campbells previously had temporary foam placed under their driveway to help prevent further collapse, but that was washed

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Florence Email: kynews@communitypress.com Website: NKY.com

away during the storms April 19-21, he said. A collapse could damage their sewer line. According to Burke, he and city officials will meet with Sanitation District 1 to discuss possibly remedies for the situation. Boone County Engineer Greg Sketch told Boone County Fiscal Court members that the county is facing its share of rain-related issues. “It’s been pretty trying on the Public Works Department,” he said. At least 10 roads are being affected by slides and the department is “actively working” to find the best fixes.

RECORDER

Find news and information from your community on the Web Florence – nky.com/florence Boone County – nky.com/boonecounty News Nancy Daly | Senior Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1059 | ndaly@nky.com Justin Duke | Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1058 | jbduke@nky.com Stephanie Salmons | Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1057 | ssalmons@nky.com Melanie Laughman | Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . 513-248-7573 | mlaughman@nky.com James Weber | Sports Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1054 | jweber@nky.com Advertising Debbie Maggard | Advertising Manager. . . . . . 578-5501 | dmaggard@nky.com Chip Munich | Account Executive . . . . . . . . . 835-1851 | cmunich@nky.com Rachel Read | Account Relationship Specialist578-5514 | rread@nky.com Delivery For customer service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 781-4421 Sharon Schachleiter | Circulation Manager . . 442-3464 | sschachleiter@nky.com Victoria Martin | District Manager . . . . . . . . . 442-3463 | vmartin@communitypress.com Classified To place a Classified ad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283-7290 | www.communityclassified.com To place an ad in Community Classified, call 283-7290.

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Two roads also had major culverts washed out, Sketch said. Nancy Wood, spokeswoman for the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet District 6, said the cabinet is seeking emergency funding to assist with repairs to Mile Hill Road and several other areas. “Right now we are doing temporary fixes to keep roads safe and passable wherever possible and shutting lanes down if they are not safe,” she said. KYTC is working on long-term repairs and trying to clean out ditches and pick up debris countywide, Wood said. According to Wood, some of the critical areas include Ky. 2852 (Riddles Run), Ky. 338 (East Bend Road near the power plant), Ky. 20 at Mile Hill and a few other sections along the area of Ky. 338 to the Petersburg section and Ky. 536 (Hathaway Road). Walton administrative clerk Connie Goins said the city had several streets flood due to the storms. “Storm drains could not take the water,” she said. “That was the biggest issue.” Florence Mayor Diane Whalen said the city hasn’t heard of any major issues and that there weren’t any additional cleanup costs because of the rain.

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News

May 12, 2011

Florence Recorder

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Pinwheels honor abused children

THANKS TO MARK BEALER

On April 7, 1,764 pinwheels were planted at the Northern Kentucky Children’s Advocacy Center in Florence in recognition of Child Abuse Prevention Month. These pinwheels were planted in honor of the abused and neglected children in Northern Kentucky in 2010. Pinwheels were planted by (front row, from left): Hannah Ziegler, Aiden Dickerson, Jackson Fornash, Karly Holleran, Garrett Holleran, Luke Ziegler, Ben Ziegler. Back row: Amanda Stephens, Darla Holleran, Meghan Wright and Candace Ziegler. Not pictured: Amy Pugliano.

April is Child Abuse Prevention Month. In recognition of the observance, Northern Kentucky Children’s Advocacy Center in Florence planted 1,764 pinwheels – one for each child abused in Northern Kentucky during the past year – outside its facility April 7. Pinwheels are the national symbol for child abuse prevention. They represent hope, health and safety. The pinwheels were assembled by volunteers, including students at Covington Catholic High School. The pinwheels were planted by children of NKCAC staff and The Advocates. The Advocates are the fundrais-

ing group for the NKCAC. In addition, the NKCAC hung T-shirts on a clothesline to represent the nine Northern Kentucky children who were either killed or seriously injured in 2010 as a result of child abuse. The T-shirts were painted by art students at Baker Hunt Art and Cultural Center in Covington. As they painted the shirts, we asked the children about their shirts. Abby Noll and Lydia Bruns, who painted a shirt representing a 2-year-old, said, “We did some hearts representing that we love them and we miss them, and some stars to show they are in heaven and they are

shining down on us.” Amy Pugliano also used hearts in her shirt’s design. “The hearts represent the people who love them,” she explains. Grace Gieske said, “These two hand praying say that these kids were abused, and we should pray for them.” The Northern Kentucky Children’s Advocacy Center is a nonprofit organization that provides services to children that have been sexually abused, severely physically abused and children who have witnessed violent crimes. In addition,

Boone OKs ‘goals and objectives’ By Stephanie Salmons ssalmons@nky.com

Boone County officials unanimously approved May 3 an amended version of a much-debated document. The goals and objectives portion of the county’s comprehensive plan was approved with three changes made to the document. State statute requires a review of the county’s comprehensive plan every five years. The original plan was adopted in 1980 and the last update was completed in 2005. Municipalities must adopt the goals and objectives by ordinance before planners can begin reviewing chapters of the plan. The comprehensive plan is a longrange overview plan for the whole county. The discussion was tabled twice in March. May 3 was the last day commissioners could vote on the matter

before the Boone County Planning Commission’s recommended document would stand. Commissioner Matt Dedden read a statement that explained his reasoning for delaying the vote. Dedden previously said he was uncomfortable voting on a document that had taken eight to 10 months to create after only being in office a short time. In addition to questioning whether existing language within the comprehensive plan had prevented some development in the county, Dedden also addressed previous discussion concerning the usage of the word “shall” within the document. “My major concern in this tone of the document, which is a reflection of the image, the attitude, the creativity, and flexibility that Boone County is projecting to the rest of the state,” he said. Shall, by definition, he said, implies the will of the subject is not being

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taken into account. “It is used to indicate determination, threat, demand and obligation. Are we using shall as an objective or as an obstacle?” Judge-executive Gary Moore said that it was the county’s responsibility to vote on the matter. “I believe the art of compromise you’re seeing tonight is important and I do believe to sit here and do nothing and allow the 90 days to play out would be us abdicating our responsibility to vote and move the ball forward,” he said. Commissioner Charlie Kenner, who previously said that he liked the goals and objectives as originally presented by the planning commission, voted in favor of the amendments. “I was afraid (the language) would get too specific,” Kenner said. “It didn’t. It just phrased it a different way ... This was a great compromise. I was prepared not to support it, but I love the language.”

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Florence Recorder

May 12, 2011

ACHIEVEMENTS

Editor Nancy Daly | ndaly@nky.com | 578-1059

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NEWS

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ACTIVITIES

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Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Florence

HONORS

Email: kynews@communitypress.com

N K Y. c o m

RECORDER

THANKS TO STACIE KEGLEY

Music through the decades

THANKS TO KARA NIXON

Gray Middle School sixth-grade language arts teacher Andy Jones, top center, joined several of the school’s sixth-graders in shaving their heads to support Robert “Bobby” Klette and Elizabeth “Bizzy” Schumaker, Gray students who have cancer.

The School House Symphony visited Longbranch Elementary School to perform for the fourth- and fifth-grade students. The music selected reviewed how much music has changed over the decades and ranged from Civil War battle hymns to My Old Kentucky Home to jazz. Students learned about the instrument families and had the opportunity to ask questions. Pictured are the members of the School House Symphony introducing themselves.

Shirts raise money for students with cancer By Justin B. Duke jbduke@nky.com

UNION - A Union middle school is rallying around two students in the fights of their lives. The Gray Middle School student council sponsored a T-shirt fundraiser to help two of the school’s students who have cancer. “They wanted to do something to brighten their days and help raise some money for their families,” said Kara Nixon, student council sponsor. The fundraiser benefitted Robert “Bobby” Klette and Elizabeth “Bizzy” Schumaker. Klette is a sixth-grader who was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in 2006. He’s gone through chemotherapy and hospital stays. In 2008, the cancer returned. Schumaker is a sixth-grader who was diagnosed with non-

Hodgkin’s lymphoma during this school year’s winter break. Through the fundraiser, $3,000 will be split up between the two families. Even though the fundraiser is over, students are still showing up to school with their shirts, Nixon said. “The kids are still wearing them over and over,” she said. The fundraiser touched more than just the students at Gray, Nixon said. “Several of the doctors who were treating (Schumaker) at Children’s also purchased shirts,” she said. Their willingness to help speaks well of the students at Gray Middle School, Nixon said. “Over and over again, these kids have shown me how thoughtful and caring they are,” she said. For more about your community, visit www.nky.com/union.

COLLEGE CORNER Sturniolo awarded Xavier scholarship

Peter Sturniolo of Florence was awarded a Presidential Scholarship from Xavier University in Cincinnati. Peter is the son of Elisabeth and Donald Sturniolo. He will graduate from Boone County High School this spring and is active in swimming and service. He plans to major in physics or business at Xavier.

King selected as UK Gaines Fellow

Kelly King of Florence was one of 11 undergraduates selected by the University of Kentucky Gaines Center for the Humanities as new scholars in UK’s Gaines Fellowship Program for the 2011-12 and 2012-13 academic years. King is a sophomore at UK majoring in English and philosophy. She is the daughter of John Kelly and Joy King and a 2009

graduate of Covington Latin. Gaines Fellowships are given in recognition of students’ outstanding academic performance, demonstrated ability to conduct independent research, interest in public issues and desire to enhance understanding of the human condition through the humanities. Fellowships are awarded for the tenure of the student’s junior and senior years, or for the last two years of a five-year program. The program includes a seminar both semesters of junior year and the completion of a major independent study project senior year. The Gaines Fellowship carries a stipend of $2,000 in a scholar’s junior year and $3,000 in their senior year. King is an active member of Alpha Phi Omega co-ed service fraternity and hopes to volunteer with the Peace Corps or Teach for America before pursuing a graduate degree in English.

THANKS TO STACIE KEGLEY

The School House Symphony visited Longbranch Elementary School to perform for the fourth- and fifth-grade students. The music selected reviewed how much has changed over the decades. Pictured are fourth-grade students listening to the School House Symphony.

THANKS TO STACIE KEGLEY

The School House Symphony performed for music from various decades for the Longbranch Elementary School. The music ranged from Civil War battle hymns to My Old Kentucky Home to jazz.

IHM HONOR ROLL Here are the third-quarter honor roll students for Immaculate Heart of Mary:

All A’s

Grade 8: Nicole Allender, Kandis Arlinghaus, Ashley Brockman, Kelsey Cline, J.P. Ferraro, Nathan Freihofer, Maggie Jett, Lauren Johnson, Connor Kunstek, Adam Lannon, Madeline Marita, Taylor Matsko, Connor McGinnis, Thomas McGrath, Abby McLaughlinm, Savannah Neace and Sam Thorburn. Grade 7: Emily Beimesch, Holly Blades, Nathan Carr, Allie Coldiron, Nick Cummings, Mark Dvornak, Becky Goebel, Joanna Rebitski, Paul Rebitski, Katie Ruholt, Kassidy Schreiber, Lucas Timmerman, Allison Van Meter, Chloe Voelker, Paul Wallenhorst and Madeline Wermeling. Grade 6: Paige Avery, Maddie Darlington, Brad Deters, Kelsey Donahue, Emma Duerstock, Abby Glaser, Kirk Grome, Caroline Iglesias, Andrew Jacob, Tanner Krumpelman, Julie McGinnis, Emily McGrath and Courtney Zieglemeyer. Grade 5: Joe Beischel, Brett Bessler, Haley Cline, Justin Deter, Elaina Dobosiewicz, Jackson Haddle, Lauren Handorf, Catherine Harkins, Malia Heck, Maddy Knab, Olivia Landry, Clair Lange, Abby Leonhard, Annie Neiheisel, Jade Nicely, Natasha Rodriguez, Morgan Schoulties, Sam Schutte, Arlyn Shields, Lexi Trapp, Madison Vujnovich and Hannah Wagner. Grade 4: Elizabeth Apollonio, Thomas Bartlett, Bridget Bessler, Reese Foster, Katie Glaser, Nyah Hollman, Evan Ihrig, Claire Jacob, Jude Kiely, Carter Krumpelman, Lauren Magary, Evan Moon, Colleen Spellman, Grace Stevie and Morgan Weltzer.

A-B

Grade 8: Alex Barton, Tony Bessler, Jared Clark, Samantha Conradi, Brian Garcia, Anthony Gillespie, Grace Goddard, Susan Gripshover, Austin Langen, Devon Loos, Gail Marcos, Allie McGlade, Calvin Neltner, Sam Ritter, Emily Rose, Kyle Steiner, Luke Tobergte, Maria Topmiller, Brad Whittle and Scott Wilson. Grade 7: Liz Beimesch, Hannah Bockweg,

Caroline Cullen, Noah Cullen, Ben Darlington, Tatum Davis, Sarah Esselman, Olivia Fischer, Libby Hahnel, Trevor Harms, Andrew Hicks, Elizabeth Hoffman, Riley Hogan, Catherine Hooper, McKenzie Jacob, Julia Jones, Grace Kahmann, Matthew Klear, Andrew McMahon, Morgan McNeely, Mike Meyer, Erin Monohan, Jack Neltner, Molly O’Connor, Mary Katherine Otto, Abby Pleas, Robert Rebitski, Kylie Smith, Katie Steffen, Paige Tepe, Teresa Urban, Danielle Vogt and Meredith Wilde. Grade 6: Lauren Ackley, Maggie Barnett, Jackson Becker, Will Brady, Jenna Burns, Renee Canterna, Adam Conradi, Dalton Everett, Daniela Foltz, Hypha Fries, Jessica Goetz, Sam Mashni, Ashley McMain, Dylan Silbernagel, Tyler Spaulding, Veronica Specht, Savanna Stevie, Ava Thaman, Noah Tolbert, Will Wagner and Austin Wilson. Grade 5: Sylvia Baker, Matthew Bohman, Philip Bruni, Tyler Chandler, Will Cunniffe, Libby Durrough, Brad Esselman, Adam Fischer, Hannah Foster, Steven Gadd, Brendan Hansen, Conor Hicks, John Hooper, Anna Klear, Faith Kosco, Carter Kunstek, Melanie McNeely, Maggie Meyer, Grace Michels, Casey Nowak, Audrey Reed, Nick Rintala, Evan Rose, Jacob Schaller, Phillip Schrirtzinger, Parker Schwarz, Karolina Soltys, David Vogt and Stewart Woolums. Grade 4: Richard Arlinghaus, Quinton Becker, Zachary Bockweg, Carolyn Brueggemann, Jenna Cayze, Jack Coldiron, Julia Cullen, Patrick Cummings, Olivia Eilerman, Zach Farwick, Grace Gallenstein, Elijah Heck, Tara Hege, Ashley Ives, Bryson Jones, Oli Marita, Timmy Mashni, Audrey McCoy, Alyssa McGriff, Patrick Merse, Madison Middendorf, Hanna Miller, Kaylee Moore, Rachel Nesmith, Ryan O’Connor, Genna Pettit, Johan Plummer, Brooke Reis, Lauren Schutte, Jared Silbernagel, Jackson Sora, Brad Steiner, Anna Sutfin, Maria Tobergte, Noah Wilson and Sarah Zimmer.

Saints Award

Grade 8: Nicole Allender, Kirsten Bartlett, Alex Barton, Paul Beatrice, Abigail Buechel, Tyler Cahill, Samantha Conradi, Nathan Frei-

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hofer, Grace Goddard, Libby Holten, Lauren Johnson, Megan Kathman, Taylor Matsko, Connor McGinnis and Thomas McGrath. Grade 7: Laurel Atchison, Emily Beimesch, Liz Beimesch, Holly Blades, Hannah Bockweg, Nathan Carr, Sarah Esselman, Olivia Fischer, Becky Goebel, Libby Hahnel, Chase Hansen, Trevor Harms, Andrew Hicks, Elizabeth Hoffman, McKenzie Jacob, Julia Jones, Matthew Klear, Leah Melching, Rachel O’Bryan, Molly O’Connor, Abby Pleas, Paul Rebitski, Robert Rebitski, Kassidy Schreiber, Paige Tepe, Teresa Urban, Allison VanMeter, Chloe Voelker, Danielle Vogt and Paul Wallenhorst. Grade 6: Lauren Ackley, Abby Capozza, Maddie Darlington, Brad Deters, Emma Durestock, Erin Edwards, Jessica Goetz, Kirk Grome, Justin Haacke, Andrew Jacob, Tanner Krumpelman, Julie McGinnis, Emily McGrath, Chase Pillon, Savanna Stevie, Noah Tolbert and Hannah Whitlock. Grade 5: Elaina Dobosiewicz, Libby Durrough, Molly Grome, Malia Heck, Grace Michels, Audrey Reed, Morgan Schoulthies and Max Zorn. Grade 4: Quinton Becker, Jack Coldiron, Olivia Eilerman, Zach Farwick, Grace Gallenstein, Katie Glaser, Grace Grant, Elijah Heck, Kennedy Hill, Nyah Hollman, Evan Ihrig, Claire Jacob, Bryson Jones, Jude Kiely, Lauren Magary, Oli Marita, Patrick Merse, Evan Moon, Colleen Spellman, Grace Stevie, Morgan Weltzer and Sarah Zimmer. Grade 3: Haley Anderson, Jake Brockman, Brady Cline, Mary Theresa Ford, Lexi Keipert, Katy Magary, Michael Schlueter and Matthew Thaman. Grade 2: Richie Blaney, Caroline Dunlevy, Emma Esselman, Kaden Foreman, Nathan Goebel, Mackenzie McNay, Ty Neltner, Cory Shea, Olivia Voelker, John Wagner, Joe Wilson and Carson Woolums. Grade 1: Cole Becker, Paige Becknell, Joey Earley, Sean Hicks, Nick Nolan, Hannah Rice and Katey Snodgrass. Kindergarten: Taelyn Ackley, Kyra Bellman, Al Bessler, Lexi Cash, Tommy Haas and Sydney Nolan.


News

May 12, 2011

Florence Recorder

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Derby party emcee Howard Tankersley, of Burlington, and Dale and Barbara Bardes, of Rabbit Hash, chat for a few minutes during the party at Dinsmore Saturday.

Linda and Dan Whittenburg, of Hebron, enjoy the Derby party at Dinsmore May 7.

Dinsmore celebrates Kentucky Derby in style

Richard and Renetta McBride, of Florence and Florida, show off a World War II uniform and 1940s-type hat during the Derby party at Dinsmore May 7.

The Dinsmore Homestead celebrated with its ninth annual Derby Day party on Saturday, May 7. Attendees enjoyed mint juleps and Kentucky burgoo, listened to music and watched a televised broadcast of the Kentucky Derby. There was a hat and costume contest for men and women.

PATRICIA A. SCHEYER/ CONTRIBUTOR

Four-year-old Samara Lee Tuman, of Covington, got all dressed up to go to the Derby party at Dinsmore Homestead May 7 with her grandpa, and she even had an umbrella that matched her outfit.

Peggy Lisnek and Jan Lawson, of Florence, look around at the silent auction items during the Derby Party at Dinsmore Homestead May 7 while sipping on mint juleps.

Coleen Detzel, of Florence, wears a sparkly hat to the Derby party at Dinsmore where she has won for best hat in the past.

The hat contest judges – Brenda Sparks, Betsy Conrad, Pat Tanner and Julie King – pose in front of the Dinsmore Homestead during the Derby party May 7. Patty and Rick Hayden, of Union, show off their hats at the Derby party May 7 at Dinsmore in Burlington.


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Florence Recorder

News

May 12, 2011

BRIEFLY Shickel to return salary

Sen. John Schickel, RUnion, has announced he will return the salary he received for veto days during the special session of the 2011 General Assembly to the state treasury. “I feel it is important to return these funds to the public treasury in order to make the state whole for these days in which the Senate did not convene,” Schickel said. “In this time of reduced government budgets, it is important that all of us take part in a shared sacrifice, including myself.” The Senate did not convene on these special session veto days, but remained in session to preserve their authority to override the governor’s vetoes. The amount returned to the state by Schickel totals $2,826.58.

PVA inspections set

The Boone County Property Valuation Administrator’s office will inspect Chris Chad, Edward Heights, Bearcat Crossing, Francis Court, The Downs, Tree Lane, Stacy Acres, Benton and Benton, Bert Park subdivision, Chamber Heights, George Ryan subdivision, Chris Brook subdivision, Kelfken Estates, Porter-

field Acres and new construction throughout Boone County during the week of May 16. Do not be alarmed if you see staff members in these areas. They will be in a marked vehicle and have identification available upon request. If you have any questions, contact PVA Cindy Arlinghaus at cindy.arlinghaus@boone countyky.org.

Police memorabilia show

The Florence Police Department is hosting a police badge and memorabilia show from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, May 14, at the Florence Government Center. Collectors from as far away as Michigan and Florida are scheduled to be on hand. An emergency medical helicopter Tuesday morning responded to an accident in Florence where a baby reportedly was ejected from a vehicle. The two-vehicle accident occurred about 9:35 a.m. on U.S. 42 and Ockerman Drive. All lanes of U.S. 42 were closed at Ockerman Drive. The accident occurred when a car, which was headed west, collided with a minivan. Crews called for the helicopter because initial reports say a 1-year-old child was ejected from a vehicle, Boone

County dispatchers said. There was at least one other injury. According to Florence Police Department, the toddler, just shy of 2 years old, was seated belted in a booster seat in the left rear section of the van.

Future of NKY to be discussed at forum

The Northern Kentucky Forum, in partnership with the Boone County Planning Commission, Campbell County Planning and Zoning and the Northern Kentucky Area Planning Commission, is hosting a community discussion about the future of the Northern Kentucky community. The forum, featuring opening remarks by Roxanne Qualls, will be 5:30-7:30 p.m. Thursday, May 12, in the Holbrook Student Center, Stiegerwald Hall, Thomas More College, 333 Thomas More Parkway, Crestview Hills. Research indicates that demographic and economic trends are beginning to change the face of development. The forum will lead discussion about many national trends. The cost is free and RSVP is requested, but not required, to tford@vision2015.org.

Mystery Photo revealed

The May 5 photo was an excursion boat to Split Rock. Frank Beeman of Union and Bill Goodman of Hebron correctly identified this location. This photo was provided by Matt Becher, who is the rural/open space planner at the Boone County Historic Preservation Review Board.

Florence AAA moves to a new location Florence area residents can find their local AAA Office in a new location that opened May 2. The new office is 7733 Mall Road, Florence. It is right behind the previous location of the Florence AAA Office and next to Hallmark. Office hours are 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Fri-

day and 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. AAA members can pick up TripTik routings and TourBook guides before traveling and purchase discounted movie tickets and discounted area attraction passes such as the Cincinnati Zoo and Kings Island. Travelers looking for trip ideas and discount vacation

packages can meet with a travel agent who can help find deals that fit their budgets. Consumers can also meet with a get a AAA insurance agent to get a free rate quote for their home, automobile and more. Call 1-800-543-2345 or visit AAA.com/offices.

STATE OF KENTUCKY COUNTY OF BOONE I, Kenny Brown, County Clerk in and for the county and state aforesaid, do hereby certify the foregoing is a true and correct list of persons who are candidates by their respective political parties for the offices of Governor/Lieutenant Governor, Secretary of State, State treasure, Auditor of Public Records, and Commissioner of Agriculture, that will be voted on in all sixty precincts. I further certify that all the candidates listed are to be voted on at the Primary Election to be held in Boone County, State of Kentucky, on Tuesday, May 17, 2011. Given under my hand and official seal this 12th day of May, 2011. Kenny Brown, Boone County Clerk

NOTE: This ballot to be voted on in all 60 precincts in Boone County. VOTING PRECINCTS AND POLLING PLACES FOR THE PRIMARY ELECTION MAY 17, 2011

Boone Precinct AIRPORT BEAVER BELLEVIEW BULLITTSVILLE BURLINGTON 1 BURLINGTON 2 BURLINGTON 3 BURLINGTON 4 BURLINGTON 5 BURLINGTON 6 BURLINGTON 7 BURLINGTON 8 CARLTON CONSTANCE DEVON #1 DEVON #2 DEVON #3 FLORENCE #1 FLORENCE #2 FLORENCE #3 FLORENCE #4 FLORENCE #5 FLORENCE #6 FLORENCE #7 FLORENCE #8 FLORENCE #9 FLORENCE #10 FLORENCE #11 FLORENCE #12 FLORENCE #13 FLORENCE #14 FLORENCE #15 GLENVIEW GREENVIEW HAMILTON HEARTHSTONE HEBRON #1 HEBRON #2 HEBRON #3 HEBRON #4 HEBRON #5 HOPEFUL KENSINGTON LIMABURG LINKVIEW OAKBROOK PETERSBURG PLEASANT VAL RICHWOOD SHAMROCK SUMMITVIEW UNION #1 UNION #2 UNION #3 UNION #4 UNION #5 UNION #6 VERONA WALTON #1 WALTON #2 CE-0000459288

C123 B114 A102 A103 A104 A105 A111 A112 A113 A115 A116 A120 A106 A107 C102 C110 C117 C124 C125 C126 C127 C128 C129 C130 C131 C132 C133 C134 C135 C136 C137 B133 B115 B116 A118 B132 A108 A109 A114 A117 A121 B117 C120 A119 B118 B119 A110 B120 B121 C121 B131 B122 B123 B124 B125 B129 B130 B126 B127 B128

LOCATION

As of 1/20/2006 POINT PLEASANT FIREHOUSE BEAVERLICK BAPTIST CHURCH BELLEVIEW MCVILLE FIREHOUSE BULLITTSVILLE CHRISTIAN CHURCH OLD COURTHOUSE BURLINGTON BAPT. FAM. LIFE CENTER STEPHENS ELEMENTARY SCHOOL BURLINGTON FIREHOUSE BOONE CO. EXTENSION OFFICE BURLINGTON ELEMENTARY SCHOOL FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST CAMP ERNST MIDDLE SCHOOL RABBIT HASH GENERAL STORE CONSTANCE CHURCH OF BRETHREN FLORENCE FIRE STATION #2 MARKSBERRY MOVING AND STORAGE FLORENCE FIRE STATION #3 FLORENCE CHRISTIAN CHURCH FLORENCE FIRE STATION #1 FLORENCE ELEMENTARY-RALPH RUSH CENTER BOONE CO. HEALTH DEPT. BOONE CO. HIGH SCHOOL HILLARD COLLINS ELEM. SCHOOL COLONIAL HEIGHTS RETIRE. CENTER OCKERMAN ELEM. SCHOOL KENTABOO BAPTIST CHURCH ACTIVITY CENTER R.A. JONES MIDDLE SCHOOL ERPENBECK ELEM. SCHOOL A.M. YEALEY ELEM. SCHOOL PANORAMA PLUS APTS. FLORENTINE RECEPTION HALL SHIRLEY MANN ELEM. SCHOOL BOONE LINKS GOLFCOURSE HOPEFUL LUTHERN CHURCH BIG BONE STATE PARK GARAGE VINEYARD CHRISTIAN CHURCH HEBRON CHURCH OF CHRIST HEBRON FIREHOUSE CONNER MIDDLE SCHOOL NORTH POINTE ELEM. SCHOOL SANDRUN BAPTIST CHURCH HOPEFUL LUTHERN CHURCH RICHWOOD PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH GREENVIEW BAPTIST CHURCH BOONE LINKS GOLFCOURSE CHRIST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH PETERSBURG FIREHOUSE FLORENCE UNITED METHODIST CH RICHWOOD PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH SADDLEBROOK RESERVE CLUBHOUSE FLORENCE ALLIANCE CHURCH NEW UNION FIREHOUSE UNION LIBRARY GRAY MIDDLE SCHOOL RYLE HIGH SCHOOL UNION BAPTIST CHURCH ST. TIMOTHY’S CATHOLIC CHURCH NEW BETHEL BAPTIST CHURCH WALTON VERONA HIGH SCHOOL WALTON FIRE STATION

ADDRESS 3444 TURFWAY RD. 11460 U.S. 42 6900 MCVILLE RD. 3094 PETERSBURG RD. 2988 E. WASHINGTON ST. 3031 WASHINGTON ST. 5687 NORTH BEND RD. 6050 FIREHOUSE DR. 6028 CAM ERNST RD. 5946 ORIENT ST. 6080 CAMP ERNST RD. 6515 CAMP ERNST ROAD 10021 LOWER RIVER RD. 4760 RIVER RD. 7201 INDUSTRIAL RD. 7370 INDUSTRIAL RD. 1152 WEAVER RD. 300 MAIN ST. 269 MAIN ST. 103 CENTER STREET 7505 BURLINGTON PK 7056 BURLINGTON PK 9000 SPRUCE DR. 6900 HOPEFUL RD. 8250 US 42 7037 CURTIS AVE. 8000 SPRUCE DR. 9001 WETHERINGTON BLVD. 10 YEALEY DR. 8510 OLD TOLL RD. 8605 HAINES DR. 10435 HWY 42 19 CLUBHOUSE DR. 6431 HOPEFUL CHURCH RD. 3380 BEAVER RD. 7101 PLEASANT VALLEY RD. 2966 DAMASCUS RD. 3120 NORTH BEND RD. 3300 COUGAR PATH 875 NORTH BEND RD. 1327 NORTH BEND RD. 6431 HOPEFUL CHURCH RD. 1070 RICHWOOD RD. 1050 BURLINGTON PK 19 CLUBHOUSE DR. 1440 BOONE AIRE RD. 6517 MARKET ST. 8585 OLD TOLL RD. 1070 RICHWOOD RD. 466 SADDLEBROOK LANE 980 CAYTON ROAD 9611 US HWY 42 8899 US 42 10400 US 42 10379 US 42 HWY 42 & MT ZION RD. 10272 HWY 42 2022 VERONA MUDLICK RD. 30 SCHOOL RD. 12600 TOWNE CENTER DR.

CITY ERLANGER UNION BURLINGTON HEBRON BURLINGTON BURLINGTON HEBRON BURLINGTON BURLINGTON BURLINGTON BURLINGTON BURLINGTON BURLINGTON CONSTANCE FLORENCE FLORENCE FLORENCE FLORENCE FLORENCE FLORENCE FLORENCE FLORENCE FLORENCE FLORENCE FLORENCE FLORENCE FLORENCE FLORENCE FLORENCE FLORENCE FLORENCE UNION FLORENCE FLORENCE UNION FLORENCE HEBRON HEBRON HEBRON HEBRON HEBRON FLORENCE WALTON FLORENCE FLORENCE FLORENCE PETERSBURG FLORENCE WALTON FLORENCE FLORENCE UNION UNION UNION UNION UNION UNION VERONA WALTON WALTON


News

Global trade focus of conference By Stephanie Salmons

Ambassadors and consuls from countries such as India, South Korea, China, Brazil, Russia and Mexico, will be available.

ssalmons@nky.com

Businesses across the region and state will have the opportunity to learn more about expanding their businesses beyond U.S. borders at the 21st Kentucky International Trade and Investment Conference. The Kentucky International Trade Association and Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce are hosting the conference 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Thursday, May 19, at the Northern Kentucky Convention Center, 1 West Rivercenter Blvd., Covington. Registration starts at 7:30 a.m. The cost is $75 for chamber members and $100 for future members. Those interested in attending can register online at www.nkychamber.com. Keynote speakers are Peter Sorrentino, vice president and senior portfolio manager of Private Financial Group with Huntington, and Jorge Perez Izquierdo, senior vice president of staffing with Manpower. Special guest will be Indian ambassador Meera Shankar. The event aims to help businesses of all sizes expand their knowledge of

Longo Raverty market opportunities available worldwide, connect with international resources, understand the challenges of doing business with different cultures, increase business opportunities and learn how to increase business worldwide. “We’re catering to a couple of different audiences – businesses that are currently exporting and businesses that are thinking they should get involved in exports,” conference cochair Patrick Raverty said. The conference will help business owners get a better understanding of what’s involved in exporting and what’s happening in the international market, he said. According to Daniele Longo, chamber vice president of business growth, healthcare solutions and international affairs, organizers are trying to bring in experts in different areas of

export and international trade. Delegates, including ambassadors and consuls from countries such as India, South Korea, China, Brazil, Russia and Mexico, will be available during the day. The idea, Longo said, is to find out the needs of each market and how to be successful in deals with that specific culture. Mexico and Canada are the top two countries to which items are exported for Kentucky, Longo said, but a free-trade agreement with South Korea, which Longo said should be signed by August, will open up an “enormous” market for agricultural, IT and manufacturing products. The past two years attendees were mostly small businesses of 25 employees or less, Longo said. This year, a number of area colleges and universities will be attending as well.

Florence Recorder

May 12, 2011

Festival to help build Rabbit Hash bandstand By Stephanie Salmons ssalmons@nky.com

RABBIT HASH - An allday music festival will help raise money to build a permanent bandstand in Rabbit Hash. The benefit will be held from noon to 11 p.m. Saturday, May 14, in the river town and will feature live music, food, drinks a silent auction featuring riverthemed times and musicians’ gear and instruments. There will be a raffle featuring a large collage of CDs donated by musicians who have played in the town. Proceeds will go to the Rabbit Hash Historical Society who will build a permanent bandstand on the Ohio

River bank. The bandstand will be designed by local artisan Terry Sawyer. There will be performances on two stages featuring Gunpowder Creek, The Side Cars, Dallas Moore, Tex Schramm and the Radio King Cowboys, The Tammy WhyNots, Buffalo Brothers, The Tillers, Acoustic Kill, Pure Grain, Poke, Bill Kramer, The Cincinnati Dancing Pigs, Blood Roots Barter, Mojo River, Cynical Mountain Boys, The Swells and Lagniappe. Terrie Markesbery, owner of the Rabbit Hash General Store, said the town has been growing as a music venue and every time they have an event, they have to put up a stage, which is

why the decided to build something “that looks like it belongs in Rabbit Hash.” The one-time event is similar to the town’s Old Timer’s Day festival, but bigger, she said. Organizers are asking those who attend for a $10 donation, Markesbery said. They hope to raise about $10,000 and have about 1,000 people attend. With a new bandstand, Markesbery said she thinks concerts in the town will continue to grow. Parking for the space is limited so those who can carpool should. There will be designated parking areas with shuttles to carry patrons to the festival.

Office moves from Detroit to Florence FLORENCE - Tokyo Boeki North America Inc. has relocated its sales and service support office from Detroit to Florence. Tokyo Boeki provides integrated measurement and data processing work that contributes to the improvement of the product development capabilities for auto-makers, according to Northern Kentucky Tri-

County Economic Development Corp. Established in Michigan in 1988 to accommodate the U.S. market for Tokyo Boeki, the firm focuses on technology, automobiles and the information industry. The company provides custom designed 3D coordinate measuring machine sales and services. “We are pleased to wel-

come Tokyo Bokei North America,” said Mayor Diane Whalen. “The company will provide a strong addition to the growing high-tech and advanced manufacturing sectors already in our region.” Tokyo Boeki North America relocated to 11 Spiral Drive in Florence where the company employs six people.

PURSUANT TO KRS 424.290, “MATTERS REQUIRED TO BE PUBLISHED,” THE FOLLOWING RACES WILL APPEAR ON THE VOTING MACHINES AND PAPER BALLOTS IN THE PRECINCTS LISTED IN BOONE COUNTY FOR THE PRIMARY ELECTION, MAY 17, 2011. OFFICIAL BALLOT FOR BOONE COUNTY PRIMARY ELECTION HELD ON TUESDAY, MAY 17, 2011 4TH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT

4TH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT

REPUBLICAN PARTY PRIMARY ELECTION

DEMOCRATIC PARTY PRIMARY ELECTION

DEMOCRATIC PARTY

REPUBLICAN PARTY

GOVERNOR and LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR (Vote for One)

SECRETARY of STATE (Vote for One) □ Elaine N. WALKER □ Alison Lundergan GRIMES

□ Barbara “Bobbie” HOLSCLAW Bill VERMILLION JR.

STATE TREASURER (Vote for One)

□ Phil MOFFETT Mike HARMON

□ L. J. “Todd” HOLLENBACH □ Steve HAMRICK

□ David L. WILLIAMS Richie FARMER

COMMISSIONER of AGRICULTURE (Vote for One)

SECRETARY of STATE (Vote for One) □ Hilda LEGG □ Bill JOHNSON

□ □ □ □ □

AUDITOR of PUBLIC ACCOUNTS (Vote for One) □ Addia Kathryn WUCHNER □ John T. KEMPER III. COMMISSIONER of AGRICULTURE (Vote for One) □ Rob ROTHENBURGER □ James R. COMER

ALL PRECINCTS CE-0000459294

A7

David WILLIAMS B. D. WILSON Robert “Bob” FARMER Stewart GRITTON John Faris LACKEY


SPORTS

A8

Florence Recorder

BRIEFLY

The week at Cooper

• The Cooper girls tennis team beat Campbell County 3-2, May 3. Cooper’s Chelsea Nibert beat Hyden 6-1, 6-2; Sidney Russell beat Bricking 4-6, 6-1, 7-5; and Jackson beat Peek 6-3, 6-0. • In boys tennis on May 4, Simon Kenton beat Cooper 41. Cooper’s Jake Honschopp beat Daniels 6-1, 6-4. • In baseball, Cooper beat St. Henry 6-1, May 7. Cooper’s Cameron Carlotta was 2-2 with two RBI; St. Henry’s Rex Rogers was 2-3. Then, St. Henry beat Cooper 8-7. In this game, Jared Blank was 2-4 and hit a triple for Cooper, and St. Henry’s Dillon Bryant hit a double.

Week at Walton-Verona

• The Walton-Verona girls tennis team beat Williamstown 5-0, May 3. Kirchner beat Wilson 6-0, 6-0; Cresci beat Elliott 6-0, 6-2; Williams beat Hicks 6-0, 6-1; Flege and Pulliam beat Fryman and Moss 6-0, 62; Kirby and Baumgartner beat Brown and Liesbers 6-0, 6-0. • In baseball, WaltonVerona beat Scott 9-8, May 6. Walton’s Tilley hit a double and had two RBI. On May 7, Walton beat Spencer County 7-1. Matthew Monday pitched eight strikeouts, and Tilley was 2-3 with a double, a homerun and four RBI for Walton.

The week at Ryle

• The Ryle baseball team beat McNicholas 3-1, May 4. Ryle’s Caleb Lonkard was 2-3 with a triple. • In softball, Ryle beat Cooper 15-2, May 4. Ryle’s Kate Rouse was 3-4 with a double and two RBI. Cooper’s Jessica Koors hit a double. • In boys tennis, Ryle beat Conner 5-0. Ryle’s Yushi Okita beat N. Eberhard 6-0, 6-2; Kento Okita beat J. Eberhard 60, 6-1; Adam Rost beat T. Johnson 5-7, 6-1, 6-0; Evan Wagner and Logan North beat Hodge and Owens 5-7, 6-4, 6-0; Arnett and David Geis beat Garnett and S. Johnson 6-4, 6-1. • The girls tennis team beat Boone County 4-1, May 4. Ryle’s Erin Bellhorn beat Alexis Caddell 6-2, 6-2; Meghan Watson beat Caldwell 6-0, 6-0; Harlee Hornsby and Maddie Lucas beat Christine Finley and Alison Brannon 6-2, 6-1; Kara Worley and Hannah Worley beat Kolb and Brooke Pendleton 6-0, 6-3. Boone’s Lauren McQueary beat Carley Lucas 6-4, 6-4. Ryle also beat Conner 4-1, May 4. Ryle’s C. Lucas beat Kaseke 6-2, 6-1; Erin Bellhorn beat North 5-7, 6-4, 10-4; Maddie Lucas and Harlee Hornsby beat Dolwick and Glahn 6-3, 6-0; Sam Zwick and Meghan Watson beat Kremer and Leick 6-0, 6-0. Conner’s Frisch beat Kristen Green 6-4, 6-4. Notre Dame beat Ryle 3-2, May 6, in the NKAC Division I Championship. Ryle’s Sam Zwick beat Ryan 6-1, 7-6; and Harlee Hornsby and Maddie Lucas beat Beischel and Morrison 6-2, 6-4.

Week at Boone County

• In boys tennis, Campbell County beat Boone County 41, May 4. Boone’s McQuery and Black beat Hall and Jaggers 6-4, 6-4. • The Holy Cross baseball team beat Boone County 3-2, May 6. Boone County’s Jackson Laumann scored a homerun. On May 7, Highlands beat Boone County 8-3. Boone’s Doug Teegarden scored a homerun.

The week at Heritage

• In softball, Villa Madonna beat Heritage 8-2, then 4-2, May 6. Bescecker hit a double for Heritage in game one. Heinrick and Besecker each hit a double in game two. On May 7, Newport beat Heritage 6-1, then 5-3. In game two, Rutt was 2-2.

May 12, 2011

HIGH

SCHOOL

Editor Melanie Laughman | mlaughman@nky.com | 513-248-7573

|

YOUTH

|

RECREATIONAL

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Florence Email: kynews@communitypress.com

N K Y. c o m

RECORDER

Raiders serving up wins in tennis By James Weber jweber@nky.com

Ryle High School nearly defeated the dominance of Covington Catholic in boys tennis last week. The Raiders fell 3-2 to the Colonels in the boys semifinals of the Northern Kentucky Athletic Conference Division I tournament. “It could have gone either way,” Ryle head coach Amy Bates said. “They couldn’t have been any closer. My guys played really well, and I was proud

of them. We’re hoping they can prove it in the regional tournament.” Kento Okita lost to Cov Cath’s Stephen Schafer in three sets at first singles. Yushi Okita won at second singles. Sophomore Adam Rost lost at third singles. Seniors Logan North and Evan Wagner won at first singles, and junior Alex Arnett and eighth-grader David Geis lost at second singles. Both Okitas, senior twin brothers, will go to Western Kentucky University to play

tennis. The Okitas, who have been part of the Ryle program for about seven years, are the first Division I signees for the program in recent memory. Yushi played in the state tournament the last two years. Kento has been one match away from qualifying, losing to Yushi in a playoff match for a berth in 2009 after both lost in the regional semifinals. With the addition of the new state team tournament this year, the regional semi-

finalists will go to state no matter what. Bates’ goal is to get both brothers into the state singles tournament and get the Raiders into the team tournament at the same time. The regional team champion will play in the state tournament, starting with a sectional tourney May 21. That tourney will be in the standard dual match format. “I’d like the team to go to state,” Bates said. “That was our goal from the beginning, have a winning season and be competitive

with Cov Cath. We’re still working on it.” She said the North and Wagner doubles team have really stepped up in their senior years. Arnett was away from the team for two years and has come back. Ryle’s girls tennis team is also having a strong season. The Raiders lost 3-2 to Notre Dame in the finals of the Division I conference tournament. See more sports coverage at www.cincinnati.com/ blogs/presspreps.

Track all-stars converge at Dixie May 13 By James Weber jweber@nky.com

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

Jake Nutter of Ryle runs the final leg of the boys 4x200 relay during the Lloyd Invitational May 6 at Lloyd Memorial High School in Erlanger.

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

Demi Welte of Walton-Verona runs the last leg of the 4x200 relay during the Lloyd Invitational May 6 at Lloyd Memorial High School in Erlanger.

Jeremy Fisher and the Area 5 championship track meet may be at new schools, but Fisher expects the same success this year, if not more. Fisher, who took over the track program at Beechwood High School after several years at Conner, remains the meet director of the Area 5 meet, which returns for its second year. The meet will move to Dixie Heights High School this year. Area 5 refers to the local region of the Kentucky Track and Cross Country Coaches Association. It includes the counties of Boone, Kenton, Campbell, Grant, Gallatin and Pendleton. “The idea has definitely caught on,” Fisher said. “All the heavy hitters will be coming, and that says a lot about our credibility.” The meet begins at 4:45 p.m. Friday, May 13. The top 16 performers in each event so far this season, regardless of class, are invited to participate. Fisher is looking forward to the meet at Dixie’s three-

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

Kyle Henderson hands off to Nick Ballinger for Cooper during the boys 4x200 relay during the Lloyd Invitational May 6 at Lloyd Memorial High School in Erlanger. year old facility, which has automatic timing. The Beechwood and Dixie staffs will work together to run the meet. “The qualifying times are spectacular,” Fisher said. “It’s rare to have a competition that gets them all together at the same time.” In addition to the standard events, there will be 800 meter races for both

“open” and freshman/sophomore divisions. A freshman/sophomore 100-meter race will also happen. In last year’s meet, seven events were won with performances that were topranked in the state. Fisher expects more of that this year, with most of the local powers signing up for the meet. That includes all three reigning state girls

team champions in Campbell County, Highlands and Newport Central Catholic and their top-flight sprinters. “The sprints are really going to be something to watch,” Fisher said. “Last year had more of a distance feel.” See more sports coverage at www.cincinnati.com/ blogs/presspreps.

Nominate top student athletes starting May 4 The Community Recorder will accept nominations for its third-annual Sportsman and Sportswoman of the Year online contest until Monday, May 16. The award – whose winners are determined online by newspaper readers – recognizes student-athletes of the highest caliber who show excellence in the classroom, community and in their sports. Go online to nky.com/ preps and look for the red and blue Sportsman icon on the right hand side of the page. You may need to scroll down. Once you click on the icon, you will see a photo gallery of last year’s winners and nomination links for each of the three counties in Northern Kentucky. Juniors or seniors who are regular contributors/ starters for their sports are eligible to be nominated. Freshmen or sophomores will be considered if they’ve been recognized at the state level. Not every nomination will be included on the ballots, but those with the most nominations will be given priority consideration. Once ballots are formed

from these nominations, online readers can vote often for their favorite athletes starting Friday, May 20. Top vote-getters win. The ballots will be online Friday, May 20, and run until midnight Monday, June 6. Voters will need a cincinnati.com user account to cast a final ballot. (It will not be necessary to make one to nominate an athlete.) Sign up in advance of the voting period using the link at the top, left-hand corner of cincinnati.com. Contact Jordan Kellogg at jkellogg@nky.com for assistance to get your account set up. For all other questions on the Sportsman of the Year, contact Melanie Laughman at mlaughman@ nky.com.

Boone County’s Cole Wendeln (7) scores against Elder catcher Daniel Schwarz (24) on a double to left field in the third inning of the Rebels’ 7-4 victory May 5 in Florence.

Rebels beat Panthers

Boone County beat Elder 7-4 in baseball action May 5 at Champion Window Field in Florence. Boone improved to 145. Doug Teegarden had three hits and three RBI for the Rebels, and Jackson Laumann got the win on the mound.

PHOTOS BY JOSEPHFUQUA II/STAFF

Boone County pitcher Jackson Laumann (25) throws a pitch against Elder in the first inning May 5.


Sports & recreation

Florence Recorder

May 12, 2011

A9

Crusaders regroup after All ‘A’ loss jweber@nky.com

ERLANGER - For the first time in three years, the St. Henry District High School softball team will not play in the All “A” Classic state tournament. Head coach Kyla Brady is now preparing to refocus her team’s efforts on the postseason, which begins May 23. The Crusaders’ All “A” dreams ended with a 2-0 loss to Newport Central Catholic May 5 in the Ninth Region semifinals. St. Henry dropped to 11-5. St. Henry allowed a run in the first inning off three Crusader errors. “The first inning, we had a lot of jitters,” Brady said. “We were pretty tight. We’ve been in these situations before but that’s the game sometimes.” St. Henry starting pitcher Mamee Salzer struck out

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

St. Henry pitcher Mamee Salzer delivers to Newport Central Catholic during NCC’s 2-0 win in the All “A” Ninth Region semifinals May 5 at Beechwood. eight batters out of a possible nine outs in the first three innings and did not allow a hit until the fourth inning. The Crusader offense only

got four hits themselves, however, off NCC ace Danielle Hausfeld and her 1.00 ERA. “She’s a great pitcher, and

we respect what she can do,” Brady said. “She kept us off balance. We had to be more aggressive at the plate. She’s so consistent and always gets the ball over the plate.” For the season, Salzer has a 1.35 ERA. “She’s pitching really well for us,” Brady said. “She’s having a nice year.” Noelle Butts is 5-1 with a 0.42 ERA. Salzer (.476) and Abbey Kirkwood (.479) are the top two hitters on the team. Jordan Kramer, Cameron Kreimer, Sami Ives, Riley Cantrall and Jaime Maley are also over .400. Salzer, a junior, has three home runs on the year and 22 RBI to lead the team. Kirkwood has 22 runs

$10 Off CE-0000453421

By James Weber

Volunteer opportunities with the Special Olympics of Northern Kentucky: Flag football: 8-10 volunteers are needed to referee scrimmages and games on various Saturdays in May. Email John Foppe at jrfoppe@insightbb.com. Softball: 20-30 volunteers are needed to be umpires, experience preferred, and to manage the score-board from 8:30 a.m.

to 5:30 p.m. on a Saturday in July for a tournament at Rivershore in Hebron. Email Foppe at jrfoppe@insightbb.com. Golf: 10 volunteers are needed to help run the regional tournament in August, date to be determined, from 1-6 p.m. at the Kenton County Golf Course. Must know the basic rules of golf. Email Mark Staggs at staggsm@fuse.net.

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last year and will look to do so again with a fairly young team. The Crusaders have no seniors and seven juniors. “I’ll have to build them back up,” Brady said. “We have experience but they’re still a young bunch.” See more sports coverage at www.cincinnati.com/ blogs/presspreps.

$200 min.

BOONE COUNTY SOCCER Volunteers needed U13 Girls and Boys Select Soccer Try-Outs. for Special Olympics U13 Girls Try-outs Central Park Field #1

scored to rank third in Northern Kentucky and leads the area with 27 stolen bases. St. Henry has little time to regroup. The Crusaders have a key test at Conner May 9, then seeding games in the 34th District still to come with Dixie Heights and Ludlow. St. Henry won the district


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Florence Recorder

May 12, 2011

| LETTERS | Editor Nancy Daly | ndaly@nky.com | 578-1059 EDITORIALS

COLUMNS

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CH@TROOM

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Touseytown once was thriving place on the Ohio River (Excerpted from “Lost River Towns of Boone County”) The historic settlement of Boone County dates back over two centuries. While some early communities such as Petersburg or Bullittburg have survived (perhaps with a name change), quite a few others have dwindled or disappeared entirely. “Lost River Towns of Boone County,” published late last year, explores the history of a number of these fascinating locations. The book, published by The History Press, features contributions from several authors and was edited by Bridget B. Striker. It is available at local book and media outlets and online through www.historypress.net.

Touseytown

About 1804, brothers Zerah, Thomas and Moses Tousey settled on the Ohio River just north of Petersburg at the mouth of Second Creek. The Tousey family lived in Durham, New York, before making the arduous trip to Kentucky. Thomas and Moses quickly established themselves as savvy businessmen, building a mill and a tobacco warehouse and running the ferry across the river to Lawrenceburg. Though it was never officially a town, the settlement became known as Touseytown. Located between the mouth of Taylor and Second Creeks, the tiny hamlet thrived as the brothers built their businesses, and their growing families settled into their new lives. After the deaths of Moses in 1834 and Thomas in 1839, coupled with the growth of nearby Petersburg and Lawrenceburg, the community faded away. Most of the Tousey children either died young or moved on, leaving the Tousey legacy to die out much like the old town. When the Touseys made their journey to Kentucky, they brought another family with them. Some-

times family names fade away over time, and the Percival family is one such name. Moses and Thomas married cousins (interestingly, both named Lydia Percival) and brought some of the family with them to settle. Most of the surviving Percival and Tousey children later intermarried with other prominent Boone County families, like Johnson (Cave), Bush and Gaines. Moses’s daughter Miranda married Captain Thomas Porter (the Porters were the parents of Albert Gallatin Porter, governor of Indiana, 1881-85), who took over the ferry in 1835. Porter then sold the ferry to the Piatt family, whose land was on the hill above Touseytown. Not much is known about the oldest brother, Zerah (died 1831), though he was the father of Erastus Tousey, whose Federal-style mansion in Burlington still stands (now the Tousey House Tavern). Today, all that is left (of Touseytown) is the cemetery on the hill overlooking the Ohio River. Full of weeds and broken headstones, the final resting place of the Tousey, Percival and Piatt families of Touseytown lies forgotten. The roads that once led to Touseytown – Lawrenceburg Ferry Road and Second Creek Road – now end in an overgrowth of weeds and trees that shows no sign of ever having been home to a thriving community. The Boone County Historic Preservation Review Board meets at 4 p.m. the second Thursday of every month. Meetings are open to the public. For more information about Historic Preservation in Boone County please contact the Review Board at 859-334-2111 or mbecher@boonecountyky.org. The Review Board is online at www.boonecountyky.org/pc.

Mailmen collect for hunger relief On Saturday, May 14, letter carriers throughout the Tristate will be taking part in the 19th annual National Association of Letter Carriers Stamp Out Hunger Food Drive. Since its inception in 1993, the NALC food drive has grown to be the largest one-day food drive in the nation. Since the food drive’s inception, we have been partnered with the Freestore/Foodbank and the hundreds of agencies they support. During this time we have locally collected over 2 million pounds of non-perishable food. In 2010, our national total number of food poundage collected over the years exceeded the 1 billion pound threshold. With help from the other postal crafts and thousands of other volunteers, we conduct the food drive annually in every U.S. state and jurisdiction. The timing of the annual event is calculated to restock the shelves of local food banks and pantries as their stores are depleted. It should come as no surprise that this year the food drive will be especially important as more Americans than ever need help feeding their families.

To take part, simply place non-perishable food items next to your mailbox before the carrier makes his/her rounds on Saturday morning, Gerald May 14. Your Giesting carrier will colCommunity lect the non-peritems Recorder ishable and the Postal guest Service will columnist transport it to the Freestore. If you live outside the city of Cincinnati, you can still participate and be assured that food collected in your local community stays in your local community. I want to take this opportunity to thank the members of our community and all the volunteers for the generosity they’ve shown throughout the years. And I am asking you once again to help letter carriers Stamp Out Hunger. Please help us so we can help others. Gerald Giesting is president of Branch 43 of the National Association of Letter Carriers.

Court of Honor

Troop 805 from Union Presbyterian Church are shown at their winter Court of Honor. Photo provided via NKY.com/Share.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Williams will get my vote

Having the opportunity to meet Senate President David Williams, his running mate Agriculture Commissioner Richie Farmer and Mrs. Robin Williams was a pleasure. Senator Williams acknowledges the importance of our county, our Northern Kentucky region and the impact the airport has on our community. As we all know, growth, funding and support at the state level are vital to our area prospering. Senator Williams’ wife, Robin, is a Chase Law school graduate and a former resident of Northern Kentucky. She and Senator Williams complement one another providing a strong team for our area and state. Let’s share in moving forward while protecting what we already have accomplished in the past. David Williams for governor will receive my vote in the May 17 primary. Nancy J. Lucas, Union

Who will say no?

Acting almost in lock step, several of the universities in Kentucky and Ohio have announced another round of tuition increases, ranging from 5 to 6.5 percent. They attribute the increases to another round of faculty pay increases. Who is to step in and say “no”? According to Forbes magazine, during the past 30 years overall inflation in the U.S. was 106 percent; health care costs went up 251 percent. College tuition and fees soared 439 percent. Louis Lataif, dean emeritus of Boston University’s School of Management, calls the rapid rise in tuitions a bubble resembling those that hit housing in the last decade. College graduates, he says, may earn higher incomes, but how can the cost of tuition and room and board continue to increase at a rate six times greater than the increase in the average earnings of college graduates. Government shares some of the blame. The more aid government gives students, the faster tuition rises. According to Forbes, the tuition bubble is about to burst. Too many parents and young scholars aren’t getting their money’s worth these days. As a former legislator, I have seen the education lobby at work in Frankfort. The best politicians are the university presidents. They are super salesmen and most legislators are too timid or intimidated to say “no” to them. Those who do, are targeted. They are not “friends of education.” The greatest boost in education has come from the community

About letters & columns We welcome your comments on editorials, columns, stories or other topics important to you in the Recorder. Include your name, address and phone number(s) so we may verify your letter. Letters of 200 or fewer words and columns of 500 or fewer words have the best chance of being published. All submissions may be edited for colleges. Their fees are reasonable, the programs are sound and they are turning out graduates to waiting jobs. More emphasis should be given to the community college programs. The universities deserve a second look. Paul H. Marcotte, Union

With $4 gas, it’s time to start exploring

I couldn’t agree more with Sen. Mitch McConnell’s article “Simple solutions at the pump.” You don’t have to be a Washington insider to realize that God has blessed our great country with vast resources of energy both off shore and in the ground. The fact that the current administration as well as others in the past have done everything in their power to keep this energy from being used is a disservice to the American public. As early as 1980 Alaska’s coastal plain (ANWR) was estimated to contain 17 billion barrels of crude oil and 34 trillion cubic feet of natural gas. With gas at $4 a gallon and heading up, don’t you think it’s time to start exploring? You don’t have to worry about the wildlife, this area is a waste land, besides, we’ve all seen the pictures of bears walking on the Alaska pipeline. Nature finds a way. I’m thankful we have a man like Sen. McConnell working on our behalf, bringing common sense to where it’s needed most. John W. Ellis, Burlington

Cigarette butts on roadside are a problem

On April 29 the staff of the Boone County Adult Education Program and some of its students picked up garbage along Gunpowder Road and Highland Drive. We recruited staff and students through our education center then met at a central location. We covered three miles with 20 volunteers. We found beer bottles, fast food wrappers, and a host of other items. During our trip, we had discussions about the problem of litter and why people don’t just keep it in their cars until they can discard

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length, accuracy and clarity. Deadline: Noon Monday E-mail: kynews@community press.com Fax: 859-283-7285 U.S. mail: See box below Letters, columns and articles submitted to Recorder may be published or distributed in print, electronic or other forms. it into a trash can. We noticed how beautiful the areas were we worked in and what a shame it is that people don’t take better care of their community. We also noticed the number of cigarette butts there were along the roadside. We agreed that is a real problem. They were everywhere. If people are going to smoke they need to use the ashtray in their cars instead of tossing them out the window. It was a very pleasant day and we had a good time helping to keep the community we live and work in clean. Martha Karlage Boone County Adult Education director

Picking up trash helps football program

“Trash for Cash is an excellent opportunity for us to fundraise for football and give back to the community at the same time.” – Rick Thompson, Boone County High School head football coach On April 26 parents from the Boone County football team participated in the Trash for Cash program sponsored by the Boone County Public Works Department. Volunteers were organized to pick up trash and debris on nine miles of the county’s roadside areas. We covered Weaver, Sam Neace, and surrounding roads. We were also sent to Cayton and Beemon Road areas. Our group screened the areas for paper, plastic wrappers, empty bottles and cans. The team got a late start at 6 p.m., however we split up into several groups after we were given our safety vests and gloves. It took approximately 21⁄2 hours to clean up all of the areas that we were designated. “Working together as a team to improve the area we all live in was actually a good feeling.” said John Beutel, a junior at Boone. It was an eye-opening experience to the team how much trash was collected. The group was glad to participate in this program, and raise money for their team at the same time. Christine Steele, Boone County High School football parent , Union

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A WORLD OF DIFFERENT VOICES

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T h u r s d a y, M a y 1 2 , 2 0 1 1

PEOPLE

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IDEAS

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RECIPES

BEST FRIENDS FOREVER

PATRICIA A. SCHEYER/CONTRIBUTOR

Heather Russell and Sarah Chambers like the fact that they’re different.

Differences bond friends together By Patricia A. Scheyer

friendship is cherished and valuable. “Heather opens me up,” said Sarah, who is more of a realist. “I’m more of a joiner because of her.” “Sarah keeps me balanced,” said Heather. “I tend to over-think, and she brings me back to earth.” Both friends live in Union. The two friends have stuck together through good times and bad, and it has strengthened the bond. Next month the two plan to attend the New Kids on the Block concert together, spending an evening laughing and having fun. “We’re looking forward to being old, drinking martinis on the porch and criticizing people’s outfits,” said Sarah with a laugh. “We’ll be friends forever.” For more about your community, visit www.nky.com/union

Community Recorder Contributor

UNION - Heather Russell and Sarah Chambers didn’t realize they would be best friends when they first met at age 13 at Florence Baptist Temple. Heather’s outgoing nature and tendency to say whatever she thinks made Sarah’s more reticent personality a little leery of the newcomer. But as they hung out with the same group of friends, the two discovered that being different could work for them. “We would have sleepovers at the house whose parents allowed a longer curfew,” laughed Heather. “We did get into more trouble that way, but we had a lot of fun.” Now that they’re older, both married with two children, they know their

COMMUNITY FACES

PATRICIA A. SCHEYER/CONTRIBUTOR

Gaines House reopens

Walton Mayor Wayne Carlisle, right, greets Ron Tackett of Walton outside the Gaines Tavern, a historical building being restored by the city, during the open house Saturday. The city is restoring the Abner Gaines House and about 450 people attended the May 7 open house. Story, B5.

THANKS TO SARAH CROMER

Participants in Cardinal Hill’s adult day health program take fields trips all over the area.

Cardinal Hill meet needs of patients, caregivers

Adult day program offered for a few hours or all day By Justin B. Duke jbduke@nky.com

A Florence facility is helping those with disabilities have their needs met every day. Cardinal Hill offers its adult day health center for those who could use help throughout the day because of a medical condition or disability. “They need someone during the day who can meet their medical needs,” said Sarah Cromer, spokesperson for Cardinal Hill. The program is open to adults, age 18 to 100 years old, who are able to spend the day in a supervised, medical setting. The day program is staffed by a registered nurse, a licensed practical nurse, activity coordinators and program aides. The adult day program has two major benefits because it helps patients by serving their needs, and it also allows caregivers to be free to have a job or run errands, Cromer said. “It takes that pressure and stress off the caregivers,” she said. Patients can attend the program as they need, whether it be five days a week during business hours or for just a few hours a week, she said. “We’ve got folks who come once a week; we’ve got folks who come every day,” Cromer said. While at Cardinal Hill patients have a variety of needs met from basic

THANKS TO SARAH CROMER

The Cardinal Hill adult day health program focuses on mental stimulation. things, like being fed and given medication, to more advanced needs, like speech and occupational therapy. Often those who suffered accidents will go to the day program to help their recovery, Cromer said. “Once they’re better, they can get back into the workforce,” she said. During their time at Cardinal Hill, patients also get to do crafts and go on field trips to movies and restaurants, Cromer said. “They go everywhere. I get kind of

jealous,” she said. Caregivers can feel guilty about sending their loved ones to a day program, but oftentime it’s just what patients need, Cromer said. Along with getting mental and physical stimulation, Cardinal Hill focuses on helping patients build relationships, she said. “They’re getting that social stimulation,” Cromer said. Patients are grouped by similar age and ability so they can socialize with each other. Close bonds usually form as time is spent together, she said. “We’re a small group. We’re practically family,” Cromer said. In addition to providing the day program, Cardinal Hill will also provide transportation for families who need it. “We are approved to pick clients up and drop them off at home,” Cromer said. To help families determine how they can enroll loved ones in the day programs, Cardinal Hill offers financial counseling. To decide if Cardinal Hill is right for families, Cromer recommends setting up a tour of the facility. Cardinal Hill is located at 31 Spiral Drive in Florence. For more information about Cardinal Hill’s adult day health center or any other programs visit www.cardinalhill.org or call 859-525-1128. For more about your community, visit www.nky.com/florence

After torrential rains, mold can damage buildings Torrential rains and resulting flood damage have left a path of destruction for homeowners across Kentucky and the nation. Sunny skies and warm temperatures will help cleanup efforts, but with high moisture content in the air, conditions are ripe for the growth of mold and fungi in waterlogged buildings. Flooding may have occurred due to high water from a creek, or misdirected downspouts. It may have been minor or major. Mold is a type of fungi that begins to grow on materials that stay wet longer than two or three days. It produces tiny cells called spores that float and spread easily through the air. Live spores act like seeds to form new colonies when they find the right conditions. These include mois-

ture, nutrients and a suitable place to grow. Moisture is the key factor. If mold Diane growth is Mason not taken Extension care of, the can Notes mold d a m a g e buildings and furnishings. It can rot wood and eventually cause structural damage. Mold can also cause stains and unsightly damage to furnishings. Some people are very sensitive to mold, but longterm or heavy exposure to it is unhealthy for anyone. Mold can trigger allergic reactions, asthma attacks and also can compromise a person's ability to resist illness. Young children and

the elderly are most vulnerable. Special care is needed to safely and effectively remove mold from a flooddamaged building or area. Here are suggestions to help you safely manage the removal of mold from your home. 1. Consider the size of the mold problem. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, if the area is less than 10 square feet (less than roughly a 3 feet-by-3 feet patch), in most cases, it can be handled by the homeowner. 2. Wear protective gear including gloves, goggles and an N95 respirator. Depending on the severity and extent of the mold, you may need to consider a more extensive respirator that will provide better filtration. 3. Isolate the area you

are working in by closing doors and ventilate by opening a window, if possible. Disturbing mold colonies during cleanup can release spores into the air. Take necessary steps to insure that mold spores are not able to spread. Cover air vents and turn off central air conditioning or heating. 4. Remove and dispose of moldy, porous materials that have been contaminated. These may include carpeting, upholstery, fabrics and mattresses. Building insulation can wick up moisture and stay wet for a long time. Cut wall covering above the water line and remove insulation to prevent the growth of mold and fungi inside walls. Remove vinyl wallpaper and flooring, ceiling tiles, gypsum wallboard and processed wood products that have retained moisture.

5. Clean and disinfect. You can effectively clean surface mold from nonporous materials such as hard plastic, concrete, glass and metal with water and common detergent. Clean to remove the mold, not just kill it, because dead spores can still cause health problems. After cleaning you may choose to disinfect with a common household disinfectant. Read the product label for details. In cases where sewage contamination has occurred, disinfection is a must. Follow label directions for the disinfecting product and wear rubber gloves. 6. Dry all wet materials as quickly as possible by running fans and a dehumidifier. Air out the building by using window fans to pull mold spores outdoors. 7. Remain on the lookout for mold recurrences. If it returns, repeat cleaning

and use speed drying equipment. 8. Do not attempt restoration until all materials have dried completely. If you are unsure of your own ability to adequately clean up mold, contact a professional for advice and assistance. Currently, there are no government licensing programs in Kentucky for mold remediation. If you choose to hire a contractor to remove mold, seek out a licensed contractor with special training and equipment such as HEPA vacuums and dehumidifiers. Ask about cost, the methods to be used, the steps to be taken and references. Request details in writing. Diane Mason is county extension agent for family and consumer sciences at the Boone County Cooperative Extension Service.


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Florence Recorder

May 12, 2011

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD F R I D A Y, M A Y 1 3

COMMUNITY DANCE

Youth Dance, 7-10 p.m., Alexandria Firehouse, 7951 Alexandria Pike, Fire Department Hall, downstairs. For area students in grades 4-8. Benefits Alexandria Fire and Police Explorers. Family friendly. $5. Presented by Alexandria Fire Explorer Post 100. 859-635-5991. Alexandria.

FESTIVALS

Maifest, 5-11:30 p.m., MainStrasse Village, Main Street, Arts and crafts booths, German and international foods, music, children’s play area, amusement rides, street chalk art contest and more. Music on four stages. Presented by MainStrasse Village Association. 859-491-0458; www.mainstrasse.org. Covington.

FOOD & DRINK

Wine Tasting, 4-8 p.m., D.E.P.’s Fine Wine & Spirits Fort Thomas, 90 W. Alexandria Pike, Free. 859-781-8105; www.depsfinewine.com. Fort Thomas. Wine Tasting, 6-9 p.m., StoneBrook Winery, 6570 Vineyard Lane, Stonebrook is on the Northern Kentucky Back Roads Wine Trail. Pick up a passport at one of the five wineries and get it validated at each winery for a gift. Information and list of participating wineries at website. Five for $5. 859-635-0111; www.stonebrookwinery.com. Camp Springs. Wine Tasting, 5-9 p.m., Camp Springs Vineyard, 6685 Four Mile Road, $1. 859-4480253. Camp Springs.

About calendar

To submit calendar items, go to “www.nky.com” and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to “life@communitypress.com” along with event information. Items are printed on a space-available basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to “www.nky.com” and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page.

MUSIC - R&B

Los Honchos, 10-11 p.m., Southgate House, 24 E. Third St., Free. 859-431-2201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport.

MUSIC - WORLD

Twenty One Pilots, 7 p.m., Mad Hatter, 620 Scott St., $8. 859-291-2233; www.cincyticket.com. Covington.

ON STAGE - COMEDY

D.L. Hughley, 8 p.m. and 10:30 p.m., Funny Bone Comedy Club, Newport on the Levee, Special engagement, no coupons or passes accepted. $30. 859-957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Showtune, 8 p.m., Stained Glass Theatre, 802 York St., Musical revue celebrates words and music of Jerry Herman, composer and lyricist for Broadway shows. $20. Presented by Footlighters Inc. Through May 28. 513-4748711; www.footlighters.org. Newport. Best of the Best, 7:30 p.m. and 10:30 p.m., Shadowbox Cabaret, Newport on the Levee, Most popular-by-demand sketches and songs. Food and drink available. $20-$30. Through July 9. 859-957-7625; www.shadowboxcabaret.com. Newport.

SPECIAL EVENTS

Stonebrook and BB Riverboat Dinner and Cruise, 6 p.m.-9:30 p.m., BB Riverboats Newport Landing, 101 Riverboat Row, A unique and festive evening includes a buffet dinner, music, Stonebrook wines and cruise on the scenic Ohio River. $50 per person. Reservations required. Presented by StoneBrook Winery. 859-261-8500; www.stonebrookwinery.com. Newport.

HEALTH / WELLNESS

Health Screenings, 9 a.m.-noon, Homan Chiropractic Newport, 52 Carothers Road, Brief health questionnaire, blood pressure, height, weight, pulse and spinal/postural evaluation. Free. 859-291-2225. Newport.

MUSEUMS

In a League of Our Own: Play Ball! Knothole Baseball in Northern Kentucky, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, 1600 Montague Road, Included with admission: $7, $6 seniors, $4 children; free for members. 859-491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

MUSIC - ACOUSTIC

Vandaveer, 9:30 p.m., Southgate House, 24 E. Third St., Parlour. With Ferraby Lionheart. Non-smoking. Doors open 8:30 p.m. $10, $8 advance. 859-431-2201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport. Mick Denton and Don Mackie, 8-11 p.m., Vintage Wine Bar - Kitchen - Market, 2141 North Bend Road, 859-689-9463; www.thevintagewinebar.com. Hebron.

MUSIC - BLUES

Ricky Nye and the Paris Blues Band, 7:3010:30 p.m., Rabbit Hash General Store, 10021 Lower River Road, 859-334-3151. Boone County.

MUSIC - POP

The Gamut, 6-10 p.m., Newport on the Levee, 1 Levee Way, 859-291-0550; www.newportonthelevee.com. Newport.

Top Chef Tour, 10:30 a.m., noon and 1:30 p.m., Kroger Marketplace Hebron, 3105 N. Bend Road, Includes cooking demonstrations. With two former “Top Chef” contestants. Free. 859-962-4900; www.bravotv.com/thetour. Hebron.

SPORTS – TRYOUTS & REGISTRATIONS

Basketball Summer Camp Sign-ups, 9 a.m.-9 p.m., Sports of All Sorts Mt. Zion, 10094 Investment/Demia Way, Camp features former UK basketball stars Troy McKinley, Dickey Beal, Cedric Jenkins, Kyle Macy, Jack Givens, Leroy Byrd, Roger Harden and Tom Heitz. Grades 1-12. Camp held June 13-17. $175. Registration required. Presented by Sports of All Sorts Youth Association. Through June 1. 859-372-7754. Union. Summer Slam Sports Day Camp Sign-ups, 9 a.m.-9 p.m., Sports of All Sorts Mt. Zion, 10094 Investment/Demia Way, Camp designed to provide top-shelf recreational experience and safe and growing social experience. Family friendly. $125. Registration required. Presented by Sports of All Sorts Youth Association. 859-372-7754. Union. Coach Ken Shields Summer Camp Signups, 9 a.m.-9 p.m., Sports of All Sorts Mt. Zion, 10094 Investment/Demia Way, Camp led by former NKU head coach. Camp held July 25-28. $125. Registration required. Presented by Sports of All Sorts Youth Association. 859-372-7754. Union. Sports of All Sorts Youth Association Summer 1 League Registrations, 9 a.m.-9 p.m., Sports of All Sorts Mt. Zion, 10094 Investment/Demia Way, Register now for recreational basketball, girls’ volleyball, outdoor soccer, outdoor flag football and bowling for youth ages 4-18. $95. Registration required. Presented by Sports of All Sorts Youth Association. 859-372-7754; www.sportsofallsortsky.com. Union. Sports of All Sorts Basketball Camp SignUps, 9 a.m.-9 p.m., Sports of All Sorts Mt. Zion, 10094 Investment/Demia Way, Camps to be held June 27-30 and July 6-9. Fundamental camps open to any boy or girl going into grades 1-9 of next school year and will be held 9 a.m.-4 p.m. each day. $100. Registration required. Presented by Sports of All Sorts Youth Association. 859-372-7754; www.sportsofallsortsky.com. Union.

S A T U R D A Y, M A Y 1 4

BENEFITS

Austin’s Angels Fundraiser, 8 p.m.-midnight, Drawbridge Inn Hotel, 2477 Royal Drive, Music by Troy Brooks, open bar, hors d’oeuvres, raffle, silent auction and live auction with C.W. Webster, auctioneer. Benefits research for Alternating Hemiplegia of Childhood. $75, $65 advance. Presented by Austin’s Angels. Email: austinsangels2010@gmail.com; www.austinsangels.org. Fort Mitchell.

EDUCATION

Improv Workshop, 1 p.m., Funny Bone Comedy Club, Newport on the Levee, With Missy Whitis, renowned improv coach and publicist. $45. 859-957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

HISTORIC SITES

Dinsmore Homestead, 1-5 p.m., Dinsmore Homestead, 5656 Burlington Pike, 1842 farmhouse and furnishings of the Dinsmore family. Tours begin on the hour; the last tour begins at 4 p.m. Includes gift shop. $5, $3 ages 60 and up, $2 ages 7-17, members and ages 6 and under free. 859-586-6117; www.dinsmorefarm.org. Burlington.

KARAOKE & OPEN MIC

Karaoke, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Super Bowl Bellewood, 1211 Waterworks Road, $12 buckets, $3 domestics and $2 Jell-O shots. With DJ Chill Will. No cover. Presented by Super Bowl. 859-781-1211; www.superbowlnky.com. Newport.

LITERARY - SIGNINGS

Christina Wald, 1:30-3 p.m., Blue Marble Children’s Bookstore, 1356 S. Fort Thomas Ave., Great Green Room. Illustrator discusses and signs “Habitat Spy,” written by Wald Cynthia KieberKing. Free. 859-781-0602. Fort Thomas.

MUSIC - ACOUSTIC

Sasha, 7-10 p.m., Argentine Bean Bistro and Wine Bar, 2875 Town Center Blvd., Gypsy Latin Jazz. Free. 859-426-1042; www.argentinebean.net. Crestview Hills.

MUSIC - CLASSIC ROCK

The New Lime, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Mokka and the Sunset Bar and Grill, 500 Monmouth St., Columbia recording artists perform music from 1960s-’70s. Free. 859-581-3700; www.mokkaandthesunsetbarandgrill.com. Newport.

MUSIC - CLASSICAL

Rebekah Chesnes, 4-5:30 p.m., Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, 1028 Scott Blvd., Otto M. Budig Theatre. Flutist concert with Naoko Tanaka, piano; Kenneth H. Piatt, trumpet; and the Innocenti String Quartet. Kaleidoscopes of the 21st Century exhibit also open for viewing. Ages 8 and up. Free. Presented by Street Symphony Artist Alliance. 513-847-1250. Covington.

MUSIC - WORLD

Wild Carrot, 8-11 p.m., Vintage Wine Bar Kitchen - Market, 2141 North Bend Road, Folk music. 859-689-9463; www.thevintagewinebar.com. Hebron.

PROVIDED

Behringer-Crawford Museum’s exhibit “In a League of Our Own: Play Ball! – Knothole Baseball in Northern Kentucky,” will run through June 5 on the museum’s third level. The exhibit explores the history and impact that knothole baseball has had on Northern Kentucky residents for the past 75 years. There will be scheduled reunion days, luncheons and presentations. The museum is located at 1600 Montague Road in Devou Park, Covington. Museum hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. TuesdaySaturday and 1 p.m.-5 p.m. Sundays. Admission is $7; $6, seniors; $4, ages 3-17; and free to museum members. For more information call 859-491-4003 or visit www.bcmuseum.org. Pictured is the District 29 Otto Printing team at Riverfront Stadium. They won the Class B Greater Cincinnati Tournament in 1973.

ON STAGE - COMEDY

Jim Florentine, 9:30 p.m., Southgate House, 24 E. Third St., Comedian. Ballroom. Doors open 8:30 p.m. $18, $15 advance. 859431-2201; www.ticketfly.com. Newport.

PETS

Hoe Down for the Greyhounds, 6-10 p.m., Campbell Lodge Boys’ Home, 5161 Skyline Drive, Equine Center. Food, beverages, dancing, raffles, silent auction and adoptable dogs. Benefits Homeward Bound Greyhound Association. $20. Registration required. 859781-1214. Cold Spring. S U N D A Y, M A Y 1 5

BENEFITS

Run with a Vision 5K Run/Walk, 9 a.m., Champion Window Field, 7950 Freedom Way, Benefits Cincinnati Association for the Blind and Visually Impaired. 9 a.m. registration. Silent auction with autographed Reds memorabilia. Benefits Cincinnati Association for the Blind and Visually Impaired. $10 for 5K race; $5 kids 1-mile race. Presented by Florence Freedom Professional Baseball. 859-594-4487. Florence.

MUSIC - ROCK

The Twilight Singers, 9 p.m., Southgate House, 24 E. Third St., Doors open 8 p.m. With Margot and the Nuclear So And So’s. $20, $17 advance. 859-431-2201; www.ticketfly.com. Newport.

SUPPORT GROUPS

Creatively Speaking: Family Art Therapy Workshop, 6-8 p.m., Hospice of the Bluegrass - Northern Kentucky, 7388 Turfway Road, Designed to foster communication, build coping skills and create a support network for families. Registration required. 859441-6332; www.hospicebg.org. Florence. T U E S D A Y, M A Y 1 7

CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS Triangle Toastmasters Meeting, 7-8:30 p.m., Campbell County Fiscal Court, 1098 Monmouth St., Become a confident, more effective speaker. Family friendly. Free. Presented by Triangle Toastmasters. 859-6523348. Newport.

MUSIC - CONCERTS

Third Eye Blind, 8 p.m., Madison Theater, 730 Madison Ave., Alternative rock band. $35.90. 800-745-3000. Covington.

FESTIVALS

Maifest, Noon-9 p.m., MainStrasse Village, Music by Ricky Nye and the Paris Blues Band on trestle Stage 3-5:30 p.m. 859-4910458; www.mainstrasse.org. Covington.

HISTORIC SITES

Dinsmore Homestead, 1-5 p.m., Dinsmore Homestead, $5, $3 ages 60 and up, $2 ages 7-17, members and ages 6 and under free. 859-586-6117; www.dinsmore farm.org. Burlington.

LECTURES

History, Art and Culture Lecture Series, 2 p.m., Baker Hunt Art and Cultural Center, 620 Greenup St., Amos Shinkle-Covington Philanthropist and Financier-Rags to Riches. With Dave Schroeder, executive director of the Kenton County Public Library and local historian. Refreshments served. Baker Hunt Museum open for free tours after the lecture. $40 series, $7. 859-431-0020; www.bakerhunt.com. Covington.

MUSIC - RELIGIOUS

Evensong, 7 p.m., Trinity Episcopal Church, 326 Madison Ave., Canticles: Herbert Murrill in e. ”Rejoice in the Lamb” by Benjamin Britten. With the Choir of Trinity Church. Wine and cheese will follow meditative services. 859-431-1786. Covington.

RECREATION

Mommy & Me Time, 11 a.m.-4 p.m., Star Lanes on the Levee, 1 Levee Way, Unlimited bowling, shoe rental and soft drinks. Includes cheese pizza, popcorn and cartoons on endof-lane screens. Reservations available in two-hour increments. $15 per child with same day purchase, $10 advance. Through Dec. 18. 859-625-7250; www.starlaneslevee.com. Newport.

RECREATION

Women’s Bridge, 10:30 a.m., Covington Art Club, 604 Greenup St., Kate Scudder House. Bring lunch; drinks provided. $2. 859-4312543. Covington.

SENIOR CITIZENS

Bingo, 12:20 p.m., Walton Multipurpose Senior and Community Center, 44 N. Main St., All collected money goes to the winning players. $1 for two cards. Presented by Senior Services of Northern Kentucky. 859-485-7611. Walton. W E D N E S D A Y, M A Y 1 8

CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS Team In Training Information Meeting, 7:30 p.m., Fort Thomas-Carrico Branch Library, 1000 Highland Ave., Recruiting for upcoming marathons. Benefits the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. Free. Presented by The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society’s Team In Training. 513-698-2828; www.teamintraining.org/soh. Fort Thomas.

MUSIC - CHORAL

Midday Musical Menu, 12:15 p.m., Trinity Episcopal Church, 326 Madison Ave., Antebellum Apassionato Piano Duo with Jewel A. Smith, pianist and Tami L. Morris, pianist. Free parking in church lots.Free; $6 lunch available at 11:30 a.m. 859-431-1786. Covington.

For more about Greater Cincinnati’s dining, music, events, movies and more, go to Metromix.com.

NATURE

Wild Wednesday, 10 a.m., Middleton-Mills Park, 3415 Mills Road, Shelterhouse 2. Birds of Prey with Raptor Rehabilitation of Kentucky. Pre-program: Educational with Marsha Bach of Northern Kentucky Health Department, 9:45 a.m. Hour-long programs. Rain or shine. Free, donations of nonperishable food and personal care items accepted. Presented by Kenton County Parks and Recreation. 859-525-7529; www. kentoncounty.org. Independence. T H U R S D A Y, M A Y 1 9

EDUCATION

GPS to Academic Success Workshops, 68 p.m., Newport High School, 900 E. Sixth St., Registration required. How to be Successful in a Predominately White Institution. 513-418-3917; email mgriffin@devonshiresmith.org; www.devonshiresmith.org. Newport.

MUSIC - STUDENT PERFORMANCES

Young Band Night, 6-9 p.m., Mahogany’s Coffee House and Bar, 3715 Winston Ave., Four young or new bands perform. Free. 859-261-1029. Latonia.

ON STAGE - COMEDY

Ian Bagg, 8 p.m., Funny Bone Comedy Club, Newport on the Levee, $15. Ages 18 and up. 859-957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport. Incredulity’s Night of Improv, 8:30-10 p.m., Mokka and the Sunset Bar and Grill, 500 Monmouth St., Upstairs. Performers in Cincinnati Fringe Festival and Chicago Improv Festival host night of improvisational comedy. Includes audience participation. Ages 18 and up. Free. Through May 26. 859-581-3700. Newport.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Showtune, 8 p.m., Stained Glass Theatre. $20. 513-474-8711; www.footlighters.org. Newport.

SPECIAL EVENTS

Product Runway, 7:30 p.m., Newport Syndicate, 18 E. Fifth St., Doors open at 6 p.m. Interior designers and architects flaunt their creativity and technical skills by producing fashion constructed out of interior finish materials. With Cash bar, hors d’oeuvres and music by DJ. Business or professional attire. $35. Presented by IIDA Ohio Kentucky Chapter c/o Amy Ostigny Company. 513-5187888; www.iidaohky.org. Newport.

SPECIAL EVENTS

Ben-Gals Cheerleading Tryouts, 3-8 p.m., Newport Syndicate, 18 E. Fifth St., Candidates perform skill sets for a spot on the 30person roster. The women will be judged by dance professionals, celebrities and local fans. Cash bar and food available. $25, $20 advance. Registration required. Presented by Cincinnati Bengals. 513-236-1643; www.bengals.com/cheerleaders. Newport.

SPORTS – TRYOUTS & REGISTRATIONS

ELISE MANAHAN/STAFF

The MainStrasse Village Association will present the 32nd annual MainStrasse Village Maifest from 5-11:30 p.m. Friday, May 13; noon to 11:30 p.m. Saturday, May 14; and noon to 9 p.m. Sunday, May 15, on Main Street in Covington. Maifest includes more than six city blocks filled with German and international food and drinks, specialty and domestic beers, works by more than 75 artisans and crafts person, amusement rides, live entertainment on four stages, a street chalk art contest, Baby Mai contest and more. Admission is free. Free parking is available in the IRS parking lot at 4th and Johnson streets. “All You Can Ride” bracelets will be available from opening to 5 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday for $15 and will be valid until 6 p.m. the day of purchase only. For more information visit www.mainstrasse.org. Pictured is Zinzinnati Bierband at a previous Maifest.

Women’s Basketball Leagues, 9 a.m.-9 p.m., Sports of All Sorts Mt. Zion, 10094 Investment/Demia Way, Games start June 24. Deposit of $100 required at time of registration with balance due day of first game. Family friendly. $475 per team. Presented by Sports of All Sorts Youth Association. Through June 12. 859-372-7754. Union. M O N D A Y, M A Y 1 6

MUSIC - BLUEGRASS

Bluegrass Jam, 8-11 p.m., Molly Malone’s Irish Pub and Restaurant, 112 E. Fourth St., No sign-up required. Ages 21 and up. Free. 859-491-6659. Covington.

THANKS TO JEANNA VELLA

Cincinnati Shakespeare Company offers a new twist on “The Two Gentlemen of Verona,” through May 29. The company’s take is inspired by the 1970s, with a retro feel. Performances are 7:30 p.m. Thursday-Saturday; and 2 p.m. Sunday, at 719 Race St. Tickets are $22-$28. Call 513-381-2273 or visit www.cincyshakes.com. Pictured are Darnell Pierre Benjamin as Valentine, Jolin Polasek as Silvia and Cary Davenport as Proteus in the production.


Life

Florence Recorder

May 12, 2011

B3

What to do, what to think when crises arrive in our lives When crises arrive in our lives the first one we tend to blame is God. “Why does he allow such things to happen?” we wonder. Whether an earthquake, a car accident, or unfaithful spouse, we forget the fact the fact we are imperfect people, living in an imperfect world, and each imperfect person possesses a free will. I hold little credence in the idea that God causes suffering and crises. I believe they come along and God uses them. From womb to tomb we presume that life will always be nice, understandable and favoring me. When reality seems otherwise we’re shocked and surprised. Where do crises come from? Author Sue Monk Kidd offers some helpful analyses of the origin of many difficult times. They come from three

b a s i c sources: developmental transit i o n s , intrusive events Father Lou and interuprisGuntzelman nal ings. Let’s at Perspectives look each. 1. Developmental transitions naturally occur in everyone’s life. Ordinary persons move from stage to stage as their lives progress. Though after awhile we hate the changing, each transition is to serve as a doorway into greater life and fuller maturity. Consider some of the stages: birth; beginning school; puberty; moving away from home; risking and forming relationships, etc. Add to these the arrival of midlife; the empty nest,

coping with aging; redefining our marital relationship; leaving the workforce. Developmental changes are sprinkled throughout life. Their occurrence usually is accompanied by varying degrees of crisis. They cause turmoil and rattle our illusion that we have control of life and it will always be the same. They call for us to make wise choices. In us is a tug toward growth, yet a stronger tug to stay where we are. How we deal with these crises of a developing life makes all the difference. 2. Intrusive events are a second source of crises. They can come in many forms and take us by surprise. Too many to number, they include such events as accidents, serious illness, a beloved’s death, losing our job, betrayal by a friend, a natural catastrophes, a mis-

carriage, etc. Though harsh, such crises present several doorways through which we can choose to enter. We can become bitter or better persons. The greatest factor affecting our lives for good or ill is the attitude we take in the face of things we cannot change. 3. Internal uprisings are the third source of personal crises. Their arrival is quietly subtle and often unspecified. We may slowly begin to notice a vague sense of restlessness, emptiness or a tinge of depression that persists. There may be spiritual doubts about our faith, insomnia, blossoming addictions or even more pronounced symptoms such as panic attack or phobias. We try to explain them by using the generic terms of stress, burnout or boredom. Where do these mysteri-

ous afflictions come from? There is a life force within us always straining toward wholeness. It has its own way of getting our attention when healthy development is stymied or stifled. Typically we only become concerned about psychic advancement when we hurt inside. Unfortunately, a crisis is always considered as something wrong, not helpful. A crisis is very often a holy summons to grow. As Robert Frost instructs us, “The answer is to find the way through, not the way around.” Sometimes we need help from another human with competent and professional insights. Perhaps the best way to meet the crises of our lives is to admit them and their accompanying feelings, spend time in genuine reflection, and be painfully honest with ourselves. This is the way of feel-

ing, searching, and learning. It takes time. Theologian Martin Marty offers an excellent insight for us when such times occur. He writes, “Brokenness and wounding do not occur in order to break human dignity but to open the heart so God can act.” One comes into the kingdom of the True Self by entering a “narrow gate.” Jesus Christ encouraged us not to be afraid of that door. Father Lou Guntzelman is a Catholic priest of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati. Contact him at columns@ communitypress.com or P.O. Box 428541, Cincinnati, OH 45242.

Hate your Ugly Tub?

Do you need insurance for your utility lines? Local homeowners are getting fliers offering to protect them if their utility lines fail. But is such protection really needed? The answer depends, in large part, on the age of your house. Jack Stall of Reading received a flier offering what seemed like a good deal. “They would cover all of my sewer lines, water, electric, sewage inside and outside of the house for $9.95 a month,” he said. Stall said the price sounded reasonable. “Roots, every once and a while, get into your lines and this sounded like a golden opportunity … The mere fact of the expense to replace these lines and to fix them versus $9.95 a month, or $110 a year, is great,” he said. Stall has lived in his house for the past 40 years, and knows it inside and out. When I asked him to start recalling some of the repairs he’s had to make over the years he recalled how the gas lines had been upgraded by Duke Energy.

T h e s e w e r main had b e e n replaced, he said, and he replaced s o m e Howard Ain water lines Hey Howard! a few years back. “Turns out it’s a legitimate offer, but what I thought was too good to be true is probably not as good as I thought it was,” said Stall. Pam Hess of Eastgate said she wishes she had known about Duke Energy’s underground line protection. She bought her 35-yearold house a year ago and recently discovered there was a problem with the electric wire running outside her house. Duke came out and made a temporary repair but said she must get it fixed permanently within 20 days. Duke could fix it for a flat fee of $500, and Hess said she wishes she had signed

It’s best to check with your homeowners insurance company first so you know exactly what’s covered – both inside and outside your home. Then you’ll know the true value of an utility line protection you’re considering. up for Duke’s protection plan costing $30 a year. That plan will pay for any repairs up to $3,000, and will cover underground electric lines from the transformer to your house. Because she didn’t have the protection plan she hired her own electrician and he was able to fix the problem for less than $200. Duke says 38 percent of its electric service territory has underground lines, and 26,000 of those customers have signed up for Duke’s underground protection. Duke is not allowed to advertise the plan because state regulators say that would be unfair to others offering the same protection. A local insurance agent tells me the older the house is, the more likely you are to see these kinds of problems

– and should consider buying this type of insurance. However, he says, many homeowners insurance policies will pay for the excavation cost to fix tree root damage to your underground lines. Such costs represent the

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Round 1 Voting Ballot Round 1 Voting Ballot • May 8 - May 23 Mail to: The Enquirer Baby Idol 2011, 312 Elm St., Cincinnati, OH 45202 or drop off ballot between 8:30 a.m. and 5 p.m. weekdays to the Customer Service Center in the lobby at 312 Elm St., Cincinnati, OH 45202.

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Name: ____________________________________________________________ Contact Phone: ____________________________________________________ Note: ONLY ORIGINAL BALLOTS accepted, no photocopies. One free vote per ballot. All voting ballots must be received by 11:59 p.m. May 23, 2011.

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biggest portion of any repair bill you might face. Bottom line, it’s best to check with your homeowners insurance company first so you know exactly what’s covered – both inside and outside your home. Then you’ll know the true value of an utility line protection you’re considering. Howard Ain answers consumer complaints weekdays on WKRC-TV Local 12. Write to him at 12 WKRC-TV, 1906 Highland Ave., Cincinnati 45219.

Exp. Date: __________ /__________ Signature: __________________________________________ Date: ______________________________________________

You can vote online now at Cincinnati.com/babyidol NO PURCHASE OR DONATION REQUIRED TO ENTER. ALL FEDERAL, STATE, LOCAL AND MUNICIPAL LAWS AND REGULATIONS APPLY. VOID WHERE PROHIBITED. The Enquirer Lend-A-Hand Baby Idol 2011 Contest is open to Ohio, Indiana and Kentucky residents who are 18 years or older and a parent or legal guardian of a child at the time of entry. Employees of Enquirer Lend-A-Hand, The Cincinnati Enquirer, Gannett Co., Inc., and each of their respective affiliated companies, and advertising and promotional agencies, and the immediate family members of, and any persons domiciled with, any such employees, are not eligible to enter or to win. Contest begins at 12:01 a.m. (EST) 3/20/11 and ends at 11:59 p.m. (EST) 6/22/11. Beginning at 12:01 a.m. (EST) 3/20/11 and ending at 11:59 p.m. (EST) 6/22/11, Enter by submitting a photo of your baby and a completed entry form. Entries must be submitted by a parent or legal guardian, 18 years or older. Children must have been born on or after 5/8/07 and Sponsor reserves the right to verify proof of age. Entries with incomplete or incorrect information will not be accepted. Only one (1) entry per child. Multiple births can be submitted as 1 entry with 1 photo. Enter online at www.Cincinnati.com/babyidol. Enter by mail or in-person: complete an Official Entry Form available in The Cincinnati Enquirer, The Kentucky Enquirer, The Community Presses in Ohio & KY and at The Enquirer Customer Service Center, 312 Elm Street, Cincinnati, OH 45202. All entries must be received by 5:00 p.m. (EST) 4/18/11. Odds of winning depend on the number of eligible entries and votes received. (1) First Place Winner will receive a $2000 American Express gift card. (1) Runner Up Winner will receive a $500 American Express gift card. (1) Randomly Selected Winner will receive a $500.00 American Express gift card. Winners will be notified by telephone or email on or about 6/27/11. Participants agree to be bound by the complete Official Rules and Sponsor’s decisions. For a copy of the prize winners list (available after 7/3/11) and/or the complete Official Rules send a SASE to Baby Idol 2011 c/o The Enquirer, 312 Elm Street, Cincinnati, OH 45202 or contact Pam Clarkson at 513-768-8577 or at pclarkson@enquirer.com.

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B4

Florence Recorder

Life

May 12, 2011

Add a twist to chicken nuggets with pretzel crust This cool, rainy weather has been great for our peas, radishes and early greens. We’re just starting to get a good amount of asparagus and the potatoes and onions are up. Today is the first day in many that it’s sunny and not raining. Perfect for hanging clothes on the line.

Chicken nuggets with pretzel crust

For Sherie Mitchell, a Lebanon reader. “I want something a little different than the usual nuggets for the kids, and I saw a pretzel coated nugget

Rita Heikenfeld Rita’s kitchen

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1 pound boneless chicken breasts, cut into 2-inch pieces Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Spray a cookie sheet. Put pretzels and cheese in a food processor and process until well mixed and coarsely ground. Or do this in a plasitic food bag by hand. Place in shallow bowl. Combine flour and pepper together. Beat eggs with water. Roll chicken in flour until coated. Dip in egg mixture, letting excess drip off. Put into pretzel mixture and roll until coated. Bake 20 to 25 minutes until golden. You can turn the nuggets halfway through if you want. Serves four. Tip from Rita’s kitchen: To get better browning on breaded and crusted foods, spray lightly with cooking spray before baking. That little bit of fat helps brown.

Gorgonzola bacon dressing for salad

I know it’s not low fat, but this is delicious. We ate it with our green and radishes from the garden. Go to taste on the seasonings.

Mark Ballas

Homemade Montreal steak seasoning

I’ve been getting requests for something similar to commercial steak seasonings. I guess it’s because grilling season is here.

Convection vs. regular ovens

Mix together: 1

⁄2 teaspoon garlic powder 1 teaspoon ground coriander seed 11⁄2 teaspoons salt or to taste (can leave out for saltfree blend) 1 teaspoon dried dill leaves 1 teaspoon sweet paprika 1 ⁄4 to 1 teaspoon ground cayenne pepper 1 teaspoon ground black pepper

In a convection oven, air is circulated by a fan, as opposed to the static heat source in a standard oven. This creates a faster, more even distribution of heat, and as a result, foods no longer have to be rotated halfway through cooking.

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Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator and author. E-mail columns@community press.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-2487130, ext. 356.

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Community

Florence Recorder

May 12, 2011

B5

Massey explains role of school board FLORENCE - Longtime Boone County school board member Ed Massey provided insight into the work of school boards and state and national school board associations at a recent Florence Rotary Club meeting. As part of that presentation, Rotarians received an update on Boone County Schools. The Boone County school district is the third largest district in Kentucky with more than 20,000 students and it continues to grow. Massey pointed out it is one of the highest performing large, diverse districts in the state due to the efforts of both teachers and students.

All of the teachers meet the criteria of highly qualified and 56 are National Board Certified. Attendance in the classroom averages 95.8 percent each day. Ninety-three students were Advanced Placement Scholars in 2010. Bearing out this diversity designation is the fact that 95 different languages are spoken by the students. The Boone County Board of Education is the official policy-making body for the Boone County school system. The board, along with the superintendent, sets the school system’s mission and goals. The five board members are elected from individual districts within the

county. One non-voting student member also serves on the board. The board is committed to providing the best education for Boone County’s children. The Kentucky School Board Association is a nonprofit corporation of school boards from each public school system in the state. It serves school districts in such areas as governmental relations, board member and staff training, insurance and risk management, legal, policy, publications and community relations. A similar role, but played on the national level, is the National School Boards

Association, which represents 95,000 school board members throughout the country. These local officials govern 13,809 local school districts serving the nation’s 50 million public school students. Massey is the presidentelect of this association. In that role he expects to bring at least two conferences to Northern Kentucky and is looking forward to the opportunity for showcasing Boone County’s schools. For information about the weekly meetings, guest speakers and community service opportunities of the Florence Rotary Club, contact Greg Palmer, president,

PROVIDED

Attorney Ed Massey spoke on behalf of the Boone County school board during the May 2 meeting of the Florence Rotary Club. weekly on Mondays at noon at the Airport Hilton Hotel in Florence. This article was submitted by Chuck Seal.

at greg@palmercapitalonline.com or 859-282-1220. Visit the group’s website at www.florencekyrotary.org. Florence Rotary meets

BUSINESS UPDATE Jack Lillie Insurance recognized

Jack Lillie Insurance of Hebron was named one of the Top 10 growth agencies for auto insurance companies in the state for 2010. The agency was recognized at a luncheon meeting in Lexington and at a recep-

tion with all regional associates. They and other recipients were presented with a plaque commemorating their accomplishment.

Best joins Huff Realty

Christina Best has joined Huff Realty’s sales team operating out of the Flo-

Tri-City Insurance Services recognized

Tri-City Insurance Services Inc. of Florence was named one of the Top 10 growth agencies for auto

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B6

Florence Recorder

Community

May 12, 2011

New venue brings music to Richwood By Stephanie Salmons ssalmons@nky.com

RICHWOOD – They’ve only had a handful of shows so far, but Richwood Opry promoter Gary Strong hopes the new venue will become a destination point for locals and visitors alike. Located on Dixie Highway, next to the Richwood Flea Market (in the former Journey building), shows are already booked through November, Strong said. While Strong’s main forte is bluegrass and country music, he wants to have

something for everybody. Strong said he hopes to bring in a variety of music – everything from bluegrass and Big Band to rockabilly, oldies and gospel. “Our goal is to try to help the local and lesser-known musicians to build them a name,” he said. “When our legends are gone and our heroes are gone, we’re going to have to have someone step up and take their place, and that’s what we’re after.” Richwood Opry will also bring in national talent, Strong said.

Strong, who has worked in radio for the last 30 years, has been promoting shows since the 1970s. He was previously promoter at the Olde Star Theater in Grant County. The theater was located inside a flea market and when that closed, Strong was contacted by building owner Mike Stallings, who also owns the Richwood Flea Market. “I’m telling you, it was divine intervention,” Stallings said. He had the facility and had recently started to promote music at the flea market. “I guess we’re both really excited about the prospect of making this thing big,” Stallings said. They’re aiming to provide a family-friendly venue, Strong said. Drinking and smoking won’t be

allowed, but “you can bring your kids and if you get happy feet and want to dance, you can dance.” The Opry offers a chance to hear good live music without having to go to a bar to do so, Stallings said. “There’s a huge need in this whole area for something like this,” he said. Within a 150-mile radius, there’s “nothing like this that we know of,” Stallings said. “I think this could be a real destination for families and people who love music.” Blair Carmen will bring his rockabilly sound to the Opry Friday, May 6. Double Cross will perform Friday, May 13, and Russell Moore and IIIrd Tyme Out will perform Saturday, May 21. Doors open at 6 p.m. and music lasts 7 p.m.-10 p.m

STEPHANIE SALMONS/STAFF

Gary Strong stands in front of the Richwood Opry stage. The Opry, which opened recently, offers family-friendly entertainment and already has shows booked through November. Seating is on a first-come basis. Shows are typically $10 unless otherwise noted. The May 21 show is $15 in advance or $18 at the door. Children 12 and under

are free. For more information or a calendar of shows, visit www.richwoodopry.com or contact Strong at 859-4740554 or 859-992-5775.

About 450 attend Gaines reopening Saturday was a perfect day for the reopening of the Abner Gaines House. About 450 people enjoyed the work that has been accomplished restoring the first floor and grounds of the 1800s home.

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T h e r e Walton were lots of News information Ann Leake and displays about the and Ruth past life of Meadows the Gaines family. Several of our WaltonVerona High School students did an excellent job serving as guides through the property along with other volunteers. Some people came dressed in period clothing to enjoy entertainment by dulcimers, fiddlers and banjo players. Lots of artifacts and furniture has been graciously donated to preserve some of our past history. We will be anxiously waiting for the next phase to be started. Thanks to our city for making it possible to

preserve some of our past for future generations. Evelyn Hance, Joyce Foley and Sally Douglas attended a reception at the Governor’s Mansion this past week in Frankfort. This was the re-dedication of the Floral Clock by the Kentucky Federation of Garden Clubs. The WaNa Club held its May meeting at the Walton Christian Church. Our program was given by Kim Chevalier of Walton-Verona High School. Chevalier presented information on the addition of eight new classrooms with additional improvements. She also made us aware of the change that teachers are preparing for coming terms that should enhance

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our children’s education. The June meeting will be held on June 2 at Triple Crown. Reservations are to be confirmed by May 27. Don’t forget the Diggers and Planters plant sale 8-11 a.m. Saturday, May 14. Come and support the scholarship program plus get some nice plants. The regular club meeting will be on Monday, May 16, to tour the gardens of Eloise Acree and Janet Lucas and have a hot dog roast and smores. John and Lucille Maddox will celebrate their 58th wedding anniversary on May 16. Ann Leake (485-1063) and Ruth Meadows (391-7282) write a column about Walton. Feel free to call them with Walton neighborhood news items.

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Community

Florence Recorder

May 12, 2011

B7

Ticks prefer to hide out in grassy edge of woods

Question : The last time I let my dogs out in Horticulture the lawn, Concerns they came in with Mike Klahr back ticks on them. Is there anything I can spray on the lawn to kill ticks? Answer: Treating entire lawns is of little benefit since this is not a preferred habitat for ticks. If insecticides are used, treatment should be concentrated in areas where pets, rodents, and other potential wild hosts of ticks are likely to frequent, e.g., a dog house, fence line, and along margins between wooded or brushy areas and the lawn. Sevin (carbaryl), Bayer Advanced Lawn and Garden Multi-Insect Killer (cyfluthrin) and Ortho Bug B Gon (permethrin) are examples of effective materials. Check insecticide labels for products that contain these active ingredients. Like most creatures, ticks have their favorite haunts and hangouts. They prefer the grassy edges of wooded areas and other overgrown

places frequented by small, medium, and large-sized animals that can supply them with a blood meal. Ticks spend a large portion of their life cycle on the ground. When “questing” or looking for a meal, they climb onto low vegetation and catch on to hosts that pass by, including pets and people. 1. Avoid walking through uncut fields, brush and other areas likely to harbor ticks. When hiking or picnicking in these areas, wear light -colored long pants tucked into socks and consider using tick repellents. Walk in the center of mowed trails to avoid brushing up against vegetation. 2. Inspect family and pets after being in tickinfested areas, and promptly remove ticks if found. Ticks often attach at the waist band, under the arms, at the nape of the neck, or in the scalp. Remove attached ticks carefully using a finepoint tweezers. Grasp the tick just behind the point of attachment and pull slowly and steadily until the tick is dislodged. Vaseline, matches and other alternative methods of removal should

not be used. Wash the bite area, apply antiseptic and cover with a band-aid. 3. Keep grass and shrubs in your yard trimmed, and clear overgrown vegetation from edges of your property. Ticks avoid places characterized by direct sunlight and low humidity. 4. Free-roaming pets are much more likely to become infested with ticks than are those that are confined. Pets may be treated with insecticide dips or sprays, although these products generally lose effectiveness in about a week.

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THE RECORD B8

ON

Florence Recorder

Tabitha Page, 31, of Walton and Andrew Pope, 32, of Walton; issued Oct. 26. Cindora Hauger, 51, of Walton and Keith Donohoo, 53, of Walton; Oct. 26. Kristin Conaughty, 29, of Burlington and Brian Bates, 32, of Burlington; Oct. 26. Morgan Brooks, 25, of Florence and Justin Rolf, 25, of Florence; Oct. 27. Stephanie Arsenault, 23, of Union and Dylan Mason, 27, of Union; Oct. 28. Megan Peel, 20, of Walton and Chad Boles, 22, of Union; Oct. 28. Tiffany Hammons, 19, of Erlanger and Matthew Klette, 20, of Florence; Oct. 28. Rachel Ward, 22, of Florence and Ryan Neaves, 20, of Florence; Oct. 29. Rosanne Baughman, 39, of Burlington and William Sebring, 43, of Burlington; Oct. 29. Paula Stevenson, 36, of Florence and Donald Lawson, 32, of Florence; Nov. 1. Jennifer Ziegler, 40, of Union and Christian Fraiture, 41, of Union; Nov. 3. Melissa Behymer, 42, of Walton and Davis Kisker, 44, of Walton; Nov. 3. Kardiatou Sow, 29, of Florence and Mohamed Niass, 37, of Florence; Nov. 3. Jasanniel Fields, 29, of Florence and Nathaniel Scott, 30, of Covington; Nov. 4. Holly Bruner, 21, of Florence and Benjamin Releford, 21, of Florence; Nov. 5. Victoria Wyatt, 24, of Florence and Corey Mason, 27, of Florence; Nov. 8. Kathleen Kennedy, 23, of Florence and William Northern, 25, of Florence; Nov. 9.

May 12, 2011

BIRTHS

Editor Nancy Daly | ndaly@nky.com | 578-1059

Kaylae Birtcil, 28, of Burlington and Tyler Whisman, 28, of Florence; Nov. 10. Whitney Beil, 24, of Florence and Charles Rollins, 27, of Walton; Nov. 12. Chastity Mocahbee, 37, of Florence and Scott Mocahbee, 39, of Florence; Nov. 12. Jacqueline Martinez, 41, of Florence and William Honaker, 37, of Union; Nov. 15. Jennifer Ullrey, 37, of Walton and David Hurta, 39, of Walton; Nov. 15. Shannon Griffith, 28, of Burlington and Christopher Boyce, 30, of Burlington; Nov. 16. Rebecca Combs, 22, of Florence and John Cobb, 23, of Florence; Nov. 16. Jessica Thomas, 25, of Florence and Jason Marsh, 26, of Florence; Nov. 17. Bonnie McDonald, 45, of Burlington and Shawn Par-due, 33, of Burlington; Nov. 19. Maria Anderson, 44, of Florence and Edison Calvopina, 48, of Wilder; Nov. 19. Valerie Bennett, 20, of Florence and Danny Wallace, 18, of Florence; Nov. 19. Buffy Pauly, 41, of Burlington and David Pauly, 44, of Burlington; Nov. 19. Anna Deaton, 30, of Dry Ridge and Brian Courtney, 30, of Walton; Nov. 23. Kristin Dahlenburg, 26, of Burlington and Kyle Leadingham, 23, of Florence; Nov. 23. Linda Schwartz, 54, of Florence and Roger Hogan, 58, of Florence; Nov. 24. Jennifer Marshall, 26, of Walton and Michael Goodenough, 34, of Walton; Nov. 24. Terrie Robinson, 45, of Walton and Delbert Bowman, 51, of Walton;

|

DEATHS

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Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Florence

N K Y. c o m Email: kynews@communitypress.com

RECORDER

MARRIAGE LICENSES Nov. 30. Carla Reed, 29, of Florence and Mutiu Usman, 23, of Highland Heights; Dec. 1. Krista Barger, 29, of Florence and James Whitworth, 39, of Florence; Dec. 1. Lynette Elliott, 43, of Florence and Richard Ollman, 36, of Florence; Dec. 1. Janet Peters, 63, of Florence and Brent Keairns, 68, of Florence; Dec. 2. Cara Gripshover, 26, of Union and John Gray, 28, of Union; Dec. 2. Lynn Grant, 27, of Florence and Dustin Brummett, 28, of Florence; Dec. 2. Kelly Cook, 18, of Florence and Jeffrey Wipfel, 20, of Florence; Dec. 2. Loretta Crawford, 36, of Walton and Paul Crawford, 40, of Walton; Dec. 2. Jessica Buckler, 29, of Burlington and Randall Johnson, 35, of Burlington; Dec. 3. Brittany Arsenault, 24, of Hebron and Barry Robertson, 33, of Hebron; Dec. 6. Kathleen Muhsam, 46, of Burlington and Richard Helm, 34, of Burlington; Dec. 6. Michelle Tarleton, 18, of Walton and Jacob Perry, 20, of Carmel, Ind.; Dec. 7. Andrea Petty, 45, of Union and David Burch, 53, of Union; Dec. 8. Kristan Tucker, 22, of Burlington and Eric Northrup, 23, of Florence; Dec. 8. Katrina Bennett, 24, of Florence and Jeremy Persinger, 30, of Florence; Dec. 8. Heather Lokesak, 31, of Hebron and Eric Franzen, 24, of Hebron; Dec. 9. Callie Gross, 51, of Burlington and Robert Seed, 50, of Burlington; Dec. 10.

Emily Redman, 24, of Hebron and Benjamin Hensley, 29, of Hebron; Dec. 10. Sherry Wabnitz, 60, of Florence and James Linville, 61, of Cincinnati; Dec. 13. Sandra Baker, 51, of Walton and Glenn Davis, 48, of Walton; Dec. 13. Trisha Heger, 25, of Florence and Anthony Reiber, 27, of Florence; Dec. 14. Wendy Huffman, 48, of Hebron and Vernon Huffman, 48, of Hebron; Dec. 14. Heather Lipp, 32, of Cincinnati and Jason Blackburn, 31, of Burlington; Dec. 14. Magen Niece, 25, of Burlington and Andrew Grote, 20, of Florence; Dec. 15. Ruth Gillum, 44, of Union and Scott Ramey, 44, of Florence; Dec. 15. Katie Koester, 29, of Florence and Dean Vukovic, 26, of Florence; Dec. 15. Diana Green, 40, of Burlington and Christopher Greene, 39, of Burlington; Dec. 20. Rebecca Stover, 20, of Florence and James Reams, 20, of Independence; Dec. 21. Akiko Ura, 31, of Burlington and John Goldfuss, 34, of Burlington; Dec. 22. Stephanie Burkart, 24, of Florence and Craig Burch, 39, of Florence; Dec. 22. Christine Wallace, 38, of Florence and Vance Kendrick, 58, of Florence; Dec. 22. Katherine Knaak, 50, of Taylor Mill and Claude Marcum, 62, of Burlington; Dec. 27. Brenda Hodges, 58, of Sheperdsville, Ky., and James Sullivan, 59, of Burlington; Dec. 27. Casie Cain, 25, of Burlington and

Adam Staff, 29, of Walton; Dec. 27. Tiffany Moore, 20, of Florence and Matthew Tucker, 27, of Florence; Dec. 28. Natalie Barnes, 25, of Florence and David Hehman, 25, of Florence; Dec. 29. Shannon Newberry, 30, of Walton and Stephen Platt, 30, of Cynthiana; Dec. 30. Paula Stevenson, 36, of Florence and Donald Lawson, 33, of Florence; Dec. 30. Ashley Schroder, 25, of Florence and Anthony Kordenbrock, 27, of Florence; Dec. 30. Erin Smith, 31, of Florence and William Rowland, 29, of Florence; Jan. 3. Jeseca Ryan, 18, of Florence and Alejandro Calderon, 24, of Florence; Jan. 3. Mary Carder, 30, of Burlington and Jamey Sipple, 33, of Burlington; Jan. 3. Karen Lockhart, 49, of Florence and Robert Averitt, 45, of Florence; Jan. 3. Amber Konerman, 23, of Florence and Bradley Rohan, 33, of Elsmere; Jan. 4. Jody Biedenharn, 41, of Walton and Clint Thomas, 33, of Walton; Jan. 7. Sonya Christian, 40, of Hebron and Robert Cross, 41, of Hebron; Jan. 7. Krysta Eades, 24, of Florence and William Slaven, 26, of Florence; Jan. 7. Kristin Reeves, 33, of Florence and Eric Barbiea, 29, of Florence; Jan. 11. Danielle Daniels, 20, of Walton and Timothy Gilmartin, 25, of Florence; Jan. 14. Angel Redden, 34, of Cleves, Ohio, and Michael Findley, 31, of Hebron; Jan. 19.

Ana Norambuena, 47, of Florence and Charles Glatting, 42, of Edgewood; Jan. 20. Kelly Alomia, 24, of Florence and James Sciarrino, 37, of Florence; Jan. 21. Deborah Scudder, 53, of Burlington and Eddy Dotson, 51, of Hebron; Jan. 24. Stephanie Wayt, 20, of Florence and Robert Shaw, 24, of Florence; Jan. 24. Trina Neiheisel, 37, of Hebron and Darren Webb, 38, of Hebron; Jan. 24. Challin Phelps, 33, of Florence and Steven Hilbert, 44, of Florence; Jan. 27. Peggy Law, 51, of Florence and William Yaegel, 48, of Florence; Jan. 31. Stacey Lang, 51, of Hebron and Benjamin King, 51, of Hebron; Feb. 2. Cynthiana Edwards, 43, of Florence and James Fields, 48, of Burlington; Feb. 3. Desiree Burton, 29, of Florence and Kelsey McFadden, 32, of Florence; Feb. 4. Sandy Waltz, 58, of Florence and Douglas Downey, 35, of Florence; Feb. 8. Jodie Stewart, 42, of Florence and Ronald Welch, 45, of Union; Feb. 11. Tabitha Christ, 44, Hebron and Joel Marshall, 33, of Erlanger; Feb. 11. Lillie Prophett, 26, of Florence and Joshua Sorrells, 26, of Florence; Feb. 14. Amanda Shipman, 25, of Verona and Michael Osborne, 25, of Verona; Feb. 14. Shahawna Frakes, 32, of Burlington and Nathaniel Cox, 29, of Burlington; Feb. 14. Tammy Heuser, 23, of Taylor Mill and Joshua Gerdes, 33, Petersburg; Feb. 14.

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On the record

May 12, 2011

POLICE REPORTS Arrests/Citations

Richard A. Arnold, 53, possession of marijuana, DUI at Dream St., March 18. Lois R. Schneider, 45, DUI at 9001 Wetherington Blvd., March 18. Chanda A. Baird, 23, operating a motor vehicle on a suspended license, giving officer a false name or address at I-75 northbound, March 18. Michael D. Haws, 50, violation of a Kentucky EPO/DVO at 50 Cavalier Blvd., March 28. Gwendolyn Draughn, 36, shoplifting at Houston Rd., March 28. Stacy R. Gaylor, 26, shoplifting at Mall Rd., March 27. Jamie N. Brauer, 23, shoplifting at 7607 Mall Rd., March 27. Chris T. Pfeiffer, 30, possession of an open alcoholic beverage in a motor vehicle at Alan Ct., March 27. Robert C. Thomas, 21, DUI at Burlington Pk. and Ridge Ave., March 27. Harvard D. Cates Jr., 50, alcohol intoxication in a public place at 50 Cavalier Blvd., March 26. April E. Pendleton, 34, shoplifting at 6920 Burlington Pk., March 26. Ryan A. Courtney, 21, first-degree promoting contraband at 3020 Conrad Ln., March 26. Ronald J. Dwyer Jr., 41, shoplifting at Mall Rd., March 25. Dawn R. Turner, 34, shoplifting at Mall Rd., March 25. David C. Due II, 45, violation of underage drinking laws at 15697 Violet Rd., April 3. Greg Smith Jr., 30, possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia, DUI at 411 Mt. Zion Rd., April 2. Brian D. Lucas, 42, DUI at Mt. Zion Rd., April 2. Michael G. Winkle, 26, DUI, reckless driving at I-275 westbound, April 2. James W. Whitaker, 33, alcohol intoxication in a public place at Patrick Dr., April 2. Gregg L. Dunn, 32, second-degree disorderly conduct, fourth-degree assault at 7500 Turfway Rd., April 1. Michelle L. Richardson, 39, reckless driving at Interstate 275, April 23. William E. Grandstaff Jr., 41, alcohol intoxication at 13019 Walton Verona Rd., April 23. Maurice Savage, 35, alcohol intoxication at Burlington Pk., April 23. Paula R. Winters, 42, driving on DUI suspended license at 11229 Frontage Rd., April 22. Dustin L. Maines, 20, possession of marijuana at Weaver Rd., April 23. Matthew S. Tepe, 29, possession of marijuana at Interstate 275, April 22. Daniel R. Gose, 25, vehicle a nuisance at Interstate 275, April 22. Zach Brewer, 20, alcohol intoxication at 7503 Woodspoint Dr., April 22. Michael S. Canter, 35, possession of marijuana at U.S. 42, April 22. William A. Tuites, 51, DUI at Interstate 75, April 22. Ashleigh N. Nicholas, 26, DUI at U.S. 42, April 21. Brandon G. Chamberlain, 21, possession of marijuana at Snead Ln., April 21.

Assault

Incidents/Reports

Victim assaulted by known subject at 8405 U.S. 42, March 13. Reported at 3423 Queensway Dr., April 22.

Burglary

Residence broken into and items taken at 7500 Turfway Rd., March 18. Residence broken into and items taken at 280 Melinda Ln., April 2. Metals stolen at 3869 Belleview Rd., April 20.

Theft

Subject tried to steal goods from the Florence Mall at 5000 Mall Rd., March 17. Subject tried to steal merchandise from Walmart at Houston Rd., March 28. Subject tried to steal items from business at 4949 Houston Rd., March 28. Subject tried to steal goods from the Florence Mall at 5000 Mall Rd., March 27. Subject tried to steal items from business at 7607 Mall Rd., March 27. Subject tried to shoplift goods from Remke’s at 6920 Burlington Pk., March 26. Subject tried to steal items from business at 7606 Mall Rd., March 25. Subject tried to steal items from business at 5960 Centennial Ln., April 2. Subject tried to steal goods from

Kohl’s at 12300 Towne Center Dr., April 2. Tools stolen from vehicle at Mall Rd., March 18. Items taken from business at 7348 U.S. 42, March 18. Items taken from business at 7383 Turfway Rd., March 28. Vehicle broken into and items taken at 205 Claxon Dr., March 25. Items taken from business at 7860 Mall Circle Rd., March 25. Electronics stolen at 2205 Horizon Dr., April 23. Electronics stolen at Chestnut Dr., April 22. Tools stolen at 225 Old Walton Nicholson Rd., April 22. Reported at 10007 U.S. 42, April 22. Purses stolen at 7625 Houston Rd., April 22. Electronics stolen at 8845 Evergreen

The Community Recorder publishes the names of all adults charged with offenses. The information is a matter of public record and does not imply guilt or innocence. To contact your local police: Boone County Sheriff Mike Helmig at 334-2175; Florence Police Chief Tom Szurlinski at 647-5420. Dr., April 21. Narcotics seized at 9910 Berberich Dr., April 21. Reported at 1102 Aviation Blvd., April 21. Metals stolen at 820 Ridgedale Dr., April 20. Tools stolen at 6073 Zig Zag South Rd., April 20. Reported at 2811 Circleport Dr., April 20. Purses stolen at 8015 Dixon Dr., April 19. Money stolen at 3105 North Bend Rd., April 19. Jewelry stolen at 5099 Flintlock Rd., April 19. Reported at 460 Shorland Dr., April 19.

Reported at 9000 Empire Connector, April 19. Vehicle parts stolen at 1020 Burlington Pk., April 18. Reported at 7305 Industrial Rd., April 18.

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Property vandalized at 7937 Dream St., March 18. Vehicle vandalized at U.S. 42 and Dream St., March 28. Vehicle vandalized at 9 Scott Dr., March 27. Vehicle vandalized at 126 Beeson Dr., April 3. Structures damaged at 10020 Demia Way, April 22. Vehicles damaged at 500 Weaver Rd., April 21.

Fraud

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Fraudulent use of credit card

Money stolen at 110 Roger Lane, March 24 Electronics stolen at Houston Rd., Feb. 6.

Incident

Subject arrested for disorderly conduct at Turfway Rd., April 1.

Narcotics

Deputies discovered heroin on subject at 2077 W. Horizon Dr., March 18. Deputies discovered narcotics on a subject at 100 American Ave., March 19. Deputies discovered narcotics inside residence at 6221 Ancient Oak Dr., March 18. Prisoner found to be in possession of narcotics at 3020 Conrad Ln., March 26.

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Possession of controlled substance Narcotics seized at 7503 Woodspoint Dr., April 22. Narcotics seized at 10100 Turner Rd., April 21.

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Robbery

Victim robbed of jewelry at I-75 northbound, Jan. 24.

Curves adds Zumba Florence Curves offers the only 30-minute class that mixes the moves of Zumba with the proven strength training of Curves for one wildly effective workout. “Curves Circuit with Zumba Fitness is an amazing workout,” said a Curves of Florence staff member. “It combines Curves’ proven strength-training program – where you can burn up to 500 calories in just 30 minutes – with the Latin and international inspired music and exhilarating, simple dance moves that have made Zumba so popular.” Non-members are invited to try Curves Circuit with Zumba Fitness classes free for one week through this month. The benefits of Curves Circuit with Zumba classes are numerous, according to Curves director of exercise and research Katie Mitchell. “This is definitely a boredom-busting workout,” said Mitchell. “There’s a lot going on to keep your attention and keep you motivated. You’re listening to high-energy music that just makes you want to move, watching to make sure you’re meeting your goals on the strength machines, and training your body and your brain by learning new dance moves. And research shows that the dynamics of group exercise like the Curves Circuit

with Zumba Fitness classes promotes attendance and lowers drop-out rates, so people are more likely to stick with it.” All ages, fitness levels and dance abilities can participate in and benefit from Curves Circuit with Zumba Fitness classes. During the 30-minute class, participants work out on each Curves strength machine for one minute, alternating upper, lower and core muscles. After one minute, the music cues the participant to change stations on the circuit, and she moves to an area between machines to do Zumba moves for one minute, which tone and sculpt the body while burning fat. A licensed Zumba instructor from the Zumba Instructor Network teaches simple, modified Zumba moves from the center of the circuit. At the end of 30 minutes, participants have completed one trip around the entire circuit, worked every major muscle group, and achieved a fun, energetic cardio workout ending with a group stretch led by the Zumba instructor. For more information visit www.curveskentucky. com. Participating Curves include those in Erlanger, Fort Thomas, Hebron, Independence, Florence and Villa Hills.

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* Offer subject to credit review and approval. The applicable interest rate varies depending on your credit qualifications, line amount, property state, and loan-to-value ratio. Loanto-value restrictions may vary by property location. A Fifth Third checking account and payments made automatically using Auto BillPayer are required for the following pricing. When opened, the introductory Annual Percentage Rate (APR) is 2.99% for the first 12 months. Beginning on the first day of the 13th month, for an Equity Flexline in the amount of $10,000–$24,999, the applicable interest rate varies from a variable APR of Prime + 1.00% (currently 4.25% APR) to Prime + 2.25% (currently 5.50% APR). For an Equity Flexline in the amount of $25,000–$49,999, the applicable interest rate varies from a variable APR of Prime + 0.75% (current minimum is 4.00% APR) to Prime + 2.00% (currently 5.25% APR). For an Equity Flexline in the amount of $50,000–$99,999, the applicable interest rate varies from a variable APR of Prime + 0.75% (current minimum is 4.00% APR) to Prime + 1.75% (currently 5.00% APR). For an Equity Flexline in the amount of $100,000 or more, the applicable interest rate varies from a variable APR of Prime - 0.26% (current minimum is 2.99% APR) to Prime + 1.75% (currently 5.00% APR). Interest rates may vary and are indexed to the Prime Rate as published daily in The Wall Street Journal Eastern Edition “Money Rates” table. As of 4/1/11, the WSJ Prime Rate is 3.25%. Offer is available on new Fifth Third equity lines of credit only. The maximum APR will not exceed 25%, or the state usury ceiling, whichever is less. Annual fee of up to $65 waived for one year. In Georgia, intangible taxes apply. The bank is currently paying these taxes on the borrower’s behalf. In Tennessee, recordation taxes may apply. The bank is currently paying these taxes on the borrower’s behalf. Rate and offer are subject to change without notice. Consult a tax advisor regarding deductibility of interest. Fifth Third Bank, Member FDIC. Equal Housing Lender.

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Criminal mischief

Subject wrote false checks in victim’s name at 8115 Connector Dr., March 18. Subject found to be in possession of a fraudulent prescription at 8193 Mall Rd., March 17. Victim’s credit card stolen and used multiple times at 8100 Ewing Blvd., March 29. Victim’s credit card stolen and used multiple times at 4990 Meijer Dr., March 27. Victim’s credit card stolen and used multiple times at Quiet Creek Dr., March 26.

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About police reports

CE-0000453423

BOONE COUNTY

Robert F. Humphrey Iii, 41, possession of controlled substance at 10100 Turner Rd., April 21. Bridget N. Ford, 25, possession of controlled substance at 10100 Turner Rd., April 21. Steven R. Todd, 31, operating on suspended license at Dixie Hwy., April 21. Matthew J. Frodge, 20, possession of marijuana at 321 Mt. Zion Rd., April 20.

Florence Recorder


B10

Florence Recorder

On the record

May 12, 2011

DEATHS Terresa Germann

in memory of Nancy Harrigan Boyd, 522 Cincinnati Mills Drive, Suite B248, Cincinnati, OH 45240.

Terresa Germann, 52, of Erlanger, died May 2, 2011, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. Her parents, Clifford Nash and Dorothy Johnson Nash, and a brother, Mike Nash, died previously. Survivors include her husband, Jeff Germann; daughters, Kristi Niceley of Elsmere, Erin Fulmer of Florence and Melissa Lehmenkuler of Amelia, Ohio; sons, Anthony Germann and Michael Gillespie, both of Covington, Matthew Germann of Newport and Joshua Germann of Erlanger; brothers, Rick Nash of Fullerton, Calif., Jeffrey Nash of West Harrison, Ind., and David Nash of Hamilton, Ohio; sister, Gail Myers of Elsmere; and nine grandchildren. Burial of cremated remains was at Maysville Cemetery. Memorials: Susan G. Komen for the Cure, Greater Cincinnati Affiliate,

Andrew Kordenbrock II

Andrew J. “Drew” Kordenbrock II, 19, of Florence, died May 2, 2011, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He was a salesman for TruGreen ChemLawn in Florence. Survivors include his mother, Stephanie Dunhoft Kordenbrock of Florence; father and stepmother, Andy and Jennifer Kordenbrock of Independence; sisters, Natalie Kordenbrock of Florence, Chelsea Rider of Richmond and Caitlynne Rider of Independence; paternal grandparents, Joseph and Maxine Kordenbrock of Alexandria; and maternal grandparents, Jack and Janet Dunhoft of Florence. Burial was in Independence Cemetery.

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Memorials: The Drew Kordenbrock Memorial Fund, c/o The Bank of Kentucky, 350 Buttermilk Pike, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017.

Rosella Kuntz

Rosella Kuntz, 91, of Union, formerly of Newport, died May 1, 2011, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. She was a retired clerk with R.L. Polk in Cincinnati. Her husband, Omar, and a son, Lonnie, died previously. Survivors include her daughter, Sharon Schwab of Union; sons, Gary Kuntz of Ocean Pines, Md., and Dennis Kuntz of Southgate; daughter-in-laws, Nancy Kuntz of Cold Spring and Veronica Kuntz of Cincinnati; several grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren. Entombment was in Evergreen Cemetery, Southgate. Memorials: St. Elizabeth Hospice, 483 S. Loop Road, Edgewood, KY 41017.

John McManama

John Franklyn McManama, 83, of Florence, died April 26, 2011, at St. Elizabeth Florence. He was a retired teamster, a member of Hebron Lutheran Church and the Elks Club of Florence, and enjoyed bowling, fishing and hunting. His wife, Frances Louise Jones McManama; sisters, Laura Cantan and Della Francis; and brothers, Clifford McManama, Charles McManama, Paul McManama and Chris McManama, died previously. Survivors include his children, Dan McManama of Taylor Mill, Linda

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Judith ‘Judy’ Miller

Judith Ann “Judy” Miller, 69, of Barnesville, Ohio, died May 2, 2011, at Southeastern Ohio Regional Medical Center in Cambridge, Ohio. She was a retired retail manager, a homemaker and a member of the Barnesville First Christian Church. A sister, Janice Miller, and a brother, Gary Lucas, died previously. Survivors include her daughter, Corrina Sorrell of Florence; sons, Chris Miller of Verona and Chad Miller of Dry Ridge; sisters, Sue Van Fossen and Brenda Kerner, both of Barnesville, Ohio; brothers, Dale Lucas of Middletown, Ohio, Mike Lucas, Sam Lucas and Mark Lucas, all of Barnesville, Ohio; three grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren. Burial will be at the convenience of the family.

Windell Lee Morrow

Windell Lee Morrow, 70, of Florence, died May 1, 2011, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. Two sisters, Hazel Register and Edna Fairchild, died previously. Survivors include his wife, Nancy; daughter, Tawanna Powers; sons, Windell Franklin Morrow and Gregory Lee Morrow; sisters, Maxine Maxey, Ella Payne, Imogene Banfield, Josephine Monroe and Sharon Hill; brothers, Leonard Morrow, Douglas Morrow, James Morrow, Clyde Morrow, Jerry Morrow, Donny Morrow and Kenny Morrow; seven grandchildren; and one great-grandchild. Burial was at Floral Hills Memorial Gardens.

Mildred ‘Millie’ Muff

Mildred L. “Millie” Muff, 87, of Florence, died May 6, 2011, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. She served in the Women’s Air Corps during World War II when she

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McManama of Pittsburgh, Pa., Sandy Fuller of Burlington and Michael McCarty of Congress, Ariz.; seven grandchildren; and seven great-grandchildren. Memorial service will be 3:30 p.m. Sunday, May 15, at Hebron Lutheran Church. A fellowship meal will follow at the church. Memorials: Hebron Lutheran Foundation in memory of John F. McManama, 3140 Limaburg Road, Hebron, KY 41048.

met and married her husband, Lester. She was a talented artist, an active member of Florence Baptist church for 64 years, former member of a local homemaker’s club and formerly worked with Girl Scouts and Sunday school classes. Her husband, Lester L. Muff, died previously. Survivors include her daughters, Lois F. Seifert of Cincinnati and Live Oak, Fla., and Sharon L. Smith of Hebron; son, Ray A. Muff of Florence; sister, Edna L. Preston of California; two grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren. Burial was at Floral Hills Cemetery. Memorials: Florence Baptist Church.

Richard O’Donnell

Richard Joseph O’Donnell, 83, of Florence, died April 29, 2011, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He served as a deacon with the Diocese of Covington and the Diocese of Wheeling in Charleston, W.Va. He served in the U.S. Navy for 25 years and three years in the U.S. Army Air Corps. His wife, Peggy, died previously. Survivors include his children, Richard O’Donnell Jr. of Arlington, Va., Mathews O’Donnell of Santa Clara, Calif., Mary Harrah of Batesville, Ind., John O’Donnell of Temecula, Calif., Michael O’Donnell of Martinsburg, W.Va., Elizabeth Littrell of Independence and Francis O’Donnell of Hebron; and 22 grandchildren. Burial was at St. Mary’s Cemetery, Fort Mitchell. Memorials: Immaculate Heart of Mary Building Fund, 5876 Veterans Way, Burlington, KY 41005.

Check NKY.com

For the most up-to-date Northern Kentucky obituaries, click on the “Obituaries” link at NKY.com. Survivors include his daughters, Carolyn Hibbard of Villa Hills and Jo Ann Beyersdoerfer of Foster, Ky.; and three grandchildren. Entombment was in Floral Hills. Memorials: Hilltop Church of Christ, 5300 Taylor Mill Road, Taylor Mill, KY 41015 or charity of donor’s choice.

Robert Schmidt

Robert Warren Schmidt, 60, of Lawrenceburg, Ind., formerly of Northern Kentucky, died April 30, 2011, at his home. He served in the U.S. Army, retired from CSX as a brakeman and was an avid outdoorsman. His parents, Elmer R. and Edna M. Schmidt, died previously. Survivors include his son, Robert Schmidt of Lawrenceburg, Ind.; sisters, Jean Tate of Edgewood, Janice Wendling of Lakeside Park, Mary Schmidt of Villa Hills and Susan Depenbrock of Union; and brothers, Gregory Schmidt of Rabbit Hash, Michael Schmidt of Fort Wright, Raymond Schmidt of Edgewood and Moe Schmidt of Villa Hills. Interment was at Veterans Cemetery North, Williamstown. Memorials: Holy Cross High School Alumni Association, 3617 Church St., Latonia, KY 41015.

Wanda Cox Selvestru

Carl Ross, 101, of Florence, formerly of Covington, died May 3, 2011, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He was a retired sheet metal worker, a member and elder of Hilltop Church of Christ, and an avid wood worker. He was a bus driver with Ross Motor Coach, which later became the Greenline Bus Co. He drove the last bus across the Suspension Bridge in 1937 before the flood waters were too deep to travel across. His wife, Mary E. Ross, and a grandson, Randy Hibbard, died previously.

Wanda Cox Selvestru, 92, of Latonia, formerly of Crescent Springs, died May 3, 2011, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. She retired as co-owner/operator of Madison Fruit Market in Covington, was a member of Garden of Hope Church and former member of Immanuel Baptist Church in Covington. Her husband, Savas “Sam” P. Selvestru, died previously. Survivors include her son, Paul Selvestru of Covington; nephew, Akila “Ike” Misali of Indian Hills, Ohio; and sister-in-law, Betty Cox of Florence, Interment was at Highland Cemetery, Fort Mitchell. Memorials: Garden of Hope Ministries, 699 Edgecliff Drive, Covington, KY 41014.

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