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FLORENCE

RECORDER

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Florence and Union 75¢

THURSDAY, APRIL 3, 2014

ON THE DIAMOND A4 Previewing softball season

BECAUSE COMMUNITY MATTERS

Panera could add drive-thru By Melissa Stewart mstewart@communitypress.com

FLORENCE — A drive-thru could possibly be added to Panera Bread Florence. Panera is requesting permission from the city to add a drivethru at the back of its building on Houston Road. Council unanimously approved the first reading of an ordinance that would approve the drive-thru March 25. The final vote will be taken at the next council business meeting 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 8, at the government center, 8100 Ewing Blvd., Florence. Vice president of marketing for Breads of the World Judy Ketner-Dollison said, if approved, the drive-thru would be

more convenient for Panera customers. Breads of the World owns all Northern Kentucky locations of Panera. “We know our customers like ways to make things more convenient for themselves,” she said. “The drive-thru is just one way we can help them through their busy lives. It’ll be another way for customers to experience Panera.” Ketner-Dollison said she could not give specifics or the project start and completion date until the project is approved. Currently the Newport Panera is the only franchise in the area that has a drive-thru. If approved, it will be the only restaurant in that area of Houston Road with a drive-thru.

According to Todd Morgan of the Boone County Planning Commission, several years ago as part of a lawsuit settlement agreement, it was agreed that no restaurants in that area of Houston – from KY 18 to Ted Bushelman Bouelvard – would be permitted to have a drivethru. Panera representatives, however, received approval for the project from the Boone County Planning Commission in February. “With this request, the drivethru is 100 percent hidden by the building,” Morgan said. “No one will be able to see it from Houston Road.” Want to continue the conversation? Tweet @MStewartReports

Panera is seeking approval from the city of Florence to add a drive-thru to its Houston Road location. MELISSA STEWART/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Small animals get second chance with rescue effort

Cooperative extension office expanding

By Melissa Stewart

ssalmons@nky.com

mstewart@communitypress.com

FLORENCE — They’re little,

but they’re important, Amanda Ruiz says of small animals. Ruiz, 18, just started a small animal rescue organization, Chins n’ Friends. The nonprofit accepts all small animals, including hamsters and rabbits, and more exotic animals such as hedge hogs and chinchillas. The rescue is based in Florence and uses volunteers who become foster homes for the animals. “My goal is to take in those animals that need a home and to educate people locally on how to care for small animals,” Ruiz said. Her passion for pocket pets, as small animals are often referred, began when she was a young child. She had a rabbit and a guinea pig, and when the guinea pig was added to the family, she and her parents didn’t quite know what they were getting into. The guinea pig, Angel, had been given as a Christmas gift. “Unfortunately, there are many misconceptions when it comes to small animal care,” she said. “But I understand

Amanda Ruiz, 18, of Florence, with a chinchilla, named Joy, up for adoption from the new rescue organization Chins n’ Friends. MELISSA STEWART/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

how people can get into that situation. Like most, when we got Angel, we didn’t do our research.” However, with the proper education in small animal care, Ruiz said, small animals can make great companions.

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“It’s important that people understand that these pets are not toys or just kids’ pets,” she said. “They have very special needs. They have their own personalities and are willing to

NEED A RESCUE? For more information on Chins n’ Friends, visit http://bit.ly/1dxS03p.

See RESCUE, Page A2

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By Stephanie Salmons BURLINGTON — The Boone County Cooperative Extension is expanding. An enrichment center of more than 20,000 square feet is currently being constructed near the extension’s current site at the intersection of Ky. 18 and Ky. 237 in Burlington. County extension agent for family and consumer sciences Diane Mason says the new building isn’t a replacement of the extension’s current facility but rather an addition and expansion of meeting room space. Mason said the plan has been in development for almost two years and the cooperative extension has been working with an architect since 2012. Jerry Brown, extension agent for agriculture and natural resources, said the contract for the building is slightly more than $7 million. The money to pay for the addition has been saved up over a number of years, and there will be no debt related to the project, he said. Use of the extension’s current meeting facilities “often go beyond the capacity we have,”

See OFFICE, Page A2 Vol. 19 No. 32 © 2014 The Community Recorder ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


A2 • FLORENCE RECORDER • APRIL 3, 2014

NEWS

K1

Rescue Continued from Page A1

The Boone County Cooperative Extension is building additional meeting space near its existing location in Burlington. STEPHANIE SALMONS/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Office Continued from Page A1

Index Calendar .............B2 Classifieds ............C Deaths .............. B7 Food ..................B3 Life ....................B1 Schools ..............A4 Sports ................A5 Viewpoints .........A8

she said. According to Mason, the enrichment center will also have spaces for projects that may be messy as well as a cooking lab. Work on the new facility began in January, she said, and should be completed by next spring.

Want to continue the conversation? Tweet at @SSalmonsNKY

FLORENCE RECORDER

Find news and information from your community on the Web Florence • nky.com/florence Florence • cincinnati.com/florence cincinnati.com/northernkentucky

News

Marc Emral Editor ..............................578-1053, memral@communitypress.com Stephanie Salmons Reporter .................578-1057, ssalmons@communitypress.com Melissa Stewart Reporter .....................578-1058, mstewart@communitypress.com Melanie Laughman Sports Editor ............513-248-7573, mlaughman@communitypress.com James Weber Sports Reporter ................578-1054, jweber@communitypress.com

Advertising

To place an ad .................................513-768-8404, EnquirerMediaAdvertising@enquirer.com

Delivery

For customer service .........................781-4421 Sharon Schachleiter Circulation Manager .........................442-3464, sschachleiter@communitypress.com

Classified

To place a Classified ad ......................283-7290, www.communityclassified.com

To place an ad in Community Classified, call 283-7290.

Bob Luehrmann owner of Buffalo Bob’s Family Restaurant, in Florence off the Mount Zion Road exit. The restaurant will go smoke free Tuesday, April 1.THANKS TO BOB LUEHRMANN

Buffalo Bob’s goes smoke free By Stephanie Salmons ssalmons@nky.com

A Boone County eatery will go smoke free April 1. Bob Luehrmann, owner of Buffalo Bob’s Family Restaurant, at 9910 Berberich Drive, off the Mount Zion Road exit, said the switch has “been on my mind for a couple of years now.” With the word family in the name, the restaurant has a lot of children come in, and Luehrmann said he thought a smoke-free environment would be better for them.

Additionally, three of the restaurant’s bar tenders do not smoke, one of whom is pregnant. “So just for her wellbeing, I thought this would be perfect timing,” said Luehrmann, who live sin Burlignton. He’ll give back to the smoking customers, however, by renovating the bar area, expanding the patio and adding a television outside. The restaurant, he said, is, “making provisions for our smokers so they have a nice area to go.”

bond with their owners. People don’t realize what a strong bond they can have with a small animal.” Ruiz said she recognized the need for a small animal rescue in Northern Kentucky after volunteering with the Boone County Animal Shelter. She said most shelters are unsure how to handle a small pet that is dropped off; they are a bit more challenging to adopt out. She took it upon herself to care for those small pets that were given to the shelter. “I’ve gotten so many rescues, some from bad conditions,” she said. “These animals are defenseless and looked at as disposable. That just tugs at my heart.” Rachel Pflugh, a veterinarian’s tech assistant for the Boone County shelter, said she is impressed with Ruiz’s commitment to small animals. “She loves them so much. There’s almost no

room in her heart for people,” Plugh said. “She’s been very involved at the shelter. Her love for animals is very cool. We’re excited about the rescue and it will help us a lot, it’s hard to find rescue groups locally that will take on small animals.” Ruiz has plans to create partnerships with other shelters in the area and hopes to someday take in animals from Ohio and Indiana. She’s also hoping to reach out to those for help with donations of money and supplies. In addition to taking in and caring for small pets, she also hopes to place them in new homes, giving them a second chance for a happy life. Currently she has one chinchilla, Joy, up for adoption. “I love having this rescue. It’s almost a stress reliever,” she said. “I get up in the morning and I can’t wait to see the animals. They’re like family. They keep me going and motivated.”

Want to continue the conversation? Tweet @MStewartReports

Cincinnati Bell opens flagship store in Florence Cincinnati Bell has opened a new flagship retail store in Florence at 7688 Mall Road. The store features an innovative retail design that showcases the company’s range of products and services with a focus on its Fioptics enter-

tainment offerings. The new Florence store is open MondaySaturday 10 a.m.-8 p.m. and Sunday from noon-6 p.m. For questions about Cincinnati Bell products and services, call 859372-5300.

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NEWS

APRIL 3, 2014 • FLORENCE-UNION RECORDER • A3

BRIEFLY Computer, Internet class offered

FLORENCE — The Florence branch of the Boone County Public Library will host a four-week class on computer and Internet basics 1 p.m. Thursdays, April 3-24. Learn about parts of a computer system, how to get online and get to websites, how to use search engines and perform keyword searching, and how to set up and use an email account. Registration is required. Call 859-342-2665. The branch is located at 7425, U.S. 42, Florence.

DAR meeting

The Rebecca Bryan Boone Chapter, National Society Daughters of American Revolution, will meet at 11 a.m Wednesday April 9, at the Golden Corral Restaurant, 488 Orphanage Road. The winners for the Good Citizen essay will be presented with their scholarship awards. Chapter regent Ruth Korzenborn will preside. For further information or to make a reservation send an e-mail to rgkorz@twc.com or call 859-341-2017.

ing participants, organizing the line up and working the day of the parade. The parade will begin at 7 p.m. Friday, June 27, from the Union Kroger, near the intersection of U.S. 42 and Braxton Drive. Anyone interested in being a part of the new committee should contact city events coordinator Karen Franxman at unioncityevents@nw.twcbc.com. A date for the first meeting will be scheduled after contacts are made.

Former UK players host fundraiser

Former University of Kentucky basketball players and Northern Kentucky residents Troy McKinley and Dicky Beal will host a fundraiser for Boone County Fiscal Court candidate Adam Chaney. The fundraiser is 6-8 p.m. Thursday, April 17, at the home of Trent and Ellen Lucas, 10713 Meadow Stable Lane, Union. Chaney, of Burlington, will face challengers Anthony (Tony) Jones, Mike Bailey, Cathy Flaig and Christy Vogt Mollozzi in

the May 20 Republican primary for the District 1 commissioner seat. Space is limited. Register online at www.chaney4boone.com.

National College to host career fair

FLORENCE — The Florence Campus of National College, 7627 Ewing Blvd., will host a free career fair 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday, April 10. More than 25 area employers will be participating in the career fair, including The Christ Hospitals Physicians Group, CitiBank, Wal-Mart, Fifth-Third Bank, Visiting Angels Home Care, FedEx Ground, Pomeroy, Manpower, Senior Helpers Home Care, Brighton Center, Levi Strauss, SMX Staffing, RC Durr YMCA, Kentucky Career Center and more. A limited amount of free booth space is still available for interested employers. For more information, contact career center director Jeff Elmlinger at 859-525-6510 or jselmlinger@national-college.edu.

Monthly prayer service planned

A nondenominational prayer service for service men and women serving overseas is planned for 7 p.m. Thursday, April 3, at the Trucker’s Chapel of the Travel Centers of America truck stop at 7777 Burlington Pike in Florence. Volunteers from the community host this service the first Thursday of each month to pray for people from all around the Greater Cincinnati area who are stationed overseas. This service is open to anyone. For more information or to add a name to the prayer list, call Bobby Vallandingham at 859462-4652 or email robert.vallandingham@gmail.com.

Dialogue For Democracy dinner

Brent Cooper, interim president of the NKY Chamber of Commerce, John Dubis, president of St. Elizabeth Healthcare, and Randy Poe, superintendent of Boone County Schools, will discuss challenges and opportunities facing Boone County and N. Ky. at the Dialogue for Democracy dinner, 6-9 p.m. Thursday, April 3, at the Airport Marriott, 2395 Progress Drive in Hebron. The fundraising dinner is being hosted by the Boone County Democratic Party. In addition to the panel presentation, Adam Edelen, auditor general of Kentucky, will present the first Community Builder Award to former Judge-executive Bruce Ferguson. Ferguson is being honored for his many contributions to Boone County.

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Union looks to start parade committee

Stop by and see us or call at

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UNION — The city is looking to establish a committee to work on all aspects of organizing the city’s annual Union Celebrates America parade. Members of the committee will work on a number of tasks, such as locat-

Take Exit 178 go east Off I-75, Left on Sam Neace, Right on Berberich Dr. Left to Friendly Market CE-0000586810


SCHOOLS

A4 • FLORENCE-UNION RECORDER • APRIL 3, 2014

COMMUNITY

RECORDER

Editor: Marc Emral, memral@communitypress.com, 578-1053

ACHIEVEMENTS | NEWS | ACTIVITIES | HONORS

CommunityPress.com

COLLEGE CORNER Mercer honors Union student

Carlie Copeland, of Union, was named to the dean’s list of Mercer University’s College of Liberal Arts for the Fall 2013 semester. Inclusion on this list requires students to meet rigorous grade-pointaverage standards specific to the college or school within the university. Copeland is a senior at Mercer, in Macon, Ga.

Dean’s Awards honor triple achievers

Covington Catholic students Chris Holthaus, left, and David Rice attended the West Point Leadership and Ethics Seminar with teacher Andy Zerhusen, right.THANKS TO MAUREEN REGAN

CovCath students attend Leadership and Ethics Seminar Covington Catholic junior Chris Holthaus, sophomore David Rice and teacher Andy Zerhusen recently attended the second annual Leadership and Ethics Seminar hosted by the West Point Society of Cincinnati. The seminar provided sophomore and junior students and faculty members from 73 high schools in Ohio, Kentucky and Indiana the opportunity to expe-

rience leadership and ethics training developed for cadets at the United States Military Academy at West Point. The seminar featured two guest speakers. In the morning, the students heard from University of Cincinnati President Santa J. Ono. The closing comments were provided by Brig. Gen. Margaret W. Burcham, commander of the Great Lakes and Ohio River Division, U.S.

Army Corps of Engineers. She is a West Point graduate and is the first female general officer in the Corps of Engineers. All participants received letters of recognition and encouragement from governors John Kasich of Ohio and Mike Pence of Indiana, as well as from U.S. Sen. Daniel Coats (Ind.), U.S. representatives Tom Massie (Ky.),Luke Messer (Ind.) and Brad Wenstrup (Ohio).

Eastern Kentucky University recently announced 551 Dean’s Award recipients for the Fall 2013 semester, including: Robert Kippler of Burlington, a junior athletic training major; Kelsey Lawhorn of Burlington, a senior health services administration major; Jordan Sebald of Burlington, a senior special education major; Benjamin Turner of Burlington, a sophomore pre-occupational science major; Paige Fetters of Florence, a junior criminal justice major; Alexander Molen of Florence, a junior athletic training major; Austin Molen of Florence, a sophomore marketing major; Brittany Moore of Florence, a senior english major; Samantha Parrigan of Florence, a sophomore criminal justice major; Taylor Dantes of Union, a junior psychology major; Jonathan Heimbrock of Union, a sophomore police studies major; Lindsey Smith of Union, a sophomore pre-occupational science; and Ashley Svec of Union, a sophomore pre-communication disorders major. To earn the Dean’s Award, students must achieve dean’s list honors at EKU for three semesters, not necessarily consecutive. A lapel pin is presented to students by the dean of their academic college. To achieve dean’s list honors, students attempting 14 or more credit hours must earn a 3.5 grade-point average out of a possible 4.0. Students attempting 13 credit hours must earn a 3.65 GPA, and students at-

tempting 12 credit hours must earn a 3.75 GPA.

EKU honors graduates

Eastern Kentucky University recently recognized 1,111 graduates at the conclusion of the Fall 2013 semester. Among the graduates: Daniel Josef Mullins, of Union, B.A. in geography and a certificate in geographic information systems; Daniel Allen Delaney, of Burlington, B.S. in police studies; Madeline Helen Schuler, of Burlington, Magna Cum Laude B.S. in special education; David Andrew Vonderschmidt, of Burlington, Magna Cum Laude B.A. in anthropology; Raven Symone Draper, of Florence, B.A. in public relations; Lindsay Catherine Knapik, of Florence, Magna Cum Laude B.S. in special education; Craig Patrick Sorrell, of Florence, M.S. in criminal justice; Jacqueline Amanda Ashcraft, of Hebron, B.S.N. in nursing; Elise H. Wigger, of Hebron, Cum Laude B.S. in special education; Danielle Nicole Cook, of Union, M.Ed. in instructional leadership; Anna Catherine Helmer, of Union, B.S. in special education; Magan L. Meade, of Union, M.P.H. in public health; and Alexandra Paige Karlage, of Walton, B.B.A. in finance.

Herich named to dean’s list

Carlie Herich, of Hebron, was named to the Wheaton College dean’s list for the Fall 2013 semester. Herich is majoring in sociology.

McMillan scores perfect 4.0

Olivia McMillan, of Florence, was named to the president’s list for the Fall 2013 semester at Freed-Hardeman University in Henderson, Tenn. Inclusion on the president’s list requires maintaining a grade-point average of 4.0 for the semester and full-time status. McMillan is an arts-and-humanities student.

St. Timothy Preschool students Violet Main and Hayden Wright play a game of “Where’s the Matching Letter?”THANKS TO DEB THOMAS

FUN AND GAMES Students at St. Timothy Preschool are able to incorporate fun and games into their daily learning.

St. Timothy Preschool students Gracie Haines, Abby Lee and Sadie Kaiser have fun while playing at the sensory table.THANKS TO DEB THOMAS

St. Timothy Preschool student Julia Webster teaches the calendar activity for the day.THANKS TO DEB THOMAS


SPORTS

APRIL 3, 2014 • FLORENCE-UNION RECORDER • A5

COMMUNITY

RECORDER

Editor: Melanie Laughman, mlaughman@communitypress.com, 513-248-7573

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | RECREATIONAL

CommunityPress.com

FIRST SWING AT THE 2014 HIGH SCHOOL SOFTBALL SEASON

Boone teams remain strong in softball By James Weber

jweber@nky.com

BOONE COUNTY — - The county of Boone has been dominant in softball for many years, and will look to re-establish things this year after Notre Dame won the Ninth Region last season. Here is a look at area squads:

Boone County

The Rebels were 17-12 last year, finishing as district runner-up and losing to Notre Dame in the Ninth Region quarterfinals. The Rebels hope to make a run to go further behind senior pitcher Dallis Knotts, who took a perfect game into the fifth inning of Boone’s 2-1 loss to Notre Dame in the regional. She also plays shortstop and hit over .400 at the plate. Other players to watch start senior catcher/third baseman/second baseman Kiersten Maines, senior catcher/third baseman/ outfielder Madison Graham and junior first baseman/third baseman Cait-

St. Henry sophomore JoAnna Rebitski sets up at first base March 29 against Brossart March 29 at the Uncle Pete Noll Tournament.JAMES WEBER/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

lyn Palmer. Boone plays at Cooper April 3 then plays in the Lafayette tourney in Lexington April 12.

Conner

The Cougars were 2311 last year, winning the 33rd District championship before falling to Notre Dame in the Ninth Region final.

Head coach Kristin Koors returns as head coach with a 161-72 record at the school. She returns a veteran team with incumbent starters Elizabeth Sims, Alexia Snelbaker, Amber Clark, Jenna Hicks, Paige Thompson, Hannah Straley, Brooke Maines, Sydney Himes, Hannah Darling, Beth Maines and Kayla Ellis. Sims, a junior pitcher, enters the season with an 86-37 record on the mound. She could reach the100-win mark this year and, later, Kelsey Robinson’s school record of 107 wins. Sims had 21 wins and a 2.64 ERA with 208 strikeouts. Conner plays April 4-5 at a tournament at Woodford County, then plays at Newport Central Catholic April 15. Conner then plays Ryle and Cooper in district play April 16-17.

Cooper

St. Henry’s Jordan Kramer throws a pitch during the Uncle Pete Noll Tournament began March 29 at Softball City in Taylor Mill.JAMES WEBER/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

The Jaguars were 9-12 last year for head coach Michelle Isaac, who returns as the only head coach in the program’s history. Returning players

start with senior catcher Jessica Koors and senior pitcher/first baseman Hayley Van Dusen. Koors, who hit .580 last year, has been behind the plate for every contest in Cooper softball history and returns for her final season. Van Dusen is a veteran hurler throwing to her. Cooper hosts Boone County April 3 then goes down to Prestonsburg for a tourney April 11-12.

Ryle senior Ali Crupper is one of the area’s top pitchers.FILE PHOTO

Heritage

The Eagles were 2-15 last year but are already off to a 3-1 start to 2014 with wins over Ludlow, Bellevue and Silver Grove. The head coach this year is Joe Mullins. Top players are senior senior shortstop/catcher Mariah Cain and freshman pitcher/infielder Maddie Mullins. Heritage plays at Lloyd April 3 and at Beechwood April 4.

Ryle

The Raiders return six starters for new head coach Craig Milburn, who looks to keep the team’s track record of postseaSee SOFTBALL, Page A6

Sydney Himes is one of Conner’s top returning players.FILE PHOTO

Ryle archers shoot for the future By James Weber jweber@nky.com

UNION — Playing for an official Kentucky High School Athletic Association title has caused the archers at Ryle High School to step up their game. Sharing the same status as more established sports such as basketball and football has helped the sport at the school, which has had a club team for about a decade. “The quality of the kids is much higher than years past,” said head coach Brenda Klaas, who originated the program at Ryle. “They were more focused and they had a goal in mind. Being sanctioned, they got more serious; it was not just about having fun and hanging out. They wanted to shoot well. They were pointing things out to each other in practice and helping each other.” In the recent KHSAA state meet, Ryle finished 15th in the team competition at the tournament, scoring 3,304 points. A perfect score is 3,600, based on 360 arrows. The format is 30 arrows scored from 12 different students, the top four scores from each gender plus the next

Ryle competed in the KHSAA state archery tournament in March.THANKS TO BRENDA KLAAS

four. The champion, Trigg County, scored 3,457. Out of Ryle’s 360 scoring arrows, 146 or 41 percent, were perfect 10’s, and another 151 were 9’s. “The kids did really well,” Klaas said. “We set team records for totals twice this year. Our regional score was a record and we turned around and did even better at state” Junior Sam Loehrke led Ryle in 16th place in the boys divi-

sion, scoring 288 out of a perfect 300. Junior Jacob Grimes was 96th (279) and junior Micky King 104th (279). Additional scoring was junior Ben Benton (276), junior Tyler Zahn (275), freshman Spencer Sanders (273), senior Andrew Clark (273) and junior Steven Gripshover (270). Additionally for Ryle was junior Jack Kirby (267), freshman A.J. Bailey (264), freshman Mason Gooch (238), junior Dylan Rooks (235),

sophomore Conner Hoffman (229), freshman Noah Riddle (178) and freshman Brady Mugavin (130). Junior Elizabeth Shouse finished 11th out of 278 girls with a score of 288. Like Loehrke, she hit19 perfect10’s out of 30 shots. Junior Allison McCarthy finished 99th with a 270. Sophomore Caitlyn Klaas scored 268 and sophomore Elizabeth Pulsifer, 265, to round out the team scoring. Also scoring

were sophomore Abigail Smith 264, sophomore Lindsee Borland 253, freshman Delaney Kamp 245, senior Daonna Owens 236 and junior Kaitlyn Niehaus 210. Up next is a potential berth in the National Archery in the Schools Program national tournament, which will be May 8-10 in Louisville. Ryle’s score was high enough to get a berth in the tourney, though spots are limited in the tournament and entry into the field works much like getting tickets to a major rock concert. Klaas will have to log onto a web site April 15 to try to get the Raiders into the field with other coaches from around the country endeavoring to do the same thing. “They wanted to quality for the national tournament and I told them they had to shoot 3,300 and they just got above that,” Klaas said. “We’re planning to move on to the next level.” Until then, the Raiders will continue to practice twice a week. Follow James Weber on Twitter, @RecorderWeber


SPORTS & RECREATION

A6 • FLORENCE-UNION RECORDER • APRIL 3, 2014

Clippers win big at Mid-Winter Meet Community Recorder

The Northern Kentucky Clippers recently posted a dominant team victory at the 2014 MidWinter Meet at Silverlake in Erlanger. The Clippers scored 9,076 points, with the second-place Cincinnati Marlins scoring 2,685. In addition, the Clippers won 52 events – 39 more than the second-place team. “This is an incredibly strong showing for this point in the season,” head age-group coach Chad Rehkamp said. “Our swimmers put up 71-percent lifetime-best times. As we head into the championship season, we

Mariah Denigan swims in the 2014 Mid-Winter Meet. She broke four meet records during the weekend.THANKS TO JOSH DENIGAN

are positioned to swim well at the state level and to continue improving our national ranking.”

Mariah Denigan of Edgewood broke a Clippers team record in the 9-10 girls 200 individual med-

ley. New meet records include: Nick Smith, of Fort Mitchell, 8-and-under boys 50 breast (broke his oldest brother’s record); Mariah Denigan, of Edgewood, 910 girls 200 IM, 100 back, 200 free and 100 IM; Patrick Merse, of Florence,1112 boys 100 breast and 50 breast; Sophie Skinner, of Independence, 13-andover girls 200 IM; Brendan Meyer, of Taylor Mill, 13and-over boys 100 fly, 200 fly and 100 back; Mike Summe, of Edgewood, 13and-over boys 200 IM and 200 breast; and Austin Haney, of Fort Mitchell, 13and-over boys 100 breast. For more information, visit on Clipperswim.org.

PRESS PREPS HIGHLIGHTS By James Weber jweber@communitypress.com

Baseball

» Conner beat Campbell County 10-9 March 27. Jared Williams walked to score the winning run. Cameron Ross had four RBI. Blaise Ostertag had three hits. » Ryle beat St. Henry 9-8 March 26. Four Raiders had two hits each.

Catching Up with College Athletes

» Notre Dame Academy graduate Tully Bradford (Lakeside Park) was a Division III All-American in swimming this year. At the nationals in Indianapolis, she helped her teammates finish third in the 800 freestyle relay.

TMC Notes

» Thomas More College senior right fielder Cody Makin (Elder) was named the Presidents’ Athletic Conference Baseball Hitter of the Week for March 24. Makin helped the Saints finish the week 3-1, which included taking two-ofthree against Geneva to open their 2014 league season. He hit .400 (six-of-15) with five runs batted-in and five runs scored, while also recording six putouts and a 1.000 fielding percentage. » Thomas More College sophomore guard/forward Sydney Moss has been named the National Player of the Year by the internet website D3hoops.com. Moss, who was also named a first team All-

American by D3hoops.com, was named a Women’s Basketball Coaches Association (WBCA) All-American and one-of-three finalists for the WBCA Player of the Year on Thursday. She led the nation in scoring at 27.8 points per game as she tied the NCAA Division III single-season scoring record with 891 points. Moss also broke the NCAA Division III single-game scoring record when she scored 63 points against Waynesburg University in the semifinals of the Presidents’ Athletic Conference Championship Tournament. She was also seventh in the country in field goal percentage a 60.6 percent, eighth in assist-turnover ratio at 2.72, 66th in steals per game at 2.75 and 214th in assists per game at 3.4.

Moss pulled down 8.4 rebounds per game and recorded 15 double-doubles. Moss is the first Thomas More women’s basketball student-athlete to be named the National Player of the Year. The WBCA Player of the Year will be announced during the fourth annual WBCA Awards Show on Monday, April 7, in the Omni Nashville Hotel’s Broadway Ballroom. This event is part of the WBCA National Convention and is held in conjunction with the NCAA Women’s Final Four. Thomas More finished the season with a program best 31-1 record and firstever appearance in the Sectional Finals “Elite Eight” of the NCAA Division III Championship.

Softball Continued from Page A5

son excellence intact. Ryle was 21-8 last year and had a streak of seven regional championships in eight years snapped after losing in the district semifinals. The Raiders will try to get back to the regional final with a veteran lineup. Top players to watch start with senior pitcher Ali Crupper, sophomore catcher McKenzi Dickerson and senior shortstop Bella Steinle. Crupper is a veteran hardthrowing ace pitcher, striking out 259 batters in 173, an average of 1.5 each inning (half the outs). Steinle, a starter as a freshman, is returning after two years away. After spring break, Ryle hosts Turpin April 10 then plays in a tournament at East Jessamine April 12.

St. Henry

The Crusaders were 20-12 last year and 34th District champs for head coach Freedom Fogt, who returns for her second season. The Crusaders lost to Highlands in the Ninth Region quarterfinals a year ago. St. Henry has enjoyed district titles the past four seasons, and also celebrated the All “A” regional title last year. Players to watch start with junior infielder/pitcher Jordan Kramer, sophomore

catcher Gabrielle Stewart, senior shortstop Emily Specht, junior third baseman Molly Dietz, sophomore outfielder Teresa Urban and sophomore first baseman JoAnna Rebitski. Stewart hit over .450 last year with 36 RBI and 15 extra-base hits. Behind the plate, she threw out 13 runners stealing bases. Kramer hit .448 and will take over No. 1 pitching duties this spring. St. Henry hosts Villa Madonna Thursday, April 3, then plays Notre Dame and Dixie Heights in the annual Strike Out Cancer series at Notre Dame Saturday, April 5.

Walton-Verona

The Bearcats were 32nd District runnerup last season and fell in the Eighth Region quarterfinals. W-V was 16-13 overall. Head coach Marlin Gregg takes over the program this year. He inherits a young team with two seniors. The Bearcats will try to regain the district title after Simon Kenton snapped a string of three straight titles for the Bearcats in 2013. The teams meet April 3 at Simon Kenton. W-V’s top players are senior infielder Julann Ginn, senior Hannah Thacker, junior Jaylene Anderson and junior Emily Quatkemeyer. Follow James Weber on Twitter, @RecorderWeber

It’s tournament time, and we’ve got your team covered! With updated brackets, team matchups, pre & post-game analysis, infographics, video and more, The Enquirer will keep you in the conversation. Pick up a copy or visit Cincinnati.com for the most up-to-date tournament results


SPORTS & RECREATION

APRIL 3, 2014 • FLORENCE-UNION RECORDER • A7

NKU baseball sees increments of progress on Division I field

Madeira graduate Cody Kuzniczci takes a swing for the Northern Kentucky University Norse. THANKS TO JEFF MCCURRY/NKU SPORTS

contests. The progress is evident both inside and outside the program. “Our opponents are noticing how much we’ve improved,” said Asalon. “It’s nice to hear that from opposing coaches in our conference.” The timing of the jump to Division I coincided with an influx of new players. The Norse have relied on primarily freshmen and junior college transfers over the past season and a half. “We wanted to get young, but we wanted to get a good blend of talent and experience,” said Asalon. Recruiting has also been a challenge. As the Norse strive to build pitching depth to keep up with their new confer-

ence foes, they have lost two projected starters to the Major League Baseball draft and two more to eligibility issues. “The quality of pitching in this conference is incredible. We have to be able to match that on the mound,” said Asalon. “When kids get drafted in June, they’re hard to replace.” Junior Jordan Procyshen (Holy Trinity Academy, Alberta) and sophomores Logan Spurlin (Loyola Academy, Ill.) and Cody Kuzniczci (Madeira) have been leading the way so far in 2014. The Norse entered April at 7-18, just one win shy from equaling their 2013 win total. They closed out March with a 13-11 win at East Tennessee State, hopefully cre-

Soccer camps OSYSA Soccer Unlimited Soccer Camps run by Jack Hermans and Ohio South are returning this summer to several locations throughout the area. Visit www.osysa.com/ camps to view the list of camps. Call Jack Hermans at 513-232-7916, or email jhermans@fuse.net.

revelation this season. He was one of the last freshmen to get a chance to crack the starting lineup this season. Once he started playing regularly, he made himself indisposable, leading the Norse with a .368 batting average, .605 slugging percentage, and .489 onbase percentage despite starting just 11 games. “Sometimes, you have to roll the dice and sometimes you end up with surprises,” said Asalon. “Caleb Kellogg is a true example of that. Guys who make the most of their chances are going to stick. Now, we can’t get him out of our lineup. That sets an example for everyone else.” The Norse return home on April 2 against non-conference Ball State, followed by a home weekend series with A-Sun opponent Stetson.

By Adam Turer presspreps@gmail.com

In its second year as a Division I program, Northern Kentucky University’s baseball program measures itself in small increments of progress. It could be a freshman seizing his opportunity in limited playing time. It could be words of encouragement from an opposing coach seeing the Norse play for the second or third time. It could be an offense erupting for 13 runs in a game, as the Norse have done twice since March 19. “We’re still hunting for consistency,” said head coach Todd Asalon, who led the Norse to eight Division II regional tournament appearances in his first 12 seasons at the helm. “We’re still tinkering with our lineup and trying to find the combination that makes us happy.” Asalon’s 13th and 14th seasons have been more challenging. NKU moved up to Division I and the Atlantic Sun conference last season, and struggled. The program that averaged more than 36 wins per season in Division II under Asalon managed to win just eight games total and three conference games in 2013. Already in 2014, the Norse have won two of their six conference

SIDELINES

ating momentum heading into the meat of the conference schedule. The day after the March 30 victory in Johnson City, Tenn., Asalon was on the road recruiting. He is looking for mature high school seniors who are ready to come in and contribute right away at a Division I program. “We put our freshmen right into it. We tell them during recruiting that they’re going to get their chance,” said Asalon. “We understand that there’s going to be good and bad with freshmen, but we really don’t feel like they’re freshmen anymore at this point of the season.” Freshman outfielder Caleb Kellogg (North Oldham, Ky.) has been a

Softball players sought Northern Kentucky Shooting Stars 16U girls fastpitch traveling softball team seeks players for its 2014 roster, preferably dedicated girls who have played for either their high school team or another traveling team. All positions are open. Email Mcvalvano@yahoo.com.

Baseball opening The Southwest Ohio 12U baseball team, Team Ignite, has openings. They will participate in a tournament in Cooperstown, N.Y., June 13. Contact Chris Van Meter at cvm@fuse.net or 393-8863.

Get golf-ready World of Golf, 7400 Woodspoint Drive, Florence, is offering a series of “Get Golf-Ready” classes this spring. Classes are 5:30-7 p.m. Cost is $75 per participant. Dates include: April 17, 22, 24, and May 22, 27, 29. Visit www.landrumgolf.com, or call 859-3718255.

FALL 2014 SIGN UPS

$65.00

Saturday Apr. 12th • 10-4 Sunday Apr. 13th • 2:30-4:00 Saturday Apr. 26th • 12-4 Sunday Apr. 27th • 2:30-4:00 Ages 3-14

Central Park off Camp Ernst Rd • Burlington KY Shelter 2 by soccer field #4 CE-0000588420

For Questions, Call Adele Nichols

@ 859-866-4583

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VIEWPOINTS A8 • FLORENCE RECORDER • APRIL 3, 2014

Editor: Marc Emral, memral@communitypress.com, 578-1053

EDITORIALS | LETTERS | COLUMNS | CH@TROOM

COMMUNITY

RECORDER

Cincinnati.com/northernkentucky

A CLOSER LOOK

Skyler is the dog of a Senior Services of Northern Kentucky client who may have to decide what to do with the dog if the client cannot care for the dog.THANKS TO SENIOR SERVICES OF NORTHERN KENTUCKY

Pets good friend, but care can be problem

St. Timothy Preschool student (and future scientist) Abel Grant takes a closer look during a playtime adventure.THANKS TO DEB THOMAS

CIVIC INVOLVEMENT Boone County Businessman Association

Meeting time: 11:30 a.m. final Thursday of each month Where: Florence Holiday Inn, 7905 Freedom Way, Florence Contact: Bill D’Andrea, 859-240-7692

Boone County Jaycees

Meeting time: 7 p.m. first Wednesday of each month Where: Florence Government Center, 8100 Ewing Blvd., Florence (lower level) Contact: President Katie Beagle, 859-466-8998 Description: Community and young professional organization to provide community service and leadership development.

Florence Lions Club

Meeting time: Second and fourth Wednesdays of each month Where: Lions Clubhouse, 29 LaCresta Drive, Florence Website: www.florencelions.com Contact: Membership chairman markh@tciky.com Description: Florence Lions Club’s main mission is to provide local eyesight care for those that need help in Boone County and the surrounding area.

Florence Rotary Club

Meeting time: Noon Mondays Where: Airport Hilton Hotel, Florence Contact: President Billy Santos, wsantos@bankofky.com or 859-4262285 Website: florencerotary.org

Florence Woman’s Club

Meeting time: 11:30 a.m. third Tuesday of each month (except July and August) Where: Florence Nature Park Club House Contact: Linda Gritton, president, Lgritton@twc.com Description: Club organizes exclusively for charitable and educational purposes.

Interact Club of Boone County

Meets: Twice monthly, dates vary Where: Scheben library, 8899 U.S. 42, Union Contact: florencerotary.org/1173-2 Description: Open to ages 12-18, it is sponsored by Florence Rotary Club. Erica Almquist is new president.

Kenton County Republican Women’s Club

Meeting time: Fourth Monday of each month (except August and December). Times vary. Where: Oriental Wok, 317 Buttermilk Pike, Fort Mitchell Contact: President Kim Kraft, president@kcrwc.org Website: www.kcrwc.org Description: Interested in promoting the objectives and policies of the Republican Party.

Kenton County Tea Party

Meeting time: 6-7:30 p.m. second and fourth Wednesday of each month (except only second Wednesday in November and December) Where: PeeWee’s, 2325 Anderson Road, Crescent Springs Contact: 859-992-6615

Kiwanis Club of Riverfront

Meeting time: 12:30 p.m. Wednesdays Where: Chez Nora’s in Covington Contact: riverfrontkiwanis@fuse.net Website: riverfrontkiwanis.org

Need a friend? Get a dog! That’s good advice for seniors, as many studies have shown that pets can help the elderly live longer, healthier lives. Walking a dog Charles Brewer keeps a senCOMMUNITY PRESS ior active, petting a cat GUEST COLUMNIST or dog lowers blood pressure, having a pet companion reduces stress and loneliness. But what happens when a senior has trouble taking care of that four-footed best friend? Lack of money and transportation may keep the pet from getting proper medical care. A senior may not be able to afford pet food – and may be forced to share his or her limited “people food” with a pet. Even worse, what happens when a senior passes away, leaving behind a beloved cat or dog? Dan Evans, director of the Kenton County Animal Shelter, is very aware of the problem of seniors who lack the means to properly care for their pets. The shelter regularly gives dry pet food to Senior Services of Northern Kentucky’s AniMeals Program. AniMeals provides free pet food to low-income seniors as part of the SSNK Seniors-Only Food Pantry. SSNK case aides also bring pet food to some of their home-bound clients. But finding a new home

for a pet when the elderly owner can no longer care for it is more difficult. Too many times, the pet will end up in an animal shelter. In Northern Kentucky, the county animal shelters must dispose of unwanted animals, although there are some no-kill shelters and pet rescue organizations in southern Ohio, such as PAWS Adoption Center in Middletown. SSNK Social Service case aide Dan Baker recently faced this dilemma with a client whose sole companion is a 95-pound sheepdog mix named Skyler. Bob is 74, nearly deaf and confined to a wheelchair. He can’t leave his house in Erlanger and requires meals and housekeeping services. Like many isolated seniors, Bob has no family support and limited contact with neighbors. Bob recently had to spend a week in the hospital, and Dan found a kennel to care for Skyler. But Bob faces more medical and financial issues, and may need to enter a nursing home. What will happen to Skyler? Fortunately, Dan Evans said the Kenton County shelter doesn’t see many pets being abandoned by elderly owners. “Families seem to feel an obligation to care for grandma’s cat or dog after she passes away,” he said. Charles Brewer is communications director, is the Senior Services of Northern Kentucky. You can reach him at cbrewer@seniorservicesnky.org.

Fidelity Investments helping students learn financial literacy early in school As the world becomes increasingly more uncertain and complex, the need for a quality education grows as well. Education should include many elements, with the three Rs (reading, writing and arithmetic) serving as its foundation. However, today’s young person needs more than that, and the month of April has been designated to focus on one of those needs. April is National Financial Literacy Month, which highlights the importance of knowing the ABCs of financial literacy, which touch every facet of life. Studies show that people with low levels of financial

literacy tend to be less financially secure, and less confident in all matters related to financial decisions, be they personal Nicole or family oriGordon COMMUNITY PRESS ented. Sadly, MichGUEST COLUMNIST igan Retirement Research Center research reveals only 27 percent of young adults understand basic financial concepts such as interest, inflation and risk diversification. According to research completed at the

FLORENCE

RECORDER

A publication of

University of Arizona, early financial education efforts increase the likelihood students will continue to be financially literate throughout their lives. Just as Fidelity Investments provides our customers with guidance and financial tools to help them realize their personal financial goals, we are working hard in Northern Kentucky and throughout Greater Cincinnati to do the same with students to ensure they have the financial foundation they need to be successful in the future. We teach students personal financial basics, such as spending and saving, to

empower them to make smart financial decisions, focusing our volunteer efforts on inclassroom discussions and hands-on simulations with teachers and students to help improve their financial literacy. One effort involves nearly 1,300 students from Kenton County School District and Covington Independent Schools. These students are participating in our year-long Investing in Students program that includes in-person lessons and online simulations, culminating with an investment tournament emphasizing the importance of implementing

228 Grandview Drive, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017 654 Highland Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075 phone: 283-0404 email: kynews@communitypress.com web site: cincinnati.com/northernkentucky

the Kentucky mathematics Common Core standards. We can all make a difference when it comes to financial literacy and preparing students for the future. We encourage families to talk to children about how to handle money, stressing the importance and benefits of saving responsibly and helping them set their own financial goals. Together, we can all help prepare students in northern Kentucky to make better financial decisions to improve their lives. Nicole Gordon is manager, community relations for Fidelity Investments.

Florence Recorder Editor Marc Emral memral@communitypress.com, 578-1053 Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday See page A2 for additional contact information.


THURSDAY, APRIL 3, 2014

LIFE

COMMUNITY RECORDER

PEOPLE | IDEAS | RECIPES

Lisa Freeman of Florence, Angie Walthers of Erlanger, Shelia Snow of Ghent, Tiffany Brandenburg of Mebourne and Nicci Kouns of Butler were part of the St. Elizabeth hospital workers who participated in the Mercy Health Heart Mini Marathon & Walk March 16.THANKS TO DAVID SORCHER/ST. ELIZABETH

Walking, and running, for better health

Hundreds of workers from St. Elizabeth Healthcare participated int h Mercy Health Mini Marathon and Walk March 16 in downtown Cincinnati. Even though the temperatures were as bit chilly, they, along with thousands of other Greater Cincinnati residents, raced and walked out Columbia Parkway. The annual event is held each March.

Emily Haml of Fort Thomas, Teresa Burtschy of Union, Meg Menne of Edgewood and Carol Ansari of Erlanger were part of the Mercy Health Heart Mimi Marathon and Walk Marcy 16.THANKS TO DAVID SORCHER/ST. ELIZABETH

Kelli Henson of Independence, Christina Sexton of Independence and Heather Newman of Alexandria wear their medals from the morning running portion of the heart mini marathon.THANKS TO DAVID SORCHER/ST. ELIZABETH

St. Elizabeth Healthcare Chief of Patient Services and Chief Nursing Officer Gary Blank of Hebron with Jeff Melching and Jenny Beck of Edgewood. They were among hundreds of St. Elizabeth workers at the Mercy Health Heart Mini Marathon March 16.THANKS TO DAVID SORCHER/ST. ELIZABETH

Hundreds of St. Elizabeth Healthcare workers turned out for the Mercy Health Heart Mini Marathon & Walk March 16. Denise Sawyer of Burlington and Amelia Stohr of Sparta work for St. Elizabeth Physicians of Burlington. THANKS TO DAVID SORCHER/ST. ELIZABETH


B2 • FLORENCE-UNION RECORDER • APRIL 3, 2014

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD FRIDAY, APRIL 4 Dining Events Fish Fry, 4 p.m.-8 p.m., Mary Queen of Heaven School, 1130 Donaldson Highway, Dine-in service, carry-out and drive-thru. Benefits Mary, Queen of Heaven School. Prices vary. Presented by Mary, Queen of Heaven Parish. 859-525-6909; www.mqhparish.com. Erlanger. Immaculate Heart of Mary, 5876 Veterans Way, Burlington; 5-8 p.m.; dinners $7.50 and up; 859-689-5070. Burlington St. Paul Fish Fry, 5 p.m.-8 p.m., St. Paul School, 7303 Dixie Highway, Carlin Center. Weekly specials, dine in, carry out or call ahead. Fried haddock, fried cod, shrimp, crab cakes and more including pizza and mac and cheese. Benefits Saint Paul School athletic programs. Price varies. Presented by Saint Paul Boosters. 859-647-4072; www.saintpaulboosters.net. Florence. St. Barbara Fish Fry, 4:30 p.m.-8 p.m., St. Barbara Church, 4042 Turkeyfoot Road, Dine in or carry out. Fried fish, baked tilapia, shrimp and cheese pizza. Adult dinners include three sides. $8 and up. 859-371-3100. Erlanger. Fish Fry, 4 p.m.-8 p.m., Burlington Lodge No. 264, 7072 Pleasant Valley Road, Includes fish sandwich on rye or white bread, choice of fries or mac and cheese, hushpuppies and cole slaw. $9; $5 for children. Presented by Burlington Masonic Lodge #264 F&AM. 859-7463225 or 859-689-4328. Florence.

Education AARP Tax-Aide, 9 a.m., Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Middle and low-income taxpayers are eligible for this free tax preparation service. Those with complex tax returns will be advised to seek professional tax assistance. Free. Registration required. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-3422665; www.bcpl.org. Burlington.

Literary - Libraries Meet Your Match Trivia, 7 p.m., Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Registration required. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-342-2665. Burlington. Mahjong, 1 p.m., Scheben Branch Library, 8899 U.S. 42, All skill levels welcome. 859-3422665. Union.

SATURDAY, APRIL 5 Exercise Classes Zumba, 10 a.m.-11 a.m., Boleros Dance Club, 8406 U.S. 42, $7. 859-379-5143; www.bolerosdanceclub.com. Florence.

Literary - Libraries PAWS to Read (grades K-5), 10 a.m., Scheben Branch Library, 8899 U.S. 42, Read to therapy

dog. Call to schedule 15-minute time slot. 859-342-2665. Union.

On Stage - Theater The Who’s: Tommy the Musical, 8 p.m., Union Community Building, $12-$15. 859-384-0295; www.unionct.net. Union.

Recreation Ryle Band Bingo, 5 p.m.-10 p.m., Erlanger Lions Club Hall, 5996 Belair Drive, Doors open 5 p.m. Early games begin 6:30 p.m. Regular games begin 7:15 p.m. Ages 18 and up. Benefits Ryle Marching Band Boosters. Presented by Ryle Band Boosters. Through May 31. 859-2821652. Erlanger.

Florence.

Education Russian Language Class, 1 p.m.-2 p.m., The Lively Learning Lab, 7500 Oakbrook Drive, Suite 10, Introduces Russian language and culture, facilitated by the study of vocabulary, grammar, short readings and guided conversation. For ages 10 and up. $22. Registration required. 859-371-5227. Florence.

Literary - Libraries

Indoor Flea Market, 10 a.m.-11 a.m., Prince of Peace School, Covington, Free. 859-431-5153. Covington.

Zumba, 6 p.m., Chapin Memorial Library, 6517 Market St., Latininspired, calorie-burning workout. $5. 859-505-8263. Petersburg. Gentle Yoga, 6 p.m., Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Learn basic postures and flows. $25. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-342-2665. Burlington. Yoga, 7:10 p.m., Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Hatha Yoga postures. $25. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-342-2665. Burlington. In the Loop, 10 a.m., Florence Branch Library, 7425 U.S. 42, Knit or crochet in relaxed, friendly company. Learn for first time or pick up new tricks. 859-342-2665. Florence. Zumba, 6 p.m., Scheben Branch Library, 8899 U.S. 42, Latininspired dance-fitness program. $25 per month. 859-334-2117. Union. Teen Gaming (middle & high school), 3:15 p.m.-4:45 p.m., Lents Branch Library, 3215 Cougar Path, Gaming and snacks. Free. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-342-2665. Hebron.

MONDAY, APRIL 7

TUESDAY, APRIL 8

Art & Craft Classes

Education

Art Camp, 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Monday-Friday., The Lively Learning Lab, 7500 Oakbrook Drive, Suite 10, Paint a mural on The Lively Learning Lab wall, use watercolors, learn pencil drawing, make chalk art, learn about clay and pottery, paint our own canvas and more. Ages 3-14. $150. Registration required. 859-3715227. Florence.

Admissions Information Session, 2 p.m.-3 p.m., Gateway Community and Technical College Boone Campus, 500 Technology Way, B104A, Center for Advanced Manufacturing. Find out about financial aid, academic programs, advising and more. Ages 18 and up. Free. Presented by Gateway Community and Technical College. 859-441-4500; gateway.kctcs.edu/admissions. Florence. Financial Aid Workshop, 3 p.m.-4 p.m., Gateway Community and Technical College Boone Campus, 500 Technology Way, B206, Center for Advanced Manufacturing. Attend workshop and get help with filing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid. Ages 18 and up. Free. Presented by Gateway Community and Technical College. 859-441-4500; gateway.kctcs.edu/admissions. Florence. Sign Language, 4:30 p.m.-5:30 p.m., The Lively Learning Lab, 7500 Oakbrook Drive, Suite 10, Learn conversational sign language. $10. 859-371-5227. Florence.

SUNDAY, APRIL 6 Exercise Classes Zumba, 1 p.m.-2 p.m., Boleros Dance Club, $7. 859-379-5143; www.bolerosdanceclub.com. Florence.

Exhibits Vietnam: Our Story, 1 p.m.-5 p.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, Free for veterans from all eras and all current military personnel, $7, $6 ages 60 and up, $4 ages 3-17. 859-491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

Music - Concerts Los Lonely Boys, 8 p.m., Madison Theater, 730 Madison Ave., $30, $25 advance. 859-491-2444; www.madisontheateronline.com. Covington.

Shopping

Civic Tea Party Meeting, 6 p.m.-8 p.m., Sub Station II, 7905 Dream St., Meet and discuss limited government, free markets and fiscal responsibility. Free. Presented by Grassroots Tea Party of Boone County. 859-586-9207; www.teapartyboonecounty.org. Florence. Cardio Dance Party Dance Fitness Class, 6 p.m.-7 p.m., The Ritz Ballroom Dance Studio, 8150 Mall Road, Variety of dance styles, including jazz, hip-hop, Latin, jive and more danced to popular music. Ages 18 and up. $7-$12. Presented by Cardio Dance Party. 513-617-9498; www.cardiodanceparty.com.

Exhibits Vietnam: Our Story, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, Free for veterans from all eras and all current military personnel, $7, $6 ages 60 and up, $4 ages 3-17. 859-491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

Health / Wellness Living Optimally with Advanced Dementia, 2 p.m.-4 p.m. 6:30 p.m.-8:30 p.m., Boone County Cooperative Extension Service, 6028 Camp Ernst Road, Coping strategies, common symptoms and management of Alzheimer’s disease shared as progression of disease is explored. Ages 21 and up. Free. Presented by Boone County Cooperative Extenson Service. 859-586-6101; boone.ca.uky.edu. Burlington.

Literary - Crafts Lotion-Making, 7 p.m., Florence Branch Library, 7425 U.S. 42, Start with dry ingredients and add high grade oils while using an immersion blender to whip and create your own lotion. $5. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-342-2665; www.bcpl.org. Florence.

Literary - Libraries Jessie Boone’s “Be” is among the works on display in The Carnegie’s Recognized: Contemporary Portraiture exhibition, running through May 17.THANKS TO SHANNAN BOYER

Bridge, 12:30 p.m.-3 p.m., Scheben Branch Library, 8899 U.S. 42, 859-342-2665. Union. Writers Group, 7 p.m., Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Share your

The Scheben Branch Library hosts PAWS to Read for grades K-5, 10 a.m. Saturday, April 5. Call 859-342-2665 to schedule a 15-minute time slot.FILE PHOTO work, get feedback, encouragement and perhaps even inspiration to write your masterpiece. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-3422665. Burlington. Chapter and Verse, 7 p.m. Discuss “Eli the Good” by Silar House., Scheben Branch Library, 8899 U.S. 42, 859-342-2665. Union.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 9 Education Lego Club, 3 p.m.-4 p.m., The Lively Learning Lab, 7500 Oakbrook Drive, Suite 10, Learn science with Legos. Free. 859371-5227. Florence. Vietnam: Our Story, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, Free for veterans from all eras and all current military personnel, $7, $6 ages 60 and up, $4 ages 3-17. 859-491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

Job Fairs Career Fair, 1 p.m.-4 p.m., Beckfield College, 16 Spiral Drive, Features 50 employers. Companies on campus recruiting for full-time, part-time and seasonal positions ranging from entry level to professional. Dress professionally and bring resumes. Ages 18 and up. Free. 859-371-9393; www.beckfield.edu. Florence.

Literary - Libraries Teen Cafe, 3:15 p.m.-4:45 p.m., Florence Branch Library, 7425 U.S. 42, Gaming, Internet, snacks and more. Teens. Free. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-342-2665; www.bcpl.org. Florence. Young @ Heart Book Group, 6 p.m., Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-342-2665. Burlington. Yu-gi-oh, 6:30 p.m., Scheben Branch Library, 8899 U.S. 42, Play with other local players. Bring your own deck. No trading. English cards only. 859-3422665. Union. Sensory Storytime (all ages), 6:30 p.m., Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Storytime with adjustments for sensory sensitivity and special needs. Free. Registration required. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-3422665. Burlington. Chess Club, 7 p.m., Florence Branch Library, 7425 U.S. 42, All ages and levels are invited to play. 859-342-2665. Florence. Piecemakers, 1:30 p.m., Lents Branch Library, 3215 Cougar Path, Learn basics or share expertise in quilting. Free. 859-342-2665. Hebron.

ABOUT CALENDAR To submit calendar items, go to www.NKY.com and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to life@communitypress.com along with event information. Items are printed on a space-available basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to www.NKY.com and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page. Computer & Internet Basics, 10 a.m., Florence Branch Library, 7425 U.S. 42, Learn how to use computer and surf Internet. Learn about parts of computer system, how to get online and get to websites, how to use search engines and perform keyword searching and how to set up and use an email account. Registration required. 859-3422665; www.bcpl.org. Florence. Thrillers & Chillers Book Group, 10 a.m. Discuss “Await your Reply X” by Dan Chaon., Lents Branch Library, 3215 Cougar Path, 859-342-2665; www.bcpl.org. Hebron. Bridge, 12:30 p.m.-3 p.m., Scheben Branch Library, 859-3422665. Union. Yoga, 6:15 p.m., Scheben Branch Library, 8899 U.S. 42, Class suitable for all levels. 859-3422665. Union.

FRIDAY, APRIL 11 Cooking Classes Cooking the Books, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Book: “First They Killed My Father.”, Boone County Cooperative Extension Service, 6028 Camp Ernst Road, Prepare foods inspired by monthly book selection. Ages 21 and up. Free. Registration required. Presented by Boone County Cooperative Extenson Service. 859-586-6101. Burlington.

Dining Events Fish Fry, 4 p.m.-8 p.m., Mary Queen of Heaven School, 1130 Donaldson Highway, Dine-in service, carry-out and drive-thru. Benefits Mary, Queen of Heaven School. Prices vary. Presented by Mary, Queen of Heaven Parish. 859-525-6909; www.mqhparish.com. Erlanger.

Immaculate Heart of Mary, 5876 Veterans Way, Burlington; 5-8 p.m.; dinners $7.50 and up; 859-689-5070. Burlington St. Paul Fish Fry, 5 p.m.-8 p.m., St. Paul School, 7303 Dixie Highway, Carlin Center. Weekly specials, dine in, carry out or call ahead. Fried haddock, fried cod, shrimp, crab cakes and more including pizza and mac and cheese. Benefits Saint Paul School athletic programs. Price varies. Presented by Saint Paul Boosters. 859-647-4072; www.saintpaulboosters.net. Florence. St. Barbara Fish Fry, 4:30 p.m.-8 p.m., St. Barbara Church, 4042 Turkeyfoot Road, Dine in or carry out. Fried fish, baked tilapia, shrimp and cheese pizza. Adult dinners include three sides. $8 and up. 859-371-3100. Erlanger. Fish Fry, 4 p.m.-8 p.m., Burlington Lodge No. 264, 7072 Pleasant Valley Road, Includes fish sandwich on rye or white bread, choice of fries or mac and cheese, hushpuppies and cole slaw. $9; $5 for children. Presented by Burlington Masonic Lodge #264 F&AM. 859-7463225 or 859-689-4328. Florence.

Education AARP Tax-Aide, 9 a.m., Boone County Main Library, Free. Registration required. 859-3422665; www.bcpl.org. Burlington.

Music - World The Tillers, 7 p.m., Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Free. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-3422665; www.bcpl.org. Burlington.

THURSDAY, APRIL 10 Art & Craft Classes Arts and Crafts by Defy Gravity Designs, 5:30 p.m.-6:30 p.m., The Lively Learning Lab, 7500 Oakbrook Drive, Suite 10, Make different art/craft piece every week. $5. Registration required. 859-371-5227. Florence.

Exercise Classes Sombo/Russian Judo, 6:30 p.m.-8 p.m., Hebron Lutheran Church, 3140 Limaburg Road, Downstairs. Ages 6-adult. Learn Russian art of self-defense and how to fall properly to prevent injury. Ages 6-. $85 per year. Presented by Sombo Joe. 859609-8008. Hebron.

Literary - Libraries

Paul Loehle’s “Trophy” is among the works on display in The Carnegie’s Recognized: Contemporary Portraiture exhibition, running through May 17.THANKS TO SHANNAN BOYER


LIFE

APRIL 3, 2014 • FLORENCE-UNION RECORDER • B3

Lentil and rice dish perfect for Lent

I’ve already gone through one batch of my homemade yogurt and have another batch “cultivating” on my counter. We eat yogurt year ‘round, but especially during Lent, when it tops my vegetarian lentils and rice. The yogurt recipe is too long to include here, but you’ll find it, with step-bystep photos, at Rita AbouteaHeikenfeld ting.com. RITA’S KITCHEN The recipe I’m sharing today may be an unusual recipe to some of you. Called mujadarah, it’s a dish we grew up with that evokes fond memories of my mom wrapping her jar of homemade yogurt in towels to keep it warm enough to inoculate.

Mujadarah/Lentils with rice and cumin

Go to taste on seasonings. Some people like to stir in some of the cooked onions into the lentils and rice.

3 very large yellow onions ⁄3 cup olive oil 1 cup whole brown lentils 11⁄2 cups long grain rice 5 cups water 1 to 2 teaspoons cumin Salt and pepper to taste Plain yogurt or tzatziki (cucumber and yogurt salad) Chopped greens (optional) Sprinkle of cayenne pepper (optional) 1

Slice onions and cook,

covered, over medium heat, in oil until caramelized/dark brown. You’ll start out with a lot but they will cook down considerably. What happens is the onions’ natural sugars come to the surface and create a caramelization, making them taste sweet. Combine lentils, 1 teaspoon cumin, salt and water in pan. Cover, bring to boil and cook over medium heat, covered, until lentils are half cooked, about10 minutes. Add rice and simmer, covered, until rice is cooked, about 20 minutes. Water should be absorbed but, if not, drain off. Adjust seasonings. To serve, put onions over mujadarah and garnish with yogurt and greens.

Tip from Rita’s kitchen

If using brown rice, check package directions for liquid and time needed. Lentils help lower cholesterol, stabilize blood sugar and contain protein and B vitamins.

Crockpot breakfast egg and sausage casserole No dry mustard? Leave it out. Go lightly when you sprinkle salt and pepper on. Turn this on before bed and it will be ready to eat Easter morning. I like to thaw the hash browns a bit, but the Eastern Hills reader who shared the original recipe said he “just pours them straight from the bag.” Here’s my adaptation.

Tzatziki or plain yogurt can top this spiced lentil-and-rice dish.THANKS TO RITA HEIKENFELD 2 pounds frozen shredded hash browns 1 pound sausage, cooked and crumbled 1 bunch green onions, finely sliced, both white and green parts 1 pound shredded cheese 12 eggs 1 ⁄3 cup milk 1 ⁄4 teaspoon garlic powder 1 ⁄2 teaspoon dry mustard Salt and pepper

Spray 6-quart slow cooker/crockpot. Layer 1⁄3 potatoes on bottom, sprinkle with salt and pepper and top with 1⁄3 sausage, sprinkle with salt and pep-

per, add 1⁄3 onions and cheese, sprinkle with salt and pepper. Repeat layers two more times, ending with cheese. Whisk eggs, milk, garlic powder and mustard. Cook on low 6-8 hours or high 4-5.

From readers’ kitchens

Bridgetown Finer Meats turkey salad. I enjoy chatting with Richard Hoehn and Brian Brogran about their famous turkey salad. For years, readers have asked me for a clone. And for years, I get the same answer: a chuckled

“no.” I respect that this recipe is proprietary but a while back, a reader wanted it to send to her daughter in the Navy, hoping the chef there could recreate what was her favorite turkey salad from home. Bridgetown softened up and gave me ingredients, but no amounts. They sell a whopping 300 pounds of it a week and make it several times so it’s always at the peak of freshness. I sent the information to Embeth B., who then sent it to her daughter. The reply I got was this: “With your help, a recipe for a

‘close second’ was created and our daughter in the Navy says to her ‘it tastes like something from home’!” Of course it’s not the real deal, but close enough for her daughter to enjoy a taste of the West Side a long way from home. Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator, Jungle Jim’s Eastgate culinary professional and author. Find her blog online at Abouteating.com. Email her at columns@communitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-248-7130, ext. 356.

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LIFE

B4 • FLORENCE-UNION RECORDER • APRIL 3, 2014

States investigating student loans A multi-state investigation is now underway into the practices of the student loan servicing firm SLM Corp., also known as Sallie Mae. This comes after numerous complaints have been filed with state attorneys general around the country. Complaints are coming from people like Eric Wooddell of Martinsville, Ohio. “Sallie Mae is taking money specified for certain accounts (in this case the ones with higher interest rates) and posting the money how they wish (to lower interest loans),”

Woodell wrote. Wooddell said he has recorded phone conversations with the compaHoward ny and has Ain bank stateHEY HOWARD! ments showing the problem. “Over $1,300 hasn’t even been posted to my account where I have bank records showing I paid the amount. They are blaming a system change while millions of students are being impacted and paying thousands more in

interest payments,” he said. I’ve told Wooddell, as I’m telling everyone else with such problems, to file a complaint with their state attorney general. Ohio officials there say they are not permitted to say whether they are part of the multi-state investigation being led by the Illinois Attorney General. Ohio has received 57 complaints about Sallie Mae since 2012. Nationwide, the federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau reports almost half the 3,800 student loan servicer complaints it’s received

are against Sallie Mae. It says the most common complaints concern inaccurate payment processing and an inability to modify loans. One complaint on file with the Ohio Attorney General reads, “On the 18th of January, I ‘paid off’ one of the loans, but they have no record of it! Key Bank has repeatedly sent them verification, and they refuse to acknowledge that they ‘received the electronically sent payment’! I am beyond what to do!” Another complaint filed with the Ohio Attorney General reads, “Sallie

Mae continues to change the way they have done business which changes the original agreement when the loan was made. Further investigation is needed into the Sallie Mae practices.” A spokesperson for the Illinois Attorney General said, “We’re looking into the increasing reports of abusive servicing practices involving consumers who have taken on considerable student debt loans.” Congress created the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau in 2010 as part of the Dodd-Frank law in an effort to watch

over banks and student loans. The law encourages state attorneys general to take more of an interest in complaints against student lenders. Sallie Mae is the nation’s largest student loan provider and had set aside $70 million to help resolve enforcement actions by the Department of Justice and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. Howard Ain’s column appears bi-weekly in the Community Press newspapers. He appears regularly as the Troubleshooter on WKRC-TV Local 12 News. Email him at heyhoward@local12.com.

Apples are hard to grow in your backyard

Question: What types of apples grow best here? I want to have my own little backyard orchard. Answer: An apple tree usually is one of the first fruit crops backyard fruit growers think about planting in their yard. However, they are one of the more difficult fruit crops to grow, primarily because of the wide range of pests that like them. One of the more difficult diseases for home fruit growers to combat is apple scab. This is a fungus that causes lesions on the fruit and can also defoliate the tree and kill the spurs – the structures that produce the flower buds. Some other apple diseases Kentucky fruit growers must contend with are fire blight, cedar

Mike Klahr HORTICULTURE CONCERNS

apple rust and powdery mildew. Over the past 25 years a number of disease-resistant apple varieties have been re-

leased. The following apple varieties have performed well in Kentucky and are discussed in order of ripening, from early to late. Most of these have resistance to several apple diseases. Pristine – best for applesauce; yellow fruit with a red blush. Redfree – a firm summer apple; dark red on

yellow. Liberty – crisp, juicy, yellowish flesh, tart at harvest; develops dark red stripes over a green/ yellow fruit. Spartan – a firm, McIntosh type; red fruit. Jonafree – like a Jonathan, but less acid; 90 percent red stripes. Pixie Crunch – small, sweet flavor, super crisp; deep red. Priscilla – tart, firm, crisp, juicy, small; dark red blush over yellowgreen. Enterprise – a red, spicy, crisp and finegrained apple that ripens in mid-to-late October. Enterprise has a very good disease resistance package and stores well until February. Gold Rush – a very

UPCOMING CLASSES AND EVENTS: » The View at Night, Thursday, April 10, 8-9:30 p.m., Boone County Extension Environmental & Nature Center, 9101 Camp Ernst Road, Union, Main Gate. Learn about the night sky, including constellations during this walk and talk. » Spring Woods & Wildflowers Walk, Friday, April 11, 1:30-4 p.m., Boone County Extension Environmental & Nature Center, 9101 Camp Ernst Road, Union, Main Gate.

VISIT OUR WEBSITES:

» Boone County Cooperative Extension Service: boone.ca.uky.edu » Boone County Arboretum at Central Park: www.bcarboretum.org » On Facebook: www.facebook.com/BooneHortNews » On Twitter: www.twitter.com/BooneHortNews » On Pinterest: www.Pinterest.com/BooneHortNews

crisp, firm, tart, yellow apple that ripens in midto-late October. It sweetens up in storage and is one of the best storing apples available, keeping up to eight months. Sundance – a firm, yellow apple which is more difficult to find. It is very resistant to

all four of the early season problem diseases and ripens in mid-October. Since these apples are disease resistant, many novice growers mistakenly believe they don’t need to spray them. Unfortunately, these varieties don’t have any insect resistance. Attempting to grow ap-

ples without spraying for plum curculio, codling moth, rosy apple aphid and scale can cause major crop losses, if not complete crop loss, depending on the season. The most important sprays for apple varieties are the early ones, the dormant oil, pin, petal fall and first-cover sprays. The publication, Disease and Insect Control Programs for Homegrown Fruit in Kentucky with Organic Alternatives (ID-21), provides descriptions of these varieties and spray recommendations. For more information, and to win free vegetable seeds for your garden, go to www.facebook.com/ BooneHortNews or contact your local County Cooperative Extension Service. Mike Klahr is the Boone County extension agent for horticulture.

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LIFE

APRIL 3, 2014 • FLORENCE-UNION RECORDER • B5

Purple Heart memorial dedication April 12 The dedication of the Purple Heart Memorial has been rescheduled for 4 p.m. Saturday, April 12, at the Veteran’s Memorial. The dedication was previously scheduled in December, but had to cancel because of inclement weather. An interesting program is planned that you won’t want to miss. ■ The annual Easter Egg Hunt will happen beginning at noon Saturday, April 12. There will be activities and contests for kids 10 years old and under. ■ You might want to mark your calendars for

the annual Clean Up Week beginning Monday, April 28, through Sunday, May 4. Ruth There will Meadows be the regWALTON NEWS ular pickups and dumpsters at the Public Works Department at 11 High School Court. Just in time for spring cleaning. ■ Walton Verona Middle School has four boys wrestling on team Kentucky. Braden Mulcahy, Mason Smith, Blake Roth

and Jaydon Streine will be wrestling along with some of the best talent in the state in middle school and youth national duals tournament in Council Bluffs, Iowa, on Saturday and Sunday, April 12, and 13. ■ Walton Homemakers met at the home of Mary Lou Hampton with 12 members present. Devotion was given by Dorothy Beighle. Vonnie Walker presented a home cure for sore throat. Mary Lou Hampton, Grace Kroniez and Sandy Orchelle shared how much they enjoyed working with 4H kids making meatloaf and biscuits. Sylvia Toole and

Grace Kroniez gave a report on the history of quilts, why they matter and how they have changed through the years. The next meeting will be Friday, April 11. If anyone would like to enjoy the friendships and the exchange of ideas, please call 859-586-6101 for more information. ■ Fifteen CSX retirees met at Family’s Main Street Restaurant last Tuesday. These Over the Hill Gang as they call themselves meet twice a month at Family’s to reminisce and get caught up with all their activities. ■

We are glad to report that Jack Rouse is feeling much better and appreciates his visitors since moving to Jewel’s Nursing Home in Williamstown. ■ Anna Mae Simpson (Pete) has been suffering with some back problems recently. Hope for a quick recovery. And Hope Glenn is scheduled to come home on Saturday after being in St. Elizabeth-Edgewood this week. She had been suffering from a viral infection. ■ We were saddened to hear of the passing of

Mary, Queen of Heaven School

Stephenson Mill offers fresh take ascalf@communitypress.com

WALTON — Jordan Stephenson is putting a lot on his plate. The 28-year-old lifelong Kenton County resident is starting a new restaurant featuring fresh, locally-sourced, organic ingredients in a location known as much for its illicit history as its good food. Stephenson Mill Tavern and Grill, at 14042 Dixie Highway, was called the Woodland Inn in the 1940s, and then-owner Glenn “Bulldog” Wright” boasted the area’s best prime rib while rumors lingered about illegal gambling and a brothel operating out of the rural eatery. “I remember coming here with my dad, Jimmy Ray,” said Stephenson. “We’d ride here in his ‘72 GMC truck, and we’d get two shrimp cocktails each. They cost $7.50 for five jumbo shrimp.” He’s considering naming the shrimp cocktail for his dad, or maybe bar manager Rachel Isaacs will craft a signature cocktail in his honor. Isaacs won 2012’s Not Your Pink Drink contest from the Bourbon Women Association with her bourbon-based orange-flavored martini, Not Your Subourbon Housewife. She will be crafting more exclusive beverages cleverly named to highlight the restaurant’s history, which includes more of Stephenson’s family history. “Beth Turner and Jimmy Ray Stephenson, those lovebirds, met out here in the spring of 1982. This is the place where people meet,” said Stephenson. “I want to bring it back to its legendary status. It doesn’t need to be another roadside hole-in-the-wall. It can be a classy place

...Embracing a “Higher” Education

nix Farm in Morning View, and he’ll get cheese from Ed-Mar Dairy, both are about six miles away.

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Richard Lee Hudson. Officer Hudson served in the city of Walton Police Department in late 19801990s. Services were at Allison-Rose Funeral Home on March 22. Interment was at Highland Cemetery. Our sincere condolences to his wife Carol and family. Also, sympathy is extended to the family of Doris Eisenschmidt. Services were held on Tuesday at Chamber and Grubbs Funeral Home. ■ Happy Birthday to Mary Ruth Glacken on Friday, April 4, and Peggy Gray on Saturday, April 5.

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Tune-Up SPECIAL Owner Jordan Stephenson and Bar Manager Rachel Isaacs toast with her award-winning bourbon cocktail for the opening of Stephenson Mill Tavern and Grill in Walton on Wednesday, March 26. AMY SCALF/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

where people can hold wedding receptions or special dinners.” Stephenson plans a casual family-friendly menu that features all-natural hot dogs for the kids as well as sustainablyfarmed pasture-raised chicken and local produce their parents can feel good about. “I’ve read about chick-

en wings being shipped to China to get broken down, then shipped back here. How does that even work? I want people to feel really confident about the meats we serve here,” said Stephenson. Many of the farms providing ingredients are nearby. Stephenson’s poultry producer is Rising Phoe-

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Want to Stay Busy Year Round? Tired of Chasing Jobs? Qualified contractors get the opportunity to bid weekly on pre-screened, third-party paid-for jobs. The contractors who will be allowed to bid on these jobs are restricted to a small number (see below). The NKCAC Weatherization program is seeking Weatherization Private Contractors for Heat Systems and Hot Water repairs or replacements and Energy Conservation installation. Applicants must have proficient carpentry and energy conservation material skills, and/or HVAC and Plumbing Licensure as well as communication skills with clients. Applicants must comply with current codebooks and State Weatherization manuals.. Must be willing to travel and work throughout an 8 county designated service area in Northern Kentucky. Certificates of Insurance for General Liability and Comprehensive Coverage should meet minimum $800,000. Master HVAC minimum Certificates of Insurance required in amount of $500,000 for general liability and $300,000 for property damage. An orientation meeting is mandatory and can be scheduled upon receipt of application.

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LIFE

B6 • FLORENCE-UNION RECORDER • APRIL 3, 2014

Extension celebrating 100 years Kentucky Cooperative Extension is celebrating its 100 year anniversary this year. The Smith-Lever Act of1914 codified into federal law and provided funding for outreach endeavor at the land-grant universities. The act was designed to expand the vocational, agricultural, and home demonstration programs in rural America. The act was unique in that it set up a shared partnership among the federal, state and county levels of government. Kentucky extension began with county agents in several counties in the

commonwealth. Records from 1918 for one of the first county agents, H.D. CauDiane dill, Mason showed he EXTENSION traveled NOTES 1,362 miles by rail and 975 miles on horseback to serve his Letcher County clients. Caudill was actually an agent for six years before the Smith-Lever Act was passed in 1914. By 1917 Kentucky had 4-H in 42 counties with

more than 3,800 youth enrolled. 4-H youth at that time were growing better pigs and corn, and canning in tin cans. Between 1914 and 1920 the first home demonstration agents, 17 in all, were hired by the University of Kentucky. In the 1920s home demonstration clubs were established. Kentucky had more than 370 clubs with over 4,000 members. While America was experiencing the Great Depression, Kentucky Cooperative Extension was providing practical and useful information on food production, preser-

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was introduced into Kentucky in the 1960s. The technique is still used today. The U.S. Congress also funded the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) to provide nutrition information to low-income families. The program continues in Kentucky today. In the 1970s a single farmer produced enough food to feed himself and 57 others. Extension played a big role in the development of better quality cattle and Kentucky’s beef production became a major agricultural operation in the state. More than 156,000 youth were enrolled in 4-H in the 1970s. 4-H programming expanded into urban locations and focused on energy conservation and citizenship. Farmers and others were affected by the economic crisis in the 1980s. Cooperative Extension

developed programs to help farmers manage stress and family life. In the 1990s home economics was changed to Family and Consumer Sciences. In Kentucky, the extension service adopted new vision and mission statements. In addition, the Master Volunteer in Clothing Construction program was born. Since 2000 Kentucky extension has continued its grassroots focus. In keeping up with the changing times, 4-H has introduced more projects related to science, engineering and technology. Agriculture has helped tobacco farmers transition to new income streams. Through the years cooperative extension has worked to improve the lives of residents. Diane Mason is county extension agent for family and consumer sciences in the Boone County.

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vation, and storage. By the end of the 1930s every county in the commonwealth had 4-H clubs. In the 1940 agriculture and home demonstration agents carried out the “Live-at-Home” campaign. Families agreed to produce 75 percent of their own food supply. 4-H members grew Victory Gardens in this decade. Agriculture in the 1950s in Kentucky saw rapid expansion of the dairy industry. Cooperative extension was there to provide researchbased support. 4-H Camps were developed and the Kentucky Extension Homemaker organization had more than 33,000 members. No-till corn production

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LIFE

APRIL 3, 2014 • FLORENCE-UNION RECORDER • B7

DEATHS Raymond Ashcraft Sr. Raymond Harold Ashcraft Sr., 92, of Florence, formerly of Covington, died March 18, at the Bridgepoint Care Center in Florence. He was an Army veteran of World War II, retired boiler operator for International Fruit Co. of Cincinnati and H.H. Meyer Packing Co. of Cincinnati, member of Bethlehem Baptist Church in Holbrook, Ky., and enjoyed riding his Harley and Honda Hawk motorcycles to Indianapolis on Saturdays, playing his guitar at the Gay 90s Restaurant in Boone County, and fishing and hunting. His son, William Ashcraft, died previously. Survivors include his wife, Helen F. Sparks Ashcraft; sons, Dennis Ashcraft of Price Hill, Ohio, and Raymond H. Ashcraft Jr. of Bright, Ind.; daughter, Joyce Ashcraft Lester of Lawrenceburg, Ind.; six grandchildren and 15 great-grandchildren. Interment with military honors was at Floral Hills Memorial Gardens in Taylor Mill.

Geraldine Berry Geraldine K. Berry, 79, of Glencoe, died March 21, in Edgewood. She attended Oakland Baptist Church and enjoyed crafting. Survivors include her husband, Oliver Berry of Glencoe; son, Rick Turner of Ohio; daughters, Sandra Turner and Kathy Freyler, both of Erlanger, Jerri Clayton of Burlington, and Mary Jane Turner of Dearborn, Ind.; 18 grandchildren and 24 greatgrandchildren. Interment was at Bullittsburg Baptist Cemetery.

Mary Chambers Mary Kathryn Chambers, 100, died March 22. She was a musician, played piano and organ at various churches in Northern Kentucky, was a piano teacher for more than 30 years, and 30-year member of First Church of Christ, where she was a Bible teacher for 20 years. Her husband, Eugene Chambers; daughter, Joann Chambers; and grandson, Mark Platt, died previously. Survivors include her daughters, Jeanne Chambers of Florence, and Nancye Platt of Walton; two grandchildren, five great-grandchildren and two great-great-grandchildren. Interment was at Highland Cemetery in Fort Mitchell. Memorials: First Church of Christ, 6080 Camp Ernst Road, Burlington, KY 41005.

Charles Chittum Jr. Charles Frank Chittum Jr., 71, of Covington, died March 20, at his son’s residence in Florence. He was a retired fork-lift driver for Duro Bag Co. in Covington, member of St. John the Evangelist Church, and Army veteran of the Vietnam War. His brothers, John, Robert and Bernard Chittum; and grandson, Dustin Johnson, died previously. Survivors include his wife, Frances Marie Adams Chittum of Covington; son, Franklin Wade Chittum of Florence; daughter,

ABOUT OBITUARIES For the most up-to-date Northern Kentucky obituaries, click on the “Obituaries” link at cincinnati.com/northernkentucky. Funeral homes may submit basic obituary information to bwalpole@communitypress.com. To publish a larger memorial tribute, call 513-242-4000 for pricing details.

Melissa Lynn Chittum-King of Covington; brother, Steve Chittum of Latonia; sister, Janet Niess of Valparaiso, Ind.; five grandchildren and one greatgrandson. Military honors and burial was at St. John Cemetery in Fort Mitchell.

Emma Dowell Emma Elizabeth Dowell, 87, of Hebron, died March 20. She was a member of Elsmere Baptist Church, and retired sales clerk for Pogue’s. Her husband, Victor Dowell, died previously. Survivors include her sons, Adrian Dowell of Independence, and Gentry Dowell of Burlington; daughter, Alma R. Kirk of Hebron; sister, Geroline Tingle of Georgetown; brothers, Joe Vance of Newtown, Ohio, Jimmy Vance of Corinth, Dan Vance of Winchester, Donnie Vance of Georgetown, and Glen Vance of Corinth; 10 grandchildren, 19 great-grandchildren and one great-great-grandchild. Burial was at Corinth Cemetery. Memorials: United Christian Volunteer Ministry, 15 Kenton St., Elsmere, KY 41018.

Doris Eisenschmidt Doris Janet McNeely Eisenschmidt, 83, of Walton, died March 21, at St. Elizabeth Hospice in Edgewood. She was a retired bookkeeper for Dixie State Bank in Walton, member of Walton Christian Church, member of the Air Stream Travel Club, past president of the Walton Verona PTA, and enjoyed Swedish weaving, spending winters in Florida, and spending time with her family. Her daughter, Anita Portwood, died previously. Survivors include her husband, Robert Charles Eisenschmidt; daughter, Sharon Gadd; son, Blake Eisenschmidt; six grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. Interment was at Spring Grove Cemetery. Memorials: American Cancer Society; or American Heart Association; or St. Jude’s; or Salvation Army.

Patricia Fleckenstein Patricia “Pat” Fleckenstein, 71, of Crestview Hills, died March 26, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. She worked as a registered medical assistant with Patient’s First in Union. Her husband, Les Fleckenstein, died previously. Survivors include her sons, Scott Fleckenstein of Burlington, and Brian Fleckenstein of Crestview Hills; brothers, Jerry Clenney of Covington, Ty Clenney of Scottsville Ky., and Chris Clenney of Covington; and two grandchildren.

Memorials: American Cancer Society, 297 Buttermilk Pike, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017; or American Heart Association, 5211 Madison Road, Cincinnati, OH 45227.

James Meier James L. Meier, 73, of Florence, died March 23, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. He was a retired mechanic with CG&E in Cincinnati, and loved sports, especially the Cincinnati Reds and horse racing. His son, Gregory Meier; brother, Daniel Meier; and sister, Peggy Meier, died previously. Survivors include his daughter, Patricia Brock of Erlanger; son, James “Jim” Meier of Florence; brother, Larry Meier of Elsmere; sister, Nancy Meier of Florence; five grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Interment was at St. Mary’s Cemetery in Fort Mitchell.

George Renaker

M. Brent Rouse

George A. Renaker, 80, of Florence, died March 19. He was a Navy veteran, member of Mary, Queen of Heaven Church, director of board for Fifth Third Bank, and professor emeritus at the University of Cincinnati Medicine. He practiced medicine for more than 44 years, performing more than 40,000 surgeries, enjoyed collecting cars, traveling with his family, and restoring classic vehicles. His legacy continues through the Dr. George A. and Dolores E. Renaker Charitable Foundation, established in 1998, to help advance medicine through scholarship and medical-equipment-and-hardware endowments, as well as aiding less fortunate youth in the community. His wife, Dolores E. Renaker, and son, David Renaker, died previously. Survivors include his daughters, Stephanie Renaker-Jansen, Dolores Pitts and Linda Deglow; sons, George A. Renaker Jr. and John Renaker; sister, Jeanine Godsey; brother, Jim Bennett; 15 grandchildren and four greatgrandchildren. Memorials: Dr. George A. and Dolores E. Renaker Charitable Foundation, 1334 Boone Aire Road, Florence, KY 41042.

M. Brent Rouse, 74, of Hebron, died March 18, at Florence Park Care Center. He was a member of Immaculate Heart of Mary Church, a retired accountant, an Army Reserves veteran, a Kentucky Colonel, and an avid golfer, runner, cyclist and blood donor. His twin brother, Jack Rouse, died previously. Survivors include his wife, Judith of Hebron; son, Jack Rouse of Amelia, Ohio; daughter, Lisa Steimer of Hebron; and brother, Tom Rouse of Greensboro, Ga.; and three granddaughters. Memorials: Brent Rouse Scholarship Fund, care of St. Henry District High School, 3755 Scheben Drive, Erlanger, KY 41018.

Anita Setters Anita M. Setters, 55, of Melbourne, died March 22, in Newport. She was a data transcriber with the IRS in Covington, a graduate of OLP in Newport, and loved boating, yard work and spending time with her granddaughter. Her parents, Roland and Mary Louise O’Connor Lemberg, died previously. Survivors include her daugh-

ter, Jamie Setters of Florence; son, Jason Setters of Fort Mitchell; sister, Patricia Francis of Newport; brothers, Kenneth Lemberg of Florence, Charles Lemberg of Fort Thomas, Michael Lemberg of Anderson Township, Ohio, Robert Lemberg of Melbourne, and John Lemberg of Independence; and granddaughter, Isabelle Rae Ellis. Burial was at St. Stephen Cemetery in Fort Thomas. Memorials: St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, 501 St. Jude Place, Memphis, TN 38105.

Jason Nolan Jason Andrew Nolan, 21, of Portsmouth, N.H., formerly of Florence, died March 9. He was an IT security analyst with Liberty Mutual Insurance Co., a 2010 graduate of Boone County High School, and a 2013 graduate of RIT. Survivors include his parents, Chuck and Pam Nolan; brother, Scotty Nolan; paternal grandparents, Glenn and Wonda Hammons; maternal grandparents, David and Vonda Metcalf; and many friends and family members. Burial was at Hopeful Lutheran Cemetery in Florence.

See DEATHS, Page B8

Phyllis Parsons Phyllis Nadine Parsons, 71, of Brooksville, Ky., died March 23, at Hospice of Hope in Maysville. She was retired as a tax examiner for the IRS for 20-plus years. Her husband, Giles Carter Parsons; and brothers, Donald Eugene Perkins and Larry Dean Lucas, died previously. Survivors include her children, Debbie Parsons Colemire of Foster, Regina Parsons Orcutt of Dayton, Ky., Linda Parsons Govan of Latonia, and Jason Louis Parsons of Brooksville; sisters, Anna Katherine Perkins of Covington, Karen Lucas Arrowood of Florence, Lisa Lucas Stamper of Crescent Springs, and Lori Lucas Young of Latonia; brothers, Arthur Junnie Lucas of Covington, and Gary Allen Lucas of Sebring, Fla.; 13 grandchildren and 22 great-grandchildren. Burial was at Johns Hills Cemetery.

Ralph Prabel Ralph L. Prabel, 89, of Burlington, formerly of Hebron, died March 20, at Mountain Crest Rehabilitation Center in Cincinnati. He was a retired baggage handler for American Airlines, associate for MiddendorfBullock Funeral Homes, an Army veteran of World War II, serving in Normandy and Omaha Beach, and was a member of First Church of Christ in Burlington, Scottish Rite and Hebron Masonic Lodge No. 757. His wife, Norma McGlasson Prabel, died previously. Survivors include his daughter, Peggy L. Prabel of Burlington. Interment was at Hebron Lutheran Cemetery. Memorials: Alzheimer’s Association, 644 Linn St., Suite 1026, Cincinnati, OH 45203.

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LIFE

B8 • FLORENCE-UNION RECORDER • APRIL 3, 2014

Take in a fish fry

DEATHS Continued from Page B7

Lenten season means fish-fry season, and plenty of local organizations are serving up Friday feasts: » Beechwood High School, 54 Beechwood Road, Fort Mitchell; 57:30 p.m. Drive-thru fish fry. Benefits Beechwood Band Boosters. $7 meals. 859-620-6317. » Bellevue vets fish fry, 24 Fairfield Ave., Bellevue 5-8 p.m. Nonsmoking seating area in main hall. Dinners $7.50$4.50. Carry out available. 859-431-0045. » Burlington Lodge No. 264, 7072 Pleasant Valley Road, Florence; 4-8 p.m. $9; $5 for children. 859-746-3225 or 859-6894328. » Dixie Heights High School, 3010 Dixie Highway, Edgewood; 4-7:30 p.m. Drive-thru fish fry; benefits Dixie Heights High School’s music programs. 859-802-8575; www.eyeswithpride.net. » Edgewood Fire/EMS Fish Fry, Edgewood Senior Center, 550 Freedom Park Drive, Edgewood; 5-8 p.m. $6.50-$7.25. 859331-5910; www.edgewoodky.gov. » Fort Thomas Masonic Lodge No. 808, 37 N. Fort Thomas Ave., Fort Thomas; 4-8 p.m. $7 dinner, $1 sandwich. 859-4411280. » Fort Wright Civic Club, 115 Kennedy Road, Fort Wright; 5-8 p.m.; 859331-1150. » Holy Cross High School, 3617 Church St., Alumni Hall, Covington; 5-8 p.m. 859-431-1335; www.hchscov.com. » Immaculate Heart of

Clyde Steckel Clyde Morton Steckel, 90, died March 13, in Tulsa, Okla. He was born in Covington, lived in N. Ky. until moving to Tulsa two years ago, was an active member of Erlanger United Methodist Church, where he was a recipient of the church’s highest honor, the Mayo Taylor Award, and was president of the Methodist Men for five years. Survivors include his wife, Betty of Tulsa; daughters, Sue Steckel of Florence, Debbie Martin of Tehachapi, Calif., and Sandy Graham of Wickenburg, Ariz.; son, Terry Steckel of John’s Island, S.C.; eight grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. Memorials: Dementia Research; or Erlanger United Methodist Church.

Margaret Wissman

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Margaret J. “Peggy” Wissman, 77, of Lakeside Park, died March 24, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. She was an elementary teacher at Blessed Sacrament where she taught the fifth and sixth grades for 17 years and was a member of Blessed Sacrament Church. Survivors include her husband, Jim Wissman of Lakeside Park; sons, Jeffrey Wissman of Crestview Hills, and Jerome Wissman of Hebron; daughters, Jeanne Wissman of Lakeside Park, Janet Piccirillo of Crestview Hills, Jennifer Geers of Batesville, Ind., and Joanne Glass of Villa Hills; brother, David Hagedorn of Florence; and 16 grandchildren. Burial will be at St. Mary Cemetery in Fort Mitchell.

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Mary, 5876 Veterans Way, Burlington; 5-8 p.m.; dinners $7.50 and up; 859689-5070. » Mary Queen of Heaven School, 1130 Donaldson Highway, Erlanger; 4-8 p.m. 859-525-6909; www.mqhparish.com. » Prince of Peace School, 625 W. Pike St., Covington; 4-7 p.m. 859-4315153; www.popcov.com. » St. Barbara Church, 4042 Turkeyfoot Road, Erlanger; 4:30-8 p.m. $8 and up. 859-371-3100. » St. Bernard Church, 401 Berry St., Dayton; 5-7 p.m. 859-640-0026; www.saint-bernard.org. » St. Catherine of Siena Church, 1803 N. Fort Thomas Ave., Fort Thomas; 5-7 p.m. $7 dinner, $2 and up for a la carte items. 859-653-7573; www.stcatherineofsiena.org. » St. Joseph Church – Camp Springs, 6833 Four Mile Road, Camp Springs; 4-7:30 p.m. $8.50 and up for set-ups, $6.50 sandwiches. 859-635-5652. » St. Patrick Church – Taylor Mill, 3285 Mills Road, Taylor Mill; 4:307:30 p.m. $8.50-$9.50. 859356-5151. » St. Paul School, 7303 Dixie Highway, Carlin Center, 5-8 p.m. Benefits St. Paul athletic programs. 859-647-4072; www.saintpaulboosters.net. » St. Thomas School, 428 S. Fort Thomas Ave., Fort Thomas; 4-8 p.m. $4.50-$6.50. 859-572-4641, ext. 242. If your fish fry is not listed, send the information to memral@communitypress.com.

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• 42", 46", 50" heavy-duty stamped decks deliver the beautiful results of the Cub Cadet Signature Cut™ • Available 54" fabricated deck features exclusive tunnel design for the best-in-class cut and durability

SERIES 1000

STARTING AT:

2,69999*

$

ONLY AT YOUR CUB CADET DEALER

ONLY AT YOUR

LTX KW LAWN TRACTORS

SERIES 1000

LTX KW LAWN TRACTORS • Premium features only available at your dealer including: 18 HP† – 23 HP† professional-grade Kawasaki® engines, durable front bumper and comfortable, high-back seat • Enjoy the beautiful Cub Cadet Signature Cut from 42" – 50" heavy duty mowing decks • Ultra-tight 12" turning radius for superior maneuverability around obstacles STARTING AT:

1,69999*

$

CUB CADET DEALER

• Premium features only available at your dealer including: 18 HP† – 23 HP† professional-grade Kawasaki engines; durable front bumper; comfortable, high-back seat • Enjoy the beautiful Cub Cadet Signature Cut™ from 42" – 50" heavy duty mowing decks • Ultra-tight 12" turning radius for superior maneuverability around obstacles ®

STARTING AT: $

1,69999*

*Price shown for LTX KW reflects $100 Offer.

SIGNATURE CUT SERIES™

WALK-BEHIND MOWERS

• Mow at your own speed with new MySpeed™ variable drive system (excluding SC 100)

SMART FACTORY FINANCING AVAILABLE. 2

AVAILABLE ON SELECT MODELS FOR QUALIFIED CUSTOMERS.

• Front caster wheels allow zero-turn maneuverability and have exclusive locking ability for straight-line mowing (select models) • Beautiful results of the Cub Cadet Signature Cut • SureStart Guarantee® ensures your mower will start in 1 - 2 pulls

STARTING AT:

36999*

$

SC 100 — SALE PRICE $24999*

YOUR INDEPENDENT DEALER—EXPERT SERVICE. LOCALLY OWNED.

THE ADVICE, SELECTION AND SUPPORT YOU NEED TO FIND THE RIGHT FIT IS AT YOUR LOCAL CUB CADET DEALER.

SALE PRICE:

1,69999*

$

Pleasant Valley Outdoor Power 8625 Haines Drive • Florence, KY 41042

SALE PRICE:

1,89999*

$

859-384-3263

www.pvopower.com (1) Subject to credit approval on a Cub Cadet credit card account. Not all customers qualify. Additional terms may apply. Please see your local Cub Cadet dealer for details. * Product Price — Actual retail prices are set by dealer and may vary. Taxes, freight, setup and handling charges may be additional and may vary. Models subject to limited availability. † As rated by Kawasaki, horsepower tested in accordance with SAE J1995 and rated in accordance with SAE J2723 and certified by SAE International Specifications and programs are subject to change without notice. Images may not reflect dealer inventory and/or unit specifications. The Best Buy Seal and other licensed materials are registered certification marks and trademarks of Consumers Digest Communications, LLC, used under license. For award information, visit ConsumersDigest.com. © 2014 Cub Cadet 2014 _FULL_LINE_F_REV CE-0000589200

SALE PRICE:

2,09999*

$

(1) Cub Cadet Days $100 Toward Purchase Price of LTX KW Lawn Tractors is $100 toward the regular purchase price of the LTX 1042 KW, LTX 1046 KW, and LTX 1050 KW Lawn Tractors. Offer valid between 3/15/2014 – 6/15/2014. (2) Subject to credit approval on a Cub Cadet credit card account. Not all customers qualify. Additional terms may apply. Please see your local Cub Cadet dealer for details. * Product Price — Actual retail prices are set by dealer and may vary. Taxes, freight, setup and handling charges may be additional and may vary. Models subject to limited availability. † As rated by Kawasaki, horsepower tested in accordance with SAE J1995 and rated in accordance with SAE J2723 and certified by SAE International Specifications and programs are subject to change without notice. Images may not reflect dealer inventory and/or unit specifications. © 2014 Cub Cadet 2014_CCDays_$100_OFFER_S1000_2x7

cubcadet.com


cubcadet.com

S2

UNHEARD-OF PERFORMANCE. INTRODUCING THE LATEST IN A LINE OF AWARD-WINNING ZERO-TURN RIDING MOWERS FROM CUB CADET.

RZT S ZERO

RZT ZT S SERIES ®

ELECTRIC ZERO-TURN RIDER WITH STEERING WHEEL CONTROL AND FOUR-WHEEL STEERING

FOUR-WHEEL STEER ZERO-TURN RIDERS • Only Cub Cadet delivers true zero-turn capability with steering wheel control and four-wheel steering for superior handling on varied terrain, including hills • 42", 46", 50" heavy-duty stamped decks deliver the beautiful results of the Cub Cadet Signature Cut™ • Available 54" fabricated deck features exclusive tunnel design for the best-in-class cut and durability

0% INTEREST FINANCING 24 MOS1

$

*WITH EQUAL MONTHLY PAYMENTS OF

113/MONTH

NEW FOR 2014

• With zero engine noise, zero belts and zero filters, it’s what you don’t get that’s most valuable • 42" deck delivers the beautiful Cub Cadet Signature Cut • Incredible maneuverability and stability on hills — and anywhere else

0% INTEREST FINANCING 36 MOS1

1

*WITH EQUAL MONTHLY PAYMENTS OF

$

112/MONTH

1

0% INTEREST FINANCING FOR UP TO 54 MONTHS WITH EQUAL PAYMENTS. 1

AVAILABLE ON SELECT MODELS TO QUALIFIED CUSTOMERS. NEW FOR 2014

RZT L SERIES

TANK SZ SERIES ERIES

TANK™ L SERIES

ZERO-TURN RIDERS

COMMERCIAL ZERO-TURN RIDERS

COMMERCIAL ZERO-TURN RIDERS

• Most legroom in its class and adjustable lap bars with full-length comfort grips deliver an exceptionally comfortable experience • 42", 46", 50" heavy-duty stamped decks deliver the beautiful results of the Cub Cadet Signature Cut • Available 54" fabricated deck features exclusive tunnel design for the best-in-class cut and durability

• Commercial-grade Kohler® Command ® or Kawasaki® FX Series engines • 48", 54" or 60" heavy-duty, fabricated mowing decks deliver the beautiful Cub Cadet Signature Cut • Electronically applied dual-layer corrosion coating provides twice the protection against unforgiving environmental conditions • Industry-leading, heavy-duty commercial-grade steel frame absorbs the stress of hours of operation over rough terrain

• Only Cub Cadet has zero-turn maneuverability with revolutionary power steering, steering wheel control and four-wheel steering for unrivaled stability and precision control on difficult terrain • Kawasaki FX Series commercial-grade engine delivers higher horsepower and maximum torque for enhanced performance • 54" or 60" fabricated sloped-nose mowing decks are built with superior commercial-grade components to deliver the beautiful Cub Cadet Signature Cut

0% INTEREST FINANCING 36 MOS1

$

89/MONTH

1

STARTING AT: 2,499 $

99*

0% INTEREST FINANCING 48 MONTHS1

$

136/MONTH

0% INTEREST FINANCING 54 MONTHS1

1

STARTING AT: 6,499 $

99*

COMMERCIAL ZERO-TURN RIDER with steering wheel

COMMERCIAL ZERO-TURN RIDER

COMMERCIAL ZERO-TURN RIDER 0% INTEREST FINANCING

• 48” heavy-duty, triple-blade, sloped-nose fabricated deck *WITH EQUAL MONTHLY PAYMENTS OF • Hydro-Gear charged ZT-3100 charged transmission MONTH1 STARTING AT: $4,99999* • Twin 2.8 gallon fuel tanks (5.6 gallon total)

$105/

1

STARTING AT: $10,49999*

Z-FORCE® SZ 60

Z-FORCE® LZ 60

Z-FORCE® LZ 48

195/MONTH

*WITH EQUAL MONTHLY PAYMENTS OF

*WITH EQUAL MONTHLY PAYMENTS OF

*WITH EQUAL MONTHLY PAYMENTS OF

$

• 60” heavy-duty, triple-blade, sloped-nose, fabricated deck • Hydro-Gear charged ZT-3100 transmission • Twin 2.8 gallon fuel tanks (5.6 gallon total)

0% INTEREST FINANCING *WITH EQUAL MONTHLY PAYMENTS OF

$125/MONTH

1

STARTING AT: $5,99999*

• 60” heavy-duty, triple-blade, sloped-nose, fabricated deck • Steering wheel control and four-wheel steering • Hydro-Gear charged ZT-3100 transmission

0% INTEREST FINANCING *WITH EQUAL MONTHLY PAYMENTS OF

$136/MONTH

1

STARTING AT: $6,49999*

YOUR INDEPENDENT DEALER—EXPERT SERVICE. LOCALLY OWNED.

THE ADVICE, SELECTION AND SUPPORT YOU NEED TO FIND THE RIGHT FIT IS AT YOUR LOCAL CUB CADET DEALER.

Pleasant Valley Outdoor Power 8625 Haines Drive • Florence, KY 41042 859-384-3263 • www.pvopower.com

(1) 0% Interest for up to 54 months with equal payments: a minimum purchase amount is required as follows: $1,500 on the 24 month promotion; $3,000 on the 36 month promotion; $3,500 on the 48 month promotion available on garden tractors, all residential z-force l/lz and z-force sz residential models, commercial zero-turn riders and utility vehicles; $5,500 on the 54 month promotion available on commercial tank lz/sz series. During the 24, 36, 48 or 54 month promotional period a minimum monthly payment is required that is calculated by dividing the purchase amount by the length of the promotional period. The promotional period will start on the date of purchase. Interest will not accrue during the promotional period. If the purchase amount, plus any applicable fees or charges is not paid in full by the end of the promotional period, interest will be charged at the apr for purchases on any remaining balances until paid in full. The current apr for purchases is variable 27.99%. If any required minimum payment is 60 days past due, the penalty apr, currently variable 29.99% Will apply to remaining balances. Minimum interest charge $2.00. A promotional fee will apply to the purchases as follows: for the 24 month promotion - $39 on purchases less than $2,500 and $125 for purchases $2,500 and greater; for the 36 month promotion - $125; for the 48 month promotion - $125; for the 54 month promotion - $125. Offer subject to credit approval on your cub cadet credit card account. Offer valid only during promotional period from 1/1/14 through 7/31/2014. This offer may not be available through all cub cadet dealers. Other financing options are available. See a participating cub cadet dealer for details. (2) A minimum purchase amount of $3,500 is required. During the 48 month promotional period a minimum monthly payment is required that is calculated by dividing the purchase amount by the length of the promotional period. The promotional period will start on the date of purchase. Interest will not accrue during the promotional period. If the purchase amount, plus any applicable fees or charges is not paid in full by the end of the promotional period, interest will be charged at the apr for purchases on any remaining balances until paid in full. The current apr for purchases is variable 27.99%. If any required minimum payment is 60 days past due, the penalty apr, currently variable 29.99% Will apply to remaining balances. Minimum Interest charge $2.00. A one-time promotional fee of $125 will be applied to the account for this transaction. Offer subject to credit approval on a cub cadet credit card account. Offer valid on garden tractors, commercial zero turns, z-force and utility vehicles over $3,500. * Product price — actual retail prices are set by dealer and may vary. Taxes, freight, setup and handling charges may be additional and may vary. Models subject to limited availability. Cub cadet commercial products are intended for professional use. Specifications and programs are subject to change without notice. Images may not reflect dealer inventory and/or unit specifications. Estimated monthly payment is calculated by dividing the assumed total purchase amount by the length of the promotional term and rounding up to the next dollar amount. Calculation assumes the purchase amount is paid in full within the promotional period. Actual payment may differ from estimated monthly payment. Sales tax and other fees are not included in the purchase price and may affect monthly payment amount. © 2014 Cub cadet 2014_zero_f


ONLY AT YOUR

T1 T3

CUB CADET DEALER

SERIES 2000

GTX GARDEN TRACTORS

ONE TEST DRIVE IS ALL IT TAKES.

• Fingertip control with Electronic Power Steering provides maneuverability and a more enjoyable ride (GTX 2000 and GTX 2154 only) • Legendary Cub Cadet shaft drive means no Deck sold separately — Starting at $500* belts to the drive system to slip, stretch or break, for maximum power and STARTING AT: performance $ 3,99999* • Variety of mowing decks from 42” to 54,” stamped and fabricated, deliver the Cub GTX 2154 SHOWN 99 STARTING AT $5,499 * Cadet Signature Cut

SERIES 1000

LGTX LAWN AND GARDEN TRACTORS

SERIES 1000 • Test drives on incredible zero-turn riders and lawn tractors

ELECTRONIC • Electronic Power Steering and ultra-tight WITH POWER STEERING turning radius make mowing a breeze • 50" or 54" heavy-duty mowing decks deliver the beautiful Cub Cadet Signature Cut • Fully welded steel frame backed by a STARTING AT: five-year** warranty means peace of mind $ 99* 2,699 while you’re enjoying a little mow therapy

• Expert service and advice

RZT ® S SERIES

• Don’t miss out on this exciting opportunity!

RZT S SERIES FOUR-WHEEL STEER ZERO-TURN RIDERS

FREE GIFT

*

Bring this ticket to the Cub Cadet Test Drive Experience for a free giveaway just for joining the fun.

*One per person, while supplies last. Must present ad to receive offer. Offer subject to change or cancellation without notice. Participating locations only. See dealer for complete details and restrictions.

• Only Cub Cadet has Synchro Steer® technology — true zero-turn capability with steering wheel control and four-wheel steering for superior handling on varied terrain, including hills • 42", 46", 50" heavy-duty stamped decks deliver the beautiful Cub Cadet Signature Cut STARTING AT: • Available 54" fabricated deck has exclusive $ tunnel design for the best-in-class cut 2,69999* and durability

SMART FACTORY FINANCING AVAILABLE. 1

AVAILABLE ON SELECT MODELS TO QUALIFIED CUSTOMERS.

STOP IN TO TAKE A TEST DRIVE AND PROVE TO YOURSELF WHY CUB CADET IS THE SMARTEST CHOICE.

GET THE SIGNATURE CUT THAT’S BACKED BY SIGNATURE SERVICE.

Pleasant Valley Outdoor Power 8625 Haines Drive • Florence, KY 41042 859-384-3263 • www.pvopower.com

(1) Subject to credit approval on a Cub Cadet credit card account. Not all customers qualify. Additional terms may apply. Please see your local Cub Cadet dealer for details. * Product Price — Actual retail prices are set by dealer and may vary. Taxes, freight, setup and handling charges may be additional and may vary. Models subject to limited availability. ** See your local dealer for limited warranty details and information. Certain restrictions apply. † As rated by Kawasaki, horsepower tested in accordance with SAE J1995 and rated in accordance with SAE J2723 and certified by SAE International. Specifications and programs are subject to change without notice. Images may not reflect dealer inventory and/or unit specifications. © 2014 Cub Cadet 2014_TDE_EVENT_COUPON_H

cubcadet.com


T4 T2

Stop In And Se eO

u

Reduced Pricer s On Our 2013 Models

RT 65

SC 500 hw

SC 100

• 13" dual-direction rotating tines • 18" tilling width • 16" pneumatic, ag tread wheels

• SureStart Guarantee® ensures easy starting in 1-2 pulls • 21" Cub Cadet Signature Cut™ deck • Dual-lever, 6-position deck height adjustment

• SureStart Guarantee® ensures easy starting in 1-2 pulls • 21" Cub Cadet Signature Cut™ • Dual-lever, 6-position deck height adjustment

SELF-PROPELLED WALK-BEHIND MOWER

REAR-TINE TILLER

STARTING AT:

79999*

STARTING AT:

STARTING AT:

$

$

36999*

$

TACKLE ANY CHALLENGE.

PUSH WALK-BEHIND MOWER

EFFORTLESS ZERO-TURN CONTROL GIVES YOU UNMATCHED MANEUVERABILITY TO TAKE ON ANY YARD.

24999*

THE VERSATILITY TO DO IT ALL. THE RELIABILITY OF A DEALER YOU TRUST.

YOUR INDEPENDENT DEALER—EXPERT SERVICE. LOCALLY OWNED. THE ADVICE, SELECTION AND SUPPORT YOU NEED TO FIND THE RIGHT FIT IS AT YOUR LOCAL CUB CADET DEALER.

Pleasant Valley Outdoor Power 8625 Haines Drive • Florence, KY 41042 859-384-3263 • www.pvopower.com

(1) FINANCING AVAILABLE TO QUALIFIED BUYERS. NOT ALL BUYERS QUALIFY. MINIMUM PURCHASE PRICE REQUIREMENT APPLIES. SEE STORE OR CUBCADET.COM FOR IMPORTANT DETAILS. MINIMUM MONTHLY PAYMENTS REQUIRED. TRANSACTION FINANCE CHARGES MAY APPLY. SEE YOUR CUB CADET RETAILER FOR DETAILS OR GO TO CUBCADET.COM FOR FULL DISCLOSURE. FINANCING SUBJECT TO TD BANK, N.A. APPROVAL. PROGRAMS SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE. * Product Price — Actual retail prices are set by dealer and may vary. Taxes, freight, setup and handling charges may be additional and may vary. Models subject to limited availability. **See your local dealer for limited warranty details and information. Certain restrictions apply. † as rated by engine manufacturer Specifications and programs are subject to change without notice. Images may not reflect dealer inventory and/or unit specifications. © 2014 Cub Cadet 3PV_F

CE-0000589203


Florence recorder 040314