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BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT B1

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Volume 14, Issue 9 © 2010 The Community Recorder ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

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Elsmere offers amnesty

By Jason Brubaker jbrubaker@nky.com

Reading program

Fourth- and first-graders at Arnett Elementary came together this school year to form bonds that help both younger and older students improve their reading skills. Brought in by two teachers, both found the program to exceed even their expectations. SCHOOLS, A6

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Visit NKY.com/community to find news, sports, photos, events and more from your community. You’ll find content from The Community Recorder, The Kentucky Enquirer and your neighbors. While you’re there, check out Share, and submit stories and photos of your own.

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Have a great photo from your kid’s latest field trip? Trying to drum up publicity for your group’s event? Visit NKY.com/Share to submit your photos, news and events.

The Elsmere city council recently created an amnesty program in an effort to collect past due real property taxes. Through July 31, any resident with overdue real property taxes may have the normal 10 percent penalty waived, although interest, compounded at 1 percent per month, still will be added. “This will hopefully serve as some incentive for anyone who hasn’t paid to get it taken care of,” said city clerk Holli Harrison. “With a tough economy, we understand money is tight, so hopefully this will help some people out.” Harrison estimated the city has approximately 400 past-due real property tax bills dating back to 1994. Council member Gloria Grubbs said she didn’t have an estimate on how much money the city could collect if all of those bills were paid, but said it would certainly help their budget. While some of the past dues bills were for properties in various stages of foreclosure, she said some residents just may not have paid because of the penalty fees. “We’ve all had times when money is tight, and you have a late bill and just don’t know what you’re going to do,” she said. “So I think this is a program our residents will appreciate, because it shows we understand these are tough times, and this is a way to help them out.” To give an example of the savings offered by the program, Harrison said one past-due bill was

See AMNESTY on page A2

Summer fun

With just under two weeks of school left for most school systems the Kenton County Library system is gearing up its summer reading program, along with other events and activities for children out of school, along with adults who might be looking for a little more to do as well. Read what the library is offering, and when some of the events will start. LIFE, B1

To place an ad, call 283-7290.

JASON BRUBAKER/STAFF

Cool treats

Howell Elementary third-grader Sierra Sebesta (left) enjoys a Kona Ice with second-grader Patience Huddleston and third-graders Mya Lattimore and Diamond Williams on May 24. The Kona Ice truck came to the school that day as a reward for the students’ work this year.

Marker identifies historic figures By Regan Coomer rcoomer@nky.com

Linden Grove Cemetery will unveil its new historical marker during the Memorial Day celebration May 29, 30 and 31. The marker recognizes notable individuals who are buried in the cemetery, including Thomas Kennedy, the original landowner of Covington as well as B. F. Howard, the founder of the Improved Benevolent Protective Order of the Elks of the World. “We found out in December but waited to do the installation to tie it into Memorial Day weekend events,” said cemetery board member Rick Ludlum, who said the timing of the marker is a fitting way to “increase awareness of what we owe to those who came before us.”

In addition to the marker’s unveiling starting at 11 a.m. Saturday, the three-day event will also include a dedication of the Nancy Slagle Memorial Grove, named in honor of the Covington neighborhood activist who died in 2009 as well as a chance to view the landscaping improvements to the speaker’s platform in the veteran’s area. On Sunday at 9:30 a.m., the Sons of Confederate Veterans will dedicate replacement stones on the graves of nine veterans buried at the cemetery. On Memorial Day, the annual Covington Memorial Day Parade will terminate at Linden Grove where a service will be conducted by The American Legion and the Veterans of Foreign Wars. Board member Pete Nerone said the board will also speak on the next step of the cemetery’s

master plan. We hope to draw folks in and present to key stakeholders, ‘Here are some aspirations for Linden Grove.’ We’re hoping this will create positive momentum and some increased interest in the future of Linden Grove,” he said. Proposals for the future of the cemetery include a new vehicle entrance and parking lot off of 13th Street, new burial space and restore the pond that used to be in the cemetery for aesthetic as well as irrigation purposes. “We’re trying to make the citizens of Covington aware of what we have at the cemetery. It’s not just burials. We want to try to add additional landscaping and create some trails some people can come and just relax,” Ludlum said. For details about Linden Grove Cemetery call 261-5539.

VFW plans for Memorial Day parade By Jason Brubaker jbrubaker@nky.com

Not even last year’s light drizzle could dampen the enthusiasm of the annual Ralph Fulton VFW Memorial Day parade. “Yeah- we had a little rain last year, but hopefully we won’t have to deal with that again,” said Commander Les Dalton with a chuckle. “But we still had a ton of people out there to support us, and we’re excited for this year, because it’s going to be a good time again.” The parade is sponsored by the VFW Post 6423 and is held in partnership with the cities of Erlanger and Elsmere, making it one of the larger Memorial Day events in Northern Kentucky. Each city’s Honor Guard will take

PROVIDED

The Ralph Fulton Fulton VFW is partnering with the cities of Erlanger and Elsmere for their annual Memorial Day parade. The parade is scheduled to begin at 9:30 a.m., and will conclude at the Forest Lawn Cemetery at the grave of Ralph Fulton, a World War II veteran. part in the parade, and both Erlanger Mayor Tom Rouse and Elsmere Mayor Billy Bradford are scheduled to make speeches at the Forest Lawn Cemetery, where the parade concludes with a special

tribute to World War II veterans. “That’s always a pretty cool moment to see both mayors paying their respects,” said Dalton. The parade itself, which will contain over 100 floats, will also

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include stops at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial and the Korean Memorial on Dixie Highway, where the honor guards will perform a 21-gun salute. Once the parade reaches Forest Lawn, there will be a special ceremony involving the dedication of a wreath at the grave of post namesake Ralph Fulton, a World War II veteran. “This is a terrific event, and a great way to honor the veterans who have given so much to our country,” said Dalton. “We hope we can get everyone out there to support us, because it’ll be fun.” The parade is scheduled to begin at 9:30 a.m. on Memorial Day at the VFW on Dixie Highway, and should last approximately one hour. For more information, or to participate, contact Bob Mains at 816-7433.


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Erlanger Recorder

News

May 27, 2010

Erlanger Board denies builder’s appeal in Lakemont By Jason Brubaker jbrubaker@nky.com

By a vote of 3-1, the Erlanger Board of Adjustments upheld a letter from zoning administrator Mark Stewart to The Drees Company that called for corrections to be made to seven properties in the Crestbourne section of the Lakemont subdivision. The letter, dated March 23, cited seven properties on Hawkshead Lane that did not have the patio home designation the design plans called for when they were updated in 2007 by The Drees Company and approved by the city. According to those plans, a patio home is defined as a single family dwelling unit where the property owners pays an additional fee to have their grounds maintained, as opposed to a single family unit, where the property owner is in charge of the ground maintenance. “Making the distinction between a patio home and a single family home is big, because it determines the demographics of the neighborhood, and that in turn determines the amenities,” said Todd Brockman, one of around 100 Lakemont resident who turned out at the May 24 Board meeting to voice their displeasure. “This

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changes what we thought we were buying into, and it’s not right.” Additionally, Stewart also stated in his letter that two of the properties had less than the 1,500 square feet of living space called for in the design plans, and two properties also did not have the required brick veneer on the front of the house. The Drees Company had appealed the letter the Board, saying that they had received building permits from the city for the seven properties in question, and several of them also had already received certificates of occupancy. “The city approved the permits for these properties we can’t just go back on that,” said Steven Hunt, an attorney for The Drees Company, who also questioned whether the city could enforce the price base cited in Stewart’s letter that called for the market value of the properties to average around $220,000. “The government can’t use their zoning authority to impose pricing,” he said. Michael Schoettelkotte of The Drees Company also disputed the notion that the homes currently being built in the Crestbourne section were of lesser quality than the patio homes currently constructed in the Win-

RECORDER

Find news and information from your community on the Web Elsmere – nky.com/elsmere Erlanger – nky.com/erlanger Kenton County – nky.com/kentoncounty News Brian Mains | Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1062 | bmains@nky.com Jason Brubaker | Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1060 | jbrubaker@nky.com Regan Coomer | Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1061 | rcoomer@nky.com Melanie Laughman | Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . 513-248-7573 | mlaughman@nky.com James Weber | Sports Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1054 | jweber@nky.com Advertising Debbie Maggard | Advertising Manager. . . . . . 578-5501 | dmaggard@nky.com Deb Kaya | Account Rep . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-5507 | dkaya@nky.com Delivery For customer service. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 781-4421 Sharon Schachleiter | Circulation Manager . . 442-3464 | sschachleiter@nky.com Cathy Kellerman | District Manager . . . . . . . . 442-3461 | ckellerman@nky.com Classified To place a Classified ad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283-7290 | www.communityclassified.com To place an ad in Community Classified, call 283-7290.

bourne section. “They are of a different size and price range, but I certainly don’t agree they are of lesser quality,” he said. “They’re just a different line of homes.” However, Lakemont resident Phil Sickinger said the homes currently being built go against what the original development plans stated. Sickinger led a group of Lakemont residents in 2008 in a fight against a proposed condominium development in Lakemont. “Once again, we’re playing Whack-A-Mole with this company to get them to live up to their original plans,” he said. “We all bought into Lakemont because of what we were told it would be, and to try to keep changing that isn’t right.” After a debate that spanned around three hours, Board Chairman Ruey Newsom made a motion to uphold Stewart’s letter, and called for the seven properties to receive the proper designation as laid out in the design plans. He also said that the two properties with less than 1,500 square feet of living space needed to be fixed to meet that requirement, and all homes from this point forward need to meet the requirements. Following the ruling, Schoettelkotte said that the company would abide by the ruling and would look to add more living space to the properties that were short of 1,500 square feet, saying that both were within 100 square feet of that number anyway. “That’s really the only thing we can do at this point,” he said. For more information about Lakemont, visit www.lakemont-hoa.com.

Index

Calendar ......................................B2 Classifieds.....................................C Food.............................................B4 Obituaries..................................B10 Police.........................................B12 Schools........................................A6 Sports ..........................................A8 Viewpoints ................................A12

Play time

Fifteen- month old Luke McLane plays on the equipment at Flagship Park on May 5. Following a rainy weekend, sunny weather during the week saw kids returning to the park. JASON BRUBAKER/ STAFF

BRIEFLY Summerfair participant

Erlanger resident Emily Howard has been selected to participate in Summerfair, the annual art show held at Coney Island. Howard, a printmaker, will be one of approximately 300 artists from across the country with work on display. The fair will feature artwork on a variety of mediums, and this year, for the first time, will also include a 2D/3D Mixed Media Art category. The fair will run June 4-6, and tickets will be $10, with children under the age of 12 receiving free admission. For more information about Summerfair, including a listing of the exhibits, visit www.summerfair.org.

Crafters applications

The third annual Lloyd Memorial Craft and Vendor Extravaganza is now accepting applications for booth space for the event on September 18. The craft show will begin at 9 a.m., and will run until

about 4 p.m. that day. The cost for a booth is $45 until July 30. Only a certain number of vendors will be accepted in each venue. All proceeds will go to benefit Lloyd Memorial High School athletics. For more information, send an e-mail to skey2@ fuse.net or call 859-384-8425.

Library 5K

The Kenton County Public Library’s Seventh Annual Racing to Read 5K Run & Walk will take place Saturday June 12. The race benefits the library’s Racing to Read program, an early childhood literacy initiative to introduce books and the love of reading to children in preschools, day cares and head start centers. The first-place male and female runners will win a $250 Visa gift card and a six-month membership to Better Bodies or the Silverlake Recreation Center. First-place male and female walkers will receive a six-month membership to

Amnesty for $884.20. If the resident paid that bill with the penalty and interest, the total would come to $1016.83. However, with the penalty waived, and only the interest counted, the resident would only owe $928.41. “It obviously all depends on what the bill is, but waiving that penalty can

Better Bodies or Silverlake, a $50 gift certificate to Bob Roncker’s Running Spot and a $25 gift card. Several other prizes will be awarded for age categories, family teams and more. The race will begin at the Mary Ann Mongan branch of the Kenton County Public Library in Covington. Participants can eat a free pancake breakfast courtesy of First Watch, take part in familyfriendly activities and meet the library’s mascot, Booker. Pre-registration cost is $20 per person or $75 for a family team of four members. Pre-registration can be done at www.kentonlibrary. org/race or by picking up a registration form at the Kenton County Public Library. Registration includes a performance running T-shirt, while supplies last. Race-day registration begins at 7:30 a.m. and costs $25 for individuals or $85 for family teams. Visit kentonlibrary.org/race for more information, to register or get directions.

Continued from A1

make a significant difference,” she said. The council passed a resolution to implement the program at their May 11 meeting. “I think anything that gets people to pay their taxes is a good idea,” said Grubbs. “This would be a real help to our budget, and

hopefully, this will get people out to take care of these bills.” Bills can be paid at the city building, located at 318 Garvey Avenue, during normal business hours. For more information about the program or to get a copy of a past-due bill, contact the city building at 342-7911.


News

May 27, 2010

Bank’s bells a pain, resident says

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Crestview Hills resident Chess Cornett says the Bank of Kentucky bell tower located across the parking lot from his home chimes too often and too loudly, disrupting his enjoyment of life. Cornett is asking city council to pass a noise ordinance and requesting the bank lower the volume and frequency of the chimes. Pictured: Cornett standing in his front yard, with the bell tower visible in the background. turned down then turned up again. Bank of Kentucky Senior Vice President Donald Bahr said the bell tower’s volume control was broken and since Cornett’s complaint, has been fixed. As to Cornett calling the fix temporary, Bahr said, “We’re not trying to drive residents crazy. We want to be good neighbors and we intend to keep it low.” While acknowledging Cornett’s complaint, Bahr said some residents enjoy the bells. “We don’t intend to turn them off. If we can get the volume set so it’s not disturbing people I think it will be pleasant for everybody,” he said. City Administrator Tim Williams said a noise ordinance is probably not the answer.

“They are difficult to enforce,” he said. “There is a general nuisance ordinance that police officers could use to address noise.” Crestview Hills Mayor Paul Meier said he plans to monitor how loud the bells chime. “We’ll monitor the volume and see if we feel it’s disturbing or not,” Meier said. The monitoring method has yet to be determined, Meier said, adding it’s not a “priority” because it’s not a good use of taxpayer’s money to check the sound every day. As for Cornett, the bank’s response is lackluster. “It’s probably as good as it’s going to get for me,” he said of the repair. “This bank is just not going to do anything unless there’s a public consensus.”

Two Covington women chosen for Summerfair By Regan Coomer rcoomer@nky.com

Two Covington artists will have a spot at this year’s Summerfair Cincinnati June 4, 5, and 6. Emily Howard and Janet Tobler were two of the more than 800 applicants chosen to participate in Summerfair, a nationally-recognized arts and craft fair. Howard, a graduate student at the University of Cincinnati, will be selling her drawings and prints at the show. “I was really excited,” she said of being chosen. “I’ve been a big fan of Summerfair since I was a kid.” Howard’s prints tell the tale of a little girl in a fairy tale who is equipped with her totem animal, a raven, and magical shoes that lead her on her journey. “I play the story out visually with my prints,” she explained. Howard is also a painter and sculptor. Howard’s UC thesis exhibition is a sculpture of the fairy tale girl’s bedroom, made of cardboard, paper and fabric. Howard’s sculpture can be viewed May 28 to June 11 at the Clifton Cultural Arts Center. “I wanted it to feel like people were walking into a storybook or play,” she said. “I hope people can remember scraps of the magic in their own childhood. That is what’s driving my work.” Summerfair 2010 will be Tobler’s fourth time in the show, which she called a “wonderful affair.” “It’s really exciting. The

A3

CONGRATULATIONS

By Regan Coomer Bells are ringing a little more softly in Crestview Hills after a resident’s complaint about the volume of a Bank of Kentucky bell tower. Since the bell tower’s construction in 2002, resident Chess Cornett says the bell’s chimes, which ring on the hour and every half an hour from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. every day, disturb his enjoyment of life. Cornett is asking the Crestview Hills bank to turn down the volume, and the city to adopt a noise ordinance. “Why does a bank want to ring bells seven days a week every 30 minutes next to a residential area?” he asked. “It’s been seven years of my nerves. I’ve had it.” An engineer, Cornett works long hours and is sound asleep at 8 a.m. when the chimes begin. “It’s ridiculous for a business, a bank, to ring bells. There is no peace here at all,” he said. Cornett’s bedroom is in the front of his home, located about 150 feet from the bank. On average, Cornett has recorded 80 decibels of sound coming from the chimes every day. “They are hell bent on cranking it up as much as they can,” he said. Cornett has complained twice in the past to both the city and bank, but said the problem was temporarily solved – the volume was

Erlanger Recorder

ny a m e h to t l u f e t n’s gra a i s t i a r n e ncin Had i C f o ns st o i u t r t a r r e i n e th ge d e c a l e. ep l v p a o h e o p wh nd a s t c u ue rod n p i t s n t i o in ll c i w y n pa e” m c o n c e l e l h e c T “Ex h t i w e s, v y r a e s w l a o t as , s e s i o t m ” o s r e p k ta t and i r e v e g t n a i l h o w o “ c d n a to do g n i eat h e h t ti. meet a n n i c Cin f o s d nee ms e t s , y y l S e g Sincer ating & Coolin He Bryant

PROVIDED.

Covington artist Emily Howard’s prints, shown here, will be featured in Summerfair 2010 at historic Coney Island June 4, 5 and 6. Howard’s prints tell the story about a young girl in a fairy tale. Of the 300 artists selected for exhibition, 46 were chosen from the Tri-state area. people that go to the fair are usually very upbeat and enthusiastic and well-educated about the artwork,” she said. Tobler, a potter, has made a living off of her pottery for the last 15 years. While Tobler creates vases, tea pots and more, the majority of her work is in tile form. “My work is meant to be looked at and handled and I just hope people enjoy it,” she said. Tobler believes her creations are the result of years of traveling around the world, drawing inspiration from different cultures and local pottery. “I think a little bit of all of that has seeped in and helped me come up with designs. It doesn’t really have anything to do with any particular area of the world, but it is a compilation of everything I’ve seen.”

PROVIDED.

Covington artist Emily Howard’s prints, shown here, will be featured in Summerfair 2010 at historic Coney Island June 4, 5 and 6. Howard’s prints tell the story about a young girl in a fairy tale. Of the 300 artists selected for exhibition, 46 were chosen from the Tri-state area.

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PROVIDED.

Covington artist Janet Tobler’s pottery has been chosen for inclusion in the 2010 Summerfair at Coney Island in June. Tobler said her work is inspired by her travels and ethnic pottery of all cultures. For more information about Summerfair, visit summerfair.org. Tickets are $10 at the gate or in advance and can be purchased on the website. Children 12 and under are free.

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Erlanger Recorder

News

May 27, 2010

Gregory leads special 2010 class at NDA By Adam Kiefaber akiefaber@nky.com

As Sarah Gregory prepares her speech as valedictorian of the 2010 class at Notre Dame Academy, her thoughts will be on her decisions that have shaped her academic life, the prospects of the future, the school’s recent tragedy and on her experience at NDA. One of the bigger decisions Gregory had to make took place four years ago when her family moved from Saline, Mich., to Union, Ky. She was going to have to decide whether to attend the public school, Ryle High School, or the private school, Notre Dame Academy. “Coming here and meeting the sisters, I just realized that this was the place I wanted to be for the next four years,” Gregory said. “It was a major decision and I am certainly glad that I made it.” Four years after realizing that NDA was right for her, Gregory will address the student body and faculty that she now calls her “family” at the school’s commencement exercises May

ADAM KIEFABER/STAFF

Notre Dame Academy senior Sarah Gregory has been awarded for her writing ability and will address her senior class at graduation May 28 at the Northern Kentucky Convention Center at 7 p.m. Gregory is the valedictorian of the 2010 class and has a 4.4 grade point average. 28 at the Northern Kentucky Convention Center at 7 p.m. “The really wonderful part of coming to a school like Notre Dame, where it is smaller, is that I didn’t feel like I was just a number at this new place. I was able to make friends a lot faster and the teachers were anxious to get to know me. It felt like joining a family and Notre Dame became and is now my second home,”

Gregory said. Gregory has excelled at her second home, boasting a 4.4 grade point average and being rewarded for her writing ability. Her passion for the written word began in the third grade when she would regularly get in trouble for reading Harry Potter books behind her textbooks in class. She also tried to emulate the works of Dr. Seuss in a piece she wrote in third

grade, titled “Counting Cows.” Since those days, Gregory has moved on to other authors and recently won an award for her poetry at the 2010 Overture Scholarship Competition in the Creative Writing category. “I like playing around with the way it looks on the page and the style,” she said. “I feel like there is nothing that I can’t express through poetry.”

For Gregory, it could be more of a challenge expressing how close her class is and how it as even grown closer since that fatal April car accident, which resulted in the passing of Notre Dame Academy classmate Maria Schaffstein and left classmate Jessica Russo in serious condition. “Our class is fantastic. I wouldn’t hesitate to say that. The tragedy with Maria, and we are still waiting for Jessie to come back to us, has certainly brought us closer. And, of course, being four years together, being in classes with each other – it is impossible not to see everyone as your sister,” Gregory said. Like Gregory, her Notre Dame sisters have also excelled in the classroom. Earlier this month, May 13, 64 of her senior classmates accepted nearly $3.2 million in college scholarships. As a whole, the 2010 class received approximately $8.3 million in college scholarships. Gregory, who also received scholarship aid, is currently trying to decide between attending the University of Chicago and the

ADAM KIEFABER/STAFF

Sarah Gregory.

University of Notre Dame. Eventually, she would like to earn her Ph. D and become a professor teaching philosophy or biology. No matter what the future holds for Gregory and the rest of the senior class, they will always have each other and the time they spent at NDA. “All of us are women and we are women growing together,” Gregory said. “I think that is a very unique experience and I wouldn’t say that it is better or worse than the coed experience, but it is certainly different and it has definitely shaped me as a person and as a woman.”

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Erlanger Recorder

May 27, 2010

A5

NKY SUMMER CAMPS T U E S D A Y, J U N E 1

SUMMER CAMP - YMCA

R.C. Durr YMCA Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Prorated super Sports Fan. Daily through June 4. R.C. Durr YMCA, $170, $125 members. Registration required. 5345700. Burlington. R.C. Durr YMCA Preschool Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-noon Part-day. Prorated Wild, Wild West. Daily through June 4. R.C. Durr YMCA, $170, $125 members; part-day: $105, $75 members. Registration required. 534-5700. Burlington. R.C. Durr YMCA Teen Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through June 4. R.C. Durr YMCA, $175, $130 members. Registration required. 534-5700. Burlington. Kenton County YMCA Traditional Day Camp, 8:45 a.m.-4 p.m. Schools Out. Daily through June 4. Kenton County YMCA, 10987 Marshall Road, Weekly-themed activities. Scholarship assistance available. Ages 5-11. $120, $100 members; registration fee: $40 family, $25 child. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County YMCA. 781-1814. Independence. Advanced Camping Experience Camp, 8:45 p.m.-4 p.m. Daily through June 4. Kenton County YMCA, 10987 Marshall Road, Learn about leadership development, cultural awareness and self-worth. Scholarship assistance available. Ages 13-16. $120, $100 members; registration fee: $40 family, $25 child. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County YMCA. 356-3178. Independence. Traditional Day Camp, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. School’s Out. Daily through June 4. Campbell County YMCA, 1437 S. Fort Thomas Ave. Swimming, environmental education, arts and crafts, service learning, science, literature, free time and more. Extended hours available. Financial assistance available. Ages 5-10. $140, $110 members. Registration required. 781-1814; www.myy.org. Fort Thomas. Campbell County YMCA Adventure Camp, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through June 4. Campbell County YMCA, 1437 S. Fort Thomas Ave. Teen Camping. Themes, activities, swimming and fun traditional day camp. Ages 11-12. $140, $110 members. Registration required. 572-3063. Fort Thomas. Campbell County YMCA A.C.E.S. Camp, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through June 4. Campbell County YMCA, 1437 S. Fort Thomas Ave. Work on learning projects in surrounding communities and participate in several team building experiences. Financial assistance available. Ages 13-16. $140, $110 members. Registration required. 572-3063. Fort Thomas. Campbell County YMCA Pre and post Camp, 6:30 a.m.-8:45 a.m. Pre-camp care. Daily through June 4. Campbell County YMCA, 1437 S. Fort Thomas Ave. Extended care for any family available. Ages 5-16. Pre: $35, $25 members; post: $30, $20 members. Registration required. 781-1814; www.myy.org. Fort Thomas. R.C. Durr YMCA Summer Camp Leadership in Training Program, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through June 4. R.C. Durr YMCA, $60, $30 members. Registration required. 5345700; www.myy.org. Burlington. R.C. Durr YMCA Summer Day Camp, 6:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Daily through June 4. R.C. Durr YMCA, $125-$175 per week. Registration required. 534-5700; www.myy.org. Burlington. M O N D A Y, J U N E 7

SUMMER CAMP - ARTS

Newport Central Catholic Summer Drama Program, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Grades 5-8. Monday-Friday. Continues through June 24. Performances at 7:30 p.m. on June 25-26. $200. Newport Central Catholic High School, 13 Carothers Road, Black Box Theatre. Lunch, acting, dancing and music. With drama coach and assistants. Each session limited to 30 students. Registration required. 292-0001; www.ncchs.com. Newport. Camp Claymation, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through June 11. Behringer-Crawford Muse-

um, 1600 Montague Road, Ages 8-12. Work in teams to create clay figures, make visual story boards and create story to bring clay figures to life. $230 future members, $175 members. 491-4003. Covington.

SUMMER CAMP - HORSES

Little Britain Stables Horse Camp, 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Daily through June 11. Little Britain Stables, 5309 Idlewild Road, Horse care, riding instruction, leading, lunging, ground driving, driving and riding. Ages 7-16. $300. Registration required. 586-7990; ww.LittleBritainStable.com. Burlington.

SUMMER CAMP MISCELLANEOUS

Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Summer Program, 6:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Daily through June 11. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Highland Heights, 2907 Alexandria Pike, Hands-on activities, arts and craft projects, visits from community resources, field trips and more. Additional weekly summer fees for optional activities may apply. Ages 2-10. $130-$180 depending on age of child. Registration required by June 1. 581-6166. Highland Heights. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Summer Program, 6:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Daily through June 11. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Taylor Mill, 710 Valley Square Drive, Handson activities, arts and craft projects, visits from community resources, field trips and more. Additional weekly summer fees for optional activities may apply. Ages 2-10. $130-$180 depending on age of child. Registration required by June 1. 581-6166. Taylor Mill. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Summer Program, 6:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Daily through June 11. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Florence, 2012 Terrace Court, Hands-on activities, arts and craft projects, visits from community resources, field trips and more. Additional weekly summer fees for optional activities may apply. Ages 2-10. $130-$180 depending on age of child. Registration required by June 1. 581-6166. Florence. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Summer Program, 6:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Daily through June 11. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center, 11293 Grand National Blvd. Hands-on activities, arts and craft projects, visits from community resources, field trips and more. Additional weekly summer fees for optional activities may apply. Ages 2-10. $130-$180 depending on age of child. Registration required by June 1. 581-6166. Richwood. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Summer Program, 6:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Daily through

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SUMMER CAMP - SPORTS

NewCath Hoops Camp, 9 a.m.-noon Girls’ Sessions. Grades 5-8. Daily through June 10. Newport Central Catholic High School, 13 Carothers Road, Emphasis on fundamentals, camp T-shirt, snack and soft drink daily, guest speakers, contests and door prizes. Family discounts available. $65 after May 15; $55 advance. Registration required by May 15. 292-0656. Newport. Big Baseball Giveback: Kenton County Summer Camp, 8:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m. Daily through June 9. Ages 6-9. Villa Madonna Academy, 2500 Amsterdam Road, Brandon Berger presents baseball fundamentals. $99. Registration required. Presented by At The Yard Baseball Training Center. 6477400. Villa Hills.

SUMMER CAMP - YMCA R.C. Durr YMCA Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Back to the Future. Daily through June 11. R.C. Durr YMCA, $170, $125 members. Registration required. 534-5700. Burlington. R.C. Durr YMCA Preschool Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Part-day. Journey to Space. Daily through June 11. R.C. Durr YMCA, $170, $125 members; part-day:

SUMMER CAMP MISCELLANEOUS

SUMMER CAMP MISCELLANEOUS

Skidaddles Summer Camp, 7 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Skidaddles Inc. $170 for five days, $140 for four days, $115 for three days. Registration required. 647-7529; www.skidaddles.com. Florence. W E D N E S D A Y, J U N E 9

SUMMER CAMP - YMCA

Teen Adventure Trips, 8 a.m. COED Parent/Teen Team. Little Miami Bike Canoe. $395 per pair. Teens entering grades 6-9. Three days and two nights. Daily through June 11. Camp Ernst, 7615 Camp Ernst Road, Exploring Little Miami Scenic Bike Trail. Swimming, canoeing and camping. Registration required. 586-6181; www.myycamp.org. Burlington. T H U R S D A Y, J U N E 1 0

SUMMER CAMP MISCELLANEOUS

Skidaddles Summer Camp, 7 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Skidaddles Inc. $170 for five days, $140 for four days, $115 for three days. Registration required. 647-7529; www.skidaddles.com. Florence. S U N D A Y, J U N E 1 3

SUMMER CAMP - YMCA Teen Adventure Trips, 8 a.m. COED Teen Trips: Greenbrier River West Virginia Bike. Biking, whitewater rafting and mountain biking. $820; teens entering grades 8-10. Six days and five nights. Daily through June 18. Camp Ernst, Registration required. 5866181; www.myycamp.org. Burlington. M O N D A Y, J U N E 1 4

Miss Julia’s Camp for Young Ladies, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Daily through June 18. Dinsmore Homestead, 5656 Burlington Pike, Heritage activities and etiquette for girls. Includes embroidery, dancing, tea party, etiquette lessons, and more. Snacks and water provided. Lunch not included. For Ages 11 and up. $100, $85 members. Registration required. 586-6117; www.dinsmorefarm.org. Burlington. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Summer Program, 6:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Daily through June 18. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Highland Heights, $130-$180 depending on age of child. Registration required by June 1. 581-6166. Highland Heights. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Summer Program, 6:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Daily through June 18. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Taylor Mill, $130-$180 depending on age of child. Registration required by June 1. 5816166. Taylor Mill. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Summer Program, 6:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Daily through June 18. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Florence, $130-$180 depending on age of child. Registration required by June 1. 5816166. Florence. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Summer Program, 6:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Daily through June 18. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center, $130-$180 depending on age of child. Registration required by June 1. 581-6166. Richwood. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Summer Program, 6:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Daily through June 18. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Fort Thomas, $130-$180 depending on age of child. Registration required by June 1. 581-6166. Fort Thomas. Skidaddles Summer Camp, 7 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Skidaddles Inc. $170 for five days, $140 for four days, $115 for three days. Registration required. 647-7529; www.skidaddles.com. Florence.

SUMMER CAMP - HORSES

Little Britain Stables Horse Camp, 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Daily through June 18. Little Britain Sta-

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Young Stewards of the Earth, 8 a.m.-noon, Northern Kentucky Montessori Center, 2625 Anderson Road, Montessori-based camp. Learn to recycle, compost and reduce waste; importance of local farming and the origins of the food we eat; and importance of nutritious food and sustainable packaging. Twoweek sessions culminate with field trip including Turner Farms, the Cincinnati Zoo and Gorman Heritage Farm. Children may attend any number of weeks. Ages -3-7. $150-$180 per week. Registration required. 331-3725. Crescent Springs.

bles, $300. Registration required. 586-7990; ww.LittleBritainStable.com. Burlington.

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$105, $75 members. Registration required. 534-5700. Burlington. R.C. Durr YMCA Teen Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through June 11. R.C. Durr YMCA, $175, $130 members. Registration required. 534-5700. Burlington. Kenton County YMCA Traditional Day Camp, 8:45 a.m.-4 p.m. Wild Wild West. Daily through June 11. Kenton County YMCA, $120, $100 members; registration fee: $40 family, $25 child. Registration required. 781-1814. Independence. Advanced Camping Experience Camp, 8:30 p.m.-4 p.m. Daily through June 18. Kenton County YMCA, $120, $100 members; registration fee: $40 family, $25 child. Registration required. 356-3178. Independence. Traditional Day Camp, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Wild Wild West. Daily through June 11. Campbell County YMCA, $140, $110 members. Registration required. 781-1814; www.myy.org. Fort Thomas. Preschool Camp, 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Daily through June 11. Campbell County YMCA, 1437 S. Fort Thomas Ave. Scholarships and financial assistance available. Ages 3-5. $85, $65 members. Registration required. 7811814; www.myy.org. Fort Thomas. Campbell County YMCA Adventure Camp, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through June 11. Campbell County YMCA, $140, $110 members. Registration required. 572-3063. Fort Thomas. Campbell County YMCA A.C.E.S. Camp, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through June 11. Campbell County YMCA, $140, $110 members. Registration required. 572-3063. Fort Thomas. Campbell County YMCA Pre and post Camp, 6:30 a.m.-8:45 a.m. Pre-camp care. Daily through June 11. Campbell County YMCA, Pre: $35, $25 members; post: $30, $20 members. Registration required. 7811814; www.myy.org. Fort Thomas. R.C. Durr YMCA Summer Camp Leadership in Training Program, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through June 11. R.C. Durr YMCA, $60, $30 members. Registration required. 534-5700; www.myy.org. Burlington. R.C. Durr YMCA Summer Day Camp, 6:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Daily through June 11. R.C. Durr YMCA, $125-$175 per week. Registration required. 534-5700; www.myy.org. Burlington.

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June 11. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Fort Thomas, 29 Churchhill Dr. Hands-on activities, arts and craft projects, visits from community resources, field trips and more. Additional weekly summer fees for optional activities may apply. Ages 2-10. $130-$180 depending on age of child. Registration required by June 1. 581-6166. Fort Thomas. Skidaddles Summer Camp, 7 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Skidaddles Inc. 8660 Bankers St. Explore wonders of nature, walk on the wild side, sports week, snacks, hands-on projects and more. Ages -1-5. $170 for five days, $140 for four days, $115 for three days. Registration required. 647-7529; www.skidaddles.com. Florence.

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SCHOOLS A6

Erlanger Recorder

May 27, 2010

ACHIEVEMENTS

Editor Brian Mains | bmains@nky.com | 578-1062

|

NEWS

|

ACTIVITIES

|

HONORS

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Elsmere and Erlanger

N K Y. c o m

RECORDER

JASON BRUBAKER/STAFF

Arnett first-grader Alexis Franklin listens intently as fourth-grader Lindsey Webster reads to her. The fourth-graders have been working with the first-graders all year to develop their reading skills.

Reading Buddies program keeps pages turning By Jason Brubaker jbrubaker@nky.com

It’s safe to say that the firstyear Reading Buddies program at Arnett Elementary has been a success. “Oh, it’s been terrific,” said fourth-grade teacher Regina Pelfrey. “We thought it would be good, but I think it’s even exceeded our expectations. I would highly recommend this to anybody.” Pelfrey and first-grade teacher Stephanie Ruttle started the Reading Buddies programs this year as a way to not only improve the reading skills of their students, but

also to increase collaboration among classes. Throughout the year, students from Pelfrey’s class have visited Ruttle’s class once a week to be paired up with a student to help them read. The students typically take turns reading to each other, with the older student offering guidance and helping the younger kids sound out words when necessary. “My kids love it, because they look at these older students as role models,” said Ruttle. “They really look forward to the fourth-graders coming in each week.” Both Ruttle and Pelfrey felt the extra reading time was helping

JASON BRUBAKER/STAFF

Arnett Elementary fourth-grader Tyuante Offutt helps first-grader Hunter Phillips during a Reading Buddies session on May 21. their students, and their thoughts were validated when both classes showed tremendous leaps in their reading scores on the Measure of Academic Progress (MAP) tests this year. “I had a couple students who improved by 20 points - which is amazing,” said Pelfrey. “I think by serving as mentors to these younger kids, it’s helped their selfesteem and given them a lot of confidence, which was one of the original goals of the program.” The other major goal of the program - to build relationships between the classes and students -

has also been met, according to both teachers. Most of the younger students have had the same mentor all year, and the kids all have been eager to work together. Pelfrey said she fields questions each week from her students, wondering when they’re going to be able to visit their friends in Ruttle’s class. “It’s been neat to see these kids take on a different role, and become leaders,” she said. Hanna Reeves, one of the fourth-graders involved in the program, said she’s noticed a big

difference in the reading abilities of the younger kids, and has enjoyed being a part of the program. “I think they’re getting a lot better, and they’re having more fun too,” she said. “It’s cool to feel like we’ve helped them out.” Pelfrey and Ruttle said they plan to continue the program next year. “I think it’s been great for everybody,” said Pelfrey. “The kids are learning and their enthusiasm has only increased during the year. It’s been everything we could’ve hoped for.”

JASON BRUBAKER/STAFF

Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet Secretary Len Peters (right) poses with a group of Turkey Foot Middle School students on May 19 after presenting a $2 million check to the school district. The money will be used to install solar panels on the roof of the new school, which will be completed by this fall.

Grant will allow for solar panels on new Turkey Foot

By Jason Brubaker jbrubaker@nky.com

Turkey Foot Middle School Principal Tom Arnzen paused briefly after welcoming close to 50 guests at the “new Turkey Foot” on May 19. “Man - it feels good to say that,” he said. “This place is going to be amazing, and we’re just so excited about our future here.” With the new school scheduled to open for the beginning of the 2010-11 school year, Arnzen has had plenty of reasons to be excited lately, as he’s watched the nearby building take shape. However, that day, he had even more reasons...namely a $2 million grant check that will allow the school to install solar panels on the roof. According to a press release describing the grant, the solar powers will make the new school “one of the first net-zero energy schools in the Commonwealth. A net-zero energy building generates as much power as it consumes.” The grant check was presented to the Kenton County School District by Len Peters, the secretary of the Kentucky Energy and Envi-

ronment Cabinet. The grant was funded through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act through the U.S. Department of Energy. “I really commend the Kenton County schools for leading by example with this project, and it’s a great pleasure to be here and see what is happening,” he said. “This project is an enormous accomplishment, and this school will be a model for the rest of the state.” Superintendent Tim Hanner said the solar panels will continue the energy-efficient, green theme for the district. Although twice the size of the current school, he said that several energy saving features will ensure that the new school uses approximately only one-third of the energy. Those features include a green roof, geothermal heating and cooling, daylighting and rainwater retention features. The district also has formed a Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) team, comprised of community leaders and district officials, to look at ways to increase energy efficiency and environmental stewardship throughout the district. “We’ve proven that you can

have a high-performance design and technology in a cost-effective manner,” he said. In addition to praising the numerous community partners the district has worked with on the projects, Hanner also praised the Turkey Foot students, many of whom have been actively involved in the project. The students have been studying energy-efficient features and worked with the architects and design teams to offer input on the new building. “As important as the physical features are, I think I’m just as proud of that fact,” said Hanner. “They’ve done a terrific job throughout this entire process.” Mark Ryles, a member of the Facilities Management Staff with the Kentucky Department of Education, also spoke at the ceremony and praised the district for their forward thinking. “Imagine a community where the building doesn’t just house education, but is also a learning tool for the teachers and students,” he said. “That’s what we have here, and it’s great to see the district being so proactive in their approach to learning and the environment.”

PROVIDED

Breaking wood

Dominach's Taekwondo Academy recently held a break-a-thon fundraiser to support the DARE program. Morgan Stamper of Independence participated in the event and was very excited to get to break some boards. The school was able to raise money to help the DARE program and the students got to have a great time and learn how to help others.

PROVIDED

Butterflies

St. Henry School second-graders are seen here releasing the butterflies that they nutured all spring. The butterflies start out as catepillars and go through different stages until they hatch as butterflies. The students then take them outside to coax them to take flight. Watching and waiting for the butterflies to hatch is a part of their science class. Nancy Huser does this every year to help her students understand this metamorphisis.


Schools

May 27, 2010

Erlanger Recorder

A7

GOT SKILLS? Get what it takes to get the career you want...

Finalists

Diane Wurzbacher, a third-grade teacher from St. Pius X School, and Jaime Nelson, who teaches second grade at the school, were finalists for the Hixson Architecture, Engineering, Interiors 2010 Teacher of the Year Award. The award has been given since 1991 to a current teacher of a Hixson associate’s child or grandchild. Approximately $100,000 has been awarded since the program’s inception.

(Classes starting soon!) Medical Coding and Billing AAPC Certified - CEU Eligible

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Gateway grads welcomed into nursing The Nursing and Allied Health Division of Gateway Community and Technical College presented nursing pins to 23 soon-to-be graduates of the associate degree and practical nursing programs in a special pinning ceremony Tuesday at Notre Dame Academy in Park Hills. Toni Schklar, a registered nurse and manager of St. Elizabeth Healthcare’s holistic health and women’s heart centers, welcomed the graduates into the profession. The semi-annual nurse pinning ceremony is a longstanding tradition among healthcare professionals and marks their formal entry into the profession. Students in the associate degree nursing program who received pins are: Jamie L. Beagle, Burlington Amy L. Carpenter, Independence Justine N. Cherutich, Erlanger

Crystal M. Como, Cincinnati Janice J. Frost, Fort Thomas Bridget C. Gemmer, Burlington Stacey N. Gripshover, Verona Laura M. Handy, Erlanger Rachel N. Hardin, Dayton, Ky. Charlene R. Herzog, Covington Julie A. LaFollette, Dry Ridge Jennifer A. Meyer, Walton Christine M. Mize, Falmouth Stacey L. Moorhead, Moorhead Shannon M. Schawe, Independence Amber D. Steele, Hebron Kimberly A. Thomas, Edgewood Nancy A. Wagner, Florence Kellie R. Worley, Covington

Four students who will graduate Thursday with diplomas in practical nursing received pins, including: Amanda N. Black , Alexandria Robyn M. Stamper , Hebron Alisa N. Turner, Florence Nikki L. Tuttle, Erlanger

Gateway Community and Technical College (GCTC) is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools to

award associate degrees. Contact the Commission on Colleges at 1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097 or call 404679-4500 for questions about the accreditation of Gateway Community and Technical College. GCTC enrolls more than 4,200 students and offers associate degrees, diplomas and certificates in 30 subject areas. Classes are provided at GCTC locations in Boone County, Covington/Park Hills, and Edgewood. Through partnerships with more than 400 local businesses, GCTC provides customized, short-term training to more than 3,000 other people. Find out how to “start here and go anywhere” at www.gateway.kctcs.edu. GCTC is one of 16 colleges that comprise the Kentucky Community and Technical College System.

Every year, the Kentucky Community and Technical College System provides real opportunity to real people—transforming the economy of the entire state by transforming the lives of the people who live in it. Help us continue transforming lives in our state's economy by joining the Kentuckians for Community and Technical Colleges at kctcs.edu.

business partner and displaying identifiable community impact. These partnerships for the 2009-2010 school year were selected based on data submitted on the partnership tracking tools. They include Twenhofel Middle School and Northern Kentucky Health Department, St. Augustine and PNC Bank, Holmes High School and Citi, Ockerman Middle School and Schwan’s Global Supply

Chain, Inc., Piner Elementary and Ticona Engineering Solutions, Conner High School and Citi, New Haven Elementary and Skyline Chili, Boone County High School and Citi, Sixth District Elementary and Gateway Community and Technical College, and Goodridge Elementary and Citi. For more information, contact Amanda Dixon at adixon@nkychamber.com or 859-578-6396.

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Partnerships honored by alliance Education Alliance of Northern Kentucky recently recognized the impact made by B.E.S.T. partnerships across the region at a special Eggs ‘N Issues event, the Business Educaiton Success Teams (B.E.S.T.) Celebration Breakfast May 11. The alliance congratulated the partnerships on their success throughout the year. Special achievements of the partnerships were celebrated. 2010 B.E.S.T. Award recipients included: • Outstanding Work Ethic K-8 Award: Piner Elementary and Ticona • Ockerman Middle School and Schwan Food Co. • B.E.S.T. Service Learning Partnership Award: Walton Verona Middle School and McDonald’s • BEST “Rookie” Outstanding Partnership of the Year: New Haven Elementary and Skyline • Twenhofel Middle School and Northern Kentucky Health Department • BEST Outstanding Projects of the Year: Boone County High School and Citi, Holmes High School and Citi B.E.S.T. Hall of Fame Inductees included Goodridge Elementary and Citi, Ockerman Middle School and Schwan Food, 6th District Elementary and Gateway Community and Technical College, and Boone County High School and Citi. In addition to annual awards, a new honor was presented to Gold Standard B.E.S.T. Partnerships, based on their focus throughout the year to producing measurable results, implementing high impact partnership activities, providing equal benefits to the school and

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Erlanger Recorder ADVERTISEMENT

May 27, 2010 ADVERTISEMENT

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Roadshow Comes to Florence Next Week! By Jason Delong

Treasure Hunters Roadshow STAFF WRITER Clean out your attics, closets and lock boxes, because the Roadshow is coming to Florence. Roadshow experts are in town examining antiques, collectibles, gold and silver. While the Roadshow will accept anything that’s old, they will be focusing on gold and silver coins made before 1964, military items, toys and trains, musical instruments, pocket and wrist watches. Scrap gold is expected to be a popular category this week due to soaring gold prices.

“U.S. coins made before 1964 are most sought after by collectors. Coins made before 1964 are 90% silver and valuable because of the silver content or could be worth even more if one happens to be a rare date.� Expert buyers for the Roadshow have noticed a tremendous increase in the amount of gold coming to the Roadshow and for good reason. Record gold prices have Roadshow guests cashing in on broken jewelry or jewelry they don’t wear anymore with our “fair and honest� purchase offers.

Got Gold? Next week, visitors can cash in on antiques, collectibles, gold, silver, coins or just about anything that is old.

The Roadshow encourages anyone planning a visit to take a minute and examine their jewelry box or their lock box at the bank and gather anything that’s gold. If a guest is not sure if something is gold, bring it anyway and the Roadshow staff will test it for free. Other gold items of interest include gold coins, gold ounces, gold proof sets and dental gold. Other types of items Roadshow experts hope to see include old toys and train sets. Archie Davis, roadshow toy expert spoke about some of the top toys getting great offers. “Old tin windup toys from the late 1800’s through the 1960’s are in great demand now.� said Davis, “Especially those that are character related. Mickey Mouse, Donald Duck, the Flintstones or any character toys are sought. Old Buddy L toys from the 1920’s to 1960’s

are in demand.� Basically any toys made before 1965 are wanted. Train sets made by Lionel, American Flyer, Marklin and others have the potential to fetch high prices. Davis also stressed, “Toys with boxes and in mint condition bring sensational

prices. Most of the toys that come to the Roadshow are not in perfect shape but can still bring good prices from collectors.� When expert Tom Fuller was asked what he enjoyed most about working at the Roadshow, he was quick to answer “Old

“If you go to the Roadshow, you can cash-in your items for top dollar. Roadshow representatives will be available to assess and purchase your items at the Springhill Suites, next Tuesday through Saturday, in Florence.�

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SPORTS BRIEFLY

This week in baseball

• Scott beat Ryle 7-6, May 18. Scott’s Joe Adkins was the winning pitcher, and scored a homerun. • Beechwood beat Simon Kenton 3-2, May 18. Simon’s Winkler was 2-3 with a triple. • Holy Cross beat Highlands 10-1, May 18. Holy Cross’ Andy Roenker was the winning pitcher, and Blake Tiberi hit a double and had three RBI. • Ryle beat Holy Cross 2-1, May 19. Holy Cross’ Nick Ritter was 2-3 with a double. • Highlands beat Simon Kenton 5-2, May 19. Simon’s Chad Lawrence scored a homerun and had two RBI. • Ryle beat St. Henry 11-1 in six innings, May 20. • Holy Cross beat Newport Central Catholic 8-7, May 22. Holy Cross’ Blake Tiberi was the winning pitcher, and Johnson was 2-4 with two RBI. • Dixie Heights beat Bourbon County 7-3, May 22. Dixie’s Brett Stansberry pitched seven strikeouts, and Ben Wolfe was 2-2.

This week in softball

• Scott beat Beechwood 19-4, May 18. Scott’s Amanda Bruemmer was the winning pitcher, and Roma Maloney was 2-5, hit two triples and had five RBI. • Ryle beat Simon Kenton 8-3, May 19. Simon’s Jami Bamberger hit a double. • Notre Dame beat Lloyd 8-7, May 20. Lloyd’s Ellen Woodward was 2-3 with two RBI. • St. Henry beat Highlands 3-0, May 20. St. Henry’s Mamee Salzer was the winning pitcher, and Abbey Kirkwood was 2-3 with a triple. • Ryle beat Dixie Heights 10-0 in five innings, May 22.

This week in tennis

• In the first round of Ninth Region, May 18. St. Henry finished with a team score of two. St. Henry’s Linkugal beat Walton’s Reynolds 7-5, 7-5; Pallazo and Bungenstock beat Simon’s Brown and Stephens 6-1, 6-1; and Boelsher and Hils beat Boone’s Piaciente and Guenther 6-3, 6-3. • Dixie Heights, Scott and Simon Kenton were sixth as of the second round in the Ninth Region Tournament, May 19. Dixie’s Thompson and Harnett beat Ryle’s Maynard and Wagner 6-4, 6-1. Simon’s Sam Benner and Eric Schadler beat Holy Cross’ Schaefer and Tewes 6-2, 6-1. • Holy Cross placed fifth and Dixie Heights, Scott and Simon Kenton were sixth as of the second round in the Ninth Region Tournament, May 19. Holy Cross’ Marcus Lea and Jared Andrews beat Cooper’s Snatchco and Yeomanson 6-1, 6-0. Dixie’s Thompson and Harnett beat Ryle’s Maynard and Wagner 6-4, 6-1. Simon’s Sam Benner and Eric Schadler beat Holy Cross’ Schaefer and Tewes 62, 6-1. Dixie Heights and Holy Cross were sixth, and Scott and Simon Kenton were ninth in the Ninth Region, May 20. Dixie’s Thompson and Harrett beat Holy Cross’ Lee and Andrews 6-2, 6-4. • Scott girls placed third, St. Henry placed eighth, Holy Cross placed ninth and Dixie Heights placed 11th as of the quarterfinals in the Ninth Region Tournament, May 19. On May 20, St. Henry placed ninth in the Ninth Region, May 20.

Erlanger Recorder

May 27, 2010

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | Editor Melanie Laughman | mlaughman@communitypress.com | 513-248-7573

RECREATIONAL

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Elsmere and Erlanger

N K Y. c o m

A9

RECORDER

Overpeck 3rd Juggernaut to run in college By James Weber jweber@nky.com

Elisha Overpeck completed a trifecta of sorts May 21. The Lloyd Memorial High School senior became the third distance runner at the school to receive a college athletic scholarship this spring. Overpeck signed with NAIA Georgetown College. She joins teammates Courtney Siefert (Mount Olive) and Joey Landrum (Union) at the next level. “It’s a great school, athletically and academically,” said Overpeck, who is leaning toward majoring in pharmacy. “They’re giving me a good amount of money and I know some runners who go there.”

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

Lloyd Memorial senior Elisha Overpeck signed to run for Georgetown College May 21. Sitting, from left: Mother Brandy, Elisha, Georgetown head coach Betsy Laski and father William. Standing are Lloyd coaches Erin Pifer and Danielle Dierig.

Kenton teams prep for regional track meet

Senior, freshmen win titles for NDA

By James Weber

By James Weber

jweber@nky.com

jweber@nky.com

Ally Westling is used to winning regional titles. But she had a new experience last week, claiming her first Ninth Region tennis championship in singles. The Notre Dame Academy senior defeated sophomore teammate Madie Cook, 6-2, 6-2 to win the Ninth Region title May 21 at Five Seasons. Westling had won the past three regional doubles titles with 2009 graduate Julia Volpenhein, and the pair made the state semifinals last year. “Both are really nice, but it feels really good to win a singles title,” she said. “If you just saw the score, you would not think it was a close match. It was a battle.” Westling and Cook are key to the Pandas’ hopes for an overall state title. The tourney is May 27-29 in Lexington. Westling is the three seed and Cook sixth. Notre Dame rolled to the girls’ regional title for the 15th straight year. “I think our prospects are super,” said NDA head coach Rob Hardin. “We’re super strong in singles, our doubles are solid. We’ve played everybody.” In the doubles final, NDA freshmen Catriona Shaughnessy and Laura Irons beat teammates Amy Beischel (senior) and Alyssa Kennedy (sophomore). The freshmen won 6-3, 6-2. “It was stressful,” Shaughnessy said. “We were freshmen and they are so good. Amy and Alyssa are such a tough team. We knew we had to bring it if we wanted to win.” Shaughnessy is the fourth sister in her family to represent the Pandas in the state doubles tournament. The other three - Caitlin, Cristin and Meghan - have all made the quarterfinals at state. “I’ve been thinking

In cross country, Overpeck won the Class 2A regional championship last fall and finished second in the state meet. In track last year, she was part of the third-place team at state in the 4x800 relay. She also finished seventh in the 3,200. Recently, she has set personal bests in the 1,600 (5:33) and 3,200 (12:08). She is aiming for the state title in the 1,600 this spring. Overpeck, who has been running for five years, enjoys the high she gets from a good race. “I’ll miss the atmosphere of a meet and the family aspect,” she said. “We’re like a family here.”

Track teams will compete in the regional meets Saturday, May 29. Class 1A is at Walton-Verona, 2A at Harrison County and 3A at Ryle. Dixie Heights hosted a tune-up meet which had most of Northern Kentucky in it.

Girls

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

Notre Dame senior Ally Westling returns a shot to teammate Madie Cook during the Ninth Region girls' singles final May 21 at Five Seasons.

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

Notre Dame freshmen Catriona Shaughnessy (front) and Laura Irons play an early-round match in the Ninth Region doubles tournament. They won the title. about it the whole tournament, but I was trying not to let it get to me because I needed to do it for myself,” Catriona said. The doubles players won a season-long tryout to determine who would play in the regional. “It helps us to have to play them week in and week out,” said Irons, a lefthander. “That makes our game better. That’s why

we’re so strong.” Beechwood’s state qualifiers from 2009 will go back there this week. Senior Carly Wilson lost to Cook in three sets in the singles semifinals. Ellen White and Emily Pawsat lost to Shaughnessy and Irons in the doubles semifinals. Taylor Reynolds of Holy Cross also reached the semifinals and will play at state.

Team: Campbell County 125, NCC 95, Lloyd 90. 4x800: Campbell County (Dreyer, Roaden, Robinson, Dumaine) 9:48.31, NCC (Niemer, Hlebiczki, Schwarber, Suedkamp) 10:05.70, Cooper (Kane, Phillips, Patton, Gregory) 10:12.17. 100 hurdles: Jessica Crabtree (Lloyd) 16.08, McKenna Edgett (Dixie) 16.91, Nicole Ridder (Brossart) 16.93. 100: Michelle Canterna (Cooper) 12.80, Allison Ponzer (SK) 12.92, Tati Jouett (Lloyd) 12.95. 4x200: Campbell (Yenter, Kitchen, Heilman, Carrigan) 1:45.07, NCC (Kelly, Dubuc, Bartels, Muench) 1:49.77, Ryle (Stephens, Hearn, Pennington, Elkins) 1:50.77. 1,600: Elisha Overpeck (Lloyd) 5:32.73, Taylor Robinson (Campbell) 5:36.22, MacKenzie Hester (SK) 5:36.77. 4x100: NCC (Muench, Kelly, Hlebiczki, Bartels) 51.99, Lloyd (Wood, Crabtree, Jouett, Vance) 52.59, Dixie (Edgett, Ochs, Perdue, Jamison) 52.63. 400: Anna Carrigan (Campbell) 57.47, Christina Cook (SK) 58.56, Sarah Klump (Brossart) 1:00.06. 300 hurdles: Christina Heilman (Campbell) 46.68, Aubrey Muench (NCC) 49.46, Abby Hills (Highlands) 50.05. 800: Carolynn Dreyer (Campbell) 2:24.28 Mary List (NDA) 2:27.69, Sarah Suedkamp (NCC) 2:29.11. 200: Anna Carrigan (Campbell) 25.56, Tati Jouett (Lloyd) 26.49, Christina Cook (SK) 26.62. 3,200: Elisha Overpeck (Lloyd) 12:12.0, Gabrielle Bergman (HC) 12:36.56, Taylor Robinson (Campbell) 12:43.84. 4x400: Campbell (Dreyer, Dumaine, Heilman, Carrigan) 4:04.61, NCC (Dubuc, Bartels, Suedkamp, Muench) 4:10.50, Dixie (Ochs, Walz Wehage, Jamison) 4:13.36. Shot put: Frannie Schultz (NCC) 35-0, Jenna Lehkamp (Scott) 3410, Lashawn Ford (34-2.5). Discus: Brianna McCarthy (Beechwood) 113-5, Frannie Schultz (NCC) 111-4, Shelly Morgan (Boone) 94-5. Long jump: Michelle Canterna (Cooper) 17-6.5, Allison Ponzer (SK) 17-2.5, Katie Bell (Scott) 16-

7.5. Triple jump: Allison Ponzer (SK) 35-9.25, Lauren Wetenkamp (Ryle) 33-3.75, Carly Wood (Lloyd) 33-0. High jump: Hillary Jamison (Dixie), Kelsi Pickens (VMA) 4-10, Emma Heil (NCC) 4-10. Pole vault: Paige Turner (Dixie) 8-0, Jessica Crabtree (Lloyd) 8-0, Kyra Hickman (BB) 7-6.

Boys

Team: Campbell County 111.5, Covington Catholic 99 Ryle 70. 4x800: Campbell (Bernard, Rawe, Strange, Scharold) 8:02.08, Dixie (M. Menkhaus, B. Menkhaus, Reekers, Schuchter) 8:38.03, Ryle (Galan, Fueta, Edwards, Culbertson) 8:40.22. 110 hurdles: Erik Pederson (Ryle) 16.13, Paul Cusick (CCH) 16.14, Aaron Lyon (Campbell) 16.47. 100: Jeff Tetteh (Boone) 11.37, Brayson Smith (HC) 11.49, Ryann Reynolds (Lloyd) 11.69. 4x200: Dixie (Hocker, Sikra, Meyer, McKinney) 1:31.74, Campbell (Johnson, Boehm, Mahoney, Neyman) 1:35.06, Boone (Tetteh, McGarr LeRoy, Howell) 1:35.16. 1,600: Alexx Bernard (Campbell) 4:24.83, Joseph Landrum (Lloyd) 4:27.99, Cameron Rohmann (St. Henry) 4:33.78. 4x100: Cov Cath (Batts, Hudepohl, Bowdy Maschinot) 43.69 (meet record), Holy Cross (Smith, Piccirillo, Norris, Walker) 45.76, Lloyd (Chappie, Johnson, Walker, Reynolds) 46.00. 400: Nathan McKinney (Dixie) 50.51, Mason Hutchinson (Cooper) 51.07, Austin Johnson (Campbell) 51.91. 300 hurdles: Paul Cusick (CCH) 41.66, Aaron Lyon (Campbell) 43.42, Taylor Bergman (HC) 43.66. 800: Robbie Scharold (Campbell) 1:53.67, Alexx Bernard (Campbell) 2:01.65, Joey Landrum (Lloyd) 2:04.19. 200: Kyle Hocker (Dixie) 23.30, Mason Hutchinson (Cooper) 23.47, Austin Hudepohl (CCH) 23.54. 3200: Laureano (Lex. Cath), Pete Miller (VMA) 10:30.46, Michael Menkhaus (Dixie) 10:32.76. 4x400: Cooper (Ballinger, Replogle, Blevins, Hutchinson) 3:34.44, Ryle (Eubank, Nutter, Boggs, Culbertson) 3:39.92. Shot put: Jordon Hansel (SK) 44-10, Andy Deglow (CCH) 429.25, Ryan Arey (Boone) 42-9. Discus: Jordon Hansel (SK) 13410, Brayden Erpenbeck (CCH) 1327, Derek Piccirillo (SK) 127-4. Long jump: Michael Bowdy (CCH) 21-10.75, Sag Powell (SK) 21-3, Jon McGarr (Boone) 20-2.75. Triple jump: Sage Powell (SK) 43-2.5, Zhock Mason (Ryle) 42-2.5, Ryan Cahill (CCH) 40-3. High jump: Ben Bessler (St. Henry) 6-6, Alex Connelly (CCH) 64, Jeff Huntley (Ryle) 5-10. Pole vault: Doug Long (Campbell) 11-6, Chris Sikra (Dixie) 11-6, Sam Schaefer (NCC) 11-6.

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A10

Erlanger Recorder

Sports & recreation

May 27, 2010

NDA wins middle school track meet Dixie Heights had a major middle-school track and field May 6. Notre Dame won the girls’ title and Campbell County won boys. The top three in each event:

Girls

Team: Notre Dame 83, Campbell County 79.5, Dixie Heights 74, Beechwood 66. 4x800: Beechwood (Morgan Fritz, Brooke Dosker, Mackenzie Rylee, Maddy Schwarz), Campbell (Jennah Flairty, Morgan Becker, Hannah Nelson, Brandi Rice), Notre Dame (Sara Borchers, Alexa Colvin, Grace Restle, Emma Folzenlogen). 100 hurdles: Brittney Turner (Dixie), Katie Jennings (Dixie), Marie Burns (Beechwood). 100: Raven Rice (Newport), Morgan Feldman (St. Mary), Chelsea Perdue (Dixie). 4x200: Campbell (Brooke Buckler, Taylor Carnes, Katelyn Helton, MacKenzie See), Dixie (Mary Conti, Chelsea Perdue, Sara Edgett, Brittney Turner), Beechwood (Morgan Fritz, Mackenzie Fessler, Alex Keller, Mallory Suchanek). 1,600: Lauren Ossege (Highlands), Abby Vandergriff (St. Mary), Alexa Colvin (NDA). 4x100: Dixie (Brittney Turner, Chelsea Perdue, Sara Edgett, Randi McIntosh), Campbell, Beechwood (Sophie Colosimo, Mackenzie Fessler, Alex Keller, Addy Fessler).

400: Alex Keller (Beechwood), Mary Conti (Dixie), Abby Vandergriff (St. Mary). 800: Abby Vandergriff (St. Mary), Brandi Rice (Campbell), Jennah Flairty (Campbell). 200: Chelsea Perdue (Dixie), Mandy Arnzen (NDA), Katelyn Helton (Campbell). 4x400: Campbell (Brooke Buckler, Taylor Carnes, Katelyn Helton, Brandi Rice), Beechwood (Morgan Fritz, Alex Keller, Mackenzie Rylee, Maddy Schwarz), Dixie Randi McIntosh, Mary Conti, Darcy Whitehead, Sara Edgett). Shot put: Molly Diamon (Holmes), Zoe Luebbe (W-V), Avery Henderson (NDA). Discus: Molly Diamon (Holmes), Olivia Scaringi (NDA), Morgan Trusty (Villa Madonna). Long jump: Mandy Arnzen (Notre Dame), Raven Rice (Newport), Mackenzie Fessler (Beechwood). High jump: Carol Ray (Tichenor), Maria Blom (VMA), Brooke Buckler (Campbell).

Boys

Team: Campbell County 103.5, Newport 62, Holmes 57, St. Mary 55. 4x800: Campbell (Kevin Lackey, Aaron Orth, Kyle Edgley, Sean Fausz), W-V (Matt Harper, Ben Gruber, Joe Rider, Colton Francis), Tichenor (Zack Clark, Zach Niceley, Tyler Hughes, Jakob Schulkers). 100 hurdles: Trey Simmons (Dixie), JaShawn Stanley (Newport), Jonathan Jones (W-V).

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100: Jonathon Scruggs (Holmes), Jamanti Wilson (Holmes), Jake Zabonick (Campbell). 4x200: Campbell (Kyle Edgley, Daniel Schiller, Matt Mayer, Dylan Rich), Twenhofel (Daniel Cully, Nathan Staley, Thomas Swift, Elijeh Tauai), Newport (Tyler Farmer, Charles Bailey, Mason Whaley, Brian Burton). 1,600: Michael Caldwell (St. Mary), Keegan Hanrahan (Scott), Sean Fausz (Campbell). 4x100: Dixie (Jackson Stanek, Miles Payne, Joe Radenhausen, Trey Simmons), Newport (Andre Anderson, Charles Bailey, JaShawn Stanley, Mason Whaley), Campbell (Daniel Schiller, Stewart Knaley, Kyle Edgley, Jake Zabonick). 400: Jamanti Wilson (Holmes), Stewart Knaley (Campbell), Aaron Orth (Campbell). 800: Michael Caldwell (St. Mary), Keegan Hanrahan (Scott), Aaron Orth (Campbell). 200: Jake Zabonick (Campbell), Jonathon Scruggs (Holmes), Jonathon Jones (W-V). 4x400: Dixie (Jackson Stanek, Joe Radenhausen, Trey Simmons, Miles Payne), Campbell (Stewart Knaley, Aaron Orth, Matt Mayer, Kevin Lackey), Newport (Charles Bailey, Brian Burton, Mason Whaley, Chaz Ware). Shot put: Cameron Hansel (Twenhofel), Nick True (Highlands), Dominick Joseph (Tichenor). Discus: Cameron Hansel (Twenhofel), Dominick Joseph (Tichenor), Nick True (Highlands). Long jump: Jake Zabonick (Campbell), Drew Berkemeyer (St. Mary), Darnell Ball (Tichenor). High jump: JaShawn Stanley (Newport), Armani Housley (Holmes), Troy Phelps (VMA).

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Sports & recreation

Erlanger Recorder

May 27, 2010

A11

Roebker, Colonels repeat tennis titles By James Weber jweber@nky.com

Jimmy Roebker expected a tight match against his familiar rival. So the Covington Catholic senior was a bit stunned and apologetic after winning his fourth straight Ninth Region boys’ tennis singles title against Calvary senior Pierce Kohls. Roebker did not lose a game, winning 6-0, 6-0 as he beat Kohls in the regional final for the fourth time. Roebker only lost one game in five matches in the tournament. “I just played really well and he didn’t play his best,” Roebker said. “He missed a lot of balls. Whenever he had an opportunity I came up with a big serve or something. “He’s a really good player; he deserves to win. It’s

kind of bad luck. He’s a good player, and it’s usually really close.” Roebker, the 2009 state singles champion, will start his defense Thursday, May 27, at the University of Kentucky. The tourney is six rounds, and Roebker expects a tough challenge. Roebker is the third seed in the tourney behind two sophomores. “It’s a lot less pressure,” Roebker said. “If I don’t win, I already won it. But I really want to win it. I’m excited and nervous about the state tournament. There are a lot of good players.” Roebker said he served well against Kohls, something he hadn’t done lately and noted he needs to do well to succeed at state. Roebker’s win highlighted a ninth straight team championship for the Colonels, who will send

their entire regional lineup to state. Stephen Schafer reached the quarterfinals in singles. Junior Haden Cotton repeated as regional doubles champion, this time with senior Daniel Sullivan, who played singles last year. They beat teammates Jacob Litmer and Andrew Schult, 6-2, 6-0 in the regional final. “Playing our second doubles team we were just having fun,” Sullivan said. “It was awesome because they won and we got to play against them.” Sullivan said he loved the net play of doubles. He is the third brother to play for Cov Cath. “Both doubles teams were so much better now than they were a month ago,” said Cov Cath head coach Al Hertsenberg. “Haden had a lot of success

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

Covington Catholic senior Jimmy Roebker gets set to serve to Calvary senior Pierce Kohls during the Ninth Region boys’ tennis singles final May 22 at Boone Woods. last year. He worked harder in the offseason and got bigger.” Hertsenberg said the Colonels were playing for their tradition. “Now it’s the expectation they have for themselves,” he said. “They don’t want to let down the previous classes. These guys have prac-

ticed all season long and every opportunity they had they kept getting better.” Cov Cath neighbors Dixie Heights and Villa Madonna claimed the other two doubles spots in the state tourney. VMA’s Deuce Gibson and Andres Garcia will play at state, as will Laine Harrett

and Eric Thompson of Dixie. Gibson and Garcia won a three-set thriller over Sam Benner and Eric Schadler of Simon Kenton in the quarterfinals to earn a state berth. They then lost to Litmer and Schult in a long threeset match, falling in a tiebreaker in the third set.

BRIEFLY

Pat on the back

Thomas More wins title

Thomas More completed its comeback run and captured its first-ever PAC baseball title by edging the Presidents 2-1, May 15, against Washington and Jefferson. With the victory, the Saints earned the PAC’s automatic bid to the NCAA Division III playoffs, while the top-seeded Presidents must now hope for a Pool C “at large” bid to NCAAs on Monday.

Covington Catholic senior Brett Stayton (12, center) gets congratulated by fellow Colonels after knocking in the gamewinning run against Beechwood May 4. Cov Cath won its 35th District semifinal over Holmes May 24 and was scheduled to play in the final May 26 against Holy Cross. Cov Cath is in the Ninth Region tournament no matter what. THOMAS E. SMITH/CONTRIBUTOR

Tied in NCAA champs

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A point of celebration

Tryout are scheduled between May 26 and June 4. For specific dates and times, please see the web site.

St. Henry’s Nick Bungenstock (right) celebrates with teammate Dominic Palazzo after they won a point during the Ninth Region Tournament May 18.

More in tennis

Why Choose Hammer FC?

SIDELINES Soccer tryouts

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• Covington Catholic boys finished with a team score of four in the first round of Ninth Region, May 18. Beechwood and Villa Madonna both finished with a three, Scott finished with a two and Dixie Heights, Holy Cross and Simon Kenton both finished with a one. Cov Cath’s Jimmy Roebker beat Conner’s Chitwood 6-0, 6-0; Stephen Shafer beat Dixie’s Nowland 6-1, 6-2; Haden Cotton and Daniel Sullivan had a bye; Jacob Litmer and Andrew Schult beat Dixie’s Comley and Jackson 6-2, 6-0. Beechwood’s Ben Hackett beat Simon Kenton’s Daniels 6-4, 7-6; Craig beat St. Henry’s Anderson 6-2, 6-0; Kyle Nienaber and Craig beat Covington Latin’s Smith and Becker 6-0, 6-0. Villa’s VanMelle beat Dixie’s Middendorf 6-2, 6-2; Lord and VanMelle beat Conner’s Lang and Stephens 4-6, 7-5, 6-3; and Gibson and Andres Garcia beat Beechwood’s Richardson and Barry 7-5, 6-0. Scott’s A.J. Berk beat Holy Cross’ Wiseman 61, 6-2; Chadd Allender beat Covington Latin’s Stephens 61, 6-1. Dixie’s Thompson and Harret beat Walton’s C. Burns and D. Burns 6-0, 6-0. Simon’s Sam Benner and Eric Schadler beat Conner’s Taylor and Walton 6-0, 6-1. Holy Cross’ Marcus Lea and Jared Andrews beat Calvary’s Leichter and Grinstead 6-1, 61; and Schaefer and Tewes won by forfeit. • In the girls’ second singles round of Ninth Region, May 18, Holy Cross’ Reynolds beat Beechmont’s Jaindl 7-6, 6-4.

Hammer FC Invites you to tryout for the fall 2010/spring 2011 soccer year. Join the leader in player development in the Greater Cincinnati area!

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The Thomas More College men’s golf team shot a fourth round 301 May 14, for a final total of 1,237 (322-304-310301) to finish tied for 22nd at the 2010 NCAA Division III Men’s Golf Championship at Hershey Links in Hershey, Pa. Junior Jacob Bowman, a Holy Cross High School graduate, tied for 108th with a 321 (8381-80-77) and sophomore Mike Pharo, a Moeller High School graduate, finished 118th with a 340 (84-82-89-85).

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A12

Erlanger Recorder

May 27, 2010

VIEWPOINTS

EDITORIALS

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LETTERS

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COLUMNS

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CH@TROOM

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Elsmere and Erlanger

N K Y. c o m

Editor Brian Mains | bmains@nky.com | 578-1062

RECORDER

CH@TROOM

Last week’s question

Should a U.S. Supreme Court justice have prior judicial experience? Why or why not? “The U.S. Supreme Court is the ultimate interpreter of the law of the land. Justices need to understand all the nuances of the law and relate current questions to the precedents that have gone before. “The most important attribute is to understand the law. Being a bench judge is certainly good experience but it is not the primary duty of a Supreme Court justice. Deep judicial understanding of the law, a breadth of academic experience and exceptional logical skills and intelligence are much more important. A new justice will have a long time to learn the skills of the bench on the job and the benefit of the best teachers in the land, his or her fellow justices.” F.S.D. “What is the difference between Congress and the Supreme Court? You don’t have to be an attorney or know all the laws that should be known to pass legislation bills in Congress, which greatly affects us all. “So why not confirm someone who has some knowledge and maybe common sense? It is all too political and monetary for what decisions must be made by either branch.” D.J. “I would say yes mainly for judicial decisions in higher court levels, ie: appeals or state supreme courts, not necessarily criminal courts. Having extreme knowledge of the Constitution and laws in this situation should be tops on any resume for Supreme Court justices.” O.H.R. “I don’t think that it is absolutely necessary, particularly if they are well schooled in law and understand how the system is designed to work. After all, many thought Sarah Palin was qualified to be a vice president with no experience in Congress.” B.N. “Yes, how do you know if you can handle the pressure if you have never been in a judgmental position. This is a country of 300 million people depending on the thought processes and rulings of nine people.” N.P. “No, not a necessary requirement. Forty justices (36 percent of all) representative of 30 associate justices and 10 chief justices had no previous judicial experience before joining the Supreme Court. “President Obama has nominated Solicitor General Elena Kagan (with no prior judicial experience) to be the 112th Supreme Court justice. Ms. Kagan’s preparation and experience create an impeccable resume for her to assume a seat on the bench of the Supreme Court. “She has practiced law. She was clerk to Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall. She was the first woman to be the dean of Harvard Law School. As the first woman to be solicitor general, she has represented the government before the U.S. Supreme Court. She is an acclaimed legal scholar with a rich understanding of constitutional law. Elena Kagan is more than qualified to be the 112th U.S. Supreme Court Justice.” R.O.S. “Close to 40 percent of our Supreme Court Justices have had

Next question

Does the Reds’ early-season success make it more likely that you will go to a game, or more games, this season? Why or why not? Send your answer to bmains@nky.com with Chatroom in the subject line. no prior experience as judges. Traditionally knowledge of the Constitution has the been the primary qualification and law professors consequently were thought highly suitable. Others had a strong tradition of public service like Justice Louis Brandeis, but no judicial experience, who then became one of the most brilliant Justices of all time. Recently there seems to have been a rush to get the potential candidate a seat on a Federal Appeals Court as in the case of Justice Clarence Thomas who served only a year before his nomination. As many know, the GOP successfully sat on Elaine Kagan’s nomination to Federal Appeals court. When elected, GW Bush quickly removed her name and sent Supreme Court Justice Roberts name in its place. At the time they essentially had identical careers and education.” A.M.B. “I find it hard to believe that some one who had not been a judge would be qualified to serve on the highest court in the land. But I find it hard to believe the lack of qualifications for most current politicians including the current president. It seems the old saying is still true: “those that CAN do and those that can NOT, run for office. I would prefer experienced people running for political office and judicial appointments. I would also prefer it not be a life long career but instead 812 year tenure. Just once I would like to see some one who successfully ran a business get involved in politics but then why would they take the step down. Go Figure!” T.D.T. “I would think that a rational individual would respond by saying something like, ‘Isn’t that obvious?’ Likewise, the question ‘Why or why not?’ should be unnecessary. “The nine justices of the Supreme Court are appointed for life by the president currently in the White House when an opening occurs. I doubt that any ordinary human being over the age of 21 is without ideological bias, and that certainly applies to Supreme Court of the United States members. Therefore, presidents, according to their own bias, generally appoint someone they believe will help to promote their own ideological viewpoints. “These nine individuals, with lifetime appointments, have tremendous power, much greater in some ways that the 535 members of Congress. And since all human beings are fallible, it is a given that these justices will use their positions of power to implement rulings that are consistent with their own biases. “Serving as a magistrate in our judicial system will at least give a candidate some experience in seeing both sides of issues that end up in court, even if they remain biased. To appoint someone who has no such judicial experience to the position of Supreme Court of the United States justice is simply ludicrous. It would be akin to appointing someone with no medical experience to head the AMA.” B.B.

PROVIDED

Special visit

Students from St. Henry District High School enjoyed a special night of dancing, food and entertainment with the residents at St. Charles Care Center at the annual "Senior Prom". Sixty St. Henry District High School students helped organize the event which was held at St. Charles Care Center.

Remembering service to U.S.

Memorial Day has always been a special occasion for me. Growing up in a military family, those holiday weekends were a great opportunity to spend time with my father. He spent more than 22 years on active duty and was a Vietnam War veteran. My father would take us to various memorial sites and veteran reunions to reflect on the sacrifices of our veterans and generate an appreciation of service in his sons. The time spent together introduced us to another side of our Dad that I still think about to this day. Those were great times for my brother and myself as it served as an inspiration for my eventual enlistment in the Army. This Memorial Day, I will spend time reflecting upon the service of our service members and their families. Our current operations in Afghanistan and Iraq have required a lot from our men and women in uniform and

will continue to impose a large burden on our forces. Large percentage of these military professionals has had multiple deployments Major and will continStephen M. ue to serve in Marshall order to support their teammates Community and our country. Recorder Their sacrifice in guest the form of time columnist away from family and service in hazardous conditions more than deserves our personal reflection. Some may argue that Memorial Day is reserved to honor those who have served and made the ultimate sacrifice. I personally feel that anyone who has made the commitment to serve should also be in our thoughts.

Winged termites require treatment Question: How can I tell the difference between flying ants and flying termites? Answer: Warmer weather and springtime showers signal termites to emerge and fly into the air to find mates and start new colonies. This is why it is common to see large numbers of winged termites at this time of year. It may be difficult to distinguish between swarming termites and winged ants. A termite has straight antennae, uniform waist and wings of equal size. Conversely, a winged ant has elbowed (bent) antenna, a narrow, constricted “neck” and

“waist,” and wings that are longer in the front than back. Swarming termites emerging from wood piles, tree stumps, old leaf Mike Klahr piles and other Community outdoor locaRecorder tions don’t necindicate columnist essarily a home or building infestation. However, winged termites found indoors usually are a sign of an infestation that needs treatment. Although termites swarm-

RECORDER

ing indoors die without causing damage, seeing thousands of them emerge inside can be an emotionally trying experience. Winged termites emerging from the base of a foundation wall or adjoining porches also usually indicate that the house is infested and requires treatment.

Upcoming events

• Learn Your Trees and Shrubs: 8:30-11:30 a.m. Thursday, June 3, Boone County Extension Office. Call 586-6101 to register, or enroll online at www. ca.uky.edu/boone. Mike Klahr is the Boone County Extension Agent for Horticulture.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR Kimmich thanks voters

In November of 2008 my wife Jean and I, along with our two daughters, embarked on a remarkable journey to be the Republican Party nominee for Kenton County Judge-Executive. Since that time we have made hundreds of new friends, renewed countless old acquaintances and promoted a positive agenda for Kenton County’s future. While our efforts fell short of those needed for victory I want to express my heartfelt thanks to

those who worked so hard on our campaign and to the more than 4,000 Kenton County Republicans who cast their vote for my agenda. We ran a positive, issueoriented campaign and despite the outcome I can honestly say there is nothing I would have done differently, because at the end of the day, I can hold my head high and be proud of our message. Regardless of where time takes us, my family and I will forever cherish the good memories of this experience and I will never relent

A publication of

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Elsmere and Erlanger

I know many cadets and new recruits waiting to begin training and become a part of our military. These future service members know that there is a high probability that they will deploy, yet they stand ready to serve. The mental toughness and dedication of these new service men and women will also be in my thoughts. This Memorial Day I look forward to attending the ceremony at Fort Leavenworth with my children, continuing the tradition my father started with me. While they are too young to understand or appreciate Memorial Day, I hope in time they come to honor and respect all the sacrifices our veterans (past and present) made for our country. Maybe when my children become older they will continue the tradition with their families. Major Stephen Marshall, who enlisted out of Boone County, is now stationed at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas.

Erlanger Recorder Editor . . . . . . . . . . .Brian Mains bmains@nky.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .578-1062

in my efforts to improve the quality of life in this community. I want to take this opportunity to publicly congratulate fellow Republican Steve Arlinghaus on his victory and wish him well as he prepares to undertake the awesome responsibility of seeking to govern a great community that Jean and I are so proud to call home. Scott Kimmich Former Republican candidate for Kenton County Judge-Executive

s

A WORLD OF DIFFERENT VOICES

Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Friday | See page A2 for additional contact information. 283-0404 | 228 Grandview Drive, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017 | 654 Highland Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075 | e-mail kynews@nky.com | Web site: www.NKY.com


Erlanger Recorder

May 27, 2010

A13

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A14

Erlanger Recorder

May 27, 2010

Lower Prices Are here to stay!

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Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Elsmere and Erlanger kynews@communitypress.com

T h u r s d a y, M a y 2 7 , 2 0 1 0

SPOTLIGHT ON BUSINESS

RECORDER

Web site: NKY.com

PEOPLE

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IDEAS

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RECIPES

Library offers summer of fun By Jason Brubaker jbrubaker@nky.com

By Regan Coomer rcoomer@nky.com

REGAN COOMER/STAFF

Kidzville Child Care opened three months ago in the Crescent Park area of Fort Mitchell. The day care offers extended hours and flexibility for working parents. Director Roseanna Yarnell (left) leads singing with the day care’s toddlers May 20.

Day care provides help for working parents By Regan Coomer rcoomer@nky.com

A new day care in Crescent Park offers extended hours, flexible schedules and discounts for families with more than one child. “We’re very individualized,” said Kidzville Child Care, LLC Director Roseanna Yarnell. “We know all the parents and grandparents.” Currently the statelicensed day care accepts children aged 6 weeks to 5 years old and offers extended hours for the working parent. Most day cares, Yarnell said, close at 6 p.m. Kidzville, however, is open from 5 a.m. to midnight Monday through Friday. “We do try to accommodate our parents and they really do appreciate it. We really are able to accommodate anyone’s schedule,” she said.

Yarnell, who has 30 years of experience in childcare, said Kidzville has a creative curriculum, meaning children learn as they play. “We don’t sit them down with flash cards. If they’re playing with block, we ask them ‘What color is the block?’ And they learn that way,” she said. Kidzville employees also teach children not old enough to talk sign language, Yarnell said, giving an example of when the children want more to eat the employees try to get children to use the sign for “more.” “Then they’re actually saying more and doing the sign for more. They catch on really quick,” she said. Kidzville is located at 2509 Avon Drive in Crescent Park. For pricing information, call 916-KIDZ (5439) or e-mail kidzvillechildcarellc@yahoo.com.

THINGS TO DO Memorial Day Parade

There will be a Memorial Day Parade in Elsmere from 8 a.m. to 11 a.m. May 31. The parade will begin at the VFW Post 6423 and end at the Forest Lawn Memorial Park Cemetery. There will be a small service for fallen commands from the Korean and Vietnam wars given at the intersection of Dixie Highway and Stevenson Road at the Vietnam and Korean Memorials. For more information, call 859-816-7433. The VFW Post 6423 is located at 4435 Dixie Highway.

Taste of Kentucky

The Kentucky Haus Artisan Center in Newport will host a Taste of Kentucky event from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. May 29. The event will be for bourbon, coffee and tea lovers. The products featured will be Kentucky Proud Food Products. For more information, call 859-261-4287. The Kentucky Haus Artisan Center is located at 411 E. 10th St.

The Kenton County Public Library has just the solution to help fill summer schedules. “We have a ton of great programs this summer, and we’ve really tried to make sure there’s something for everyone, no matter their age or interests,” said Venus Moose, the adults programs coordinator at the Erlanger Branch. “We’re pretty confident everyone will be able to find something they’ll enjoy.” The biggest program among all three branches will again be the Summer Reading Club, a program that allows participants to keep track of all of their books and potentially win prizes, including gift cards, raffle tickets and even electronics, such as an iPod Nano or Flip Video Camera for teens. The program will again be open to everyone, including adults. “We had some adults participate last year, but we’d love to see that number grow this year,” said Moose. “I still don’t know if everyone realizes the summer reading isn’t just for kidsit’s for everyone!” The library will kickoff the program on June 5 with parties at each of the branches. Each of the kickoff events will feature Snappy Tomato Pizza, live music and family-style carnival games. “The program is fun and free, which is a great reason for people to stop by the library,” said Gina Holt, a media relations coordinator with the library. PROVIDED But the fun won’t stop there this Haylee Mitchell poses with the Snappy Tomato mascot during a pizza party at the Durr Branch last summer. summer. Each of the branches has a Snappy Tomato will be sponsoring the Summer Reading Club kickoff parties at each branch this year. variety of events planned through the summer to keep patrons entertained, on some of the older video game sys- where they could not only go for free, including Family Matinee Movies, Ice tems, such as the original Nintendo. but have a great time as well.” Cream Socials, Final Friday Concerts, a There will also be a variety of cook“We tried to do a lot of familyMurder Mystery Night, and even a themed events this year, because we ing classes at the branches, including Classic Video Game Night at the know families are looking for ways to a special Teens Cook Salsa night at the Erlanger Branch on July 26, where save some money,” explained Moose. Durr Branch on Aug. 27. teens can enjoy playing some games “So we wanted to give them a place “I want teens to learn to make things on their own,” said Jessy Griffith, a teen librarian at the branch. “We want to encourage healthy eating, and teens are more likely to have a healthy snack if they can make it themselves. It should be fun.” Throughout the summer, the library will also continue with their regular programs, including the book discussions, story times, puppy tales and craft classes. “We just want to keep people coming here, even during the summer,” said Moose. “We’ve got so many cool things going on, and we hope to see everyone taking advantage of them.” All of the library’s summer events are free, but some programs will require pre-registration. For more information about a specific program, or for a complete schedule of events at JASON BRUBAKER/STAFF any of the branches, visit www.kenBrian Hill works on his July Fourth craft at the Erlanger Library last summer. The library’s summer programs tonlibrary.org. include programs for kids of all ages.

Weekend of Freedom

The Florence Freedom will be at Champion Window Field for its first weekend home series of the season May 2830. The series will be against the Evansville Otters. Friday will feature postgame fireworks, Saturday will feature a band after the game and Sunday is Family Fun Sunday at the ballpark. The games begin at 6:05 p.m. May 29-30 and at 7:05 p.m. May 28. For tickets and more information, visit www.florencefreedom.com or call 859-594HITS. Champion Window Field is located at 7950 Freedom Way in Florence.

Share your events Go to nky.com and click on Share! to get your event into the Erlanger Recorder.

JASON BRUBAKER/STAFF

William St. Onge reads to attentive audience members Sugar and Echo at the Erlanger Library during the Puppy Tales program. The library will continue with many of their regular programs this summer, while also offering a number of special events.


B2

Erlanger Recorder

May 27, 2010

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD F R I D A Y, M A Y 2 8

MUSEUMS

History Unearthed: Archaeology Speaks, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Behringer-Crawford Museum, 1600 Montague Road, Exhibit explores world of archaeology through photography, dig-site information and hands-on activities including actual staged indoor dig for all ages. Included with admission: $7, $6 ages 60 and up, $4 ages 3-17, free for members and ages 2 and under. 491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Spring Fling, 7:30 p.m. Shadowbox Cabaret, Newport on the Levee, Fresh sketch comedy and vibrant rock ‘n’ roll celebrate life, love and laughter. $20-$30. Through June 12. 957-7625; www.shadowboxcabaret.com. Newport.

SPECIAL EVENTS

Jamie Combs, 5 p.m.-8 p.m. J.B. Fin’s, 301 Riverboat Row, Solo acoustic happy hour. 291-4133. Newport.

Old Fashioned Memorial Day Party Weekend, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Popsicle Party on party patios 1-2:30 p.m. Totter’s Otterville, 4314 Boron Drive, Old fashioned priced brats, metts, hot dogs and medium fountain drinks for $0.50. Stars & Stripes Express (trolley) to U.S.A Station available to children, $1. Includes patriotic crafts held in art studio. $7.95. Through May 31. 491-1441; www.johnnystoys.com. Latonia.

MUSIC - BLUEGRASS

SPORTS

MUSIC - ACOUSTIC

Bluegrass Jam, 6 p.m.-9 p.m. Willis Music Store Performance Hall, 7567 Mall Road, All ages and skill levels welcome. Family friendly. Free. Presented by Willis Music. 5256050. Florence.

MUSIC - BLUES

Chuck Brisbin & the Tuna Project, 10 p.m. Mansion Hill Tavern, 502 Washington Ave. $4. 581-0100. Newport.

MUSIC - CLASSIC ROCK

BlueStone Ivory, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Guys ‘n’ Dolls Restaurant and Nightclub, 4210 Alexandria Pike, $5. 441-4888; www.guysndollsllc.com. Cold Spring. Second Wind, 6 p.m.-10 p.m. Newport on the Levee, 1 Levee Way, Free. 291-0550. Newport.

MUSIC - CONCERTS

Jessica Lea Mayfield, 8:30 p.m. Southgate House, 24 E. Third St. Ballroom. With Among the Oak & Ash and No No Knots. Ages 18 and up. $12. Presented by JBM Promotions Inc. 431-2201. Newport. The Freak Show Exploded: Featuring Mystique Summers, 8 p.m. With Shafreaka Jane, Tyese Rainz, Brooklyn Steele-Tate, Christina Lustra and Queen B. Leapin Lizard Gallery, 726 Main St. $20, $15 advance. 581-2728; www.cincyticket.com. Covington. Lou Gramm, 7:30 p.m. Doors open 6 p.m. Newport Syndicate, 18 E. Fifth St. Lead singer of Foreigner. Dinner buffet 6 p.m. Part of Syndicate concert series. $70, $60, $50, $40. 491-8000; www.rwatickets.com. Newport.

MUSIC - COUNTRY

Matt Woods, 9 p.m. Southgate House, 24 E. Third St. Free. 431-2201. Newport.

MUSIC - JAZZ

New Sleepcat Band, 7:30 p.m. Dee Felice Cafe, 529 Main St. Directed by Bill Gemmer and features John Von Ohlen. 261-2365; www.deefelice.com. Covington.

MUSIC - ROCK

Jimmy’s New Adventure, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Riverside Marina Bar and Grill, 145 Mary Ingles Highway (Ky. 8), Presented by Riverside Marina. 442-811. Dayton, Ky. The Whammies, 10 p.m. Jefferson Hall, 1 Levee Way, Suite 2118, 491-6200. Newport. ETC, 10 p.m. Peecox, 635 Donaldson Highway, 342-7000; www.peecox.com. Erlanger. Sloppy Seconds, 7 p.m. Mad Hatter, 620 Scott St. $12, $10 advance. 291-2233; www.cincyticket.com. Covington. Noise by Numbers, 9:30 p.m. Doors open 8:30 p.m. Southgate House, 24 E. Third St. Parlour. With Till Plains and Army Coach. $8 ages 18-20, $5 ages 21 and up. 431-2201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport.

MUSIC - WORLD

The Tillers, 7 p.m. Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Free. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 342-2665; www.bcpl.org. Burlington.

ON STAGE - COMEDY

Darren Carter, 8 p.m. $14. Funny Bone Comedy Club, Newport on the Levee, Ages 21 and up. 957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

Florence Freedom Baseball, 7:05 p.m. vs. Evansville Otters. I Love the 90s! And postgame fireworks show. Champion Window Field, 7950 Freedom Way, VIP includes wait service. Lawn available on game day only. Fans must show a lawn chair or blanket at time of purchase. $10$12 VIP, $9, $7 lawn. Presented by Florence Freedom Professional Baseball. Through Aug. 29. 594-4487; www.florencefreedom.com. Florence. S A T U R D A Y, M A Y 2 9

ART CENTERS & ART MUSEUMS

Impressions, noon-3 p.m. Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, Exhibit is free. 9571940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

COOKING CLASSES

Cork and Fork Cooking Class, 2 p.m. Argentine Bean Bistro and Wine Bar, 2875 Town Center Blvd. Cooking demonstrations with wine pairings. Family friendly. $20. Reservations required. 426-1042. Crestview Hills.

FARMERS MARKET

Boone County Farmers Market, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Boone County Farmers Market, 5866101. Burlington.

LITERARY - SIGNINGS

Don McNay, 1 p.m.-3 p.m. Borders Books, Music and Cafe Crestview Hills, 2785 Dixie Highway, Edgewood native author discusses and signs “Son of a Son of a Gambler: Winners, Losers and What to Do When You Win the Lottery.”. Free. 333-0295. Crestview Hills.

MUSEUMS

History Unearthed: Archaeology Speaks, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Behringer-Crawford Museum, Included with admission: $7, $6 ages 60 and up, $4 ages 3-17, free for members and ages 2 and under. 491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

MUSIC - BLUES

Surf & Blues Winterfest, 6 p.m.-1 a.m. Mahogany’s Coffee House and Bar, 3715 Winston Ave. Music by the Maladroits, the AmpFibians, the Surfer Tiki Bandits and the Southgate Boys.Family friendly. 261-1029. Latonia.

MUSIC - CLASSIC ROCK

The Avenues, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Guys ‘n’ Dolls Restaurant and Nightclub, 4210 Alexandria Pike, DJ music and dancing continues to 2 a.m. $5. 441-4888; www.guysndollsllc.com. Cold Spring. Strange Brew, 8 p.m.-11 p.m. Gil Lynn Park, Third Street and Greendevil Lane, Free. Presented by City of Dayton. 431-4355. Dayton, Ky.

For more about Greater Cincinnati’s dining, music, events, movies and more, go to Metromix.com.

ON STAGE - COMEDY

Darren Carter, 7:30 p.m. $14. Funny Bone Comedy Club, 957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Spring Fling, 7:30 p.m. Shadowbox Cabaret, $20-$30. 957-7625; www.shadowboxcabaret.com. Newport.

SHOPPING

Taste of Kentucky for Bourbon, Coffee and Tea Lovers, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Kentucky Haus Artisan Center, 411 E. 10th St. Featuring Kentucky Proud Food Products. Free. 261-4287. Newport.

SPECIAL EVENTS Old Fashioned Memorial Day Party Weekend, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Popsicle Party on party patios 1-2:30 p.m. Totter’s Otterville, $7.95. 491-1441; www.johnnystoys.com. Latonia. SPORTS

Florence Freedom Baseball, 6:05 p.m. vs. Evansville Otters. Post Game Band-Velvet Soul. Champion Window Field, $10-$12 VIP, $9, $7 lawn. 594-4487; www.florencefreedom.com. Florence. S U N D A Y, M A Y 3 0

FARMERS MARKET

Boone County Farmers Market, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Boone County Farmers Market, 5866101. Burlington.

HISTORIC SITES

Dinsmore Homestead, 1 p.m.-5 p.m. Dinsmore Homestead, $5, $3 ages 60 and up, $2 ages 7-17, members and ages 6 and under free. 586-6117; www.dinsmorefarm.org. Burlington.

MUSEUMS

History Unearthed: Archaeology Speaks, 1 p.m.-5 p.m. Behringer-Crawford Museum, Included with admission: $7, $6 ages 60 and up, $4 ages 3-17, free for members and ages 2 and under. 491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

FILE PHOTO

The 2010 RGI River Run will take place Saturday, May 29, at 9:15 a.m. in Newport. Registration will begin at 8 a.m. The 5K run/walk benefits Kicks for Kids. The cost is $17, $14 in advance for adults, $10 for ages 12 to 17, and $8 for ages 6 to 11. For more information, visit www.kicksforkids.org or call 331-8484.

SPORTS

Florence Freedom Baseball, 6:05 p.m. vs. Evansville Otters. Bellies and Baseball: All about the pregnant fans with fun activities planned for all. Family Fun Sunday: Autographs, running the bases and a pre-game parade for kids. Champion Window Field, $10-$12 VIP, $9, $7 lawn. 594-4487; www.florencefreedom.com. Florence. M O N D A Y, M A Y 3 1

ART CENTERS & ART MUSEUMS

Impressions, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, Exhibit is free. 957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

MUSIC - CLASSIC ROCK

The Rusty Griswolds, 10 p.m. Jefferson Hall, 1 Levee Way, Suite 2118, 491-6200. Newport.

MUSIC - JAZZ

Sunday Jazz in the Afternoon, 4:30 p.m. The Royal Palm Orchestra. Dee Felice Cafe, 529 Main St. 261-2365; www.deefelicecafe.com. Covington.

ON STAGE - COMEDY

Darren Carter, 7:30 p.m. $12. Funny Bone Comedy Club, 957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

RECREATION

Texas Hold ‘Em Poker Night, 5 p.m. Shimmers, 1939 Dixie Highway, Includes Shimmers gift certificate prizes. Free. 426-0490. Fort Wright.

SPECIAL EVENTS

Old Fashioned Memorial Day Party Weekend, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Popsicle Party on party patios 1-2:30 p.m. Totter’s Otterville, $7.95. 491-1441; www.johnnystoys.com. Latonia.

About calendar

To submit calendar items, go to “www.NKY.com” and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to “life@communitypress.com” along with event information. Items are printed on a space-available basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to “www.NKY.com” and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page. W E D N E S D A Y, J U N E 2

CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS COMMUNITY DANCE Hex Squares, 7:30 p.m.-9:30 p.m. Promenade Palace, 3630 Decoursey Pike, Western square dance club specializing in hexagon style for experienced dancers. $5. Presented by Southwestern Ohio/Northern Kentucky Square Dancers Federation. 513-929-2427. Covington.

SwinGallery, 8 p.m.-11:30 p.m. Step-N-Out Studio, 721 Madison Road. Free beginner East Coast Swing lesson 8-9 p.m. Dancing to music by DJ 9-11:30 p.m. Ages 18 and up. $5. 513-290-9022; www.swingallery.com. Covington.

MUSIC - ACOUSTIC

(Almost) Every Other Thursday Science, 10 a.m. Dendrochronology: Nature’s Time Machines with Dr. Tom Sproat. Pioneer Park, 3951 Madison Pike, Shelterhouse 1. 5257529. Covington.

Acoustic Tuesdays at J.B. Fin’s, 8:30 p.m.12:30 a.m. J.B. Fin’s, 301 Riverboat Row, 291-4133. Newport.

HOLIDAY - MEMORIAL DAY

Memorial Day Parade, 8 a.m.-11 a.m. VFW Post 6423, 4435 Dixie Highway, Ends at Forest Lawn Memorial Park Cemetery. Small service for fallen commands from Korean War and Vietnam war given at intersection of Dixie Highway and Stevenson Road at Vietnam/Korean Memorials. Free. Presented by Ralph Fulton VFW Post 6423. 816-7433. Elsmere.

KARAOKE AND OPEN MIC

Karaoke with DJ Will Corson, 9:30 p.m.1:30 a.m. The Avenue Lounge, 411 Madison Ave. $5 wine and $10 domestic buckets. 261-6120. Covington.

SPECIAL EVENTS

Old Fashioned Memorial Day Party Weekend, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Popsicle Party on party patios 1-2:30 p.m. Totter’s Otterville, $7.95. 491-1441; www.johnnystoys.com. Latonia.

T H U R S D A Y, J U N E 3

MUSIC - BLUES

Original Wed Blues Jam, 6 p.m.-1 a.m. Mahogany’s Coffee House and Bar, 3715 Winston Ave. Hosted by Dick and the Roadmasters award winning blues band. Burgers & Blues Dinner starts 6 p.m. 261-1029; www.mahoganyslive.com. Latonia.

MUSIC - JAZZ

Mike Darrah, 7 p.m. Dee Felice Cafe, 2612365; www.deefelice.com. Covington.

NATURE

Wild Wednesday, 9:30 a.m. Kentucky Division of Forestry and KC Forester. Middleton-Mills Park, 3415 Mills Road, Shelterhouse 2. Hour long programs. Rain or shine. Free, donations of nonperishable food and personal care items accepted. Presented by Kenton County Parks and Recreation. 525-7529; www.kentoncounty.org. Independence.

EDUCATION

MUSEUMS

History Unearthed: Archaeology Speaks, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Behringer-Crawford Museum, Included with admission: $7, $6 ages 60 and up, $4 ages 3-17, free for members and ages 2 and under. 491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

SPORTS

Florence Freedom Baseball, 7:05 p.m. vs. Oakland County Cruisers. Champion Window Field, $10-$12 VIP, $9, $7 lawn. 594-4487; www.florencefreedom.com. Florence.

T U E S D A Y, J U N E 1

ART CENTERS & ART MUSEUMS

Impressions, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, Exhibit is free. 957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

COMMUNITY DANCE

Line Dancing, 7 p.m.-9 p.m. Lookout Heights Civic Club, 1661 Park Road, Holly and Bernie Ruschman, instructors. Beginners welcome. $6, $3 for first-timers. Presented by H & B Dance Co. 727-0904. Fort Wright.

KARAOKE AND OPEN MIC

Karaoke, 8:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. Shimmers, 1939 Dixie Highway, 426-0490. Fort Wright.

MUSEUMS

PROVIDED

The newly renovated Bizarre and Beautiful Gallery at the Newport Aquarium will show off some of the strangest marine animals there are, such as a fish that walks and crabs with 10-feet-long legs. Pictured is a Giant Pacific octopus that will be on display in a new multi-dimensional, 360 degree, see-through aquarium. The aquarium begins extended summer hours Friday, May 28, which are 9 a.m. to 7 p.m., and last until Sept. 4. Current hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily. Admission is $22, $15 for ages 2-12, and free for 2 and under. Visit www.newportaquarium.com.

History Unearthed: Archaeology Speaks, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Behringer-Crawford Museum, Included with admission: $7, $6 ages 60 and up, $4 ages 3-17, free for members and ages 2 and under. 491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

MUSIC - ACOUSTIC

Bob Cushing, 9:30 p.m. Sidebar, 322 Greenup St. Food and cheap drink specials. Free. Through Dec. 21. 431-3456. Covington.

PROVIDED

The ASA Action Sports World Tour comes to Kings Island from Saturday, May 29, through Monday, May 31, with five of the top pro skateboarders and BMX stars from the X Games showcasing their talents with performances each day. Skateboarders Anthony Furlong and Josh Stafford and BMX riders Jay Eggleston, Koji Kraft and Jimmy Walker (pictured) will perform. The shows are free with park admission or a season pass. Visit www.visitkingsisland.com.


Life

Erlanger Recorder

May 27, 2010

B3

Some thoughts on going or not going to church We don’t go to church for God’s sake, we go for ours. Some think when we worship we’re doing God a favor. There’s also the impression we’re gaining points with God or using our attendance as a bargaining chip – “I do this for you, God, now you do something good for me!” Worshipping with those attitudes proves one thing – our spiritual life is in the childish category. God doesn’t need favors, doesn’t keep count, and doesn’t enter into quid pro quo deals, i.e. you scratch my divine back and I’ll scratch yours. God just loves us intensely. Worshipping is just one of many ways that we say with our lives, “And I love you, too!” More than clergy encourage developing the spiritual dimension of a person’s life. Psychiatrist Carl Jung reached the conclusion that besides sexuality and aggression,

there was in us a religious function of the utmost importance which we neglect at our peril. In “Modern Man In Search Father Lou of a Soul,” Jung Guntzelman wrote: “Among my patients Perspectives all in the second half of life, that is to say over 35, there has not been one whose problem in the past resort was not that of finding a religious outlook on life. “It is safe to say that every one of them fell ill because he had lost that which the living religions of every age have given to their followers, and none of them has really healed who did not regain this religious outlook.”

True spiritual health programs psychological health, and vice versa. “True” is italicized because not all organized religions are healthy. Religion is, ironically, the safest place to hide from God and become spiritually malformed. But in its healthy forms, religion is also one of the best places to find God. So, caveat emptor! Let the buyer (believer) beware. Humans are social beings. Gathering together for a common purpose in a church or temple, listening to the words of scripture, hymns, preaching and prayers gradually forms us. God’s grace is subtly present. If we’re open to it we gain personal insights into the meaning of life itself as well as our own individual lives and relationships. All this engenders understanding, serenity and a courage amidst the storms that often rage outside or inside us.

When the spiritual dimension of life is undeveloped, we lack this invisible means of support. Lacking faith, the weight of our struggles and sufferings can intensify or overwhelm us. A minister, preaching on the need to grow spiritually, entitled his sermon it: “Faith: you can’t wait ’til you need it.” Some excuses for not attending church are the following. 1. “Look at the news, there’s just a bunch of hypocrites there.” That’s correct. A church or temple is not a museum for saints but a hospital for sinners. 2. “Organized religion is just a crutch to try and handle life.” Response? “And what makes you think you don’t limp?” 3. “I pray better to God by myself in nature.” That’s wonderful. But we still benefit much from the communal nature of worship.

4. “I don’t get anything out of the religious service, so why go?” Granted, some places of worship are not in touch with people’s needs today. They offer ill-prepared services, mediocre music and inadequate preaching. If that’s so, try somewhere else. Your spiritual life is too important to abandon. 5. “I’m too busy to attend church services.” Guess whose priorities are out of whack? Yes, life is too busy. But the question Jesus Christ once asked still holds true: “What does it profit you to gain the whole world and lose yourself in the process?” Father Lou Guntzelman is a Catholic priest of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati. Contact him at columns@ communitypress.com or P.O. Box 428541, Cincinnati, OH 45242.

Selling home might reveal true property value You could be paying too much in property taxes if the value of your house has dropped significantly. Unfortunately, you may not realize just how much of a drop there’s been until you go to sell it. That’s what an area woman says she’s learned. Mary McGee said she was fine with the county auditor’s value of her Loveland house, which had gone up in value over the six years she’s owned and made improvements to it. McGee says, “When I went to sell the house my expectation was I would be able to sell it for at least

what it w a s appraised for.” T h e a u d i t o r ’s website set the value at Howard Ain $630,000. “There Hey Howard! was no problem with the buyer, it’s just that when his appraiser came back, (hired by) his mortgage company, the appraisal was so low it just devastated us, devastated everyone,” said McGee. The house was appraised at $530,000, which is

$100,000 lower than the value given by the county auditor in his 2008 appraisal. In fact, at that time, the auditor said her home had actually increased in value. “I didn’t do anything but pay more taxes, and then I really didn’t feel the effect of this until I sold my home. I’m wondering about other people, (I’m speaking up) for other people,” she said. McGee said some of the homes in her neighborhood and surrounding area have actually sold for next to nothing recently and she believes its those sales that have adversely affected her home’s value.

“We’re definitely finding that values can be lower than the auditor’s assessed value because that value was done a few years ago,” said Guy Wesselkamper, a certified residential appraiser. Wesselkamper, who was not involved in McGee’s appraisal, said one local survey done by another appraiser found area home values have lost about 10 year’s worth of appreciation. “The median value in 2000 was $129,000. It went up to $133,000, then $138,400, and it kept going up. Then it started going down, and right now we’re

at $129,000 again,” he said. McGee said, “I just feel like there are other people out there that aren’t aware of what’s going on and they need to find out. They may be planning on selling their house expecting to get one amount, and they’re not going to get it.” Fortunately, those buying McGee’s house really wanted it, even though a second appraisal also put the value at $530,000. As a result, they paid additional money to make the deal work – but McGee said she still lost money. Hamilton County Auditor Dusty Rhodes said he’s not

surprised by the drop in the home’s value. He said some prior appraisals had been greatly inflated and now appraisers may actually be deflating values in order to protect the banks. In addition, the county’s last mass appraisal was in 2008 – just before many values dropped. Rhodes said new county appraisals will be done next year and will take effect in January, 2012. Howard Ain answers consumer complaints weekdays on WKRC-TV Local 12. Write to him at 12 WKRC-TV, 1906 Highland Ave., Cincinnati 45219.

Cincinnati Rare Coin Galleries is happy to introduce our newest location and staff member. Florence Rare Coin will bring to Nothern Kentucky the same dedication to numismatic excellence our Ohio stores have for many, many years. Taylor Fraley, our newest partner, has over 20 years experience in the numismatic hobby. What began as a pastime with his Grandfather has evolved into a full-time profession today. Taylor is a graduate of the University of Cincinnati with a Bachelor’s Degree in Business Asministration, and his personal goal is to provide friendly, knowledgeable service to the Nothern Kentucky Community.

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7503 Woodspoint Dr. Florence, KY 859-727-2646 across from Airport Ford


B4

Erlanger Recorder

Life

May 27, 2010

The ‘berry’ thing you were craving

We finally got most of the garden in, except for pickling cucumbers, more summer squash a n d pumpkins. O u r corn is up a couple of inches, and the Rita b a c h e l o r Heikenfeld b u t t o n s I Rita’s kitchen that t r a n s planted from volunteer seeds (they overwintered in the garden) have turned into a 20-foot row of bobbing pink and blue flowers. They make a nice border next to the early greens. And if Mother Nature cooperates, we’ll soon be picking strawberries and gathering in my kitchen to make homemade jams. We like the cooked jam and the recipe is always included in the box of pectin that you buy.

Sugar-free strawberry jam

Try this with other berries and gelatin, as well. 2 cups strawberries 1 cup cold water 1 (3 ounce) package strawberry flavored gelatin, sugar free Crush berries in saucepan. Add water and gelatin and mix well. Over medium heat, bring mixture to boiling, stirring constantly. Reduce heat to low and simmer a few minutes. Pour into jars, let set until cool, and then cover. Store in the refrigerator for a week or frozen up to a month or so.

Homemade gourmet strawberry syrup

Try this over ice cream, pancakes or even as a flavoring for sodas and shakes. Pour some into some carbonated water or

Cook over medium heat, stirring constantly, until sugar is dissolved and syrup comes to a boil. Boil two minutes. Remove from heat, skim off foam and put a few drops of coloring in if you want. Pour into clean jars and cool. Cover and refrigerate up to two months or freeze up to a year. Recipe can be doubled or tripled.

lemon soda and crushed ice for an impromptu spritzer. Again, any type of good, ripe berry can be used. Minimum cooking time is the key to freshness. You’ll get about 3 cups.

4 generous cups ripe strawberries, caps removed 1 cup water Sugar Red food coloring (optional) Line colander or strainer with double layer of damp cheesecloth. Set over bowl. Combine berries and water and bring slowly to boiling point. Reduce heat and cook very slowly for 10 minutes. Pour into lined colander/strainer and let stand, without squeezing, until juice has dripped into bowl. Then gently squeeze pulp to get remaining juice. Measure juice into saucepan. For every cup of juice, add 1 cup sugar.

Speed scratch strawberry crisp

Or should I call it strawberry “dump” cake? This uses the same technique for the popular “dump” cakes, where you just “dump” ingredients in a pan, layering as you go. Make this with 2 pounds frozen, unsweetened berries if you can’t get fresh. Try raspberries in here, too. 7-8 cups strawberries, caps removed 1 box, 18.25 oz, plain

yellow cake mix 2 sticks butter or margarine, cut into little pieces Whipped cream for garnish Toasted slivered almonds for garnish (optional but good) Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Put berries in bottom of sprayed 13-by-9 baking pan. Cover with half of dry cake mix. Sprinkle half of butter over mix. Cover with rest of mix and sprinkle rest of butter pieces of top. Bake 1 hour or so until golden and crisp on top. Serve with whipped cream or ice cream and a sprinkling of the toasted nuts.

Can you help?

Like Frisch’s tartar sauce: For Eileen Coon, an Erlanger reader. “I’d like a homemade recipe with no preservatives,” she said.

Tips from readers

Cottage cheese pie: This is one popular pie. Most readers, including Joan Daugherty, who baked “Pie No. 3,” said it took a lot longer to bake, up to 11⁄2 hours, though it was delicious. Some of you wanted to know what kind of canned milk is in Mrs. Bauer’s recipe. My thinking is it is evaporated, not condensed. Darker sauerbraten gravy: I’m still getting tips about this, and most, including Marge Thomas of Western Hills, said to either brown it in a dry skillet on top of the stove, or put it in an ovenproof skillet and brown slowly in the oven, stirring occasionally. Rita Nader Heikenfeld is a herbalist, educator and author. E-mail columns@community press.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-2487130, ext. 356.

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Community

Veterans’ graves to be honored organizations, sometimes it's difficult to contact these groups to recruit volunteers, so we eagerly welcome all volunteers who want to participate” said Meade. The American Legion is a patriotic service organization, chartered by Congress in 1919 and composed of American veterans that served during wartime. Since American Legion Post 275 does not own a building, its meets on the first Thursday of every month at the Kenton County Courthouse in Independence. The Sons of The American Legion is a program of The American Legion, established in 1932 and is composed of nearly 400,000 direct male descendants of Legionnaires and deceased wartime veterans.

Flags. “Because so many flags were salvaged from last year's project, and due to the current economic conditions, we did not solicit contributions for this year's project” said Bryan Meade, Squadron 275 Commander, whose grandfather served in World War II. The cemeteries' ground crews collect the flags after the Memorial Day holiday and then members of the Sons of The American Legion spend about 3 months cleaning, rolling, and bundling the grave marker flags for use the next year. Although donations were not solicited, volunteers are always in high demand. “Due to changes in membership and leadership in the various service

The annual Veterans' Graves Decoration Project, sponsored by Sons of The American Legion Squadron 275 and The American Legion Post 275, of Independence will take place on Saturday, May 29 beginning at 9 a.m. This is the 28th year for the Veterans' Grave Decoration Project that will decorate Veterans' graves in Floral Hills Cemetery, Saint John Cemetery, Highland Cemetery, Saint Mary's Cemetery, Mother of God Cemetery, Linden Grove Cemetery, Independence Cemetery, and Saint Cecilia's Cemetery. This year's project will involve more than 100 volunteers from a wide variety of service organizations and will decorate approximately 8,500 veterans' graves in these eight Kenton County cemeteries with American

Salvation Army offers kids’ camps The Salvation Army in Covington recently announced that it has summer camping opportunities for low-income children and teens. Two key programs are offered: Camp SWONEKY and summer day camp. Both programs are available to age-appropriate children who live in Kenton County and require pre-registration. Four separate camping adventures are offered in camp SWONEKY: Worship

Arts Camp from June 14-20, for children ages five to 12; Sports Camp from June 2329, for children ages five to 12; Outdoor Adventure Camp from July 13-19, for children ages five to 12; and Teen Camp from August 26, for teens ages 12 to 17. The fee for Camp SWONEKY camps is $15 per child, per camp. Transportation is provided to and from the facility (located about 10 miles north of Kings Island), from The Sal-

vation Army’s Covington Community Center. The summer day camp is a multi-week program, running from June 14th through July 30th (closed July 5th for the holiday).. Key elements of the summer day camp include: Field trips, including a season pass to The Beach Waterpark; enrichment activities; arts & crafts; breakfast, lunch and snacks; t-shirt; music & arts programs; sports; literacy

Erlanger Recorder

May 27, 2010

program; and swimming. Summer day camp runs daily, Monday through Friday from June 14th through July 30th. Fees include a $25 registration fee, and $25 per week (per child) program fees. For more information or to register for any of these camping opportunities, contact Heather J. WinstanleySmith at 859-261-0835.

RELIGION NOTES Amazing Grace

Amazing Grace Lutheran Church will have its Vacation Bible School for children, ages four through 13, June 29-July 1 from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. The VBS will be themed as a wild west adventure. Crafts, snacks and activities will reflect the western theme. The program is free. For more information, contact the church by calling 859283-9009. Amazing Grace Lutheran Church is located at 7804 Pleasant Valley Road in Florence.

First Baptist

First Baptist Church of Highland Heights will host its Real Men’s Conference June 4 from 7 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. and June 5 from 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. The conference is being held to encourage men of all ages in their spiritual growth through teaching, fellowship and worship. Featured speakers and topics include “It’s Time To Step Up” by Mark Webb of FBC Highland Heights, “Winning With The Word” by Pete Coleman of I Won Today Min-

istries, “No More Dis-Connected” by Ronny Raines of FBC Cold Spring, and “A Call To Purity” by Bill Clark of Hickory Grove Baptist Church. Worship leader is Chris Daniels and his band from Hickory Grove Baptist. For more information or to register for the event, call 859-441-7274 or e-mail fbchh@fuse.net. The church is located at 2315 Alexandria Pike.

Hopeful Lutheran

Hopeful Lutheran Church in Florence is offering four summer camps in June and July. Each camp is a week long. The camps will take place June 14-18, June 21-25, July 12-16 and July 19-23. The camps are for ages three to eight and are from 9 a.m. to noon Monday through Friday. For more information, call 859-647-1105. Hopeful Lutheran Church is located at 6430 Hopeful Church Rd. Have an event at your church? Please send your information to akiefaber@nky.com.

Follow Community Press sports on Twitter twitter.com/crkysports

MARRIAGE LICENSES Rachel Friedhoff, 23, of Fort Wright and Eric Ernest, 25, of Texas, issued May 13, 2010. Kate Thomas, 27, of Kentucky and Gerard Duffy Jr., 26, of New York, issued May 14, 2010. Chassity Tomlin, 26, and Bradley Hungler, 23, both of Covington, issued May 14, 2010. Virginia Anderson, 38, and Jody Bradford, 35, both of Morningside, issued May 14, 2010. Tonya Garner, 35, of Covington and Moussa Diarra, 36, of Cincinnati, issued May 14, 2010. Erin Johnson, 39, and Douglas Michels, 34, both of Covington, issued May 14, 2010. Astrid Battery, 22, of Ohio and Thomas Schneider Jr., 41, of Kentucky, issued May 17, 2010.

Debbie Peace, 57, and Charles Merrell, 79, both of Lakeside Park, issued May 17, 2010. Delta Payne, 50, of Lakeside Park and Robert Bailey, 49, of Cincinnati, issued May 19, 2010. April McCain, 19, and Mitchell Unthank, 22, both of Erlanger, issued May 19, 2010. Danielle Mastin, 24, and Christopher Fryer, 25, both of Erlanger, issued May 19, 2010. Ashley Hamm, 20, of Edgewood and Jordan Adkins, 21, of Independence, issued May 19, 2010. Lindsey Veigl, 23, and Nicholas Profitt, 25, both of Union, issued May 19, 2010. Lisa Boegnschutz, 25, and Trenton Rose, 26, both of Villa Hills, issued May 19, 2010.

Stephanie Connor, 24, of Crescent Springs and Dennis Carter, 25, of Fort Wright, issued May 19, 2010. Susan Butler, 30, and Richard Shackleford Jr., 23, both of Ludlow, issued May 19, 2010. Emily Hill, 25, and Robbie Flick, 27, both of Erlanger, issued May 19, 2010. Bobbie Burchett, 31, and Ricky Penick, 45, both of Edgewood, issued May 20, 2010. Sarah Young, 25, of Fort Wright and James Lane, 28, of Latonia, issued May 20, 2010. Selina Mays, 23, of West Chester and Philip Hicks, 23, of Crestview Hills, issued May 20, 2010. Nicole Deitisch, 24, and Nathan Bowling, 28, both of Ludlow, issued May 20, 2010.

BUSINESS UPDATE Dunn promoted

Mike Dunn has earned the Senior Sales Executive designation and was recently honored for his accomplishments at the Huff Realty Annual Awards Banquet. The honor is given to top agents who achieve and maintain exemplary levels of success. Dunn also received the Presidents Club Award from Huff for local achievements, was nationally recognized with the Realty Alliance Award and was honored with the Platinum Celebrate Excellence Award for customer service.

Nominations sought The Northern Kentucky Area Development District is seeking nominations for the principal recognitions made at the NKADD Annual Meeting. In preparation for the 2010 event on Aug. 16, nominations are being solicited for the following awards: The Intergovernmental Awards to recognize contributions in the public arena; two Intergovernmental Unity of Effort awards; the Community Leadership Award; the Volunteer Award. Nominees will be required to complete a form. Visit www.nkadd.org. The deadline for nominations is July 16. For more information, call Robert Schrage at 859-283-1885.

Mooney joins Huff

Pat Mooney has joined Huff Realty as President-Market Lending Manager of Huff Realty Mortgage in Ft. Mitchell. Mooney has more than 20 years experience in the mortgage industry. For the past nine years he has been with HomeServices

Lending as sales manager of the Mortgage, Title, and Insurance Division of Champion Realty of Maryland. Prior to his work with HomeServices Lending, Mooney managed financial services branches for both ITT and Citigroup and directed a fulfillment site for Travelers Bank.

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cincinnati.metromix.com/taste


B6

Erlanger Recorder

Community

May 27, 2010

O FIND THE HELP YOU NEED IN NORTHERN T Y A W KENT ST UCK ASTE F E Y Business & Professional TH

SERVICE DIRECTORY of Northern Kentucky Publishes every Tuesday in The Kentucky Enquirer, every Thursday in The Community Recorder. Search ads online any day, any time at NKY.com.

DONATIONS Dog Items

Frankies Furry Friends Rescue Inc. 859-635-9114 frankiesfurryfriends@gmail.com

Material or towels

Frankies Furry Friends Rescue Inc. 859-635-9114 frankiesfurryfriends@gmail.com

White Board

Pencils

Plastic Easter Eggs

Crayons to Computers 513-482-3290 hegan@crayons2computers.org

Binders

Mt. Zion Construction

PATRICK MONOHAN ATTORNEY AT LAW

Criminal Law • Divorce Bankruptcy

ground

283-1140

We are a debt relief agency. We help people file for relief under the bankruptcy code. This is an advertisement.

CONTROL landscaping, inc.

We’ll keep your landscaping needs under C O N T R O L .

Call us if you need:

landscape design & installation water features • stone work concrete work • retaining walls excavation & bobcat work drainage • demolition snow removal (859) 468.5514 cell (859) 261.1087 office

• Free Estimates • Fully Insured • Over 20 Years Experience

Overgrown

Currently Offering

SHRUB REMOVAL

10% DISCOUNT AND 1 YEAR WARRANTY

OFFICE

Pruning • Shearing Cleanups • Tear Outs Haulaway • Disposal GREEN TEAM

COREY 859-393-4856

cohornconcrete@aol.com

www.cohornconcrete.com

CONCRETE

K&M Construction NO JOB TOO SMALL FREE ESTIMATES

Union, KY (859)384-3291 (859)307-5513

CUSTOM REMODELING

EXCAVATING & GRADING

FREE ESTIMATES Hourly or Contract Discounts to Senior Citizens 30 years + experience Call 859-991-7234 CE-1001556458-01

DRIVEWAYS • CONCRETE PAVING • REPAIR

All Types of Concrete Work Driveways, Steps, Sidewalks, Patios, Porches, Retaining walls-concrete or landscape blocks. Fully insured & in business over 30 yrs in NKY. Free estimates, quick service.

Free Estimates • Fully Insured Phone:

Licensed & Insured For Your Protection All Work Supervised By David Saner Quality Roofing For Two Generations FREE ESTIMATES

Brown’s Roofing Siding & Gutters Fully Insured • Over 20 Years Experience New Construction Specialist Ron Brown 1111 Plateau St., Fax: 859/342-4398 Elsmere, KY 41018 brownsroofingandsiding.com CE-1001555911-01

KEVINS LAWNCARE

CE-1001560598-01

Call the

Nov.-Apr. 6am-8pm, May-Oct. 6am-9:45pm Open at 7am on Sat. & Holidays Open at 10am on Sun. Closed Christmas Day Mile 477.6 Ohio River State Rt. 8 • Constance, KY to Anderson Ferry Rd. & US 50, Cin., OH

859-485-9210

OH 44931

& Cooling Professionals Heating

LANDSCAPING L LANDSCAP ANDSCAP & MOWING

• Shredded Topsoil • Gravel • Fill Dirt, etc. • Friendly Service • Great Rates

Great Rates! Commercial & Residential

Single Axle Dump Trucks For Hire

380-1236

Dump Site Available Serving all of Northern Kentucky for over 25 years.

www.nkylawnboys.com CE-1001562691-01

we buy junk cars

CE-1001553034-01

CE-1001553235-01

NKyHomeRepair Remodel . Rehab

CE-1001556511-01

Basements . Kitchens . Baths . Decks Painting . Drywall . Tile . Showers

Free Estimates . Insured . www.NKyHomeRepair.com

859-331-0527

859-393-4890 BUYING JUNK CARS

we buy junk cars

Scott (859) 341-6776

DL WEBSTER

we buy junk cars

Mowing • Mulching • Fertilizing Landscaping • Retaining Walls Pavers • Property Cleaners 15 years Experience CE-1001555177-01

FREE ESTIMATES 859-240-1544

New Construction Homes Additions • Doors • Windows Decks • Siding • Concrete Tile Roofing • Home Remodeling FULLY INSURED • FREE ESTIMATES ACCEPTING ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS

(859)630-9118

CE-1001560691-01

ROBERTS

Convenient on site repair of leather, vinyl and plastic. • Residential • Business • Auto • Marine 859-746-2900 cinnky@fibrenew.com

WHATEVER YOUR BUSINESS OR SERVICE LIST IT IN THE NORTHERN KENTUCKY BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL SERVICE DIRECTORY! To advertise contact Brenda Krosnes at 859-578-5509, fax 859-578-5515 or bkrosnes@nky.com

Pet Adoption Center House Boone County

The Pet Castle, Inc. Animal Rescue 8597607098 kittensandpuppies@fuse.net

Art Easels for pre-schoolers Children, Inc. 859-431-2075 sking@childreninc.org

Sidewalk chalk, bubbles, crayons, scissors, paper, pencils

Office needs

Northern Kentucky Community Action Commission 859-581-6607 nsolomon@nkcac.org

Wheelchair

Matress Pads ,queen size,Baby bed ,Summer clothes 4t and 2t girls, Children, Inc. 859-431-2075 sking@childreninc.org

Fabric markers, trash cans with lids, Chalk Boards,paper,Infant toys, small drinking cups. Children, Inc. 859-431-2075 sking@childreninc.org

BEST Partner for Longbranch Elementary School

Boone County Schools 859.282.4628 laurie.walton@boone.kyschools.us

Children, Inc. 859-431-2075 sking@childreninc.org

Children's puzzles,multi-cultural dolls Children, Inc. 859-431-2075 sking@childreninc.org

Children, Inc. 859-431-2075 sking@childreninc.org

Child size table seats 4 Children, Inc. 859-431-2075 sking@childreninc.org

Be Concerned, Inc 859-291-1340 beconcernedinc@yahoo.com

Cleaning supplies

Be Concerned, Inc 859-291-1340 beconcernedinc@yahoo.com

Jump Ropes

Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Cincinnati 513-421-8909 brogers@bgcgc.org

Pool Sticks

Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Cincinnati 513-421-8909 brogers@bgcgc.org

Linens and Towels

Lawn Care

Children, Inc. - Young Families Program 859-491-9200 smilinkovich@childreninc.org

Playground equipment

Hygiene items

we buy junk cars

Children, Inc. - Young Families Program 859-491-9200 smilinkovich@childreninc.org

Kenton County Alliance to Prevent Substance Abuse 859-760-2051 kathy.nafus@erlanger.kyschools.us

Play Dishes, Play Tools,Bean Bags Chairs,Sensory Balls

LAWNBOYS

859-918-5400 www.phoenixcomfort.com

Prizes to be used for Project Sticker Shock participants

4 cars seats , 3-4 foot slide triple stroller ,2 porta cribs ,1st sleep castle(outdoors),

Y Ye Year Round nd S Service ice Since 1817

OVER 20 YEARS EXPERIENCE

• Grass Cutting - $25/UP • Mulching - $150/UP • Landscaping - FREE ESTIMATES Call 859-331-8255 | 859-835-5685

KY M04724

859-342-4333

Vinny (859) 620-7448

NBD CONTRACTORS, INC. CE-1001556559-01

(859) 356-3217

CE-1001554180-01

Grass Cutting

859-630-5953

Frankies Furry Friends Rescue Inc. 859-635-9114 frankiesfurryfriends@gmail.com

New Perceptions Inc. 859-344-9322 tmeenach@newperceptions.org

859-525-7888

CE-1001554137-01

Call for a Free Estimate

Fully insured

Used but good bed linens

New Perceptions Inc. 859-344-9322 tmeenach@newperceptions.org

& GUTTERS

859-803-3875

by Vintage Home Services LLC Tired of pushing that old mower in the heat? Relax this summer. Enjoy more of your free time. Owner operated to insure the highest level of customer satisfaction. Free quotes.

Crayons to Computers 513-482-3290 hegan@crayons2computers.org

Used/New Picture Frames

ROOTS INCLUDED!

859-485-6535

CHRIS 859-393-1138

All Types of Home Repair Roofing Decks Basement and Bathroom Remodeling

CE-1001558887-01

Specializing in new and old replacement of driveways, patios, sidewalks, steps, retaining walls, decorative concrete work, basement and foundation leaks & driveway additions.We also offer Bobcat, Backhoe, Loader, and Dumptruck work, regrading yards & lot cleaning.

· · · ·

For more donation information and a place to list needed items visit nkyhelps.org.

Wooden clothes pins

The Point/ARC of Northern Kentucky 859-491-9191 blovensheimer@thepointarc.org

To place an ad call 859-578-5509, fax 859-578-5515 or email bkrosnes@nky.com.

More information

Frankies Furry Friends Rescue Inc. 859-635-9114 frankiesfurryfriends@gmail.com

Dog supplies

Frankies Furry Friends Rescue Inc. 859-635-9114 frankiesfurryfriends@gmail.com

Items for Flea Market

Sisters of Notre Dame 859 392-8229 mschnelle@sndky.org

Items for Silent Auction Sisters of Notre Dame 859 392-8229 mschnelle@sndky.org

Children, Inc. 859-431-2075 sking@childreninc.org

Children, Inc. 859-431-2075 sking@childreninc.org

Cleaning supplies for families Children, Inc. 859-431-2075 sking@childreninc.org

Baby items

Children, Inc. 859-431-2075 sking@childreninc.org

Classroom equipment Children, Inc. 859-431-2075 sking@childreninc.org

Christmas gifts for teens electronics, etc.

Shoulder To Shoulder Inc. 859-371-0444 melissa@shouldertoshoulderinc. org

Christmas Gift Wrap

Shoulder To Shoulder Inc. 859-371-0444 melissa@shouldertoshoulderinc. org

Food Drive

Northern Kentucky Community Action Commission 859-581-6607 jbelisle@nkcac.org

Fleece material

Northern Kentucky Community Action Commission 859-581-6607 lwolsing@nkcac.org

Fleece & Yarn

Scarf It Up For Those In Need (859) 802-4881 scarfitup@fuse.net

Handmade scarves

Scarf It Up For Those In Need (859) 802-4881 scarfitup@fuse.net

Hats & Gloves

Scarf It Up For Those In Need (859) 802-4881 scarfitup@fuse.net

Infant Cribs

Care Net Pregnancy Services of Northern KY 859-431-9178 Lyndi@carenetnky.org

Diapers size 1-5

Care Net Pregnancy Services of Northern KY 859-431-9178 Lyndi@carenetnky.org

Pumpkins and gourds

Northern Kentucky Community Action Commission 859-581-6607 kbishop@nkcac.org

Montessori classroom equipment

Activity Boxes

Children, Inc. 859-431-2075 sking@childreninc.org

Northern Kentucky Community Action Commission 859-581-6607 kbishop@nkcac.org

Plywood & 2x6s or 2x4s

Clorox Wipes or Hand Sanitizer

Cincinnati Horticultural Society 513-872-9555 chsfoods@fuse.net

Silent auction items

Redwood Center 859-331-0880 dfoussard@redwoodnky.org

Toothpaste/Toothbrushes

Redwood Center 859-331-0880 dfoussard@redwoodnky.org

Waterbed

Redwood Center 859-331-0880 dfoussard@redwoodnky.org

Desk

Redwood Center 859-331-0880 dfoussard@redwoodnky.org

Towels

Redwood Center 859-331-0880 dfoussard@redwoodnky.org

Play-Doh

Redwood Center 859-331-0880 dfoussard@redwoodnky.org

Batteries

Redwood Center 859-331-0880 dfoussard@redwoodnky.org

Cooking supplies

Redwood Center 859-331-0880 dfoussard@redwoodnky.org

Art supplies

Redwood Center 859-331-0880 dfoussard@redwoodnky.org

Sweatpants

Redwood Center 859-331-0880 dfoussard@redwoodnky.org

Clorox wipes and Lysol

Redwood Center 859-331-0880 dfoussard@redwoodnky.org

Wags and Whiskers Rescue Fundraiser Wags and Whiskers Rescue 8593630388 grace@zoomtown.com

Awards/Incentives/Prizes for Students/Parents

Boone County Schools 859.282.4628 laurie.walton@boone.kyschools.us

Color Printer/Copier

Boone County Schools 859.282.4628 laurie.walton@boone.kyschools.us

Northern Kentucky Community Action Commission 859-581-6607 kbishop@nkcac.org

Garden vegetables and fruits

Northern Kentucky Community Action Commission 859-581-6607 kbishop@nkcac.org

Sponors

The Pet Castle, Inc. Animal Rescue 8597607098 kittensandpuppies@fuse.net

Puppy Pads

The Pet Castle, Inc. Animal Rescue 8595259215 kittensandpuppies@fuse.net

HE Detergent

The Pet Castle, Inc. Animal Rescue 8597607098 kittensandpuppies@fuse.net

Bleach

The Pet Castle, Inc. Animal Rescue 8597607098 kittensandpuppies@fuse.net

Hand Sanitizer

The Pet Castle, Inc. Animal Rescue 8595259215 kittensandpuppies@fuse.net

Cross Cut Shredder

The Pet Castle, Inc. Animal Rescue 8595259215 kittensandpuppies@fuse.net

Puppy, dog, cat or kitten food

The Pet Castle, Inc. Animal Rescue 8597607098 kittensandpuppies@fuse.net

Raffle Items

Howl-o-ween Event Committee 859-356-3925 tiofurbean@fuse.net

Crafter and Home Party Sales

Howl-o-ween Event Committee 859-356-3925 tiofurbean@fuse.net

Animal Rescue Groups

Howl-o-ween Event Committee 859-356-3925 tiofurbean@fuse.net

$1 Small Prizes

Brighton Center Inc. 859-491-8303 x. 2413 kwoods@brightoncenter.com

Donations | Continued B7


Community

May 27, 2010

Erlanger Recorder

B7

DONATIONS National Multiple Sclerosis Society, Ohio Valley Chapter 513-956-4110 zoee.seuberling@ohg.nmss.org

Air Mattress

Welcome House 859-431-8717 awalker@welcomehouseky.org

School Supplies

Welcome House 859-431-8717 awalker@welcomehouseky.org

Can Openers

Welcome House 859-431-8717 awalker@welcomehouseky.org

Alarm Clocks

Welcome House 859-431-8717 awalker@welcomehouseky.org

Deodorant

Welcome House 859-431-8717 awalker@welcomehouseky.org

Trash Bags

Welcome House 859-431-8717 awalker@welcomehouseky.org

Children, Inc. - Young Families Program 859-491-9200 smilinkovich@childreninc.org

Cleaning supplies

Children, Inc. - Young Families Program 859-491-9200 smilinkovich@childreninc.org

Infant/toddler board books

Sponsors or donations

Rescue Our Shelter Animals and Strays, Inc. (ROSA'S) 859-743-6460 kthacker111348@yahoo.com

Paper Products/Office supplies New Perceptions Inc. 859-344-9322 dfulkerson@newperceptions.org

Guitars

New Perceptions Inc. 859-344-9322 dfulkerson@newperceptions.org

Gift certificates to local restaurants and passes to zoo, Reds games, Bengals games and bowling New Perceptions Inc. 859-344-9322 dfulkerson@newperceptions.org

Material for baby blankets

Children, Inc. - Young Families Program 859-491-9200 smilinkovich@childreninc.org

Foam art paper

Children, Inc. - Young Families Program 859-491-9200 smilinkovich@childreninc.org

Small paper plates - solids colors and white

Tickets - to games, museums, the zoo, etc.

Covington Partners in Prevention 859-392-3174 meredith.potter@covington. kyschools.us

Children, Inc. - Young Families Program 859-491-9200 smilinkovich@childreninc.org

New toys and board games

Safety door knob covers

Covington Partners in Prevention 859-392-3174 meredith.potter@covington. kyschools.us

Large picture coloring books

Contact paper - plain colors and patterns

Children, Inc. - Young Families Program 859-491-9200 smilinkovich@childreninc.org

Wooden puzzles

Children, Inc. - Young Families Program 859-491-9200 smilinkovich@childreninc.org

Rattles

Children, Inc. - Young Families Program 859-491-9200 smilinkovich@childreninc.org

Blocks

Children, Inc. - Young Families Program 859-491-9200 smilinkovich@childreninc.org

Colored duct tape

Children, Inc. - Young Families Program 859-491-9200 smilinkovich@childreninc.org

Children, Inc. - Young Families Program 859-491-9200 smilinkovich@childreninc.org

Video Games, Movies, Cds

Covington Partners in Prevention 859-392-3174 meredith.potter@covington. kyschools.us

New books- picture books and chapter books

Safety gates

Children, Inc. - Young Families Program 859-491-9200 smilinkovich@childreninc.org

Dvelopmental toys ages birth-3 years Children, Inc. - Young Families Program 859-491-9200 smilinkovich@childreninc.org

Colored card stock paper

Be Concerned, Inc 859-291-1340 beconcernedinc@yahoo.com

Walkers for Children The Point/ARC 859-491-9191 mreed@thepointarc.org

Office Supplies

Redwood Center 859-331-0880 dfoussard@redwoodnky.org

Office Size paper shredder

Redwood Center 859-331-0880 dfoussard@redwoodnky.org

Toilet Paper

Welcome House 859-431-8717 awalker@welcomehouseky.org

Canned Meat

Welcome House 859-431-8717 awalker@welcomehouseky.org

Portable keyboards

The Frank Duveneck Arts and Cultural Center 859.491.3942 rgibeau@duveneckcenter.org

Playground equipment

Covington Partners in Prevention 859-392-3174 meredith.potter@covington. kyschools.us

Sports Equipment

Old/new materials

Covington Partners in Prevention 859-392-3174 meredith.potter@covington. kyschools.us

Rescue Our Shelter Animals and Strays, Inc. (ROSA'S) 859-743-6460 kthacker111348@yahoo.com

School materials - pencils, notebooks, crayons

KY Licensed Plumber

Covington Partners in Prevention 859-392-3174 meredith.potter@covington. kyschools.us

Children, Inc. - Young Families Program 859-491-9200 smilinkovich@childreninc.org

Good quality used clothing and housewares

Stephens Elementary School and PTA 859-384-9726 slr305@insightbb.com

Cornerstone Project of Four Seasons Community Church 859-992-4379 frankiebk@insightbb.com

KY Licensed Electrician

Cornerstone Project of Four Seasons Community Church 859-992-4379 frankiebk@insightbb.com

Diapers

Care Net Pregnancy Services of Northern KY 859.431.9178 Lyndi@carenetnky.org

Coffee and end tables

Shoulder To Shoulder Inc. 859-371-0444 melissa@shouldertoshoulderinc. org

Entertainment Center

Shoulder To Shoulder Inc. 859-371-0444 melissa@shouldertoshoulderinc. org

Kitchen table and 6 chairs

Shoulder To Shoulder Inc. 859-371-0444 melissa@shouldertoshoulderinc. org

Queen bed set

Shoulder To Shoulder Inc. 859-371-0444 melissa@shouldertoshoulderinc. org

Sleeper sofa

Shoulder To Shoulder Inc. 859-371-0444 melissa@shouldertoshoulderinc. org

Bunk beds

Shoulder To Shoulder Inc. 859-371-0444 melissa@shouldertoshoulderinc. org

Deodorant

Taylor Mill Family Resource Center 859-356-4639 tina.crabtree@kenton.kyschools.us

Need dog runs or kennels

Donations or sponsors

Rescue Our Shelter Animals and Strays, Inc. (ROSA'S) 859-743-6460 kthacker111348@yahoo.com

Rescue Our Shelter Animals and Strays, Inc. (ROSA'S) 859-743-6460 kthacker111348@yahoo.com

Laptops from

Children's blunt tip scissors

1599

$

Children, Inc. - Young Families Program 859-491-9200 smilinkovich@childreninc.org

per week

78 weeks

Lease Zone Latonia 859-431-8666 Turfway 859-647-2160

Large or jumbo crayons

Children, Inc. - Young Families Program 859-491-9200 smilinkovich@childreninc.org

Poker chips

Children, Inc. - Young Families Program 859-491-9200 smilinkovich@childreninc.org

RINKS BINGO R

Non-Smoking $8 - 6-36 Faces $15 - 90 Faces Computer Fri & Sat Nights

513-931-4441 • 513-931-0259

LUTHERAN

Ping pong balls

Children, Inc. - Young Families Program 859-491-9200 smilinkovich@childreninc.org

Plastic golf balls

Children, Inc. - Young Families Program 859-491-9200 smilinkovich@childreninc.org

Children, Inc. - Young Families Program 859-491-9200 smilinkovich@childreninc.org

Finger paint

Tennis balls

Children, Inc. - Young Families Program 859-491-9200 smilinkovich@childreninc.org

Children, Inc. - Young Families Program 859-491-9200 smilinkovich@childreninc.org

Canning jar lids (flat circular piece)

Ziplock bags - sandwich, freezer quart and gallon

Children, Inc. - Young Families Program 859-491-9200 smilinkovich@childreninc.org

Family Nurturing Center 859-525-3200 jane.herms@familynurture.org

Children, Inc. - Young Families Program 859-491-9200 smilinkovich@childreninc.org

Baby wipes

Amazing Grace Cats, Inc. 859-426-5038 spay4sure@yahoo.com

Computers up to 4 years old

Children, Inc. - Young Families Program 859-491-9200 smilinkovich@childreninc.org

Cat Food

Printing

Family Nurturing Center 859-525-3200 jane.herms@familynurture.org

Safety outlet covers

Safety cabinet locks

Children, Inc. - Young Families Program 859-491-9200 smilinkovich@childreninc.org

Amazing Grace Cats, Inc. 859-426-5038 spay4sure@yahoo.com

Juice bags and snack packs

Children, Inc. - Young Families Program 859-491-9200 smilinkovich@childreninc.org

Detergent

Dish soap

Family Nurturing Center 859-525-3200 jane.herms@familynurture.org

Baby blankets/quilts

Children, Inc. - Young Families Program 859-491-9200 smilinkovich@childreninc.org

Pots and Pans

Welcome House 859-431-8717 awalker@welcomehouseky.org

Children, Inc. - Young Families Program 859-491-9200 smilinkovich@childreninc.org

Children, Inc. - Young Families Program 859-491-9200 smilinkovich@childreninc.org

Children, Inc. - Young Families Program 859-491-9200 smilinkovich@childreninc.org

Provide full dinner for families attending group therapy prorams

Glue sticks

6XSSRUWLQJ $UWLVWV DQG WKH $UWV <HDU5RXQG

Lunch for Bike MS

Lysol disinfectant wipes

CE-1001556309-01 -01

From B6

Children, Inc. - Young Families Program 859-491-9200 smilinkovich@childreninc.org

Pond / Water Gardens / Storm Water Basins Clinic Thinking about building a pond, having problems with aquatic weeds and want to know how aeration can improve the overall health of your pond? Don’t know where to begin installing a water garden? Do you live in a residential subdivision or condominium development and wonder what your responsibilities are or how to inspect and maintain your storm water basin? Please join the knowledgeable staff from the Hamilton and Butler County SWCDs along with experts to find answers to all of your questions.

The 2010 Pond / Water Gardens / Storm Water Basins Clinic held at the Sharon Woods Education Center in Sharon Woods, 11450 Lebanon Road, Sharonville, OH 45241 on

Wednesday June 9, 2010 from 6:00 pm to 9:00 pm. There is no fee, but an RSVP is required by June 5, 2009. Call (513) 772-7645 to make your reservations.

50th Anniversary

Sunday Worship: Traditional 8:00 & 11:00am Contemporary 9:00am Sunday School 9:50am Contemplative 5:30pm

$10 Admission, Kids 12 and under FREE

Advance online tickets available at www.summerfair.org Free Parking courtesy of Summerfair Cincinnati

Gary & Irene Doering On May 28, 2010, Gary and Irene Doering of Melbourne, Kentucky will celebrate their 50th Wedding Anniversary. They are the proud parents of four daughters; Brenda Seastrom, Trish Nortmann, Debbie Niemer, and Theresa Studer. Brenda is married to Chris Seastrom and has one son, Brandon Holland and reside in Fern Park, FL. Trish is married to John Nortmann and they have three sons, Jonathan, Eric, and Adam and reside in Erlanger, KY. Debbie is married to John Niemer and they have a daughter, Stephanie and a son, Michael and reside in Erlanger, KY. Theresa is married to Gary Studer and they have two sons, Austin and Ryan and reside in Alexandria, KY.

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Gary and Irene have provided a loving home for their daughters and a great example of wonderful parents and dedicated husband and wife. Congratulations Mom & Dad from your family.

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Erlanger Recorder

May 27, 2010

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Community

May 27, 2010

Erlanger Recorder

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Church honors vets Every Monday and Wednesday at Madison Avenue Christian Church, volunteers cook and prepare a hot meal for Covington's homeless and poor. Monday, May 31 will be like any other evening; people will line up for what is likely their only substantial meal of the day. But in honor of Memorial Day and the countless number of homeless veterans who

roam the streets, Madison Avenue Christian Church will honor veterans with a special cookout and prayer service beginning at 6 p.m. “We want the veterans to feel special and know that we honor and remember their sacrifices and service to their country,” said Pastor Chinna Simon. “People are hungry everyday, even on holidays. We hope that our meal and

tribute service will shine a spotlight on the tremendous need for food and support for the most vulnerable in our society.” For more information, contact Madison Avenue Christian Church at 859261-0226. The Church is located at 1530 Madison Avenue. Visit the website a t : http://www.Mchurch.com.

PROVIDED

Meghan McGee, left, of Lakeside Park, works on the robotics program with Big Sister Melody Lawrence and Little Sisters Brooklyn and Mariah. McGee, who works for the Girl Scouts of Kentucky's Wilderness Road Council, came up with the idea to partner with Big Brothers Big Sisters of Greater Cincinnati for the project.

Organizations team up to help students

A couple days a month at Grant County High School, nearly 20 students skip class to make a difference in the lives of younger children in the school district. There’s no punishment for missing math or science; in fact, these students are setting a terrific example, serving as Big Brothers and Big Sisters to kids who need someone to look up to. Big Brothers Big Sisters of Greater Cincinnati has teamed up with the Girl Scouts of Kentucky’s Wilderness Road Council to bring a Robotics program to the Bigs and their Little Brothers and Little Sisters. The elementary and high school students work together in pairs and in groups to help each other build and run their own robots. Debbie Mollette, coordi-

nator of the school-based mentoring side of Big Brothers Big Sisters, has been thrilled with the reaction to the robotics program. “The kids run in the room asking what ‘programming’ they are going to learn about today. You can see the excitement and eagerness on their faces and we pretty much have to drag them away when it’s time to finish up,” she said. This is the third consecutive year Big Brothers Big Sisters of Greater Cincinnati has coordinated mentoring programs in Grant County, and the first time the Girl Scouts have been involved. Meghan McGee, with the Scouts, says they’ve been working to increase numbers of older Girl Scouts in Grant County and wanted to reach out to young people who are already community-minded, so they chose to

partner with BBBS. Boys are also taking part in the program, and together, all the groups are mastering the arts of creating and maneuvering their robots. The Grant County matches meet twice a month, with the Littles coming from Dry Ridge Elementary. Both the school and the agency hope to increase those visits, but for now, the busing costs are too high to allow the Bigs and Littles to get together more often. They’re hoping for three times a month next year. If you’re interested in becoming involved with Big Brothers Big Sisters of Greater Cincinnati as a volunteer mentor, call (513) 421-4120. You can also go to www.bigsforkids.org for information and an application.

First Communion

Isabella Feagan made her First Communion on May 2 at St. Pius X Church.

PROVIDED

Niehaus joins Sibcy Cline Jennifer Niehaus has joined the Sibcy Cline Fort Mitchell office as a Realtor. Niehaus’ experience includes sales, project management, retail store operations, inventory planNiehaus ning and assistant buyer. She has a Bachelor of Science in adolescent education from Miami University, Oxford. Professionally, she is a member of the Northern Kentucky Association of Realtors as well as the Kentucky and National Associations of Realtors.

Niehaus and her husband, Zach, live in Cold Spring.

SMALL BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT Fort Thomas shop owner is still happy doing what she loves

For 10 years, Fort Thomas resident Alison Head has been able to make a living doing what she loves. As owner of Three French Hens on North Fort Thomas Avenue, Head said she opened her store a decade ago as a way to sell all the items she loved to buy and fix up. “I just threw some stuff I had in the store and it was

as simple as that,” Head said. Through the years, the store began featuring more and more accessories from jewelry and clothes to handbags and belts. “It’s hard to define what kind of store this is because it’s very eclectic,” Head said. “But I say its an accessory store.” Head said she loves what she does, from picking the items to sell to meeting and getting to know so many people. In 2008, Head opened a second store in Hyde Park. Last November, Head did

a face-lift on the Fort Thomas store. “It’s really different now, and there are a lot new things,” Head said. “I’ve learned a lot and come a long way in the past 10 years.” Along with accessories and clothing, the store also features furniture, baby items and wedding items. The store in open Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. and by appointment in the evenings. For more information call the store at 781-9600. CE-0000402363

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Fort Thomas resident Alison Head, owner of Three French Hens on North Fort Thomas Avenue, arranges one of her displays.

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Erlanger Recorder

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Keith Applegate

Keith R. Applegate, 84, of Erlanger, formerly of Anderson Township, died May 18, 2010, at his home. He was a salesman for Beauty Supplies and member of First Church of Christ in Burlington. His first wife, Joy Applegate, died previously. Survivors include his wife, Sharon Applegate; son, Scott Applegate; daughter, Cheryl Dyehouse; stepdaughter, Kimberly Sterneberg, Barbara Angelo and Cathryn Culbertson; stepson, Jeffrey Lewis; sister, Jean Cagle; 20 grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. Burial was in Mt. Moriah Cemetery. Memorials: Hospice of St. Elizabeth Healthcare, 483 South Loop Road, Edgewood, KY 41017; or American Cancer Society, 297 Buttermilk Pike, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017.

Donel Bagby

Donel Kieth Bagby, 63, of San Antonio, Texas, formerly of Kenton County, died May 20, 2010, at Heartland Nursing Home, San Antonio. He was an investigator for the U.S. government, an Army and Navy veteran and member of Believers’ Home Fellowship in San Antonio. Survivors include his sister, Carol Chapman of Demossville and her family. Memorials: Wilmington Baptist

May 27, 2010

| DEATHS | Editor Brian Mains | bmains@nky.com | 578-1062

Church, 15472 Madison Pike, Demossville, KY 41033-9789.

Carol Bornschein

Carol Ann Cebe Bornschein, 65, of Park Hills, formerly of Louisville, died May 15, 2010. She taught special needs students in both Louisville and Covington. Her parents, Robert and Leona Cebe; her brother, Robert; sister, Marilyn; and a newphew, Tim Cushing died previously. Suvivors include her husband of 44 years, Robert L. Bornschein Jr.; brothers Roger, Ronnie and Jimmy; sisters Joan Birk, Mary Cushing and Susie Hoffman; 21 nieces and nephews; and 24 great nieces and nephews.

Mildred Bowers

Mildred G. Stricker Bowers, 96, Erlanger, died May 17, 2010, at Villaspring of Erlanger Health Care & Rehabilitation Center. She was a ticket clerk for the Pennsylvania Railroad and a member of the Grand Chapter of Kentucky Order of the Eastern Star. Survivors include her son, Tim Weber of Walton; four grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. Burial was in Floral Hills Memorial Gardens, Taylor Mill. Memorials: Down Syndrome Association of Greater Cincinnati, 644 Linn St., Suite 1128, Cincinnati, OH 45203.

BIRTHS

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Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Elsmere and Erlanger

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DEATHS Charles Brown Jr.

Charles “Charlie” Brown Jr., 61, Florence, died May 19, 2010. He was a truck driver for 27 years with Dayton Freight, musician and member of the bands McGlasson’s Fruit Stand Blues Band and Bogey. Survivors include his wife, Sheri Ferguson Brown of Florence; daughters, Danielle Carnes of Fort Wright, Sarah Martin of Hebron and Sinthia Gray of Union; sisters, Sandra Collis and Janet Robinson, both of Florence; and five grandchildren. Memorials: Boone County Vietnam Memorial c/o any Bank of Kentucky.

Louis Burke

Louis Robert Burke, 78, Covington, died May 18, 2010, at his home. He was a custodian for Covington Board of Education, an Army veteran and member of Veterans of Foreign Wars. Survivors include his wife, Diana Eversole Burke of Covington; daughter, Sherry Cook of Latonia; sons, Randy Burke of Delville, Ala. and Terry Burke of Covington; sister, Juanita Quinn of Latonia; seven grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren. Burial was in Floral Hills Memorial Gardens.

Albert Cain Jr.

Albert Cain Jr., 78, Independence, died May 17, 2010, at his home.

He was a retired machinist for General Electric Aircraft in Evendale. He was also a member of Nicholson Christian Church, Nicholson, Ky., Colonel Clay Lodge No. 159 F&AM, Rosebud Chapter No. 39 OES; past patron of Emera Chapter No. 392 OES and American Legion Post No. 20, Elsmere. Survivors include his wife, Carolyn Roulette Cain; son, David Cain of Independence; daughter, Kimberly Cain Troxel of Edgewood; brothers, Bill Cain of Florence, Melvin Cain of Union and Don Cain of Florence; sisters, Catherine Boles of Ludlow and Bonnie Crawford of Posseyville, Ind. and six grandchildren. Burial was in Floral Hills Memorial Gardens, Taylor Mill.

Earl Clutterbuck

Earl Clutterbuck, 92, Edgewood, died May 15, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. He worked in sales for Ulrich Copper Co. His wife, Mary Clutterbuck, died in 2009. Survivors include several nephews and nieces. Don Catchen and Son Funeral Home, Elsmere, handled the arrangements.

Tennie Cox

Tennie Rose Miller Cox, 71, Taylor Mill, died May 15, 2010, at Hospice of St. Elizabeth Healthcare, Edgewood.

She was a manager for Cincinnati Bell Telephone Co. Survivors include her daughters, Patti Kennedy of Owenton and Judy Berkemeier of Hebron; sisters, Wanda Stair and Gladys Pence, both of Knoxville, Tenn.; brothers, Chester Miller of Lexington, Roger Miller of Bromley, Carl Miller of Knoxville, Tenn., Jeff Miller of Erlanger; nine grandchildren and one great-granddaughter. Burial was in St. Mary Cemetery, Fort Mitchell. Memorials: American Cancer Society, 297 Buttermilk Pike, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017.

Ernest Creech Sr.

Sgt. First Class Ernest Ray Creech Sr., 50, of Guntersville, Ala., formerly of Erlanger, died May 12, 2010, at Riverview Memorial Hospital, Gadsden, Ala. He was a recruiter for 19 years with the U.S. Army, member of Lebanon Lodge 26 F&A.M. in Lebanon, Ohio, the Shriners, and he received the Purple Heart in Somalia. Survivors include his wife, Melissa Siemer Creech; daughter, Maria Tate of King Mountain, N.C.; sons, Ernest Creech Jr. of Pooler, Ga., Anthony Creech of Fort Campbell and Michael Creech of Mililani, Hawaii; stepson, Christopher Price of Elsmere; stepdaughter, Shelly Baker of Burlington; brothers, Earl Creech of Lowell, N.C. and Joseph Creech of Dallas, N.C.; sisters, Deborah Roberts of Lowell, N.C.,

Ramona Thomas of Dallas, N.C., Rita Bagwell of Zebulon, Ga., Rosalee Rogers, Albuquerque, N.M. and Maria Cunha of Portugal; father, Earl Lorain Creech of Lowell, N.C. and five grandchildren. Burial was in Floral Hills Memorial Gardens, Taylor Mill. Memorials: American Cancer Society, 297 Buttermilk Pike, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017.

Gloria Dishon

Gloria Alma Cunningham Dishon, 80, Erlanger, died May 20, 2010, at Hospice of St. Elizabeth Health Care in Edgewood. She was a homemaker and a member of Erlanger United Methodist Church, the United Christian Volunteers, and a former president of the Lloyd Memorial High School PTA. Survivors include her husband, Creston “Pete” Dishon of Erlanger; daughters, Tonya Lutz of Morning View and Connie Dishon of Dayton, Ohio; and son, Michael Dishon of Mt. Zion, Ky. Burial was in Forest Lawn Memorial Park, Erlanger. Middendorf-Bullock Funeral Home handled the arrangements. Memorials: Erlanger United Methodist Church, 31 Commonwealth Ave., Erlanger, KY 41018; or United Christian Volunteers, 15 Kenton St., Elsmere, KY 41018.

Deaths | Continued B11

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Deaths Camille Haverkamp

From B10

John Durkin

John Joseph Durkin, 86, Fort Mitchell, died May 20, 2010, at Jewish Hospital Kenwood. He was a police officer for the city of Newport, a federal protective officer for the Internal Revenue Service buildings in both Covington and Cincinnati, and a World War II Army veteran who served with Merrill’s Marauders in Burma. His wife, Euna Kuntz Durkin, died previously. Survivors include his daughter, Sherry Wietholter of Fort Mitchell; sister, Mary Poalucci of Westerville, Ohio; one grandson; and four greatgrandchildren. Burial was in St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas. Memorials: American Cancer Society, 297 Buttermilk Pike, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017.

William Epperson

William E. Epperson, 71, Covington, died May 19, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He worked as a machine operator for NuMaid Margarine in Cincinnati, was a member of Colonel Clay Lodge 159, Scottish Rite and Southside Baptist Church. Survivors include his aunt and uncle, Lucille and Bob Huff. Burial was in Floral Hills Memorial Gardens, Taylor Mill.

Barbara Geyer

Barbara J. “Grammy” Geyer, 62, Independence, died May 20, 2010, at her home. She was a customer service representative for 30 years with the former Bax Global, now D.B. Shenker. Survivors include her husband, William Geyer; daughter, Brandy Nolan of Independence; son, Nick Geyer of Independence; sister, Joyce Vettle of Georgetown, Ohio; brothers, Joseph G. Sturgeon Jr. of Latonia and Marshall Martin of Independence; and one granddaughter. Linnemann Funeral Home handled the arrangements. Memorials: Esther Marie Hatton Cancer Center, 1 Medical Village Drive, Edgewood, Kentucky 41017.

Walter Gruenwald

Walter Henry Gruenwald, 84, Edgewood, died May 15, 2010, at his home. He owned Butterkist Bakery in Price Hill for 45 years. His son, Garry Gruenwald, died previously. Survivors include his wife of 57 years, Arlene Wertz Gruenwald; sons, Greg Gruenwald of Chicago, Ill. and Glenn Gruenwald of Western Hills; daughters, Gayle Stipe of Mason, Gloria Schlotthauer of Union, Gwene Daugherty of Loveland and Gina Lutz of Loveland; brother, Clifford Gruenwald and 10 grandchildren. Burial was in St. Mary Cemetery, St. Bernard. Imwalle Memorial Funeral Home handled the arrangements. Memorials: Roger Bacon High School, 4320 Vine St., St. Bernard, OH 45217, or National Right to Life, Attn: Development, 512 10th St., NW, Washington, D.C. 20004.

Irene Hafner

Irene Morgeson Hafner, 84, Independence, died May 19, 2010, at her home. She was a social worker for the Kentucky Medicare office. Survivors include her daughters, Connie Brady of Covington, Robin Price of Independence, Ginger Haven of Florence, Jarri Hedges of Erlanger and Sheila Yeary of Covington; sons, Denny Hacker of Independence, Mark Hafner of Columbus, Ohio and Tony Hafner of Moses Lake, Wash.; sister, Francis Moore of Mt. Sterling; brothers, Perry and Buster Morgeson, both of Lebanon; many grandchildren and several great-grandchildren. Burial was in Independence Cemetery. Memorials: Alzheimer’s Association, 644 Linn St., Suite 1026, Cincinnati, OH 45203; or Hospice of St. Elizabeth Healthcare, 483 South Loop Road, Edgewood, KY 41017.

Camille E. Steenken Haverkamp, 85, Fort Wright, died May 17, 2010, at Hospice of St. Elizabeth Healthcare in Edgewood. She was a secretary for Wiedemann Brewery, Newport. Survivors include her husband, Oscar “Mike” Haverkamp; sister, Marge Johnson of Fort Wright; 15 nieces and nephews. Burial was in Mother of God Cemetery, Fort Wright. Middendorf Funeral Home, Fort Wright, handled the arrangements. Memorials: Hospice of St. Elizabeth Healthcare, 483 South Loop Road, Edgewood, KY 41017, or St. Vincent DePaul Society of Northern Kentucky, 2655 Crescent Springs Road, Erlanger, KY 41018.

Therese Hessling

Therese Ann Williams Hessling, 61, Villa Hills, died May 21, 2010, at Hospice of St. Elizabeth Healthcare, Edgewood. She worked for Duke Energy and was a member of St. Augustine Church in Covington. Survivors include her husband, Dane Hessling of Villa Hills; son, Dane Hessling II of Florence; brothers, Ken Williams of Edgewood and Roger Williams of Independence and two grandchildren. Burial was in St. Mary Cemetery, Fort Mitchell. Memorials: St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, P.O. Box 1000, Dept. 142, Memphis, TN 381480142; or the Kenny & Brian Williams Fund, P.O. Box 17105, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017.

Orbin Jordan

Orbin Ray Jordan, 88, Villa Hills, died May 20, 2010, at Brighton Gardens of Edgewood. He worked for 32 years at Procter and Gamble and was an Army Air Force veteran. His first wife, Wanda Parker Jordan, died previously. Survivors include his wife, Allena Beach Jordan; sons, Mark and Jaime Jordan, both of Villa Hills; daughter, Marty Greenlee of Radcliff; sister, “Tots” Warren of Hamilton, Ohio; 11 grandchildren; and 24 great-grandchildren. Burial was in Highland Cemetery, Fort Mitchell. Memorials: Latonia Baptist Church Building Fund, P.O. Box 15103, Covington, KY 41015.

Joe Kathman

Joe Kathman, 70, of St. Petersburg, Fla., formerly of Fort Wright, died May 9, 2010, in Tampa, Fla. He was president of FDR/Riedinger Plumbing, volunteer police officer for Lookout Heights, part-time police officer for Park Hills Police Department, president of board of directors of Transitions, Inc., coach for girl’s softball teams for Lookout Heights Civic Club, played tuba in the Salvation Army Band and sang in the choir of St. Agnes Church in Fort Wright and St. John’s Church in St. Pete Beach, Fla. Survivors include his wife of 47 years, Carol Riedinger Kathman; daughter, Vicky Hartman of Roswell, Ga.; son, Joe Kathman of Erlanger; brothers, Tom Kathman of Florence, Jim Kathman of Cincinnati, and Jerry Kathman of Covington and three grandsons. Burial was in St. John Cemetery, Fort Mitchell. Don Catchen & Son Funeral Homes, Elsmere, handled the arrangements. Memorials: Transitions, Inc., 700 Fairfield Ave., Bellevue, KY 41073.

Kelly Keller

Kelly Ann Keller, 52, of Covington, formerly of Boca Raton, Fla., died May 14, 2010, at Hospice of St. Elizabeth Healthcare in Edgewood. She worked in retail her entire life. Survivors include her husband, Mark Keller; son, Nick Jennings of Boca Raton; daughter, Amy Rodriguez of Boca Raton; mother, Sylvia Nicholas; father, Roy Nicholas; brothers, John and Scott Nicholas and sister, Tracy Dawley.

Pearl Kinlaw

Pearl Kinlaw, 87, of Cincinnati, formerly of Covington, died May 17, 2010, at Christ Hospital, Cincinnati. She was a laborer for RCA Manufacturing, Pleasant Ridge, and a volunteer at the Clifton Senior Center, Cincinnati and a member of Baptist Faith Church. Her husband, Lloyd Kinlaw, died previously. Survivors include her son, Robert Kinlaw of Alexandria; four grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren. Burial was in St. Mary’s Cemetery, Fort Mitchell.

Dessie LaFollette

Dessie Wright Shepperd LaFollette, 93, Falmouth, died May 17, 2010, at her home. She was a homemaker and a member of the Pleasant Ridge Baptist Church. Her husband, James Edwin Shepperd, and children, Harold Shepperd, Earl Shepperd, Ruth Shepperd, Mary Shepperd and Randy LaFollette, died previously. Survivors include her daughters, Reba Fleming of Falmouth and Jean Bardon of Springhill, Fla.; sons, Jackie Shepperd of Falmouth, James Shepperd of Jamestown, Billy Shepperd of Falmouth, Joseph Shepperd of Cynthiana, Donnie Shepperd of New Concord, Gary Shepperd of Covington and Gerald Shepperd of Knoxville, Tenn.; 39 grandchildren and several greatgrandchildren. Burial was in Pythian Grove Cemetery, Berry. Memorials: River Valley Nursing Home, 305 Taylor, Butler, KY 41006.

Kenneth Malone Sr.

Kenneth Malone Sr., 73, Covington, died May 15, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He was a retired courier and served during the Korean War as a private first class, U.S. Marines. Survivors include his sons, Kenneth Malone Jr. of Paso Robles, Calif., and Michael Malone of Warsaw; daughters, Tawnza Churich of Dallas, Ore., Michelle Murphy of Oakley, Calif.; sister, Ruby Belew of Perry Park; brother, Floyd Malone Jr. of Covington and eight grandchildren. Middendorf-Bullock Funeral Home, Covington, handled the arrangements.

Salvatore Manzi Jr.

son, Michael Manzi of Alexandria; four grandchildren and six greatgrandchildren. Entombment was in St. Stephen Cemetery Mausoleum, Fort Thomas. Muehlenkamp-Erschell Funeral Home, Fort Thomas, handled the arrangements. Memorials: Children’s Music Program at St. Thomas Church, 26 E. Villa Place, Fort Thomas, KY 41075.

Jessie Martin

Jessie Lee Harmeling Martin, 79, Fort Mitchell, a homemaker, of Sarasota, Fla., formerly of Fort Mitchell, died May 19, 2010, at Sunshine Meadows Nursing Home in Sarasota. Survivors include her daughters, Kathy Vaughan of Ryland Heights, Debby Perkins of Independence and Patty Risheberger, both of Florence; son, Stan Martin of Erlanger; sisters, Edna Moeller of Louisville, Alma McGraw and Dorothy Malott, both of Covington; nine grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren. Memorials: American Lung Association, 4050 Executive Park Drive, Suite 402, Cincinnati, OH 45241.

Terrence McNally

Terrence James McNally, 73, Edgewood, died May 20, 2010, at his home. He was a professor of literature at Northern Kentucky University and a published author. Survivors include his wife, Joan McNally of Edgewood; daughters, Aileen Adams of Florence and Carolyn Rosenstiel of Fort Thomas; son, Tim McNally of Erlanger; brother, Robert McNally of Withamsville, Ohio and four grandchildren. Burial was in St. Mary Cemetery, Fort Mitchell. Memorials: Priests for Life, P.O. Box 141172, Staten Island, NY 10314.

Leona Musk

Leona M. Ruschman Musk, 93, Newport, died May 20, 2010, at Baptist Village Care Center, Erlanger. She was a social worker with the state of Kentucky, a homemaker, member of Holy Spirit Church, Altar Society and Small Christian Community. Her husband, Frank Musk and daughter, Marilyn McCulley, died previously. Survivors include her sons, Frank Musk of Fort Wright, Thomas Musk of Newport, Richard Musk of High-

land Heights and Roger Musk of Erlanger; daughters, Kathleen Oberer of Newport, Phyllis Pollard of Florence and Patricia Musk, Bellevue; brother, Paul Ruschman of Fort Thomas; 16 grandchildren and 20 great-grandchildren. Burial was in St. Joseph Cemetery, Cold Spring. Memorials: Wood Hudson Cancer Research Lab, 931 Isabella St., Newport, KY 41071.

George Rains

George “Bill” Rains, 78, Alexandria, died May 21, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He was an assembly worker for General Motors, member of the Alexandria Church of God and the Seniors Center. Survivors include his wife, Wanda Williams Rains; sons, William Rains of Alexandria and David A. Rains of Covington; stepsons, Clark Williams of Covington, Jeremiah Williams of Arkansas, and Matthew M. Williams of Florence; daughters, Marlene Alford of Bethel, Ohio; stepdaughters, Terri Daugherty of Ludlow, Ruth McCullah of Burlington, Mary M Harris of Coupins, South Carolina, Tabitha Hughes of Gaffney S.C.; brother, Ronald Rains of Williamsburg; sister, Karen Anderson of Cincinnati;19 grandchildren; and eight great-grandchildren. Burial was in Evergreen Cemetery, Southgate. Memorials: Church of God, 5 Washington St., Alexandria, Kentucky 41001.

William Riggs Jr.

William Howard Riggs Jr., 49, Covington, died May 17, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He was an auto body repairman. Survivors include his wife, Theresa Lang Riggs; daughter, Tara Talbott of Ludlow; sons, Patrick and William Riggs III, both of Covington and one granddaughter. Burial was in Floral Hills Memorial Gardens, Taylor Mill.

Nancy Ross

Nancy J. Ross, 62, of Bellevue, formerly of Newport, died May 22, 2010, at her home. She was a nurse’s aide at the Baptist Convalescent Center of Newport. Survivors include her husband, George Ross of Bellevue; son, Rick Ross of Bromley; daughters, Betty Stidham of Covington and Bobbie

B11

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Stafford of Newport; brother, Ray Miller of Warsaw, Ky.; sister, Vera Walker of Alexandria; 15 grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren. Burial was in Peach Grove Cemetery.

Hobert Runion Jr.

Hobert Runion Jr., 71, of Rudy, Ark., formerly of Covington, died May 19, 2010, at Fort Smith, Arkansas. He was a salesman for Purification Water Systems and member of the Assembly of God Church. His son, Reagan Runion, died previously. Survivors include his wife, Dianne Runion; daughter, Robin Froehlich; sons, Daren and Hobe Runion III; sisters, Betty Black and Lois Allen; brothers, Tom, Doug and Lee Runion; and six grandchildren. Burial was in U.S. National Cemetery, Fort Smith, Arkansas.

Robert Sipple

Robert C. Sipple, 51, Independence, died May 19, 2010, at his home. He was a mechanic for Swilly’s Auto Sales in Covington and a member of Hickory Grove Baptist Church. Survivors include his mother, Joyce Sipple Kerns of Independence; sister, Brenda Rothfuss of Covington, brothers, Richard Sipple of Independence and Jack Sipple of Erlanger. Burial was in Vine Run Cemetery, Dry Ridge. Memorials: Sipple Family, c/o Chambers & Grubbs Funeral Home, 11382 Madison Pike, Independence, KY 41051.

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Salvatore Charles “Rocco” Manzi Jr., 88, of Covington, formerly of Newport, died May 15, 2010, at Rosedale Manor, Latonia. He was a printer with The Cincinnati Enquirer, a former orchestra leader, piano and accordion teacher and a World War II Army Air Corps veteran. His wife, Elizabeth Clark Manzi, died previously. Survivors include his daughter, Diana Muehlenkamp of Covington; How to enter: You can enter your baby into the contest through mail or online. To mail in an entry complete the form and include a clear, color or black/white photo of your baby along with a suggested $5 entry donation to Newspapers In Education. NO PHOTOS WILL BE RETURNED. To enter online visit our Web site at Cincinnati.Com/babyidol and complete the entry form. All photos must be received by 5:00pm Monday, July 12, 2010. PHOTOS WILL BE PUBLISHED IN THE ENQUIRER. How to win: Sunday, August 1, 2010 all entrants will appear in The Enquirer and the first of three voting rounds will begin. We ask that all votes be accompanied by a donation to the Newspapers In Education program, however a donation is not necessary to vote or to win the Baby Idol 2010 contest. This contest is just one of the many fun and innovative programs we use to raise money to promote literacy in our local schools.

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Mail to: The Enquirer 2010 Baby Idol, 312 Elm Street, Cincinnati, OH 45202. Photo deadline: 7/12/2010 NO PURCHASE OR DONATION REQUIRED TO ENTER. ALL FEDERAL, STATE, LOCAL AND MUNICIPAL LAWS AND REGULATIONS APPLY. VOID WHERE PROHIBITED. The Enquirer Lend-A-Hand Baby Idol 2010 Contest is open to Ohio, Indiana and Kentucky residents who are 18 years or older and a parent or legal guardian of a child at the time of entry. Employees of The Enquirer Lend-A-Hand, The Cincinnati Enquirer, Gannett Co., Inc., and each of their respective affiliated companies, and advertising and promotional agencies, and the immediate family members of, and any persons domiciled with, any such employees, are not eligible to enter or to win. Contest begins at 12:01 a.m. (EST) 5/23/10 and ends at 11:59 p.m. (EST) 9/8/10. Beginning at 12:01 a.m. (EST) 5/23/10 and ending at 11:59 p.m. (EST) 7/12/10, Enter by submitting a photo of your baby and a completed entry form. Entries must be submitted by a parent or legal guardian, 18 years or older. Children must have been born on or after 07/12/07 and Sponsor reserves the right to verify proof of age. Entries with incomplete or incorrect information will not be accepted. Only one (1) entry per child. Multiple births can be submitted as 1 entry with 1 photo. Enter online at Cincinnati.Com/babyidol. Enter by mail or in-person: complete an Official Entry Form available in The Cincinnati Enquirer, The Kentucky Enquirer, The Community Press and Recorder and at The Enquirer Customer Service Center, 312 Elm Street, Cincinnati, OH 45202. All entries must be received by 5:00 p.m. (EST) 7/12/10. Odds of winning depend on the number of eligible entries and votes received. Winners will be notified by telephone or email on or about 9/13/10. Participants agree to be bound by the complete Official Rules and Sponsor’s decisions. For a copy of the prize winners list (available after 9/18/10) and/or the complete Official Rules send a SASE to Baby Idol 2010 c/o The Enquirer, 312 Elm Street, Cincinnati, OH 45202 or contact Kristin Garrison at 513.768.8135 or at kgarrison@enquirer.com.


B12

Erlanger Recorder

On the record

May 27, 2010

POLICE REPORTS COVINGTON

Arrests/citations

BUS TOURS

NEW YORK

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MANHATTAN--NYC HOTEL $129/2 persons. Singles $124. Suites $139-$159. Lincoln Ctr area, Hudson River views, 18 flrs, kitchenette, 5 mins to midtown, safe, quiet, luxury area. RIVERSIDE TOWER, Riverside & 80th St. Call 1-800-724-3136 or visit: www.riversidetowerhotel.com

FLORIDA

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Vacation Resorts of South Carolina. Hilton Head or Myrtle Beach. Lovely 1 or 2BR condos, rates from $775 to $2200! Excellent locations too! www.vrosc.com. 877-807-3828 Hilton Head Island, SC

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TENNESSEE

DESTIN. 2 great condos , 2 br, 2 ba golf, pools, dazzling Gulf view . Check our website for availability & rates. Local owner, 513-561-4683 Visit arieldunes.us or twcondo.us

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EAST COAST, NEW SMYRNA BEACH Luxurious oceanfront condos & vacation homes. Closest & best beach to Disney. Ocean Properties Vacation Rentals 800-728-0513 www.oceanprops.com

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A Beautiful Cabin Getaway Gatlinburg/Pigeon Forge. Hot tub, jacuzzi, fireplace, gas grill. $85/nt, 5 nt special $375. 800-793-8699. smokymtncrossrdrentals.com

GATLINBURG. Affordable rates. Fully furnished. 1-8 bdrms. Chalets, Cabins, Privacy, Views, Hot Tubs, Jacuzzis, Fireplaces. 1-800-235-2661 www.alpinechaletrentals.com

GATLINBURG. Choose a 2 or 3 BR chalet, conveniently located, richly appointed and meticulously main tained. Pet friendly. 877-215-3335 or visit www.marysescape.com

NORRIS LAKE. Located at Powell Valley Resort. 2 BR/1BA, fully furnished priv. home. Covered porch, deck. Lake access. $95/nt. 423-5628353, www.norrislakehse.com

Charlotte L. Johnson, 817 Scott St., no. 1, third degree possession of a controlled substance, second degree criminal possession of a forged instrument at 1026 Madison Ave., May 11. William J. Cain, 152 Ashland Ave., fourth degree assault, alcohol intoxication in a public place, second degree disorderly conduct at 111 Ashland Dr., May 11. Marven S. Ecklar, 404 E. 16Th St., fourth degree assault, resisting arrest at 404 E. 16th St., May 10. Dornita B. Stewart, 1006 Greenup St., no. 1, trafficking in marijuana at 1006 Greenup St., May 10. Cameron W. Hammons, 2014 Howell St., possession of marijuana at 400 Linden St., May 10. Joshua M. McDannold, 3622 Decoursey Ave., no. 2, inadequate silencer (muffler), failure of nonowner operator to maintain required insurance, possession of marijuana at 3622 Decoursey Ave., May 12. Mark S. Daut II, 248 Main St., no. A310, first degree possession of a controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia, public intoxication-controlled substance at 613 W. 4th St., May 12. Theodore Palmer, 1928 Yorktown Rd, no. 2, improper equipment, operating on suspended or revoked operators license, possession of marijuana at Russell St., May 13. Jason A. Briers, 821 Oak St., first degree possession of a controlled substance, possession of marijuana at 613 W. 4th St., May 12. Chasity S. Hamilton, 1718 Greenup St., second degree disorderly conduct, resisting arrest at 1 Police Memorial Dr., May 12. Joseph C. Schaffer, 712 W. 7th St., theft, resisting arrest, second degree fleeing or evading police at Philadelphia St., May 16. Ryan M. Looney, 4 Tree St., menacing, second degree fleeing or evading police, resisting arrest, second degree disorderly conduct, second degree criminal trespassing, second degree criminal mischief, third degree criminal mischief, serving warrant at Lehmer St., May 16. Jeffrey A. Howard, 8531 Skyview Ln., menacing, possession of marijuana at 1212 Greenup St., May 15. Christie M. Darrell, 4004 Decoursey Ave., no. 2, theft at 4293 Winston Ave., May 15. Ernest Lamar Jr., 1199 Cedar Ave., failure to wear seat belts, possession of marijuana at 400 Madison Ave., May 15. Sherrie L. Jones, 504 Muse Dr., menacing, second degree disorderly conduct, fourth degree assault at 504 Muse Dr., May 15. Candie L. Philpot, 4348 Mckee St., first degree criminal possession of a forged instrument at 4348 McKee St., May 15. Demarco R. Reed, 1845 Duck Creek Rd., operating motor vehicle under the influence, possession of open alcoholic beverage container in a motor vehicle, reckless driving at Zieglers Way, May 15. William L. Johnson, 2698 Harrison Ave., loitering at 613 4th St., May 14. Ricky L. Morgan, 4431 W. 8Th St., serving warrant, first degree possession of a controlled substance at 613 W. 4th St., May 14. Gary A. Stokes, 3732 Aikenside Ave., possession of marijuana at 128 E. 5th St., May 14. Timothy A. Smith, 4050 Charwood Circle, F3, alcohol intoxication in a public place, third degree possession of a controlled substance at 300 E. 5th St., May 15. Lee C. Campbell, 4910 Basin St., theft of services, alcohol intoxication in a public place, second degree disorderly conduct, resisting arrest at 126 Park Pl., May 14. Ronald L. Sharper, 707 Madison Ave., no. 1, second degree unlawful imprisonment, fourth degree assault at 707 Madison Ave., no. 1, May 14. William Bailer, 425 Bakewell St., third degree terroristic threatening, second degree disorderly conduct, menacing at 800 block of Philadelphia St., May 11. George P. Smith, 4833 Paddock Rd., Apt. 6, serving warrant (for other police agency) at 100 W. 4th St., May 16. Mark J. Sholler, 310 W. 16Th St., fourth degree assault at 310 W. 16th St., May 16. Sarah J. Wilson, 315 W. 34Th St., giving officer false name or address at W. 43rd St., May 16. Charlotte L. Johnson, 817 Scott St., no. 1, third degree possession of a controlled substance, second degree criminal possession of a forged instrument at 1026 Madison Ave., May 11. Benjamin J. Overbay, 15065 Goshorn Rd., second degree criminal trespassing at 109B. Promontory Dr., May 10. Amanda A. Overbay, 111 A Promontory Dr., illegal possession of a legend drug at 109B. Promontory Dr., May 10.

Incidents/investigations

Arson A fire was intentionally started at 1405 Scott St., May 16.

Assault Two people were stabbed at 5 E. 18th St., May 10. A man assaulted a woman at 1318 Madison Ave., May 10. A woman was kicked and punched at 1407 S. Garrard St., May 10. A man was struck several times at 33 Waterside Way, May 15. A man punched, kicked, and slapped a woman at 1830 Pearl St., May 15. A man was punched in the right at 3428 Decoursey Ave., May 14. Assault, criminal mischief A woman was struck and her vehicle was damaged at 2613 Crisnic Ct., May 13. Burglary The front window of a business was broken at 670 W. 3rd St., May 11. A power screwdriver was stolen at 25 E. 9th St., May 10. A keyboard, computer mouse, and $1 were stolen at 525 W. 5th St., Ste. 215, May 10. A handgun, computer, TV, printer, and knives were stolen at 1333 Hands Pike, May 12. A computer, TV, and TV stand were stolen at 3407 Lincoln Ave., May 11. A game system, several games, and DVD movies were stolen at 2327 Alden Ct., May 11. Two rings were stolen at 2117 Glenway Ave., May 16. Three bracelets and a ring were stolen at 503 W. 9th St., May 15. Approximately $1,500 was stolen at 414 W. 6th St. no. 1, May 15. Someone broke into a residence at 337 E. 17th St., May 16.

Criminal mischief

A vehicle was damaged at 22 Swain Ct., May 10. Two panes of glass were shattered at 100 Riverside Pl., May 10. A church window was broken at 1430 Russell St., May 10. Clay was put in the radiator of a vehicle at 629 Philadelphia St., May 16. A vehicle was scratched at 17 E. 41st St., May 13. Four garage windows were shattered at 320 Byrd St., May 13. The front passenger window of a vehicle was shattered at 6th St., May 14.

Criminal possession of a forged instrument

Someone attempted to cash counterfeit checks at 2001 Madison Ave., May 13.

Disorderly conduct, fleeing or evading police

A disorderly person ran from the police at 731 Main St., May 16.

Robbery

A man had $15 in cash and a cell phone taken from him at 2000 Oakland Ave., May 10. Someone attempted to take a wallet from a man at 402 Madison Ave., May 10. A cell phone was taken at E. Robbins St., May 16. A purse was stolen at 428 W. 13th St., May 15. A man entered a residence and demanded money at 110C Promontory Dr., May 13. $15 was stolen at 125 12th St., May 14.

Terroristic threatening

A man was threatened at W. 19th St., May 14.

Theft

A sander, lamp, and TV were stolen at 630 W. 12th St., May 10. A large metal light post was stolen at 101 Promontory Dr., May 10. Prescription medication was stolen at 318 Old Madison Pike, May 10. A bag and and DVDs were stolen from a vehicle at 700 Dalton Ave., May 13. A TV converter box, box fan, and folding chair were stolen at 1406 Banklick St., May 12. A wallet was stolen at 1044 Greenup St., no. 137, May 12. An air conditioner was stolen at 402 Scott St., May 15. A tailgate from a truck was stolen at 1617 Greenup St., May 15. A cell phone was stolen at 2311 Alden Ct., May 15. A vehicle was stolen at 917 Main St., May 15. A bicycle was stolen at 805 Madison Ave., May 13. A purse was stolen at 334 W. 7th St., May 16. $40 and a camera were stolen at 104 E. 25th St., May 16. A GPS unit was stolen from a vehicle at 600 W. 3rd St., May 13. A wallet was stolen at 617 Crescent Ave., May 14. An in-car radio/CD player was stolen at 3622 Decoursey Ave., May 13. Prescription medication was stolen at 920 Highland Pike, May 15. A vehicle was stolen at 131 Daniels St., May 14.

Theft of a controlled substance

Prescription medication was stolen at 1826 Madison Ave., May 10. Prescription medication was stolen at 16 Inez St., May 14.

Theft of services

A temporary employee wasn't paid

for work at 827 Madison Ave., May 11. Daycare services were not paid for at 101 E. Southern Ave., May 12.

Theft, criminal mischief

A subwoofer, amplifier, and computer chip were stolen at 305 E. 21st St., May 13. A purse was stolen at 1 Pioneer Park, May 15.

Theft, fraudulent use of a credit card A wallet was stolen at 401 Crescent Ave., May 16. A wallet was stolen at 700 Philadelphia St., May 16.

Theft, theft of a controlled substance

A purse with prescription medication was stolen at 613 W. 4th St., May 14.

FORT MITCHELL

Arrests/citations

Joshua R Wolfe, 21, 1806 Asbury Way, boone county warrant, May 15. Theodore Giantsuos, 48, 2100 Dixie Highway, expired registration, no operator's license, May 16. William H Clark, 46, 411 East Chelsea Drive, first degree driving under the influence, May 18. James R Hedrick, 26, , disregarding stop sign, suspended operator's license, May 17.

Incidents/investigations Criminal mischief

$100 worth of damage to structure reported at 88 Burdsall Avenue, May 14. $1,000 worth of vehicle damage reported at 161 Pleasant Ridge Avenue, May 14.

EDGEWOOD

Incidents/investigations Forgery

Reported at 1 Medical Village Drive, May 13.

Fraudulent use of credit card

Reported at Dudley Road, May 17. Reported at Dudley Road, May 14. Reported at Dudley Road, May 11.

Theft

iPhone reported stolen at 3007 Winding Trails Drive, May 16. $300 worth of tools reported stolen at Colony Drive, May 13. Reported at 201 Medical Village Drive, May 6. $44.92 worth of merchandise reported stolen at Dixie Highway, May 4. $200 purse reported stolen at 18 Lyndale Road, May 4. Reported at 20 Medical Village Drive, May 4. Theft of identity Reported at 3093 Winding Trails Drive, May 9.

ERLANGER/CRESCENT SPRINGS Incidents/investigations

Assault at 414 Commonwealth Avenue, May 17. Assault, second degree disorderly conduct at 2522 Ravenwood Road, May 14.

Burglary

$1,540 worth of computer hardware, $400 worth of office equipment reported stolen at 2522 Ravenwood Road, May 14. $1,200 worth of radios/TVs/VCRs reported stolen at 53 Carriage Hill Drive, May 17. $100 worth of jewelry, $300 worth of radios/TVs/VCRs, $300 worth of merchandise reported stolen at 530 Greenfield Lane, May 20.

Criminal mischief

$850 worth of vehicle damage reported at 624 Hallam Avenue, May 15.

Criminal possession of forged instrument

Reported at 3421 Dixie Highway, May 17. Reported at 3164 Woodward Avenue, May 14. Reported at 2276 Edenberry Drive, May 14.

Falsely reporting an incident

Reported at 391 McAlpin Avenue, May 14.

Fleeing/evading, resisting arrest, alcohol intoxication Reported at Heartwood/Circlewood Lane, May 19.

Fraudulent use of a credit card $1,459.21 worth of merchandise reported stolen at 2216 Dixie Highway, May 13.

Criminal mischief

$50 worth of vehicle damage reported at 638 Donaldson Road, May 15. $150 worth of vehicle damage reported at 107 Bartlett Avenue, May 16. Reported at 3150 Hickory Lane, May 20.

Inadequate silencer, operating on suspended license, giving false name or address

Reported at Dixie Highway, May 15.

Possession of controlled substance

$40 worth of drugs/narcotics seized at 4300 Dixie Highway, May 14.

Possession of marijuana

$10 worth of drugs/narcotics seized at Cintonya Drive, May 16.

Theft

$353 worth of vehicle parts reported stolen at 811 Stevenson Road, May 18. Reported at 2520 Ravenwood Road, May 18. Reported at 846 WInbourne Court, May 17. $200 reported stolen at 3082 Candlewood Court, May 15. $43 reported stolen at 3908 Lori Drive, May 14. $150 worth of radios/TVs/VCRs reported stolen at 2331 Anderson Road, May 16. $55 worth of drugs/narcotics reported stolen at 719 Bromley Crescent Springs Road, May 14. $9.32 worth of consumable goods reported stolen Reported at 560 Clock Tower Way, May 20.

Theft of services

Reported at 633 Donaldson Highway, May 14.

Violation of Kentucky EPO/DVO Reported at 526 Greenfield Lane, May 19. Reported at 526 Greenfield Lane, May 17.

TAYLOR MILL

Arrests/citations

Marcus Rice, 35, 331 E 13th Street, served Kenton County warrant at Grand Avenue, April 22. Ericu L. Terry, 35, Bp Sandman, served Jefferson County warrant at Sandman, April 21. Ryan Johnson, 31, 5262 Roselawn, assault domestic violence at 5262 Roselawn Drive, April 16. Chad A. Hensley, 28, 649 Mafred, served Campbell County warrant, criminal possession of a forged instrument at 649 Mafred, April 25. Calvin M. Lincoln, 21, 515 Grand Avenue, disorderly conduct at 515 Grand Avenue, April 18. Bernard O'Brien, 27, 1188 Far Hills Drive, obtaining controlled substance at 5016 Old Taylor Mill Road, April 15. James Clark, 22, 1018 Washington Ave Apt. 1, criminal trespassing at Progress Rail Yard, April 8. Alycia B. Collins, 20, 1018 Washington Ave Apt. 1, criminal trespassing at Progress Rail Yard, April 8. Justin C. Matthews, 19, 3559 Gallway Court, criminal trespassing at Progress Rail Yard, April 8. Jame Scott Cain, 39, 613 Wayskin Drive, operating on suspended/revoked operators license at Taylor Mill Road at Promontory, April 8. Kimberly S. Witham, 39, 723 Sharon no. 121, served Kenton County warrant at 723 Sharon, April 12. John D. Hornsby Jr., 32, 904 Main Street, served Kenton County warrant at 750 Sharon Drive, April 12. Carey M. Dorman, 21, 745 Honeysuckle Drive, served Kentucky ewarrant at Ky 16 at 275, April 12. Kenny Cordova, 40, 210 Mckinney, license to be in possession, possession of open alcoholic beverage, failure to wear seat belts at I 275, April 2. Gregory A. Turner, 32, 4303 Michigan Avenue, alcohol intoxication, criminal mischief at 275 East, April 3. Justin Rowe, 20, 6127 Grove, speedning 14 mph over limit, operating on suspended/revoked license at Old Taylor Mill Road, April 4. Tina L. Miller, 47, 403 East 46th Street, possession of a controlled substance, served bench warrant for fta at 4315 Winston Avenue, April 29. Kevin J. Yazell, 27, 682 Meadow, served grant county warrant, served grant county warrant at 682 Meadow, May 2. Benedicto M. Cruz, 36, no. 153 Commerce, speedning 12 mph over limit, no operators license at Locust Pike, May 5. Arnold E. Lloyd, 50, 6470 Taylor Mill Road, burglary, possession of burglary tools at 5530 Taylor Mill road, May 8. Keith Berry, 38, 64 Parkview, operating on suspended/revoked operators license at Old Taylor Mill Road, May 14. Steven Grevas, 27, 9618 Clover Ridge Drive, leaving scene of auto accident, operating on supended/revoked operators license, possession of an expired license, drving on suspended license and negligence in auto accident at 16/Janet Drive, May 14. Amy Sexton, 110, 6141 High Top Court, disorderly conduct, endangering the welfare of a minor at 6141 High Top Court, May 15.


May 27, 2010

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May 27, 2010

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