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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19, 2013

BECAUSE COMMUNITY MATTERS

Sister Helen retires from St. William School By Kurt Backscheider

kbackscheider@communitypress.com

Master gardeners and volunteers who helped plant at Floral Paradise Gardens recently are, front row, from left Diane Massa, Vicki Bricker, Beth Townsend, Betsy Betagole and Nancy McCormick; back row, Tim Daugherty, Terry Parker, Don Horak, Helen Lawson Peggy Berninger and Shelia Ritchey. MONICA BOYLSON/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Volunteers planting at Floral Paradise Gardens By Monica Boylson mboylson@communitypress.com

Delhi Twp. — Spring showers brought May flowers and master gardeners to Floral Paradise Gardens. Volunteers from the Ohio State University Hamilton County Extension Master Gardener program, which offers horticulture instruction, recently planted flowers and plants in two plots at the Delhi

park. More than 10 volunteers and park staff spent hours digging and planting marigolds, impatients and other plants to create a floral masterpiece, Delhi Parks and Recreation employee Peggy Berninger said. Volunteers at the park were either working to become a master gardener or volunteering to maintain their master gardener title. “To become a master gar-

dener you have to take classes and volunteer 50 hours at extension sites around Cincinnati and Floral Paradise Gardens is one of them,” Berninger said. “In order to maintain your master gardener status you have to volunteer 20 hours a year and take six hours of classes.” She said in 2007 Floral Paradise Garden became a certified extension site which means that gardeners can volunteer there for the master gardener

program. Each spring, she coordinates a group of volunteers to plant at the site. Mack resident Diane Massa has been volunteering at the park since Floral Paradise Gardens opened and said she looks forward to it every year. “I’ve always enjoyed gardening,” she said while patting soil around a freshly planted flower. “I love getting my

Price Hill — Linda Geil said she’ll never forget the day she dropped her daughter, Liz, off at St. William School for her first day of first-grade. She said her daughter was excited for weeks leading up to her first day at the school, but when the day finally arrived, as they stood outside Sister Helen Attenweiler’s classroom, Geil’s young daughter began screaming and crying. “And then she kicked Sister,” Geil said. “I was terrified and I didn’t know what to do. All the way home I cried. “I was worried about Liz; I was more worried about Sister’s shins,” she said. When she walked nervously back into the school at the end of the day to pick up Liz, Geil said all her worries disappeared. “Liz ran up to me with a big smile on her face and she said, ‘Mom, that was the best first day of school ever,’” Geil said. “Sister put all her fears to rest.” Sister Helen had a knack for teaching and helping children grow.

See RETIRES, Page A2

See FLORAL, Page A2

MESSY MOTHER NATURE

Severe storms ripped through Sayler Park last week causing some havoc.

MERCY GRADS Photos from the ceremony See photos A9

RITA’S KITCHEN Have basil, make pinwheels. See story B3

A tree limb fell on a van parked on Elco Street in Sayler Park after morning storms swept through the village. MONICA BOYLSON/THE

Sister Helen Attenweiler, right, a Sister of Charity, walks arm in arm with Rosie Red during a ceremony celebrating her retirement from St. William School. Attenweiler, who is a devoted Cincinnati Reds fan, taught for 56 years, the last 37 years at St. William. KURT

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NEWS

A2 • DELHI PRESS • JUNE 19, 2013

Floral

Retires

Continued from Page A1

Continued from Page A1

hands dirty.” She said the most rewarding feeling is coming back in midsummer to see the progress and growth in the garden. “It’s very satisfying to know that I had a hand in this,” she said. And Berninger said that volunteers continue to help at the park throughout the growing season. “We have so many volunteers help maintain not only that garden but the park,” she said. “They garden wherever they see a weed or see something that needs to be planted. Their hands are in the dirt working.” If you’re interested in volunteering at Floral Paradise Gardens call the parks and recreation department at 451-3300.

After a 56-year teaching career, Attenweiler, a Sister of Charity who lives in Covedale, has decided to pass the torch to a new generation of teachers. She retired at the end of this school year, marking the end of a century of service by the Sisters of Charity to St. William School. Attenweiler was the last remaining Sister of Charity teaching at the school. St. William students and staff honored her during an all-school Mass and ceremony May 22. “I’ll miss the kids and the people here,” Attenweiler said. A graduate of Mother of Mercy High School, she earned her bache-

Mack resident Diane Massa plants a bed of flowers at Floral Paradise Gardens. MONICA BOYLSON/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

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lor’s degree at the College of Mount St. Joseph and later her master’s degree in education from Xavier University. She said she became a nun because she felt the call of God. “The Sisters of Charity were so hospitable and friendly, and they are God-loving people,” she said. Her teaching career began in 1957 when she served a mission at a Catholic school in Detroit, she said. “After I taught one year I fell in love with it,” she said. “It was a gift.” Upon completing her service in Detroit, she moved to a school in Springfield, Ohio, and in 1966 she came back to Cincinnati to teach at St. Lawrence School. Attenweiler taught at St. Lawrence for 10 years, and she’s spent the past 37 years at St.

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William. Linda Geil, who, besides being a school parent, is the art teacher at St. William and has taught with Sister Helen for 24 years, said Attenweiler is truly a treasure. It’s hard to describe in a few words just how much Sister Helen means to St. William and what she’s given the children of the parish, Geil said. “You are, and will continue to be, a wonderful example of God’s love for us,” she told Attenweiler during the ceremony. The eighth-grade class presented Attenweiler a plaque in appreciation of her dedication to the Catholic schools. “We will miss you, Sister Helen,” said eighth-grader Alex Witte. “You will never be replaced in our school or in our hearts.” Sister Helen said she has no big plans for her retirement. “Not for a while, I’m not going to do anything,” she said. She will move to the Sisters of Charity Motherhouse in Delhi Township in June, and said she plans to eventually get back to working with children as a literacy tutor.

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NEWS

JUNE 19, 2013 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • A3

Covedale theater making improvements to enhance patron experience ter. In total, Pille said Cincinnati Landmark Productions has invested roughly $1.5 million into the building. Perrino said the Covedale is more than just a performing arts center, it’s an icon and point of pride for the entire community. “Our patrons have sup-

By Kurt Backscheider kbackscheider@communitypress.com

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spanking new,” he said. Rodger Pille, communications and development director for the theater group, said the work was identified shortly after Cincinnati Landmark Productions bought the building in 2002. “This will mark the completion of five phases of renovation to transform this building from an old movie house into a 21st century performing arts center,” he said. The work is estimated to cost nearly $160,000, and Pille said the theater received funding from Cincinnati’s Neighborhood Business District Improvement Program, the PNC Charitable Trust, the MH Foundation, the Ohio Valley Foundation

and Fifth Third Bank, two anonymous donors and a patron donation campaign. “It was a true mix of funding methods that got us here,” he said. “We’ve received incredible support, and it’s been a great combination of raising money and people putting their blood, sweat and tears into this place.” Previous improvements the theater group has made at the Covedale have included turning a two-screen movie house into a single, 400-seat auditorium; building a stage and permanent theatrical lighting grid; adding a 1,700-square-feet rehearsal hall and backstage dressing rooms; and re-installing the light beacon on top of the thea-

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The Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, originally opened in March 1947, is undergoing its fifth and final stage of renovations this summer. The theater is getting a new lobby, improved marquee, new entry doors, a new section of roof and an expanded women’s restroom. FILE

a ball.” The lobby improvements are scheduled to be completed in time for the Cincinnati Young People’s Theatre production of “Grease” in late July, and the entire project should be finished before the Covedale’s 2013-2014 season kicks off with the Johnny Cash musical “Ring of Fire” on Sept. 5.

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West Price Hill — The Covedale Center for the Performing Arts will have a new look by the end of the summer. Renovation work is underway at the historic theater, which first opened as a movie theater in March 1947. “It’s an exciting project,” said Tim Perrino, executive artistic director for Cincinnati Landmark Productions, the theater organization that owns both the Covedale and the Showboat Majestic. “This building is a landmark in the hearts and minds of West Side residents. A lot of people have a very near and dear soft spot in their hearts for this place. “This is our home, and we want to have a strong, positive effect on the neighborhood and the business district.” The renovation work being completed this summer includes beautification of the lobby, installation of new energy efficient entry doors, expansion of the women’s restroom, the addition of a wheelchair-accessible restroom, electrical repair and new programmable LED panels on the marquee sign, resealing of the parking lot and replacement of a section of the roof. Perrino said the lobby will feature a new tile floor, a fresh paint job and new lighting in the form of 1950s-style hanging pendant lamps. “It will all look brand-

ported our efforts to produce professional theater on the West Side,” he said. “We’re very excited to in turn give our patrons a great front-of-house experience and the firstclass amenities they deserve. This really demonstrates our continued passion for this facility and the surrounding community, and we’re having

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NEWS

A4 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • JUNE 19, 2013

WestFest returns to the heart of Cheviot By Kurt Backscheider kbackscheider@communitypress.com

Cheviot — West Siders are invited to the heart of the city for the annual summer celebration of food and music. The Cheviot Westwood Community Association’s 12th annual WestFest is

set for 1 p.m. to midnight Saturday, June 22, and 110 p.m. Sunday, June 23, along Harrison and Glenmore avenues in Cheviot. “I think it’s a great highlight to the community,” said Ray Kroner, president of the community association. “I just love the idea of

shutting down the street and throwing a party.” More importantly, he said the money the association raises from the twoday festival helps fund the group’s neighborhood service projects and scholarship program. “We take the proceeds and funnel them back into

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the community in a variety of ways,” he said. This past year the organization used proceeds to purchase a bucket truck for Cheviot’s maintenance department, he said. Other community benefactors over the years have included the Cheviot Branch Library, the Cheviot Municipal Pool, renovations at the Cheviot Memorial Fieldhouse and eight elementary school libraries in the area, he said. The association’s partnership with the Thomas J. Rebold Foundation has also resulted in the donation of more than $14,000 to fine arts programs at West Side grade schools and high schools, Kroner said. Bonnie Perrino, an association member who has helped organize the festival from its very beginning, said WestFest gets bigger and better every year. A new addition to this year’s installment is the Budweiser Build-A-Bar, she said. Association member Tamara Borgmann said the Build-A-Bar is a portable bar that will be set up along Glenmore Avenue. The bar features five televisions, a sound system, fixed bar seats, bar stools, ceiling fans and a VIP area, she said. “It’s going to be an attraction,” Borgmann said. “It’s a high-end beer selling station.” She said the Build-ABar is where festival attendees will be able to buy

Bridgetown resident Mike Redrow added cheese and onions to some burgers while working the grill at the Sandy’s Hi-Lo booth at last year’s WestFest. The street festival returns to the heart of Cheviot this year on Saturday, June 22, and Sunday, June 23. KURT BACKSCHEIDER/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Budweiser’s Stars and Stripes beer, which supports scholarships for families of fallen servicemen and women. As in years past, Perrino said booths will line both sides of Harrison Avenue, offering guests a variety of food, drinks, games and merchandise from dozens of vendors. Popular food vendors like Sandy’s Hi-Lo, NYPD Pizza, Gary’s Cheesecakes, Maury’s Tiny Cove and Humbert’s Meats will once again set up shop. Two entertainment stages will feature music and performances from more than 20 acts, Perrino said. “The bands this year, with the exception of three, are all new to WestFest,” she said. “We have a lot of talent here on the West Side.”

Other attractions include a craft tent in front of City Hall, a beer garden on Glenmore Avenue, the classic car show will take place Saturday and the children’s area will once again have rides from Kissel Brothers. “It’s always a neat event,” Perrino said. “We all come together, you see people you haven’t seen in a while and everyone is working for the same goal.” Kroner added, “It’s a great way to celebrate life and highlight all the good things going on around the area.” For more information about the 2013 WestFest, visit www.westfest.info or call 389-9378. “Come out and see us,” Perrino said. “We’ve been assured it’s going to be a beautiful weekend.”

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NEWS

JUNE 19, 2013 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • A5

Bayley host artists, writers in LeadingAge exhibit By Monica Boylson mboylson@communitypress.com

Alice Allison shows some of her paintings of city scenes and landscapes. MONICA BOYLSON/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Delhi Twp. — Alice Allison said she submitted her first art work, sketches of the Little Old Lady Who Lived in a Shoe and Cinderella, to the Cincinnati Times-Star when she was 8 years old. “It was a pen drawing,” she said. “After I finished Cinderella, I realized she was too short so I put another tier on her skirt and put two little dabs down at the bottom indicating feet. It added another five or six inches to her height.” Now 84 years old, Allison said her paintings are a little more refined. “The style I do is all traditional,” she said. “You can recognize what the subject is.” Pointing to paintings hanging in her living room, she briefly described the process of creating the art. “The painting there of the musicians,” she said pointing to an oil painting of violinists. “I took this photograph of young children getting ready for a recital in the main hallway of the art museum. I got up on the balcony, looked down and took a photograph of them. When I did, I thought, not only do I love the perspective of the children giving a recital but I liked the pattern of the floor.” Allison said she can see art in every day things. “I just feel so very fortunate to be an artist,” she said. “It just has so much wealth to it. There are so

many tangents of art.” While she said she likes to paint things from photos and even things she finds online, Allison said there’s nothing better than painting the subjects or objects in person. Allison walked to her studio/office, as she called it, and pointed out a small painting of a scene in Mount Adams. “I call it ‘Mount Adams 7 p.m.,’” she said. “You can see how the light hits the buildings. Around the corner is the Immaculata and up the hill is the monastery.” She joked that there was nothing like painting outside and having her view blocked by several beer trucks making deliveries on the street. A painting she holds dear, Allison decided to submit “Mount Adams 7 p.m.” to the LeadingAge Ohio Southwestern Forum Art and Writing Show at Bayley, a continuing care retirement community, on June 27. She joins more than 200 senior artists from nursing homes, assisted living and retirement communities in Southwest Ohio who are members of LeadingAge – an association of 6,000 nonprofit organizations dedicated to making America a better place to grow old. There are 19 different categories including fine arts, needle arts, photography and writing. Winners will be awarded in each of the categories. Allison said staff at Bayley encouraged her to participate and she looks

forward to the competition and seeing other artists’ work. “I love the people who are involved in art,” she said. “Artists are such wonderful people.” The art show is open to public from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday, June 27, at the Bayley Wellness Center, 401 Farrell Drive.

For more information about the art show, call Debbie Kremer at 3475540. “Bayley likes to host events like this because it invites the public into our facility,” Kremer said. “At the same time, it lets senior citizens have an audience for their art work.”

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NEWS

A6 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • JUNE 19, 2013

BRIEFLY Zoning commission meets in Delhi

The Delhi Township Zoning Commission will meet at 7 p.m. Wednesday, June 19, at the administration building, 934 Neeb Road. For more information about the meeting call 922-2705.

Chabot speaks at St. Antoninus

U. S. Rep. Steve Chabot (R–1st District) will speak at St. Antoninus Church undercroft at 7 p.m. Monday, June 24. He will address prolife and pro-family issues, including the status of the Health and Human Services mandates and the attacks on religious freedom, the impact of Obamacare on the life issues, and any new efforts to defend the sanctity of marriage. There will be time for questions and answers. For more information, contact Joan Loebker at 922-0348 or Loebker@yahoo.com.

Land conservancy meets June 21

The Land Conservancy of Hamilton County’s summer program at 7 p.m. Friday, June 21, at the 1827 Shaker Meeting House at 11813 Oxford Road in Crosby Township. The meeting features a review of the Land Conservancy’s land preservation activities. This includes the announcement of a conservation easement that protects 50acre Chanyata Farm in rural north Colerain Township, assuring that this

family land will always be used for farming, forestry and preservation of wildlife habitats. The meeting, hosted by Friends of White Water Shaker Village, is open to the public. For more information, visit www.land conservancyhc.org or call 513-574-1849. The Land Conservancy of Hamilton County, a nonprofit organization with membership open to all, helps families preserve their lands, and works to protect the county’s land and water resources to benefit the quality of life.

Delhi Veterans to meet at St. Dominic

The Delhi Township Veterans Association will now host its meetings at St. Dominic Church, 4551 Delhi Ave. The veterans association meets at 6:30 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month for a board meeting followed by a 7:30 p.m. general membership meeting. For more information about the veterans association visit www.delhiveterans.com.

Vacation Bible School at St. William

St. William Church offers its annual Vacation Bible School from Monday, July 8, through Thursday, July 11, at the church, 4108 W. Eighth St. Children ages kindergarten through fifthgrade are invited to learn about St. Peter and the special relationship he had with Jesus and the church.

Seton High School sophomore Sarah Rolfes holds up her award and the book her winning photograph was published in, “Words 2013.” THANKS TO CHRISTY SCHUTTE

Children will hear how Peter was called by Christ to be a “fisher of men” and will see him walk on water during a puppet show. Participants will make chairs, boats, nets and sheep to help them understand the Gospel stories. There will be songs, stories, crafts and snacks. Activities will take place each night in Father Reardon Hall from 6:30-9 p.m. The cost is $10 per child or $25 per family (three or more from the same family). For more information, contact Deacon George Bruce at 921-0247 or visit www.saintwilliam.com to download and print a registration form.

Orchestra playing summer concerts

The Cincinnati Metropolitan Orchestra announced its 2013 Summer Concert Series. Titled “Fascinating Rhythms,” the series will include performances in Ohio, Kentucky and Indi-

ana. There’s something for everyone in this concert – selections from Broadway, big band sounds, blues and a patriotic finale. Attendees will hear music from “Wicked” and “Fiddler on the Roof,” classics by Irving Berlin, a tribute to Louis Armstrong and a rocking medley from “Mamma Mia.” The season begins with a concert at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, July 30, in the Seton Performance Hall, 3901 Glenway Ave. The series continues with a performance at 7 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 29, as part of the “Music on the River” show in Lawrenceburg, Ind. The final summer performance is at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 10, at Tower Park in Fort Thomas, Ky. Performances are free and open to the public. Donations are welcome. Visit www.gocmo.org or call 941-8956 for more information.

Soph’s winning photo published

Sarah Rolfes, an incoming sophomore at Seton High School, had a winning photograph of hers included in the recently published book, “Words 2013.” Her photograph, “Barge on the Ohio,” won the second place photography award in the 2012 Good River Celebration Contest sponsored by Thomas More College. The book of arts and literature is a compilation of all of the winning entries. In addition to having

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Beginning July 1, all Oak Hills Local School District Board of Education meetings will start at 6:30 p.m. Meeting times were originally scheduled at 7 p.m. To view all upcoming meetings as well as agendas and minutes from previous school board meetings, visit http://ohlsd.us/members/. Board development sessions start times will remain at 4:30 p.m. unless otherwise noted. All meetings are open to the public. The next school board meeting is at 6:30 p.m. Monday, July 1, at the district office, 6325 Rapid Run Road. For more information, call 574-3200.

Cincinnati Public Schools is offering free meals to children 18 and under at area schools, civic organizations and recreational centers this summer. No registration is required, but students should arrive 15 minutes

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Price Hill Will is accepting applications for its annual summer youth photography program. This year’s program runs Monday, July 15, through Friday, July 19. The program is open to sixth-, seventhand eighth-grade students. Participants will spend time exploring the streets of the neighborhood, while learning about the buildings and traditions of Price Hill. The week will include the capturing of images through the lens of a camera and creating pieces of artwork using graphic design software. This year’s theme revolves around the history and architecture of the community. Photographs produced by participants will be displayed at the Flats Gallery during the Illuminating the Arts event Friday, Aug. 23. For more information, contact Pamela Taylor at 251-3800, extension,105 or pamela@pricehillwill.org.

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NEWS

JUNE 19, 2013 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • A7

Baseball tournament raises $1,800 for cancer research By Monica Boylson mboylson@communitypress.com

Delhi Twp. — C.J. Martini said his mom Karen Taylor would always drive him to his Delhi Eagles baseball games. “She was nice. She did a lot of stuff for Delhi,” Martini, 13, said. “She was right there if I needed help.” On Jan. 9, Taylor died of small cell carcinoma lung cancer. A decade earlier, she suffered from lymphoma, a cancer that affects the immune system, but the cancer was considered in remission a few years later, her friend Amy Angelo said. After learning of Taylor’s death, Eagles head coach Andrew Angelo said he wanted to find a way to give back and fund cancer research. He developed a Strikeout Cancer competition during a May Madness tournament the team hosted at Delhi Park on May 8 and 9. He said the 27 teams that participated in the tournament paid to

Danielle Martini, 14, throws out the first pitch at a Delhi Eagles baseball game in honor of her late mother Karen Taylor. PROVIDED.

The Delhi Eagles team and coaches are; front row, from left, Jadon Burch, Devin Angelo, Isaiah Klein, Nick Bartholomew, Tyler Backscheider and Ty Wetterich; middle row, Alex Richardson, Jared Viel, Tyler Favia, C.J. Martini, Jordan Perry and Jeff Favia; back row, Mark Spurlock, Andy Angelo, Steve Bartholomew and Steve Burch. PROVIDED.

sponsor their players to compete in a strike-out competition pitched by Martini. The goal was to raise money while the batters tried not to strike out. The Delhi Eagles baseball team raised more

than $1,800 for the American Cancer Society as a way to honor the memory of their teammate’s mother. In addition to the competition, players walked through the crowds ask-

ing for donations and sold cancer awareness bracelets and balloons that people could write a loved one’s name on to be released at the end of the tournament. “We thought it would

be good for the boys to support their teammate and for them to be conscious and aware of issues like cancer,” Angelo said. Martini said he was happy his teammates were so supportive. “It was a great thing. They were right there by my side to help if I needed anything,” he said. Teammate Devin Angelo helped organize the event with his Dad and

said that the players couldn’t imagine losing a parent. “We all agreed that it would be sad if we lost our parents so we were trying to be nice to him,” the 12year-old said. “It probably made him feel good that we cared about that. I think we could definitely do it again next year.” Andrew Angelo said he was pleased with the amount of money they raised. “I told the woman at the American Cancer Society that we might be able to raise $500 to $1,000,” he said. “I never imagined we would raise $1,800.” On Saturday, June 1, Martini’s sister Danielle, 14, threw out the first pitch in an Eagles game against the West Side Sluggers and the team gave the donations to the American Cancer Society. “It felt good knowing that we raised the money,” C.J. Martini said. “There are a lot of people that need help with cancer.” Our Lady of Lourdes parent volunteer Melissa Comarata, left, adheres a temporary tattoo to the arm of second-grader Dominic Frondorf during the school’s Trek for Tech fundraiser. This year’s walk had a western theme. KURT

Lourdes students trek for technology By Kurt Backscheider

kbackscheider@communitypress.com

Westwood — Adorning cowboy hats and bandannas, students at Our Lady of Lourdes enjoyed perfect weather as they walked around raising money for their school. Lourdes hosted its annual Trek for Tech fundraiser May 24. Students spent two hours in the afternoon traversing the campus during a walk-a-thon benefiting the technology program. “This is our 12th annual Trek for Tech,” said Heather Leesman, a Lourdes parent who serves as secretary of the PTO. “It’s great to see everyone out supporting our school and all the parent volunteers. It’s wonderful.”

Lourdes Principal Aimee Ellmaker said all the money raised during the walk goes toward maintaining and upgrading the school’s computer systems and SMART boards. “The sole purpose is to raise money for our technology program,” she said. “It helps offset what we’re able to provide the students.” Because of the success of the annual trek, Ellmaker said Lourdes has been able to keep its tuition the same for the past four years, and the school doesn’t charge a hidden technology fee. “This really means so much to the school because without it we wouldn’t be able to do what we do,” she said. Leesman said the PTO organizes the walk each year, and dozens of parents are always will-

ing to volunteer to help make sure it runs smoothly. This year’s walk, which had a western theme, featured several stops along the route where students could play games, grab a snack and dance, she said. Prizes were awarded throughout the day. “It’s the end of the year and everyone is so excited,” Leesman said. “I know the kids have a great time and they look forward to it. It’s a great event.” She said this year’s walk raised just shy of $9,400 for the school. Ellmaker said she loves seeing the students enjoy themselves as they get a couple of hours outside the classroom. “It’s a great way have fun and get some exercise,” she said.

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NEWS

A8 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • JUNE 19, 2013

Incoming freshmen inducted into Elder Honors Program

STUDENT OF THE YEAR

Twenty-two eighthgrade boys were honored at the annual Elder High School Honors Program induction ceremony. The students were celebrated for their outstanding achievement on the high school placement test and academic success in grade school. Each student will receive the highest academic scholarship from Elder High School. The young men and the schools they currently attend are: Jacob Adams, Our Lady of Lourdes; Kelton Ashe, St. Antoninus; William Conway, St. William; Connor Davis, Our Lady of the Visitation; Mike Dirksing, Our Lady of the Visitation; Timothy Doren, Our Lady of Lourdes; Adam Gerhardt, Our Lady of the Visitation; Dakota Handorf, All Saints; Jonathan Huschart,

Elder High School senior Jacob Lindle was honored as the Western Hills Community Service Club Student of the Year with a plaque and check for $1,000. Pictured from left are Tom Otten, Elder High School principal; Bill Robbe, club member; Lindle; and Joe Driehaus, Elder director of guidance. PROVIED

St. Ursula Academy sophomores Sarah Crowley of Anderson Township, Grace Kelly of Lakeside Park, Sophia Settle of Hyde Park, Lydia Breitenstein of Green Township, Claudia Vollman of Western Hills, Erin Donovan of Westwood, Anna Sittason-Wilson of Fort Thomas, McKenzie Warman of Bridgetown, and Natalie Danenhauer of Green Township present a check to Max Raphael and Josh Elstro from the Music Resource Center in Walnut Hills. PROVIDED

St. Ursula talent show supports Music Resource Center The sophomore class at St. Ursula Academy presented a check April 24 in the amount of $556 to the Music Resource Center in Walnut Hills. The money was the result of a talent show and bake sale held by the sophomore class. This was the second talent show held to raise money for a local nonprofit organization. The show was held earlier in April and for a small ad-

mission, the audience was treated to a night filled with Irish Dancing, a dramatic monologue, vocal selections, and guitar and piano performances. The students chose the Music Resource Center as the benefactor this year because they were impressed with the Center’s commitment to providing a facility that students may use for a very small fee each year.

At the state high school dance competition, the St. Ursula dance team brought home nine awards including four first-place trophies. After practicing for several months, the team was prepared to face tough competition at the state contest, held at Oak Hills High School.

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of Victory; Collier Smith, St. Antoninus; Jacob Smith, St. Ignatius; Jack Streicher, Our Lady of the Visitation; Connor Sullivan, St. Jude; Matthew Trotta, Our Lady of Victory; Andrew White, St. Do-

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Awards earned at state from students from the West Side were: » Natalie Shoemaker of White Oak and Olivia Witte of Hyde Park, duet, Ultimate Star; first-place senior duet; • Junior varsity team, “Back in Black,” superior rating; • Varsity team, “Strongest Suit,” high superior rating; • Combined team, “Vogue,” high superior rating; • Hip hop team, “Run the Night,” high superior rating; • Senior team, “Lovely,” high superior rating; first place A open routine; and • Varsity team, “Eet,” high superior rating; first place AA open routine. Team members from the West Side are Imani Crosby of Finneytown,

The St. Ursula Academy dance team celebrates a strong showing at the Ohio state competition. Pictured from front left are Maureen Reilly, Emma Krug, Georgia Bridgers, Kate Doherty, Jessica Zalewski, Imani Crosby and Grace Kelly; second row, Elyse Karsten, Molly Lankisch, Anna Hopkins, Charlie Wilcox; third row, coach Molly Bruns, Ellen Upham, Meaghan Flesner, Camilla Voltolini, Nora Hemmer, Nia Crosby, Olivia Stanforth, Olivia Witte, Natalie Shoemaker, Anna Kelley and coach Jenny Bruns. PROVIDED.

Nia Crosby of Finneytown, Kate Doherty of Delhi Township, Meaghan Flesner of Miami Heights,

Anna Kelley of Delhi Township, Maureen Reilly of Mack, and Natalie Shoemaker of White Oak.

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St. Ursula wins big at state dance contest

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Pictured from front left are Elder High School Honors Program inductees, Paxton Kelley, Jonathan Huschart, Michael Dirksing, Adam Gerhardt, Matthew Peterson, Connor Sullivan and Michael Rosen; second row, William Conway, Duncan Rackers, Alex Witte, Collier Smith, Jack Streicher, Dakota Handorf, Matthew Trotta, Kelton Ashe and Collin Scheiner. PROVIDED.

minic; and Alex Witte, St. William. The Honors Program was designed to provide unique opportunities and challenges to select students. These are students who have proven to excel as leaders in academics and other areas of the school community. The program began with 22 students in 2007 and now includes over 100 students. Students invited to the program have the opportunity to attend four evening speaker events, enroll in all honors level classes, take part in leadership seminars, enroll in PSAT and ACT prep courses at no cost, take part in college visits organized by the program and shadow a local business leader. Honors program students are highly involved in the school, participating in more than 70 clubs and sports and log over 60 service hours a year.

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Thanks to the following businesses, community supporters, volunteers and families, etc. for their support this year! This event is not possible without you! A Total Tan Acme Tree and Landscape Service AE Outfitters Foundation Anderson Ferry Dental Center Andrew J. Bucher and Co. Animal Hospital of Delhi Hills Arby's Roast Beef Artisan Restoration, LLC Beach Water Park Best Buy Western Hills Betsey Struckman Bick’s Driving School of Western Hills BJ Meyer Funeral Home Brent Daniels / James M. Bagot Brian Lillis of Ameriprise Financial Bridgetown Finer Meats Bruce and Rhonda Cortright Bucket Head's Grill Buffalo Wild Wings Build-A-Bear Workshop BW3's Cake Creations Champions Grill Cheesecake Factory Chick Fil-A Chipotle Restaurant Cincinnati Dive Shop Chubby's Drive Thru Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park Cincinnati Reds Cincinnati Zoo City Barbeque Coldwell Banker West Shell / Rick & Holly Finn Coney Island Cookies by Amy Danbarry Cinemas Management Dave Backer Auto Body Diamond Oaks School Dick's Sporting Goods

Dillon Rhodenbaugh, DDS Don Bacon Appliance Service Dr. Fernando Martinez Dr. Scott Hunter Family Duebbers Automobile Service Dunkin Donuts Edible Arrangements Elite Photo Faigle Jewelers Family Video Fawn Candy Five Guys Burgers and Fries Frisch's Restaurant Gamble Nippert YMCA Game On Bar & Grill GameWorks Gary's Cheesecakes Glenway Animal Hospital Gordon Food Service, Inc. Graeter's Great Clips Green Township Fire Department Green Township Parks & Services Hart Pharmacy Hatting's Hoeting Realtors / Jeanne Reider Humberts Meats J McQueen's Salon J Michael Salon J T M Provisions Co Jenny's Homemade Cookies Jerry & Nancy Kuley Jersey Mikes Subs Jiffy Lube Jim & Joyce Williamson Jimmy Johns Restaurant John Bennet, DDS John Lambrinides Family Ken & Stephanie Schmaltz Kim & Mike Kehling

Kiwanis Club of Riverview-Delhi Hills Klug Bus Service/Charter Bus Service Kroger La Rosa's Lawrence and Jan Tepe, DDS Long Schaefer & Company CPA Lorie Schaefer Lutz Florist M. A. Faris, DDS Mary Rose Lierman Makris Financial Group Marco’s Pizza Margaret B. Rost School Marybeth & Gregory Keyes Meijer Harrison Avenue Meiners Meats Miami Corporation Moments by Monica Mr. Bob Welsh Nancy & Dave Thomas Nancy Hellman Nick & Tom's Restaurant Oak Hills Board of Education Oak Hills Alumni & Educational Foundation Oak Hills Athletic Boosters Oak Hills Athletics Oak Hills H.S. Principal/Jeff Brandt Oak Hills Kiwanis Club Oak Hills Staff O'Charleys Restaurant Orange Leaf Outback Steakhouse Papin Appraisal Penn Station Peppe Ramundo & Son Perfect North Slopes Price Hill Chili Restaurant PTA Bridgetown Middle School PTA C.O. Harrison Elementary

PTA Delhi Middle School PTA Delshire Elementary PTA J.F. Dulles Elementary PTA Oak Hills High School PTA Oakdale Elementary PTA Springmyer Elementary Qdoba Western Hills R&R Meats Richard Curry of State Farm Insurance Robert E. Hamilton D.D.S. Robin James Jewelers Roger Grant Agency Roger Lindle Marysue Braun Ross Bakery, Joyce Harville Sams Club Sandra Hickey Schmoes Auto Body Servatii's Bakery Skyline Delhi Soccer City Supreme Nut & Candy Glenway Tangles Hair Designers TAN-U Tanning Systems Thirty-one Jeanna Linenkugel Timothy & Margie Ehrman Family Tom Sexton Furniture & Equipment Associates Trotta's Pizza United Dairy Farmers Village Pantry Catering Wassler Meats Western Tennis & Fitness Club White Castle Wild Mike's An American Eatery Willie's Sports Café Wirfel Family Wishbone Restaurant Wok of China Zip Dip CE-0000560094


SCHOOLS

JUNE 19, 2013 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • A9

COMMUNITY

PRESS

Editor: Marc Emral, memral@communitypress.com, 853-6264

ACHIEVEMENTS | NEWS | ACTIVITIES | HONORS

CommunityPress.com

Mother of Mercy’s Class of 2013 toss their caps in celebration after their commencement ceremony June 3 at the high school on Werk Road.. PROVIDED

Mother of Mercy High School valedictorian Katherine Ruwe and salutatorian Erin Glankler. PROVIDED

NEW MERCY GRADUATES Mother of Mercy High School graduated 117 students at ceremonies June 3 at the high school on Werk Road. Katherine Ruwe was this year’s valedictorian and Erin Glankler was the salutatorian. Seventy-three percent of this year’s graduates were awarded a total of $10.9 million in scholarships.

Mother of Mercy President Kirsten MacDougal addresses the graduates. PROVIDED

Mercy grads overlooking the front circle are, from left, Megan Mitchell, Ashley Humphrey, Haley Baker, Katherine Ruse, Kelsey Watts, Laura Burkhart, Erin Glankler, Becca Kaiser, Kristen Bauer and Emily Wernke. PROVIDED

Mother of Mercy seniors receive their diplomas from Principal Dave Mueller. PROVIDED

New Mercy High School graduates, from left in front, Mykayla Cassidy, Kristen Brauaer and Bree Smith; back from left, Grace Simpson, Giorgia Arfelli, Hannah Smith, Katelyn Stapleton, Marissa Schwartz and Maria Finnell. PROVIDED

Mother of Mercy Valedictorian Katherine Ruwe speaks to her classmates. PROVIDED

Mother of Mercy’s Principal Dave Mueller welcomes the crowd to the commencement ceremony at the high school June 3 for the Class of 2013 . PROVIDED

Bishop Joseph Binzer delivers the commencement speech to Mother of Mercy’s Class of 2013. PROVIDED


SPORTS

A10 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • JUNE 19, 2013

Editor: Melanie Laughman, mlaughman@communitypress.com, 513-248-7573

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | RECREATIONAL

COMMUNITY

PRESS

CommunityPress.com

The Seton lacrosse teams gets fired up before their match with Mercy April 16. The Saints finished the season 11-7 and in second place in the GGCL, while making a run to the Division II regional semifinals. TOM SKEEN/COMMUNITY PRESS

Elder sophomore Anthony Stacklin serves for the Panthers during their Division I state title match against Hillard Darby May 26. The Panthers lost in four sets after reaching the title game for the first time since 2010. THANKS TO ELDER HIGH SCHOOL

SPRING SPORTS IN REVIEW

The high school season for spring sports recently ended for schools in The Western Hills Press coverage area. These photos represent some highlights of the past few months. 6-foot-8 Andrew Chisholm of Oak Hills goes up for a spike over Lakota West defenders during the Highlanders’ four-set victory April 16 at Oak Hills High School. Chisholm helped lead Oak Hills to an 18-4 record and their first GMC title since 2011. TOM SKEEN/COMMUNITY PRESS

Oak Hills senior pitcher Lauren Slatten tosses a strike to a Fairfield batter during their 2-1 Division I sectional final loss May 20 at Harrison High School. Slatten helped the Lady Highlanders to the first GMC softball title and 20-win season in school history. TOM SKEEN/COMMUNITY

Loretta Blaut of Seton High School won the state high jump title by clearing 5-feet-7, June 8. The junior won both the regional and state title in her first year competing in the high jump. MIKE

PRESS

DYER/COMMUNITY PRESS

Western Hills High School senior catcher Jordan Saunders attempts to pick off an Anderson High School runner during the Division I sectional baseball tournament May 14. Saunders help lead the Mustangs to their 40th Cincinnati Metro Athletic Conference title in school history. MARK D. MOTZ/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Haley Baker of Mother of Mercy High School took first place in the pole vault with a jump of 8-feet, 6-inches at the Fairfield Invitational April 4 at Hamilton High School. MELANIE LAUGHMAN/COMMUNITY PRESS

La Salle High School senior Alex Murray takes off in the Division I state pole vault competition June 8. Murray cleared 13-feet-6 to take 13th place. MARK D. MOTZ/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Elder High School sophomore Joe Ratterman clears the bar at 13-feet-6 June 8 in the Division I state pole vault competition. He eventually cleared 14 feet to take 11th in the state. MARK D. MOTZ/THE COMMUNITY PRESS Elder’s Luke Groene slaps a return over the net during during his match at the GCTCA Coaches Classic at Fairfield High School April 25. Groene helped lead the Panthers to the Flight D title, while earning a third-place finish for himself. TOM SKEEN/COMMUNITY PRESS


SPORTS & RECREATION

JUNE 19, 2013 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • A11

A FIRST FOR GAMBLE

GREEN MACHINE

The seventh-grade St. Teresa basketball team caps off a great season, winning the City Championship by beating Holy Family at Elder High School. It was the 38th victory of the year for this "Little Green Machine," including eight tournament wins, the Elder Invitational Tourney Championship and an undefeated season of league play. In front are Mitch Barnett, Steve Nickels, Morgan Weast and Nate Johnson. In back are Bob Morgan, head coach Dan Federmann, Michael McGregor, Nate Schatzman, Ben Collett, Evan Bold, Nate Wright, Kaleb Cox, and assistant coaches Jeff Barnett and Brian Ober. THANKS TO ROBERT MORGAN

Gamble Montessori’s Chris Martin, center, sits with Gator coach Brad Wolfzorn, left, and Miami University-Middletown basketball coach Bob Nocton as Martin signed his National Letter of Intent, May 22, to play for the Thunderhawks next season. Martin is the first member of the school to sign to play collegiate athletics. TOM SKEEN/COMMUNITY PRESS

Elder’s six baseball seniors to play in college All six seniors on the Elder High School baseball team recently signed letters of intent to participate in collegiate athletics. Nick Beard will play baseball for Northern Kentucky University. He is the son of Michelle and Matt Beard. They reside in Delhi Township and are members of St. Dominic Parish. Alex Lind will play baseball for Lake Erie College. He is the son of

Lora and Chris Lind, and live in Harrison. Michael Luebbe will play baseball for Thomas More College. He is the son of Lisa and James Luebbe, and live in Delhi Township and are members of Our Lady of Victory Parish. Tyler Nieberding will play baseball for Marietta College. He is the son of Julie and Jay Nieberding. They reside in Delhi Township and are members of St. Teresa of Avila

Parish. Joe Ramstetter will play baseball for the University of Dayton. He is the son of Maria and Mark Ramstetter, and live in Delhi Township and are members of Our Lady of Victory Parish. Jimmy White will play baseball for Sinclair Community College. He is the son of Chrissie and James White and live in Delhi Township and are members of St. Simon Parish.

Elder’s six seniors on the baseball team, Nick Beard, Alex Lind, Michael Luebbe, Tyler Nieberding, Joe Ramstetter and Jimmy White, will play the sport in college. THANKS TO J.P. OWENS

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VIEWPOINTS A12 • DELHI PRESS • JUNE 19, 2013

CommunityPress.com

Park levy not enough to cover park expenses it and never questioned it. There was no need to go to the taxpayer as long as the general fund was able to subsidize the parks. But first the Legislature eliminated the estate tax and them severely cut the local government fund. So the additional funds are no longer available to support the parks. The annual operation of the Park Lodge and the Senior Center combined run $40,000 in the red. We have to close that gap. Without the former general fund revenue those funds have to come from fees. There can be many interpretations of why voters turned down the levy but

suggesting well informed voters had reason to believe the existing park levy was sufficient to maintain existing services doesn’t pass the smell test. It’s strange that former Trustee Duebber says residents “shouldn’t have to pay twice” for parks and recreation. That didn’t seem to bother him when he lead the charge to pay close to $250,000 of township funds to rebuild Delhi Pike, a county road for which residents had already paid through their county taxes. Jerry Luebbers is a Delhi Township trustee.

Civic leaders sought to change the name of Price Hill In the mid 19th century affluent, healthful living defined the West Side. In 1894 the area was promoted as a “perpetual health resort,” saying, “The prevailing west winds waft the smoke, gases and impurities which arise from the city proper to the eastern hills.” “Successful business men” who lived in “pretentious residents” belonged to the Elberon Country Club, where Overlook Avenue is today. The name Elberon was taken from Elberon, N.J., Jim Grawe COMMUNITY PRESS an exclusive beach commuGUEST COLUMNIST nity known for its fresh air. Elberon’s affluent and healthful image was highly publicized when President Garfield went there to recover after being shot in 1881. Other West Side Elberon references are Elberon Avenue, formally Park Avenue, and the Elberon Land Co., which built the magnificent homes on Purcell Avenue. In 1892 the neighborhood of Mornington changed its name to Hyde Park, after a fashionable New York community, “to appeal to persons of a high class of citizenship.” At the same time prominent Price Hill residents were moving to the eastern suburbs. On Aug. 23, 1900, the Cincinnati Enquirer announced in bold headlines: Elberon Heights Suggested as New and Attractive Name for Price Hill. The story line read, “The Price Hill Improvement Association will take steps to change the name of Price Hill to Elberon Heights. It is stated that the present name is not a pretty one, and that it keeps many people from locating there.” Obviously, Price Hill civic

From the Cincinnati Enquirer, Aug. 23,1900. PROVIDED BY PRICE HILL HISTORICAL SOCIETY

leaders embraced the proven Hyde Park business model and considered the Elberon Heights identity to be the west side’s trump card in the game of one-upmanship. So, why wasn’t their request granted? Did the anti-West Side-city establishment prevent it? We can only speculate. In 1902 the villages of Cedar Grove and Warsaw, located within the northeast section of Deli Township, were annexed to the city. But the city “officially” called the area Price Hill. In 1913 the Elberon Heights Improvement Association formed. The Elberon Country Club was purchased and the area west of Rapid Run Road extending to the Green Township line was developed and marketed as Overlook, the Miracle Suburb on the Western Hills Beautiful. The name attracted attention, and respect. There was an Overlook Theater, and Library. However, the Overlook neighborhood was not recognized by the

DELHI

PRESS

A publication of

PRESS

Editor: Marc Emral, memral@communitypress.com, 853-6264

EDITORIALS | LETTERS | COLUMNS | CH@TROOM

Former Trustee Al Duebber has suggested the $473,000 annual proceeds from the park levy should be enough to maintain current park operations. We haven’t been able to operate the parks solely out of the levy Jerry Luebbers for years and COMMUNITY PRESS former Trustee Duebber GUEST COLUMNIST well knows it. During his eight years as a trustee we subsidized the parks from the general fund every year and he supported

COMMUNITY

city, and it subsequently faded from our collective memory – another victim of the city’s “You live in Price Hill!” drumbeat. Now, without explanation, Covedale is no longer on the city map. However, Covedale residents see the past with an eye toward the future, and are outspoken about wanting to retain their neighborhood’s proper and attractive name. In an act of civil disobedience, they defiantly say, “We live in Covedale damn it!” Now, West Side well-wishers are cheering them on; hoping that the energy, the faith, and the devotion they bring to the endeavor will light the entire west side. And they wonder, “Will this generation of Price Hill civic leaders join the crusade, or will they dutifully accept the city’s marching orders?” Jim Grawe is the co-founder of the Covedale Neighborhood Association. He can be reached at covedaleneighborhoodassoc@gmail.com.

Summer in Price Hill brings river memories

With the coming of the summer I feel sorry for the youth of today, with rockets to the moon, space ships and the like they will never experience the joy we once had of a ride to Coney Island on the Island Queen. The real season started sometime Larry Schmolt in the middle COMMUNITY PRESS of April when the Queen GUEST COLUMNIST returned from its winter home in Pittsburgh. The Moonlight cruises began, high school fraternities and sororities would sell tickets to these cruises for 60 cents keeping half the money to build up their treasury. The boat would begin loading about 8 p.m. and at 9 p.m. take off for the cruise up the river. The dance floor would be filled with teens dancing to the music of Clyde Trask. When it reached the water tower on the shores of Fort Thomas it was time to make way back to the Cincinnati port – also maybe time for some of the dancers to slip up to the top deck with their favorite sweetie and maybe under the stars steal a few kisses. By 11 p.m.. you were ready to make your way up Broadway and catch your favorite mode of transportation of the day the streetcar. Home by midnight and ready for school the next day. The real summer started when the Island Queen made its way to Ludlow, Ky., for its annual picnic. It loaded right across from Mount Echo Park so all the kids from this side of the river would be waiting at 11 p.m. to give it a big send off as the calliope played. The next Wednesday it would make its way to Lawrencburg to transport the picnickers to their favorite amusement park. Then the third Wednesday of June was reserved for

those at Sedamsville. The Queen would make her way way down the river to Acei’s Harbor which was along Southside Avenue and the boat would be loaded with those from Sedamsville, Riverside, Delhi, and maybe even a few from Price Hill. Oh what a joyous trip as you made your way up the river to Coney, for sure the boys from the East End would be paddeling their canoes along side of the Queen. One wonders how they did not get sucked under the giant paddlewheels. Inside the boat it was fun sliding on the dance floor and one thing you had to make sure you got mom was a nice rocker to enjoy the ride. All of our joy came to an end when the Queen caught fire and exploded while in port at Pittsburgh; thank the Lord their was no one on board and no one was injured Ten or so years ago we as seniors again were able to relive some of these memories, with the coming of the gambling boats to Indiana. No better way to spend an afternoon – make your way to Rising Sun, board the boat and put a few nickels in the slot as the boat made it’s way up the river, get a cold one and go to the top deck and relax and relive old memories of the past as the pilot guided the boat up past Lawrenceburg. As always seems to be the way, good things suddenly have to come to an end. The boat did not have to go out in the river anymore to take your nickels and dimes. Staring at a blank wall along the dock was no fun anymore Now our Casinos have found a new way to get your money with fancy restaurants and the like. To me I still prefer the old fashion way of a little boat ride on an afternoon. Larry Schmolt is a life-long resident of Price Hill.

MEETINGS » Cincinnati City Council meets at 2 p.m. every Wednesday in room 300 at Cincinnati City Hall, 801 Plum St. When there is a Monday holiday, all meetings including committee meetings are pushed back a day. City Manager: Milton Dohoney Jr. Mayor: Mark Mallory. » Cincinnati Public Schools Board of Education usually meets at 7 p.m. the second and fourth Mondays of the month at 2651 Burnet Ave. Board of Education phone: 475-7000. Superintendent: Mary Ronan. Board President: Eve Bolton. » East Price Hill Improvement Association meets the third Monday of each month at 7:30 p.m. at Holy Family Church, 814 Hawthorne Ave., Phone: 549-3744. Association President: Tom Gamel. » Delhi Township Trustees meet at 6 p.m. the second and last Wednesday of the month at township offices, 934 Neeb

5556 Cheviot Road Cincinnati, Ohio 45247 phone: 923-3111 fax: 853-6220 email: delhipress@communitypress.com web site: www.communitypress.com

Road. Phone: 922-3111. Administrator: Pete Landrum and President: Marijane Klug. » Oak Hills Local School District Board of Education members meet the first Monday of the month at 7 p.m. at various locations within the district. District office: 6325 Rapid Run Road. Phone: 5743200. Superintendent: Todd Yohey. Board President: Jeannie Schoonover. » Price Hill Civic Club meets the second Tuesday of each month at 7:30 p.m. at Seton K of C Hall on West Eighth St. (across from St. William Church), Phone: 251-0880. Club President: Charles Bazeley. Hamilton County » Board of County Commissioners meet at 9:30 a.m. every Wednesday in Room 603 of the County Administration Building, 138 E. Court St., downtown. Call 946-4400 for information.

Delhi Press Editor Marc Emral memral@communitypress.com, 853-6264 Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday See page A2 for additional contact information.


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19, 2013

LIFE

COMMUNITY PRESS

PEOPLE | IDEAS | RECIPES

Seton students who won the Principal’s Awards, given to 10 students who excelled exceptionally in Christian leadership, faith and service, were, in back row from left, Lindsey Mullen, Allison Walke, Laura Mersmann, Andrea Toth, Emma Hand; front from left, Emilie Mattei, Kelsey Murphy, Jenna Martini and Erika LaRosa PROVIDED

Seton High School graduates 159 students S eton High School’s 186th commencement exercises were May 30 at St. Peter in Chains Cathedral downtown. The baccalaureate Mass and graduation were both at the cathedral The class of 2013 consisted of 159 seniors, who were awarded nearly $14 million in scholarships.

Valedictorian Katarina Gay, left, and salutatorian Laura Mersmann lead the new graduates out of St. Peters in Chains Cathedral May 30. PROVIDED

Sarah Macke and Hannah Lanzillotta. Hannah was the recipient of the St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Award, one of Seton’s top awards given to a senior. Valedictorian Katarina Gay was the recipient of the Alumnae Spirit Award, Seton’s other top award. PROVIDED

The top students at Seton: salutatorian Laura Mersmann and valedictorian Katarina Gay. PROVIDED

Mckenzie Davis and Stephanie Myers at Seton’s graduation. PROVIDED

At graduation is Seton’s academic top 10 students: back row from left, Sarah Hilvert, Laura Mersmann, Kelsey Murphy, Paige Moorhead, Christina Schultz, and Morgan Doerflein; front from left, Kat Gay, Allison Walke, Emily Reiring and Lindsey Mullen. PROVIDED

Senior class president and vice president Taylor Kuhl and Emma Summers wait to lead their class into the ceremonies. PROVIDED

Seton graduates Maria Svec, Emily Hayhow and Katie McCarthy. PROVIDED

Sarah and Ashley Doyle, two new new Seton alumni. PROVIDED

Lindsey Selby, Kara Hunsche, Christa Rottenberger, Morgan Vogel and Emilie Mattei line up at Seton High School’s graduation. PROVIDED

Three Seton grads: Ashley Bretnitz, Addie Lottman, and Stefanie Schwarm. PROVIDED


B2 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • JUNE 19, 2013

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD THURSDAY, JUNE 20 Art & Craft Classes Paint Poppies, 6:30-8 p.m., Broadhope Art Collective, 3651 Harrison Ave., Artist-led beginner’s class on making mixedmedia painting of a poppy field to decorate your walls. Supplies included. For ages 12 and up. $25. 225-8441; www.broadhopeartcollective.com. Cheviot.

Auditions Delhi Rising Star Singing Competition, 6:30-9 p.m., Shiloh United Methodist Church, 5261 Foley Road, Cash prizes and mini concert at Delhi Skirt Game. Ages 16 and up. $10 registration fee. Reservations required. Presented by Delhi Township Civic Association. 451-3600; delhicivicassociation.org. Delhi Township.

FRIDAY, JUNE 21 Exercise Classes Intro to Yoga Retreat, 7-9 p.m., EarthConnection, 370 Neeb Road, Concludes June 23. Bring journal and mat. Ages 18 and up. $50. Reservations required. Presented by Yoga by Marietta. 675-2725; www.yogabymarietta.com. Delhi Township.

Farmers Market Sayler Park Farmers Market, 4-7 p.m., Nelson Sayler Memorial Park, Parkland Avenue and Monitor Street, Farmers Market with home-grown items like fruits, vegetables, desserts, salsas, relishes, jam and olive oil. Presented by Sayler Park Village Council. 675-0496. Sayler Park. Lettuce Eat Well Farmers Market, 3-7 p.m., Cheviot United Methodist Church, 3820 Westwood Northern Blvd., Locally produced food items. Free. Presented by Lettuce Eat Well. 481-1914; www.lewfm.org. Cheviot.

Music - Rock Laurie Morvan Band, 9 p.m., Legends, 3801 Harrison Ave., Doors open 6 p.m. Blues rock band fronted by female blues guitarist Laurie Morvan. Ages 18 and up. $10 advance. 662-1222; www.legendscincinnati.com. Cheviot.

SATURDAY, JUNE 22 Art & Craft Classes Sewing 101, 9-11 a.m., Broadhope Art Collective, 3651 Harrison Ave., Learn to sew on sewing machine. Leave with pillow you have sewn yourself. All materials provided. $50. Registration required. 225-8441; www.broadhopeartcollective.com. Cheviot.

Exercise Classes Spinning, 9-10 a.m., Western Sports Mall, 2323 Ferguson Road, Racquetball Center. Group cycling workout. Ages 14-99. $8-$10. Presented by SpinFit LLC. 451-4920; www.spinfitcincinnati.com. Westwood. Zumba Fitness Classes, 10:3011:30 a.m., St. John’s Westminster Union Church, 1085 Neeb Road, $25 for five classes. Presented by Zumba Fitness. 347-4613. Delhi Township.

Festivals WestFest, 1 p.m.-midnight, Downtown Cheviot, Harrison Avenue, Two stages of music, food, beer garden, craft tent and a Kidz Zone. Classic car show Saturday (rain date: Sunday). Sunday includes happy hour 1-5 p.m. Free. Presented by City of Cheviot. 389-9378; www.westsidestreetfest.com. Cheviot.

Garden Clubs Hillside Community Garden Regular Gardening Day, 9 a.m.-noon, Hillside Community Garden, 5701 Delhi Road, Garden together in unique hillside edible garden. All experience levels welcome. Dress for weather and bring water to drink. Work gloves and boots recommended. Other useful items are pruning shears and shovels. Free. Presented by Hillside Community Garden Committee. Through Nov. 2. 400-4511; hillsidegardendelhi.com. Delhi Township.

Home & Garden Hamilton County Recycling and Solid Waste District Yard Trimmings Drop-Off, 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Kuliga Park, 6717 Bridgetown Road, Hamilton County residents can drop off yard trimmings for free. Free. Presented by Hamilton County Recycling and Solid Waste Dis-

trict. 598-3089; bit.ly/11UQb9r. Green Township.

and Solid Waste District Yard Trimmings Drop-Off, 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Kuliga Park, Free. 598-3089; bit.ly/11UQb9r. Green Township.

Music - Blues Chuck Brisbin & the Tuna Project, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Poppy’s Tavern, 5510 Rybolt Road, Free. 574-6333. Green Township.

SUNDAY, JUNE 30 Art & Craft Classes

SUNDAY, JUNE 23

Stained Glass Dragonfly, Noon-2:30 p.m., Broadhope Art Collective, 3651 Harrison Ave., Learn basic stained glass-making skills like cutting glass, foil wrap and using welding iron to make dragonfly garden stake decoration for your garden. Supplies included, class limited to six participants. $25. Registration required. 225-8441; www.broadhopeartcollective.com. Cheviot.

Art & Craft Classes Cancer Awareness Washcloth Knitting Class, 11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m., Broadhope Art Collective, 3651 Harrison Ave., For those with basic understanding of knitting, add to skills and learn multiple other ways of knitting. Yarn included, call for knitting needle requirements. For ages 10 and up. $15. 225-8441; www.broadhopeartcollective.com. Cheviot.

Festivals WestFest, 1-10 p.m., Downtown Cheviot, Free. 389-9378; www.westsidestreetfest.com. Cheviot.

Home & Garden Hamilton County Recycling and Solid Waste District Yard Trimmings Drop-Off, 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Kuliga Park, Free. 598-3089; bit.ly/11UQb9r. Green Township.

The annual free Chris Macarthy Memorial Fishing Derby is 7 a.m.-2 p.m. Sunday, June 23, at the River Hill Pond at Mitchell Memorial Forest, 5401 Zion Road. The pond is stocked with 250 pounds of channel catfish. Anglers ages 12 and under who catch one of 50 tagged fish wins a trophy. Every child who catches any fish will receive a certificate. Catfish caught during event hours may be taken home. Anglers must bring their own equipment, but live bait will be available. For more information, visit www.greatparks.org. PROVIDED.

Recreation Chris Macarthy Memorial Fishing Derby, 7 a.m.-2 p.m., Mitchell Memorial Forest, 5401 Zion Road, River Hill Pond. Pond is stocked with 250 pounds of channel catfish. Anglers ages 12 and under who catch one of 50 tagged fish wins a trophy. Each child who catches any fish will receive a certificate. Catfish caught during event hours may be taken home. Bring own equipment. Live bait available. Benefits Chris Macarthy Memorial Fund. Free; vehicle permit required. Presented by Great Parks of Hamilton County. Free; www.greatparks.org. Cleves.

Summer Camps Religious/VBS Vacation Bible School, 6:30-9 p.m., First Baptist Church of Dent, 6384 Harrison Ave., Crafts, games, music, snacks, Bible stories and life lessons. Age 4 through sixth grade. Free. 5746411; www.fbcdent.org/ events.htm. Dent.

MONDAY, JUNE 24 Exercise Classes Spinning, 5:45-6:45 p.m., Western Sports Mall, $8-$10. 451-4920; www.spinfitcincinnati.com. Westwood.

Health / Wellness Mobile Heart Screenings, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Kroger Dent, 5830 Harrison Road, Several screening packages available to test risk of heart attack, stroke, aneurysm and other major diseases. Appointment required. Presented by Mercy Health Partners. 866819-0127; www.mercyhealthfair.com. Green Township.

Summer Camps - Arts Western Hills Music School of Rock, 10-11 a.m., Western Hills Music, 4310 Harrison Ave., Group classes to explore basics of drums, bass, guitar, voice and keyboards with other budding rock stars. Monday-Friday. For ages 7-12 and 12-17. $75. Registration required. 598-9000; westernhills-music.com. Western Hills. Stomp It Up, 6-8 p.m., Western Hills Music, 4310 Harrison Ave., Create musical story through rhythm and movement. Directed by Suzanne Lockwood. Ages 11-13. Monday-Friday. Performance date TBD. $125. Registration required. 289-2575; westernhills-music.com. Western Hills.

TUESDAY, JUNE 25 Art & Craft Classes Sewing 101, 11 a.m.-1 p.m., Broadhope Art Collective, $50. Registration required. 225-8441; www.broadhopeartcollective.com. Cheviot.

Farmers Market Sayler Park Farmers Market, 4-7 p.m., Nelson Sayler Memorial Park, 675-0496. Sayler Park.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26 Art & Craft Classes Sewing 101, 3:30-5:30 p.m., Broadhope Art Collective, $50. Registration required. 225-8441; www.broadhopeartcollective-

To submit calendar items, go to www.cincinnati.com and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to life@communitypress.com along with event information. Items are printed on a spaceavailable basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to www.cincinnati.com and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page. .com. Cheviot.

Exercise Classes Gentle Ashtanga Vinyasa Yoga, 7-8 p.m., EarthConnection, 370 Neeb Road, Moving meditation, increasing strength and flexibility, allowing for calming of mind and refreshing of spirit. Bring mat. $35 five-class pass; $8 drop-In. Presented by Yoga by Marietta. 675-2725; www.yogabymarietta.com. Delhi Township.

Health / Wellness Yoga Back Therapy, 6 p.m., EarthConnection, 370 Neeb Road, Gentle yoga postures to soothe the back. $30 for fiveclass pass or $7 drop-in. Presented by Yoga by Marietta. 6752725; www.yogabymarietta.com. Delhi Township.

Religious - Community Wednesday Night Solutions, 7-8:30 p.m., Vineyard Westside Church, 3420 Glenmore Ave., Weekly interactive DVD presentation hosted by Dr. Henry Cloud and Dr. John Townsend. Variety of topics addressing everyday issues such as communication, conflict and more. 922-7897; www.cloudtownsend.com/ resources/solutions. Cheviot. Free Community Meal, 5:306:30 p.m., Central Church of Christ, 3501 Cheviot Ave., Free. 481-5820; www.centralchurchofchrist1.com. Westwood.

Senior Citizens Zumba Gold, 1-2 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Modified Zumba for seniors and beginners with standing and chair participation. For seniors. $3, $25 for 10 classes. Presented by Deb’s Fitness Party. 205-5064; www.debsfitnessparty.com. Green Township.

Cheviot.

Music - Blues

MONDAY, JULY 8

The Walter Trout Band, 9 p.m., Legends, 3801 Harrison Ave., With Sonny Moorman. 662-1222; www.legendscincinnati.com. Cheviot.

MONDAY, JULY 1

Art & Craft Classes Sewing 101, 11 a.m.-1 p.m., Broadhope Art Collective, $50. Registration required. 225-8441; www.broadhopeartcollective.com. Cheviot.

SATURDAY, JUNE 29 Art & Craft Classes Sewing 101, 9-11 a.m., Broadhope Art Collective, $50. Registration required. 225-8441; www.broadhopeartcollective.com. Cheviot.

Art Openings Aquatica, 11 a.m.-6 p.m., Broadhope Art Collective, Free. 2258441; www.broadhopeartcollective.com. Cheviot.

Support Groups

Exercise Classes

Western Hills Job Search Satellite Group, 9-11 a.m., Westwood First Presbyterian Church, 3011 Harrison Ave., Community members welcome to learn from and support each other in job-seeking process. Speakers present valuable content about latest in electronic resumes, LinkedIn, effective networking, interview skills, available funding and community resources. Group members provide support and accountability to one another during this stressful time. Free. 608-9359. Westwood.

Spinning, 9-10 a.m., Western Sports Mall, $8-$10. 451-4920; www.spinfitcincinnati.com. Westwood. Zumba Fitness Classes, 10:3011:30 a.m., St. John’s Westminster Union Church, $25 for five classes. 347-4613. Delhi Township.

THURSDAY, JUNE 27 Art & Craft Classes Paint a Swallow, 6:30-8 p.m., Broadhope Art Collective, 3651 Harrison Ave., Paint metal swallow to hang at home or give as a gift. All supplies included. For ages 8 and up. $30. 225-8114; broadhopeartcollective.com.

Soccer Unlimited Camps, 6-9 p.m., Harrison Stateline Soccer Complex, 7849 Harrison Ave., Through July 5. Soccer Unlimited & Jack Hermans organize camps and clinics to improve/maintain your soccer talents by playing serious, training with intensity, and keeping the element of “FUN” involved at all times. $79. Presented by Soccer Unlimited. 232-7916. Cleves.

Aquatica, 4-8 p.m., Broadhope Art Collective, 3651 Harrison Ave., First themed art opening. Aquatic-themed crafts and special window. Free. 225-8441; www.broadhopeartcollective.com. Cheviot.

Women’s Connection Golf Outing, Noon-9 p.m., Aston Oaks Golf Club, 1 Aston Oaks Drive, Prizes awarded in men’s and women’s categories for best foursome, longest putt, longest drive and closest to pin. Entry fee includes greens fees, golf cart, lunch, dinner, beverage tickets and gift bag. Benefits The Women’s Connection. $100. Registration required. Presented by The Women’s Connection. 471-4673. North Bend.

Films In the Park After Dark, 8:30-11 p.m., Olden View Park, 800 Matson Place, Outdoor movie series. Free. Presented by Cincinnati Parks. 251-3800, ext. 103. East Price Hill.

Garden Clubs Hillside Community Garden Regular Gardening Day, 9 a.m.-noon, Hillside Community Garden, Free. 400-4511; hillsidegardendelhi.com. Delhi Township.

Home & Garden Hamilton County Recycling

SUNDAY, JULY 7 Over 55 Dance, 2-5 p.m., Delhi Senior and Community Center, 647 Neeb Road, Non-members welcome. Music by Nelson. $5. Presented by Delhi Seniors. 451-3560. Delhi Township.

TUESDAY, JULY 2

Recreation

Hamilton County Recycling and Solid Waste District Yard Trimmings Drop-Off, 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Kuliga Park, Free. 598-3089; bit.ly/11UQb9r. Green Township.

Senior Citizens

FRIDAY, JUNE 28

Sayler Park Farmers Market, 4-7 p.m., Nelson Sayler Memorial Park, 675-0496. Sayler Park. Lettuce Eat Well Farmers Market, 3-7 p.m., Cheviot United Methodist Church, Free. 481-1914; www.lewfm.org. Cheviot.

Home & Garden

Hamilton County Recycling and Solid Waste District Yard Trimmings Drop-Off, 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Kuliga Park, Free. 598-3089; bit.ly/11UQb9r. Green Township.

Art Openings

Farmers Market

Garden Clubs Hillside Community Garden Regular Gardening Day, 9 a.m.-noon, Hillside Community Garden, Free. 400-4511; hillsidegardendelhi.com. Delhi Township.

Home & Garden

Summer Camps - Sports

ABOUT CALENDAR

Bring seating. Free. Presented by Covedale Neighborhood Association. 471-1536. Covedale.

Farmers Market Sayler Park Farmers Market, 4-7 p.m., Nelson Sayler Memorial Park, 675-0496. Sayler Park.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 3 Art & Craft Classes Sewing 101, 3:30-5:30 p.m., Broadhope Art Collective, $50. Registration required. 225-8441; www.broadhopeartcollective.com. Cheviot.

Religious - Community Wednesday Night Solutions, 7-8:30 p.m., Vineyard Westside Church, 922-7897; www.cloudtownsend.com/resources/solutions. Cheviot. Free Community Meal, 5:306:30 p.m., Central Church of Christ, Free. 481-5820; www.centralchurchofchrist1.com. Westwood.

Senior Citizens Zumba Gold, 1-2 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, $3, $25 for 10 classes. 205-5064; www.debsfitnessparty.com. Green Township.

FRIDAY, JULY 5 Farmers Market Sayler Park Farmers Market, 4-7 p.m., Nelson Sayler Memorial Park, 675-0496. Sayler Park. Lettuce Eat Well Farmers Market, 3-7 p.m., Cheviot United Methodist Church, Free. 481-1914; www.lewfm.org. Cheviot.

Health / Wellness Pre-Diabetes Class, 2:30-4:30 p.m., Mercy Hospital Western Hills, 3131 Queen City Ave., Information on making healthy food choices, exercise and blood sugar control and monitoring blood sugar levels. $20. Presented by Mercy Health Partners. 956-3729; www.e-mercy.com. Westwood.

Summer Camps - Arts Musical Theater Day Camp, 9-11 a.m., Western Hills Music, 4310 Harrison Ave., Camp teaches all aspects of musical theater production; including singing, dancing and acting as well as backstage and technical activities. Performance on Saturday following camp. Ages 12 and up. Directed by Suzanne Lockwood. Monday-Friday for two weeks. $300. Registration required. 289-2575; www.westernhillsmusic.com. Western Hills.

Summer Camps Religious/VBS Vacation Bible School, 6:30-9 p.m., St. William Church, 4108 W. Eighth St., Daily through July 11. Children in kindergarten through fifth grade learn about St. Peter and his special relationship with Jesus and the church. Songs, stories, crafts, snacks and more. Week ends with Mass and ice cream social. $10 per child, $25 per family. Registration required. 921-0247; www.saintwilliam.com. West Price Hill.

TUESDAY, JULY 9 Art & Craft Classes Sewing 101, 11 a.m.-1 p.m., Broadhope Art Collective, $50. Registration required. 225-8441; www.broadhopeartcollective.com. Cheviot.

Farmers Market Sayler Park Farmers Market, 4-7 p.m., Nelson Sayler Memorial Park, 675-0496. Sayler Park.

Senior Citizens 55+ Club for Seniors, 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Grace Lutheran Church, 3628 Boudinot Ave., Art presentation. Free. $8.75 for lunch. Registration required for lunch. 661-5166. Westwood.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 10 Art & Craft Classes Sewing 101, 3:30-5:30 p.m., Broadhope Art Collective, $50. Registration required. 225-8441; www.broadhopeartcollective.com. Cheviot.

Music - Pop

Music - Concerts

How Bizarre ‘90s Night, 8 p.m.-midnight, Cabana on the River, 7445 Forbes Road, Free. 941-7442. Sayler Park.

Covedale Gardens Summer Concert Series, 7 p.m., Covedale Gardens, Ralph and Covedale avenues, Music by Rory and the Rockets. KDots Restaurant sells hotdogs and hamburgers. Frisch’s Big Boy greets children. Bring seating. Presented by Covedale Neighborhood Association. 471-1536. Covedale.

SATURDAY, JULY 6 Art & Craft Classes Sewing 101, 9-11 a.m., Broadhope Art Collective, $50. Registration required. 225-8441; www.broadhopeartcollective.com. Cheviot.

Exercise Classes Zumba Fitness Classes, 10:3011:30 a.m., St. John’s Westminster Union Church, $25 for five classes. 347-4613. Delhi Township.

Films Covedale Gardens Movie Night, 8:30-10:30 p.m., Covedale Gardens, Ralph and Covedale avenues, Film: “Elizabethtown.”

Religious - Community Wednesday Night Solutions, 7-8:30 p.m., Vineyard Westside Church, 922-7897; www.cloudtownsend.com/resources/solutions. Cheviot. Free Community Meal, 5:306:30 p.m., Central Church of Christ, Free. 481-5820; www.centralchurchofchrist1.com. Westwood.


LIFE

JUNE 19, 2013 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • B3

Ham, basil pinwheels make colorful appetizer I’m not saying I have the world’s best memory, but when it comes to food, I have a photographic memory. Like the other day when I was going through one of my vintage cookbooks and came across a recipe for cinnamon pinwheels. After readRita ing the Heikenfeld recipe, I RITA’S KITCHEN had a feeling these are the “radio rolls” that were available in bakeries here. It’s not the one that uses puff pastry. This recipe calls for a yeasted dough that you form into coils and flatten out before baking. I think it’s the same roll recipe that many of you wanted to make at home. It’s too long to print here, but I’ll post it on my blog.

Ham and basil pinwheels

If you’re growing basil, it won’t be long before flowers start to form. Pinch those off (yes, they’re edible) and while you’re at it, cut off enough leaves to make these pinwheels. This is a do-ahead appetizer that keeps appetites at bay until the main dish is served.

6 10-inch flour tortillas 8 oz. cream cheese, softened 3 ⁄4 cup sun-dried tomatoes, minced 12 thin slices ham Fresh basil, enough to cover tortillas

Mix cream cheese and dried tomatoes. Spread each tortilla with cream cheese mixture. Put ham slices on top. Lay basil on top. Roll up tightly and stick toothpicks in 4-5 evenly spaced spots. Cover and refrigerate for several hours. Slice and serve.

by 13-inch pan, baked it at 375 degrees for a few extra minutes. So if you don’t have a jellyroll pan that the original recipe calls for, a 9-inch by 13inch works well.

Can you help?

Spinning Fork’s mushroom sauce. Reader Tom Ohmer says his wife and granddaughter love the sauce and hopes a reader has the recipe or a similar one.

Readers want to know

Try a variety of flour tortilla flavors to vary Rita’s recipe for ham and basil pinwheels. THANKS TO RITA HEIKENFELD

Marinated honey mustard grilled veggie skewers The honey mustard lends a nice color. 4 long skewers

Whisk together: 3 tablespoons white balsamic vinegar 3 tablespoons honey mustard 3 tablespoons olive oil 3 ⁄4 teaspoon crushed dried rosemary or about 2 teaspoons fresh, minced 3 ⁄4 teaspoon onion powder Salt and pepper

Have ready: 1 red bell pepper, cut into 11⁄2-inch pieces1 yellow and green zucchini, about 8 oz. each, cut into 1⁄2-inch thick slices

If using wooden skewers, soak in water 30 minutes ahead of time. Put veggies in plastic bag and pour marinade over. Let sit at room temperature 30 minutes or

more. Thread onto skewers, reserving marinade. Grill, turning occasionally and brushing with marinade until tender, about 15 minutes.

Savory pork roast

How many times have I told you one of the most fun things about writing this column is the recipes you share? Marianne D. shared her favorite recipe for pork roast with me and said: “The ranch dressing mix is the secret ingredient and it’s diabetic friendly, too. Sometimes I’ll toss in a little minced fresh parsley.” 2-3 tablespoons olive oil 1 tablespoon ranch salad dressing mix 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard 1 clove garlic, minced Salt and pepper to taste 21⁄2 pound boneless pork loin roast 1 cup chicken broth or water

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Mix oil, dress-

REAL ESTATE DELHI TOWNSHIP

5636 Alomar Drive: Hoy, Gregory H. and Maria N. to Gustafson, Ronald; $174,900. 306 Anderson Ferry Road: Platt, Phillip W. and Bonnie M. to Fannie Mae; $46,000. 1031 Bandanna Drive: Stoepel, Julie to Alsip, Kimberly G.; $109,000. 5266 Briarhill Drive: Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. to NAPA Investments Inc.; $56,000. 5525 Cleves Warsaw Pike: Spencer, Ashley and Kurtis Smith to Scott, Jeffrey L. and Silvana M.; $174,000. 5430 Delhi Pike: Murphy, Robert P. and Phyllis to Parrish, Richard; $78,500. 4928 Duebber Drive: Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. to Burnet Capital LLC; $28,550. 4951 Duebber Drive: Burke, Robert E. and Anne M. to Correll, Douglasm and Teresa; $72,000. 266 Francisridge Drive: Wellendorf, David A. to White, Cathleen G.; $128,500. 1087 Hickok Lane: Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. to WDWP Winn LLC; $71,000. 559 Mitchell Way Court: Backer, Elizabeth to Bank of America NA; $175,000. 829 Neeb Road: Kleinholz, Milton F. and Shirley L. to Kehling, Michael E. and Kimberly A.; $85,000. 575 Picuda Court: Berding, Teresa M. Tr. and Peggy Braun Tr. to Kenkel, Scott M.; $54,500. 5399 Rapid Run Road: McCamey, Ronald D. and Patsy Ann to Baker, Roxanna J; $90,000. 353 Robben Lane: Janszen, Cynthia M. to Allen, Michele S. and Gary W.; $109,900.

“I saw salad burnet at a garden store and wondered what it’s used for.” Salad burnet is a hardy perennial herb that tastes like cucumber. It’s a pretty little plant with lacy green leaves and a pinkish, cone-shaped flower. I like to use it in salads and to make herbal vinegars. Borage is another cucumber-flavored herb.

470 Samoht Ridge Road: Priestle, Norbert F. to Jackson, Thomas A.; $65,500.

EAST PRICE HILL

911 Chateau Ave.: Cheap Connections LLC to KB Partners LLC; $5,000. 1021 Del Monte Place: Groll, Eric to Fifth Third Mortgage Corp.; $30,000. 2714 Eighth St.: Federal National Mortgage Association to Singhoff, Cheri; $1,250. 736 Elberon Ave.: Umble, Paul L. to Federal National Mortgage Co.; $36,000. 3615 Glenway Ave.: Moore, Steven to U.S. Bank NA; $26,000. 1940 Grand Ave.: Phillips, Vershelia to Federal National Mortgage Association; $30,000. 3314 Lehman Road: Cain, Keith E. to Senske, David P.; $20,000. 1529 Manss Ave.: Goodwin, David L. to Ladisa Investments LLC; $19,000. 1637 Minion Ave.: Calvert, Robert K. to Federal Home Loan Mortgag Corp.; $18,000. 949 Oakland Ave.: LandR Property Management LLC to Federal National Mortgage Association; $32,000. 2914 Warsaw Ave.: Ellison, Gary M. and Glenna F. to Federal Home Loan Mortgag Corp.; $24,000.

SAYLER PARK

143 Meridian St.: Meyers, Richard to Federal National Mortgage Association; $34,000. 170 Richardson Place: Middendorf, John J. and Judith A. to Sizemore, Lance; $230,000. 227 Thisbe Ave.: Niehaus, Gregory Charles III to Federal National Mortgage Association;

ing, mustard, garlic, salt and pepper. Rub all over roast. Put roast in baking pan and pour broth around roast. Bake about an hour, or until thermometer reads 150 degrees. Remove from oven, tent with foil and let sit 10 minutes. Serves

SOUTHERN BAPTIST

8.

Diabetic exchanges: 4 lean meat, 1/2 fat.

Tips from readers’ kitchens

Opera cream cake. So many of you told me you loved the cake. Suzanne M. said she used a 9-inch

UNITED METHODIST

DELHI HILLS BAPTIST CHURCH “Come Hear The Story of Jesus” 5421 Foley Rd. • 513-922-8363 Rev. Bob Overberg

Sunday School..................................10:00a.m. Sunday Morning Worship ..................11:00a.m. Wednesday Evening Bible Study .........7:00p.m.

Liberty Missionary Baptist Church "Where Everybody is Somebody" 1009 Overlook Ave. 513-921-2502 Rev. Kendell Hopper Sunday School 10:00 am Sunday Morning Worship-11:00 am Sunday Evening 6:00 pm Wednesday Bible Study - 7:00 pm

NORTH BEND UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

123 Symmes Ave. North Bend, OH 45202 One block off Route 50, Phone 941-3061 Small, friendly, casual, blended music, Bible based messages that connect with real life. Sunday School 9:30am Worship 10:30am

SHILOH

UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

5261 Foley Rd. / Cincinnati, Ohio 45238 513-451-3600 www.shilohumc.com WORSHIP TIMES Saturday @ 5:30 pm Sunday @ 9:30 am & 11:00 am

$34,000.

WEST PRICE HILL

1719 Ashbrook Drive: Lane, Gathera L. to Wyatt, Jeff; $31,500. 1105 Benz Ave.: Steinwert, David P. and Sherry to Mumfrey, Valerie; $77,000. 4770 Dale Ave.: Gottmann, Esther to Burnet Capital LLC; $28,000. 4770 Dale Ave.: Burnet Capital LLC to VBOH Annex LLC; $31,500. 1173 Overlook Ave.: Juergens, Janice L. to Lusenhop, Lucy M.; $164,900. 576 Panorama Court: Bayview Loan Servicing LLC to AandA Ultimate Enterprises; $18,500. 576 Panorama Court: AandA Ultimate Enterprises LLC to Ohio Re Holdings 1 LLC; $18,500. 1658 Rosemont Ave.: Neeley, Mark T. and Celeste P. to Federal Home Loan Mortgag Corp.; $12,000. 1020 Seton Ave.: Brennan, Thomas J. to Federal National Mortgage Association; $36,000. 1229 Sunset Ave.: MandT Bank to Stroud, Anthony W. Tr.; $8,500. 1868 Sunset Ave.: Tritex Real Estate Asvisors Inc. to 1868 Sunset LLC; $1,500,000. 620 Trenton Ave.: Bank of America NA to A. andA Ultimate Enterprises L.; $9,900. 1811 Tuxworth Ave.: Swann, Dominique C. to U.S. Bank NA Tr.; $42,000. 4935 Western Hills Ave.: Padilla, Crispin to CFEDERAL National Mortgag Association; $48,000.

Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator and author. Find her blog online at Cincinnati.Com/blogs. Email her at columns@communitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-248-7130, ext. 356.

PRESBYTERIAN OAK HILLS PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 6233 Werk Rd. (Enter off Werkridge) 922-5448 Rev. Jerry Hill 10:00 a.m Worship & Sunday School Nursery Care Avail.

Come and worship in a small casual church that emphasizes the fellowship and mission in the community and globally. www.oakhillspc.com

UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST St. Peter & St. Paul United Church of Christ

3001 Queen City Ave. 513-661-3745 Rev. Martin Westermeyer, Pastor Bible Study: 9 am Worship & Church School: 10 am Dial-A-Devotion 426-8957 www.stpeterandstpaulucc.org

Laura Schiller, DDS GENERAL DENTISTRY

Dr. Laura Schiller

Dr. Laura M. Schiller

• Interest Free Financing • Dentistry for adults and children • Sports & night guards • Products to enhance your home care CE-0000558313

5330 Glenway Ave. Cincinnati, OH 45238 513-922-7111 schillerdental@yahoo.com


LIFE

B4 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • JUNE 19, 2013

Check your home warranty service contract Home warranty service contracts are a $3 billion a year business, but you need to know the drawbacks as well as the advantages. For instance, you can expect many warHoward ranty comAin panies to HEY HOWARD! do the least expensive repair possible. Home warranties have become fairly

standard with real estate sales. But while it can give a buyer peace of mind, I’ve seen time and again where there’s been a problem when a claim was filed. Terri Miller said her daughter ran into a claim problem when the air conditioning went out in her Reading home. “The air conditioning fan went out. We turned the unit on and it didn’t turn at all,” Miller said. Miller’s daughter bought a home warranty when buying the house last year after it had

been foreclosed upon. She called the warranty company and a repairman was sent out. “He immediately looked at the unit and told me it was a fan motor. ‘We’re in luck, I have it on my truck. I’ll go change it out,’ he said,” Miller said. Unfortunately, the repairman couldn’t separate the fan from the motor so he removed both – with the electricity still on. “He left the unit completely wide open. He left the electric panel wide open. When I asked him if that

was safe he told me, ‘Yes.’ I found out later from my husband it was not safe,” Miller said. The serviceman didn’t return for two days. Then, Miller said, “When he rewired it, rather than turning the motor itself another quarter inch so he could run the electric through the conduit in there, which would be the appropriate thing to do, he chose to put the wires above the unit and he has them zip-tied.” Miller sent a picture of the job to the home warranty company and

it agreed to send out a different company to properly wire the air conditioner. “The air conditioner does work. It is cooling the house. The problem is the wiring, the way they installed the wiring. It’s not safe,” Miller said. A big thing to remember with home warranty companies is you can’t pick the repair companies they send to your home. Sometimes you’ll get a good, well qualified repairman, other times you won’t. Check the warranty

to see exactly what it does and does not cover. One woman told me although the warranty company gave her a new air conditioner, she ended up paying the serviceman $1,500 for labor. These warranties generally cost about $400 a year and have a $100 deductible for each repair. Howard Ain answers consumer complaints weekdays on WKRC-TV Local 12. Write to him at 12 WKRC-TV, 1906 Highland Ave., Cincinnati 45219.

County parks having photography contest

Parks are one of the best places to take photos of nature, wildlife, family and friends. The Great Parks of Hamilton County provides the perfect backdrop, with 21 parks and nature preserves and over 16,500 acres of greenspace. What better way to capture all of its essence than with a

photography contest. From June to May 2014, the Great Parks Photo Contest encourages everyone, from amateur to skilled photographers, to share their park experiences through photography. How it works: Each month during the contest, the park district will accept entries that

were taken in Great Parks of Hamilton County during that month. Each month’s winner will receive a Charlie Harper poster and will be featured as that month’s photo in the 2015 Great Parks calendar. All monthly winners will be entered to win the grand prize (valued at $150). The

Healthy Adults 55 to 74 Years Old Needed for Pneumonia Vaccine Study Adult Pneumonia Vaccine Study

Who

Healthy adults 55 to 74 years old who: ! Received the pneumonia vaccine 3 to 7 years ago or ! Never received the pneumonia vaccine

Pay CCHMC IRB #2012-1211: Version 2.0

May receive up to $250 for time and travel

Details

cincinnatichildrens.org/clinical-studies facebook.com/cincinnatichildrensstudies pinterest.com/cincykidstrials

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grand prize winner’s photo will also be showcased on the covers of both the 2015 Great Parks calendar and one of the quarterly GO Guides. To enter: » Go to greatparks.org/photocontest and download and entry form and model release. » Submit form and

If you are suffering from uncontrolled diabetes, you might want to find out if you also have sleep apnea before upping your insulin, says Mercy Health Physician Shyamsunder Subramanian, MD, a pulmonary, critical care and sleep specialist and medical director of Mercy Health – Western Hills Sleep Center. In a research review published in the “World Journal of Diabetes,” Subramanian found that many people with diabetes – up to 40 percent – also have sleep apnea but they just don’t know it. Sleep apnea causes the windpipe to narrow significantly or even close during sleep. Sufferers can experience up to 300 narrowing or closing events during each rest period. In response to the choking sensation, the body releases the stress hormones adrenaline and cortisone, which startle the sleeper into breathing.

trol. They may require less insulin or go from insulin injections to pills or even cut down on the number of pills they take to control their diabetes.” If you have uncontrolled diabetes together with symptoms of sleep apnea, which include daytime fatigue, waking up tired, disturbed sleep, loud snoring or unexplained weight gain, ask your physician if a sleep study is right for you. Mercy Health’s board-certified physicians and credentialed technologists can diagnose and treat sleep disorders, including sleep apnea, insomnia, restless leg, narcolepsy, sleepwalking and more. For more information on Mercy Health’s sleep centers and sleep medicine specialists, visit www.e-mercy.com or call Western Hills Sleep Center at 513-389-5540 or Subramanian at West Pulmonary, Critical Care & Sleep, 513-3895365.

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Together, these hormones trigger the formation and release of glucose in the body. As a result, diabetics may find they have high fasting blood sugars when they measure their glucose first thing in the morning. Because these patients appear to have uncontrolled diabetes, there’s a strong likelihood that their physicians will increase their dosage of insulin, which can bring on new health concerns. “Diabetic patients with undiagnosed sleep apnea who treat ‘uncontrolled diabetes’ with an increased insulin dose might be having more intense therapy than they need. They could actually veer into hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, by overcompensating for a morning measure impacted by sleep apnea,” says Subramanian. “We need to screen these patients for sleep apnea because by treating the apnea, we can dramatically improve patients’ glucose con-

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($10 annual; $3 daily) is required to enter the parks. Armleder and Fernbank parks are cooperative ventures with the Cincinnati Park Board; a Motor Vehicle Permit is not required. For additional information, please visit greatparks.org or call (513) 521-PARK (7275).

Diabetes could cause sleep apnea

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photo to photocontest@greatparks.org or via CD/DVD to Hamilton County Park District, Attn: R. Taylor, 10245 Winton Road, Cincinnati, OH 45231. » Rules, restrictions and terms and conditions must be reviewed before entering. A valid Hamilton County Park District Motor Vehicle Permit

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LIFE

JUNE 19, 2013 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • B5

Green Twp. becomes a Purple Heart Township By Kurt Backscheider kbackscheider@communitypress.com

The second 2013 Delhi Civic Association Yard of the Week winner is Lisa Shaw of Orangelawn Drive. PROVIDED

Second yard of week winner The 2013 Delhi Civic Association Yard of the Week winner No. 2 is Lisa Shaw of Orangelawn Drive. She will display for one week the Delhi Civic Association Yard of the Week yard sign. A photo of her yard will be displayed on the Delhi Civic Association website. She also received a planter and gift certificates from Robben Florist and Garden Center and Nature’s Corner. Delhi Township residents can submit nomi-

nations for the homes of friends or neighbors who they feel have a beautiful, well maintained yard which exemplifies Delhi’s greenhouse heritage as the Floral Paradise of Ohio. Entries can be submitted through the Delhi Civic Association website, www.delhicivic association.org, or by email to yardoftheweek@delhicivic association.org or by calling 513-922-3111. Nominations will be accepted through Aug. 23.

Green Twp. — Tony Kohl said the township has always been supportive of military veterans. “They do a lot for veterans and we’re very appreciative of what they do,” he said. Green Township, home to Veterans Park and the Veterans Tribute Tower, has taken another step Boiman to honor area servicemen and women. The board of trustees voted unanimously Monday, June 10, to approve a resolution declaring the township a Purple Heart Township. The designation pays tribute the service and sacrifices of veterans who were wounded or killed in combat while serving our country. Kohl, a U.S. Marine veteran who was wounded in the Vietnam War and now serves as commander of the Military Order of the Purple Heart, Cheviot Chapter 3620, said Green Township is the first township in Ohio to become a Purple Heart Township. He said the Purple Heart organization has been reaching out to proveteran communities and asking them to become Purple Heart municipalities. Cheviot became a Purple Heart City last year. The West Side Purple

Heart chapter will present the township a plaque to hang in the township administration building and a Purple Heart flag the township can fly, Kohl said. “This is a great honor for our organization,” he said. Green Township Trustee Chairman Rocky Boiman said a member of the Cheviot Purple Heart chapter approached him a couple of weeks ago during the memorial for World War II veteran Tom Griffin at Veterans Park, and encouraged the township to consider becoming a Purple Heart community. “It’s a nice designation for our township and our veterans,” Boiman said. “It’s a nice honor, especially considering we have Veterans Park.” Kohl said the purpose of establishing Purple Heart townships and cities is to show support for those who were wounded in combat and raise awareness about the Purple Heart organization. He said he and his fellow Purple Heart members volunteer at the VA Hospital, visit schools, take part in parades and assist with area high school ROTC programs. “We work to help all veterans succeed,” he said. “We want to provide camaraderie among all veterans groups and honor the sacrifices of all the men and women who serve this country. “Our veterans should not be forgotten,” Kohl said. The Purple Heart is the

Tony Kohl, commander of the Military Order of the Purple Heart, Cheviot Chapter 3620, reads from a proclamation designating Cheviot as a Purple Heart City last year as Mayor Samuel Keller, back, held a commemorative plaque. Green Township became a Purple Heart Township on June 10. The West Side Purple Heart group will present the township a plaque at an upcoming meeting. FILE PHOTO

nation’s oldest military medal. Gen. George Washington first awarded the medal as the “Badge of Military Merit” in 1782. Boiman said the town-

ship has invited area Purple Heart recipients to be recognized at an upcoming board of trustees meeting.

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LIFE

B6 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • JUNE 19, 2013

Grant allows Mount to offer co-op positions

Construction workers make progress on the eastbound ramp to Interstate 74 at North Bend Road. The Ohio Department of Transportation is upgrading the the entrance ramps at the interchange. Work is anticipated to be finished within the next three weeks. JENNIE KEY/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

North Bend Road construction to be finished by November By Kurt Backscheider Rinks Flea Market Bingo Follow us on... www.facebook.com/RinksBingo w twitter.com/RinksBingo

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Green Twp. — Motorists who use North Bend Road in the Monfort Heights area have likely noticed the construction crews

working on the ramps to Interstate 74. The Ohio Department of Transportation is upgrading the entrance ramps to I-74 from North Bend Road. “The project manager

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anticipates the ramp work to be finished within a few weeks,” said Sharon Smigielski, spokeswoman for ODOT’s District 8 office in Lebanon. The ramp to eastbound I-74 from northbound North Bend Road, in front of St. Ignatius Church, is being extended farther south. Smigielski said the reconfiguration will allow northbound drivers nonstop access to the eastbound I-74 ramp. Right now drivers heading to the interstate sometimes have to stop at the traffic light in front of St. Ignatius. On the west side of North Bend Road, crews are adding a turn lane to access the eastbound I-74 ramp, she said. The curb lane on the overpass on the west side of North Bend Road is currently an exit-only lane to eastbound I-74. She said the project will make the curb lane a through lane, with an optional right-turn lane to the I-74 entrance ramp. “It should help the traffic backups in that area,” she said.

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After the interstate ramps are completed, Smigielski said crews will finish the North Bend/West Fork Intersection Improvement project. The intersection project involves the addition of right-turn lanes at all four corners of the intersection. Space has been made on North Bend and West Fork for the turn lanes, and the new curbs and sidewalks at the corners of the intersection are already finished. Smigielski said there’s been a delay to the intersection project due to an issue with an underground water detention system on West Fork in front of the Speedway gas station. When the water detention issue is resolved, she said new utility poles will be installed and the intersection will be repaved. She said the project manager does not have an estimated completion date for the intersection project, but ODOT is scheduled to finish all the work in the area by Nov. 1.

The College of Mount St. Joseph will continue to offer five cooperative education positions each semester during the upcoming school year with Hamilton County Job and Family Services funded by a grant of $84,000 from The Carol Ann and Ralph V. Haile, Jr./U.S. Bank Foundation. The grant from The Haile/U.S. Bank Foundation provides funding for Mount students to have a cooperative education, or co-op, work experience at Hamilton County Job and Family Services (HCJFS). As a result, the agency gains the benefits of having college student employees at no cost while the students gain valuable career experience. “The Carol Ann and Ralph V. Haile/U.S. Bank Foundation has been very generous in granting us the ability to offer these co-op positions for a third year,” said Jen Franchak, director of the Career and Experiential Education Center at the Mount. “The students learn a lot through their experiences, and we are grateful that we can continue to offer these opportunities to them.” Sara Vice, a psychology major and student coop at HCJFS in the communications department, has had opportunities to shadow caseworkers and visit the Mayerson Center for Safe and Healthy Children at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital through her position. “My co-op has been a great learning experience and has prepared me for my future in the field of psychology,” she said. Cooperative education allows students to learn in an actual career setting, applying their interests and learning about career options. Nearly one-third of students who participate in cooperative education at the Mount accept full-time employment with previous co-op employers upon graduation.


LIFE

JUNE 19, 2013 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • B7

Day care takes care of your dogs By Amanda Hopkins

DOG DAYS

westnews@communitypress.com

At the K 9 Social Club, the daily rate for one dog is $22; for two dogs $28. There are prices for multiple visits. Daycare rates for half days: (less than 5 hours) for one dog is $14. Additional dog in same family $6

Westwood — On some

days Jamie and Brad Stenz wanted to come home from work and relax but their dogs usually wouldn’t allow it. To help them and their dogs, the Westwood couple started sending their two dogs, Zoey, a shepherd mix, and Murphy, a border collie, to a doggie day care. When their doggie day care closed unexpectedly, the Stenzes took matters into their own hands. The K9 Social Club opened at the end of April at 5090 Crookshank Road. Jamie Stenz said working with dogs every day is a big change from her old day job as an executive assistant.

Jamie and Brad Stenz, owners of K 9 Social Club, with some of the dogs they care for each day. AMANDA HOPKINS/FOR THE COMMUNITY PRESS

“I’m not used to wearing jeans and T-shirts to work, but I’ve always wanted to bring my dogs to work,” she said. The K9 Social Club offers daily day care for dogs. Brad Stenz says

they are averaging around 16 dogs each day and have a capacity for around 30 dogs a day. He said the dogs all have different personalities but so far all get along very well. Both Ja-

mie and Brad said each dog gets personal attention throughout the day, is fed separately and is taken for a short walk if the weather allows. Water is available for the dogs at all times. Brad says the dogs play very hard from about 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. and wind down just as their owners are picking them up. Owners can watch their dogs

interacting throughout the day via the Internet. Kim Phillips and her husband Mike, of Delhi Township, bring their boxer mix, Tasha, to the K9 Social Club. “I drop (Tasha) off and feel secure,” said Phillips. “And we love being able to watch Tasha on the web cam.” She said Tasha comes home exhausted from playing with all of the other dogs. The K9 Social Club also offers grooming, doggie apparel and kennel free

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Dewey’s, Graeter’s could anchor new Green Twp. development By Kurt Backscheider

This is the conceptual plan for Harrison Green. Neyer Properties is proposing to build the retail and office development on Harrison Avenue, near Westwood Northern Boulevard and Lee Court, in Green Township.

kbackscheider@communitypress.com

Green Twp. — A Dewey’s

Pizza restaurant and Graeter’s ice cream shop could be coming to Harrison Avenue. Neyer Properties has a proposal to build Harrison Green, a retail and office development near the intersection of Harrison Avenue, Lee Court and Westwood Northern Boulevard, next to the Cincinnati Central Credit Union branch. Jeff Chamot, land development manager for Neyer, said both Dewey’s Pizza and Graeter’s have signed letters of intent to open stores in the project’s 15,000- to 16,000square-feet retail center. He said the plan is to develop the site as a pedestrian-friendly mini lifestyle center, offering features like a patio, an outdoor seating area and a water fountain. Harrison Green would be similar to the retail space Dewey’s and Graeter’s occupy in

THANKS TO NEYER PROPERTIES

West Chester near Voice of America Park, Chamot said. “We like the location on Harrison Avenue,” he said. “Retail tenants are starting to get more active. We’re excited about that. We think it will be something exciting and unique for Green Township and the West Side of town.” Adam Goetzman, Green Township’s assistant administrator/director of planning and devel-

opment, said the roughly 5-acre site will require a zoning change before the project proceeds. He said the proposal will be reviewed during the zoning change process in August. The project includes a proposed 25,000-squarefeet office building on the rear of the site, he said. Green Township Trustee Chairman Rocky Boiman said he and his fellow board members are very much in favor of bringing a variety of new restaurants to the township.

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He often hears comments from people lamenting the fact Green Township has few dining options outside the typical fast-food chains, he said. If everything is approved, it will be the first Dewey’s Pizza on the West Side. Greater’s has stores at 3301 Westbourne Drive and 2376 Ferguson Road. “We’re certainly excited both Dewey’s and Graeter’s could be making their way into Green Township,” Boiman said. “I think it’s great.” He said he would like Harrison Green to serve as an example, encouraging restaurants like Olive Garden and Carrabba’s Italian Grill to open in the township. “We have a lot of great folks in Green Township who I think would certainly appreciate and patronize those types of restaurants,” he said. Chamot said Neyer hopes to begin construction of the project this fall, and anticipate an opening in spring 2014.

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boarding. “The dogs sleep in open areas on dog beds and someone is always here with the dogs,” Jamie said of the kennel free boarding. The K9 Social Club is open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Friday, Saturdays from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sundays by appointment. For more information on the K9 Social Club, call 513-347-3647 or visit www.facebook.com/The K9SocialClub.

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11069 Colerain Ave., Cinti., OH 45252 • 513.385.9309

CE-0000558689

LEGAL NOTICE NUISANCE VIOLATION 186 FRANCISRIDGE DRIVE Notice is hereby given to David & Kristy J. Fisher that property you own in Delhi Township contains excessive vegetation. The Delhi Township Board of Trustees has determined, at Resolution #2013-070, that the condition of the property constitutes a nuisance and is detrimental to the health, safety and general welfare of all persons who live, work or own property within Delhi Township. This notice shall serve as a formal order for you to address the nuisance violations 186 at located property your at Francisridge Drive (also known as Parcel 540-0033-0076 of the Hamilton County Auditor’s Tax Plats), Delhi Township, Hamilton County, State of Ohio as described below: •Cut all excessive vegetation, remove clippings there from, and maintain such at a height not to exceed 12" (All yards). If such excessive vegetation is not cut and removed or provision for such cutting and removal is not made within seven (7) days of publishing/posting of this notice, or a hearing before the Board of Trustees is not requested as specified below, the Board will provide for the cutting and removal, and any expenses incurred by the Board in performing such tasks will be entered upon the tax duplicate and will be a lien upon the properties from the date of entry. You have the right to request a hearing before the Board of Trustees within seven (7) days of publishing/posting of this notice. If requested, the hearing will be held at the next regularly scheduled meeting of the Board. The Boards’ meetings are held on the second and last Wednesdays of each month commencing at 6:00 p.m. at 934 At Neeb Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45233. the hearing, you may appear in person or by counsel, may present evidence and examine witnesses. If a hearing is timely requested, action to abate the nuisance conditions will be stayed pending the hearing and further decision of the Board. Your request for a hearing before the Board may be submitted in writing to: Thomas R. Stahlheber, Zoning Inspector, Delhi Township Department of Development Services, 697 Neeb Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45233. Any questions concerning this order should be directed to Mr. Stahlheber at the above described address or at 513-9222705. 1766969


LIFE

B8 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • JUNE 19, 2013

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES Animals/ Nature

GRRAND – Golden Retriever Rescue and Adoption of Needy Dogs takes in needy displaced, abandoned or unclaimed stray golden retrievers and places them in volunteer foster homes until adoptive families are found. Call 1-866-981-2251 and leave your name and phone. Visit www.ggrand.org. email www.cincygrrand@yahoo.com. League For Animal Welfare – A no-kill shelter needs volunteers 16-and-older to help socialize cats and 18-and-older to socialize and walk dogs. Other opportunities available. Call 735-2299, ext. 3. Save the Animals Foundation – Needs people 18 and older to staff its shelter for homeless cats and dogs. Call 378-0300 for cats and 588-6609 for dogs. Spring Grove Cemetery and Arboretum – is the nation’s second largest cemetery and arboretum. Spring Grove serves the Cincinnati area and welcomes visitors from all over the world. More than 1,200 trees and plants are labeled to serve as a reference for the public. Spring Grove is looking for volunteers to help maintain specialty gardens, perennial flower beds and seasonal gardening. We offer horticulture staff experience every Tuesday morning from 9:30 till 11:30. For more information please call 513-853-4941 or vcoordinator@springgrove.org. Tri State County Animal Response Team (CART) – Is at 11216 Gideon Lane in Sycamore Township. Meetings are open to the public. Visit www.tristatecart.com for monthly subjects or more information. Call 702-8373. Winton Woods Riding Center – is in need of volunteers to assist with the Special Riders Program, which provides training and competition opportunities for children and adults with disabilities, and to help with barn duties, horse shows and a variety of other tasks. No experience is necessary and training is provided.

Interested individuals ages 14 and older are invited to contact the Winton Woods Riding Center at 931-3057, or at wwrc@greatparks.org.

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

Executive Service Corps of Cincinnati – Professionals can use their administrative skills to help a busy, growing nonprofit manage its projects and members. Executive Service Corps of Cincinnati is looking for someone with experience in Word, Excel, Power Point and Outlook to assist in the Blue Ash office. Volunteers set their own days and hours and enjoy nice working conditions and friendly, bright volunteers and staff. Help the ESCC help other nonprofits succeed. Contact Darlyne Koretos for more information at 791-6230, ext. 10. ESCC is located at 10945 Reed Hartman Highway, Suite 108.

HEALTH/WELLNESS

Crossroads Hospice – Volunteers are wanted to join the team of Ultimate Givers who strive to provide extra love and comfort to terminally-ill patients and their families in Brown, Butler, Clermont, Clinton, Hamilton, Highland and Warren counties. Volunteers are also needed to support signature programs inspired by Jim Stovall’s novel, “The Ultimate Gift” The Gift of a Day program asks patients what their perfect day is and staff and volunteers work to make it a reality. Ultimate Givers visit with patients in their homes, assisted living facilities and nursing facilities and help with clerical duties at the Crossroads office. They provide emotional support and companionship to patients and family members, assist with errands or provide respite for those caring for terminally-ill loved ones. For more information or to sign up as an Ultimate Giver, call 793-5070 or compete an application online at www.crossroadshospice.com/

volunteering. Before becoming a Crossroads Hospice Ultimate Giver, participants must complete an application, TB skin test and training session lead by members of the Crossroads team. Volunteers must wait a minimum of one year after the death of an immediate family member or loved one before applying. Heartland Hospice – Volunteers needed in bereavement department, making six-month follow-up grief calls, assisting with mailings and other tasks in the Red Bank office; to visit and sit with patients all over the Cincinnati area who may not have family available to visit; to help patients preserve memories through scrapbooks and crafts in facilities all over the Cincinnati area; to sit vigil with patients as they are passing to ensure that no patient dies alone; and perform office tasks in Red Bank office. Training required. For more information, e-mail volunteer coordinator Amber Long at 4707officestaff2@hcrmanorcare.com.

EDUCATION

Change a life – Volunteer to tutor an adult with low-level literacy skills or GED preparation needs. Call 621-READ. Cincinnati Reads – a volunteer tutoring program working with K-4 students in Cincinnati Public Schools. Volunteers receive free training to work one-on-one with children who are struggling to read. Call 621-7323 or email Jayne Martin Dressing, jdressing@lngc.org. Great Oaks – currently recruiting volunteer tutors for its GED and ESOL classes. There are five hours of training required. The next dates are Wedmesdays, Aug. 22 and 29, at Scarlet Oaks in Sharonville. Numerous sites and times are available for volunteering. Call Kim at 612-5830 for more information. Inktank – Group looking for volunteers to help children and adults improve their skills in writing-based initiatives across the city. Call 542-0195.

Helping Young Mothers Mentors Inc. – is seeking individuals who are willing to give their time as a mentor to assist teen mothers in improving their quality of life and who are striving to make it in today’s society. If you are interested in helping to “create a self sufficient mom for a better tomorrow” in your community and interested in truly seeing results, become a mentor by calling 513-520-6960. The Salvation Army – The Salvation Army issued an appeal today for volunteers to assist with its youth development programs. The Salvation Army offers After-School and Summer Enrichment programs, providing children from at-risk neighborhoods with development opportunities throughout the year. The Salvation Army offers these programs at Community Centers across Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky, providing localized opportunities for volunteers to engage with these critical programs. The Salvation Army seeks those who have interest volunteering in one or more of the following roles: assisting children with homework, being a reading buddy, playing learning games with the children, assisting with skill drills, playing sports and gym games with the children, helping with snacks and meals provided to the children, being a good listener and role model. The Salvation Army’s After-school program serves children ages 6 to 12 years throughout the school year, from August to May, generally three to five days a week in the 2:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. time frame. Program elements include tutoring, homework help, computer literacy, conflict resolution and character training, spiritual development, recreation, sports and arts & crafts. The Salvation Army’s Summer Enrichment program functions for eight weeks, five days per week, in the 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. timeframe. The itinerary entails sports and recreation, field trips, computer literacy, arts and crafts, character training, spiritual development and academic maintenance. Volunteers are sought to help with any and all components of these wonderful youth

programs. Volunteers are generally high school age and older. It is preferred that volunteers can be present at least one hour per week for the duration of the program (i.e., the school year, or summer). For more information or to volunteer with The Salvation Army’s youth programs, please contact Melanie Fazekas at 762-5671, or Melanie.fazekas @use.salvationarmy.org. Winton Woods City Schools – Wants to match community members who are interested in volunteering in the schools with the students. Volunteer opportunities at Winton Woods Primary North and South, middle school and high school. Volunteers who would have one-on-one contact with students outside of a classroom are required to have a background check. To volunteer, contact Gina Burnett at bu rnett.gina@wintonwoods.org or 619-2301. The YMCA of Greater Cincinnati’s College Readiness Program – that inspires and encourages teens of color toward paths of success is looking for caring professionals who want to make a difference, and for young people who can benefit from positive adult role models. Part of a national YMCA initiative, the local program incorporates mentoring, career exploration and college readiness; and helps students develop a positive sense of self, build character, explore diverse college and career options. Volunteers, many of whom are sponsored by area companies, share their own personal insight and encouragement. Contact Program Director Darlene Murphy at the Melrose YMCA, 961-3510 or visit www.myy.org.

ENTERTAINMENT

Business Volunteers for the Arts – BVA is accepting applications from business professionals with at least three years experience, interested in volunteering their skills within the arts community. Projects average six to eight months in length and can range from marketing or accounting to Web design or planning special events. A one-day training program is provided to all accepted applicants. Call 8712787.

LEGAL NOTICE NUISANCE VIOLATION 3950 DELHI PIKE Notice is hereby given to Mary Almon that property you own in Delhi Township contains excessive vegetation. The Delhi Township Board of Trustees has determined, at Resolution #2013-066, that the condition of the property constitutes a nuisance and is detrimental to the health, safety and general welfare of all persons who live, work or own property within Delhi Township. This notice shall serve as a formal order for you to address the nuisance violations at your property located at 3950 Delhi Pike (also known as Parcel 540-0010-0083 of the Hamilton County Auditor’s Tax Plats), Delhi Township, Hamilton County, State of Ohio as described below: •Cut all excessive vegetation, remove clippings there from, and maintain such at a height not to exceed 12" (All yards). If such excessive vegetation is not cut and removed or provision for such cutting and removal is not made within seven (7) days of publishing/posting of this notice, or a hearing before the Board of Trustees is not requested as specified below, the Board will provide for the cutting and removal, and any expenses incurred by the Board in performing such tasks will be entered upon the tax duplicate and will be a lien upon the properties from the date of entry. You have the right to request a hearing before the Board of Trustees within seven (7) days of publishing/posting of this notice. If requested, the hearing will be held at the next regularly scheduled meeting of the Board. The Boards’ meetings are held on the second and last Wednesdays of each month commencing at 6:00 p.m. at 934 Neeb Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45233. At the hearing, you may appear in person or by counsel, may present evidence and examine witnesses. If a hearing is timely requested, action to abate the nuisance conditions will be stayed pending the hearing and further decision of the Board. Your request for a hearing before the Board may be submitted in writing to: Thomas R. Stahlheber, Zoning Inspector, Delhi Township Department of Development Services, 697 Neeb Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45233. Any questions concerning this order should be directed to Mr. Stahlheber at the above described address or at 513-9222705. 1766972

Center for Independent Living Options – Seeking volunteers to staff Art Beyond Boundaries, gallery for artists with disabilities. Volunteers needed noon to 4:30 p.m. Tuesday through Friday, and noon to 5 p.m. Saturday. Call 241-2600. Cincinnati Museum Center – Needs volunteers to work in all three museums, the Cincinnati History Museum, the Museum of Natural History and Science and the Cinergy Children’s Museum, and special exhibits. Call 287-7025.

HEALTH CARE

Ameircan Diabetes Association – Seeks volunteers in its area office downtown for clerical support, filling requests for educational materials from phone requests, data entry, special events support and coordinating the Health Fair. Call 759-9330. American Heart Association – Volunteers needed to assist with the American Heart Association’s cause campaigns, Power to End Stroke, Go Red For Women, Start!, and the Alliance for a Healthier Generation. Assignments include clerical work, event specific duties and community outreach. Contact the American Heart Association at 281-4048 or email ray.meyer@heart.org. Captain Kidney Educational Program – Needs volunteers one or more mornings or afternoons a month during the school year to educate children in first through sixth grades about kidney function and disease. Training provided. Call 961-8105. Crossroads Hospice – Seeking volunteers to assist terminally ill patients and their families. Call 793-5070. Destiny Hospice – is seeking caring and compassionate people to make a difference in the life of a person living with terminal illness. No special skills or experience needed; simply a willingness to help provide comfort and support. Orientation is scheduled to fit the volunteer’s schedule. Opportunities are available throughout the Cincinnati, Middletown and Butler County area. Contact Angie at 554-6300, or amclaughlin@destiny-hospice. com. Evercare Hospice and Palliative Care – is seeking volunteers in all Greater Cincinnati communities. Evercare provides care for those facing end-of-life issues and personal support to their families. Volunteers needed to visit with patients and/or assist in administrative and clerical tasks. Volunteers may provide care wherever a patient resides, whether in a private home or nursing facility. Call 1-888-866-8286 or 682-4055. Heartland Hospice – is seeking volunteers to assist with our patients and their families. We will train interested persons who are needed to sitting at the bedside and providing vigils for persons without families available. We could also use some extra people to work in our office. Call Jacqueline at 513 831-5800. Hospice of Southwest Ohio – Seeks volunteers to help in providing hospice services, Call 770-0820, ext. 111 or email ajones@hswo.org. Hoxworth Blood Center – Hoxworth is recruiting people to help during community blood drives and blood donation centers in the area. Positions include: Blood drive hosts, greeters, blood donor recruiters and couriers. Call Helen Williams at 558-1292 or helen.williams@uc.edu. Wellness Community – Provides free support, education and hope to people with cancer and their loved ones. Volunteers needed to work at special events, health fairs, bulk mailings and other areas. Visit www.thewellnesscommun ity.org and click on “volunteer” to sign up. Call 791-4060, ext. 19.

MISCELLANEOUS

Community Shares of Greater Cincinnati – Seeking volunteer campaign assistant to plan workplace employee giving campaigns and campaign project support volunteers to assist with campaigns. Call 475-0475 or email info@cintishares.org.


LIFE

JUNE 19, 2013 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • B9

Pondarama showing off water gardens This summer marks the 12th anniversary of Meyer Aquascapes’ Pondarama Water Garden Tour. The tour will be Saturday, June 22, and Sunday, June 23, and will be separated into four areas around Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky. There are 25 features on the tour, with some of the best water gardnes in the area. Admission is free. Hours are 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday and 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday. This self-guided tour of water gardens will display eco-system friendly ponds of various sizes and shapes and low maintenance pondless waterfalls and streams. All water features are custom built exclusively for the homeowner. And don’t forget your cameras for a photo contest. Photos need to be in .jpg format and will be sent to Meyer’s email address. Details of our photo contest will be posted on our website. Dan Meyer, owner of Meyer Aquascapes, has been installing custom water gardens for over 13 years. He is a certified contractor with Aquascape Inc. and is an affiliated member of the Better Business Bureau. For information, go to www.aquascapes.com and click on the Pondarama icon to download the Pondarama locations and directions or call 513-9418500. Water gardens on the West Side being featured are: » Aston Oaks Golf Clubhouse, 1 Aston Oaks Drive, North Bend This large pondless feature is behind the clubhouse for viewing by the patrons in the restaurant, wedding parties, and golfers. This is a 20-feet wide by 20-feet high feature built out of natural stone from the area with 16 waterfalls. » Dave and Cathy Carnessali, 6549 Candlestick, Delhi Township New on the tour. This pondless waterfall is a perfect example of a 360 degree waterfall located in the circle driveway. Water spreads out over three sides. This is a unique waterfall. The property has been landscaped with knock out roses and other perennials.

The 360 degree waterfall at Dave and Cathy Carnessali home in Delhi Township sits in a circle driveway. PROVIDED

LEGAL NOTICE NUISANCE VIOLATION 5387 ROMANCE LANE

This pond of Russ and Donna Welty in Miami Township was built with 70 tons of boulders and 30,000 gallons of water. PROVIDED

This is an example of a small pondless waterfall fits into small spaces for this patio home at a home in Forest Park. PROVIDED

» Marathon Station at corner of Ebenezer and Bridgetown roads, Green Township This is a large pondless waterfall with three powerful waterfalls. Two waterfalls – one faces the street and the other one faces the gas station. The front waterfalls push 15,000 gallons per hour. The feature is constructed with Weathered Limestone rock. » Russ and Donna Welty, 8183 Jordan Road, Miami Township This 28-foot by 65-foot pond gives a magnificent view from all rooms facing the pond, decks and patios. This pond was built with 70 tons of boulders and 30,000 gallons of water. There are two large waterfalls separated by a 15-foot stone

bridge. Lots of koi with a fish cave and tunnels to travel under the bridge. The petunias and roses are in full bloom and there is a hosta garden with a bench. Ask about the man cave. Every year new wonders are added and this feature gets better every year. Follow the walking path around this beautiful pond. » Western Hills Builder’s Supply, 6801 Harrison Ave., Green Township Saturday only. A pondless waterfall with a 10foot stream and three waterfalls. This pondless has been designed by Meyer Aquascapes and is built from a new man-made stone called Rosetta Stone. Join them for a cookout at lunch. » Dave and Diane Collini, 4170 Clearpoint

Drive, Monfort Heights Fellow firefighters will love this feature. This is an unusual pond that was recently converted. The source of the waterfall is a fire hydrant which cascades down into a 4foot by 6-pond. Pond has beautiful plants and fish. » Bonita and Gene Brockert, 2382 Crest Road, Colerain Township This home has three features and beautiful, lush gardens. Visit the 20foot by 20-foot sandstone pond which is framed with landscaping, gazebo and a pergola. Walk throughout the property to enjoy the variety of gardens, statues and rock fountain. Don’t miss the pondless waterfall that can be viewed from the back of the house. Sit on the benches and watch the dragonflies and see the beautiful koi swimming in the pond and pause a moment. See a day lily collection. » Tricia and Erich Cross, 1537 Winford Court, Forest Park. This is the classic example of a small pondless waterfall fits into small spaces for this patio home.

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Notice is hereby given to Betsy Berwanger that property you own in Delhi Township contains excessive vegetation. The Delhi Township Board of Trustees has determined, at Resolution #2013-065, that the condition of the property constitutes a nuisance and is detrimental to the health, safety and general welfare of all persons who live, work or own property within Delhi Township. This notice shall serve as a formal order for you to address the nuisance violations at your property located at 5387 Romance Lane (also known as Parcel 540-00720171 of the Hamilton County Auditor’s Tax Plats), Delhi Township, Hamilton County, State of Ohio as described below: •Cut all excessive vegetation, remove clippings there from, and maintain such at a height not to exceed 12" (All yards); •Remove all debris, or store indoors (All yards garbage, trash, and house hold items). If such excessive vegetation is not cut and removed and if such accumulated debris is not removed, or provision for such cutting and removal is not made within seven (7) days of publishing/posting of this notice, or a hearing before the Board of Trustees is not requested as specified below, the Board will provide for the cutting and removal, and any expenses incurred by the Board in performing such tasks will be entered upon the tax duplicate and will be a lien upon the properties from the date of entry. You have the right to request a hearing before the Board of Trustees within seven (7) days of publishing/posting of this notice. If requested, the hearing will be held at the next regularly scheduled meeting of the Board. The Boards’ meetings are held on the second and last Wednesdays of each month commencing at 6:00 p.m. at 934 Neeb Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45233. At the hearing, you may appear in person or by counsel, may present evidence and examine witnesses. If a hearing is timely requested, action to abate the nuisance conditions will be stayed pending the hearing and further decision of the Board. Your request for a hearing before the Board may be submitted in writing to: Thomas R. Stahlheber, Zoning Inspector, Delhi Township Department of Development Services, 697 Neeb Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45233. Any questions concerning this order should be directed to Mr. Stahlheber at the above described address or at 513-9222705. 1766963


LIFE

B10 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • JUNE 19, 2013

DEATHS Rita Bill Rita Meiners Bill, 96, Price Hill, died June 10. Survived by children Joan (Dan) Halpin, Mary Jean (Bob) Wenzel, Bill Frank L. (Jangchup), Dan (Cheri) Bill, Therese (Steve) Schmuelling; grandchildren Bridget, Maureen, Karen, Tenzin Tharpa, Tenzin Nyingpo, Janine, Mark, Erik, Eric, Elise; siblings Jean, Louis Meiners; five great-grandchildren. Preceded in death by husband Frank Bill, grandson Kurt Bill. Services were June 17 at St. William. Arrangements by Neidhard-Minges Funeral Home. Memorials to: St. William Church, 4108 W. Eighth St., Cincinnati, OH 45205, The Women’s Connection, 4042 Glenway Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45205 or the American Heart Association, 5211 Madison Road, Cincinnati, OH 45227.

James Bunner James Bunner, 62, died June 11. Survived by wife Joyce Helmers Bunner; sons Jamie (Erin), Jerry Bunner Bunner; grandchildren Emerson, Lucia; siblings Wayne, Don Bunner, Charlene (Kevin) Oldfield. Arrangements by Meyer & Geiser Funeral Home. Memorials to: Hospice of Cincinnati, P.O. Box 633597, Cincinnati, OH 45263-3597.

Nino Catanzaro Anthony C. “Nino” Catanzaro, 61, Price Hill, died June 2. He was an analyst for Catholic Health Partners. Catanzaro Survived by wife Angie Catanzaro; children Tony W., David (Marie) Catanzaro, Anne (Kevin) Weiss; granddaughter Sophia Weiss; father Anthony C. Catanzaro, siblings Bobbi (the late Bud) Owens,

Mike (Lavonne) Addis, Mare’ (Tex) Chee, Joe (Kathy), Chris Steele. Preceded in death by mother Mary Jo Steele Smith. Services were June 7 at St. William. Arrangements by Ralph Meyer & Deters Funeral Home. Memorials to: Elder High School, 3900 Vincent Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45205.

Herbert Couch Herbert Lee Couch, 80, Price Hill, died May 30. He was an electrician for American Laundry Machines. Survived by Couch children Michael (Loretta) Couch, Amanda (George) Busche; sister Lucy Everman; six grandchildren; three great-grandchildren. Preceded in death by parents Ned, Amanda Couch, stepmother Della Couch. Services were June 3 at Ralph Meyer & Deters Funeral Home.

Francis Erndt Francis A. Erndt, 72, died June 4. He was a computer operator for Provident Bank. Survived by siblings Nicholas (Annemarie) Erndt, Susie (the late Mato) Tomasevic, Hans (the late Ilse) Schult; many nieces, nephews, great-nieces and nephews. Arrangements by Radel Funeral Home. Memorials to the Hospice of Cincinnati.

Michael Hoffman Michael John Hoffman, 80, died June 6. He worked for IBM. He was an Air Force veteran, served on the parish boards at Guardian Angels and St. John Fischer, was a board member of Pregnancy Center East, a founding board member of the Ohio Family Alliance and The Way of Love, and volunteered as a probation officer for Hamilton County courts and with the Society of St. Vincent de Paul. Survived by wife Jane Leroux Hoffman; children Deborah (Mark) Hiltenbeitel, Michael (Karen) Jr., Mark, William (Holly), Andrew Hoffman, Ann (Floyd) Vanzant; stepchildren Robert, John (Anne) Leroux,

Butch Scherrer

ABOUT OBITUARIES Basic obituary information and a color photograph of your loved one is published without charge by The Community Press. Please call us at 853-6262 for a submission form. To publish a larger memorial tribute, call 242-4000 or pricing details.

Amy (Dwayne) Craft; sister Sister Ann Marie, DC; 17 grandchildren; four great-grandchildren. Preceded in death by wife Mary Lou Hoffman, siblings Leo (Irene) Hoffman, William Hoffman, Joseph (Phyllis) Hoffman, Mary (John) Belting. Services were June 14 at St. Antoninus. Arrangements by Meyer & Geiser Funeral Home. Memorials to: Pregnancy Center East, 3944 Edwards Road, Cincinnati, OH 45209 or Right to Life, 1802 W. Galbraith Road, Cincinnati, OH 45239.

Donald Peyton Donald C. Peyton, 76, Price Hill, died May 27. He worked for Otis Elevators. He was a 32nd degree Mason and a Peyton member of Norwood Carthage Lodge 576. Survived by daughters Dawn, Desiree Peyton; grandchildren Gabrielle Peyton, Isabella Dewald, Jade Hamby, Gregory Senger; stepdaughter Deborah (Greg) Jaspers; step-grandchildren Douglas Hensley, Matthew, Mark Childs, Sebastian Siglock; sister Bonita Peyton; former wife Remilda Peyton. Preceded in death by sister Marlene Buttleworth. Services were June 4 at Ralph Meyer & Deters Funeral Home.

Anna Privett Anna Richmond Privett, 78, formerly of Price Hill, died June 8. Survived by children Sandy (Robert) Griffin, Sue (Greg) Reed, Norma, Nancy (Tim) Tarter, Kathy Privett, Frank Zimmerman; grandchildren Debbie, Sharon, Kim, Mike, Shonda, Barb, Tina, Jason, Steven, Cindy, Jennifer, Angie, Walter, Tyler, Zachary; siblings Bill, Ralph, Jerry, Clint; 42 great-grandchildren; one great-greatgrandchild. Preceded in death by husbands James Wathen, Lester Privett, siblings Geniva,

Nan, Jimmy, Lucille, Jane, Roy. Services were June 13 at E.C. Nurre Funeral Home. Memorials to the American Cancer Society.

Angela Re Angela M. Re, 88, died June 9. She was a secretary for General Mills. Survived by siblings Joseph (Margie) Jr., Re JoAnn, Bill (Lucy) Re, Mary Francis BrownRe; sister-in-law Lois Re; many nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by parents Joseph, Lena Re, siblings Adrienne (Frank) Sieve, Sister Marie, S.C., Tony, Larry Re. Services were June 13 at St. Teresa of Avila. Arrangements by B.J. Meyer Funeral Home. Memorials to: St. Teresa of Avila Memorial Fund, 1175 Overlook Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45238 or Tender Mercies, P.O. Box 14465, Cincinnati, OH 45250.

Daniel Rountree Daniel J. Rountree, 78, died June 9. He was a contractor. He was a Marine Corps veteran and a member of the Rountree Moores Hill, Ind., American Legion. Survived by wife Loretta Lynch Gillespie Rountree; children Audrey (Terry) King, Rhonda (Daryl Dailey), Daniel “Boonie” (Pam), Mark (Sharon), Daniele (Dave McNeal) Rountree; siblings Robert Rountree, Dorothy Anderson, Betty Jean Bailey; seven stepchildren; eight grandchildren; many step-grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Preceded in death by wife Dora Lynch Rountree, parents George, Dorothy (Bath) Rountree, brothers Frances, Albert Rountree. Services were June 12 at Dennis George Funeral Home.

Robert “Butch” Scherrer, 67, died May 31. He was an entrepreneur. He was an Army veteran of Vietnam. Scherrer Survived by wife Susan Scherrer; children Katie, Jon Scherrer; sisters Carol Davidson, Mary “Kathy” Kral; many nieces and nephews. Services were June 10 at Our Lady of the Visitation. Arrangements by Radel Funeral Home. Memorials to the Thomas Scherrer Memorial Scholarship Fund at Elder High School.

Daniel Sehlhorst Daniel A. Sehlhorst, 66, Price Hill, died June 11. Survived by wife Diana Sehlhorst; sons Douglas (Lori), David (Lisette), Dan (Beth) Sehlhorst; grandchildren Andrew, Daniel, Lana, Mitchell, Simon, Gus; sisters Claire Sawyers, Patty Ott, Sue Tadesco. Preceded in death by brother James Sehlhorst. Services were June 15 at St. Lawrence Church. Arrangements by Mihovk-Rosenacker Funeral Home. Memorials to: Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45229.

Nell Silbernagel Nell Alberta Silbernagel, 89, died June 18. She worked for Sears. Survived by children Michael (Teresa) Silbernagel, Gail Boertlien; grandchildren Shannon, Matthew, Stewart, Kyla; greatgrandchildren Kennedy, Miles. Preceded in death by husband Silbernagel. Services were June 12 at Radel Funeral Home. Memorials to: Hospice of Cincinnati Inc., P.O. Box 633597, Cincinnati, OH 45263-3597.

Richard Tenoever

Tenoever

Richard W. Tenoever, 89, died June 10. He was an Army veteran of World War II and a longtime volunteer at Bayley and Mother Marga-

ret Hall. Survived by wife Virginia Hudson Tenoever; children Diane (Harry) Woytsek, Rick (Veronica), William (Amy Farr) Tenoever, Nancy (Michael) McLaughlin, Teresa (Ron) Martin; son-in-law Ed Nemann; 14 grandchildren; six great-grandchildren. Preceded in death by daughter Janet Nemann, siblings Sylvia Grow, Steve Tenoever, Rosemary Terlinden, Mildred Doepker, Marge Griese, Mary Grace Huesman. Services were June 14 at the Bayley Enrichment Center. Arrangements by Meyer & Geiser Funeral Home. Memorials to Bayley.

Lawrence Tepe Sr. Lawrence Tepe Sr., 90, died June 7. He was a machinist for Keebler. He was an Army veteran of World War II. Tepe Survived by children Larry (Jan), Tim (Barbara), Dennis (Krista), Matt (Cindy), John (Marianne) Tepe, Mary (Mike) Woeste; grandchildren Adam (Mary), Kate, Dennis (Anne), Eric, Tim, Julie, Christina, Jonathan, Maria Tepe, Josh, Laura, Ben, Jessica Woeste, Ted Schaible, Colleen (Ben) Hofstetter, Emily (Ryan) Huxtable, Jill (Jason) Gordon; great-grandsons Dennis, Cooper, Bradley Tepe. Preceded in death by wife Patricia O’Donnell Tepe. Arrangements by Rosenacker & Sexton Funeral Home. Memorials to Elder High School, 3900 Vincent Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45205.

Robert Wolff Robert A. Wolff Jr., 66, died June 10. Survived by wife Ann Wolff; children David, Laura Wolff; sister Christine Berry; grandchildren; many nieces and nephews. Services were June 13 at St. Ignatius of Loyola. Arrangements by Neidhard-Minges Funeral Home. Memorials to: Children’s Hospital Medical Center, P.O. Box 5202, Cincinnati, OH 45201.

LEGAL NOTICE NUISANCE VIOLATION 343 GREENWELL AVENUE Notice is hereby given to CPA1 Holdings LLC that property you own in Delhi Township contains excessive vegetation. The Delhi Township Board of Trustees has determined, at Resolution #2013-063, that the condition of the property constitutes a nuisance and is detrimental to the health, safety and general welfare of all persons who live, work or own property within Delhi Township. This notice shall serve as a formal order for you to address the nuisance violations at your property located at 343 Greenwell Avenue (also known as Parcel 540-00410151 of the Hamilton County Auditor’s Tax Plats), Delhi Township, Hamilton County, State of Ohio as described below: •Cut all excessive vegetation, remove clippings there from, and maintain such at a height not to exceed 12" (All yards); •Remove all debris, or store indoors (All yards garbage, trash, and house hold items). If such excessive vegetation is not cut and removed and if such accumulated debris is not removed, or provision for such cutting and removal is not made within seven (7) days of publishing/posting of this notice, or a hearing before the Board of Trustees is not requested as specified below, the Board will provide for the cutting and removal, and any expenses incurred by the Board in performing such tasks will be entered upon the tax duplicate and will be a lien upon the properties from the date of entry. You have the right to request a hearing before the Board of Trustees within seven (7) days of publishing/posting of this notice. If requested, the hearing will be held at the next regularly scheduled meeting of the Board. The Boards’ meetings are held on the second and last Wednesdays of each month commencing at 6:00 p.m. at 934 At Neeb Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45233. the hearing, you may appear in person or by counsel, may present evidence and examine witnesses. If a hearing is timely requested, action to abate the nuisance conditions will be stayed pending the hearing and further decision of the Board. Your request for a hearing before the Board may be submitted in writing to: Thomas R. Stahlheber, Zoning Inspector, Delhi Township Department of Development Services, 697 Neeb Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45233. Any questions concerning this order should be directed to Mr. Stahlheber at the above described address or at 513-9222705. 1001766953

LEGAL NOTICE NUISANCE VIOLATION 1032 BEECHMEADOW LANE Notice is hereby given to Karen T. Tomlin that property you own in Delhi Township contains a junk motor vehicle. The Delhi Township Board of Trustees has determined, at Resolution #2013-064 (copy attached), that the condition of the property constitutes a nuisance and is detrimental to the health, safety and general welfare of all persons who live, work or own property within Delhi Township. This notice shall serve as a formal order for you to address the nuisance violations at your property located at 1032 Beechmeadow Lane (also known as Parcel 540-0051-0098 of the Hamilton County Auditor’s Tax Plats), Delhi Township, Hamilton County, State of Ohio as described below: •Remove the junk motor vehicle (red Honda Prelude), or store within a garage. If such junk motor vehicle is not removed or repaired or provision for such removal and repair is not made within fourteen (14) days of publishing/posting of this notice, or a hearing before the Board of Trustees is not request ed as specified below, the Board will provide for the removal, and any expenses incurred by the Board in performing such tasks will be entered upon the tax duplicate and will be a lien upon the properties from the date of entry. You have the right to request a hearing before the Board of Trustees within seven (7) days of publishing/posting of this notice. If requested, the hearing will be held at the next regularly scheduled meeting of the Board. The Boards’ meetings are held on the second and last Wednesdays of each month commencing at 6:00 p.m. at 934 Neeb Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45233. At the hearing, you may appear in person or by counsel, may present evidence and examine witnesses. If a hearing is timely requested, action to abate the nuisance conditions will be stayed pending the hearing and further decision of the Board. Your request for a hearing before the Board may be submitted in writing to: Thomas R. Stahlheber, Zoning Inspector, Delhi Township Department of Development Services, 697 Neeb Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45233. Any questions concerning this order should be directed to Mr. Stahlheber at the above described address or at 513-922-2705. 6964

LEGAL NOTICE NUISANCE VIOLATION 4301 DELRYAN DRIVE Notice is hereby given to William T. & Patricia A. Schmitt that property you own in Delhi Township contains excessive vegetation. The Delhi Township Board of Trustees has determined, at Resolution #2013-072, that the condition of the property constitutes a nuisance and is detrimental to the health, safety and general welfare of all persons who live, work or own property within Delhi Township. This notice shall serve as a formal order for you to address the nuisance violations at your property located at 4301 Delryan Drive (also known as Parcel 540-00120406 of the Hamilton County Auditor’s Tax Plats), Delhi Township, Hamilton County, State of Ohio as described below: •Cut all excessive vegetation, remove clippings there from, and maintain such at a height not to exceed 12" (All yards). If such excessive vegetation is not cut and removed or provision for such cutting and removal is not made within seven (7) days of publishing/posting of this notice, or a hearing before the Board of Trustees is not requested as specified below, the Board will provide for the cutting and removal, and any expenses incurred by the Board in performing such tasks will be entered upon the tax duplicate and will be a lien upon the properties from the date of entry. You have the right to request a hearing before the Board of Trustees within seven (7) days of publishing/posting of this notice. If requested, the hearing will be held at the next regularly scheduled meeting of the Board. The Boards’ meetings are held on the second and last Wednesdays of each month commencing at 6:00 p.m. at 934 At Neeb Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45233. the hearing, you may appear in person or by counsel, may present evidence and examine witnesses. If a hearing is timely requested, action to abate the nuisance conditions will be stayed pending the hearing and further decision of the Board. Your request for a hearing before the Board may be submitted in writing to: Thomas R. Stahlheber, Zoning Inspector, Delhi Township Department of Development Services, 697 Neeb Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45233. Any questions concerning this order should be directed to Mr. Stahlheber at the above described address or at 513-9222705. 6970


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JUNE 19, 2013 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • B11

POLICE REPORTS CINCINNATI DISTRICT 3 Arrests/citations Brian D. Brodeur, born 1956, possession of drugs, 6100 River Road, May 29. Chris Simonson, born 1985, simple assault, larceny, 4205 Glenway Ave., May 30. Lashonda Allen, born 1978, possession of an open flask, 3101 Price Ave., May 30. Robert Lee Claxton, born 1961, simple assault, larceny, 4441 W. Eighth St., May 31. Denise L. Grace, born 1958, theft, 4798 Prosperity Place, June 1. James R. Hamilton, born 1978, possession of drug paraphernalia, 4553 Midland Ave., June 1. Tequilla Hearing, born 1983, theft, 4798 Prosperity Place, June 1. Knoel Coleman, born 1988, possession of drug paraphernalia, 1915 Westmont Lane, June 2. Allen Phinney, born 1994, criminal trespassing, 4751 Clevesdale Drive, June 3. Arthur Tucker, born 1970, failure to comply with police, assault, disorderly conduct, possession of drugs, 3642 W. Liberty St., June 3. Daniel Kelley, born 1987, violation of a protection order or consent agreement, 6800 Rapid Run Pike, June 3. Jonas Whorton, born 1987, possession of drugs, 3640 Mayfield Ave., June 3. Michael Lamonte Wright, born 1987, domestic violence, 921 Elberon Ave., June 3. Rebecca A. King, born 1968, using deception to obtain a dangerous drug, 4861 Glenway Ave., June 3. Shauna M. Goerner, born 1977, permitting drug abuse, drug abuse, misdemeanor drug possession, trafficking, possession of drug paraphernalia, 3462 W. Liberty St., June 3. Dontai L. Robinson, born 1971, violation of a temporary protection order, 1224 Iliff Ave., June 4. Judith P. Parker, born 1979, disorderly conduct, 1022 Wells St., June 4. Oscar Ferguson, born 1969, disorderly conduct, misdemeanor drug possession, 1022 Wells St., June 4. Roosevelt D. Knight, born 1982, criminal damaging or endangering, aggravated burglary, felonious assault, 2604 Price Ave., June 4. Sean L. Bradley, born 1973, domestic violence, 1035 Purcell Ave., June 4. Thomas Robinson, born 1992, possession of drugs, 3789 Warsaw Ave., June 4. Yosiah Pitts, born 1982, domestic violence, 1015 Beech Ave., June 4. Bobby Smith, born 1967, criminal damaging or endangering, 3201 Warsaw Ave., June 5. Emery Gray, born 1969, assault, 3201 Warsaw Ave., June 5. Kesi Pickens, born 1992, assault, aggravated menacing, criminal damaging or endangering, 906 Elberon Ave., June 5. Les Paul Stuckey, born 1982, domestic violence, 535 Grand Ave., June 5. Reyna Morales, born 1970, disorderly conduct, obstructing justice, falsification, 1924 Westmont Lane, June 5. Branden Eaton, born 1988, criminal trespassing, 1638 Gilsey Ave., June 6. Donald D. Shelton, born 1992, failure to confine or leash vicious dog, 1031 Rosemont Ave., June 6. Jessica J. Nicely, born 1980, using deception to obtain a dangerous drug, 4241 Glenway Ave., June 7. Mark Jones, born 1993, obstructing official business, 1201 Manss Ave., June 7. Thomas I. Hughley, born 1978, aggravated menacing, assault, 640 Overlook Ave., June 7. Toby M. Strunks, born 1976, possession of drug abuse instruments, 528 Trenton Ave., June 7. Lorenzo Bratcher, born 1994, assault, 1752 Iliff Ave., June 8. Major Cody, born 1957, criminal trespassing, 3609 Warsaw Ave., June 8. Raymond Lowery, born 1977, assault, 2660 Lehman Road, June 8. Zaire Raven, born 1994, resisting arrest, city or local ordinance violation, obstructing official business, 3700 Warsaw Ave., June 8. Jose Levano, born 1987, drug

ABOUT POLICE REPORTS The Community Press publishes the names of all adults charged with offenses. The information is a matter of public record and does not imply guilt or innocence. To contact your local police department: » Delhi Township: Chief Jim Howarth, 922-0060 » Cincinnati District 3: Capt. Russell A. Neville, 263-8300 abuse, 4813 Rapid Run Pike, June 9. Jose Solis Vargas, born 1967, drug abuse, 4813 Rapid Run Pike, June 9. Joseph Gray, born 1971, aggravated menacing, 4431 W. Eighth St., June 9. Keith Marcum, born 1991, possession of an open flask, disorderly conduct, 3100 W. Eighth St., June 9. Cody Rouse, born 1993, disorderly conduct, 71 Monitor Ave., June 10. Robert S. Lewis, born 1980, domestic violence, 6943 Gracely Drive, June 10.

Incidents/reports Aggravated burglary 2604 Price Ave., June 4. Aggravated menacing 429 Hawthorne Ave., June 2. 1945 Dunham Way, June 2. 4500 Glenway Ave., May 30. 778 Summit Ave., May 31. Aggravated robbery 1044 Winfield Ave., June 1. 1211 Wessels Ave., June 3. Assault 1047 Rosemont Ave., June 2. 1141 Grand Ave., June 3. 1836 Sunset Ave., June 3. 1913 Westmont Lane, June 3. 1022 Wells St., June 4. 3215 Warsaw Ave., June 4. 805 Pedretti Ave., May 30. 4441 W. Eighth St., May 31. Breaking and entering 3614 Warsaw Ave., June 1. 3920 Glenway Ave., June 1. 6902 Home City Ave., June 2. 1222 Quebec Road, June 3. 314 Purcell Ave., June 3. 4332 Glenway Ave., June 3. 1700 Grand Ave., June 5. 3417 Warsaw Ave., June 6. 3635 Glenway Ave., May 31. Burglary 1230 Quebec Road, June 1. 3637 Mayfield Ave., June 2. 907 Kreis Lane, June 4. 1008 Schiff Ave., June 5. 1147 Olivia Lane, June 6. 664 Enright Ave., May 31. Criminal damaging/endangering 1271 Ross Ave., June 1. 3217 Price Ave., June 1. 355 Grand Ave., June 1. 4053 St. William Ave., June 1. 3050 Mickey Ave., June 2. 450 Fairbanks Ave., June 2. 919 Fairbanks Ave., June 2. 4719 Green Glen Lane, June 3. 1006 Grand Ave., June 4. 2604 Price Ave., June 4. 4859 N. Overlook Ave., June 6. 4891 N. Overlook Ave., June 6. Domestic violence Reported on Enright Avenue, May 28. Reported on Hillside Avenue, May 28. Reported on Enright Avenue, May 29. Reported on Green Glen Lane, May 29. Reported on Nancy Lee Lane, May 30. Reported on Henkel Drive, May 30. Reported on West Eighth Street, May 31. Reported on Fairbanks Avenue, June 2. Reported on Lehman Road, June 3. Reported on Elberon Avenue, June 3. Felonious assault 1112 Rosemont Ave., May 26. 925 Chateau Ave., May 29. 1100 Ross Ave., June 1. 2604 Price Ave., June 4. Improperly discharging firearm at/into habitation/school 1840 Sunset Ave., June 2. 3750 Laclede Ave., June 5. Menacing 3738 Warsaw Ave., May 25. 1004 Seton Ave., May 29. 1271 Ross Ave., June 1. Robbery 3601 W. Eighth St., May 27. 1047 Rosemont Ave., June 2. Theft 716 Mount Hope Ave., May 22. 747 Mount Hope Ave., May 20. 816 Summit Ave., May 18. 925 Wells St., May 19. 153 Meridian St., May 19. 6360 Revere Ave., May 23. 6615 Gracely Drive, May 23. 1011 Morado Drive, May 21. 1015 Benz Ave., May 24. 1039 Rosemont Ave., May 20. 1050 Schiff Ave., May 21. 1211 Beech Ave., May 22.

1818 First Ave., May 22. 3741 Westmont Drive, May 20. 3775 Westmont Drive, May 19. 4030 Heyward St., May 20. 4220 Glenway Ave., May 18. 4612 Rapid Run Road, May 20. 4657 Glenway Ave., May 21. 4719 Dale Ave., May 19. 4724 Glenway Ave., May 20. 4748 Dale Ave., May 20. 4968 Glenway Ave., May 23. 640 Overlook Ave., May 22. 696 Overlook Ave., May 19. 825 Pedretti Ave., May 21. 3302 Price Ave., May 24. 3738 Warsaw Ave., May 24. 810 Matson Place, May 24. 4718 Highridge Ave., May 24. 461 Considine Ave., May 25. 486 Crestline Ave., May 25. 510 Considine Ave., May 25. 583 Considine Ave., May 25. 583 Purcell Ave., May 25. 1427 Manss Ave., May 25. 2120 Ferguson Road, May 25. 3400 Warsaw Ave., May 26. 3003 W. Eighth St., May 27. 3006 W. Eighth St., May 27. 3736 Warsaw Ave., May 27. 670 Enright Ave., May 27. 6568 River Road, May 27. 1014 Covedale Ave., May 27. 4746 Hardwick Drive, May 27. 231 Mount Echo Drive, May 28. 983 Wells St., May 28. 6439 Home City Ave., May 28. 3713 Glenway Ave., May 29. 1144 Gilsey Ave., May 30. 4431 W. Eighth St., May 30. 814 Overlook Ave., May 30. 531 Grand Ave., June 1. 2120 Ferguson Road, June 1. 4131 Glenway Ave., June 1. 4173 Pleasure Drive, June 1. 801 Considine Ave., June 2. 808 Fairbanks Ave., June 2. 2144 Ferguson Road, June 2. 531 Grand Ave., June 3. 573 Grand Ave., June 3. 843 Fairbanks Ave., June 3. 3900 Latham Ave., June 3. 5304 Glenway Ave., June 3. 2680 Lehman Road, June 4. 2144 Ferguson Road, June 4. 687 Hawthorne Ave., June 5. 810 Matson Place, June 5. 1043 Benz Ave., June 5. 1868 Sunset Ave., June 5.

4921 Zula Ave., June 5. 706 Rosemont Ave., June 5. 3522 Warsaw Ave., June 7. 4980 Glenway Ave., June 8. 3609 Warsaw Ave., May 30. 977 Hawthorne Ave., May 31. 4441 W. Eighth St., May 31. Unauthorized use of a motor vehicle 490 Elberon Ave., May 21. Unlawful sexual conduct with a minor 3219 W. Eighth St., May 16. Violation of a protection order/consent agreement 1256 Rutledge Ave., May 20. 3788 Westmont Drive, May 21. 1142 Rosemont Ave., May 30. 4507 Glenway Ave., June 3.

DELHI TOWNSHIP Arrests/citations Nicholas Shane Arnsperger, 20, 140 Elco St., driving under suspension at 400 Pedretti Ave., June 4. Caleb M. Thornton, 20, 11048 Quail Ridge Court, driving under suspension at 400 Pedretti Ave., June 5. Charles W. Pryor II, 33, 4031 Heyward St., Apt. 1, driving under suspension at 400 Pedretti Ave., June 5. Latisha Taylor, 32, 807 Summit, driving under suspension at 500 Rosemont Ave., June 5. Juanita C. Luna, 29, 601 Crescent Ave., driving under suspension at 502 Pedretti Ave., June 5. Anthony Mays, 40, 1040 Rosemont Ave. Apt 1, driving under suspension at 500 Rosemont Ave., June 6. Anthony L. Ward, 56, 700 Delhi Road, driving under suspension at 3900 Delhi Road, June 6. David Hensley, 26, 5380 Romance Lane, driving under suspension at 4900 Delhi Road, June 8. Scott Albert Reid, 19, 5426 Amanda’s Oak Drive, driving under suspension at 5100 Delhi Road, June 9. James Carlton, 54, 1860 Queen City Ave., Apt. 108, theft at 4460 Glenhaven Road, Apt. 67, June 7.

Incidents/reports Assault Suspect injured arms and legs of victim at 5409 Plover Lane, June 5. Criminal damaging Skull spray painted on skate park at 5125 Foley Road, June

LEGAL NOTICE NUISANCE VIOLATION 251 ANDERSON FERRY ROAD Notice is hereby given to IL Bridge Fund LLC that property you own in Delhi Township contains excessive vegetation. The Delhi Township Board of Trustees has determined, at Resolution #2013-073, that the condition of the property constitutes a nuisance and is detrimental to the health, safety and general welfare of all persons who live, work or own property within Delhi Township. This notice shall serve as a formal order for you to address the nuisance violations at your property located at 251 Anderson Ferry Road (also known as Parcel 5400081-0078 of the Hamilton County Auditor’s Tax Plats), Delhi Township, Hamilton County, State of Ohio as described below: •Cut all excessive vegetation, remove clippings there from, and maintain such at a height not to exceed 12" (All yards). If such excessive vegetation is not cut and removed or provision for such cutting and removal is not made within seven (7) days of publishing/posting of this notice, or a hearing before the Board of Trustees is not requested as specified below, the Board will provide for the cutting and removal, and any expenses incurred by the Board in performing such tasks will be entered upon the tax duplicate and will be a lien upon the properties from the date of entry. You have the right to request a hearing before the Board of Trustees within seven (7) days of publishing/posting of this notice. If requested, the hearing will be held at the next regularly scheduled meeting of the Board. The Boards’ meetings are held on the second and last Wednesdays of each month commencing at 6:00 p.m. at 934 Neeb Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45233. At the hearing, you may appear in person or by counsel, may present evidence and examine witnesses. If a hearing is timely requested, action to abate the nuisance conditions will be stayed pending the hearing and further decision of the Board. Your request for a hearing before the Board may be submitted in writing to: Thomas R. Stahlheber, Zoning Inspector, Delhi Township Department of Development Services, 697 Neeb Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45233. Any questions concerning this order should be directed to Mr. Stahlheber at the above described address or at 513-9222705. 1766976

6. Unknown person keyed victim’s car and attempted to slash tire at 691 Anderson Ferry Road, June 9. Domestic violence Victim was struck with belt at Delhi Road, June 5. Drug offense Juveniles in possession of drugs and alcohol at 4728 Mayhew Ave., June 3. Possession of marijuana at 5125

Foley Road, June 3. Menacing Woman threatened by person who said would kill her at 4301 Skylark Drive, June 3. Theft Jewelry stolen at 262 Greenwell Ave., June 4. Power tools stolen from truck at 3979 Andrews Ave., June 8.

LEGAL NOTICE NUISANCE VIOLATION 241 GREENWELL AVENUE Notice is hereby given to Eleanor G Bussberg that property you own in Delhi Township contains excessive vegetation. The Delhi Township Board of Trustees has determined, at Resolution #2013-071, that the condition of the property constitutes a nuisance and is detrimental to the health, safety and general welfare of all persons who live, work or own property within Delhi Township. This notice shall serve as a formal order for you to address the nuisance violations at your property located at 241 Greenwell Avenue (also known as Parcel 540-0032-0099 of the Hamilton County Auditor’s Tax Plats), Delhi Township, Hamilton County, State of Ohio as described below: •Cut all excessive vegetation, remove clippings there from, and maintain such at a height not to exceed 12" (All yards). If such excessive vegetation is not cut and removed or provision for such cutting and removal is not made within seven (7) days of publishing/posting of this notice, or a hearing before the Board of Trustees is not request ed as specified below, the Board will provide for the cutting and removal, and any expens es incurred by the Board in performing such tasks will be entered upon the tax duplicate and will be a lien upon the properties from the date of entry. You have the right to request a hearing before the Board of Trustees within seven (7) days of publishing/posting of this notice. If requested, the hearing will be held at the next regularly scheduled meeting of the Board. The Boards’ meetings are held on the second and last Wednesdays of each month commencing at 6:00 p.m. at 934 Neeb Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45233. At the hearing, you may appear in person or by counsel, may present evidence and examine witnesses. If a hearing is timely requested, action to abate the nuisance conditions will be stayed pending the hearing and further decision of the Board. Your request for a hearing before the Board may be submitted in writing to: Thomas R. Stahlheber, Zoning Inspector, Delhi Township Department of Development Services, 697 Neeb Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45233. Any questions concerning this order should be directed to Mr. Stahlheber at the above described address or at 513-922-2705. 6967

LEGAL NOTICE NUISANCE VIOLATION 3930 DELHI PIKE Notice is hereby given to Citimortgage INC that property you own in Delhi Township contains excessive vegetation. The Delhi Township Board of Trustees has determined, at Resolution #2013-077, that the condition of the property constitutes a nuisance and is detrimental to the health, safety and general welfare of all persons who live, work or own property within Delhi Township. This notice shall serve as a formal order for you to address the nuisance violations at your property located at 3930 Delhi Pike (also known as Parcel 540-0010-0079 of the Hamilton County Auditor’s Tax Plats), Delhi Township, Hamilton County, State of Ohio as described below: •Cut all excessive vegetation, remove clippings there from, and maintain such at a height not to exceed 12" (All yards). If such excessive vegetation is not cut and removed or provision for such cutting and removal is not made within seven (7) days of publishing/posting of this notice, or a hearing before the Board of Trustees is not requested as specified below, the Board will provide for the cutting and removal, and any expenses incurred by the Board in performing such tasks will be entered upon the tax duplicate and will be a lien upon the properties from the date of entry. You have the right to request a hearing before the Board of Trustees within seven (7) days of publishing/posting of this notice. If requested, the hearing will be held at the next regularly scheduled meeting of the Board. The Boards’ meetings are held on the second and last Wednesdays of each month commencing at 6:00 p.m. at 934 Neeb Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45233. At the hearing, you may appear in person or by counsel, may present evidence and examine witnesses. If a hearing is timely requested, action to abate the nuisance conditions will be stayed pending the hearing and further decision of the Board. Your request for a hearing before the Board may be submitted in writing to: Thomas R. Stahlheber, Zoning Inspector, Delhi Township Department of Development Services, 697 Neeb Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45233. Any questions concerning this order should be directed to Mr. Stahlheber at the above described address or at 513-9222705. 1766974


B12 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • JUNE 19, 2013

LIFE

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