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RECORDER

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Elsmere and Erlanger kynews@communitypress.com Dixie Heights sophomore Christopher Schoettker swims one leg of the 200-yard butterfly relay in the race.

Volume 14, Issue 37 © 2010 The Community Recorder ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

T h u r s d a y, D e c e m b e r

9, 2010

Web site: NKY.com

B E C A U S E C O M M U N I T Y M AT T E R S

Hoopin’ it up

St. Henry kids learn basketball basics at camp

As students gear up for a couple of weeks off this holiday season, the Kenton County Library is doing some gearing up of its own. The library kicked off a reading program for the month of December that area kids 12 and under can participate in. Read more about the program, and how to sign up. SCHOOLS, A6 JASON BRUBAKER/STAFF

Mike Brungs goes over some basic dribbling drills during basketball camp at St. Henry on Dec. 5.

Winterland walk

Pet pics

Pet pictures with Santa Claus will be taken 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Dec. 11-12 at Complete Pet Mart on Buttermilk Crossing in Crescent Springs. Santa will be there for another round of pet photos on Dec. 18-19. Donations go to Friends of the Shelter, a local humane organization that assists Northern Kentucky residents with spay or neuter for their pets. For more information, call Bonnie at 859-371-8380.

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Think you know everything there is to know about your favorite holiday movies? Look at this week’s Holida Movie quiz to see if your smarts match up with what our crack team of reporters and movie fans came up with to stump you. LIFE, B1

To place an ad, call 283-7290.

By Jason Brubaker jbrubaker@nky.com

Winter reading

Independence residents enjoyed light snow, brisk temperatures, and downtown last Saturday night for the city’s 14th Annual Christmas Walk. Hot cocoa a and cookies were plentiful as businesses, and the city, along Madison Pike opened their doors for visitors. NEWS, A2

50¢

JASON BRUBAKER/STAFF

Mike Brungs prepares to watch as Ashlyn Schlake shows off some her ball-handling abilities.

Twelve years into running the annual winter basketball camp at St. Henry Parish in Elsmere, Mike Brungs still can pick out one of his favorite moments. “On year, we had a little girl who couldn’t even get the ball up to the rim in the first week,” he recalled. “So we worked and worked, and in the last week, with her mom holding a video camera, she made a basket during a game. To see her reaction and her smile that’s the kind of thing that keeps me energized to do this.” This year’s camp officially started on Dec. 5, with about 20 campers braving the cold weather to hit the gym and learn some basketball basics. Since the camp, which is on Sunday afternoons for one hour, is for kids in kindergarten through second grade, Brungs said they work almost exclusively on the fundamentals for the first six weeks, on everything from basketball terminology to the proper way to shoot a basket. They then use the final two weeks to play some scrimmages to show off their newly-acquired skills. “I figure in other leagues, the practice time is usually so limited that they don’t get a chance to

work as much on basic things like dribbling and passing,” explained Brungs. “So that’s our biggest focus, and I think it’s good for the kids to learn the fundamentals now, so they’ll be prepared if they move on and play later.” To help corral the campers and keep things running smoothly, Brungs enlists several volunteer coaches who assist with drills, keep the kids focused and ensure that the errant basketballs flying around the gym don’t meet up with the face of a unsuspecting camper. “It gets to be a little crazy sometimes with everyone throwing up shots and things like that,” said St. Henry eighth-grader Hannah Blackburn, one of the assistants, as she shot baskets with a camper. “But it’s a lot of fun, and I like working with all the kids, because you can see they’re having fun too.” Brungs agreed. He said the camp had been going for about four years before he took over, and now it’s something he looks forward to all year. “Oh, this is fantastic,” he said. “I love basketball and a I love working with the kids, so it’s perfect for me. Nothing beats seeing the kids’ smiles and knowing they’re proud of themselves.” For more information about the camp, visit www.sthenryel.com.

Book links generations of friends, cities By Jason Brubaker jbrubaker@nky.com

It’s been said you can’t judge a book by its cover. But don’t tell that to Gary Hansman and Tom Heist. Hansman, the owner of Gramer’s Market in Erlanger, and Heist, who runs Kremer’s Market in Crescent Springs, both have family members featured on the cover of the new “Images of America: Villa Hills” book, which was released by author Deborah Kohl Kremer this week. It is Kremer’s third book, and features over 120 pages of historical photographs showing the growth of Villa Hills over the years. “Those books are pretty cool, just to see how much things have changed over the years,” said Hansman. “I’m anxious to flip through it and see what it looks like.”

However, it’s the cover of the book that has Hansman and Heist excited. The front picture shows five farmers leaning on an old farm truck, presumably before taking their goods to the market for sale. Those five farmers include Hansman’s father, Ray, as well as Heist’s grandfather and great-grandfather - Urban Kremer and Frank Kremer Sr. “It’s definitely a cool thing to look on the cover and see my family,” said Heist. “It really touches you to see how they did things back then, and it fills you with a lot of pride.” Heist also drew a parallel from the cover to he and Hansman, who have become good friends over the years. “Our relatives were both small farmers who worked hard, and we’re both small business owners who are doing the same thing,” he

Images of America: Villa Hills

The new “Images of America: Villa Hills” book by author Deborah Kremer Kohl, is available at most local retailers, and will be available to purchase at the upcoming book signings. The first signing will be at the Villa Hills Civic Club on Dec. 10 at 6 p.m., followed by another signing at Kremer’s Market on Dec. 11 at 1 p.m. Finally, Kremer will be at the Barnes & Noble in Florence on Dec. 16 at 7 p.m. for her final book signing of the year.

said. “It’s just kind of neat that his dad and my grandfather were friends, and now he and I are friends.” Hansman agreed, adding that his dad was thrilled to see his pic-

ture on the cover. In fact, he said the 84-year old plans to attend at least one of the book signings scheduled throughout the month, including the kick-off party at the Villa Hills Civic Club on Dec. 10. “I know he’s really excited, because he will remember a lot of the stuff in the book,” said Gary. “It’s just a cool thing to see him on the cover, along with Tom’s family, and know that everyone is going to see that.” The official kick-off party will be at the VHCC beginning at 6 p.m. There will also be another book signing at Kremer’s Market, located at 755 Buttermilk Pike, on Dec. 11 from 1 - 3 p.m. “The book looks really cool, and having my family on the cover is just a great feeling,” said Heist. “I think this is something people will really enjoy.”

State tax program could benefit area By Jason Brubaker jbrubaker@nky.com

A new state income tax credit program that starts in January could impact several Kenton County cities in a positive way. The Kentucky Small Business Investment Credit, part of Governor Steve Beshear’s Incentives for a New Kentucky legislation, provides tax credits for small businesses that that “create, fill and maintain one or more new, eligible

jobs and invests at least $5,000 in qualifying equipment or technology.” The program was originally scheduled to begin in 2012, but was accelerated by the General Assembly in a 2010 special session. The program, which was announced in a press release on Dec. 6, comes as welcome news for many local cities who are trying to attract more businesses. In Erlanger, the city council is only a few months removed from

approving their own tax credit program for new businesses, and city administrator Linda Carter said that the city is on board with any program that could attract new businesses for the city. “Small businesses are a vital part of our community, and if this is something that entices more of them, then we’re certainly okay with that,” she said. “They’re not only important to the identity of the city, but they also make up the majority of our

businesses, so we’d love to have even more. Hopefully, this will help that happen.” According to the press release, the program provides state income tax credits ranging $3,500 to $25,000 per eligible small business, and states that “most small businesses with 50 or fewer employees are considered eligible for the program.” More information about the program can be found at www.thinkkentucky.com/KSBIC.

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Independence celebrates holiday at 22 venues By Regan Coomer rcoomer@nky.com

Up to 50% Off Sale extended through November 30, 2010.

A timely snowfall made the 14th Annual Independence Christmas Walk fit for a Irving Berlin song Saturday Dec. 4. Residents came out to enjoy the season at many venues in two different parts of the city: the area surrounding the Kenton County Courthouse and the area surrounding the Independence City Building.

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Joining the annual activities, like a visit with Santa and Mrs. Claus, camel rides and a petting zoo were new holiday spots, including a dance recital, holiday craft making, a live nativity

scene and a Victorian home open house. Mayor Chris Moriconi kicked off the event with a tree lighting at the courthouse.

County could increase jail booking fees By Regan Coomer

Kenwood Towne Centre Tri-County Mall Florence Mall Northgate Mall Eastgate Mall

REGAN COOMER/STAFF

Independence residents braved the snow and cold to celebrate Christmas at the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2010 Christmas Walk Saturday, Dec. 4. The Billiter family, Emily, Allen, Joshua and Jacob, looked on while Mayor Chris Moriconi led the tree lighting.

When inmates are processed in the jail, currently they are charged $30. Kenton County Jailer Terry Carl recommended the fee be increased to $35 per inmate, which he estimates could generate an additional $25,000 to $30,000 a year for the jailâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s budget. The fee, which has not been changed for five years, charged county inmates more than $154,000 last year. The Kenton County Fiscal Court is set to vote on the issue at the Dec. 9 special meeting. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Booking is our most expensive thing because not only do we have a lot of deputies there booking, but we also have medical people evaluating them as they

Index

Calendar ......................................B2 Classifieds.....................................C Food.............................................B4 Obituaries....................................B6 Police...........................................B7 Schools........................................A6 Sports ..........................................A5 Viewpoints ..................................A8

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Elsmere and Erlanger

come in,â&#x20AC;? Carl said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That cost is very expensive.â&#x20AC;? Counting the amount of employeesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; salaries and benefits plus utilities, Carl estimates the county spends about $260,000 annually on booking. In order to come close to meeting costs, the county would have to charge around $50, Carl said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re never ever going to be able to meet any of our costs. We can just offset our costs.â&#x20AC;? Oftentimes, Deputy Judge-executive Joe Shriver said at a recent meeting, inmates donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have cash to pay their fees. In those cases, a negative balance is put on their account. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When frequent flyers come back to the facility, if they have a negative balance, it can be deducted at that time,â&#x20AC;? he said. Increasing the fee is one way to relieve the burden on taxpayers, Carl said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Inmates get themselves in a jam and it shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be up to the taxpayers to take care of their expenses.â&#x20AC;?

RECORDER

Find news and information from your community on the Web Elsmere â&#x20AC;&#x201C; nky.com/elsmere Erlanger â&#x20AC;&#x201C; nky.com/erlanger Kenton County â&#x20AC;&#x201C; nky.com/kentoncounty News Brian Mains | Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1062 | bmains@nky.com Jason Brubaker | Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1060 | jbrubaker@nky.com Regan Coomer | Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1061 | rcoomer@nky.com Melanie Laughman | Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . 513-248-7573 | mlaughman@nky.com James Weber | Sports Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1054 | jweber@nky.com Advertising Debbie Maggard | Advertising Manager. . . . . . 578-5501 | dmaggard@nky.com Deb Kaya | Account Rep . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-5507 | dkaya@nky.com Delivery For customer service. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 781-4421 Sharon Schachleiter | Circulation Manager . . 442-3464 | sschachleiter@nky.com Cathy Kellerman | District Manager . . . . . . . . 442-3461 | ckellerman@nky.com Classified To place a Classified ad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283-7290 | www.communityclassified.com To place an ad in Community Classified, call 283-7290.


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Erlanger Recorder


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Erlanger Recorder

News

December 9, 2010

Reality Tuesday a Park Hills staple for a decade By Regan Coomer rcoomer@nky.com After 10 years in business, Park Hills’ Reality Tuesday Café is still building a “community within a community.” So says co-owner Traci Gregg, a self-described “person person,” who runs the part-bakery, part-cafe, partcoffee shop during the day while husband Bill spends his nights at Reality baking fresh pastries, cookies, muffins and donuts using recipes passed down from his great-uncle, a pastry chef in New York City. “One part of me can’t believe where this 10 years went, but another part of me feels like it was just yesterday. It has defined us. This is who we are. We are Reality,” Traci said of the place that was surprisingly

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born out of a “smart aleck” joke. “I said, ‘Look, the place across the street is for rent. Why don’t we open it up and sell coffee and donuts?” That night, the Greggs toured the space and decided they were going to go for it. “We had no idea what we were doing,” she laughed. Once Traci and her husband underwent coffee and pastry crash courses, the awards, now hung up around the homey cafe, started rolling in: City Beat named Reality Best New Coffeehouse in 2002, The Sunday Challenger named Reality Best Local Cup of Joe in 2005 and most recently, in 2009 Cincinnati Magazine deemed Reality Tuesday as the home of Cincinnati’s Best Cheesecake. While Traci acknowledges the high-quality of their homemade organic fare, she says in reality, Reality is all about the “Cheers” atmosphere. “Something I think we do a really good job with is

The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet seeks information about unmarked graves on the KY 16 Taylor Mill Road Project (Item No. 6-344.21; FD04 C059 6471402 R) in Kenton County. A private cemetery at the corner of Taylor Mill and Hands Pike is impacted by the project. It is located behind the former JD’s Food Mart and Gold Star Chili. Anyone with information, please contact Right of Way Agent Jason Rankin by phone at (859) 341-2700 or by mail at 421 Buttermilk Pike, Covington, KY 41017.

Reality Tuesday Café owner Traci Gregg serves up snowflake cupcakes to regulars Mark Padgett and Joe Vogelsang Dec. 6. helping you start your day and being a source of encouragement for your day,” she said, pausing a moment to talk to a sixyear-old patron. “We know their name, we know their order. I think the whole connectivity part is just huge.”

Reality Tuesday barista Amanda Lord agreed, saying “That’s my favorite part of the job; the fact that you see the same people every day, especially in the morning. You get to know their drinks and you get to know them.”

In the future, Traci and Bill, who have five children under the age of five, hope to concentrate on streamlining the business; putting themselves in more of an administrative role. The Greggs also hope to make Reality a name in the wed-

ding cake market. “Thanks a latte to our customers,” said Traci with a laugh. “We can’t open our doors unless there’s somebody willing to come through.”

New employee ordinance causing stir By Jason Brubaker jbrubaker@nky.com

With a new mayor set to come into office in January, an ordinance recently

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passed by the current Villa Hills city council and outgoing mayor adopting a Civil Service System is causing some debate. The ordinance, which was adopted at a special meeting on Nov. 29, establishes guidelines for the hiring, firing and suspension of city employees. Under the system, a civil service commission is appointed by the mayor, and that commission has to approve decisions regarding an employee’s work status. “We wanted to do this to protect our employees,” said councilman George Bruns, who said he brought the ordinance before the council. “It’s a state statute, and we decided it was something we wanted to adopt.” However, while the ordinance was passed according to all state regulations, the timing of it has created a unique situation in the city. With newly-elected mayor Mike Martin slated to take office in January, some speculate he would fire

Police Chief Dan Goodenough and Detective Joe Schutzman, who are both named as defendants in a lawsuit Martin currently has filed relating to his 2007 arrest on forgery charges. Those charges were eventually dismissed in Kenton District Court, which prompted Martin’s lawsuit for being “maliciously prosecuted,” which was dismissed by a federal judge and is now in the Sixth District Court of Appeals. For his part, Martin said he found the timing to be “interesting.” He had previously stated he had not made any decisions about potential changes once he entered office, despite the rumors circulating around the city. “The rumors going around with all of this are unbelievable,” he said. “I just don’t see where this ordinance has any benefit to the residents, but I guess it’s something I’ll have to deal with.” Martin also said the ordi-

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nance was unnecessary, as city employees had an appeal process under the city’s old system. In that system, if the mayor made a decision to fire an employee, that employee could appeal to the city council to have their job reinstated. “It’s my understanding that we already had protection in place for our employees, so I don’t understand why this was needed,” he said. “I think it’s upset a lot of residents, because they voted for me to have authority under one system, but now we’re going to have a different system.” Laura Ross, an attorney with the Kentucky League of Cities, said the Civil Service System is complicated and some of the regulations vary depending on the city’s classification. However, she said one of the basic functions of the ordinance is indeed to prevent discriminatory firings, and the guidelines laid out for dismissing an employee are fairly rigid. “In order to fire an employee, it has to be a big reason, such as job inefficiency or insubordination,” she explained. “This system eliminates someone from taking office and just making changes to ‘go in a new direction’ or something along those lines.” Martin admitted that he’s still learning the details of the system, and is unsure how it will affect decisions as he takes office. “I know people think that my running for office was retaliatory and if that’s what’s behind this ordinance, then I think that’s a little short-sighted,” he said. “I don’t see how this is in the best interest of our city, but it’s been passed, and now it’s time to move forward.” The next regularly scheduled council meeting will be Dec. 15 at 7 p.m. at the city building.

Find your community news at nky.com/local


News

Erlanger Recorder

December 9, 2010

A5

Caboose owner seeks railroader stories By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

Dominic Ruschman, 60, can remember when his father worked for the railroad and rode in cabooses out of the former Stevens rail yard of the Chesapeake & Ohio Railway in Silver Grove. To ensure future generations hear the stories of what life was like working on the railroad, Ruschman, a Villa Hills resident and Melbourne native, is seeking firsthand accounts of former railroad employees and their family members who remember what life was like when cabooses were still a fixture at the end of every train. Today, cabooses have been replaced by electronic “End of Train” devices, Ruschman said. Cabooses

How to share your story

Dominic Ruschman is seeking stories about people working and living around the railroad as it relates to cabooses. To reach Ruschman, send e-mails to deruschman@aol.com or mail letters to Dominic Ruschman, 2526 Thirs Drive, Villa Hills, KY 41017. were used as working offices and as a place for conductors and brakemen to take a break from the weather when they weren’t walking the length of a train to check for any problems with the freight cars. Ruschman purchased a former Louisville and Nashville Railroad steel caboose and had it moved to a piece of land he owns

south of Alexandria off Pleasant Ridge Road. While some cabooses remain preserved in this fashion, and the idea of the caboose remains in toy train stores, it’s important to remember the intricate role the caboose played in moving goods across the country and how humans used them, he said. There used to be a lifestyle associated with the railroad and the entire community around the tracks was integrated into it at one time, he said. Ruschman said old railroaders and their families have stories to tell, and he’s only looking for the general stories, and not looking to identify all the people involved in a story. “I think people who played a big part in that era might want that preserved,”

he said. Growing up around railroaders, Ruschman said he got to travel with his father on the trains sometimes although his father wasn’t supposed to let anyone on the trains. Ruschman said he remembered that railroaders could be gruff and crude, but also kind, and many of them were some of the nicest people he ever met. One time a conductor he knew saw a hobo in the winter on a train, and the conductor went and bought a bag of doughnuts and cup of coffee into the box car door and yelled out to the hobo, Ruschman said. “He said, ‘I don’t know that you’re here, I don’t want to know that you’re here, but it’s cold so here.’” Ruschman said he’s looking for more railroad

stories before the generation that worked around them aren’t here anymore to retell their memories. Ruschman said people who want to share their stories could have worked in the shops on cabooses, or anywhere around the trains from the locomotive at the front of a train back to the caboose. “I would defer to the accounts of those whose hands held the handrails, sat in the cupolas looking for smoke and sparks from the cars’ axles ahead, and all the other duties of the work crews and the families that waited for them to return home from their trips,” Ruschman said. Ruschman has previously written the book “Evolution of a community: Thirs Landing Subdivision, Buttermilk Pike, Villa Hills,

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Dominic Ruschman, 60, of Villa Hills, holds a photograph of himself as a young boy standing in front of a New York Central steam locomotive that had made a transfer run of railroad cars to the Chesapeake & Ohio Railway’s Stevens Yard in Silver Grove where Ruschman’s father worked as a conductor. Ky.,” a story starting with the history of the former Thirs Dairy Farm.

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SCHOOLS A6

Erlanger Recorder

December 9, 2010

ACHIEVEMENTS

Editor Brian Mains | bmains@nky.com | 578-1062

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NEWS

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ACTIVITIES

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HONORS

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Elsmere and Erlanger

N K Y. c o m

RECORDER

JASON BRUBAKER/STAFF

Lloyd Memorial senior Lou Woods (back left) prepares to serve during the Volley For Wishes volleyball tournament at Scheben Gym on Dec. 5. The tournament helped raise money for the Make A Wish Foundation to benefit a local girl.

PHOTOS: NKY.COM/SHARE

Pizza party

Can you dig it?

Beechgrove Elementary School fourth grader, Sydney Hicks, enjoys her pizza and soft drink reward at the “Pizza with the Principal” party for earning honor roll status during the first grading period.

Charity volleyball tournament a success By Jason Brubaker jbrubaker@nky.com

Lou Woods can easily pinpoint the reasons for his team not lasting long in the first-ever Volley For Wishes volleyball tournament. “Umm...we’ll go with a lack of athleticism, too small of a court and bad officiating,” said the Lloyd Memorial senior with a big smile. “I think with a better ref and a bigger court, and maybe a lot of luck, we’d have easily won this thing.” His teammate, teacher Brendhan Haynes, wasn’t quite so sure. “I’m not sure what it would have taken for us to win,” he said. “But I will tell you this - nobody had more fun than our team.” Fun was only one theme of the weekend however, as the two-day tournament featured 16 teams battling in Erlanger’s Scheben Gym, as well as Tichenor Middle School. The tournament, organized by Lloyd teacher Jessica Rouse, raised over $2,000 for the Make-AWish Foundation of Ohio, Kentucky and Indiana, Southern Ohio Region. Rouse, who volunteers

as a wish-granter for the foundation, said the proceeds will go toward helping a local girl have her wish granted. To help with the tournament, Rouse enlisted the help of the school’s Gold Rush Club, a club dedicated to community service. The kids helped officiate the games, run the scoreboard, and even sold baked goods and T-shirts at the tournament to help raise more money. “We didn’t really know what to expect going into this, so we’re pretty pleased to reach our goal,” said Rouse. “It’s been a pretty fun weekend, and I think everyone had a good time.” Opening the tournament to anyone, regardless of volleyball experience or ability, provided for some interesting match-ups through the weekend, said Rouse. Some of the teams were composed of Lloyd students and/or faculty members, while there were also teams from local businesses or representing other area schools. “We’ve had some really competitive games, and some - what’s the nice way to say this - some not real

competitive games,” she said, laughing. “But overall, it’s been pretty good, and the biggest thing is just raising the money, which we were able to do.” Haynes agreed. “I’ve got no problem coming out here and making a fool out of myself for a good cause like this,” he said. “It was a lot of fun, and I’m glad it went so well.” Rouse said the tournament is just the first step, however, as the Gold Rush Club plans to have a few more fundraising events throughout the year to raise even more money. She said they’ll try to involve the community as much as possible in those events, and by the end of the year, hopefully they’ll have raised enough money to help grant a wish. “It’s a terrific cause, and we’re just going to what we can to reach our overall goal,” she said. For more information about the Gold Rush Club, including upcoming events, visit http://lloydmemorialhs.blogspot.com.

Matthew Carpenter, a fifth grade student at Beechgrove Elementary, shows off his dance moves at the “Pizza with the Principal” party for Honor Roll students.

Beechgrove Elementary School fourth graders, Carson Lee and Corey Duke, enjoy pizza and soft drinks as a reward for earing honor roll status at the “Pizza with the Principal” party.

Winter reading program offers fun, prizes for kids By Jason Brubaker jbrubaker@nky.com

December may only contain a couple weeks of school for students, but that doesn’t mean they still can’t pick up a few good books. The Kenton County Public Library is running a winter reading program throughout the month, offering rewards for kids who read at least five books and fill out a book log. The program, dubbed “Reading is Snow Wonderful,” is open to kids up to the age of 12, and book logs are available at any of the three branches. “It’s just a fun way to

make sure kids are still reading over the holiday break,” said Lise Tewes, the children’s program coordinator at the Erlanger Branch. “We figure if kids are going to be inside because of the cold and snow, it’s better to read than just play video games or watch TV all the time.” Tewes said all kids who complete five books will receive a small prize once they turn in their book log a package of special edition holiday Silly Bandz, the popular brand-name rubber bands that are shaped like various animals and objects. “Those are the big things right now- we see kids

wearing tons of them!” said Tewes. However, the prizes don’t stop there. For each additional book log the kids turn in after their first, they’ll earn an additional raffle ticket, which will put them in the running for a much bigger, secret surprise. Each of the three branches will announce their raffle winner in early January. “The more you read, the better your chances,” said Tewes. “We want kids to be excited about reading, and this is a way to do that.” For more information, or to pick up a book log, visit www.kentonlibrary.org or contact your local branch.

Bradley Beiting, Beechgrove fifth grader, shows off his dance moves at the “Pizza with the Principal” party for Honor Roll Students.

Lindeman to put on holiday version of ‘Idol’ Lindeman Elementary will put on a special holiday version of “American Idol,” complete with audience interaction, on Dec. 16. Dubbed “North Pole Star,” the show was put together by teacher Kaitlin Stephens and will feature

“Nicky Snowcrest” as the host, reindeer as contestants, and Santa and Mrs. Claus as judges, along with a disgruntled British producer.. After the final song, the audience will be given ballots to vote for the winner, while at the same time tak-

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ing part in signing Christmas carols with the 4th and 5th graders. The show will be held at the Dietz Auditorium on Dec. 16 at 7 p.m. For more information, contact the school at 727-1188.


SPORTS BRIEFLY

The week at Lloyd

• The Lloyd girls basketball team lost 49-42 to Williamstown, Nov. 29. • In boys basketball, Lloyd beat Ludlow 70-32, Nov. 30. Lloyd’s Donnie Cheatum was the team’s top-scorer with 22 points. • In girls basketball, Brossart beat Lloyd 55-27, Dec. 1. Lloyd’s top-scorer was Fulmer with six points.

The week at St. Henry

• The St. Henry girls basketball team beat Scott 56-39, Nov. 29. St. Henry’s top-scorer was Abby Janszen with 19 points. Scott’s top-scorer was Lauren Tibbs with 15 points. On Dec. 2, St. Henry beat East Jessamine 75-24. St. Henry’s top-scorer was Jessica Knaley with 18 points. • The Bishop-Brossart boys basketball team beat St. Henry 59-49, Nov. 30. St. Henry’s Darius Meiman was the team’s top-scorer with 18 points.

The week at Dixie Heights

• The Dixie Heights girls basketball team beat Holmes 46-39, Nov. 30. Holmes’ Dionna Wear was the team’s topscorer with 22 points. On Dec. 2, Dixie Heights beat Dayton 51-29. Dixie Heights’ top-scorer was Meredith Hartfiel with 16 points. On Dec. 4, Dixie Heights beat Holy Cross 62-53 in the Dixie Heights Invitational finals. Dixie Heights’ top-scorer was Meredith Hartfiel with 221 points. Holy Cross’ topscorer was Ronney with 15 points. • In boys basketball, Dixie Heights beat Villa Madonna 67-30, Dec. 3. Dixie’s topscorer was Jordan Hassell with 15 points.

The week at Scott

• The St. Henry girls basketball team beat Scott 56-39, Nov. 29. Scott’s top-scorer was Lauren Tibbs with 15 points. The Scott boys lost 62-56 to Mason County, Dec. 4. Scott’s top-scorer was Tibbs with 17 points. • In boys basketball, Scott beat Calvary Christian 87-30, Nov. 30. Scott’s Cameron Haynes was the team’s topscorer with 17 points.

The week at Simon Kenton

• The Simon Kenton boys basketball team beat Harrison County 68-47, Nov. 29. Ryan Mullen was Simon’s top-scorer with 12 points. On Dec. 3, the Simon Kenton boys beat Gallatin County 72-61. Simon’s top-scorer was Matt Reilly with 21 points. • In wrestling, Ryle beat Simon Kenton 39-27, Dec. 1. Simon’s Parrot beat North in a 2-1 major decision; Yocum beat Ahern in a 6-2 major decision; Cooper pinned Hoskins in 1 minute, 20 seconds; Herald pinned Stephens in 1 minute, 5 seconds. • In girls basketball, Simon Kenton beat Grant County 8037, Dec. 3. Simon’s top-scorer was Sydni Wainscott with 30 points. On Dec. 4, the Simon Kenton girls beat Conner 67-46. Simon’s top-scorer was Wainscott with 25 points.

The week at Holy Cross

• The Holy Cross girls basketball team beat Cooper 6463, Dec. 2. Holy Cross’ topscorer was DeAsia Beal with 22 points. Holy Cross beat Beechwood 52-35, Dec. 3. Holy Cross’ top-scorer was Beal with 21 points.

Erlanger Recorder

December 9, 2010

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | Editor Melanie Laughman | mlaughman@communitypress.com | 513-248-7573

RECREATIONAL

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Elsmere and Erlanger

N K Y. c o m

A7

RECORDER

Williamson leads deep Panda swim team

By James Weber jweber@nky.com

Notre Dame Academy has had several swimmers go to the Division I college level. Ellen Williamson has already put her name in that list and is trying to cement a legacy as one of the best ever in the school. Last February, she set three state records at the 2010 state meet, including former Notre Dame and University of Texas standout Michelle Schroeder. Williamson won the 200 individual medley and 100 butterfly titles at state, plus the 200 medley relay. Williamson signed with the University of Virginia this fall. She leads seven returnees who swam in the state meet last year, leading NDA to third place overall. That includes all four swimmers in

Caitlyn Forman is one of the top returners for the Notre Dame swimming team. that medley relay champion. Head coach Emily Maier is looking for a strong season with several state championship possibilities in different events. Junior Caitlyn Forman set two state records last year. She was on

the medley relay champs and finished second in the backstroke after breaking the state record in the preliminaries. She was also seventh in the 50 free. She and Williamson are both on the National Youth Team and will travel internationally,

Kenton County swim teams hit the pool By James Weber jweber@nky.com

Beechwood

The Tigers said goodbye to key faces from last year, including two Division I college swimmers and head coach Amanda Johnson. The Tigers welcome back former head coach Paula Miller, who will look to keep Beechwood at the top of the combined rankings (boys and girls). Beechwood was combined regional champs last year and state runnerup. While the Tigers lost four individual state titles in Shane Coltharp and Krissie Brandenburg, they return 1.25 others. Justin Youtsey was state diving champion last year. Michael Miller was onefourth of the 200 medley relay champs that won last year. Miller was individual runner-up in the butterfly and signed to swim for the University of Kentucky this fall. Coach Miller said Michael has a chance to win that event this year. Other returning starters are Austin Haney, Stephen O’Hare, Mallory Meier, Annie Davies, Maggie Bushelman, Amanda Haney, Maddie Heist, and Madison Rylee. Most of them have state meet experience. Meier was sixth in the 200 IM at state last year. Top newcomers include Abby Dosker, Abby Shoyat, Bray Zimmerman, Chris Weinstein, and Quinn Sesher.

Covington Catholic

The Colonels finished fourth in the state team standings last year under Richard Dickmann, who returns for his third season as head coach. Sophomore Max Williamson was second in the 200 individual medley and 100 backstroke last year at state. He and junior Hunter Pasek return from a 200 free relay which finished third at state as well as the 400 free relay which finished sixth. Pasek was also an individual qualifier. Sam Mullen and divers Derek Manis and Sam Hehman are other returning starters. Top newcomers are Chase Vennefron and Nate Kunkel.

“Our team is the largest in school history but we are very young,” Dickmann said. “We look to be strong contenders at the regional level and work towards positioning ourselves for the next few years at the state level.”

Covington Latin

Janna Volz has a young but promising team this year. Returning starters include Whitney Ash, Kelly Bilz, Jessica Chan, Olivia KuschKavanagh, Leona Nease, Brenna Walters, Kerry Whiting, Sam Deis (Diving), Eddie Hewett, Sam Hopkins, Stephen McMurtry, Lorenzo Ortiz, EJ Schroeder, and Paul Wintring. McMurtry was the lone state qualifier last year, finishing 19th in the butterfly. Top newcomers include Kara Kanter, Emma Ganshirt, Brett Ziegler, Ceiliah Ahearn, Michael Loftus, Becca Nienaber, Emily Noel, and Patrick Becker (Diving). Covington Latin’s next varsity meet is Dec. 11 at Scott.

Dixie Heights

Ed Cook returns a lot of veterans for the Colonels this season. The boys team was fourth at regionals and seventh at state. The top girls returners are Allison Poweleit, Hannah Gardner, Whitney Sprague, Lindsey Cook, Lauren Curtis, and Callie Budrick The top boys swimmers are Connor Bright, Evan Dulaney, Spencer Franzoi, Cole Garriott, Bailey Harrison, and Christopher Schoettker. Harrison was third in the state in diving last year. Top newcomers include Sammy Huffman and Eric Huffman.

Holmes

Deb Winkler is excited about the growth of the program. The Bulldogs have 18 swimmers this year after only having a handful for many years. Three of them are seniors in Josh Lee, Derek Parson and Sean McDermott.

Holy Cross

The Indians did not submit information to the Recorder.

FILE PHOTO

including a trip to Ireland for a prestigious meet this past summer. Molly Hinken finished in the top six in all four events she swam at state and was on the relay champs. Mackenzie Margroum was also on the 200 medley relay and qualified for state in two individual events. Carly Scheper finished fourth in diiving last year. Natalie Lawson and Julia Johnson also return. The top newcomer is freshman Sharli Brady, who already has state experience swimming for Cooper High School. A versatile athlete, she was top of her class at the club level, Maier said. “We have some incoming freshman that are going to be able to contribute right from the beginning, so collectively, we’re really looking forward to this season,” Maier said.

NKy Sports Hall of Fame to induct 6 PROVIDED

The high school swimmin season commenced in Northern Kentucky with the Ready or Not Relay Swim Meet Nov. 17 at Scott High School. Dixie Heights sophomore Christopher Schoettker swims one leg of the 200yard butterfly relay in the race.

Scott

The Eagles finished 10th in the state meet in boys last year. The top returner is senior Tyler Groneck, who was sixth in the 100 breaststroke at state to medal, and was eighth in the 200 freestyle relay with two fellow returners in Seth Robinson and Michael Sherrard. Groneck was 10th in the 200 medley relay with Sherrard and fellow returner Chase Ford. Groneck was also ninth in the 200 individual medley. Groneck is a regional champion from last year as well. Logan Stevens returns for his junior year after finishing fourth in diving last year. The top girls returners are Markie Duffy in the butterfly and Bridget Fallis in diving.

The Northern Kentucky Sports Hall of Fame will induct new members at 1 p.m. on Wednesday, Dec. 15. The public is invited to the ceremony at the Villa Hills Civic Club, 729 Rogers Road. The inductees are as follows: • Donald Plummer: Plummer has been participating is baseball, football, basketball and golf since he was a young child. He describes his greatest thrill as being selected as captain for the football and baseball team for Newport Catholic High School. What led him to be the captain as a senior in high school was in his freshman year, he was quarterback and linebacker during their undefeated season. In his sophomore years he scored a 65-yard touchdown in his first varsity game. In his senior year he was leading passer, rusher, point scorer, and led his team in tackles and defense. In baseball, he played as catcher, and captain at Newport Catholic High School. • Daniel “Sully” Sullivan: He described his greatest moment in sports was in 1979, when he led his team to the Ninth Region championship during a Highlands versus Holmes regional game. Sully was also head coach at Campbell County High School when his team won the 10th Region title. Sully was also head coach for the 1993 8th region baseball champs at Walton-Verona High School. • Dan Sullivan: He was a football quarterback, basketball guard, baseball catcher, and played tennis and track. He was the head football coach and assistant basketball coach for Ludlow High School for eight

years. He was also awarded the MVP two times in the All NKAC Multiple. • Scott Wiggins: Wiggins made significant contributions to basketball, football and baseball. He played both in the minor and major leagues in baseball for Montreal. His greatest thrill was playing baseball for Northern Kentucky University for three years. • William “Bill” Martin: He began his basketball and baseball career in 1956 at Boone County High School. The significant highlights of his high school sports years were when he received recognition for three varsity letters in basketball, team scorer, and team captain, most points scored in a game, and four varsity letters in baseball. While Bill attended college, he played as team captain, three varsity letters in basketball and scored most points. His high batting average led him to the honors of most valuable player. • Ernestine Miller: While in high school, Miller received the prestigious Babe Ruth Award for athletic ability and outstanding sportsmanship while playing basketball and track. Miller has been playing golf for more than 40 years. While on the board of directors for the Northern Kentucky Lady’s Golf Committee, she procured the Lady’s Kentucky State Amateur Tournament, and the Kentucky State Seniors Tournament. She also organized the Boone County Jaycees, where she served as president, and taking this baseball team to many championships in all classes. The guest speaker will be former Reds pitcher Tom Browning.

Simon Kenton

The Pioneers have a lot of numbers on their roster this year, close to 30 members. SK did not have any state qualifiers last year and is looking to change that.

St. Henry

Louis Rodgers returns for his senior year. He was ninth in 100 breaststroke last year.

Villa Madonna

Jacob VonHandorf is the top returner for VMA under second-year head coach Scott Vennefron. He won the 100 breaststroke at the freshman regional and was top 16 at the varsity regional. Senior Kim Yocom, senior Lauren Vennefron and eighth-grader Monica Spritzky are the top girls swimmers. Lauren placed eighth in the 100 breaststroke at the state meet in 2009 while swimming for Notre Dame. The team starts at Scott’s December Invitational Dec. 8.

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

Season-opening win

Dixie Heights junior center Ellie Ruedebusch looks for someone to pass to during Dixie’s 46-39 win over Holmes in the first game of the Dixie Heights Invitational Tuesday, Nov. 30.


A8

Erlanger Recorder

December 9, 2010

VIEWPOINTS

EDITORIALS

PATRICIA A. SCHEYER/CONTRIBUTOR

Hello Santa

Jaden Green, 2, of Covington, visits with Santa and her great-grandmother who lives in Walton at the annual Christmas on Main celebration in Walton Friday.

CHATROOM If you could be any fictional character, whom would you be and why? “I’d choose to be Yossarian from Joseph Heller’s ‘Catch-22.’ The novel is so funny that it contains a hilarious line in almost every paragraph. Being the center of all the wacky, witty action would be like living in a sitcom. Yossarian is a bomber pilot who can’t catch a break—he has a supervisor who constantly raises the number of missions a cadet has to complete before he can leave. When Yossarian fakes sickness, he spends time in the hospital in a bed next to a Texan who is so talkative that it makes the patients near him get sicker. He can apply to be relieved from missions, but if he does so, he proves himself sane, and therefore isn’t eligible to be relieved on the grounds of insanity. Maybe this guy’s not the most glamorous choice, but the book is a great comedy, and it’s the only thing that can make me laugh about all the red tape in the world.” T.O. “’The Invisible Man.’ I could go into dangerous places and situations, and not fear being discovered and probably killed. “And I could learn the truth about things that divide people, and be able to expose liars for what they are.” B.B. “Federal agent Elliot Ness ... old-fashioned crime fighting where the constitutional rights didn’t play a huge part on investigations and apprehensions.” O.H.R. “I would like to be an intelligent, responsible, honest, ethical member of the U.S. Congress who puts the interests of my country first, as opposed to seeing how much money I can get the federal government to waste in my district or how I could get myself reelected. “I would believe in ‘truth, justice, and the American way,’ play fair and co-operate with my fellow members for the good of our constituents, regardless of their party. “Oops, forgot Superman passed away. Clearly, I would be a fictional character.” F.S.D. “None other than our president, Barack Obama. This guy has lived in a fantasy world since being elected. “His idea after the election was that he was going to part the waters and the flock would follow him for whatever he wanted

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Next question How much do you plan to spend for Christmas or holiday gifts this year? How does it compare to last year? Send your answer to “bmains@nky.com” with Chatroom in the subject line. done. “He has increased our government in size, and spending followed. I still don’t understand what 35 czars are doing besides adding to our deficit spending and inflating government salaries with secretaries, advisers, etc., etc. to the tune of or upward of $1 million per czar’s cabinet. What is the purpose of our House representatives and senators? “To me, if you ever watch CSpan channels, in chamber sessions seems to be a farce – one person does the talking to a bunch of empty seats or people walking around lobbying for something. “I just wish we could go back to basics and do more than freeze salaries. If they would put all government employees into the Social Security system and have the same benefit packages and near salaries as the commoners, the system would be in better shape. “I could go on for ever as there is a lot more so I don’t want to take up the whole paper.” D.J. “Anne Shirley of Green Gables is the fictional character I would most want to be. She is plucky, loves to read and became a teacher. She had a certain joy for life that was inspiring.” K.S. “I guess the talking horse. Just think how it would be – you as a horse who could talk at the race track talking to the other horses and getting the inside of who was going to win the big race even before it began.” L.S. “Although I’m still a believer and do not consider him fictional, I think I would choose Santa Claus. Who else do you know of who is loved by everyone and who loves everyone in return? I do my part to assist him every year.” B.N. “Elizabeth Bennet. Because when all was said and done with the family drama, and the societal pressures in 19th England, she and Mr. Darcy lived happily ever after.” C.A.S.

RECORDER

RECORDER

Library helps academics The first half of the school year is coming to a close, is your student making the grade? The library is an excellent resource to help kids improve their grades and become lifelong readers. Did you know that students who visit the library typically receive improved reading, writing and ACT scores? The staff at each branch are prepared to help children find the information they need to complete school assignments and excel in their academic ventures. We have access to Accelerated Reading programs, a wide variety of books, databases, reference materials, magazines, programs like Hooked on Phonics available for check out, free internet access and more. The libraries weekly and special programs also make a great supplement to the school day. Our gaming and crafting programs are not only fun, they encourage creativity. Children can utilize their design, planning, and creative problem solving skills with the Lego Clubs at the Durr and Erlanger branches. Kids can test their concentration, perseverance and independent thinking skills at Covington’s After School Open Chess Play and Erlanger’s Chess Club. You’re sure to find a program to stimulate your child’s imagination at the Kenton County Public Library.

Jenny Schwartz Community Recorder guest columnist We also offer Puppy Tales, a canine reading mentoring program, at all three branches of the library. Studies show that reading to a dog alleviates anxiety and induces relaxation and lowers blood pressure in children. Dogs don’t tease or correct the child when they make a mistake, so the child feels less stress while reading, which builds their confidence. Participating kids make enormous strides in reading and communication skills while, along the way, building self-esteem, confidence, and social skills. As an added benefit, performance in other subjects tends to improve. The Erlanger Branch offers Reading Buddies, which encourages children who are not native English speakers, and children who want to boost their reading performance to attend. At various

times throughout the month, children aged 2-12 can come and spend time reading with an adult Reading Buddy volunteer. Finally, studies show that library reading programs do actually improve student’s performance in school. An article in the November 2010 edition of the School Library Journal, states that students who take part in their local library’s summer reading program significantly improve their reading skills. You may be asking, what can I do now, summer is over? Well, beginning December 1, children 12 and under can visit any Kenton County Public Library location for our winter reading program and pick up a "Books are Snow Wonderful" book log. Don’t let them lose learning in the hustle and bustle of the holiday season. Keep them reading with the “Books are Snow Wonderful” reading program and check out all the great programs and resources the Kenton County Public Library has to offer. Visit www.kentonlibrary.org for a full listing of programs, access to the databases or directions. Jenny Schwartz is the Children’s Programmer and School Coordinator at the William E. Durr Branch of the Kenton County Library.

Beshear holds private sector accountable; how about SD1?

On Dec. 2, the Enquirer published an article titled, “Beshear warns Passport Health Plan,” and provided the following quote, “Governor Steve Beshear said Wednesday that the state will terminate Passport Health Plan’s Medicaid contract unless all management officials are replaced and changes are made to ensure openness and more responsible spending.” For some reason, the governor has no problem demanding the private sector fire their management officials if they wish to provide services to Kentucky. Why doesn’t the governor take the same actions with our public-sector in Northern Kentucky? It’s been widely reported that our Northern Kentucky Water District (NKWD) has recklessly spent taxpayers’ money. The attorney general even pointed out this fact in his brief filed with the Public Service Commission (PSC) on Nov. 30. The attorney general wrote, “For a water district, such payments, however noble, are outside of the scope of the district’s authority (and are, at best, uncomfortably on the border of a lawful action).” I’m not an expert in psychobabble, but that sounds

like it’s very questionable behavior. Has the governor publicly demanded all management officials at NKWD be Tom Wurtz replaced for their irresponsiCommunity ble spending? Recorder No! The NKWD guest testified at a columnist hearing before the PSC indicating they had not disclosed to their bonding company the entire bond amount they will need to meet an EPA mandate. Does that behavior not also fit under The governor’s statement that “changes are made to ensure openness?” Why hasn’t the governor demanded the resignation of the oversight commissioners at NKWD and SD1 who failed to monitor the numerous acts of irresponsible spending and openness? The facts are clear. The governor’s inaction is not. The Enquirer also reported on the questionable behavior occurring at Sanitation District 1. The article states “Upon analysis of

the totality of the circumstances, including but not limited to inadequate searches, inordinate delays, implausible explanations, insufficient and incomplete production of records and possible illegal record destruction, there is but one conclusion that can be reached,” Kenton Circuit Judge Sheehan wrote. “(The district) repeatedly and willfully violated the Open Records Act.” The judge ordered SD1 to reimburse a local construction company $38,133.78. Is the governor demanding management officials at SD1 be replaced and changes be made to ensure openness and more responsible spending? I can’t find any action by our governor to defend the taxpayers from the public-sector waste and lack of openness in Northern Kentucky. Why is the governor silent on NKWD and SD1 mismanagement? The taxpayers deserve the same accountability and action that the governor is taking with the private sector. Tom Wurtz is a member of the Northern Kentucky Tea Party. He is a business consultant and resident of Fort Mitchell.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR A question of tax cuts

It is reassuring to know that US Representative Geoff Davis plans to seriously address the nation's unsustainable deficit. It is less reassuring that Mr. Davis has voted against extending unemployment benefits in a climate of high unemployment - read no jobs for most job seekers - unless the government can show proof

of paying for them with other cuts. At the same time where does he find money to pay for lost revenue from the tax cuts for the super wealthy among us? This amount dwarfs what the unemployment extension would cost. It appears that those high-end tax cuts have been a disaster for the country or how explain unemployment at nearly 10 percent

and a stratospheric deficit. The wealth of the upper two percent income level people was garnered in great measure by the flat income level of the other 98 percent of Americans over the past 30 years if indeed they are even working. Perhaps Mr. Davis could explain how this is sustainable in a moral, civilized nation. Nancy Rowles Covington

For more viewpoints from around Greater Cincinnati, go to cincinnati.com/opinion A publication of

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Elsmere and Erlanger

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Elsmere and Erlanger

N K Y. c o m

Editor Brian Mains | bmains@nky.com | 578-1062

Erlanger Recorder Editor . . . . . . . . . . .Brian Mains bmains@nky.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .578-1062

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Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Friday | See page A2 for additional contact information. 283-0404 | 228 Grandview Drive, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017 | 654 Highland Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075 | e-mail kynews@nky.com | Web site: www.NKY.com


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T h u r s d a y, D e c e m b e r

RECORDER

Web site: NKY.com

9, 2010

PEOPLE

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IDEAS

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RECIPES

When the weather outside is frightful, what better way to pass the time than with a good movie? It doesn’t matter if you’re young or old, prefer comedies to tear-jerkers, or have never heard of Clark Griswold. Everyone has a favorite movie for this time of year. With that in mind, here’s a quiz to test your knowledge of some holiday classics. Enjoy! 1). In “National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation,” what are the names of Cousin Eddie’s two children? A). Eddie Jr. and Audrey B). Rusty and Ellen C). Rocky and Ruby Sue 2). In “A Christmas Story,” what is the name of the department store where Ralphie visits Santa? A). Macy’s B). Higbee’s C). Shillito’s

Provided by 1965 United Feature Syndicate

Provided by 1989 John Hughes Entertainment/Warner Brothers Pictures

5). In “Frosty the Snowman,” how much does a ticket to the North Pole “by way of Saskatchewan, Hudson Bay, Nome, Alaska, the Klondike and Aurora Borealis” cost? A). $1,050.50 B). $874.00 C). $3,004.04 6). In “A Charlie Brown Christmas,” Linus quotes Bible verse John 3:16 when he explains the true meaning of Christmas. A). True B). False 7). In “Home Alone,” why doesn’t Kevin want to share a bed with his cousin, Fuller? A). He thinks Fuller will wet the bed B). He thinks Fuller smells bad C). Fuller talks in his sleep

Results: If you scored a perfect 16: You’re the Old Man congrats on that Major Award! I f y o u s c o r e d 1 1 - 1 5 : You’re Kevin McCallister you’ve got almost everything you need for a perfect Christmas If you scored 6-10: You’re Cousin Eddie - you mean well, but you’re just not that bright If you scored 2-5: You’re the Grinch - your heart is still three sizes too small If you scored 0-1: You’re Scrooge - you need some help to get in the holiday spirit

Provided by 1966 Turner Entertainment

3). In the original version of “How the Grinch Stole Christmas,” what reason does the Grinch give for taking Cindy Lou Who’s Christmas tree? A). To fix a broken light B). To give it to another family C). To sell it for firewood 4). In “It’s a Wonderful Life,” what is the name of George Bailey’s Guardian Angel? A). Gerald B). Clarence C). Lawrence

Provided by 1983 MGM/UA Entertainment Co.

8). In “Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer,” what is Hermey’s dream profession? A). Dentist B). Optometrist C). Lawyer 9). In “A Christmas Story,” what language does the Old Man think is written on the special package he receives? A). English B). Chinese C). Italian 10). In “It’s a Wonderful Life,” how does an angel get its wings? A). Hands clapping B). Bells ringing C). Fingers snapping Provided by 1964 Videocraft International

11). On what date was “Miracle on 34th Street” released in theaters? A). Nov. 27, 1946 B). May 2, 1947 C). Dec. 3, 1948 12). Who narrated the original version of “How the Grinch Stole Christmas?” A). Anthony Hopkins B). Vincent Price C). Boris Karloff 13). In “National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation,” what street does Clark’s boss live on? A). Melody Lane B). Hummingbird Way C). Forest Avenue

14). In “Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer,” what is the name of the lion who governs the Island of Misfit Toys? A). Gandalf B). Sunbeam C). Moonracer 15). In “Frosty the Snowman,” what are the last words Frosty speaks? A). “I’ll be back on Christmas Day!” B). “See y’all next Christmas!” C). “I’ll be back someday!” 16). Which unique feature does the sleigh contain in “The Santa Clause?” A). A GPS system B). A cookie/cocoa dispenser C). Heated seats

LOL is ... Local bloggers writing from your perspective on cooking, wine, romance and more! Visit: Cincinnati.Com/LOL or search: living

Answers: 1 - C, 2 - B, 3- A, 4 - B, 5 - C, 6 -B, 7 - A, 8 - A, 9 - C, 10 - B, 11 - B, 12 - C, 13 - A, 14 - C, 15 - A, 16 - B


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Erlanger Recorder

December 9, 2010

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD F R I D A Y, D E C . 1 0

S A T U R D A Y, D E C . 1 1

FOOD & DRINK Freestore Foodbank Mac & Cheese Benefit, 11 a.m.-2:30 a.m., Keystone Bar & Grill, 313 Greenup St., From now until the end of the year Keystone Bar & Grill donates 25 cents to Freestore Foodbank for every serving of mac & cheese sold and 10 cents donated for half-priced servings. 859-2616777; www.keystonebar.com. Covington.

CRAFT SHOWS Dixie Heights Craft Show, 9 a.m.-2 p.m., Dixie Heights High School, 3010 Dixie Highway, Gym. More than 100 fine crafters and vendors. Theme raffle baskets and lunch available. Benefits Dixie Heights Marching Band. Family friendly. $3.859-653-0301. Edgewood.

HOLIDAY - CHRISTMAS

Holiday Toy Trains, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, Included with admission: $7, $6 ages 60 and up, $4 ages 3-17; free ages 2 and under. 859-4914003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington. Santaland: Pictures with Santa, 1-4 p.m., Frank Duveneck Arts & Cultural Center, 1232 Greenup St., Free pictures with Santa, crafts, snacks and drinks. Free. Presented by Covington-Kenton County Jaycees. 513-333-6799; www.ckcjaycees.org. Covington.

Holiday Entertainment, 6-8 p.m., Newport on the Levee, 1 Levee Way, Gallery Building, Riverwalk level. Dickens Carolers perform. Free. 859-291-0550. Newport. Holiday Toy Trains, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, 1600 Montague Road, 250 feet of track and opportunity to be engineer of train. Included with admission: $7, $6 ages 60 and up, $4 ages 3-17; free ages 2 and under. 859-4914003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington. Scuba Santa’s Water Wonderland, 10 a.m.6 p.m., Newport Aquarium, Newport on the Levee, Holiday decorations throughout Aquarium, Scuba Santa’s Post Office and Reindeer Roundup game. Included with admission: $22, $15 ages 2-12, free ages 1 and under. 859-261-7444; www.newportaquarium.com. Newport.

SPECIAL EVENTS

Absolute Action MMA Eight, 6 p.m., Drawbridge Inn Hotel, 2477 Royal Drive, Mixed Martial Arts fighting in a cage. A Night To Give Back. Scheduled to appear: Amy Lack vs. Sarah Cook, Jerry McClain vs. Eric Price, Trent Thomas vs. Dustin Lema, Nicholas Noe vs. Derik Byrd and others. Free admission for first 25 fans that donates a new toy. Benefits The Uprising Movement. $50 table seat, $35 VIP around cage; $25, $15 with donation of new toy. 859-803-3100; www.aamma.net. Fort Mitchell.

CE-0000436993

HOLIDAY - CHRISTMAS

MUSIC - CHORAL

Christmas Songfest, 7-9 p.m., St. Patrick Catholic Church, 3285 Mills Road, With Hickory Grove Brass Band, Carter’s Chapel United Methodist Church Bell Choir, Dixie Heights High School Treble Choir and Joyful Noise. Party follows. Free parking. Free. 859-3567864. Taylor Mill.

MUSIC - COUNTRY

B105 Presents - Randy Houser, 9 p.m., Madison Theater, 730 Madison Ave., Standing only on main floor. With Christian Kane, the Danny Frazier Band and All Proceeds Benefit. Doors open 8 p.m. Ages 18 and up. Benefits Toys for Tots. $15.859-491-2444. Covington.

About calendar

To submit calendar items, go to “www.NKY.com” and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to “life@communitypress.com” along with event information. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. S U N D A Y, D E C . 1 2

LITERARY - SIGNINGS

Cheri Brinkman, 1-4 p.m., Borders Books, Music and Cafe Crestview Hills, 2785 Dixie Highway, Author discusses and signs “Cincinnati and Soup: Recipes from the Queen City and Great Soup.” Free. 859-3318200. Crestview Hills.

LITERARY - STORY TIMES

Polar Express Reading, 2-5 p.m., BehringerCrawford Museum, 1600 Montague Road, Includes hot chocolate, cookies, special gift from Santa and viewing of Holiday Toy Train display. Pajamas welcome. $7, $6 seniors $4 ages 3-17, free ages 2 and under. Registration required. 859-491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington. M O N D A Y, D E C . 1 3

ART CENTERS

People We Knew/Didn’t Know, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Artisans Enterprise Center, 859-2922322; http://tinyurl.com/2fqfgho. Covington.

CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS Voice of Independence Toastmasters Club Meeting, 7-8:30 p.m., William E. Durr Branch Library, 1992 Walton-Nicholson Road, Open to area residents interested in improving speaking, listening and leadership skills in supportive environment. Through Dec. 27. 859-652-3348; voice.freetoasthost.net. Independence.

T U E S D A Y, D E C . 1 4

HOLIDAY - CHRISTMAS

Holiday Toy Trains, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, Included with admission: $7, $6 ages 60 and up, $4 ages 3-17; free ages 2 and under. 859-4914003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

SUPPORT GROUPS

H.E.A.R.T.S., 6:30-8 p.m., Faith Community United Methodist Church, 4310 Richardson Road, For anyone whose life been touched by pregnancy or infant loss. Everyone welcome. Reception follows. Presented by H.E.A.R.T.S.. 859-282-8889. Independence. W E D N E S D A Y, D E C . 1 5

ART & CRAFT CLASSES

Crafters’ Corner, 10 a.m.-noon, Chapin Memorial Library, 6517 Market Street, Bring supplies to work on own project. All mediums welcome, from macaroni to knitting; crochet, scrapbooking, beading, jewelry, embroidery, quilting, plastic canvas, and more. Free. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-342-2665; www.bcpl.org. Petersburg.

ART CENTERS & ART MUSEUMS

People We Knew/Didn’t Know, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Artisans Enterprise Center, 859-2922322; http://tinyurl.com/2fqfgho. Covington.

PROVIDED

“Nativity The Pop Opera” will run Dec. 11-12 and Dec. 16-19 at The Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, at 1028 Scott Blvd., Covington, with seven shows. The light-hearted pop opera commemorates the Christmas story as seen through the eyes of the angels. Ticket proceeds will be donated to 'Njoy-it-all Camp, a camp for children with cancer and blood diseases operated by Cincinnati Children’s Medical Center. Performances are 8 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, Dec. 11-12, and Thursday- Sunday, Dec. 16-19; additional 2 p.m. matinee is Saturday, Dec. 18. Tickets are $20; $15, groups of 10 or more. To purchase tickets call 859957-1940 or visit www.thecarnegie.com. T H U R S D A Y, D E C . 1 6

CIVIC Libertarian Party of Kentucky District 4 Meeting, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Chez Nora, 530 Main St., Judges Chambers, level 3R. Meeting starts 6:35 p.m. Guest speaker or special topic discussion begins 7 p.m. Social hour begins 7:30 p.m. Family friendly. Free. Presented by Libertarian Party of Kentucky District 4. 859-652-3575; www.facebook.com/lpky4. Covington.

HOLIDAY - CHRISTMAS

Holiday Toy Trains, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, Included with admission: $7, $6 ages 60 and up, $4 ages 3-17; free ages 2 and under. 859-4914003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

COMMUNITY DANCE

SwinGallery, 8-11:30 p.m., Step-N-Out Studio, 721 Madison Road, All ages. No partner required. Free beginner East Coast Swing lesson 8-9 p.m. Dancing to music by DJ 911:30 p.m. Ages 18 and up. $5. Presented by SwinGallery. 513-290-9022; www.swingallery.com. Covington.

Scuba Santa’s Water Wonderland, 10 a.m.6 p.m., Newport Aquarium, Included with admission: $22, $15 ages 2-12, free ages 1 and under. 859-261-7444; www.newportaquarium.com. Newport.


Life

Erlanger Recorder

December 9, 2010

B3

Why does Christmas cause us a certain uneasiness? There’s an aspect of the coming of Christmas that rattles us. We attribute it to our busyness, the expectations, and the expenses incurred. Partly true. But a reflective wisdom suggests something else lies unrecognized in us at this time of year. Psychologists and spiritual directors remind us that no human is all-good or allbad. Each of us is a mixture of a bright side and a dark side. We have the potential of performing noble altruistic deeds. Or, we can direct our inner energies toward the darker elements of life. Any of us can go either way and be more the sinner or the saint. The Christmas atmosphere and its meaning nudges us toward our bright side. The songs, lights and efforts to help others all tug at our hearts. Higher aspirations come to mind. We look at our spouse and wonder why we don’t

love her even more than we do; or how m u c h more we could be involved in the Father Lou lives of Guntzelman our kids or u r Perspectives ochurch. We notice other people who really have to struggle with life because of impoverishment, unemployment or illness and think, “I ought to help them more.” Christmas is the time we more readily admit to spiritual realities, go to church and desire to live better. But here’s where a deeper dynamic comes into play. The same experts that point out the mixture of good and evil in every person also divulge a strange human trait. We are frightened of the potential for good in ourselves. It is much easier, they

say, to get people to eventually admit to the skeletons in their closet than to admit to the bright side dormant within them. Strange dynamic, isn’t it? Christmas time disrupts this dynamic. It not only reminds us of how much we’re really loved and treasured by God, but it also reminds us how much we can love and positively affect the lives of others. And that’s disturbing. It clashes with our ego, selfishness and darker side. “I wouldn’t want to try and do this good stuff all year long,” we quietly admit, “I’d be walked on, taken advantage of, and it’d be such a struggle. I feel I wouldn’t be myself.” The resolution of this call to altruism then becomes: “It’s better to say I’m really not much, just an average and struggling worldly person – so don’t expect a lot of good from me.” Perhaps this kind of thinking reveals why we’re

so obsessed with the scandals and sins of others; why the dirt in the lives of the rich and famous fascinates us; why we look backwards in history and write expose books about statesmen and people who are admired. We’re eager to find blemishes and secret sins. It’s not just to make us look good, but to cynically make us all look bad and hopelessly weak. Then we can excuse ourselves from rising higher. “Look at them! So, do you expect differently from people like us?” we rationalize. When Jesus Christ, the one whose birth we celebrate on Christmas, walked among us, there was an occasion when he looked us in the eye and said in so many words, “You are the salt of the earth, … if you don’t flavor it with good, who will?” Similarly, in his inauguration address in 1994, Nelson Mandela referred to our tendency to hide our poten-

Online deal might lead to counterfeit wares Although most holiday shoppers still like to go to the stores to pick out gifts, a good many are taking to the Internet. Sales are up dramatically but, if you’re not careful, you could end up spending your money on illegal counterfeit goods and copyrighted material. The government just closed 82 websites where sellers were attempting to sell illegal products. But more websites are still operating, so you need to beware. That’s what Joyce Shelton has learned firsthand. She and her daughter wanted to buy some Coach handbags and decided to see what they could find online. “I started online searching outlets just to see if we could find something. From one website to another website this link had popped up,” Shelton said. It was from a website called “CoachBagShow.Com.” “We surfed the site probably 15 to 20 times before we picked out two bags. They were an excellent price. I thought I had come across a genuine Coach outlet,” said Shelton. In order to make certain,

she called t h e woman at the website and says she w a s assured these are Howard Ain g e n u i n e C o a c h Hey Howard! items. Then she ordered the purses, paying $59 dollars for each of them. Shelton said she thought she was getting a great deal, adding, “A bag like this you would probably find for $198 and up on the average.” Soon after the handbags arrived Shelton started to notice the stitching on her bag was falling apart. In addition, the snap inside the bag was now just dangling. So, despite the Coach emblem on the bag and the name on the buttons, zippers and rings, Shelton is convinced it’s just a knockoff. Shelton sent an e-mail to the website asking for a refund, but didn’t get it. The company said she could return the bags but warns if she did the bags would probably be confis-

cated by customs officials. In that case, she wouldn’t get a refund. So, how did the purses get past customs when shipped to Shelton? A close look at the shipping label from China shows it says the contents are just Tshirts, not purses. “I always make sure I buy good quality bags and that they are genuine. That’s why I was so offended when I found out they were not original,” Shelton said. She’s not the only one. Robin Stith of Delhi Township wrote to me that she had ordered from a different website and said her “Coach” handbag packing slip claimed it was shoes, not purses, inside. She said she thought the handbags were so cheap because they were discontinued, not because they were counterfeit. So, play it safe when shopping online. Check out the websites selling items, and beware if the price seems too good – because they could be selling counterfeits. Don’t use search engines looking for special deals. Instead, go directly to rep-

utable sites with which you’re familiar. Finally, always pay with a credit card, not a debit card. That way, you can dispute the charge should anything go wrong. Howard Ain answers consumer complaints weekdays on WKRC-TV Local 12. Write to him at 12 WKRC-TV, 1906 Highland Ave., Cincinnati 45219.

tial for good. He said: “Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate. Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure. It is our light, not our darkness, that most frightens us. “We ask ourselves, who are we to be brilliant, gorgeous, talented, fabulous? Actually, who are we not to be? “We are a child of God. Our playing small doesn’t serve the world… We were

born to make manifest the glory of God that is within us. It is in everyone! “And as we let our own light shine, we unconsciously give other people permission to do the same.” Father Lou Guntzelman is a Catholic priest of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati. Contact him at columns@ communitypress.com or P.O. Box 428541, Cincinnati, OH 45242.

Prime Rib $9.49/lb Whole Beef Tenderloins $7.99/lb Spiral Sliced Hams $4.79/lb

Party Trays

Prices are per person (Minimum 10 People)

Roast Beef, Turkey, Ham and Assorted Cheese Ham, Turkey and Assorted Cheese Assorted Lunch Meats & Cheese Assorted Diced Cheese with Pepperoni & Salami Deluxe Relish or Vegetable Tray (feeds 25-30 people)

$2.45 $2.25 $2.10 $1.95 $25.00

40 Finger Sandwich Tray Turkey, Roast Beef, Ham, Ham Salad, Chicken Salad

40 Finger Sandwich Tray Ham Salad, Chicken Salad, Pimento Cheese Spread

$29.50

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(garnished with cherry tomatoes, olives & parsley)

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FREE Macy’s Downtown Dazzle on Fountain Square December 4, 11, 18 at 6:30 FREE Weekend Carriage Rides Saturdays and Sundays Holly Jolly Downtown Trolley Presented by Fifth Third Bank • Saturdays and Sundays Rookwood Pottery Art Tile Sold only at Macy’s Fountain Place

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B4

Erlanger Recorder

Life

December 9, 2010

Gourmet clones save money, come from the heart It’s a good thing I’ve kicked up my exercise routine. Otherwise, I wouldn’t fit in any of my clothes by Christmas. I’m having fun testing recipes and, of course, tasting the results. Here are some recent successes.

Gourmet chocolate peppermint fudge sauce

I’m working on a true clone of Williams-Sonoma’s peppermint fudge sauce,

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unwhipped 1 tablespoon butter 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon light corn syrup 2 cups high quality chocolate chips (I used Kroger private selection 43 percent cacao semi-sweet) 11⁄2 to 2 teaspoons peppermint extract

which is made by cooking cream, butter, corn syrup, etc. down and then adding chocolate and peppermint oil. My first attempt is Rita what I’m Heikenfeld s h a r i n g It’s Rita’s kitchen atoday. supereasy version that is foolproof. My tasters loved it. When I refine the true fudge sauce version, I’ll share that, too.

Bring cream to a boil in large saucepan. Remove from heat, whisk in butter and corn syrup. Whisk in chips. Mixture will look runny at first but keep whisking and it will get smooth and silky. Stir in extract. Cool and store in fridge. Warm before serving to make it pourable.

1 cup whipping cream,

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Combine everything in pan and bring to a boil. Remove from heat and let cool. Great over chopped slaw mix (about 4 cups). Can marinate up to a day.

To make dressing for greens:

Add several tablespoons Canola for a salad dressing for mixed greens, spinach, etc.

Blue ribbon chili con carne Antipasto in a jar makes a great gift.

Rita’s blog

Check out my blog on Cincinnati.com for peppermint bark like WilliamsSonoma. You’ll save lots of cash by making your own, and I think it’s just as good as the gourmet bark you buy (which is now over $25 a pound!). See a photo of the bark on my website Abouteating.com.

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Antipasto in a jar

Go to taste on the herbs and spices. Use your favorite veggies and cheeses, as well. A little more or less of any ingredient is OK. Leave out meat for a vegetarian version.

Mix together:

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COURTESY RITA HEIKENFELD

Mozzarella balls – a dozen or so mini balls 8 oz. or so cheddar cheese cubes or cheese of your choice 1 bell pepper, chunked up 4 oz. small whole mushrooms, or large ones sliced 1 can artichoke hearts, drained and quartered Handful of shredded or sliced carrots 1 cup or so olives 2 celery ribs sliced into 1 ⁄2-inch pieces 1 cup pepperoni sticks, salami, etc. (opt.) 1 teaspoon or so dry onion flakes or 2 table-

spoons chopped onion Italian seasoning to taste, start with 1 teaspoon 1 teaspoon powdered garlic or up to 1 tablespoon fresh chopped 1 ⁄4 to 1⁄2 teaspoon red pepper flakes (opt. but good)

Pour over to coat:

Favorite bottled Italian, Greek or vinegar and oil dressing, or homemade. When ready to give, pour into pretty jar, and add more dressing to cover if necessary. Make up the gift and give within a couple of days, and note on the gift tag that the antipasto should be kept in the refrigerator. I like to give this with a loaf of Italian bread or crackers.

Diabetic celery seed dressing for slaw

For those on your holiday list who need to consume less carbs. 1

⁄2 cup vinegar – cider or clear 1 ⁄2 to 3⁄4 cup water 1 ⁄2 cup Splenda or less to taste 1 ⁄2 teaspoon salt or substitute 1 ⁄2 to 1 teaspoon celery seed Squirt of Dijon mustard or 1⁄2 teaspoon dry mustard

A version of this won a blue ribbon years ago at River Downs. For Janet. 2 lbs. ground chuck 1 large onion, diced 1 teaspoon garlic, minced 46 oz. tomato juice 1 pound can spicy chili beans, undrained 1 tablespoon chili powder or more to taste Crushed red pepper to taste Salt to taste 1 ⁄2 cup uncooked macaroni, added during the last 20 minutes (opt) Fry meat, onion and garlic and drain. Add all ingredients and bring to boil. Reduce and simmer uncovered at least 1 hour, stirring occasionally. Serve with shredded cheddar.

Online column

Go to my online column for Ruth Ann Rooks’ chili con carne recipe. Ruth Ann, a Clermont County reader, found this in her mother’s recipe book “made in the 1920s from newspaper clippings.” Ruth Ann makes this recipe for her family today. You’ll also find diabetic salad dressings, sides and sweets. Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator and author. E-mail columns@community press.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-2487130, ext. 356.

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Difficult Decisions? We’re Here For You. Hospice care can be one of the most difficult, important decisions you make. St. Elizabeth Hospice makes it a little easier. As the first hospice in the area, we make comfort, support, and dignity priority number one for you and your loved ones. We offer a full spectrum of care in your home or in a nursing home — and if specialized care is needed, in our inpatient unit.

NKY History Contest! Visit NKY.com/history and try your hand at our quiz! By using the Encyclopedia of Northern Kentucky you can learn something about Northern Kentucky history and you could even win over $100 in prizes!

We at St. Elizabeth would like to help you keep your loved one in the place they call home, surrounded by their family and friends. If you have these difficult decisions in front of you, we are here for you and the ones you love. St. Elizabeth Hospice. Contact us at 859-301-4600 or www.stelizabeth.com/hospice.

No purchase necessary. Must be a resident of Ohio, Indiana or Kentucky who is 18 years or older to enter. Deadline to enter is 12/17/10 at 9:00 AM. Visit Nky.Com/history for details. CE-0000434089

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Community

December 9, 2010

Erlanger Recorder

B5

Jimmie’s Roller Drome, a piece of local history You know how sometimes you hear a song and it makes you think of something in your past? Every time I hear The Beatles’ “Hey Jude,” I think of Jimmie’s Roller Rink. They used to play it all the time in 1968, along with “The H o k e y Pokey.” JimDean mies is still Herron on Main Street in Community Elsmere. Recorder PROVIDED Jimmie guest The original building for Jimmie's Rollerdrome in Elsmere. Mullins and columnist and you had to use a key to big Pepsi Cola clock above his wife tighten them in front and an the DJ’s room was once Marie Buckley opened the rink on New ankle strap to tighten them used at the Cincinnati GarYear’s Eve 1948 and it’s in the back. They were dens Skating Rink. There is an annual balbeen open ever since. That’s called Clamp On Skates. For almost 62 years! Jimmie larger adults they would use loon drop on New Year’s was 26 years old and Marie a six-wheeled skate for Eve to celebrate the New Year and the anniversary of was 22 when they met. Jim- extra support. There is always music the rink. The kids skate mie couldn’t think of a name for his new business, being played during skat- from 7:30 p.m. to 12:30 but Marie suggested “Jim- ing. The first 15 years or so, mie’s” and the name stuck. they played organ music. Someone suggested to The music started off with Marie the name Jimmie’s 78 rpm records and as the Roller Dome, but Marie time changed they went to liked the term “Drome” 45 rpm records, then to casinstead. So it’s really “Jim- settes, then to CDs. Today mie’s Roller Drome” not some of the music is played roller rink. Drome means with an iPod. Their original running on a course like a 45 rpm of “The Hokey race course or large place for Pokey” is displayed on the wall beside the rink along a special purpose. Instant Players Dream Hall Their children and with photos of days gone $4,000 Guaranteed Bingo Payout Each Night! grandchildren have helped by. They also show videos $10 - 6-36 Faces out at the rink all through $20 - 90 Faces Computer the years, handing out or TV shows on the wall in Fri, Sat Nights skates, working the snack the snack bar and the main 513-931-4441 • 513-931-0259 floor. Michael Jackson’s bar and DJ-ing the music. As you can imagine, “Thriller” video is very popthey have had a lot of inter- ular with the skaters. “The esting things happening Cha Cha Slide” is a popular during their years with the dance with the kids. “The business. In 1954, they had Hokey Pokey” is still popua horse that skated in their lar after all these years. The rink. Also in the 50’s, they had a greased pig event where children had to try to OMMUNITY HURCHES catch a greased pig while skating. This only happened once because Jimmie said it took too long to clean up the grease off the floor. Marie told me that more than once has a boy acciOpen Door Community Church dentally knocked over a girl 3528 Turkeyfoot Rd. Erlanger, KY 41018 while skating. There is (859) 341-8850 • www.ODKY.org nothing unusual about that, Service Times except at least twice the two Sunday: 10:30am • Wednesday: 6:30pm CE-1001599066-01 have ended up getting marAsk for our Eco-Friendly ried. (My guess is it wasn’t 4 Hour Cure Coating! UTHERAN an accident that the boy knocked over the girl). In the 70’s there was actually a wedding performed on roller skates in the rink. The bride took two weeks pracSunday Worship: Traditional 8:00 & 11:00am ticing just so she could Contemporary 9:00am stand up during the ceremoSunday School 9:50am ny. Contemplative 5:30pm A few years ago, Bengal’s wide receivers, Andre 513-7 77171-8 8827 827 Caldwell and Jerome SimpUglytub.com son, skated and even bought their own roller stakes. As a child, famous jockey Steve Cauthen skated many times at Jimmie’s. They have some of the original skates when they first opened on display. The wheels were made of fiber

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a.m. Marie says it’s a safe way to spend New Year’s Eve. Marie says she is good at remembering the faces of the children over the years, but doesn’t remember names very well. I told her I

skated there over 50 times as a child, but she didn’t remember me at all. For all you younger readers, you can ask your grandpa or grandma what a 78 or 45 record is. Jimmie’s is open for

birthday parties, anniversaries and fundraisers. For more information call Jimmie’s at 859-342-9848 and ask for Marie. Dean Herron is a retired Erlanger-Elsmere school teacher.

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B6

ON

RECORD

Erlanger Recorder

THE

James M. Cahill

James M. Cahill, 76, of Petersburg, died Dec. 1, 2010, at his home. He was a master plumber, started and retired from Cahill Plumbing Company and was an member of St. Henry Church in Elsmere. His brothers Joseph Cahill, Bernard Cahill, John Cahill and Daniel Cahill; and sisters Rita Cahill and Susan Herzog died previously. Survivors include his wife, Ann Cahill; sons, Martin Cahill of Erlanger, James Cahill of Burlington, John Cahill and Patrick Cahill, both of Florence and Lawrence Cahill of Petersburg; daughters, Bethany Ingraham of Burlington and Lisa Casteel of Union; brother, Christopher Cahill of Cincinnati, Gerald Cahill of Walton, Eugene Cahill of Owenton and Louis Cahill of Edgewood; sisters, Rosemary Mathis of Union and Sarah Brewer of Dayton, Ohio; 15 grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren. Burial was at Forest Lawn Memorial Park in Erlanger. Memorials: St. Henry District High School, 3755 Scheben Drive, Erlanger, KY 41018 or St. John Social Service, 1212 Sycamore St., Cincinnati, Ohio 45202 or St. Henry

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| DEATHS | Editor Brian Mains | bmains@nky.com | 578-1062

Church, 3813 Dixie Hwy., Elsmere, KY 4118.

Janice Fay Floyd

Janice Fay Floyd, 70, of Erlanger, died Nov. 28, 2010. She was a member of Seven Hills Church, American Legion No. 4, Ralph Fulton Post in Elsmere and Elks of Florence. Her brother Sam Hackler and sister Shirley Strunk died previously. Survivors include daughters, Tina Floyd and Teresa Penny, both of Erlanger, and Shawna Kelly of Florence; sons, Denny Floyd of Falmouth and Mike Floyd of Florence; brothers, Ovia Strunk of Cincinnati, Myles Strunk of Florence and Darrell Struck of Burlington; and sisters, Betty Brooks, Carol Matt and Phyllis Halsey, all of Independence. Burial was at Highland Cemetery in Fort Mitchell.

Elva Ruth ‘Sugar’ Hurd

Elva Ruth “Sugar” Hurd, 66, of Erlanger, died Nov. 27, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. Her father, Roy Edward Hurd; sisters, Barbara Dean and Edith Knapp; and brother, James Arthur Hurd, died previously. Survivors include her mother, Sarah Rose Hurd; nieces, Ann Voss, Cheryl Carlson and Patty Atherton; and nephews, Dr. Jim Dean and Steven Hurd. Interment was in Floral Hills Memorial Gardens in Taylor Mill.

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Jacqueline McComas

Jacqueline F. “Jackie” McComas, 72, of Elsmere, died Nov. 28, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. She was a homemaker. Survivors include her husband, Ronald L. McComas Sr. of Elsmere; daughter, Tina Marie McComas Campbell of Taylor Mill; sons, Perry B. McComas of Elsmere and Ronald Lee McComas Jr. of Milan, Ind.; four grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren. Services will be private at the convenience of the family. Middendorf-Bullock Funeral Home in Erlanger is handling the arrangements.

John J. ‘Jack’ Murphy

John J. “Jack” Murphy, 77, of Elsmere, died Nov. 26, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He was a retired printer, U.S. Army Korean War veteran, member of St. Henry Church of Elsmere and enjoyed hunting. His sister Mora Rose Hoober and brother Mike Murphy died previously. Survivors include his wife, Patricia Sanning Murphy of Elsmere; daughters, Kathleen McClanahan and Marcie McMillon, both of Erlanger and Karen Jansen of Fort Thomas; sons, Tim Murphy of Alexandria, Terry Murphy of Union, John Todd Murphy of Edgewood and Joseph R. Murphy and Martin Murphy, both of Elsmere; sisters, Ann Ernst of Fort Wright and Judy

Bergfeld of Florence; brother, Maurice Murphy of Park Hills; 16 grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren. Interment was at St. Mary Cemetery in Fort Mitchell. Memorial: American Cancer Society, 297 Buttermilk Pike, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017.

Maurice L. ‘ML’ Murphy

Maurice L. “ML” Murphy, 81, of Park Hills, died Nov. 29, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He was a retired mutuel clerk at Turfway Park and worked at River Downs, Keeneland and the former Latonia Race Course. He was a member of St. Agnes Church of Fort Wright, a race horse owner and a U.S. Army veteran. His sister Mora Rose Hoober and brothers Mike Murphy and John J. “Jack” Murphy died previously. Survivors include sisters, Ann Ernst of Fort Wright and Judy Bergfeld of Florence; and sis-

ters-in-law, Karen Murphy of Park Hills and Patricia Murphy of Elsmere.

Burial was at St. Mary Cemetery in Fort Mitchell. Memorials: Hospice of St. Elizabeth, 401 E. 20th St., Covington, KY 41014 or St. Agnes Church, 1680 Dixie Hwy., Fort Wright, KY 41011.

Darlene Shaw

Darlene Shaw, 57, of Latonia, died Nov. 30, 2010, at St. Elizabeth

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Mark Anthony Smith

Mark Anthony Smith, 42, of Owenton, died Nov. 25, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He was a U.S. Navy Persian Gulf War veteran. Survivors include his wife, Candice Bourne Smith of Owenton; children, Taylor Smith of Independence and Carson Smith of Owenton; mother, Donna Smith of Fort Wright; brothers, Roger Smith of Elsmere and Scott Moore of Fort Wright; and father- and mother-in-law, Ricky and Sharon Bourne of Owenton. Internment was at Mother of God Cemetery in Fort Wright. Middendorf Funeral Home is handling the arrangements. Memorials: St. Elizabeth Hospice, 401 E. 20th St., Covington, KY 41014.

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Lola ‘Wally’ Wallace

Lola “Wally” Wallace, 75, of Erlanger, died Nov. 25, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Florence. She was employed at St. Elizabeth Florence in telecommunications and formerly worked with St. Luke Health Alliance, the William Booth Memorial Hospital in Florence and Covington and the Spears Hospital in Dayton. Survivors include daughter, Lora Wallace of Erlanger; sons, William Wallace of Williamstown and John Wallace of Berlin, Ky.; brothers, Jim Wilson of Brooksville and Jerry Wilson of Alexandria; sister, Linda Reed of Mount Olivet, Ky.; eight grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren. Cooper Funeral Home in Alexandria is handling the arrangements.

Samuel David Yeary

Samuel David Yeary, 49, of Burlington, died Nov. 22, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Florence. He was a heavy-equipment operator for Gentz Construction. His parents, Jasper and Fayetta Miller Yeary, died previously. Survivors include his wife Darlene Owens Yeary; son, Joshua Yeary of Burlington; daughters, Telisha Yeary of Elsmere and Amy Yeary of Burlington; nine siblings; and five grandchildren. Burial was in Oakland Cemetery in Grants Lick.


On the record

Erlanger Recorder

December 9, 2010

B7

POLICE REPORTS Richard M. Young Jr., 110 W. 32nd St., first degree possession of a controlled substance, drug paraphernalia-buy/possess at 110 W. 32nd St., Nov. 23. James L. Carter III, 5433 West View Place, first degree possession of a controlled substance, drug paraphernalia-buy/possess at 110 W. 32nd St., Nov. 23. Carl Meyers, 117 Meadow Drive, operating on suspended or revoked operators license, possession of marijuana, drug paraphernalia-buy/possess at 100 block of E. Robbins St., Nov. 22. Sarah J. Wilson, 301 W. 33rd St., giving officer false name or address, possession of marijuana, third degree criminal trespass, fugitive from another state-warrant required at 218 W. 34th St., Nov. 22. Bridget N. Ford, 3118 Stoneridge Drive, first degree possession of a controlled substance (heroin), drug paraphernalia-buy/possess, first degree possession of a controlled substance, prescription for a controlled substance not in proper container at 15 E. 42nd St., Nov. 23. Raejean Meece, 32 W. 6th St., No. 7, theft, serving bench warrant for court at 614 Washington St., Nov. 23. Richard A. Chitwood Jr., 5941 Lawrence Road, possession of firearm by convicted felon at 310 E. 45th St., Nov. 23. Zakeem R. McDonald, 1913 Augustine St., fourth degree assault at 1913 Augustine Ave., Nov. 28. Daniel K. Edmondson, 1713 Euclid Ave., No. 2, menacing, first degree disorderly conduct, alcohol intoxication in a public place at 1713 Euclid Ave., No. 1, Nov. 27. Alex M. Jordan, 3030 Prestwicks Drive, operating motor vehicle under influence of alcohol/drugs/etc., disregarding traffic control device-traffic light, possession of marijuana, drug

Incidents/investigations Assault

A man was punched in the mouth at 4601 Decoursey Ave., Nov. 22. A woman was scratched at 1116 Greenup St., Nov. 27.

Burglary

Copper pipes and an air conditioner were stolen at 4618 Eureka St., Nov. 22. A folding ladder, miter saw, and copper piping was stolen at 1818 Garrard St., Nov. 23. A cash register and a bottle of whiskey was stolen at 3614 Decoursey Ave., Nov. 23. A cash register was stolen at 3618 Church St., Nov. 23. A TV, DVD player, VCR, and a game system were stolen at 220 E. Robbins St., Nov. 28. Copper piping was stolen at 322 E. 13th St., Nov. 26. A game system, home entertainment system, exercise weights, a wristwatch, HD converter box, and 15

DVDs were stolen at 1810 Garrard St., Apt. 7, Nov. 26. Copper pipes and line set for an air conditioner was stolen at 1209 Greenup St., Nov. 27. A TV set and game system was stolen at 2808 Rogers St., Nov. 26. Two air conditioning units were stolen at 1822 Greenup St., Nov. 26. Several items of jewelry were stolen at 2214 Scott St., Nov. 25. Two computers, three TVs, jewelry, and a checkbook was stolen at 409 Oliver St., Nov. 25. A game system, games, TV, and DVDs were stolen at 2521 White Court, Nov. 25. Someone forced entry into a residence and assaulted a man at 22 E. Robbins St., Apt. 4, Nov. 25. Copper wiring and piping was stolen at 1823 Pearl St., Nov. 24. A stereo receiver, tape deck, converter box, speakers, DVD/CD/radio unit, and stereo were stolen at 313 Trevor St., Nov. 24.

Criminal mischief

Paint was thrown at a residence at 1302 Hermes St., Nov. 22. The side window of a residence was broken at 2039 Mackoy Ave., Nov. 24. The siding of a residence was damaged at 284 Old Madison Pike, Nov. 23. The window of a vehicle was smashed at 500 W. 3rd St., Nov. 23. The rear window of a vehicle was broken out at 4452 Decoursey Ave., Nov. 28. A vehicle was scratched at 10 W. Rivercenter Blvd., Nov. 28. A vehicle was damaged at 108 Ashland Drive, Nov. 26. Someone damaged a coin operated

Someone tried to pass a counterfeit $50 bill at 613 W. 4th St., Nov. 25. Someone passed three counterfeit $20 bills and one counterfeit $5 bill at 302 Philadelphia St., Nov. 24.

Falsely reporting an incident

A man reported another person keeps filing false reports against him at 33 Waterside Way, Nov. 22.

Harassment

A woman reported being harassed at 1200 Highway Ave., Nov. 22. A woman was struck in the face at 115 Trevor St., Nov. 24.

Robbery

A woman was struck in the face and had her purse taken at 1400 Greenup St., Nov. 27. $2300 in cash was stolen at 200 Crescent Ave., Nov. 25.

Terroristic threatening

A woman was threatened with death at 342 E. 18th St., No. 2, Nov. 27.

Theft

Someone stolen gasoline at 3769 Old KY 17, Nov. 24. A vehicle was stolen at 3405 Church St., Nov. 26. An air conditioner was stolen at E. 11th St., Nov. 24. Movies and a flag were stolen at 911 Highland Pike, No. 11, Nov. 24. A vehicle was stolen at 1100 Holman Ave., Nov. 22. A fish was stolen from a fish pond at 3540 Park Drive, Nov. 22. Three cartons of cigarettes were stolen at 430 Bakewell St., Nov. 22. An air conditioner was stolen at 251 W. 6th St., Nov. 22. Someone tried to steal an air condi-

Theft of a controlled substance

Prescription medication was stolen from a residence at 3111 Decoursey Ave., No. 2, Nov. 22.

Theft of a controlled substance, theft Several items were stolen from a purse at 2721 Indiana Ave., Nov. 23.

Theft of motor vehicle registration plate

ERLANGER

Incidents/investigations First degree criminal possession of forged instrument

$100 reported counterfeited at 560 Clock Tower Way, Nov. 27.

First degree forgery

At 337 Terry Lane, Nov. 29.

First degree robbery

$5,900 reported stolen at 570 Clock Tower Way, Nov. 26.

Fourth degree assault

At 599 Donaldson Road, Nov. 30.

Possession of marijuana

$10 worth of drugs/narcotics seized at 619 Stevenson Road, Nov. 24.

Second degree criminal possession of forged instrument

At 3158 Dixie Highway, Nov. 28. $575 worth of negotiable instruments counterfeited at 102 International Lane, Nov. 30.

Second degree fleeing

At 446 Commonwealth Avenue, Nov. 26.

Second degree forgery

$650 worth of negotiable instruments counterfeited at 4300 Dixie Highway, Nov. 27.

A license plate was stolen at 371 Altamont Road, Nov. 27.

Theft, criminal mischief

A GPS unit, two phone chargers, an electronic game, and two suitcases were stolen at 500 3rd St., Nov. 23.

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The fastest way to find the help you need in Northern Kentucky

BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL

SERVICE DIRECTORY OF NORTHERN KENTUCKY

Publishes every Tuesday in The Kentucky Enquirer, every Thursday in The Community Recorder. Search ads online any day, any time at NKY.com.

To place an ad call 513.768.8608, fax 513.768.8632 or email tgilland@enquirer.com

Home Improvement Solutions, LLC Your Style. Defined.

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Criminal possession of a forged instrument

tioner at 631 Bakewell St., Nov. 23. A miter saw, screw gun, and a radio were stolen at 401 Crescent Ave., Nov. 23. A box safe, $300 in cash, pictures, Ids, and prescription medication was stolen at 2721 Indiana Ave., Nov. 22. Cigarettes, a wallet, $25, and prescription medication was stolen at 321 47th St., Nov. 27. $500 in cash was stolen at 1318 Madison Ave., Nov. 26. A wallet was stolen at 1743 Holman Ave., Nov. 26. Two heat pumps were stolen at 617 Main St., Nov. 27. A wallet was stolen at 329 Trevor St., No. 2, Nov. 27.

Rapunzels A Full Service Salon

In Memoriam 44, of Hebron, KY, formerly of Lexington, husband of Tamara McConnell Smither, died Monday; November 22, 2010. Born in Chicago, IL, he was the son of the late Julian and Jane Harvey Smither. A graduate of Lafayette High School and the University of Kentucky, Breck studied photography/visual arts at Parson’s School of Design in New York City. Breck was a longtime member of Centenary United Methodist Church in Lexington. He was president of J. Breck Smither Photography which encompassed commercial and editorial photographs, having had his work published in the Associated Press, Cincinnati Enquirer, ESPN Magazine, Lexington Herald-Leader, Los Angeles Time, New York Times, Sports Illustrated, Time, Inc., and USA Today. In 2002 he was hired by Alcon Laboratories, Inc. having various duties in sales and management. Breck received various awards and achievements, such as, first place finishes at 2001 KNPA Awards, Addy award for photography 2000, Lecturer at the University of Kentucky and Asbury College, Junior Achievement volunteer and you basketball and soccer coach. Breck was an amazing friend, son, and brother and a devoted husband and father. Besides his wife, he is survived by: three children, Robert “Bobby” Breckinridge Smither, Jacqueline Taylor Smither and Jonathan McConnell Smither; a sister, Phyllis A. (David) Biedron of Hebron, IN; a nephew, David (Jennifer) Biedron, Jr. of Chicago, IL; and great-niece and great-nephew, Calee and David Biedron, III. Funeral services were held 2:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 27th at Kerr Brothers Funeral Home, Harrodsburg Rd. in Lexington. Visitation was held from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 26th at the funeral home. Honorary pallbearers were Fred Ratajczak, Tim Dries, Scott Hollopeter, Tim Sharp, Todd Cavanee, Jonathan Norris, David Kemplin, John Park, David Biedron and David Biedron, Jr. A memorial celebration of life will be held on Sunday, December 5th, 2010, from 2-5 p.m. at Breck’s residence in Hebron, KY. Memorials are suggested to the American Heart Association, 15120 Collections Center Dr., Chicago, IL 60693.

washing machine at 2410 Todd St., Nov. 24.

we buy junk cars

Arrests/citations

paraphernalia-buy/possess at 300 Greenup St., Nov. 27. Nancy B. Sevier, 904 Baker St., fourth degree assault at 904 Baker St., Nov. 26. Clyde D. Rice, 704 Highland Ave., Apt. 1, possession of firearm by convicted felon at 2400 block of Phelps Lane, Nov. 26. Latasha N. Hall, 4558 Ashley Jo Drive, theft, falsely reporting an incident at 4558 Ashley Jo Drive, Nov. 26. Gregory L. Donaldson, 632 Forest Ave., possession of marijuana at 423 Madison Ave., Nov. 28. Kalama A. Kabongo, 943 Villa Drive, disarming a police officer, resisting arrest, second degree disorderly conduct, alcohol intoxication in a public place at 619 Main St., Nov. 26. Alexx J. Philpot, 4973 Wabash Drive, possession of marijuana at 411 Madison Ave., Nov. 25. Amy L. Knorr, 3918 Grove Ave., second degree promoting contraband at 3000 Decker Crane Drive, Nov. 24.

CE-1001607055-01

COVINGTON

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WHATEVER YOUR BUSINESS OR SERVICE — LIST IT IN THE NORTHERN KENTUCKY BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL SERVICE DIRECTORY! To advertise contact Terri Gilland at 513.768.8608, fax 513.768.8632 or email tgilland@enquirer.com


B8

Erlanger Recorder

December 9, 2010

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Local residents in amazement yesterday as Collectors provide a stimulus package to Florence! They are paying out right on the spot for my stuff. Unbelievable!! By DAVID MORGAN STAFF WRITER

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If you go:

Items we will accept include:

WHO: Ohio Valley Refinery Reclamation Drive WHAT: Open to public to sell gold and silver.

WHEN: December 7th - 11th WHERE: Springhill Suites 7492 Turfway Road Florence, KY 41042 TIMES:TUESDAY-FRIDAY 9:00am - 6:00pm SATURDAY 9:00am - 4:00pm SHOW INFO: (217) 523-4225

Scrap Jewelry Dental Gold Sterling Silverware Sterling Silver Tea Sets Silver Dollars All Coins Dated 1964 & Earlier

Industrial Scrap All forms of Platinum

Silver and Gold Coin Prices Up During Poor Economy. Collectors and Enthusiasts in Florence with $200,000 to Purchase Yours!

CE-0000436001

By DAVID MORGAN STAFF WRITER

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Items we will accept include: Scrap Jewelry Dental Gold Sterling Silverware Sterling Silver Tea Sets Silver Dollars

All Coins Dated 1964 & Earlier

Industrial Scrap All forms of Platinum

“I’m glad I came in! I really need the money.” CLAUDIA MCDONALD says, who received $825 for a gold coin minted in 1986.

Dozens cash in yesterday with jewelry, railroad watches and guitars. An estimated $200,000 in Florence! By DAVID MORGAN STAFF WRITER

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Items of Interest: Vintage Guitars: 0DUWLQ *LEVRQ )HQGHU 1DWLRQDO 5LFNHQEDFNHU *UHWVFK 0DQGROLQV %DQMRV DQG RWKHUV Pocket Watches: +DPLOWRQ ,OOLQRLV :DOWKDP 3DWHN 3KLOOLSH %DOO +RZDUG 6RXWK %HQG (OJLQ DQG RWKHUV :ULVW ZDWFKHV 2PHJD $FFXWURQ /RQJLQHV +DPLOWRQ %UHLWOLQJ DQG PDQ\ PRUH Old paper money: 8QLWHG 6WDWHV &RQIHGHUDWH 6WDWHV %ODQNHW %LOOV  ELOOV DQG PRUH Antique Toys: 7UDLQV 7LQ ZLQGXSV 0HFKDQLFDO %DQNV 5RERWV 3UHVVHG 6WHHO WUXFNV DQG PDQ\ PRUH War Memorabilia: 6ZRUGV %D\RQHWV +HOPHWV *HUPDQ &RQIHGHUDWH 8QLRQ 86$ DQG RWKHUV /RFDO UHFRUGV UHYHDO WR RXU UHVHDUFK GHSDUWPHQW WKDW UHFHQW YLQWDJH JXLWDU VROG IRU  DQG DQRWKHU IRU  WR D FROOHFWRU WKDW ZLOO EH WLHG LQWR WKH HYHQW WKLV ZHHN YLD OLYH GDWDEDVH IHHG

WE BUY 10¢ & 12¢ COMIC BOOKS!

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Local Residents are ready to cash in! International antique buyers in town this week and ready to stimulate economy! By DAVID MORGAN STAFF WRITER

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Top Five Items To Bring

Go d ld Gol ry C l e oin w e s J Silver

Coins Sterlin et g Pock s Silver he Watc

Refinery representatives will be on hand through Saturday to purchase all gold, silver and platinum items, as well as coins. Public welcome!

erlanger-recorder-120910  

Independence residents enjoyed light snow, brisk temperatures, and downtown last Saturday night for the city’s 14th Annual Christmas Walk. H...

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