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NOVEMBER 2010 Volume 29, Issue 11


EQUINE TIMES — NOVEMBER 2010

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Harmony Acres shares tips for holiday parade riding By Nancy Harm Harmony Acres Parade Horses NORTHVILLE, MI — Harmony Acres is getting ready for the upcoming holiday season and completing their eighteenth year of riding in some of the country’s largest parades. Our group has participated in over 400 parades including America’s Thanksgiving Day Parade, broadcast live to millions of homes across the country, Milwaukee’s famous Great Circus Parade, Toledo’s Holiday Parade, Oldsmobile’s 100th Anniversary Celebration Parade, Michigan Parades into the 21 Century Parade and many oth-

2010 foals complete the parade obstacle training course and take time for a reinforcing treat. All horses at Harmony Acres must successfully complete a desensitizing training process before even being considered for a parade.

ers in the Midwest. All of our horses go through a desensitization process before riding in parades, including listening to Spookless Sound Conditioning CDs, walking over bridges, paver bricks, tarps, hoses, rubber mats painted with clown face designs, white PVC pipes simulating highway lines, metallic shiny pom-poms stuck in rubber cones, and an automatic bubble machine path of bubbles. The horses also walk around and stand under flags, wind socks, blow up pool toys to simulate parade giant balloons, kick giant balls, and walk past people opening/closing umbrellas, and shaking newspapers. These are not the only objects that parade horses are exposed to, but a process called stimulus generalization allows horses to think, “that’s just another harmless thing like we see at home!” We train our foals to go through the same process of walking through the parade obstacle course starting at about two months of age. My current 2010 foals are at the stage where they will walk and ‘whoa’ over each obstacle at liberty! I have used a clicker and treats such as small slices of apples and carrots, as well as grain, to reinforce this behavior. We use natural horsemen techniques of desensitization, approach and retreat, and clicker training with reinforcements to expedite training. Horses are led over

and around the obstacles and respond calmly and at ease before they are ever ridden in this environment or considered to participate in a parade. Spookless Sound Conditioning CDs are available at our website, harmonyacresparadehorses.com. Sometimes parade horses are exposed to experiences that you cannot completely prepare for at home, such as circus animals. The Spookless Desensitizing Parade CD has big cats and elephant sounds that are a big help. We also put Vick’s Vapor Rub in the horses’ nostrils and around their noses so that they cannot smell exotic animals. Some people in parades such as the Great Circus parade keep their horses in a quiet spot away from the wagons with the exotic animals. When we did the Great Circus Parade for the first time in 2000, we had been told the circus animals would be arriving the day of the parade the next morning, so we decided to go for a ride around the park grounds after settling in. It was a surprise for us to ride around a circus tent and find two white tigers in a cage. Our horses stopped and our response was to give the calm down/head down cue and talk softly. I also had a fanny pack full of treats and we asked the horses to bend their necks and

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Harmony Acres shares tips for holiday parade riding Parade From Page 4 eat a treat, which relaxed their jaws as they ate. We advanced closer to the cages in stages. We do not see circus animals often in Michigan, less than a half dozen different parades, but when we returned to the Circus Parade in 2009, the horses were calm enough to pose in front of the lion and giraffe wagon. A longhorn steer was being ridden directly behind us. Many televised parades now require a banner identifying each group. Choose lettering large enough to be seen on the screen. We chose blue and white, as twenty years ago it was the most readable on a television screen. Nowadays with high definition telecasting color is not so much of a problem. A banner also helps to separate the horses from cub scouts on bicycles or other scary units and gives the horses a familiar object to follow each time they participate in a parade. Clean up is required by nearly all parades. To minimize the number of clean up stops, we feed horses early on parade day (4 AM for Detroit on Thanksgiving Day) and do not feed in the trailer on the way to a parade. We find a plastic tub in a wheeled cart is handier that a wheel barrel and easiest to haul. We use a red plastic snow shovel and child’s plastic hoe that is light and adequate for our needs cleaning behind three or four horses. The tub can be decorated with bows, pumpkins or stars. Often the cleanup crew gets as much airtime as the riders, so we costume the two people on this detail too. If young people are embarrassed to do this in a hometown, disguise them in clown makeup. Clowns are always appropriate in a parade. Our horses are turned out eating hay or pasture 24/7 unless we have a parade the next day when they are stalled. The small amount of grain that they get daily is fed on a variable time schedule so that the horses are not upset if we are in line up for a parade at a regular feeding time. We always arrive at the staging location early (one to two hours or more before step-off time) to allow for unhurried preparation. This also allows us to scout out and secure a quiet space to get ready when all units are staged in one large area. We put traffic cones and yellow caution tape around our prep area when our horses are not in a separate equine staging location. This keeps people on Page 6

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All dolled up: A closeup of the head and mane treatment. bicycles, skateboards or wearing sandals away at a safe distance. We generally haul three horses in a slant trailer. The horses being saddled are tied on the same side of the open window of the horse remaining in the trailer, who can see what is going on with the others while waiting to come out and get ready, too. Three horses tied on one side of the trailer do not give us enough room for us to get ready with several people working on each horse at the same time. After getting ready, we keep all our horses together rather than scattered about. I sometimes see horses prancing about or even running on pavement to get them to look lively during a parade. I feel this is bad for their feet and we prefer a calm, controlled walk during a parade. I have seen horses stumble and fall down on slick pavement. We always have an escort on each side of our horse during a parade to watch for potential hazards and alert riders to such things as antifreeze or oil leaks from antique cars. This does not happen often, but I prefer we do not step on such things. Escorts are also on alert for children who may dash out to pet horses. When people ask to pet the horses during a parade, we smile and answer that it is not allowed. Parade units are not allowed to stop on their own during a parade. Escorts that know your horses can also be of help if a horse hesitates to cross a railroad track, Fax: 517.368.5131

drawbridge or other unfamiliar footing. I learned this early in our parade career when Tarifa did not want to step on a shiny railroad crossing. He had only done six parades in his life the year before and just stopped, refusing several requests. In the meantime, the band behind waited a couple minutes and passed us by! We did not have escorts at that time. I rode over the tracks easily enough on Diamond, swung back to get my second horse whose nose was placed right behind Diamond when he crossed over the tracks again. A person in the crowd who knew horses came to the rescue, stepped in and led Tarifa over the tracks. That was the last time we did a parade without an escort. Our horses are also desensitized to costumes and enhancement, which are lighted or may flutter, flap or reflect light. Again, we never put them in a parade without desensitizing at home. The same kind of tinsel we place in the mane and tail for patriotic and Christmas parades is used for training when placed in a horseman stick (or just duck tape the ends of a bunch of tinsel to the end of a dowel rod). Use this to touch the horse all over with increasing intensity. We are careful that the horses are not pricked when attaching the tinsel to a bobby pin laced through a braid in the mane and tail. If a horse feels pricked or pinched it will cause them to shake it off! Rubber bands at the top of the Please See Parade, Page 15 On the Web: www.equinetimes.com


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Annual 4-H State Horse Show brings big economic impact to city EAST LANSING, MI — The results have been tallied, the winners announced, the long hours of preparation and contest jitters a distant memory, and the work to hold the event completed for another year. Thanks to on-site assistance and support from volunteers, family members and friends, the annual Michigan 4-H State Horse Show brought rewards to participants and spectators - and the local economy. Six hundred 4-H participants representing 55 Michigan counties competed in the three-day event held at the end of August at the Michigan State University (MSU) Pavilion for Agriculture and Livestock Education here. Exhibitors, who pre-qualified to compete in the event, performed in a variety of class categories ranging from gymkhana classes (timed events like barrel racing) to precision-judged equitation and western and hunt seat pleasure events. They also entered non-animal competitions in art and communication around equine-related topics. The attendance numbers translated into large dividends for the local economy. According to figures calculated from a standard formula developed by the American

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Quarter Horse Association (AQHA), this year’s State 4-H Horse Show had an estimated $840,000 economic impact on the East Lansing area. The equation took into consideration the number of horses and participants competing in the event, the approximate number of spectators, the duration of the event, and the estimated amount of money spent by each individual. East Lansing was not the only beneficiary from this annual youth event. Competitors, parents, volunteers and spectators also enjoyed the MSU Pavilion’s amenities and a variety of wares offered by commercial vendors that ranged from clothing and gear to supplies for equine enthusiasts. “Without the help and support from our many volunteers, sponsors and commercial vendors, this event could not be as successful as it is every year,” acknowledges Taylor Fabus, 2010 State 4-H Horse Show organizer. Though the State 4-H Horse Show benefited the community and provided entertainment for spectators, MSU Extension equine specialist Karen Waite noted the ones to benefit the most were the 4-H participants. “The State 4-H Horse Show helps kids

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learn how to set goals, understand the various sides of competition, and realize the importance of good sportsmanship and how to be first-rate competitors,” she said. “Personally, competing in this show influenced my career choice and the path that I followed. Not all of the contestants will pursue the same path that I did or continue to be involved in showing horses or the equine industry, but the experience definitely leaves them with the skills they need to learn how to achieve their goals.” “The State 4-H Horse Show is different from a regular horse show because it focuses on helping youth participants develop practical life skills,” Fabus added. “4-H works hard to combine education with competition. The competitive events provide 4-H members with an opportunity to apply what they’ve learned.” The 2011 State 4-H Horse Show is scheduled for Aug. 12-14 at the MSU Pavilion. For more information on 4-H equine programs, contact Waite at kwaite@msu.edu or visit www.msue.msu.edu/horsekids. For more information on the annual State 4-H Horse Show, contact Fabus at tenlenta@msu.edu.

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Harmony Acres shares tips for holiday parade riding Parade From Page 6 braid also help to secure the tinsel. Lighted nighttime parades have become more popular especially around the holidays. All units are required to be lighted. Most parades send out specific requirements regarding number of lights and other requirements. To train for this type of parade, a battery powered light string is attached to a Christmas garland and placed around the horse’s neck with Velcro for easy removal if necessary. We put these on at dusk and walk first, then ride with them until complete darkness. The gradual exposure has resulted in our horses being very comfortable with lighted costumes. We also have automatic Christmas lighted figures, arches, Putting our best feet forward: Polished hooves enhanced with crystal designed snowflakes and fringed sports medicine boots.

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and barn decorations that the horses can see safely from their paddocks turned on a couple months before the lighted parades. The completed lighted costumes consist of battery-powered halogen string of lights that are attached to riders’ Arabic capes, hats, horse’s saddle cover, bridle, and breastplates. The lights are placed on the horses in complete costume again at dusk and ridden around in complete darkness after the horses have completed habituation training. We have only needed to practice with the complete costume once before a parade due to exposure to the environment lights beforehand. We started lighted parades after gaining considerable experience in daylight parades. Grooming is an important aspect of parade presentation. In the summer horses are bathed, tails conditioned and braided, hooves trimmed and polished. Do not forget fly spray in the summer. Winter presents some cold weather cleaning and keeping warm challenges that are unique. In the winter, horses are vacuumed all over and spot-cleaned. The tips of white tails are washed and towel-dried. Since our horses are blanketed and turned out year-round, legs may need to be washed with warm water and towel-dried. I do a winter clip of the bridle path and long hair under the chin only. Since we ride in sport medicine boots, legs are not trimmed. Feet and hooves get a holiday touch with fringed sports medicine boots and hooves enhanced with crystals. Stick-on crystals for the hooves are available singularly and in snowflake or other patterns for a couple of dollars at craft stores. We bring horse rainproof covers and fleece to keep them dry and warm after tacking up in case of wet weather while waiting. We also have clear plastic ponchos from the dollar store to put over riders’ costumes. They can easily be removed and handed to an escort if the sun comes out or before camera time. To carry the horse fleece blankets or raincoats in the larger parades, we decorate a big “gift” box to put them in and have an escort dressed as an elf push it through the parade on a wheeled cart. Even televised parades will allow this if you keep colorfully costumed and in line with the parade theme. There is even room in the box for a jug of hot chocolate and cups to keep the unit warm during the wait for step off. In very cold weather we have found that heated innersoles in boots and warm socks requiring a larger boot size keep feet warm. We have also used heating patches used for sore muscles on thighs, shoulders, arms, and on tops of hands under gloves to keep warm. Most parades require a commentary with the parade application. I print this with 12-point font in bold type. Give the announcers help (in parentheses) with phonetic pronunciation of names of people or horses that are unusual or tricky to pronounce, or where the spelling of the name could lead to mispronunciation. I also use a color photo of the costumes our unit will be appearing in. This is a help to the commentator to identify us if the parade has no- shows of which they were not alerted. The last piece of advice I have is to do your preparation homework, be safe and have fun! Nancy Harm can be reached by phone at 248-437-5672 or by emailing nharm@chartermi.net. Visit Harmony Acres online at harmonyacresparadehorses.com. On the Web: www.equinetimes.com

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EQUINE TIMES — NOVEMBER 2010

List your events for FREE! (Please include Who, What, When, Where & Contact Info.) Deadline: The 20th of the preceding month.

Email your items to erobinstine@gannett.com or send them to Equine Times, PO Box 130, Camden, MI 49232

NOVEMBER 5-6: Southern Michigan Fall Quarter & Paint Horse & Tack Auction, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, 517467-7576 or www.tommooresales.com. 5-7: Waterloo Recreation Area Turkey Ride, 517-522-6482 or www.waterloohorsemen.org. 6: Dressage Clinic with Judy Kelly, B&J Horse Farm, Jackson, MI, bandjhorseboarding.webs.com or 734-5468557. 6: Michigan Barrel Racing Assn. Event, expos 11 a.m., noon start, Beaubiens Arena, Adrian, MI, 810-7932659 or mibarrelracing.tripod.com. 6: Twin Pines 6th Annual Tack Sale, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Martin, MI, 269-672-9895 or www.twin-pines.net. 6: Winter Series Dressage Show, Willowbrooke Farm, Plymouth, MI, 313938-9221 or www.snelsondressage.com. 6: Great Lakes Cutting Horse Assn. Show, Chuck Smith Cutting Horses, Winchester, OH, 614-402-7593 or www.glcha.com. 6: Horse Show, Liberty Farm, Columbus, OH, 614-279-0346 or libertyhorsefarm.com. 6-7: North American Horse Fest, presented by Wayne Williams, Sat. 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun. 9 a.m.-5 p.m., admission $5/person, kids 12 & under free, clinics by Dave Kluge, Richard Shrake, Moses Woodson, Dr. O & Dr. Amy, Mounted & Shooting Entertainment, Horse Idol, shopping, Kid’s Korral, more, Allen County Fairgrounds, Fort Wayne, IN, visit Page 16

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www.northamericanhorsefest.com for more information. 6-7: Winter Series Indoor Jumper Schooling Show, Nancy G. Held Equestrian Center, Albion College, 611 E. Porter St., Albion, MI, www.albion.edu or 517-629-1000. 6-7: Henry County Draft Horse Club Annual Farm Days, Ken Davis Farm, Liberty Center, OH, 419-410-6823 or www.hcdhc.org. 6-7: Jeff Cook Clinic, Lochmoor Stables, Lebanon, OH, 513-932-7332 or www.lochmoorstables.com. 6-7: OVRHA Reining Horse Show, Henderson’s Arena, Jackson, OH, 740988-2971 or www.hendersonswestern.com. 7: Open Ride, starting at Brighton Staging Area, BTRA will provide coffee, juice & sweets, more info at 586-9158424 or www.brightontrailriders.com. 7: Guest Hunt, Battle Creek Hunt Club invites all interested riders to come and ride, dress codes and normal capping requirements are waived for this ride, arrive at the hunt club at 9 a.m. and be willing to sign all required liability waivers, all minors must be accompanied by an adult rider, Battle Creek Hunt Club, 7878 N. 43rd St., Augusta, MI, 269-731-5672 or sesagerjr@aol.com. 11-14: MQHA Harvest Classic, Pavilion at Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, 616-225-8211 or www.miquarterhorse.com. 12-13: Addis Equine Arabian Auction, Champions Center, 4122 Laybourne Rd., Springfield, OH, www.championscenterFax: 517.368.5131

expo.com. 12-14: Novi Equestrian Expo, Fri. noon8 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.-7 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.5 p.m., admission $10/person, kids 12 and under free, featuring clinics by Dan Grunewald, TJ Casey, Mari Monda Zdunic & Steve Shaver, Rock Financial Showplace, Novi, MI, call 248-348-5600 or visit www.noviequestrianexpo.com for more information. 12-14: Midwest Indoors Show, Wilmington, OH, 513-875-3318 or www.countryheir.com. 13: B&B Fall Speed Show, noon, rain or shine, Hardy Farms, Howell, MI, 517548-1898 or mdeyoung7215@sbcglobal.net. 13: Horse Sale, 8:30 a.m., Mt. Hope Auction, Mt. Hope, OH, 330-674-6188 or www.mthopeauction.com. 13-14: Michigan Reined Cow Horse Assn. Payback Show, 8 a.m. start, JDJ Ranch, Evart, MI, 231-633-5502 or www.michiganreinedcowhorse.com. 13-14: Great Lakes Cutting Horse Assn. Show, Eden Park Equestrian Complex, Sunbury, OH, 740-667-3940 or www.glcha.com. 19-21: Midwest Indoors Show, Wilmington, OH, 513-875-3318 or www.countryheir.com. 20: Championship Four-State Youth Rodeo, Champions Center, 4122 Laybourne Rd., Springfield, OH, www.championscenter-expo.com. 20: Metamora Pony Clubbers Gymkhana, 9 a.m., Crescent Ridge Farm, Metamora, MI, 248-969-5573. 20: Michigan Barrel Racing Assn. On the Web: www.equinetimes.com


EQUINE TIMES — NOVEMBER 2010

List your events for FREE! (Please include Who, What, When, Where & Contact Info.) Deadline: The 20th of the preceding month.

Email your items to erobinstine@gannett.com or send them to Equine Times, PO Box 130, Camden, MI 49232 Event, 11 a.m. expos, noon start, Sundance Arena, Grand Ledge, MI, 810793-2659 or mibarrelracing.tripod.com. 20-21: World’s Largest Tack Swap, Birch Run Expo Center, Birch Run, MI, 810-639-0193 or tkequine@hotmail.com. 20-21: Limerick Lane Horse Show, Hilliard, OH, 614-332-2074 or www.limericklanefarm.com. 21: Trail Rescue & First Aid Seminar, tentative program scheduled, details TBD, pinckneytrailriders@gmail.com. 21: MSU Green & White Fuzzy Show, 8 a.m., no show clothes allowed, presented by the MSU Horseman’s Assn., MSU Pavilion, East Lansing, MI, 231-233-4204 or jabrock1@msu.edu. 21: Pinckney Trail Riders Rescue & First Aid Seminar, 734-878-2975 or www.pinckneytrailriders.com. 23: Maryal Barnett (S) Dressage Clinic, riders and auditors welcome, Clarkston, MI, 248-535-8145 or beverly@puddingstonemanor.com. 26-28: SOQHA Turkey Circuit Show, Champions Center, 4122 Laybourne Rd., Springfield, OH, www.championscenterexpo.com, www.oqha.com or www.soqha.com. 26-28: Cowboy Christmas, vendors, show shopping and more, MSU Pavilion, East Lansing, MI, 989-763-3276. 27: Kensington Trail Riders Thanksgiving & Christmas Parade, wterian@comcast.net. 27: Michigan Barrel Racing Assn. Event, expos 11 a.m., noon start, Beaubiens Arena, Adrian, MI, 810-7932659 or mibarrelracing.tripod.com. 27: Thanksgiving Barrel Race, Henderson’s Arena, Jackson, OH, 740988-2971 or www.hendersonswestern.com. 27-28: Limerick Lane Horse Show, Hilliard, OH, 614-332-2074 or www.limerToll-Free: 800.222.6336

icklanefarm.com.

DECEMBER 3: Wolcott Mill Trail Assn. Christmas Party, potluck, 6:30 p.m., 586-749-9153 or www.wolcotttrails.com. 4: 4-H All-Species Tack Sale, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., tables for rent for $10/1st, $5/each additional, concessions available, Smith Hall, Clinton County Fairgrounds, St. Johns, MI, 989-682-4354. 4: Brighton/Pinckney Trail Riders Christmas Party, details TBD, 517-2944753 or pinckneytrailriders@gmail.com. 4: Christmas Tack-O-Rama, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., setup at 7 a.m., new & used tack sale, 8x10 space without table: $35, w/table $25, sponsored by Midknight Ryders 4-H Club, Parnall Elementary School, 3737 Lansing Ave., Jackson, MI, 517-787-7138 or bbcox@voyager.net. 4: Clinton County 4-H All-Species Tack Sale, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., concessions available, tables for rent $10 for 1st, $5 for each more, Smith Hall on Clinton County Fairgrounds, St. Johns, MI, 989-6824354. 4-5: ALSA National Alpaca Show, Champions Center, 4122 Laybourne Rd., Springfield, OH, www.championscenterexpo.com. 4-5: Winter Series Indoor Jumper Schooling Show, Nancy G. Held Equestrian Center, Albion College, 611 E. Porter St., Albion, MI, www.albion.edu or 517-629-1000. 14: Equine Science Update, 6-9 p.m., open to all horse enthusiasts, highlights Equine Science Center’s work in advancing equine health, horse management practices, and solutions to equine industry issues, registration $25/person (nonrefundable) or $10/full-time student, registration closes Friday, Dec. 3, Cook Campus Center, 59 Biel Rd., New

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Brunswick, NJ, 732-932-2658 or esc.rutgers.edu. 18: Championship Four-State Youth Rodeo, Champions Center, 4122 Laybourne Rd., Springfield, OH, www.championscenter-expo.com.

JANUARY 8-9: Winter Series Indoor Jumper Schooling Show, Nancy G. Held Equestrian Center, Albion College, 611 E. Porter St., Albion, MI, www.albion.edu or 517-629-1000. 29: 11th Annual Tack Sale & Silent Auction, sponsored by Branch County 4H Leaders, Union City Middle School, Union City, MI, 517-568-4790 or www.branchco4-hhorse-leaders.com.

FEBRUARY 5-6: Winter Series Indoor Jumper Schooling Show, Nancy G. Held Equestrian Center, Albion College, 611 E. Porter St., Albion, MI, www.albion.edu or 517-629-1000. 26: Allegan County 4-H Horse Leaders Tack Sale, 9:30 a.m.-2 p.m., vendor space avaialble, Hamilton Middle School, Hamilton, MI, 269-751-8952 or dkamps@frontier.com.

MARCH 12-13: Winter Series Indoor Jumper Schooling Show, Nancy G. Held Equestrian Center, Albion College, 611 E. Porter St., Albion, MI, www.albion.edu or 517-629-1000.

APRIL 2: Winter Series Indoor Jumper Schooling Championship Show (Invitational), Nancy G. Held Equestrian Center, Albion College, 611 E. Porter St., Albion, MI, www.albion.edu or 517-6291000.

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MSU horse expert pens chapter in new Grandin textbook EAST LANSING, MI - The name Temple Grandin may sound familiar. It may be because the self-titled autobiographical film starring Claire Danes recently won five Emmy Awards, including outstanding lead actress for Danes. It may be because Time magazine has included her on its list of the 100 most influential people in the world and one of the 25 heroes of 2010. Dr. Grandin’s name may also be recognizable because it is synonymous with two of today’s prominent topics: autism and the humane treatment of livestock. Many consider Grandin to be the world’s expert when it comes to designing equipment for handling livestock. She has been at the forefront for establishing many of the standards that we take for granted today. Grandin has developed new cattle loading and movement chutes to reduce animal stress and created a scoring sys-

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tem for handling cattle and pigs at meat plants. She has designed the livestock handling equipment used by more than half of the slaughterhouse facilities in the United States and livestock facilities in more than 10 countries. The experiences of Camie Heleski, who coordinates the two-year Institute of Agricultural Technology Horse Management Program at Michigan State University (MSU), led naturally to lending her knowledge and expertise to write a chapter in Grandin’s latest book, “Improving Animal Welfare.” Heleski recruits students to the program, advises them about courses to take, offers direction on pursuing career aspirations and teaches four to six classes per semester. She is lead organizer for the 10th annual Animal Welfare Judging and Assessment Contest (AWJAC) and offers support and guidance to the MSU teams. Developing the AWJAC contest was

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one part of Heleski’s Ph.D. project, which spanned from 2000 to 2004. In addition to working countless hours with students, Heleski is also involved in research. She studies how working animals, especially horses and donkeys, are cared for and used in developing countries, and works with their owners and caretakers to teach them about more humane and horsefriendly training and husbandry practices. Additionally, she has helped arrange several trips to Brazil with various research teams to examine the conditions under which handlers and owners care for cart horses and donkeys there. Considered an expert on the unwanted horse issue, a situation that resulted when legislation restricted slaughter facilities from processing horses in the United States; Heleski has been called to the nation’s capital to present seminars about the subject. Please See Grandin, Page 19

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MSU horse expert pens chapter in new Grandin textbook Grandin From Page 18 In addition to spending time in Brazil, Heleski made two trips to Mali with a Ph.D. candidate she was advising. The student, Amy McLean, is now an equine specialist in the University of Wyoming Animal Science Department. The project McLean worked on in the West African country studied stress levels in donkeys as a reaction to different types of harnesses and driving methods. Their findings led them to develop training methods for the donkey owners that could result in more humane treatment for the animals. McLean’s project, along with her own experience with working animals in Brazil, factored predominately in leading Heleski to have the knowledge to write the chapter in Grandin’s book. And, just as Heleski’s experience in Brazil and Mali influenced her decision to become personally involved in making the lives of equine more tolerable

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and humane, Grandin’s exposure to seeing some animals used for agricultural purposes enduring less than optimal treatment motivated her to become involved in this same cause. Grandin’s story is nothing less than amazing. Having been diagnosed with autism at the age of 3, Grandin overcame the stigma about the disorder that existed at that time. As stated on her website biography, she was diagnosed at a time when “most professionals and parents assumed that an autism diagnosis was virtually a death sentence to achievement or productivity in life.” Yet, Grandin went on to earn a bachelor’s degree in psychology and master’s and doctorate degrees in animal science. She is now worldrenowned as both a symbol for autism awareness and a revolutionizing force within the livestock industry, transforming how producers and meat processing facilities handle livestock.

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Grandin credits her autism for providing her with a unique way of thinking - seeing the world in pictures rather than through facts - that intuitively allows her to empathize with the feelings of animals, as they exist in specific environments. “She’s a person that has made major things happen in production animal agriculture,” Heleski said. “And yet she talks the language of the producers so they don’t find it scary or intimidating. “Sometimes when people approach producers about the topic of animal welfare, producers can get a bit wary,” she added. “But Temple shows them that if they change their management practices for the welfare of the animal, ultimately the carcass quality is better, and the end result is more money in the producer’s pocket.” A shared passion for improving the Please See Grandin, age 20

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MSU horse expert pens chapter in new Grandin textbook Grandin From Page 19 living conditions of animals and appreciation for each other’s work brought Grandin and Heleski together for Grandin’s book. Heleski said that when they discussed the chapter that she would write, there was one main goal. “Speaking with Temple, she said she just wanted the book to be very, very practical,” she explained. “She wanted a veterinarian in a developing country to be able to pick it up and find that it contained applicable and useful information, such as a checklist of the most important concepts to animal care.” “Improving Animal Welfare” offers realistic suggestions for just that improving animal welfare. Chapters examine issues such as animal handling, transport, surgery and euthanasia. Heleski’s chapter highlights practices including harness placement and treating wounds.

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“My main focus has been trying to make the owners more aware,” she said. “If the owners do a better job of caring for their (work) animals, then the animal can work more hours and have a longer working life. “In other words, their owners won’t have to spend money replacing the animals as frequently as they do now.” In West Africa, Heleski said it costs the average rural farmer about one-third of his or her annual income to buy a donkey. “If that one donkey can last for eight years instead of two, that’s a huge cost savings,” she said. “When you explain some of those economic realities to them, it starts to make more sense and they begin to realize why taking better care of their animals is important.” Improving living conditions for livestock in developing countries could have even farther-reaching impacts, Heleski added.

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“In some countries, women spend a good portion of their days fetching water by hand,” she noted. “If the women could have a donkey to help them with their daily chores, their time is freed up to accomplish other things, such as taking goods to market to generate additional income.” Incorporating Heleski’s findings collected from years of work across the globe into Grandin’s book is a natural fit. “I suspect having this work highlighted in Grandin’s book will have a much broader reach,” Heleski commented. “It’s important for people to read both journal articles and applicable books such as this one. I think with this book we’ve achieved the goal of getting useful information to the people directly involved in caring for work animals and in doing so improving both the lives of the animals and the lives of their owners as well.”

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Winterizing helps horse owners to be green Leaving a Lighter Hoofprint By Laurie A. Cerny Winterizing barns, pastures, and horse trailers is not only a smart thing for horse owners to do to help make winter easier; it is also a great step toward being green. Because winterizing helps to preserve what you already have, you won’t have to replace things as often. This not only saves money, but it helps to leave a lighter hoofprint on the environment. Here is a list of winterizing things every horse owners should do: Barn & Stables: - Winterize the barn: This means repairing or replacing broken windows and doors, and making sure that they can close completely to keep out cold winter air and drafts. Make sure that all doors have ample

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clearance to allow for accumulated snow and ice. - If you have a bathroom and/or heated wash rack, wrap the water heater with an insulated blanket. Hot water pipes can also be wrapped to help save energy. - Refill stalls under mats where needed, or haul in fill in stalls without mats. - Remove anything from the barn that’s not used during the winter like fans (blow off fan and motor with an air compressor). - Store any liquids that might freeze in an unheated barn like fly spray, shampoo, coat conditioners, hoof black, fence paint, etc., indoors - Do a thorough fall cleaning. This means sweeping cobwebs and cleaning dust and debris from electric outlets, around lights, vents, etc. Clean windows so more light will fill the barn during the winter. - Organize: An organized barn runs more efficiency. Create feeding stations for grain and hay. Keep grain pans and supplements where they can easily be reached when rationing out grain. Have a place to hang bailer twine strings near the haystack. You also awn to keep a used feed bag nearby to put any undesirable weeds found in your hay like Milkweed, Canadian Thistle, and Curly Dock. - Drain hoses and water tanks: Drain hoses of all water, roll them up, and store indoors. Unused water tanks should be drained and cleaned using a dishsoap or a bleach mixture - then turn them upside down if left outside. A run-in shed or a horse trailer that isn’t going to be used during the winter is another good place to store water tanks. - Stock up on staples: Filling the barn with hay for winter goes without saying, however, stocking up on other things like bedding, stall freshener products, salt blocks, de-wormers, etc. helps to eliminate unnecessary trips to the feed or farm store.

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Winterizing helps horse owners to be green Pastures: - Fix fences: Make sure that fences are in good repair including working electric - Consider installing solar chargers, which not only work great, but also cost nothing to operate. Replace rotted boards and posts. You definitely don’t want to be digging postholes in the frozen ground. - Paint gates: Gates seem to rust quickly in seam areas, as well as areas damaged by use and by horses. Use either sandpaper or a wire brush to remove rust, and then follow up with a coat of primer and a then with a rust deterring paint. - Check electric water heaters to make sure they work. Consider replacing electric heaters with solar heaters. - Harrow pastures. If you don’t have a harrow, use a pitchfork and break up manure piles. - Spread manure and compost on hay fields and on pastures that are resting for the winter. - Create bedroom lots or dry lots. These lots help to preserve pastures from overgrazing and damage when the ground is soft. - Use hay feeders. Feeding hay up off of the ground helps to eliminate waste. Horse Trailers: - Clean horse trailer area & unload tack compartment, dressing rooms and living quarters. - Repair or replace damaged items from broken tie straps and hay bags to window screens and mats. - Remove any rust or corrosion using sandpaper or a wire brush; follow with a primer and then with a rust deterring paint. - Preserve wood floors with a weatherproofing product. - Store trailer for the winter. The ideal place for storage is in a cement-floored building away from livestock area. If left outside a trailer should be stored in a protected area, and/or tarped or covered with horse trailer cover. - Make sure to cover the tires. - Empty perishable items from tack compartment, dressing room, and living quarters. Remove anything that could get damaged if the roof or windows leak. Put a couple handfuls of mothballs inside to help repel mice and other pests. Tack - Clean and store show tack: Give your show tack a good cleaning and bring it indoors for the winter. This will protect it from the damaging effects of extreme temperatures, as well as prevent potential damage from mice and other critters and insects that might over winter in your barn. - Wash fly sheets, fly masks, stable sheets, and unused halters. Repair any tears in blankets, masks, and leg wraps. Store these items in a sealed container like a tote. - Sell or donate what items you aren’t using Laurie Cerny lives in Paw Paw, MI and shows AQHA, Ranch Horse Association, and open horse shows with her American Quarter Horses. She is the editor of Green Horsekeeping Annual Guide. The annual guide includes columns and articles by experts in areas of green horsekeeping, a national resource listings for green horse care products and services, and coupons and rebates for many of these products. The 2011 Green Horsekeeping Annual Guide is available in print for $9.95, and electronically for $6.95. Send check or money order to One Horse Press @ 70883 39th Street, Paw Paw, MI 49079. Include an email address when ordering an electronic version. For more information about the annual guide go to http://greenhorsekeepingmagazine.web.officelive.com. For weekly green horsekeeping postings go to http://greenhorsekeeping.blogspot.com. Toll-Free: 800.222.6336

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WMAR Western Michigan Appaloosa Regional It’s kind of a quiet right now. The Appaloosa World show will either be finished or just finishing up by the time you read this. The Appaloosa shows are done for the season and the banquet isn’t until January 30, 2011 at the University Quality Inn in East Lansing. Congratulations to Amy Ziegler as she was the big winner of the WMAR Raffle. It ended up being a 50/50 raffle as not quite enough tickets were sold to give the multiple awards. The next board meeting will be November 13 at 3 p.m. with the General Membership meeting to follow at 4:30 p.m. These meetings will be held at the MSU Pavilion. Please make time to attend the General Membership meeting to let your thoughts and ideas be heard. ‘til next month.... Sharon Clark

IHTA Ionia Horse Trails Association The Ionia Horse Trails Association club sponsored campouts are over for 2010, and what a grand time we all had! We would like to thank everyone who helped and came out.

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Activities in October included the annual Chili Cook-Off, a poker run, a timed ride and a 50/50 drawing. We had great weather and everyone had a great time! Board members and officers were elected in September. Our board members stayed the same except for Bob Walker took Vern Pifer’s board spot and Amy Estes took secretarial duties back from Sue Manes. The next board meeting will be Saturday, November 6, 1 p.m. at Jerry’s in Portland. All are welcome to attend. Respectfully submitted, Amy Estes

SWMHBC Southwestern Michigan Horse & Buggy Club 2010 Schedule of Events Sunday, November 7 - At Cal and Minnie Sadlers’ in Hartford, 1:30 p.m. Potluck and meeting. Sunday, December 5 - At Margie and Louie Godines’ in Lawrence, 1:30 p.m. Potluck and meeting. For more information about the Southwestern Michigan Horse and Buggy Club please call Margie Godines at 269 6743213 or Tina Streeter at 269-621-4491. Thanks, Debbie Glover

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EQUINE TIMES — NOVEMBER 2010

MFTA Michigan Fox Trotter Association The September meeting of the Michigan Fox Trotter Association Inc. was held at the home of George and Charleen Ostrom on Saturday, Sept. 25, 2010. Treasurer Charleen Ostrom read a treasurers report and it was filed. She also was the stand in Secretary in the absence of Marilyn Mannino. The secretary’s minutes were approved. The clinic with Levi Beechy in Mt Pleasant went very well. Members and non-members felt Levi helped them with their horses and respective problems. The clinic with Jim McKinney was well attended and participants were happy with the results also. We have been asked to do more clinics with these two clinicians. Plans are in the works for 2 clinics next year. Check the website often for the dates. Jan Wolfin has agreed to teach a class on camping with your horse. She has taught this class on the college level and it was always full. She is willing to teach the one-day class at her farm in the early spring for the MFTA and friends. Check the website for a date. Trail rides are being scheduled for next year. Chuck Fanslow will be hosting a national trail ride and a trail ride in July. Marilyn Mannino and Charleen Ostrom will be hosting 2 day trippers in southern Michigan next summer also. Dates will be posted on our website.

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We had discussion on selecting a horse to represent us at the MHC Expo in March. A stallion or gelding will be selected soon. The last discussion of the day was about the World Grand Champion class at the 2010 Celebration in Ava, Missouri. Region 8 director Charleen Ostrom has expressed our members dismay of the judges selection to the Board of Directors. Discussion will continue on this subject at the Board of Director’s meeting in November. Please express your opinion to the MFTHBA. All e-mails both positive and negative are forwarded to all BOD members. They need to hear your thoughts and what you support. The next meeting of the MFTA will be January in Mt Pleasant hosted by Chuck Fanslow.

MiCMO Michigan Competitive Mounted Orienteering Well the 2010 season has come to an end. We had gorgeous weather for all the rides this season and great turnouts. Some rides exceeded 30 riders, the majority of which were new riders! Let’s hope they come back in 2011. Thank you to all the Ride Managers, without you our sport would not be possible. Everyone new ride managers included did a fabulous job. The Annual Meeting will be held November 13, 2010. The location will be determined based upon the response we get for those who will be in attendance. Please RSVP to Our President, Alison Bennett, via email or phone by October 27. Email: alisonannebennett@gmail.com The annual meeting consists of voting for your officers, deciding on the banquet meal, location, etc. Choosing an awards committee, FOOD and just a good time with your fellow members. It is the most important meeting of the year and requires input from as many sources as possible. We will also award the qualifiers of the Consistency and Mentor awards and draw for the Montana Silversmith watch. Happy Trails, Rebecca Ferris

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SHTRA Sleepy Hollow Trail Riders Association Next Bd. Meeting is Nov. 9 at Pat Brown’s. 2011 plans - Feb. 5, 2011 Annual Meeting, and new event possibilities w/the old road as a multi-use non-motorized trail. This summer’s special event usage of the abandoned roadway proved its mileage was a draw for equestrian use. Oct. 8-10, it was opened for riders and carts drivers who enjoyed the scenic views over the dam and along the lake. It added needed mileage to Sleepy Hollow’s equestrian system and would be a great area to ride when the trails are spring sloppy. “Fantastic! Phenomenal! Great for Driving!” were some of the quotes from excited users. Future plans will link it to the west trail loop for special event use only. Oct. 8-11 was the weekend for SHTRA’s Ichabod Crane Day. The weekend’s weather was fantastic and the participant turnout was overwhelming. Saturday’s horse drawn wagon rides were given by the big draft teams of Russ and Julie Stickle, Amber and TJ Hunt, Gary and Sharon Fortin, Al and

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Cheryl Goodrich and Nancy Caulfield’s tiny mini team. SHTRA deeply appreciates these owners’ time and efforts to do this event. Pat Brown w/Bennie rode for hours as the Headless Horseman proving that Washington Irving’s legend lives on. Mike Woods was attired as Ichabod, the old schoolmaster and Sue Chant was costumed as his companion, Katrina. They rode the public campground and wagon route to interact with the wagon riders. Back at the beach parking lot, the Great Pumpkin’s weight of 81 lbs. was guessed at. Thanks to Gale and Lori Moore for donating it to the lucky family. The Myron Karsten family and friends hosted pumpkin bowling, giant bubble blowing, creepy sandbox digging, and the eyeball jar. Mary Wrigley donated the use of her horse, Breeze and burro, Washtenaw for finger painting. Yup, that’s right! Paint the ***! My, how creative SHTRA folks can get! The 50/50 drawing was won by Sue Chant who donated her winnings back to SHTRA! Thanks to all who donated their time volunteering helping out in so many ways. The Country Store, St. Johns, MI donated candy for the kids. Gale Moore fired up the grill

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and grilled brats, burgers and dogs for the hungry crew. Following the potluck, trails were ridden to enjoy the fall colors. Hollow logs on the campfire ended the perfect day. Gale, Gary and Pat covered the paper trail for this event. Check the web, www.shtra.org, for the new photos. Next year, will you attend? Sunday, Oct. 10 the Double M 4-H Club hosted The Spooky Ride for SHTRA. Trail obstacles done by Sandy and Shannon awaited the 74 costumed riders. The staging area was packed with participants and over 60 rigs. A lunch of hotdogs, donuts and cider was served by Amber Schupp, Jan Mehney and their families. Thanks to leader Sandy and Kevin Bashore and The Double M club for having a spectacular spook event! The Ovid Farmers Elevator has helped SHTRA by donating wheat seed for the Plow Days wildlife food plots. Gary Fortin and Gale Moore are to be thanked for completing that project. Many thanks to my SHTRA family for handling the summer events for me as I stay with Mom. Sincerely, Marsha Putnam

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MacMillan Photography wins inaugural World Games journalism contest HUNTINGTON, IN — A photo taken by Allen MacMillan of MacMillan Photography and Media Services, Huntington, Indiana, was selected as the winning entry in the Alltech A+ World Games Pre-Coverage Journalism and Photo Contest. The image appeared the April and June 2010 issues of Equine Times along with Kim MacMillan’s written coverage of the World Games selection trials. Allen took the photo of U.S. driver Bill Long and his four-inhand team competing in the 2009 Kentucky Cup combined driving event, a test event for the 2010 World Games. The shot was taken with a Nikon D300 camera body and Sigma F2.8 70 - 200 mm lens. The MacMillans received a $500 check, award certificates and bottles of Alltech’s new Pearse Lyons Reserve bourbon and Kentucky Sundown bourbon coffee. The awards were presented by Dr. Pearse Lyons, President of Alltech, the title sponsor of the 2010 Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games held last month in Lexington, Kentucky. Alltech will also sponsor a Post-World Games Journalism and Photo Contest which is open to all members of either American Horse Publications or the International Alliance of Equestrian Journalists. The MacMillans have been frequent contributors to Equine Times over the last year and were credentialed media during the World Equestrian Games. Look for their photos and written coverage of the Games in this issue. Congratulations to them on the award!

New to USA: Jardine’s Secret Products Jardine’s Secret Grooming Products founded in Oil City, Ontario, Canada in 2001, serving all who are committed in keeping your animal’s coat in the best condition. Dedication of daily grooming to the spotlight of top competition, Jardine’s Secret has the full line of products to maintain the ultimate shine. All products are hypoallergenic and safe to use daily. The Ultimate Shampoo and Ultimate Whitening Shampoo, not only cleans the hair, but keeps the white white and leaves no residue. Ultimate Conditioner keeps the coat soft and eliminates hair breakage. Ultimate Final Shine detangles and leaves a luscious coat. The Ultimate Self Rinse is a waterless product that spot cleans giving the same results. Over the years, Jardine’s Secret has provided high quality grooming products to the animal world. From the first wash, to the winning circle, Jardine’s Secret is your Ultimate choice. For more information, feel free to visit www.jardinessecret.com or contact Jardine’s US at: 260-693-0986.

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EQUINE TIMES — NOVEMBER 2010

MHDVA Michigan Horse Drawn Vehicle Association Nov 7: Annual Meeting and Dinner (SUNDAY Nov 7). Dinner at 12 p.m., meeting at 1 p.m. We will have the room 11 a.m.-3 p.m. and hope to show video from World Equestrian Games on the big screen. Location: The new food court in the Brody Complex, Michigan State University. Judy Campbell is reserving the private room and will reserve parking passes for each vehicle.Everyone planning to attend must RSVP no later than November 2. When you RSVP, please make sure to let Cady Ness-Smith know if you also need a parking pass and how many meals you are reserving. The parking passes are $3.50 and must be reserved and paid in advance. Here is a link with map to the MSU campus: http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&q=42.731457,-84.496418%20% 28Brody%20Srv%20Rd,%20East%20Lansing,%20MI%2048823,% 20USA%29. The Brody complex is marked with the “A”. This address for the building just before Brody Complex is 1111 W. Michigan Ave., East Lansing (for those with GPS). Please write checks directly to MHDVA for the total amount of meals + parking. Send to: MHDVA, 4123 S. Portsmouth Rd., Bridgeport, MI 48722. Checks need to be received no later than November 2. To RSVP via email or phone: sascns@flash.net (please

Announcements

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Horses & Equip

HOBBY HORSE Clothing Company has winning western show clothes! Jackets, vests, blazers, slinky tops, rodeo queen apparel, chaps and accessories for girls, women and plus sizes. Call 800-569-5885 for free catalog or find dealers and shop on-line at hobbyhorseinc.com

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To advertise please phone 800-222-6336 or 517-647-7400 Monday - Thursday 8 am - 4:30 pm Friday 8 am-4 pm **Deadline for the December 2010 issue of Equine Times is November 19 at 5 p.m.** Toll-Free: 800.222.6336

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make the subject MHDVA annual dinner) or 517-626-2597 (message only). If you need directions on the day of the meeting, please call Judy at 517-575-5547 or Cady 517-281-9139. We will have someone standing at the complex with the passes and directions to parking and the room (until 11:45 a.m.). This is an excellent time to renew your membership to MHDVA or join the club, if you have not already done so! Cady Ness-Smith 517-281-9139 phone 517-338-5001 fax sascns@flash.net

~ Tony ~

You brought much joy to our family. Thank you, Tony. Love, The Dean Family & Friends

Equine Times is happy to help you pay tribute to your fallen horse friends. Send a photo and short note in memory of your equine comrade to erobinstine@gannett.com. Deadline for the November issue is October 20 at 5 p.m. On the Web: www.equinetimes.com

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Photos from World Equestrian Games 2010

The athletes’ parade during the 2010 Alltech FEI WEG closing ceremonies on Oct. 10. Photo by Shannon Brearton, MacMillan Photography.

Singer Lyle Lovett, a big reining fan and owner of some of the Italian horses, performed during the closing ceremonies. Photo by Shannon Brearton, MacMillan Photography.

Ford Motor Co. was one of the sponsors of the 2010 Games and a caravan of classic Mustang cars chaperoned the athletes’ parade during closing ceremonies. Photo by Dee Kochensparger, MacMillan Photography.

Over 6,000 volunteers worked before, during and after the Games, and many of them marched with pom-poms in hand in the closing ceremonies Oct. 10. Photo by Shannon Brearton, MacMillan Photography.

A Connemara Pony jumps a picnic table during the Irish breeds demonstration in the Village Arena in the Equine Village. Photo by Allen MacMillan, MacMillan Photography. Page 36

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A “Horse Ball” demonstration performed by riders from Quebec, Canada, in the North Arena in the Equine Village at the Kentucky Horse Park. Photo by Shannon Brearton, MacMillan Photography. Fax: 517.368.5131

U.S. Endurance rider Janice Worthington and Golden Lightning, an Arabian Gelding and ex-race horse, cross the covered bridge on loop 2 of the ride. The endurance competition ran on the first Sunday of the Games with 6 loops and a total distance of 100 miles. The ride was not lucky for the American competitors, and unfortunately the only rider to finish (Heather Reynolds riding Ssamiam) were eliminated at the final vet inspection due to lameness. Photo by Allen MacMillan, MacMillan Photography.

Clinician and trainer Lynn Palm riding Painted Lark by Rugged Lark performs in the Clinicians Corral. Photo by Allen MacMillan, MacMillan Photography. On the Web: www.equinetimes.com


EQUINE TIMES — NOVEMBER 2010

Photos from World Equestrian Games 2010

The mecahnical cutting horse ride, sponsored by National Cutting Horse Associaiton, where attendees could try their hand at sitting a cutting horse. Photo by Kim MacMillan, MacMillan Photography.

A horse and rider from Rain Dance Freisians perform in the Village Arena in the Equine Village. Photo by Dee Kochensparger, MacMillan Photography.

Spanish riders aboard a spotted horse perform in the International Andalusian and Lusitano Association demonstration in the Equine Village. Photo by Dee Kochensparger, MacMillan Photography.

U.S. Para Dressage Grade II rider Jonathan Wentz, 20, Richardson, TX, riding NETC Richter Scale, a 16-year-old Shire gelding owned by Kai Handt. Photo by Shannon Brearton, MacMillan Photography.

Para Dressage Grade III rider Hannelore Brenner from Germany rode her Women of the World, a 15-year-old Hanoverian mare, to earn Individual and Freestyle Gold medals. Photo by Allen MacMillan, MacMillan Photography.

American Grade IV rider Susan Treabess, Tahoe City, CA, rode Kathy Peterson’s Moneypenny, a 16-year-old Dutch Warmblood mare by Rubenstein. Photo by Shannon Brearton, MacMillan Photography.

Guy McLean from Australia and his group of dun horses perform under saddle and at liberty in the Village Arena in the Equine Village. Photo by Dee Kochensparger, MacMillan Photography.

Performers from the Arabian Horse Association in the WEG Equine Village situated in the main part of the Kentucky Horse Park. Photo by Dee Kochensparger, MacMillan Photography.

Brazil’s Rodrigo Pessoa, son of Olympic rider Nelson Pessoa and an Olympian rider in his own right, made the top four, but had 12 faults total and finished in fourth. Photo by Allan MacMillan, MacMillan Photography.

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EQUINE TIMES — NOVEMBER 2010

Photos from World Equestrian Games 2010

The Bronze medal vaulting team from Austria had a Cirque du Soleil theme for their freestyle. The U.S. took the Team Gold and Germany the Team Silver. Photo by Shannon Brearton, MacMillan Photography.

The vaulting team from France was a crowd favorite with their metallic costumes and daring routines. They finished in fifth place. Photo by Sarah Miller, MacMillan Photography.

After having a fall in their first freestyle round, the U.S. Team recovered to take the Gold medal. All vaulters on Team U.S.A. are from California and range in age from 14 to 35. Photo by Allen MacMillan, MacMillan Photography.

See more 2010 WEG photos online at equinetimes.com!

Page 38

Toll-Free: 800.222.6336

Fax: 517.368.5131

On the Web: www.equinetimes.com


EQUINE TIMES — NOVEMBER 2010

Toll-Free: 800.222.6336

Fax: 517.368.5131

On the Web: www.equinetimes.com

Page 39


EQUINE TIMES — NOVEMBER 2010

Page 40

Toll-Free: 800.222.6336

Fax: 517.368.5131

On the Web: www.equinetimes.com

Equine Times | November 2010  

The November 2010 issue of Equine Times magazine.

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