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Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Elsmere and Erlanger kynews@communitypress.com T h u r s d a y, D e c e m b e r 1 7 , 2 0 0 9

Bethany Hanser, owner of the Motherhood Express, shows a blouse to new mothers.

Volume 13 Issue 37 © 2009 The Community Recorder ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Share holiday photos

’Tis the season for hanging lights and gathering with friends and family to celebrate the holidays. Share your holiday party and Christmas light photos at NKY.com/Share to spread the cheer in your community. We’ll publish your pictures online and your photo may even appear in your local newspaper. Log on to start sharing today.

Giving

Howell Elementary students are amassing a number of items to donate to the United Christian Volunteers basked in Elsmere. They hope to make spirits bright and help those in need this holiday season by collecting canned goods and other items for the seasonal food drive. And if all goes well the school hopes the event delivers a valuable lesson on giving and one that may be repeated in the spring if UCV needs the helping hands. SCHOOLS, A4

A healthy holiday

Read tips and tricks for trying to keep those few extra pounds off as we enter the home stretch of the holiday season. Area experts give tips on what to do when visiting others’ homes. LIFE, B1

Hoops on tap

The Northern Exposure Classic girls’ basketball tournament will return to Northern Kentucky again this year. Boone County and Notre Dame will host the event, which has eight girls’ basketball teams, four Northern Kentucky teams and four visitors. The event will be Dec. 19-22. SPORTS, A7

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B E C A U S E C O M M U N I T Y M AT T E R S

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Assistant to be compensated By Jason Brubaker jbrubaker@nky.com

The Elsmere city council has voted to give Ray Erpenbeck $1,500 for his work as an administrative assistant to Mayor Billy Bradford. Erpenbeck, the city engineer, was given the temporary role in late July to help Bradford, who was battling health issues at the time. At the time of the appointment, Bradford said Erpenbeck would serve as a “second set of eyes” for him in helping to conduct the city’s business. Per the order, the position expires Dec. 31. “I can’t think of a better person than Ray to do this,” said Bradford at the time. “I know he’s got the best interests of the city in mind.” During the appointment, which occurred by an executive order, Bradford said that Erpenbeck would not be compensated for the role, although a section of the executive order did allow for the possibility of a compensation to be decided on by the council. However, at the Dec. 8 meeting, Bradford recommended to council that Erpenbeck be paid $1,500 for his role, saying that he went above and beyond during his time as the assistant. “I don’t know if I would have gotten through this without his help, and I certainly appreciate it,” said Bradford. “He did a terrific job.” Council members Gloria Grubbs and Marty Lenhof agreed, although they questioned whether Erpenbeck should be compensated after Bradford initially said there would be no pay for the position. “I think we all know Ray does a terrific job, and we’re certainly glad he was able to step to the plate,” said Lenhof. “I just think that any level of pay should have been stipulated in the original agreement, rather than waiting until the last minute.” However, council member Kama Greene said that since Erpenbeck was willing to lend an extra hand, she had no problem voting to approve the compensation.

Jingle bells

JASON BRUBAKER/STAFF

Miles Elementary kindergartner Alex Kemper helps classmate Libby Gulick adjust her bell before a holiday concert on Dec. 14. As part of their "Pizza With Santa" program, the kindergartners fashioned their own reindeer antlers and performed songs for the parents.

District sets 2010-11 schedule By Jason Brubaker jbrubaker@nky.com

Following their recent trend of early starts with a longer fall break, the Erlanger-Elsmere School Board has set the 2010-11 school calendar. The board approved the calendar at their Dec. 10 meeting, leaning on advice from student representative Alex Drifmeyer, a senior at Lloyd High School. “It used to be a big deal to start classes early, but now we’re used to it, so it’s not a big deal,” said Drifmeyer, when asked about the schedule options. “I think we’d rather start early and have a long fall break than just start later and have no days off.”

The schedule calls for the first day of classes to be Monday, Aug. 16, with the first semester ending on Dec. 22 for the holiday break. In between, the students will have a one-week fall break Oct. 48, as well as a three-day Thanksgiving break Nov. 24-26. Students will also be off on Labor Day on Sept. 6, as well as Nov. 1-2 for Election Day. The spring semester will start on Jan. 3, and is scheduled to be completed May 25, with six days built in after that for possible makeup days. Students will be off on Jan. 17 for Martin Luther King Day, Feb. 21 for Presidents’ Day, and spring break will be April 4-8. The schedule also includes a

tentative list of the Early Release Days during the school year, although Superintendent Kathy Burkhardt said those could be changed as needed. “We always try to keep them as they’re listed so people can plan ahead, but there is always a chance there might be a slight change,” she explained. The current schedule calls for Early Release Days on Aug. 27, Sept. 17. Oct. 22, Nov. 12, Dec. 3, Jan. 7, Jan. 21, Feb. 4, Feb. 18, March 4, March 18 and April 15. Students will be released at 12:55 p.m. on these days. For more information about the schedule, visit the school’s Web site at www.erlanger.k12.ky.us or call 727-2009.

Fort Mitchell billboard attracts attention By Jason Brubaker jbrubaker@nky.com

The debate over Beechwood Independent School District potentially placing billboards on its property to generate extra revenue will continue into next year, with several council members knowing their decision could set a precedent for the area. “I think the entire county is watching us, and possibly the state as well,” said Fort Mitchell councilman David Stoeckle at the Dec. 7 meeting. “This is obviously very important to our city, and we need to realize the impact our decision could have.” The school district’s board presented the idea to the Fort Mitchell city council about six weeks ago, needing the city to apply for a text amendment to change their zoning ordinances. The council has

been researching the issue and getting feedback from residents, but has yet to reach a decision. The next regularly scheduled meeting will be Jan. 4. “If this drags out until May, I’m OK with that, as long as it helps us to make the best decision for the entire city,” said councilman Bill Reis. Among those who have spoke out against the billboards are Crestview Hills Mayor Paul Meier and Crescent Springs Mayor Jim Collett, who have both attended recent meetings to voice their opinions. Both were also among the 11 mayors in the Mayors’ Group of Kenton County who signed a resolution on Nov. 21 that asked the Fort Mitchell council to drop consideration of the idea. “You’ve established standards in your city that say you value aesthetic value over commercial

value,” said Collett. “I think this would put the city on a slippery slope.” School board President Michael Dammert disagreed that the aesthetics of the I-75 corridor would be vastly affected. “When we drive by now, we see signs for the NKAPC and a $36-a-night hotel, so what aesthetics are we talking about? ” he questioned. “I’m not saying that these billboards will be aesthetically beautiful, but it’s all in the eye of the beholder.” Dammert also said the revenue generated would allow the district to give Fort Mitchell residents some tax relief. “This isn’t being done to hurt the citizens of Fort Mitchell- it’s just the business of the school district,” he said. “We’re trying to run the school as well as we can and not put more on the backs of tax-

payers than we have to.” Dammert also agreed with Stoeckle that the ultimate decision could set a precedent for the area. “I know a lot of cities are anxiously waiting to see what happens,” he said. “This is going to be a discussion all up and down the highway, and it’s not an issue that’s going to go away.” Stoeckle said the council won’t rush to any decisions, and is welcoming feedback from residents. “I’ve received more correspondence about this issue than any other issue since I’ve been on council,” said David Stoeckle. “This is obviously very important, and I think a lot of people are watching to see how we deal with this.” The next meeting will be Jan. 4 at 7 p.m. in the council chambers. For more information, contact the city at 331-1212.


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Erlanger Recorder

News

December 17, 2009

Booth retirees help Salvation Army By Patricia A. Scheyer Community Recorder Contributor

A group of retired employees of the old Booth Hospital gave back to the organization that employed them years ago by donating $1,056 to the Salvation Army’s Christmas effort. Booth Hospital, which is

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Salvation Army Captain Heather Holt tells the Booth Elite group how appreciated the $1,056 that they just donated is, and where it will go. Standing is Jean Niehaus and seated is Major Margaret Bennett. $1,000 for the Salvation Army,” Salvation Army Major Margaret Bennett said proudly. “Last year we raised $800 for the Salvation Army’s Christmas effort, and this year we were able to raise much more.” The group formed about 10 years ago, when Jean Niehaus, a retired nurse and supervisor, organized a small lunch with other nurses in an effort to stay in touch. That lunch grew into an idea to have a group of former employees of Booth Hospital meet every three months so that they can catch up on what was going on in everybody’s life. “At the December meeting, we wanted to do something else, something special,” said Niehaus. “We talked about an ornament exchange, but we all agreed that at our stage of life we had enough Christmas decorations. Someone suggested adopting a family, and then another suggestion came to give money to the Salvation Army, and every-

one agreed.” The amount of money has grown each year. The amount suggested is $10 per person, but most of the members give more because it is such a good cause. “The Salvation Army did so much for us,” said Gloria Beck, one of the original seven nurses who started the group. “They are still doing so much for people, all year round, and especially at Christmas, for all three counties of Northern Kentucky. Our group is made up of people who grew together like a family at a hospital run by the Salvation Army.” Heather Holt was on hand to receive the donation, along with Margaret Bennett, and they praised the Booth Elite for its generosity. Holt said the organization has received requests for food from more than 600 families, and for toys for over 1,500 children, so that is where the money will go. “We are real proud of our organization,” Niehaus said. “It’s a good feeling to do for others.”

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PROVIDED

Holiday cheer

Jessica Le pets the horse before her carriage ride at the Erlanger Library where she had her picture made with Santa and received a gift, drank hot chocolate, ate cookies and made a Christmas ornament.

BRIEFLY Concert

ERLANGER – The Miles Elementary 4th and 5th graders will put on a Holiday Concert on Dec. 17 at the Dietz Auditorium. The concert will begin at 7 p.m. For more information, contact the school at 7272231.

Lights Up Elsmere

ELSMERE - The annual Lights Up Elsmere contest judging will take place on Friday, Dec. 18. That night, residents are encouraged to have their holiday decorations lit and running as soon as it begins get-

RECORDER

Find news and information from your community on the Web Elsmere – nky.com/elsmere Erlanger – nky.com/erlanger Kenton County – nky.com/kentoncounty News Brian Mains | Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1062 | bmains@nky.com Jason Brubaker | Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1060 | jbrubaker@nky.com Regan Coomer | Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1061 | rcoomer@nky.com Melanie Laughman | Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . 513-248-7118 | mlaughman@nky.com James Weber | Sports Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1054 | jweber@nky.com Advertising Debbie Maggard | Advertising Manager. . . . . . 578-5501 | dmaggard@nky.com Deb Kaya | Account Rep . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-5507 | dkaya@nky.com Delivery For customer service. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 781-4421 Sharon Schachleiter | Circulation Manager . . 442-3464 | sschachleiter@nky.com Cathy Kellerman | District Manager . . . . . . . . 442-3461 | ckellerman@nky.com Classified To place a Classified ad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283-7290 | www.communityclassified.com To place an ad in Community Classified, call 283-7290.

ting dark outside, as judges will be out around the city to look at the lights. Winners will be announced the following week. For more information, contact the city at 342-7911.

Library

ERLANGER – The Erlanger Branch of the Kenton County Public Library will host a special candy-making class on Dec. 18 for teens. The class, which will run from 6 p.m.-8 p.m., will teach participants how to make chocolate candies for the holiday. The class is free, and is intended for children ages 12-17. For more information, or to register, call 962-4000 or visit www.kentonlibrary.org.

Holiday break

ERLANGER The Erlanger-Elsmere School District will close for the winter break on Dec. 23. Students will resume classes again on Jan. 4. For more information, contact your child’s school.

Index

Calendar ......................................B2 Chatroom...................................A10 Classifieds.....................................C Obituaries....................................B6 Police...........................................B7 Schools........................................A4 Sports ..........................................A5 Viewpoints ..................................A7

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December 17, 2009

Erlanger Recorder

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SCHOOLS A4

Erlanger Recorder

December 17, 2009

ACHIEVEMENTS

Editor Brian Mains | bmains@nky.com | 578-1062

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NEWS

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JASON BRUBAKER/STAFF

Howell kids in the mood for giving

jbrubaker@nky.com

Howell Elementary first-grader Tiara Martin is matter-of-fact when asked why she has donated so many items to the school’s food drive. “It goes to help people out who need it,” she said, one day after bringing in 20 food items. “We’ve got extra stuff, so we want to make sure everyone has something.” Martin is just one of the many students participating in the annual drive, which collects items for the pantry at United Christian Volunteers, an Elsmere-based center that assists low-income families

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HONORS

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Public to vote in slogan contest

Students from Howell Elementary organize some of the goods they've donated for their annual food drive. The items will all eventually be given to United Christian Volunteers.

By Jason Brubaker

ACTIVITIES

with basic needs, including food and clothing. Each day, the students are encouraged to bring in some items to place in large boxes in their classroom, or throughout the school. The food drive will run through Dec. 18, by which point Principal Eric Saylor said he hopes the boxes will be overflowing with donated items. Last year, Saylor said the school was able to donate around 40 large-sized boxes filled with various canned goods and food packages. “With the economy the way it is, I think [UCV] is getting more and more people, so we’re just trying to help them as much as we

can,” he said. “It’s always good to be able to help out in our community.” Saylor said the school would also consider holding another food drive in the spring if necessary to help out UCV, and also continue to teach their students the importance of giving, and not just around the holidays. Third-grader Dalyn Ray said he enjoys taking part in the food drive, knowing that he can help out less fortunate people. “There’s a lot of people out there who don’t have a lot of food or any food,” he said. “So it’s good to be able to give something to them so they can have a good holiday too.”

The public now has the chance to select their favorite voting slogan to be used in the upcoming 2010 election cycle. Students across Kentucky have submitted potential voting slogans as part of the Office of the Secretary of State Voter Slogan and Essay Contest sponsored by the Kentucky Education Association, KEA Retired and the University of Kentucky Scripps Howard First Amendment Center. To vote for your favorite, visit: www.sos.ky.gov/sloganpoll by Jan. 29, 2010. “Our sponsors and teachers across the commonwealth have allowed thousands of Kentucky students to become further engaged in important civic discussions via this outstanding contest,” said Secretary of State Trey Grayson. “I encourage all Kentuckians to support these young people by voting for your favorite slogan. We look forward to using the 2010 slogan to help market the 2010 elections!” Although this is the 20th year of the contest, this is the first time that citizens will be able to vote for the winners online. In previous years, various civics groups were judges for the contest. The slogans were narrowed down to the top 20 choices and are displayed without the name of the submitting student in order to have votes cast on the merit of the slogan. The decision is an important one not only because the slogan will be seen on election materials across Kentucky but because it

carries prizes of up to a $1,000 U.S. Savings Bond for winning slogans. The contest was open to Kentucky sixth- through eighthgraders. “In order for students to become more engaged in our society and eventually become active citizens, we must take civic education directly into the classroom. Activities such as the Voter Slogan and Essay Contests allow teachers to bring civics education to life while allowing them to focus on the current Core Content required by the Kentucky Department of Education,” Grayson said. The slogan contest is part of the Civic Literacy Initiative of Kentucky and is required under Kentucky statute. CLIK is a multiyear effort that will determine a strategy for enhancing long-term civic engagement and civic literacy within the commonwealth. As part of that effort, CLIK released a report, Rediscovering Democracy: An Agenda for Action, that calls upon the state to take tangible steps to increase civic literacy. The report, which details four principle recommendations and scores of additional recommendations, was developed from the work of the Kentucky Workgroup on Civic Literacy and the CLIK. For more information about CLIK or to find out how to get your school, organization or family involved in any civic activities taking place across Kentucky, please visit: www.civics.ky.gov.

Holiday Cheer

PROVIDED

Kendall Wulfeck from Crestview Hills performs with the Pom Team during the Notre Dame Academy and Covington Catholic Christmas concert.

Turkey Foot students ask us to buckle up, drive smart By Regan Coomer rcoomer@nky.com

PROVIDED

Turkey Foot Middle School’s Justice for All Club members worked with the state transportation cabinet to install a “Drive Smart, Buckle Up TMS” and “Drive Smart, Buckle Up JDPVS” signs at the new Turkey Foot Middle School and the J.D. Patton Area Technology Center. Pictured are club sponsor and School Resource Officer Terry Chinn with Justice for All members.

Turkey Foot Middle School’s Justice for All Club want parents, faculty and their peers to snap their seat belts while riding in the car. The 20-member law enforcement education club was the impetus behind the installation of two signs reminding drivers and passengers to buckle up. The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet put up “Drive Smart, Buckle Up TMS” and “Drive Smart, Buckle Up JDPVS” signs at the exit of the new Turkey Foot Middle School and exit of the J.D. Patton Area Technology Center. “They took it upon themselves to press for the seat belt signs,” said School Resource Officer and club advisor Terry Chinn, explaining they had seen similar signs at Dixie Heights High School. Students began the process of

getting signs for their school by the students once the signs were conducting a seat belt survey on up. “It meant a lot to them to see their campus. The club counted the state putting those signs up.” Chinn said the students will and recorded whether people were conduct another wearing seat belts seat belt survey as they were Students began the process after the first of coming into school. of getting signs for their the year. Turkey Foot Justice for All school by conducting a seat seventh grader found 224 James A. Caywood stubelt survey on their Allison Hughes the signs dents, faculty, campus. The club counted hopes serve as a parents and careand recorded whether reminder for givers were wearing their seat people were wearing seat drivers and pasbelts while 26 belts as they were coming sengers. “Citizens were not. into school. would pass the At Turkey sign and be like, Foot, 241 people ‘Oh, I forgot my were wearing seat belts and 29 were not. Patton had seat belt,’ or ‘They’re totally the most people not wearing seat right,” and they might just think belts at 82; 255 faculty, parents about it,” she said. “Even if some people won’t and students were wearing seat look at it, some people will and belts. “They felt like they were mak- take it as a good think and just ing some headway,” Chinn said of buckle up their seat belt.”


SPORTS BRIEFLY

This week in basketball

• Simon Kenton High School boys beat Dixie Heights 78-70, Dec. 4. Sorrell was Simon Kenton’s highscorer with 20 points, including one three-pointer. Simon’s Chambers scored eight points, including one three-pointer; Reilly scored two; Basham scored 18, including four three-pointers; Bishop scored six; Mulberry scored one and Sampson scored nine, including one three-pointer. • St. Henry High School boys beat Covington Catholic 59-54, Dec. 4. Brian Carroll was St. Henry’s top-scorer with 16 points. St. Henry’s Ryan Anderson scored 11 points, including one threepointer; Zach Barnett scored eight, including two threepointers; Danny Seifried scored six; Ben Bessler scored seven; Alex Thorburn scored four; Will Gulla scored four and Louie Tobergte scored one three-pointer. • St. Henry girls beat Dayton High School 71-36, Dec. 4. Lauren Spencer was St. Henry’s high-scorer with 18 points. St. Henry’s Shannon O’Daniel scored 15 points, including four three-pointers; Annie Fugate scored seven, including one three-pointer; Jill Bauer scored two; Taylor Gamm scored 13; Abby Janszen scored 10; Jen Hoff scored two and Jessica Knaley scored four. • Simon Kenton girls beat Grant County High School 5824, Dec. 4. Sydni Wainscott was Simon’s top-scorer with 16 points, including two three-pointers. Aris Kuntz scored four points; Ali Ponzer scored one three-pointer; Hannah Stephenson scored eight, including two threepointers; Tessa Orr scored nine; Nikki Brown scored 10, including one three-pointer; Kayla Blevins scored four and Hurt scored two. • Lloyd High School girls beat Newport High School 4137, Dec. 4. B. Sharbono was Lloyd’s top-scorer with 15 points, including two threepointers. Lloyd’s Rudd scored 13 points, including one three-pointer; Stagge scored two points; Cheatum scored two; Mesolagbe scored five and Fulmer scored four. • Scott High School boys beat Louisville Male 64-55, Dec. 5. Jacob Niederegger scored 22 points, making him the high-scorer for Scott. Scott’s Cameron Haynes scored seven points, including one three-pointer; Kellen Smith scored 13, including one three-pointer; Daniel O’Conner scored four; Keylo Jones scored 16, including one three-pointer and Nick Farris scored two. • St. Henry girls beat Lloyd High School 71-20, Dec. 5. Abby Janszen was St. Henry’s high-scorer with 16 points. St. Henry’s Shannon O’Daniel scored two points, Fugate scored two, Jill Bauer scored two, Taylor Gamm scored 12, Carly McArtor scored 14, Jen Hoff scored two, Katie Hahnel scored two, Lauren Spencer scored 12 and Jessica Knaley scored seven. • Simon-Kenton girls beat Clark County High School 5348, Dec. 5. Sydni Wainscott was Simon’s top-scorer with 18 points, including three 3pointers. Simon’s Aris Kuntz scored six points, including one three-pointer; Ali Ponzer scored five; Hannah Stephenson scored six, including one three-pointer; Kristen Pace scored two; Nikki Brown scored 12 and Kayla Blevins scored four.

Erlanger Recorder

December 17, 2009

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | Editor Melanie Laughman | mlaughman@communitypress.com | 513-248-7118

RECREATIONAL

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Kenton returns several state qualifiers

By James Weber jweber@nky.com

Here is a look at swimming programs of interest in Kenton County, based on questionnaires received:

Covington Catholic

Richard Dickmann returns for his second year as Covington Catholic High School head coach. He directed the Colonels to second place in the state meet last season. The Colonels lost some key heavyweights from that team, including Nick Kunkel, Zane Rowland, Matt Molony and Michael Walsh. That includes three of the four members of the state champion 400 freestyle relay team. Rowland and Kunkel combined for three individual runnerup finishes. Returning starters include Robby Walsh, Brian Baxter, Hunter Pasek, Sam Mullen, Kevin Tillman & Diver Sam Hehman. Walsh, a senior, was on the state champion relay squad. Baxter was on the state runnerup 200 free relay team. Max Williamson and diver Derek Manis are the top newcomers early in the year. While some of the Colonels are year-round swimmers with the Northern Kentucky Clippers, many are not, and Dickmann said their performance is important tot he team’s depth and chances for another regional title. “This year we will continue what we started last year in building the team from the bottom up,” he said. “A group of non-year round swimmers working hard and improving tremendously. We will count on these swimmers to provide points in the regional championship to win and swim fast enough to get to the state championship. Beechwood and

FILE PHOTO

Sophomore Caitlyn Forman is one of Notre Dame’s top swimmers. Dixie will be strong competition in the region this year.”

Dixie Heights

The Dixie Heights High School Colonels’ top swimmers are senior Norman Klein, junior Spencer Franzoi, sophomore Evan Dulaney and sophomore Cole Garriott. The quartet was 12th in the 200 medley relay at state and 14th in the 400 free relay. Klein medalled in the 100 butterfly, finishing sixth at state. Garriott was sixth in the 500 freestyle. The group also qualified individually in several other events. The team was 15th at state.

Holmes

Holmes returns one senior in Nicole Winkler. Head coach Deborah

Winkler said the Bulldogs are a very young team and is looking forward to watching them grow this season.

Notre Dame

The Pandas are going for their 12th straight conference and regional titles this year. They were third at state last year. Junior Ellen Williamson was the state champion in the 100 fly last season and runner-up in the 100 back, an event in which she is world-ranked. Senior captain Tully Bradford was sixth in the 100 free at state last year. Senior captain Hannah Pohlabeln was 12th in state diving. Sophomore Caitlyn Forman was third in the 100 back. Sophomore Carly Scheper was fifth in diving at state. Top newcomers, according to head coach Emily

Maier, are Emily Koors, Molly Hinken, Addy Frey, Julia Johnson and Mackenzie Margroum. “We have speed at all grade levels, which is nice for our incoming freshmen to have great role models and for the freshmen to bring excitement for some of our veterans,” Maier said. “I’m looking forward to racing hard in our relays this season. We have the depth to stand out in the region and the state levels.”

Scott

Scott won the Dixie Heights/Simon Kenton Sprint Invitational, beating 14 other teams. Scott sophomore Tyler Groneck won the 100-yard individual medley (58.03) and the 100-yard breaststroke (1:03.03). Scott junior Ethan Reynolds also won two races, the 50-yard freestyle (23.18) and the 50-yard backstroke (29.01). Groneck and Reynolds

qualified for multiple events at state last year. The girls’ team graduated standout Jackie Sherrard. Scott was fourth in the combined standings at the regional meet last year.

Villa Madonna

Villa Madonna has a young team this year with only one returning swimmer, Kim Yocom, who participated at last year’s regionals. VMA lost state qualifier Katie Kurzendoerfer to graduation. She is continuing her swimming career at Centre College. New head coach Scott Vennefron said the team is young and mostly inexperienced, but has doubled its roster from last year. Vennefron said freshman Jacob VonHandorf is an accomplished breaststroker who has the potential to place well at the regional meet next February.

Boone, NDA to host hoops tourney Dec. 19 By James Weber jweber@nky.com

The Northern Exposure Classic girls’ basketball tournament will return to Northern Kentucky again this year. Boone County and Notre Dame will host the event, which has eight girls’ basketball teams, four Northern Kentucky teams and four visitors. The event will be Dec. 19-22. The host teams will be in the field, as will Holy Cross and Simon Kenton, the two-time defending Eighth Region champion. Princeton, No. 8 in the Cincinnati Enquirer coaches’ poll in Division I, will come across the river to participate. Downstate schools arriving are Warren

Central (Bowling Green), Muhlenberg County (Greenville) and Lafayette (Lexington). Muhlenberg County consolidated its North and South constituencies into one high school this year. Head coach Mike Harper led Muhlenberg North to the Region 3 final last year. MC is ranked third in Region 3 in preseason polls. Lafayette is coming off a 20-9 season and is ranked fifth in the 11th Region. Warren Central was 916 last year and was ranked eighth in Region 4 in the preseason.

The schedule:

Saturday, Dec. 19 (at Boone): 2 p.m., Muhlenberg Co. vs. Lafayette; 3:45 p.m., Princeton vs. Warren

Central; 5:30 p.m., Notre Dame vs. Simon Kenton; 7:15 p.m., Boone Co. vs. Holy Cross. Sunday, Dec. 20 (at NDA): 2 p.m., Holy Cross vs. Princeton; 3:45 p.m., Boone Co. vs. Warren Central; 5:30 p.m., Simon Kenton vs. Lafayette; 7:15 p.m., NDA vs. Muhlenberg Co. Monday, Dec. 21 (at NDA): 2 p.m., Boone Co. vs. Princeton; 3:45 p.m., SK vs. Muhlenberg Co.; 5:30 p.m., Holy Cross vs. Warren Central; 7:15 p.m., NDA vs. Lafayette. Tuesday, Dec. 22 (at Boone): 2 p.m., Seventhplace game; 3:45 p.m., Fifth-place game; 5:30 p.m., Third-place game: 7:15 p.m., championship game.

JIM OWENS/CONTRIBUTOR

Breaking the press

Simon Kenton’s Jared Swanson dribbles his way out of Colerain’s press in the Dec. 13 game between the Colerain Cardinals and the Simon Kenton Pioneers in the Bluegrass-Buckeye Holiday Classic at NKU’s Bank Of Kentucky Center. Simon Kenton lost to the Cardinals 68-47.

share stories. swap advice. make friends. where Cincy moms meet


A6

Erlanger Recorder

Sports & recreation

December 17, 2009

High school Heisman honorees named

SIDELINES Holiday soccer camp

The second annual OSYSA Soccer Unlimited Winter Holiday Camp is from 10 a.m. to noon, Tuesday and Wednesday, Dec. 22 and 23, at Pleasure Isle, Covington. Cost per participant is $60, with a 10 percent discount offered to families with more than one athlete attending. Bring a ball. The camp is open to boys and girls ages 5 to 15. There is a maximum of 20 participants. Register through www.osysa.com/camps.

By James Weber jweber@nky.com

Lily Rodgers of Covington Latin was named a Kentucky state finalist in the Wendy’s High School Heisman contest. The Heisman is awarded in conjunction with the college football

Heisman Trophy Dec. 12. The award is open to high school seniors who participate in athletics. Students are judged based on their academic achievements, community service involvement, and athletic accomplishments. Rodgers was one of 10 female finalists for the overall Kentucky

state winner. The Kentucky state winner was eligible for the national finals. Several area athletes were named as school winners. They are: Notre Dame: Amy Beischel. Covington Latin: Andrew Merkle, Lily Rodgers. Calvary Christian: Michelson

Boys’ soccer winners announced

Fast pitch softball sign-ups

The Northern Kentucky Bandits Fastpitch Softball Organization is currently conducting tryouts for the 2010 summer softball season. The organization is seeking players for the following ages: 10 (born after Jan. 1999), 12 born after Jan. 1997), 14 (born after Jan. 1995) and 16 (born after Jan. 1993). For tryout information, e-mail nkybandits@yahoo.com, or visit www.leaguelineup.com.

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Ryle defeated Holy Cross 2-1 in the junior varsity regional boys soccer final this year. All-tournament team (locals): Dixie Heights – Corey Nighswander. Cov. Latin – Dan Hopkins. Simon Kenton – Tyler Smith, Mitchell O'Hara. St. Henry – Jonathan Rolfsen, Shaun Cawley. Scott – Pauly Paganetto, Josh Schneider. CovCath – Peter Craig, David Moser, Nick Weber. Holy Cross – Jeff Guidugli, Ricky Pangallo,

On Sept. 19, Notre Dame Academy JV golf team competes in the Lady Cat Classic at Kincaid Lake State Park. The Pandas played well and finished third for the team. Individually, Kelly Kleier finished fourth overall and was low Panda with a 45, followed by Nicole Vollman and Jillian Grosser with 53s. The rest of the Pandas played well on a tough, hilly track. The team finished their season at 4-2 with a victory over Villa Madonna Sept. 18 at World of Sports. Medalist was Kelly Kleier with a 37. Pictured are Hayley Berling, Nicole Vollman, Megan McNulty, Kelly Kleier, Jillian Grosser, Nicole Volpenhein and Coach Kevin Sesher. Not pictured are Rachel Curtin, Addy Frey, Megan Ginter, Madison Moore, Claire Reinert and Kiersten Sesher.

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12 points, including one three-pointer. Simon’s Aris Kuntz scored four points; Ali Ponzer scored eight, including two three-pointers; Hannah Stephenson scored 11, including three 3-pointers; Nikki Brown scored 10 points, including two three-pointers and Kayla Blevins scored two points. • Simon Kenton boys beat Grant County High School 8156, Dec. 11. Casey Sorrell was Simon’s top-scorer with 17 points. Simon’s Zach Carroll scored three points; Cody Chambers scored nine; Andrew Sampson scored seven, including one threepointer; Matt Reilly scored one three-pointer; Nick Gray scored 16, including two three-pointers; Jared Swanson scored two; Matt Basham scored eight, including one three-pointer; Zach Bishop scored six; D.J. Rabe scored six; Ryan Mullen scored two and Jr. Doss scored two. • St. Henry High School girls beat Holy Cross High School 54-47, Dec. 11. Taylor Gamm was St. Henry’s topscorer with 15 points. St. Henry’s Shannon O’Daniel scored eight points, including two three-pointers; Annie Fugate scored four; Abby Janszen scored 14; Jen Hoff scored six; Katie Hahnel scored two; Lauren Spencer scored three and Jessica Knaley scored two.


VIEWPOINTS

EDITORIALS

This letter concerns the Beechwood School Board’s application to the city of Fort Mitchell for a text amendment that would allow two 14 feet by 48 feet billboards some 20 feet in the hair on the Beechwood property. One faces Interstate 75 and the other the exit at Fort Mitchell. A thir one would be on the backside of the one facing the football field. This issue is before the Fort Mitchell city council because the Area Planning Commission turned it down without city approval. Again, I voice my disapproval of allowing any type of billboard in the city of Fort Mitchell. This community does not deserve billboards on the entrance to our city. We do not deserve doing something that will make the neighboring cities, who do not

allow billboards, to see us move away from the over 30 year-long held position of mayors of all these cities. Do our citizens realize that only a few of us wrote or spoke at council meetings the last few months? Please write a letter, send an email, or speak to your elected council member. Members who can vote on this are: Vicki Boerger, Mary L. Burns, Bill Reis, David Stoeckle, Will Terwort, Christopher Wiest, and Dennis Zahler. At the last council meeting, some members felt like they needed more input. Please share your thoughts with them or ocme to the council meeting the first Monday of January, Jan. 4 at 7 p.m. M. Diane Becker Floral Ave., Fort Mitchell

CHATROOM

Next question:

President Obama has called up 30,000 additional troops to Afghanistan. Would you support a “war tax” to pay for this deployment? “We don’t need a ‘war tax.’ Defending our country from invaders domestic and foreign is one of the few things that our taxes that we already send in bulk to Washington is supposed to be used for! According to our Constitution, our federal government should NOT be dabbling in education, health insurance or businesses. All those things, and most of what D.C. now does, are supposed to be powers left to the state and local governments or the private sector. Why don’t we send representatives and senators that will say ‘no’ to all the pork and unconstitutional use of our tax money and use it for the few things it is supposed to be used for?” J.K.T. “Absolutely not! The federal budget was increased exponentially during the last year. Take a look especially at the budget of the EPA. It was increased by a crazy amount, all based on the lie of global warming. We should just go back to the budget levels of last year, and that will pay for the war and then some.” T.H. “Yes. We actually have to win there first and it should be funded by a war tax the same as World War I and World War II were paid for (the last wars the United States won). If we leave before we really win; we’ll face a worse threat from this area than we did before 2001. The Taliban would

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LETTERS

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COLUMNS

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CH@TROOM

What is your favorite Christmas or holiday tradition? What makes it special? Send your response to kynews@communitypress.com with “chatroom” in the subject line. return; and with them, their friends in Al Qaeda. We need to declare victory and get out.” Duke “Absolutely not! No more taxes! I support worthwhile causes and this war is not one of them. I would support spending money to put a helmet on Nancy Pelosi and Harry Reid and sending them to the front lines! They would send the Al Qaeda running!” N.C. “No! This is one of the very few reasons we have the constitutional government we have, military support. Stop the other spending and take care of the military.” M.C. “Absolutely not. Perhaps Our Dear Leader hasn’t had time to check how our national budget works, but if he would ask someone to show him, he would see that the category of ‘Defense’ already takes 21 percent of our total budget, or $613 billion. That’s where the cost of our national defense is handled. Perhaps if he spent less time giving empty speeches, and more time trying to understand how things are supposed to work, he and his friends wouldn’t even consider such a proposal. They could use some of the billions they are giving away in their ‘stimulus’ programs to pay any extra costs for the efforts in Afghanistan. (Or maybe this new approach to paying for defense is part of the ‘change’ he campaigned on?)” B.B.

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Elsmere and Erlanger

N K Y. c o m

Editor Brian Mains | bmains@nky.com | 578-1062

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

Last week’s question

Erlanger Recorder

December 17, 2009

A7

RECORDER

A community in overwhelming need According to Hamilton County Job and Family Services, unemployment in the Greater Cincinnati area is at a 25-year high with 316,000 adults and 167,000 children living in poverty. During home visits to the needy, volunteers with the Society of St. Vincent de Paul see first hand the suffering this causes – elderly people who sleep on the floor because they have no bed; children who go to school dirty because the water has been disconnected; families with no heat, facing eviction, or with too little food each day. If I didn’t see it with my own eyes, I would never have thought such need could be possible here in Cincinnati. But we also see moving examples of the very best the human spirit has to offer. I have seen families who stay strong and faith-filled during times of unbearable hardship. I have seen a young boy who gave up his bed so his little brother would have a place to sleep; parents that go hungry so their children can eat; a man who walks miles to work each day because he doesn’t have bus fare.

At the Society of St. Vincent de Paul, we receive more than 250 calls each day from people in desperate need – double the number of calls compared to 2008. Sometimes it can feel overwhelming. As the days grow shorter, I am aware that virtually every night of the week, St. Vincent de Paul volunteers are heading out into the cold to meet with a family in need. But it is also a great comfort to know that there are many others in Greater Cincinnati who share our concern for those who are suffering, giving generously of their time and resources to help local neighbors. When we all work together to help one another, incredible things happen. There are ways to help: • Adopt-A-Family: Fulfill a child’s wish list by adopting a family for Christmas. You will receive a wish list of gifts to purchase and may either deliver them to the family or bring them to St. Vincent de Paul for distribution. If you do not have time to shop, a gift of $150 will purchase gifts for a family of four. Contact LaMonica Sherman at 513-2353353 or lsherman@SVDPcincin-

nati.org. Liz Carter • Organize a drive: Organize Community a drive or event Press guest at schools, columnist workplaces or churches. Contact Julie Rack at 5628841, ext. 225, or jrack@SVDP cincinnati.org. • Make a financial gift to keep a family from becoming homeless, or toward the purchase a child’s bed, by sending your contribution to 1125 Bank Street Cincinnati, Ohio 45214 or visit www.SVDPcincinnati.org. As the Society of St. Vincent de Paul continues to address the most pressing needs of the poor in our community, I am grateful to every person who gives their time or financial support. And I am honored to be part of such a caring community, working together to provide small acts of kindness and support that go along way during the holiday season. Liz Carter is executive director of the Society of St. Vincent de Paul, Cincinnati Council. For more information, go to www.SVDPcincinnati.org.

PROVIDED

Special visit

C.F.P. Danny Lee visited with students from St. Augustine School fifth, sixth, seventh, and eighth grade classes. On a short leave from his deployment in Iraq, C.F.P. Lee told the students what it was like to live and carry out missions in a war zone.

Alliance offers prevention tips for all Alcohol, tobacco, marijuana, illegal drugs, sex - not for children and yet many children experiment with these every day. Prevention organizations do ad campaigns, churches teach morals, laws are passed to protect children, but still children experiment. What can we do, you ask? There is so much to experiment with! There are prescription drugs to mix with alcohol and cell phones and the Internet that make it easy to connect with dealers and predators who would harm our children. What does the future hold for our children if we cannot protect them and keep them safe? Well, it's time to stop whining

about all the dangers and look at what we do have, look at our strengths and most important, look at what works. I don't mean to be harsh here folks, but we need to do something and we already have the most effective tool available. We have a tool that can protect children from all risky behaviors. Sounds sort of like science fiction doesn't it? Sort of like a one pill for all ills, but that's how powerful it is. It's you, the parent. I know kids don't listen. I know you can't watch them every minute. “As a parent you have the greatest power to influence your children- even your teenage children. You have more power than

any law, any peer pressure, any teacher or coach, any priest, rabbi, or minister, any music, film, or Internet site, any rock star, movie star, or famous athlete, even any sister, brother, aunt or uncle,” says Joseph A. Califano, Jr. on the first page of his book How to Raise a Drug-Free Kid, The Straight Dope for Parents, published by Simon and Schuster. Califano has developed what he calls “The Nine Facets of Parental Engagement”. They are: 1. Be there: Get involved in your children's lives and activities.

2. Open the lines of communication and keep them wide open. 3. Set a good example: Actions are more persuasive then words. 4. Set rules and expect your children to follow them. 5. Monitor your children's whereabouts. 6. Maintain family rituals such as eating dinner together. 7. Incorporate religious and spiritual practices into family life. 8. Get Dad engaged - and keep him engaged. 9. Engage the larger family of your children's friends, teachers, classmates, neighbors, and community.

A publication of

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Elsmere and Erlanger

RECORDER

Erlanger Recorder Editor . . . . . . . . . . .Brian Mains bmains@nky.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .578-1062

Your kids may not listen. You can't watch them every Kathy Nafus minute, but if you start formCommunity ing a relationRecorder ship with your guest children when columnist they are very young, you won't have to. They will know what you expect and do the right thing. Kenton County Alliance is a substance abuse prevention coalition. For more information or to join the coalition, call 760-2051. Kathy Nafus is the Coordinator for Kenton County Alliance

s

A WORLD OF DIFFERENT VOICES

Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Friday | See page A2 for additional contact information. 283-0404 | 228 Grandview Drive, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017 | 654 Highland Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075 | e-mail kynews@nky.com | Web site: www.NKY.com


A8

Erlanger Recorder

December 17, 2009

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Hundreds of People Cash In at the Florence Roadshow Yesterday

By Jason Delong

Treasure Hunters Roadshow STAFF WRITER

Gold and Silver pour into yesterdays Roadshow due to highest prices in 40 years.

not the only items the Roadshow is buying. “Gold and silver markets are soaring.” says Archie Davis, a Roadshow representative. “Broken jewelry and gold or silver coins add up very quickly. I just finished working with a gentleman that had an old class

Yesterday at the Springhill Suites, hundreds lined up to cash antiques, collectibles, gold and jewelry in at the Roadshow. The free event is in Florence all week buying gold, silver antiques and collectibles. One visitor I spoke with yesterday

“If you go to the Roadshow, you can cash-in your items for top dollar. Roadshow representatives will be available to assess and purchase your items at the Springhill Suites through Saturday in Florence.”

“It is unbelievable, I brought in some old coins that had been in a little cigar box for years and some old herringbone necklaces and in less than fifteen minutes I left with a check for $712.37.” said “It’s unbelievable, I brought in some old coins that had been in a little cigar box for years and some old herringbone necklaces and in less than fifteen minutes I left with a check for $712.37. That stuff has been in my jewelry box and dresser for at least 20 years.” Another gentlemen brought an old Fender guitar his father bought years ago. “Dad had less than fifty bucks in that guitar.” The Roadshow expert that assisted him, made a few phone calls and a Veterinarian in Seattle, Washington bought the guitar for $5700.00. The seller continued, “I got another $150.00 for a broken necklace and an old class ring, it’s not everyday

Above • A couple waits with anticipation while Roadshow expert examines their antiques and gold items. The Roadshow is at the Springhill Suites this week. someone brings six thousand dollars to town with your name on it.” Jeff Parsons, President of the Treasure Hunters Roadshow commented, “Lots of people have items that they know are valuable but just don’t know where to sell them. Old toys, trains, swords,

Collectors desire vintage military items, Items from both U.S. and foreign origins from the Civil War, World War Spanish-American I, World War II, Spanish American War, Revolutionary War and Calvary times have great value. Items such as swords, daggers, medals, hardware bayonets, etc.

guitars, pocket watches or just about anything old is valuable to collectors. These collectors are willing to pay big money for those items they are looking for.” This week’s Roadshow is the place to get connected with those collectors. The process is free and

anyone can brings items down to the event. If the Roadshow experts find items their collectors are interested in, offers will be made to purchase those items. About 80% of the guests that attend the show end up selling one or more items at the event. Antiques and collectibles are

www.treasurehuntersroadshow.com The Roadshow is featured this week:

December 15th-19th

Tuesday - Friday 9 AM - 6 PM and Saturday 9AM - 4PM

FREE ADMISSION

Gold Prices High, Cash In Now

“It’s a modern day gold rush,” said Jeff Parsons. Gold is now trading at 40 year highs, and you can cash in by bringing your items to the Treasure Hunters Roadshow.”

All types of gold are wanted, including gold coins, Krugerrands, Maple Leafs, and other gold bars, etc. All gold jewelry, including broken jewelry is accepted. Anything gold is wanted. All silver items, including silver coins, bars and American Eagles are accepted. Sterling silver items like flatware, tea sets, etc. are welcome.

Roadshow Coin and gold expert Paul Dichraff examines a large presentation of coins, gold and collectibles.

Springhill Suites 7492 Turfway Rd. Florence, KY 41042

Directions (859) 371-3388

The entire process only takes a few minutes The Treasure Hunter’s Roadshow event continues through Saturday in Florence.

We have been directly involved in millions of dollars worth of rare cash and coin sales over the past 15 years.

Our private collectors are seeking all types of rare coins and currency. We have the resources available to pay you top prices for all types of rare coins or entire collections. We can arrange a private discreet meeting with you at your bank or in one of our private suites. Whether you are ready to sell your life long collection or you are settling an estate we are at your service. We are professional, honest and discreet.

Cash in with the power of the International Collectors Association Treasure Hunters Roadshow represents over 5000 members worldwide who are paying TOP DOLLAR the following types of items. • COINS - Any and all coins made before 1965. This includes all silver and gold coins, dollars, half dollars, quarters, dimes, nickels and pennies. All conditions wanted! • GOLD & SILVER - PRICES AT 40 YEAR HIGH! for platinum, gold and silver during this event. Broken Jewelry, dental gold, old coins, pocket watches, Kruggerands, Gold Bars Canadian Maple Leafs, etc.

• WATCHES & POCKET WATCHES - Rolex, Tiffany, Hublot, Omega, Chopard, Cartier, Philippe, Ebel, Waltham, Swatch, Chopard, Elgin, Bunn Special, Railroad, Illinois,Hamilton, all others.

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• JEWELRY - Gold, Silver, Platinum, diamonds, rubies, sapphires and all types of stones, metals, etc. Rings, bracelets, necklaces, all others including broken jewelry. Early costume jewelry wanted.

• Gather items of interest from your attic, garage, basement, etc There is no limit to the amount of items you .can bring • No appointment necessary • If interested in selling, we will consult our collector ’s database to see if a buyer exists. 90% of all items have offers in our database • The offer is made on the spot on behalf of our collectors making the offer • If you decide to accept the offer, we will pay you on the spot and ship the item to the collector. The collector pays all shipping and handling charges • You get 100% of the offer with no hidden fees

ring, two bracelets, and handful of silver dollars,… his check was for over $650.00. I would say that there were well over 100 people in here yesterday that sold their scrap gold.” One gentleman holding his check for over $1250.00 in the lobby of the event yesterday had this comment, “I am so happy I decided to come to the Roadshow. I saw the newspaper ad for the event and brought in an old German sword I brought back from World War II and some old coins and here is my check. What a great thing for our community. I am heading home now to see what else I have they might be interested in.” The Roadshow continues today starting at 9am. The event is free and no appointment is needed.

• TOYS, TRAINS & DOLLS - All types of toys made before 1965 including: Hot Wheels, Tonka, Buddy L, Smith Miller, Nylint, Robots, battery toys, Mickey Mouse, Train sets, all gauges, accessories, individual cars, Marklin, American Flyer, Lionel, Hafner, all other trains, Barbie Dolls, GI Joe, Shirley Temple, Characters, German, all makers accepted. • MILITARY ITEMS, SWORDS - Civil War, Revolutionary War, WWI, WWII, etc. Items of interest include swords, badges, clothes, photos, medals, knives, gear, letters, The older the Swords, the better all types wanted. • ADVERTISING ITEMS - Metal and Porcelain signs, gas companies, beer and liquor makers, automobile, implements, etc.

Silver and Gold Coin Prices Up During Poor Economy.

Collectors and Enthusiasts in Florence with $2,000,000 to Purchase Yours!

Got Coin? It might be just the time to cash in. This week starting Tuesday and continuing through Saturday, the International Collectors Association in conjunction with Treasure Hunters Roadshow will be purchasing all types of silver and gold coins direct from the public. All are welcome and the event is free.

From a single item to complete collections, the most sought after types of coins are: • Any coins dated prior to 1820, especially those dated 1700’s • High Grade Early Coins • Graded Coins • Proof Coins • Gold Coins with C, D,O and CC mint marks • Rare Dates • Complete Coin Type sets • Rare Paper Currency

GREAT PRICES PAID FOR: 1950’S & 1960’S Era Electric and Acoustic

GUITARS

- Dobro - Fender - Gibson - Martin - Gretsch - Richenbacker - National - And others


Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Elsmere and Erlanger kynews@communitypress.com

RECORDER

Web site: NKY.com

T h u r s d a y, D e c e m b e r 1 7 , 2 0 0 9

PEOPLE

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IDEAS

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RECIPES

SMALL BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT

PATRICIA A. SCHEYER/CONTRIBUTOR

Bethany Hanser, far right, owner of the Motherhood Express, shows a blouse to newborn mothers Megan Hamilton of Falmouth and 7-week-old Julia and Caitlin Howe of Batavia and 6-week-old Kylie. Hanser’s daughter, Sabrina Cain, helps the mothers find what they need.

Motherhood Express helps nursing moms

By Patricia A. Scheyer

Community Recorder Contributor

If a baby is imminent in your family, it is important to know about Motherhood Express, a small business located in the Houston Office Condos on Houston Road across from Cheddar’s, specifically dedicated to meeting the needs of the breastfeeding mother. “We have been in Florence six years, moving here after five years in Alexandria,” said Bethany Hanser, owner of the business. “It is a family owned and operated business. My two daughters are lactation counselors, and they both teach newborn massage.” Motherhood Express provides personal, private, professional assistance from custom fitting for new nursing bras, latching the baby, to selection of the best breast pump for each person’s lifestyle.

“For many of these mothers we are their families,” explained Hanser. “Some mothers don’t have generations to teach breastfeeding, and in some cases their moms didn’t breastfeed.” Hanser is an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant, and she spends three mornings a week at Pediatrics of Florence, helping moms with breastfeeding. Mothers come to Motherhood Express to feed their babies, and they also come for free baby weight checks, to make sure the baby is gaining weight. “We help the mother take care of her baby and herself,” said Hanser. “We offer one-on-one support and encouragement. We help moms be the best moms they can be.” To reach Motherhood Express, the number is 859746-2460, or the Web site is motherhoodexpress.com.

See Scuba Santa’s Water Wonderland at the Newport Aquarium through Jan. 3. Kids can visit Scuba Santa’s Post Office to write him a letter and also take part in the Reindeer Roundup game. For dive times and more information, visit www.newportaquarium.com. The Newport Aquarium is open daily from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Scuba Santa will not be at the aquarium on Christmas day. General admission is $20 for adults and $13 for Children (ages 2-12). Children under 2 are admitted free.

‘A Christmas Carol’

Dwight Blubaugh and other members of the Cincinnati Historical Dance Society will perform the Christmas classic, “A Christmas Carol,” from 2 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 20 at the BehringerCrawford Museum in Covington. Following the performance, finger sandwiches,

Milk and cookies … or water and veggies?

Holidays don’t have to pack on the pounds

By Jason Brubaker

THINGS TO DO

Santa at the aquarium

PROVIDED

Eating healthy during the holidays doesn’t have to be a pipe dream. Members of the Independence Homemaker Club cook up healthy meals. Left to right: Nancy Ballinger, Carolyn Dunn and Anna Thomas.

jbrubaker@nky.com

Healthy Holiday tips

rcoomer@nky.com

Following are some tips to avoid gaining those extra holiday pounds while still enjoying your time with family and friends.

By Regan Coomer

scones, cakes and holiday treats will be available. Reservations are required by Friday, Dec. 18. For reser-

vations or for more information, call 491-4003. The Behringer-Crawford Museum is located at 1600 Montague Road.

Become a skater

Toss those ice skates aside and learn how to skateboard at Ollie’s Skatepark this Saturday, Dec. 19 from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. After the two-hour lesson, you can skate for free from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. The cost is $20. No appointment necessary. For more information, visit www.skateollies.com or call 525-9505. Ollie’s Skatepark is located at 8171 Dixie Hwy. in Florence.

Along with cold weather and long lines at the stores, the holiday season’s arrival unfortunately also usually means one more thing...expanding waistlines. But that doesn’t have to be the case this year. With a little planning and a little effort, residents can avoid the extra pounds that tend to pile on during the holidays, says Fitness Essentials owner and personal trainer Candy Stephens. Stephens, who said her clients always have plenty of questions about keeping the holiday weight off, said the key is moderation. “You’re going to want to eat out and splurge a little during the holidays- it’s only natural,” she said. “But you can’t have an all-or-nothing approach, whether it’s with food or exercise. You’ve got to plan ahead a little.” Stephens said one of the most common mistakes during the holidays is not eating all day leading up to a big dinner or party. Then, when the food arrives, people gorge themselves, leading to overeating. “If you’ve got a big meal coming up, that doesn’t mean you have to stop eating all day to prepare for it,” she explained. “By trying to keep a somewhat normal routine, you don’t hurt your metabolism, and you’re also less likely to overeat at the end of the day.” Kathy Byrnes, an agent for the Kenton County Extension Service, agreed. She said people often talk themselves into gorging themselves on holiday treats, feeling they have to take advantage of the season. “We get caught in that mindset and

FILE PHOTO

Taking the time to savor, not gobble up, delicious Christmas treats could save you grief when it’s time to make your New Year’s resolutions. think we’re not going to have them for another year,” she said. “So we always just tell people to be a mindful eater. Don’t just toss three cookies into your mouth- take time to savor them and enjoy the flavor.” Byrnes and Stephens also cautioned against the thought that once New Years rolls around, they’ll hit the gym hard to lose those extra pounds. “If you exercise throughout the year and keep a routine, then you won’t have much of an issue over the holidays,” said Stephens. “But it’s much harder for people who go overboard during the holidays, and then expect to just lose it immediately by hitting the gym for a few weeks.” In fact, Byrnes said that the extension services’ “Never Say Diet” program is built around that very theme. “It’s just a mindset that you can do all the time,” she said. “It’s about making better choices all year.” Stephens also pointed out that trying to keep a normal routine can help to alleviate stress around the holidays, which can lead to bad eating habits. She suggested that taking a short walk around the block if you can’t make it to the gym,

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• Put out vegetable trays for party appetizers. “You can eat and eat and eat and not really worry about it,” said Kathy Byrnes, an agent for the Kenton County Extension Service. • Eat smaller serving sizes at meals. • Don’t starve yourself before a big dinner. “Keep your eating routine as normal as possible, and this way, you won’t over eat,” said says Fitness Essentials owner and personal trainer Candy Stephens. • Use a skimmer cup to reduce the fat and calories in gravy. • Select only one starch for your meal, and replace the others with seasonal fruits and vegetables. • Use sharp cheddar cheese rather than mild - it has a strong taste, so you’ll use less. • Be a mindful eater and savor holiday treats, like cookies or fudge, rather than filling up on them or eating quickly. • Make eating meaningful. Put the food on a plate and enjoy it, rather than eating straight out of the bag or package. or keeping some healthy snacks on hand in case you feel the need to munch as you settle in for a night of holiday movies. In short, both Stephens and Byrnes said that having a healthy holiday doesn’t mean you can’t still have a fun one. “You can still enjoy yourself and have fun with your family and friends and take part in all of the activities,” said Stephens. “It’s just a matter of planning ahead a little, and putting that little extra effort in to make sure you don’t overdo it.”


B2

Erlanger Recorder

December 17, 2009

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD F R I D A Y, D E C . 1 8

ART CENTERS & ART MUSEUMS

Bright Ideas, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Artisans Enterprise Center, 25 W. Seventh St. Works celebrating color by seven Baker Hunt artists. Presented by Baker Hunt Art and Cultural Center. 2922322; www.covingtonarts.com. Covington.

ART EXHIBITS

PREFAB77’s Shot at from Both Sides, 1 p.m.-6 p.m. The BLDG, 30 W. Pike St. British art collective’s first solo exhibition in the USA. Work combines various artistic mediums including a mixture of acrylic, spray-paint, varnish and inks, mainly on wood or paper. Through Dec. 31. 491-4228. Covington. Holiday Bling, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Passionate Arts Center, 31-33 W. Pike St. Gallery 31. Paintings, photographs, textiles, pottery, calligraphy, stained glass, jewelry, sculpture and more. Light refreshments provided. Through Dec. 23. 393-8358. Covington.

ATTRACTIONS

Light Up the Levee Holiday Light Show, 6 p.m. Newport on the Levee, 1 Levee Way, In front of Barnes & Noble 6:10 p.m. Featuring LED lights dancing in synchronization to holiday music. Shows every 20 minutes with last show at 11:50 p.m. and pre-programmed to take place 18 times nightly. Free. 291-0550; www.newportonthelevee.com. Newport.

FOOD & DRINK

Fish Fry, 4:30 p.m.-8 p.m. Knights of Columbus #3908, Father Bealer Council, 605 Lytle Ave. Includes fish, shrimp, chicken, hamburgers, hot dogs and sides. Drinks available. Carry-out available. Benefits charities of Knights of Columbus #3908. $1.25-$7. Presented by Knights of Columbus #3908, Fr. Bealer Council. 342-6643. Elsmere. Shared Holiday Parties Dinner Event, 8 p.m.-midnight, Gardens of Park Hills, 1622 Dixie Highway, Smaller organizations celebrate holidays. Includes dinner, cash bar, music, pies, unlimited coffee, tea and soft drinks. $18.50. Presented by McHale’s Hospitality Group. 442-7776; www.kycater.com/Holiday/shared.asp. Park Hills.

HOLIDAY - CHRISTMAS

Scuba Santa’s Water Wonderland, 10 a.m.6 p.m. Newport Aquarium, Newport on the Levee, Holiday decorations throughout Aquarium, Scuba Santa’s Post Office and Reindeer Roundup game. Scuba-diving Santa Claus performs in dive shows with sharks daily. Included with admission: $20, $13 ages 2-12. 261-7444. Newport. Christmas at the Creation Museum, 6 p.m.-8 p.m. Holiday musicals and planetarium presentation of “The Christmas Star” inside museum, tickets required. Creation Museum, 2800 Bullittsburg Church Road, Outdoors. Nativity scene with actors in firstcentury Bethlehem, Christmas light display. Included with admission: $21.95 ages 1359; $16.95 ages 60 and up; $11.95 ages 5-12; free military, police and firefighters; free ages 4 and under. 888-582-4253. Petersburg.

MUSEUMS

The Gourmet Strip: Dining, Entertainment and Gambling, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. BehringerCrawford Museum, 1600 Montague Road, Celebrate this mystical stretch of Dixie Highway from Covington through Florence that was know for its dining establishments such as the White Horse Tavern and Greyhound Grill; first-class entertainment at Lookout House; and illegal gambling. $7, $6 ages 60 and up, $4 ages 3-17, members free. 4914003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

MUSIC - CONCERTS

Frequency 94.1’s Thank God It’s Not Christmas Music Show, 7 p.m. Madison Theater, 730 Madison Ave. With Gym Class Heroes, Pilot Around the Stars, Famous Mr. Nobodies and Small Time Crooks. $25. Presented by Mix 94.1 Radio Station. 4912444. Covington.

ON STAGE - COMEDY

Jim Short, 8 p.m. Dinner available. $16. Funny Bone Comedy Club, Newport on the Levee, Comedian and actor. Ages 21 and up. 9572000. Newport.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Oliver!, 7:30 p.m. Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, 1028 Scott Blvd. Musical based on “Oliver Twist” by Charles Dickens. With Kentucky Symphony Orchestra. $25, $20 members, $18 students. Through Dec. 27. 957-1940. Covington.

RECREATION

American Contract Bridge League Bridge Tournament, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Elsmere Senior Center, 179 Dell St. Beginners welcome. $4. Presented by Northern Kentucky Bridge Club. 689-5743; www.nkybridge.com. Elsmere. S A T U R D A Y, D E C . 1 9

AUDITIONS

For more about Greater Cincinnati’s dining, music, events, movies and more, go to Metromix.com. Christmas at the Creation Museum, 6 p.m.-8 p.m. Holiday musicals and planetarium presentation of “The Christmas Star” inside museum, tickets required. Creation Museum, Included with admission: $21.95 ages 13-59; $16.95 ages 60 and up; $11.95 ages 5-12; free military, police and firefighters; free ages 4 and under. 888582-4253. Petersburg.

MUSEUMS

The Gourmet Strip: Dining, Entertainment and Gambling, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. BehringerCrawford Museum, $7, $6 ages 60 and up, $4 ages 3-17, members free. 491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

SPORTS

Thoroughbred Racing, 1:10 p.m. Holiday Meet. Gowell Stakes. Turfway Park, Free. 371-0200; www.turfway.com. Florence. S U N D A Y, D E C . 2 0

CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS

Katalyst Talent Agency Open Call, 2 p.m.-5 p.m. Katalyst, LLC, 525 West Fifth Street, Suite 118, All experience levels seeking representation with Katalyst. First come, first served. Requirements at web site. Free. 581-4555; www.katalyst.tv. Covington.

Southern Stars Square Dance Club, 5 p.m.-7 p.m. Promenade Palace, 3630 Decoursey Pike, Family square dance club. $5. Presented by Southwestern Ohio/Northern Kentucky Square Dancers Federation. 513-929-2429; www.sonkysdf.com/index.htm. Covington.

CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS

FOOD & DRINK

Tandem Squares, 8 p.m. Promenade Palace, 3630 Decoursey Pike, Plus level Westernstyle square dance club for experienced dancers. $5. Presented by Southwestern Ohio/Northern Kentucky Square Dancers Federation. 513-929-2427. Covington.

COOKING CLASSES

Cork and Fork Cooking Class, 2 p.m. Holiday Special. $20. Argentine Bean Bistro and Wine Bar, 2875 Town Center Blvd. Reservations required. 426-1042; www.argentinebean.net. Crestview Hills.

FOOD & DRINK

Taste of Kentucky, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Sample Kentucky Proud food items including Ruth Hunt candy, Weisenberger Mills mixes, Elmwood Inn Fine Teas and John Conti gourmet coffee. Kentucky Haus Artisan Center, 411 E. 10th St. Free. 261-4287; www.kentuckyhaus.com. Newport.

HOLIDAY - CHRISTMAS

Strolling Santa, 1 p.m.-5 p.m. Newport on the Levee, 1 Levee Way, Santa passes out candy to children. Guests can use own cameras for photos with Santa. 291-0550. Newport. Scuba Santa’s Water Wonderland, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Newport Aquarium, Included with admission: $20, $13 ages 2-12. 2617444. Newport. Holiday Toy Trains are on Track, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Behringer-Crawford Museum, $7, $6 seniors, $4 ages 3-17. 4914003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington. Breakfast with Santa Cow, 8 a.m.-9 a.m. Chick-fil-A Florence, 4980 Houston Road, Children receive free mini-moo cow and photo with Santa Cow. 594-4600; www.chick-fil-a.com/houstonroad. Florence.

Breakfast and Lunch with Saint Nicholas, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Wertheim’s Restaurant, 514 W. Sixth St. Food available a la cart. Free. Reservations recommended. Presented by MainStrasse Village Association. 2611233. Covington.

HOLIDAY - CHRISTMAS

Strolling Santa, 1 p.m.-5 p.m. Newport on the Levee, 291-0550. Newport. Scuba Santa’s Water Wonderland, 10 a.m.6 p.m. Free ornament craft noon-3 p.m. while supplies last. Newport Aquarium, Included with admission: $20, $13 ages 212. 261-7444. Newport. Dickens Christmas Celebration, 2 p.m.-4:30 p.m. Behringer-Crawford Museum, 1600 Montague Road, Reading of “A Christmas Carol” by Mr. Dwight Blubaugh, member of Cincinnati Historical Dance Society. Performed in period costume and accompanied by other society members. Followed by treats. $25, $22 children; $20, $18 children for members. Reservations required by Dec. 18. 4914003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington. Children’s Christmas Play, 6 p.m.-7 p.m. Grant’s Lick Baptist Church, 941 Clay Ridge Road, Children of church present. Reception follows performance. Free. 635-2444. Alexandria.

ERNEST COLEMAN/CONTRIBUTOR

Mark Woodrum of Villa Hills discusses trains with his daughter Sarah Ann Woodrum (left) and family friend Lex Boggs of Campbell County, Nov. 27 at the toy train display at the Behringer-Crawford Museum in Covington. It is the largest interactive train display in Northern Kentucky with more than 25 stations and 250 feet of track. For more information, visit www.bcmuseum.org or call 491-4003. The museum is located at 1600 Montague Road and is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday and 1-5 p.m. Sunday and closed major holidays.

ON STAGE - COMEDY

Jim Short, 7:30 p.m. Dinner available. $14. Funny Bone Comedy Club, 957-2000. Newport.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Oliver!, 3 p.m. Sign language interpreted and closed captioning available. Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, $25, $20 members, $18 students. 957-1940. Covington. M O N D A Y, D E C . 2 1

ART EXHIBITS

PREFAB77’s Shot at from Both Sides, 1 p.m.-6 p.m.The BLDG, 491-4228. Covington.

DANCE CLASSES

Beginner Square Dance Class, 7:30 p.m. Promenade Palace, 3630 Decoursey Pike, Casual dress. Smooth-soled shoes required. $4. Presented by Southwestern Ohio/Northern Kentucky Square Dancers Federation. 513929-2427. Covington.

HOLIDAY - CHRISTMAS

Scuba Santa’s Water Wonderland, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Newport Aquarium, Included with admission: $20, $13 ages 2-12. 261-7444. Newport.

KARAOKE AND OPEN MIC

MUSEUMS

The Gourmet Strip: Dining, Entertainment and Gambling, 1 p.m.-5 p.m. BehringerCrawford Museum, $7, $6 ages 60 and up, $4 ages 3-17, members free. 491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

MUSIC - CONCERTS

Hawthorne Heights, 7 p.m. With Just Surrender, Monty Are I and Nightbeast. Southgate House, 24 E. Third St. $15, $10 advance. 431-2201. Newport.

Karaoke, 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m.The Avenue Lounge, 411 Madison Ave.With DJ Will Corson.Ages 21 and up. 261-6120. Covington.

About calendar

To submit calendar items, go to “www.NKY.com” and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to “life@communitypress.com” along with event information. Items are printed on a space-available basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to “www.NKY.com” and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page. W E D N E S D A Y, D E C . 2 3

ATTRACTIONS Penguin Parade, 10:15 a.m. Newport Aquarium, Free. 261-7444. Newport. Light Up the Levee Holiday Light Show, 6 p.m. Newport on the Levee, Free. 291-0550; www.newportonthelevee.com. Newport. HOLIDAY - CHRISTMAS

Scuba Santa’s Water Wonderland, 10 a.m.6 p.m. Newport Aquarium, Included with admission: $20, $13 ages 2-12. 261-7444. Newport. Holiday Toy Trains are on Track, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Behringer-Crawford Museum, $7, $6 seniors, $4 ages 3-17. 491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

RECREATION

American Contract Bridge League Bridge Tournament, 6:30 p.m.-10 p.m. Elsmere Senior Center, $4. 689-5743; www.nkybridge.com. Elsmere. T H U R S D A Y, D E C . 2 4

ATTRACTIONS Jellyfish Gallery, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Newport Aquarium, Included with admission; $20, $13 ages 2-12. 261-7444; www.newportaquarium.com. Newport. HOLIDAY - CHRISTMAS

Scuba Santa’s Water Wonderland, 10 a.m.6 p.m. Newport Aquarium, Included with admission: $20, $13 ages 2-12. 261-7444. Newport. Holiday Toy Trains are on Track, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Behringer-Crawford Museum, $7, $6 seniors, $4 ages 3-17. 491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

T U E S D A Y, D E C . 2 2

COMMUNITY DANCE

Line Dancing, 7 p.m.-9 p.m. Lookout Heights Civic Club, 1661 Park Road, Holly and Bernie Ruschman, instructors. Beginners welcome. $6, $3 for first-timers. 727-0904. Fort Wright.

MUSEUMS

The Gourmet Strip: Dining, Entertainment and Gambling, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. BehringerCrawford Museum, $7, $6 ages 60 and up, $4 ages 3-17, members free. 491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

MUSIC - BLUEGRASS

Northern Kentucky Bluegrass Band, 9 p.m.midnight, Zola, 626 Main St. 261-7510. Covington.

MUSIC - BLUES

Sonny’s Solo Blues, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Claddagh Irish Pub Newport, One Levee Way, 581-8888; www.claddaghirishpubs.com. Newport.

MUSIC - JAZZ

Fat Tuesday, 7 p.m. Dee Felice Cafe, 529 Main St. Royal Palm Orchestra with Bill Gemmer, director. 261-2365; www.deefelice.com. Covington.

RECREATION

PROVIDED

The Cincinnati Museum Center celebrates Train Weekend Saturday-Sunday, Dec. 19-20. Already hosting Holiday Junction in the history museum, a large collection of model trains in a winter wonderland (through Jan. 3,) Train Weekend celebrates the mode of transportation with an extra focus on the holidays. “‘Twas the Night Before Christmas,” a live recreation of a 1940s radio program, is in the Newsreel Theater at 1, 2, and 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Character interpreter William Turner will offer stories from the Pullman porter days at Union Terminal from the 1940s at 2 p.m. Saturday, in the history museum. For more activities and information, visit www.cincymuseum.org or call 513-287-7000.

Scrabble Rama!, 7 p.m.-9 p.m. Bean Haus, 640 Main St. 431-2326; www.beanhaus.com. Covington. American Contract Bridge League Bridge Tournament, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Elsmere Senior Center, $4. 689-5743; www.nkybridge.com. Elsmere. Texas Hold’em Tournaments, 9 p.m. Molly Malone’s Irish Pub and Restaurant, 112 E. Fourth St. Players gather in tables of eight for the five-card game.Ages 21 and up. 4916659. Covington.

PROVIDED

The Cincinnati Ballet performs its yuletide tradition, “The Nutcracker,” tonight through Sunday, Dec. 27, at the Aronoff Center. The production will feature Tchaikovsky’s score performed live by the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra. Opening night tickets are $30; remaining performances are $30-$70. There will be Sugar Plum Parades after the 2 p.m. performances Dec. 22 and Dec. 26, in which parents can escort their children across the stage to be greeted by the performers. For tickets and information, visit www.cincinnatiballet.com or call 513-621-5282. Pictured is ballerina Janessa Touchet.


Life

Erlanger Recorder

December 17, 2009

Messy lives attract a loving God

The scene was messy and scary to say the least. It was dark, turbulent and chaotic – until God began the work of creation. That’s how the JudaicChristian scriptures describe the creation of the world as God began to bring order and beauty out of futile nothingness. Works of grandeur often emerge gradually from chaotic messiness. Many an excellent musical composition is born from a troubled life or tortured mind. Another stupendous God-event we’re about to celebrate, Christmas, follows the same principle. We envision the original Christmas with a certain pious romanticism. Handel’s “Messiah,” crib scenes with sparkles in the straw, wide-eyed shepherds, adoring animals, angels heralding on high, and Joseph, Mary and baby Jesus comfortable centerpieces. This warm and fuzzy scenario is more the work of our imagination than reali-

ty. That’s all right for celebrations, but we leap over the messiness that can mean so much to the development of our spirituality. We suppose messy lives before God mean unloved souls. Don’t we have to be pure, perfect and eminently prayerful to have God notice us and love us? The universe, the incarnation, and the coming of God to our individual souls are all usually accompanied by less than ideal situations. There is inevitably a complexity and messiness to it. At the first Christmas there was the anxiety of a man named Joseph, worried about his financée’s unexplained pregnancy and what to do about it. There is Mary his wife, pulled from an ordinary life and confused by sudden events, “How can this be since I do not know man?” A recent law necessitated their travel in the last week of her pregnancy, creating fears of roadside robbers as real as those who rip off people at malls today. Add to this the fact that

there was no place to stay, then a begged and borrowed stable for a birthplace, the smell of manure, the effort to find food and medical attention if necessary. Wouldn’t you say there was a certain messiness to it all? A combination of stress, inconvenience, worry and puzzlement? The first Christmas was far from pretty. We need to remember this about the coming of God into our lives. It rarely occurs in a milieu of perceived perfection. Doubts, darkness and chaos may not be far away. As a clergyman I have had the privilege of being privy to the inner life of many people. Most of them, and I as well, resonate to the description of messiness being present in our lives. We usually don’t see ourselves as holy specimens that God is proud of and whom he loves to be around. Yet it is stumbling and imperfect people who have taught me the most about

the coming of God and his wonderful work of love within us, despite the cluttered messiness we create. And one characteristic has been made clear to me – the coming of God, whether at the beginning, at the first Christmas, or today to you and me, is achieved because of and in the midst of the messiness of life. God comes close to the woman feeling so abandoned by her husband who has left her for another woman; to a couple who have lost a child. It may sound contradictory, but about Christmas we know more than we can say. If we have opened our hearts and messiness to God, we know a good news that exceeds our ability to spell out what it is. The essence is always more than we can know. Although the lower can acknowledge the higher, it cannot comprehend it. We can only use images, stories and metaphors to try and express the loving God who was willing to become

directly at P.O. Box 428541, Cincinnati, OH 45242. Please include a mailing address or fax number if you wish for him to respond.

one with us. Father Lou Guntzelman is a Catholic priest of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati. Reach him at columns@community press.com or contact him

B3

Father Lou Guntzelman Perspectives

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B4

Erlanger Recorder

Life

December 17, 2009

Make these treats for homemade holiday gifts There’s no doubt in my mind that a gift from the hands is a gift from the heart. It’s even more meaningful this year when budgets may be tighter and there’s not a lot of “wiggle room” for purchasing gifts. But you know what? Even if you can afford an expensive store-bought gift, try making something homemade to give, perhaps as an accompaniment to the gift or just as a stand-alone present. There’s something magical and nurturing when we gather together making homemade gifts. That’s how traditions begin, and continue.

Countdown to Christmas: Crunchy white peppermint bark with dark chocolate drizzle

2 cups crushed peppermint candies 4 cups white chocolate chips 3 ⁄4 teaspoon peppermint extract 2 cups puffed rice cereal or bit more to taste

Spray a rimmed baking sheet with nonstick cooking spray. M e l t w h i t e Rita chocolate Heikenfeld w i t h extract Rita’s kitchen over low heat or microwave. Be careful. It tends to burn easily. Remove from heat source while there are still some unmelted chips. Stir and the residual heat will melt them. Stir in candies and cereal. Pour onto pan and spread to 1 ⁄4 inch. Chill. Optional but good: After candy has chilled but before breaking into pieces, drizzle melted dark chocolate in a zig-zag pattern on top. Chill again before breaking into pieces.

Mulled cider

This makes about 12 cups.

3

⁄4 cup each: water and sugar 4 cinnamon sticks, about 2 inches long each 8 each: whole cloves and allspice 1 lemon and one orange, sliced thin 21⁄2 quarts cider

Combine everything but cider in pan. Bring to boil, then lower to simmer, covered, for five minutes. Remove from heat, add cider and stir.

Carol’s coffee-infused vodka liqueur

Best friend Carol Vanover shares this trendy drink. Better and so much less expensive than anything you can buy. The longer it ages, the smoother it gets. 1.75 liter Smirnoff vodka ⁄2 cup good quality coffee beans (Carol uses Colombian), crushed coarsely 4 teaspoons sugar (I told Carol when we tested this with the store bought version that hers was less sweet, so add more if you like.) 1

Mix everything together and let infuse at room temperature for 10 to 15 days. The color will darken and flavor will develop.

juice 2 teaspoons salt 1 ⁄2 teaspoon pepper 2 cups shredded cheese Potato chips

Mom’s hot chicken salad

Put all ingredients except cheese and chips in sprayed 13-by-9 pan. Sprinkle with cheese and chips. Bake at 350 degrees for 30 minutes.

For Delhi reader Sydney Davis, who said her mom made this back in the ’60s. “After she died, I found many of her recipes but not this one, which was always one of our favorites. “It was shredded chicken with a creamy texture and maybe a touch of lemon and a crunchy topping which was probably potato chips.” This one should work and it’s thanks to Patty Poor, Grant County Extension Agent in Williamstown, Ky. Patty sent me a cookbook from the Grant County Extension Homemakers. It has 1,000 yummy recipes like this and costs $28.95. Contact Patty at Patricia.poor@uky.edu or 859824-3355 for a copy. The recipe doesn’t say if the chicken is skinless, but I would assume so.

COURTESY RITA HEIKENFELD

Here, my friend Carol and I “testing” her vodka-infused coffee liqueur. I would also cut up the chicken fairly small and mix it with ingredients as listed below, before pouring into pan. And if the celery is real strong, I might use less. 2 pounds boneless chicken breast 4 cups diced celery 1 can cream chicken soup 2 cups mayonnaise 2 cans water chestnuts 1 can mushroom stems and pieces 1 cup slivered almonds 2 tablespoons each: chopped onions and lemon

Whoops!

Recipe clarification: Withrow High school/ Cincinnati public school’s chess/transparent pie The instructions given in my column didn’t say when to add egg yolks. Add them with the milk. If you want my recipe for this, it’s archived in our files so let me know. I also put it in our online column again this week. Rita Nader Heikenfeld is Macy’s certified culinary professional and family herbalist, an educator and author. E-mail her at columns@ communitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-248-7130, ext. 356. Visit Rita at www.Abouteating.com.


Community RELIGION NOTES Banklick Christian

Banklick Christian Church in Covington is hosting an “Old-time Christmas Signing” event Dec. 19 at 6 p.m. Refreshments will be served afterwards. For more information, call Jim Anderson at 866-9500. Banklick Christian Church is located at 4150 Madison Pike.

Bullittsville Christian

The Bullittsville Christian Church in Burlington presents its annual live nativity Dec. 19 from 7 to 9 p.m. In addition to the outdoor display, the church will serve hot cocoa and snacks. For more information, call 689-7215. The church is located 2.1 miles west of Ky. 237 at 3094 Petersburg Road (Ky. 20).

Mary, Queen of Heaven

Mary, Queen of Heaven Parish in Erlanger is hosting its fourth in a series of presentations on the Catechism of the Catholic Church. The parish’s adult education program, “Growing in Faith Together,” is held the first Tuesday of the month

beginning at 6:30 p.m. The topic Jan. 5 will be “I Believe in Jesus Christ the Only Son” and will be presented by Fr. Matt Cushing. The evening is open to all adults of the Diocese. Babysitting is provided. For more information, call 525-6909. The parish is located at 1150 Donaldson Rd.

Prince of Peace

Pastor Neal Bosse and Prince of Peace Lutheran Church in Bellevue will host a traditional German Christmas service Dec. 20 at 4 p.m. This is the second year that the church has had this service. The candlelight service will have scriptures and carols in German. Rev. Andrew Norris will be delivering the homily. A coffee hour with traditional German fare will follow. For more information, call 581-7129. The Prince of Peace Lutheran Church is located at 306 Center Street. Have an event at your church? Please send your information to akiefaber@nky.com.

Erlanger Recorder

December 17, 2009

Salvation Army donations down The Salvation Army today provided a status update of its Red Kettle Campaign, announcing that contributions to its familiar red kettles have fallen short of expectations. Currently, donations are almost $100,000 below prior-year collections. The campaign launched on November 18th. By this point in the campaign, The Salvation Army in Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky should be half way to its $600,000 campaign goal, but is running nearly 35 percent behind on kettle contributions. This represents is a sub-

stantial amount of funds that are needed to provide critical services in the community. The Red Kettle Campaign is an important part of The Salvation Army’s fundraising efforts, with the funds used to provide emergency assistance, such as food, clothing, rent and utilities. Contributions to the kettles also support Christmas programs, such as Adopt-aFamily and Toy Shop, and social service programs, such as housing and counseling, and after-school development programs for youth. “We are dependent upon

the funds we receive each year from the kettles,” explained Major Ronald Foreman, Divisional Commander for The Salvation Army, “and not just for use at Christmas, but throughout the year ahead,” Major Foreman said. “This year, demand for our services is higher than before, with many families facing additional financial and emotional hardships. We critically need the financial support of the community to allow us to bring help and hope to our neighbors in need. I am confident that generous local donors can help us catch up to

attain our campaign goal.” Approximately 100 of the iconic red kettles are in place throughout Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky, at Kroger, Wal-Mart, Sam’s Club and other retail partners. The kettles will be in place through Christmas Eve, every day except Sunday. Shoppers and others passing by the kettles are encouraged to be generous, knowing that their contributions will be used in the local community to help those most at-risk in this tough economic environment.

Lazer Kraze hosts holiday camp Lazer Kraze in Erlanger announces Winter Holiday Camp. This is a great option for working parents looking for fun safe activities for the children during the holiday break. Session I is Dec. 22 - 23 and session II is Dec. 29-30. Each two day camp is 10 a.m.- 4 p.m. Before and after care is available with prior arrangements.

Campers will sharpen their teamwork skills with various team-oriented laser tag games and tournaments. They'll try out their jousting skills and get the ultimate in exercise with team relay races and other activities in the “Zero Gravity” inflatables room. The registration fee is $59 if registered by Dec. 18. Camp is open to ages 7-12

and a lunch in included. Space is limited. For more information call Lazer Kraze at 859-3715729 or see the Web site at Kraze.com.

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Donald Davis

Donald D. Davis, 81, Elsmere, died Dec. 12, 2009, at Hospice of St. Elizabeth Healthcare, Edgewood. He worked for McLean Trucking Co. in Sharonville, was a printer for 15 years with Gibson Greeting Card Co., a Korean War Marine Corps veteran, member of Teamsters Local 100 and Erlanger Church of Christ. Survivors include his wife, Joyce A. Davis; son, Steven D. Davis of Florence; daughters, Susan E. Willis of Foster and Diane Cain of Covington; and five grandsons.

FA THE

December 17, 2009

| DEATHS | Editor Brian Mains | bmains@nky.com | 578-1062 BIRTHS

|

POLICE

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Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Elsmere and Erlanger

N K Y. c o m

DEATHS

Connley Brothers Funeral Home, Latonia, handled the arrangements. Memorials: Erlanger Church of Christ, 485 Graves Ave., Erlanger, KY 41018; or Shriners Hospitals for Children, 3229 Burnet Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45229.

Hazel Hahn

Hazel Addington Hahn, 87, Latonia, died Dec. 9, 2009, at Rosedale Manor Nursing Home, Covington. She was a statistical clerk with National Underwriters in Cincinnati and a member of Ashland Avenue

Baptist Church in Latonia. Her husband, Paul Hahn, died previously. Survivors include her stepson, Paul D. Hahn of Erlanger; stepdaughters, Billie Tallon of Elsmere, Phyllis Tanner of Erlanger and Joyce Busch of Paducah; sister, Betty Snyder of Covington; brothers, William Addington of Covington and Donald Addington of Florence; 13 step-grandchildren; and several step-great-grandchildren. Burial was in Forest Lawn Memorial Park, Erlanger.

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Memorials: Ashland Avenue Baptist Church, 2735 Ashland Ave., Latonia, KY 41015.

Norma Jansen

Norma Jansen, 88, Erlanger, died Dec. 12, 2009, at Hospice of St. Elizabeth Healthcare, Edgewood. She was a homemaker and member of St. Henry Parish, Elsmere. Her husband, Fred Jansen, died in 1976. Survivors include her daughters, Pam Lawrence of Erlanger and Jennifer Lawrence of Fort Mitchell. Burial was in Forest Lawn Memorial Park, Erlanger. Memorials: Hospice of St. Elizabeth Healthcare, 483 South Loop Road, Edgewood, KY 41017.

Joseph Kreinest

Joseph Mel Kreinest, 93, Erlanger, died Dec. 6, 2009, at Hos-

of Northern Kentucky Publishes every Tuesday in The Kentucky Enquirer, every Thursday in The Community Recorder. Search ads online any day, any time at NKY.com.

pice of Cincinnati, Blue Ash. He was a salesman and driver for Grennann and Tastyee Bakery in Cincinnati and a World War II Army veteran. Survivors include his wife, Theresa Roth Kreinest; daughters, Rose Burch of Cincinnati and Joyce Weiss of Florida; five grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. Burial was in Gate of Heaven Cemetery, Cincinnati. Linnemann Funeral Home, Erlanger, handled the arrangements. Memorials: St. Henry High School, 3755 Scheben Drive, Erlanger, KY 41018; or Hospice of Cincinnati, 4310 Cooper Road, P.O. Box 633597, Cincinnati, OH 452633597.

Rebecca Jasper-Mattingly

Rebecca “Becca” Jasper-Mattingly, 37, Covington, a homemaker, died Dec. 6, 2009, at her home. Survivors include her husband, Mark Mattingly; daughters, Stevie Mattingly of Covington and Elisha Mattingly of Covington; sons, Daniel Mattingly of Covington and Mark Mattingly Jr. of Covington; mother, Becky Vest of Independence; stepfather, David Hampton Sr. of Erlanger; sisters, Donna Wilson of

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Mary Louise McCarthy, 95, Erlanger, died Nov. 27, 2009, at Baptist Village Care Center, Erlanger. She was an elementary school teacher for 32 years with Roosevelt School in Cincinnati and various schools in Northern Kentucky, member of Cathedral Basilica of Assumption in Covington and Mother of God Church in Covington. Survivors include her nephew, Michael McCarthy of Los Angeles, Calif. and niece, Maureen McCarthy, Aptos, Calif. Burial was in Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Paris, Ky. Don Catchen & Son Funeral Home, Elsmere, handled the arrangements.

David Newman

David L. Newman, 50, formerly of Silver Grove, died Dec. 8, 2009, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He was a member of the Jokers Bike Club and was employed by Camco Chemical. Survivors include his wife, Lettie Newman; sons, David Kerish of Union, Randy Kerish of Orlando, Fla., Brandan Newman of Florence; stepson, Larry Erskine of Flemmingsburg; step-daughters, Regina Cuneo of Newport and Tracy Reed of Dayton, Ky.; brothers, Darryl Newman of Silver Grove, Mike Newman of Erlanger and Jason Newman of Melbourne; 17 grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren. Burial was at the Dunaway Cemetery, Beattyville.

Frank Santini Jr.

Frank Anthony Santini Jr., 45, Covington, died Dec. 6, 2009, at his home. His son, Frank Santini, died earlier this year. Survivors include his father, Frank Santini of Elsmere; mother, Patricia Phelps of Alexandria; stepfather, Lloyd Phelps of Alexandria; brothers, Huston Haynes of Alexandria and Joey Santini of Covington; sisters, Lisa Neiser of Alexandria and Misty Callahan of Alexandria; and one granddaughter. Burial was in St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas.

Harry Serra

Harry R. Serra, 63, of Elsmere, died Dec. 8, 2009, at Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Corryville. He was a machinist and supervisor at International Knife and Saw. His son, Harry R. Serra Jr., died previously. Survivors include daughters, Angela Ihli of Crescent Springs and Heather Hamilton of Florence; son, Adam Serra; brother, Frank Serra of Elsmere; sisters, Shirley Gonzales of Lexington, Margie Cannada of Elsmere and Jeanie Karnes of El Paso, Texas and six grandchildren. Burial was in Forest Lawn Memorial Park, Erlanger. Memorials: American Cancer Society, 297 Buttermilk Pike, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017.

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On the record

Erlanger Recorder

December 17, 2009

B7

POLICE REPORTS ERLANGER/ CRESCENT SPRINGS Arrests/citations

Everett J Gaskins, 20, 2883 Madison Pike, third degree criminal trespassing at 145 Barren River Road, Dec. 5. Kalen J Bowles, 24, 28 Linden Hill Court, theft by unlawful taking at 28 Linden Hill Court, Dec. 4. Edward B Hinkle Jr., 29, 324 Sunset Avenue, second degree assault at 324 Sunset Avenue, Dec. 5. Billy W Pickering, 27, 618 Oak Street, second degree burglary at 569 Walnut Street, Dec. 2.

Incidents/investigations Burlgary

Michael N Kinney, 31, 2531 Dixie Highway, theft by unlawful taking, Dec. 6.

Criminal mischief

$7,500 worth of vehicle damage reported at 3361 Spruce Tree Lane, Dec. 5.

Incidents/investigations Criminal mischief

Possession of controlled substance

$500 worth of damage to structure at 2530 Chelsea Park, Dec. 8. $100 worth of damage to office equipment at 54 Beechwood Drive, Dec. 7.

$20 worth of drugs/narcotics seized at 2517 Hazelwood Drive, Dec. 6.

Theft

$1,130 worth of jewelry reported stolen at 203 Timberlake Avenue, Dec. 4. $490 worth of computer hardware reported stolen at 2436 Wood Hill Court, Dec. 7.

Fraudulent use of credit card

$551.95 reported stolen at 24 Greenbriar Avenue, Dec. 7.

Theft

$139 worth of computer hardware reported stolen at 2100 Dixie Highway, Dec. 9.

FORT MITCHELL

INDEPENDENCE

Arrests/citations

$8,028 worth of jewelry reported stolen at 542 Perimeter Drive, Dec. 7.

Todd L Justice, 43, 2306 Danbury Drive, Kenton County warrant, Dec. 4.

Arrests/citations

Teri Hutchinson, 23, 5676 Neptune,

execution of bench warrant for contempt of court libel at 5676 Neptune, Dec. 3. Orien D. Crawford, 31, 38 Joseph Street, exxecution of warrant for criminal possession of a forged instrument, execution of warrant for fraudulent use of credit cards, execution of warrant for terroristic threatening, execution of warrant for violation of a ky epo/dvo, execution of warrant for criminal possession of forged instruments, execution of warrant for theft by unlawful taking at 5409 Madison Pike, Dec. 6. Melissa S. Robbins, 45, 709-2 Cherokee Drive, shoplifting at 6435 Taylor Mill road, Dec. 5. Joshua F. Bussell, 25, 3708 Decoursey Avenue no. 3, alcohol intoxication in a public place at Richardson Road, Dec. 5.

Jarod T. Mckenney, 26, 550 Mt Zion no. 8, execution of warrant for theft by deception, execution of warrant for shoplifting at 3919 Hunters Green Drive, Dec. 7. Brian M. Thoss, 34, 1181 Everwood Lane, reckless driving, dui alcohol at 1181 Everwood Lane, Dec. 5. Franklin T. Robinson, 24, 7028 Alexandria Pike, execution of bench warrant for non-owner operator to maintain required insurance at Briarwood Drive, Dec. 6. Lisa M. Mckinnis, 35, 103 Cleveland

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first five years of its free flapjack philanthropic effort. More than 1,400 IHOP restaurants throughout the United States will once again invite guests to enjoy a free short stack of IHOP’s signature buttermilk pancakes from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. on National Pancake Day. In return, IHOP guests are asked to donate what they would have paid for the free pancakes, or more, to the Children’s Miracle Network hospital in their

Incidents/investigations Burglary

Reported at 6254 Clearchase Crossing, Dec. 4.

Criminal mischief

Reported at 33 Sylvan Drive, Dec. 4. Reported at 11412 Madison Pike, Dec. 5.

Saturday, December 19 7 - 9 pm Located on Petersburg Road (Rt.20) 2 miles west of McDonalds in Hebron. All are welcome.

IHOP free pancake giveaway returns Feb. 23 IHOP has announced plans to serve millions of free pancakes again next year in celebration of National Pancake Day on Tuesday, Feb. 23. Planned as a celebration of friends, family and community, IHOP hopes the program will raise $1.75 million for Children’s Miracle Network, an international nonprofit organization that raises funds for children’s hospitals, and other worthy local causes. 2010 will mark IHOP’s

Avenue, execution of warrant for no registration plates at Madison PIke at ST. Cecilia, Dec. 7. Travis J. Bosley, 30, 61 Sylvan Drive, execution of warrant for failure to appear at 61 Sylvan, Dec. 7.

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Erlanger Recorder

TENN

December 17, 2009

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FLORIDA $99/nt*. Sanibel & Boca Grande Discover the charm & comfort of beachfront vaca tion homes, cozy cottages or spacious affordable condos. *rates from. Grande Island Vacations. 800-962-3314 bocagrandevacations.com

BeautifulBeach.com leads you to NW Florida’s Beach Vacation Rentals along the beaches of South Walton. Luxurious gulf-front homes, seaside condos and cottages. Dune Allen Realty, 50 yrs of excellent service and accommodations. 888-267-2121 or visit www.BeautifulBeach.com

There is a joke among friends here, “It’s a Phoenix that has risen from the ashes. ”When Charles and Allison Hahn Sobieck purchased the property at 502 North Main Street (in Somerset, Kentucky), there was a lot of work to be done, to say the least. With the vision of a B & B and a home in ruins, there were little choices. The dilapidated structure was removed, then reconstructed as it had been in the 1850’s. It’s a brand new home. A bit of an unusual concept for a bed and breakfast. “We reconstructed the home from scratch. This gave us the benefit of designing every amenity possible along the way, ”said Allison Sobieck, owner. Every room is equipped with many amenities you don’t often find in a traditional bed and breakfast, but rather a fine hotel. Every room has a full sized closet with a pair of micro-fiber robes hanging in them, 400- count Egyptian cotton sheets, cable TV with DVD players, queen sized beds, and a host of other things. For instance, 2 rooms have gas fireplaces and 3 rooms have whirlpool tubs. We even offer many add on amenities such as massage, dinner, flowers, etc…

FLORIDA

INDIANA

EAST COAST, NEW SMYRNA BEACH Luxurious oceanfront condos & vacation homes. Closest & best beach to Disney. Ocean Properties Vacation Rentals 800-728-0513 www.oceanprops.com

For more information, Visit the website at: www.doolinhouse.com or call 606-678-9494

SANIBEL ISLAND Quality, beachfront condos. Excellent service! Great rates! www.SanibelIslandVacations.com 1-888-451-7277

’Cause we need a little Christmas ... Make holiday memories at the Comfort Inn, Nashville, Indiana. Live music & theatre thru 12/18. 812-988-6118 ChoiceHotels.com

LOUISIANA

NEW ORLEANS • Sugar Bowl & New Year’s Eve. Premier accomodations, Presidential Suite. Wyndham LaBelle Maison . Only one left! Call now! 1-256-452-9756

SIESTA KEY Condos 2 & 3 bedrm, 2 bath, directly on world-famous Crescent Beach. Owner offers Great Winter Specials! 847-931-9113

A Beautiful Cabin Getaway Gatlinburg/Pigeon Forge. Hot tub, jacuzzi, fireplace, gas grill. $85/nt, 5 nt special $375. 800-793-8699. smokymtncrossrdrentals.com

A Beautiful Luxury Log Cabin Resort minutes from Dollywood & Pigeon Forge! Great amenities, pet friendly cabins. Excellent rates! Call now or visit us online www.hiddenspringsresort.com 1-888-HSR-TENN (477-8366)

NEW YORK MANHATTAN--NYC HOTEL $129/2 persons. Singles $124. Suites $139-$159. Lincoln Ctr area, Hudson River views, 18 flrs, kitchenette, 5 mins to midtown, safe, quiet, luxury area. RIVERSIDE TOWER, Riverside & 80th St. Call 1-800-724-3136 or visit: www.riversidetowerhotel.com

1001523976-01

Beautiful Seagrove Beach Rent & Relax. Nr Destin, between famous Seaside & Rosemary Beach. Cozy Cottages to Gulf Front Condos. Web Specials. 1-800-537-5387 www.garrettbeachrentals.com

1-7 Affordable, Deluxe Chalets & Cabin Rentals. Pigeon Forge in the Smokies. Vacation/Dollywood Specials. Free brochure. Call 1-800-833-9987. www.firesidechalets.com

FT. MYERS. Luxury 2 BR, 2 BA condo overlooking golf course & lake. Nr. airport, shopping & dining. Rental includes golf & country club privileges at reduced price. Owner • 513-260-3395 or 812-537-0495 The rooms are only half of the reason to come to The Doolin House. Owners Charles and Allison just happen to both be chefs. Some of the breakfast specialties include Caramel Banana French Toast and Southern Eggs Benedict (2 fried green tomatoes topped with 2 slices of smoked bacon, 2 eggs over easy and Hollandaise). Chuck is usually in charge of breakfast and tries to do new and different things every day. Chef Chuck pointed out, “It’s fun to experiment with breakfast. It’s the one meal that encompasses all foods. It’s perfectly acceptable to see smoked salmon or a pork cutlet at the breakfast table. ”For those in no rush to rise and shine, breakfast in bed is served at no additional charge. When you need a weekend get away that’s not too far from home or you are planning your summer vacation to beautiful Lake Cumberland, remember that The Doolin House Bed and Breakfast is only a phone call away.

TENNESSEE

NORTH CAROLINA EMERALD ISLE. Ocean Front luxury vacation homes with community pool. Call for free brochure. 1-252-354-5555 Spinnaker’s Reach Realty www.SpinnakersReach.com

CHALET VILLAGE www.chaletvillage.com Cozy cabins to luxurious chalets Fully furnished, hot tubs, pool tables. Check SPECIALS, availability and book online 24/7, or call 1-800-722-9617

GATLINBURG. Affordable rates. Fully furnished. 1-8 bdrms. Chalets, Cabins, Privacy, Views, Hot Tubs, Jacuzzis, Fireplaces. 1-800-235-2661 www.alpinechaletrentals.com

SOUTH CAROLINA CLEARWATER - Indian Rocks Beach 2br, 2ba Gulf Front condo. Heated pool, balcony. Many up grades. 513-771-1373, 260-3208 www.go-qca.com/condo

SEABROOK EXCLUSIVES Villas & Private Homes. Ocean, golf, tennis, equestrian. Pet friendly rentals. Free brochure. Book online! 888-718-7949. www.seabrookexclusives.com

www.AUNTIEBELHAMS.com Gatlinburg-Pigeon Forge. Vacation in a beautiful log cabin or chalet with hot tub, Jacuzzi, views & pool tables. Call about specials! 800-436-6618

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