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D ELHI PRESS

Your Community Press newspaper serving Delhi Township and Sayler Park

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Seton and Elder high school students are presenting a Broadway classic. Full story, A4

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 2013

BECAUSE COMMUNITY MATTERS

Delhi voters debate 3 levies By Monica Boylson

mboylson@communitypress.com

Delhi resident Kim Luken said $220.72 per year is a small price to pay to ensure the vitality of the Delhi parks and fire departments and Oak Hills schools. “I don’t think you can put a price on that,” she said. “How can you not support the parks, fire department and schools?” She and 20 other people attended a Delhi Civic Association meeting April 4 to learn about the three levies that will appear on the May 7 ballot in Delhi Township. The Oak Hills Local School district placed a five-year, 4.82mill emergency levy on the ballot to raise $5.2 million for operating costs for the school district. If passed the 4.82-mill levy would cost the owner of a home with a market value of $100,000 about $145 more per year in taxes. If the levy fails Oak Hills schools Superintendent Todd Yohey said there would be decreased programming and class sizes would be increased to maintain operations at the schools. The Delhi Township Board of Trustees placed a 0.75-mill parks and recreation levy and a 1.75-mill fire levy on the ballot.

Al Duebber, left, introduces the representatives, from left, Don Jasper, Delhi Fire Chief Bill Zoz, and Oak Hills Superintendent Todd Yohey to speak about the park, fire and school levies on the May 7 ballot. MONICA BOYLSON/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

If approved the 0.75-mill park levy would cost the owner of a home with a market value of $100,000 home about $23 more per year in taxes and generate $349,440 in revenue per year. The levy is expected to last 10 years. The parks and recreation levy is needed, officials say, to raise enough money for the department to be sustainable without money from the gener-

al fund. Should the park levy fail there would be a reduction of staffing, maintenance, higher rental fees and the possibility of no summer camp, said Don Jasper, spokesman for the Friends of the Park levy campaign. A 1.75-mill fire levy would generate $815,361 annually and is expected to last five years with the owner of a home with a market value of $100,000 pay-

ing $52.77 more per year in taxes, according to the Hamilton County auditor. The purpose of the fire levy is to maintain the current level of service in the township. If the levy fails Delhi Fire Chief Bill Zoz said that staffing cuts as much as 60 percent of parttime staff would have to be made to balance the budget. This would result in closing one fire station permanently with

the possibility of another being closed depending on the staffing level. Not every resident is so keen on supporting the levies. Steven Howe said that he didn’t think he was given all the information about the levies, in particular the fire levy, saying that even if the levy passes the paramedic units wouldn’t be fully staffed all the time. “We’re paying firefighters to babysit a big, large fire truck over there when if they do their staffing the proper way I really believe that they can staff the fire and medic units as well,” he said. “This is very disheartening to me as a township resident that we’re put in this situation of having three levies on the ballot. I will support the parks 100 percent. “At this point in time I’m not 100 percent sure that I can support both (the school and fire levy) only because it’s financial.” For more information about the Oak Hills levy, visit http://ohlsd.us/ohlevy/. For information about the parks levy and the fire levy visit www.delhi.oh.us and click on “levy information” on the left hand side of the page. Additional information can be found at http://www.delhiparks.info/ and http://delhifirelevy.com/.

Fundraiser to help Sayler Park man By Monica Boylson mboylson@communitypress.com

Sayler Park resident Jason Soudrette is the kind of guy who would give you the shirt off his back, his aunt Laura Boeing said, but now the husband and father of a 2-year-old boy needs some help. The sprint car racer and former bass player for local bluegrass band the Tillers has been battling leukemia and is scheduled to have a bone marrow transplant on May 16. He has been in and out of the hospital receiving chemotherapy treatments to prepare for the transplant and has not been working. Soudrette’s family and friends have been organizing fundraisers to help pay for medical costs not covered by health insurance and to assist his family. Boeing, with help from Soudrette’s mother, Jo, and other relatives have organized a pancake breakfast and raffle to try to raise the much-needed money.

Jason Soudrette, 30, rounds a corner in his sprint car at a race at Waynesfield Raceway Park near Lima, Ohio on July 3. THANKS TO JASON SOUDRETTE.

“You do anything you can for family and this is my way of paying it forward,” said Boeing, who herself is a 12-year breast cancer survivor. From 8:30 a.m. to noon Sunday, April 28, she and her family will take over the Delhi Senior and Community Center and whip up breakfast, have a bake sale, raffle off items and have a split-the-pot. Some

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Jason Soudrette, 30, Sayler Park and his son Ryder, then 16 months, worked on his sprint car. MONICA

of the items to be raffled include four front-row Cincinnati Reds tickets and a Kindle Fire among other prizes. Cost for breakfast is $6 for adults and $3 for children 10 and younger. Donations will be accepted and representatives from bethematch.org which helps match bone marrow donors with people with leukemia will also be at the pancake breakfast to sign people up to become bone marrow donors. Jo Soudrette has been selling raffle tickets on behalf of her son and said she’s been impressed with the generosity of strangers. “I just never realized how kind and generous people are when they hear your story,” she said. The Delhi Senior and Community Center is located at 647 Neeb Road. Donations for Jason Soudrette can also be made at any Fifth Third Bank into the Tillers LLC account for the Jason Soudrette Medical Fund.

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Vol. 86 No. 15 © 2013 The Community Press ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


NEWS

A2 • DELHI PRESS • APRIL 17, 2013

DELHI

BRIEFLY

PRESS

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Find news and information from your community on the Web Delhi Township • cincinnati.com/delhitownship Sayler Park • cincinnati.com/saylerpark Hamilton County • cincinnati.com/hamiltoncounty

News

Marc Emral Senior Editor ...............853-6264, memral@communitypress.com Monica Boylson Reporter ..............853-6265, mboylson@communitypress.com Melanie Laughman Sports Editor .....248-7573, mlaughman@communitypress.com Tom Skeen Sports Reporter ............576-8250, tskeen@communitypress.com

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Classified

To place a Classified ad ...............242-4000, www.communityclassified.com

To place an ad in Community Classified, call 242-4000.

The Delhi Township Fire Department will be servicing fire hydrants in the township during the next two months. During the spring, the fire department flushes and lubricates more than 1,200 hydrants in the township. Fire Chief Bill Zoz said that because servicing the hydrant can cause vibration in the water mains, residents should open faucets and allow them to run for a few minutes to make sure the water is clear before doing dishes or laundry. There is no need to take any other precautions because of the hydrant servicing.

Questions can be directed to the fire department by calling 922-2011 and ask for the officer in charge for the day.

Cancer awareness events

The Mercy Health mobile mammography van will be at Robben Florist in Delhi from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, April 27, for breast cancer screenings. From 2-3:30 p.m. Sunday, April 28, at the florist there will be a Mother/ Daughter/Sister/Friend Tea Party to raise money for Pink Ribbon Girls and FORCE (Facing Our Risk of Cancer Empowered). Cost is $5 per person. To make a reservation, call 251-2737.

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Westwood Works is sponsoring its Westwood Up for Grabs Day, an annual yard sale with a twist. The community recycling event is described as a free garage sale. Residents are invited to bring two gently used items to the event, and they are then free to take anything others have to offer. The only stipulation is that items taken may not be resold or used for profit.

Index Calendar .............B2 Classifieds .............C Food ..................B3 Life ....................B1 Police ................ B6 Schools ..............A7 Sports ................A8 Viewpoints ........A10

Westwood Works member Jennifer Macha said Westwood Up for Grabs Day is a great way for people to clear out unwanted items that may be a treasure to someone else. “There have actually been a lot of quality items in years past,” she said. The event is 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, April 20, at My Neighbor’s Place, 3150 Harrison Ave. Visit www.westwoodworks.org for more information.

Soccer signups

Cheviot Police Association will have 2013 SAY fall soccer signups from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, April 27, at CPA headquarters, 3706 Glenmore Ave., Cheviot. Signups are for boys and girls, ages 4-13. Fees are: $60 for ages 6-13; and $45 for ages 4-5.

Eden Chapel hosts retreat

Eden Chapel United Methodist Church in Sayler Park is hosting a retreat for women from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, April 20, at the church,150 Dahlia Ave. Cost is $10 per person and includes a gourmet lunch and fellowship. Guest speaker Adam Hudepohl will talk about urban gardening. To buy tickets and for more information, call 941-4183.

Family concert

The Cincinnati Metropolitan Orchestra will present “Animals and Adventures” at 3 p.m. Sunday, May 5, in the Seton Performance Hall, 3901

Glenway Ave. The performance features storytelling music for children and adults. Selections include Saint-Saens’ “Carnival of the Animals,” a narrated Red Riding Hood suite, “The Great Steamboat Race” and fun marches and promenades. Families and children are welcome. The concert is free, but donations are welcome. Visit www.gocmo.org or call the orchestra hotline at 941-8956 for more information.

Y seeking mentors

The YMCA is searching for mentors to work with students ages 6 to 18 at Rees E. Price Academy in Price Hill. A mentor must be at least 23 years old and able to contribute one hour per week for a 12-month period. The YMCA provides training and support to get you started in the program. Those interested in becoming a mentor, or those who would like to learn more about the program can contact Stephanie Larkins at 246-3234. All mentors receive complimentary membership at the YMCA.

Mercy hosts resale

Mother of Mercy High School will host Everything Kids, a children’s resale event, from 9 a.m. to noon Saturday, April 20, in Mercy’s gymnasium, 3036 Werk Road. For more details including how to be a vendor please contact Kim Zang at zang_k@motherofmercy.org.


NEWS

APRIL 17, 2013 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • A3 St. Ignatius School honored two men who have modeled Christian values as distinguished alumni. Ron and Bob Hewald are brothers and they have a long history of involvement with Saint Ignatius. The two brothers are lifelong residents of Monfort Heights and are charter members of St. Ignatius. They have provided many services to the parish and the community over the years and are currently active in the St. Ignatius Alumni Association and the Senior Association. With Bob, second from left, and Ron, middle, is Father John Wall, left, assistant principal Laura Sieve, and Father Bryan Reif. PROVIDED

ALUMNI HONOR

Bayley volunteer Renita Homan sits in the golf cart that will be raffled off at the Bayley golf outing. PROVIDED.

Golf outing to benefit Bayley residents By Monica Boylson mboylson@communitypress.com

Bayley, a nonprofit continuing care retirement community in Delhi Township, is hosting the 10th Annual George Knittle Memorial Bayley Golf Classic at 10 a.m. Monday, May 13, at the Hemmer Western Hills Country Club. The golf outing honors former Bayley resident George Knittle, who died at the age of 100. His grandson and FOX news anchor Bill Hemmer and his family will attend the event. “My grandfather rep-

resents the lives of so many who have been blessed with the care from those at Bayley,” Hemmer said. “Most of us will face a similar period in our lives someday and we’d be fortunate to have a facility like Bayley to spend our final years.” Proceeds from the golf outing as well as raffles, donations and sponsorships will benefit residents at Bayley, spokeswoman Debbie Kremer said. “Money raised will help Bayley residents and Adult Day members in need of financial assistance,” she said. “People can help those in need and have fun at the same time.” In addition to the golf outing, there will be a

raffle for a golf cart, a golf trip which includes a day of golf at Donald Ross, Sultan’s Run and the Pete Dye golf courses with lodging, a wheelbarrow of cheer and split the pot. There will be prizes for a holein-one, longest and shortest drive, closest to the pin and longest putt. Registration opens at 10 a.m., lunch at 11 a.m. and a shotgun start at noon. There will be beverages and snacks on the course, a cocktail reception at 4:30 p.m. and awards and raffles at 6 p.m. May 8 is the deadline for golf registration, raffle and sponsorships. To register and for more information call 3474040 or email kathy.baker@bayleylife.org.

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NEWS

A4 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • APRIL 17, 2013

Seton, Elder students performing ‘The King and I’ By Kurt Backscheider kbackscheider@communitypress.com

PRICE HILL — Seton and Elder high school students are presenting a Broadway classic for their spring production. Students involved in the Seton-Elder Performing Arts Series are ready to take the stage and entertain audiences with their rendition of “The King and I.” “The show is about a woman who travels to Siam (now Thailand) to teach the king’s children,” said Seton senior Lindsey Mullen, who stars as Anna, the lead female character.

“While she’s there she finds herself falling in love with the country on a personal level.” Mullen said the musical explores relationships and cultural differences, and has been a challenging show for her and her peers to take on. She said the story takes place in a part of the world with which many students aren’t familiar and they had learn about its cultures and master different speaking accents. “The plot of this show is well developed,” she said. “It is a musical, but the focus is less about the music and more about the story.”

Elder junior Holden Kelley, who portrays the king, said he’s had fun learning the role. “This character is different than a lot of the characters I’ve been,” he said. “He’s unique and he’s a hard character to play.” Kelley said audiences will enjoy the underlying love story between Anna and the king, which he said is not a typical love story. Maribeth Samoya, chair of Seton’s fine arts department, said she’s impressed with the effort the students have put into the show over the past few months.

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“The students are doing an excellent job of conveying such a difficult story,” she said. “The musical talent of the cast is extraordinary as well.” Mullen said there are roughly 70 Seton and Elder students involved in the production, which also features 10 students from area grade schools. Performances are at 7 p.m. Wednesday, April 17; 8 p.m. Friday, April19, and Saturday, April 20; and 3 p.m. Sunday, April 21. Shows are in the Seton Performance Hall, 3901 Glenway Ave. Kelley and Mullen said people will enjoy the show and they encourage folks to check it out. “It’s a classic show,” Mullen said. “A lot of people who come to our shows are theater patrons and I think they’ll appreciate the fact younger people are still doing classic theater.” Tickets are $8 for the Wednesday night performance and $10 for all other performances. For ticket information, call Seton at 471-2600.

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Seton High School senior Lindsey Mullen, right, and St. William School seventh-grader Nick Ciarla rehearse one of the opening scenes in “The King and I.” Students in the Seton-Elder Performing Arts Series will present the musical April 17-21. KURT

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APRIL 17, 2013 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • A5

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NEWS

A6 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • APRIL 17, 2013

New store a place for shopping, relaxing By Amanda Hopkins westernhills@communitypress.com

From the outside, Spiritual Freedom Christian Apparel and Gifts looks like another store along Harrison Avenue. However, Jeff Steely and Marc Rycek are making their store more than a place of business. It will be more of a place where the community can come to relax, read or pray. In the front room of the store at 3349 Harrison Ave. in Cheviot, there are books, movies, shirts, greeting cards and other Christian based gifts for sale. In an adjoining

met several years ago and have become best friends as well as business partners. The two now attend the same church, Lighthouse Worship Center in downtown Cincinnati. “God brought the two of us together for a reason,” Steely said. He credits Rycek for helping him get through a rough point in his life. They both said that opening the store is something that God called them to do. Steely’s wife, Kim, and Rycek’s wife, Kate, are also involved in the business. T-shirts are $15 each or two for $25 and books are around $7 or less. Sports apparel is also for sale. Steely and Rycek

room, the pair is creating a place where community members can host Bible studies or prayer groups or just come in to read a book and relax. “We are in it not to sell but to help,” said Rycek of the East Side. “I have always wanted to do something for God. My mission is ministry. “We want to be a light for the community.” The two will provide coffee, cookies and other refreshments and encourage community members to bring fellowship. Steely, a Green Township resident, and Rycek

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Spiritual Freedom Apparel and gifts owner Jeff Steely, left, and manager Marc Rycek inside the store on Harrison Avenue in Cheviot. AMANDA HOPKINS/FOR THE COMMUNITY PRESS

can also create custom Tshirts for teams, churches and other organizations. The store and meeting room are open Monday through Friday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. and on Saturday

from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Parking is available behind the building and also near the Family Dollar. To learn more about Spiritual Freedom Christian Apparel and Gifts, visit the store’s Facebook

page at www.facebook.com/spiritualfreedom. For more information about using the store community space, contact steelysells@fuse.net or spiritualfreedomc@yahoo.com.

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should be finished by the end of October or early November. Just south of the I-74 interchange, Green Township is nearing completion of its project to widen North Bend Road in front of the new Mercy Health – West Hospital. “Our project is going very well,” said Joe Lambing, Green Township’s director of public services. North Bend is being widened from Boomer Road to Kleeman Road, allowing for the addition of travel and turn lanes, as well as a grass median in front of the hospital. Butch Nanney, the township’s assistant public services director, said the lane stripes could be painted on the widened roadway in late April or early May. The next step would then involve finishing the installation of new traffic signals at North Bend and Kleeman, he said. If the weather cooperates, he said the entire project could be completed in early June, which is one month ahead of schedule. The hospital is expected to open this fall.

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SCHOOLS

APRIL 17, 2013 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS ��� A7

COMMUNITY

PRESS

Editor: Marc Emral, memral@communitypress.com, 853-6264

ACHIEVEMENTS | NEWS | ACTIVITIES | HONORS

CommunityPress.com

COLLEGE CORNER Dean’s list

Brandon Kuley was named to the fall semester dean’s list at Washington University in St. Louis. ■ The following students were named to the fall semester dean’s list at Bellarmine University: Sara Grogan, Ellen Groneman, Kristin Hamrick and Madeline Tucker. ■

Madeline Bell was named to the fall semester dean’s list at the University of Findlay. ■ Jennifer Boehm was named to the fall semester honor’s list at Purdue University. ■

Scholarships

Seton High School graduate Stephanie Little has accepted a Regents Scholarship at Eastern Kentucky University.

HONOR ROLLS ST. DOMINIC SCHOOL

The following student earned honor for the third quarter of the 2012-2013 school year.

Fourth grade First honors: Nawaf Althawadi, Sabra Charles, Heather Cook, Riley Ellis, Clare Ferencak, Ally Gilkey, Adam Kent, Kelsey Listerman, Gabe McDonald, Chris Mueller, Emily Redder, Christie Rolfes, Caitlyn Shoemaker, Jenna Sullivan and Matthew Walter. Second honors: Jarrett Caskey, Amelia Durbin and Jackson Gutzwiller.

Appearing in Our Lady of Victory Players presentation of “Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat” are, in front, Julie Deye, left, and Erin Klumb; Ryan Smith in middle; Anna Lanzillotta, top THANKS TO JOHN JUNG

OLV PLAYING OUT ‘DREAMCOAT’

The recent TV series “The Bible” has brought renewed interest in the stories that many people grew up hearing. At Our Lady of Victory, you can see one come alive for yourself. The OLV Players will present “Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat.” It is

the story of Joseph and his coat of many colors. This show tells the classic story, but with a modern twist. It incorporates country, rock and roll, hip hop, and even an Elvis character. According to director Kristie Beasley-Jung, “This show is fun, exciting, and

really shares the story in a way that is appealing to audiences of all ages.” The shows are 7 p.m. Thursday, Friday and Saturday, April 18, 19, and 20. Tickets are $9 each and are available through the school office, call 347-2072, and at the door.

Fifth grade First honors: Lucas Abbott, John Altenau, Marie Altenau, Abby Baker, Jordan Burke, Austin Combs, Makayla Deilkes, Justin Finkelstein, Kyle Gutzwiller, Kayla Hess, Jake Hibbard, Ryan Hill, Luke Kandra, Eddie Lipps, Taylor O’Leary, Elena Radigan, Caroline Rosen, Mia Roth, Matthew Schloemer, Kyle Sokolis, Marie Specker, Caitlyn Thai, Angelina Tran, Lindsey Vale and Patrick Wagner. Second honors: Chloe Cole, Zach Dugan, Logan Essen, Collin Kandra, Olivia Ohradanzky, Rylee Sanker and Nick Stenger.

Sixth grade First honors: Ally Albertz, Heidi Cook, Nicholas Gillespie, Olivia Hensley, Carmen Leisgang, Brady Lindsey, Morgan Morano, Danny Moster, Abby Neumann, Caroline Oakley, Taylor Pitchford, Reggie Richards, Zach Rizzo, Nicholas Sebas-

tian, Ryan West and Timmy Zang. Second honors: Emily Lipps.

Seventh grade First honors: Hannah Bacon, Katelyn Barnes, T.J. Berndsen, Justin Besl, Tanner Daria, Katie Erpenbeck, Austin Gilkey, Barkley HanebergDiggs, Nathan Hill, Josh Hoffman, Analise Kandra, Jacob Melvin, Tyler Mullins, Mady Nutter, Emma Ochs, Grace Paustian, Erica Schloemer, Sarah Sedler, Ally Sullivan, Jack Sunderman, Abby Tettenhorst, Kenzie Vatter and Lexi Zimmer. Second honors: Mitchel Grady, Jacob Gutzwiller, Lars Illokken, Hope Inman, Charles Lipps, Kurt Luken, Joey Shoemaker and John Specker.

Eighth grade First honors: Anne Awad, Mercede Chaney, Heather Cook, Zachary Czoer, Hannah Doll, Alexa Jacob, Jillian Kloepfer, Michael Rosen, Hannah Schwaeble, Dane Vatter, Jacob Wells, Erica Wessel and Andrew White. Second honors: Abigail Brinker, Braden Connor, Hayley Dressler, Matthew Dugan, Gage Hammann, Nathan Hartung, Olivia Jacob, Johnathon Knolle, Elizabeth Moore, Christian Staubitz, Mikaleigh Thai and Megan Wade.

URSULINE ACADEMY

The following student earned honors for the third quarter of the 2012-2013 school year.

Seniors First honors: Heather Knorr.

OAK HILLS HIGH SCHOOL HONOR ROLLS The following students earned honors for the second quarter of the 20122013 school year. The freshmen and sophomore honor roll recipients were in the April 10 Community Press.

Juniors Highest honors: Ameena Asad, Matthew Baas, Clare Byrne, Samuel Carroll, Melissa Caster, Madison Conn, Courtney Cox, Spencer Dennis, Anna Drees, Megan Eckstein, Miranda Gulasy, Logan Hines, Samantha Hodges, Kacie Ibold, Nicole James, Anthony Jantzen, Samuel Jerow, Adam Keeton, Abby Kremer, Tabitha Lambert, Anthony Mangione, Emma McCarthy, Nicholas McManis, Breanne McWilliams, Jake Nurre, Kyle Orick, Tyler Potter, Abigail Rubemeyer, Oscar Ryland, Christopher Schaefer, Katelyn Scherer, Jade Sligh, Emily Strochinsky, Davis Taske, Kiriakos Triantafilou, Samuel Webb, Megan Wessel, Cameron Wood and Rhiannon Zito. High honors: Hannah Adkins, Kaitlyn Armentrout, Neil Bechmann, Natalie Boehme, Austin Bolger, Matthew Braun, Patricia Breadon, Courtney Brown, Shawn Brown, Michelle Bushle, Holly Butler, Tyler Carmen, Troy Carmony, Michelle Caster, Paige Chesney, Tyler Clayton, Jacob Collinsworth, William Coors, Eleanor Cunningham, Rebecca Davis, Rebecca Doran, Korie Dunaway, Andrew Dupont, Johnathan Eby, Taylor English, Caroline Erhart, Kaitlyn Fadely, Cole Falco, Thomas Faust, Jessalyn Fedrick, Daniel Feller, Alicia Fieler, Ernest Freudemann, Hanna Futrell, Jessica Gourley, Ashleigh Gross, Zachary Guthier, Kaitlyn Heil, Jessica Hein, Cejay Henson, Leland Hoffman, Linzie Hollandsworth, Lauren Hulette, Kayleigh Hummeldorf, Taylor Inskeep, Corbin Jasper, Zachary Jedding, Gage Jenkins, Samantha Kaetzel, Allison Kelley, Alexandra Klumb, Jordan Krauser, Audrey Laker, David Lemmink, Brandi Liebing, Katherine Lincoln, Alexander Luczaj, Matthew Luczaj, Cierra Lunsford, Marissa Maltry, Brittany Marksberry, Katie Marsala, Miles

Marschall, Timothy Martin, Aaron Martinez, Jonah McQuire, Evan Merk, Delanie Miller, Tiffany Miller, Rosary Morgan, Courtney New, Marcus Palmisano, Kelsey Pangallo, Meghal Patel, Hayley Pearson, Emma Poland, Gerald Potavin, Cassandra Proud, Courtney Ransick, Sydney Reed, Connor Reker, Emma Ripperger, Justin Robben, Lorin Rogers, Dakota Sabath, Thomas Sajna, Maria Sams, Eric Schaefer, Lindsey Schumann, Madison Sexton, Samantha Shelby, Rachel Silber, Ethan Skowronski, Nathan Smith, Kaly Snow, Ellen Sper, Dustin Stein, Cameron Suter, Chloe Turner, Nicole Turner, Alisse Urig, Austin Vaive, Daniel Vanderbilt, Alexander Vest, Brian Walker, Kristy Watson, Kayla Weber, Eric West, David Whisman, Jesse Willis, Kristina Wilzbach, Julia Winch, Seth Winkler, Matthew Wisnicky, Tanner Wright and Belmin Zvekic. Honors: Toni Ancona, Austin Anderson, Tori Anderson, Ian Ashwell, Stephanie Bagley, Joshua Bardonaro, Ariana Bayalan, Jeffrey Bender, Kayla Bielefeld, Hannah Binkley, Kayla Blackerby, Nicholas Blanton, Kyle Boeh, Taylor Brannon, Madeline Brass, Alexander Budke, Erin Bundy, Nicholas Burke, André Burnett, Morgan Bush, Kira Campbell, Michael Carney, Andrew Chisholm, Terrence Coleman, Derek Collett, Carissa Craft, Emily Craft, Zachary Dauer, Christine Deaton, Sara Dillman, Molly Doyle, Matthew Elliott, Caleb Erwin, Jayson Essell, David Fink, Mitchel Fisher, Douglas Foley, Benjamin Frazer, Brooke Galbraith, Nicholas Galbraith, Grace Gentry, Hannah Goodman, Paul Greve, Mariah Grouios, Adam Haehnle, Kameron Hallabrin, Jessica Hamberg, Ciara Harbour, Kayla Hausfeld, Marcus Heinrich, Alysa Helmers, Kyle Helmes, Nina Henderson, Michal Hobstetter, Jacob Hogue, Taylor Hogue, Brooke Holt, Zachary Hulsman, Heather Hurley, Kristen Jansen, Emily Jaquet, Cary Jones, Tahjae Jones, David Klayer, Derek Knabe, Benjamin Knochel, Kaellie Korman, Adam Kroeger, David Kuebel, Alexander Lake, Katie Lake,

Jeffrey Lanham, Jessica Larkin, Benjamin Laumann, Austin Leuthold, Vatthana Long, Trisha Lucas, Mackenzie MacDonald, Megan Mahoney, Anna Makris, Aspasia Makris, Andrew Malone, Joseph Malone, Jessica Manley, Chandler Marston, Kristen Martin, Courtney McCarthy, Brian McCartt, Tony McCreadie, Tanner McElroy, Alexandra McFarren, Lisa McGimsey, Devin McQueary, Karlee Meiman, Audrey Meridieth, Nicole Mielke, Cacey Miles, Zachary Mitchell, Donja Mohammad-Shahi, Jonaé Montag, Jessica Neack, Alexander Olivan, Kearstin O’Mara, Michael Ott, Andrew Paduano, Kyle Peasley, Sabrina Peters, Brandon Phillips, Ethan Portune, Alexander Proffitt, Allison Reckers, Myranda Record, Kelly Rogers, Christopher Rosing, Haley Rowe, Timothy Ruffin, Kristina Sanchez, Andrew Schille, Kelsea Schloemer, Anna Schneider, Steven Schnell, Jacob Schnurr, Max Schoenung, Christopher Schwartz, Zachary Seibel, Alexis Seifert, Austin Sheeler, Eric Siegel, Jacob Smith, Stacy Smith, Jacob Snell, Collin Soudrette, Rupert Spraul, Erin Spurlock, Nolan Sroczynski, Shae Stanforth, Natalie Straw, Breanna Sturm, Lacey Sunderhaus, Rose Sweeney, Jacqueline Switzer, Jacob Tendam, Madison Terry, Margaret Tierney, Brittany Turner, Molly Turner, Katie Urban, Samantha Vance, Nicholas Vanover, Jessica Vogel, Stephanie Volz, Paige Walicki, Qi Weng, Trey Wermes, Courtney Wiesman, Kayla Wirtz, Brooke Wiseman, Hannah Wittich, Jonathan Wohlfrom, Kevin Wright and Jessi Ziegelmeier.

Seniors Highest honors: Brittany Anderson, Lora Annis, Sarah Arnold, Kimberly Baker, Christopher Beck, Danielle Bestfelt, Justin Bishop, Adam Bossman, Lindsey Eckstein, Emma Fox, Marissa Fox, Erika Frondorf, Emily Hinton, Mario Hristovski, Madison Jasper, Michelle Jennrich, Kevin Konkoly, Daniel Kurtz, Julia Lierman, Jacob Mercurio, Meredith Meyer, Brianna Meyers, Rachel Mistler, Sarah Mohr,

Kelley Murray, Tan Nguyen, Eleni Panagiotopoulou, Rachel Price, Brady Ramsaur, Curtis Robertson, Adam Roddy, Jaime Sanzere, Jessica Sherlock, Lindsay Smith, Karley Sommerfield, Halle Tenhundfeld, Elena Thier, Kaleb Tomlin, Matthew Warman, Jessica Wieman, Emma Wilhelmus, Ciera Woycke and Jim Yang. High honors: Ethan Anderson, Nathan Anuci, Amanda Arnold, Aimee Audretch, Gregory Bayalan, Alex Behm, Justin Biggs, Mitchell Bischoff, Amber Boehm, Nathan Boehringer, Michael Brackett, Patrick Breitenbach, Rex Brigger, Megan Brodbeck, Ashleigh Burg, Jordan Cain, Kyler Canfield, Ian Cundiff, Samantha Davis, Zachery Davis, Cynthia Depenbrock, Brittany Dixon, Michael Dwenger, Jacob Essert, Marisa Etris, Alec Fisher, Simon Gamel, Casey Giffin, Courtney Gilday, Alexander Golabovski, Hope Guthier, Devan Hayes, Ashely Herzner, Kelly Hetzel, Matthew Hoendorf, Hannah Inman, Brandon Kappen, John Kearns, Anna King, Robb Klawitter, Ashli Klug, Elizabeth Lang, Mackenzie Laumann, Kathleen Licht, Adam Lutz, Macy MacArthur, Brandon MacDonald, Kellie Marshall, Nicholas McGinnis, Hayley Miles, Mikayla Moore, Noah Morgan, Joseph Moster, Christine Murphy, Amin Musaitif, Felicia Nelson, Samantha Noble, Marissa O’Dell, Mackenzie Parian, Kaitlin Patton, Cassandra Penley, Kristen Petronio, Alexandria Ragland, Jeremy Record, Danielle Reddington, Rebecca Reif, Andrew Richardson, Jacqueline Roberts, Amanda Schirmer, Jack Schmidt, Kevin Scholz, Adam Schueler, Anna Schueler, Karli Shackelford, Lacy Shapiro, Sara Sheridan, Nicole Siciliano, Erin Sommer, Beverly Steele, Alec Steffen, Gweneveir Stevens, Jessica Suhr, Connor Sullivan, Mckalyn Sunderman, Kimberly Taber, Olivia Thomas, Alexander Thrasher, Summer Tscheiner, Tanner Viox, Jacob Wall, Owen Walsh, Kara Warman, Alexander Watzek, Katelyn Wauligman, Kelsey Webb, Christopher Wells, Nathan Wilkins, Tasha Williams, Tyler

Willig, Lowrey Willis, Frankie Wong and Taylor Zorick. Honors: Mary Aichele, Ali Ebrahim Albani, Ashley Amend, Anne Backer, Maxwell Baltzersen, Mark Bartlett, Corinne Baum, Tyler Bell, Kyle Berger, Sarah Berkemeyer, Morgan Berra, Anna Bettner, Kameron Bledsoe, Aaron Bohache, Brook Brannon, Amanda Braun, Andrew Breiner, Cody Bruser, Jacob Buller, Kenneth Burg, Corey Bushle, James Byrnes, Jeremy Cain, Caleb Carnes, Augustus Carpenter, Devon Clayton, Ryan Colwell, Alexander Combs, Emma Creech, Jeremy Daniels, Adam Davis, Brittany Demaggio, Colin Devine, David Didusch, Thomas Dinger, Adonis Donaldson-Spivey, Kelsey Duenhoft, Tyler Duggins, John Eilerman, Elizabeth Engleman, Gabriella Ferguson, Constance Frankenstein, Cody Frondorf, Erin Grace, Jenna Haarmeyer, Andre Hakim, Austin Hands, Brooke Hater, Victoria Hensley, Chloe Herzog, Morgan Hetzel, Bradley Hodges, Samuel Hogue, Sarah Holtman, Tanner Howell, Jeremy Jeter, Dakota Kathman, Leah Kathmann, Lloyd Keith, Zachary Keyes, David King Iii, Savannah Kreiner, Justin Lange, Kristofer Laub, Kelsey Lauman, An Le, Devin Lillis, Allison Lincoln, Sophainara Long, Harrison Lucas, Ryan Lucas, Kylie Luebbering, Michael May, Aaron McAfee, Darien McDowell, Caitlin Mergard, Sierra Meskin, Blake Meyer, Kane Miller, Ryan Neiheisel, Nicholas Norman, Michael O’Toole, Kaitlyn Parnell, Gabrielle Pasqualetti, Rose Pendley, Austin Piening, Makeyva Pleasant, Daniel Pohlmann, Michael Raabe, Kathleen Ray, Nicholas Reuss, Jacob Richmond, Mariah Robertson, Cody Roden, Mary Rosing, Emily Rubush, Krista Rudolph, Katherine Ruwe, Jacob Salzl, Jake Seaman, Melanie Shepherd, Alecia Siegel, Nathan Siemer, Elizabeth Slattery, Danielle Smith, Jessie Spangler, Kaitlyn Stenger, Tyler Stump, Joseph Trent, Elizabeth Werner, Brianna Whalen, Tyler Willenborg, Krista Witterstaetter and Chase Wullenweber.


SPORTS

A8 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • APRIL 17, 2013

Editor: Melanie Laughman, mlaughman@communitypress.com, 513-248-7573

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | RECREATIONAL

COMMUNITY

PRESS

CommunityPress.com

Oak Hills aims for winning year By Tom Skeen

Anthony Stacklin of Elder gets way up over the net to slam home another kill for the Panthers against Milford last season. The outside hitter is expected to produce in a big way for the Panthers in 2013. BRANDON

tskeen@communitypress.com

HAMILTON CO. — Aces are

being served all over the Tristate, so here is a look at how the 2013 volleyball season is shaping up in the /Delhi Press/Price Hill Press readership area:

Elder

The season didn’t start the way coach Sean Tierney anticipated for his Elder Panthers. A week before the regular season was set to begin senior Joe Sansone suffered a broken collarbone and is likely out for the majority, if not all, of the season. “It was kind of an unexpected challenge going into the season,” Tierney said. “(Sansone) has grown as a player and we were definitely looking for him to be a leader and play a vital position for us on the court.” Despite the injury, other Panthers have stepped up to lead their team to a 3-0 start. Stepping up in Sansone’s spot at setter has been junior Nathan Herdeman and sophomore Kevin Siemer. “Joe has taken both guys under his wing and has really been our setters coach for them,” the coach said. “Everybody else is inspired by his positive attitude.” Outside hitter Anthony Stacklin returns after playing significant minutes last season and Tierney is looking to the senior for big things in 2013. “He’s a captain and he’s been just that anchor for us,” Tierney said. “He’s an all-around player, has great defensive intuition and really jumps well and is smart with his shots.” With five seniors back and seeing a lot of court time, Tierney knows big things could be in-store if his guys take things one step at a time. “They have great motivation and enthusiasm and I they have experienced a lot of suc-

SEVERN/FOR THE COMMUNITY PRESS

cess in their volleyball careers,” he said. “… They need to take it one day at a time and realize they need to be playing their best ball in May. If we grow in consistency each day, take small steps forward, we will put ourselves in a great place to hopefully reach our goals.”

La Salle

The Lancers got off to a rough start this season, losing their first three matches. But the squad rebounded with a win over the defending Division II state champions, Alter. The squad’s roster is upperclassmen heavy, with seven seniors listed on the roster. Those players include Mitch Dorsey, Josh Schneider, John Volmer, Brett Cooper, Jeff Goldschmidt, Tyler Blanck and Brent Gatermann.

Oak Hills

Chris Morman enters his eighth season at Oak Hills and is coming off his first losing season since 2007 (10-12). The Highlanders are out to a quick 4-0 start in 2013 and sit at No. 4 in the Enquirer poll with victories over ranked La Salle and Mason teams. Morman’s team is led by junior outside hitter/libero Aus-

tin Anderson, who is sixth on the Oak Hills all-time digs list, just 50 away from fifth. “(Anderson) is a well-balanced, versatile player that can have an impact wherever he plays,” Morman said. Junior setter Jared Meyer is back and looking to add to his all-time assist record. He already has 113 through the team’s first four games. Meyer also ranked10th in school history in total aces. Then there is 6-foot-8 Andrew Chisholm at middle blocker. After easing his way into things last season, Chisholm already has 43 kills, including 14 against La Salle and 12 against Mason. “(He) progressed well last season and will be an offensive force this year,” the coach said. After a big freshman season, Tim Laib is back at outside hitter/middle blocker. The sophomore is just 18 digs away from being 10th all-time in school history. “Our returning players got a lot of experience last year and had one more year to mature and get better between now and then,” Morman said. “Many of them have put in quite a bit of work in the offseason to improve.”

St. Xavier A 2-1 start isn’t a bad thing considering St. Xavier and coach Bill Ferris graduated every starter from the 2012 team. His team may not be where he wants them just yet, but he is still working to find the chemistry needed to excel at the varsity level. “A big part of it is trying to figure out which combination of guys works best together,” Ferris said about his 2013 team. “… We’ve got good talent in the younger levels so when they come up to my level they’ve got talent to work with, but it’s just a matter of maximizing it.” Senior libero Michael Spohr – who saw playing time last season – has stepped into a leadership role in 2013. Being that the libero position sees more court time than anyone else, Ferris loves having his most experienced player in that position. “He was really itching to get his chance to be a leader this year and he has done that,” the coach said. Sophomore middle hitter Eric Spoelker has provided some playing making in the middle for the Bombers. “He is one of our taller kids, more athletic front-row players,” Ferris said. “He does a good job of just making plays whether it’s blocking or hitting. He seems to be our most consistent playmaker.” With a tough schedule ahead combined with an inexperienced squad at the varsity level, Ferris believes success starts from within before success will be seen on the court. “In general, because we had so many seniors and such good seniors last year, no one is a leader on the court,” he said. “They don’t yet realize any ‘keep your chin up attitude’ has to come from them now. … I think we need to get that figured out before we can really take off.”

PRESS PREPS HIGHLIGHTS By Tom Skeen

Oak Hills’ Mackenzie Laumann and McAuley’s Kristin Clark race in the 100-meter hurdles April 10 at the 2013 Coaches Classic at Ross. MELANIE

tskeen@communitypress.com

Baseball

» Elder senior Josh Moore got his first win of the season after shutting out Milford 2-0, April 6. » Oak Hills shutout Eisenhower High School out of Michigan 10-0, April 6. Jake Seaman drove in three runs. The Highlanders took down Colerain 14-6, April 9 as part of the Reds Futures Showcase event. Junior Matt Baas was 2-2 with a triple, two runs scored and two RBI. » Eduardo Rodriguez tossed just the sixth no-hitter in Western Hills High School history in a 10-0 victory over Shroder April 8. The lefty struckout 10 batters and is 2-0 with a 1.70 ERA and has 24 strikeouts in 12 innings in 2013. The Mustangs got 10 strikeouts from Levi Wolf to go along with two RBI from Dailyn Stevenson in a 5-1 victory over Purcell Marian April 9. » Taylor lost to Indian Hill 13-1, April 8. » Brad Burkhart was 3-4 with a triple and four RBIs while also earning his second win of the year as La Salle beat Elder, 6-3, April 5. On April 8, La Salle beat St. Xavier 6-1. A.J. Petri drove in three runs, while Alex Dickey earned the victory on the mound. » Carl Heywood and Jared Doarnbusch each drove in two runs as Roger Bacon beat Pur-

LAUGHMAN/ COMMUNITY PRESS

Andrew Schille of Oak Hills leads the pack in this lap of the boys 3,200 race, though his teammate Derek Knabe, behind him, eventually wins the race at the 2013 Coaches Classic at Ross April 10. MELANIE LAUGHMAN/COMMUNITY PRESS

cell Marian, 9-5, April 5

Softball

» Mercy lost to Kings 9-2 and Little Miami 11-1 in five innings April 6. » Senior Lauren Slatten struck out 11 as Oak Hills defeated Hamilton 6-1, April 8. The victory was the 100th of her career for coach Jackie Cornelius-Bedel. The Lady Highlanders got 10 strikeouts from Slatten as they knocked off Lakota West 4-1, April 10. Devin Colebank went 3-4 and scored two runs.

Oak Hills junior Jason Essell secured his first win of the season in a 6-3 victory over the Princeton Vikings April 5. GEOFF BLANKENSHIP/FOR THE COMMUNITY PRESS

» Seton shutout Mount Notre Dame 5-0, April 10 behind eight strikeouts from sophomore Abby Lamping. » Taylor lost to Finneytown 3-2, April 10. » McAuley beat Troy 11-2, April 5, and followed up with two wins the next day as the squad beat Tippecanoe 13-3, and Vandalia Butler 10-4. In the Tipp game, Alli Cimino had a double and three RBI, while against Butler, Rachael

Oakley was 4-5 with a home run and three RBIs. On April 10, McAuley blanked Mercy 10-0. Abbey Mesiter had four RBI. » St. Ursula beat McNick, 7-2, April 6. Freshman Maddie Hancock was 3-3, while sophomore Katherine Jones was 2-4 with a double and two RBI. On April 8, St. Ursula beat MND 6-5. Megan Chapman was 3-4 at the plate while also pitching the Bulldogs to the victory. SUA followed up with a 6-4 win over Loveland April 9. Katherine Jones, Sydney Priest and Kitty Difalco each had two hits.

Volleyball

» Oak Hills defeated Middletown, 25-16, 25-16, 25-16 April 2. On April 3, the squad beat La Salle, 25-18, 25-18, 25-22. The Highlanders closed out the week with 25-19, 25-21, 2624 win against Fairfield April 4. The Highlanders overcame a two-set deficit to knock off See HIGHLIGHTS, Page A9

Oak Hills High School tennis players participating in the April 10 match against Ross include, from left, Connor Sullivan (senior, first doubles), Taylor Brannon (junior, first doubles) and Sam Hogue (senior, third singles). MELANIE LAUGHMAN/COMMUNITY PRESS

Elder singles players lead team West-Side tennis teams start slow By Tom Skeen tskeen@communitypress.com

The yellow balls are crossing the net as the 2013 boys’ tennis season is underway. Here is a look at how things are shaping up in the Delhi Press/Price Hill Press coverage area:

Elder

2013 is off to a rough start for the Panthers and coach Glenn Wauligman. Sitting at 1-4, the third-year coach is looking to juniors Andrew Cole and Luke Groene to give his team the boost they need. The duo will battle for the No. 1 singles position and both are coming off winning seasons in 2012. “Cole and Groene’s offseason work ethic will prove to give Elder solid leadership at the first and second singles positions,” Wauligman said. The team’s lone senior, Tony Faillace, will team with Josh Patty as the Panthers’ top doubles duo. Faillace will play at The College of Mount St. Joseph next season. Wauligman’s son Bryce will float between singles and doubles action. The freshman comes from a long line of tennis tradition in the Wauligman family and his father looks for him to have an immediate impact while at the same time learning from his upperclassmen. “Through his overall roundness in the game, (he) can play either singles or doubles where needed,” the coach said. “His older classmates will lean heavy on his play.”

La Salle

The Lancers will be a busy bunch trying to knock off St. Xavier, Moeller and Elder in the Greater Catholic League’s South Division. At singles, the Lancers will look to get contributions from Sam Pieper, Rob Riesenbeck and Matt Bumpus, while Anthony Wieck and Eric Ruhe, as well as Matt Murphy and Jordan Moellman.

Oak Hills

Rob Heuerman enters his fourth season with the Highlanders and is looking for the program’s first winning season since 2008. The Highlanders return four players from their 510 team a season ago. Seniors Michael Raabe and Sam Hogue are the team’s top two singles players, while Oscar Ryland and Taylor Brannon will see plenty of action in either singles or doubles play. “We have a team with varsity experience and promising freshmen, which will be able to contribute to the varsity team,” Heuerman said.


SPORTS & RECREATION Haverbusch each scored five goals.

Boys tennis

Continued from Page A8

» Fairfield shutout Oak Hills 5-0 in what was the Highlanders’ first match of the season April 9. » Elder lost to St. Xavier 5-0, April 9. » Taylor shutout Winton Woods 5-0, April 9. Teddy Graham and Timmy Rapking were both straight-set winners. The Yellow Jackets lost to Wyoming 5-0, April 10.

Mason 27-29, 22-25, 25-22, 25-9, 15-9, April 9. Oak Hills beat Edgewood 25-19, 25-17, 25-18, April 10. » St. Xavier opened its season with a win over Carroll, April 2. The Bombers triumphed 2510, 25-16, 25-11. » La Salle beat Alter, 3-1, April 9.

Boys track

Cancer Free Kids event

» Taylor finished fourth at the Coaches Classic event April 6. » Gamble Montessori took home second-place at the Madeira Invitational April 10. Junior Javontae Lipscomb won the 100meter dash.

» On April 24 the Oak Hills volleyball team and the Oak Hills Athletic Boosters are hosting a benefit for Cancer Free Kids, a local non-profit whose mission is to fund childhood cancer research. The Highlanders will take on Elder at 7 p.m. (junior varsity at 5:45 p.m.). You can purchase a gree t-shirt for $6 in the athletic office to support the cause. There will be split-the-pot, raffles and a chance to win a watch donated by Faigle Jewelers.

Girls track

» Taylor was seventh at the Coaches Classic April 6. » Gamble Montessori finished fifth at the Madeira Invitational April 10.

Boys lacrosse

» Elder defeated Bishop Chatard 11-6, April 6 behind four goals from J.T. Williams. The Panthers got six goals from Williams in a 20-11 victory over Fenwick April 10.

Cincinnati Steam

» Provided - The Cincinnati Steam Baseball Club is proud to announce it will host the 2013 Great Lakes Summer Collegiate League (GLSCL) All-Star game at Western Hills High School on Wednesday, July 10 at 6:35 pm. The GLSCL is a NCAAcertified wood-bat summer league with 10 teams in Ohio and Kentucky that is partially subsidized by Major League Baseball. The league was founded in 1986 and boasts numer-

Girls lacrosse

» Seton got six goals from Carly Stagge in a 1712 victory over Ursuline April 9. » Mercy lost to St. Ursula April 9 despite two goals from Emily Friedmann. » McAuley beat Fenwick 15-12 April 10. Jessica Schulte and Courtney

ous GLSCL alumni playing professionally both in the minor league baseball ranks as well as MLB. Prior to the game there will be a showcase for the all-star participants and other MLB draft eligible players from the GLSCL (see enclosed schedule). The Steam previously hosted the league’s midsummer classic in 2010 and over 30 major league scouts were in attendance to evaluate the talent. On Tuesday, July 9 in conjunction with the AllStar festivities the Steam will also be hosting a high school futures baseball showcase at Western Hills High School. This event is open to local high school players with scouts and college coaches in attendance. The showcase will begin with registration at 10:00 a.m. followed by a pro-style showcase beginning at 11:00 a.m

FOOTBALL AND CHEER SIGNUPS April 27 from 10 am to 2 pm Oak Hills High School Commons It’s not football season yet, but it will be soon. Our final in-person signup is right around the corner. Below are a few examples of just some of the great things that Oak Hills Youth Athletics Football and Cheer have to offer…

FOOTBALL

Our program will be playing in the brand new youth version of the GMC- the same conference and same schools (Lakota East and West, Sycamore, Fairfield, etc.) that the middle and high schools play. The head coaches that will be working with your son were selected after being interviewed by a committee that included the high school head coach. All of our coaches will be USA Football certified. All of our coaches will be certified in HUT (Heads Up Tackling), and all practices will have a portion of them focusing on HUT. In addition, we have a Player Safety Coach that will visit all practices to ensure that these safety procedures are being followed, and he will also hold parent/ player meetings to educate them on these important safety principles.

SOY voting: May 1

» The fifth-annual Community Press and Recorder Sportsman and Sportswoman of the Year Award voting period for the 2013 award will run Wednesday, May 1, through Tuesday, May 22. When it’s time to vote, you’ll go to cincinnati.com/preps. Click on the Sportsman of the Year item on the right-hand side of the page. Readers will be able to vote once a day for their favorite athlete per paper. Neither the articles nor ballots will count against the meter, so you do not have to be a Cincinnati Enquirer/cincinnati.com subscriber to vote on your favorite candidate. Email mlaughman@ communitypress.com .

CHEER

We have a number of options for your daughter, all represent outstanding value. There is the option to cheer for football only ($182), or to be on the competition squad in addition to the football squad (an additional $85). On top of that, our cheerleaders may also choose to cheer at Select basketball games. For an additional $25, a football cheerleader can extend their season and cheer at a several Home basketball games for the OHYA Select teams. All of the girls will also have fun working with a number of the High School cheerleaders who will be acting as assistant coaches. There is even a mini-majorette opportunity for those so inclined.

To learn more, and to check out our special Kindergarten Budget Pack, please visit our website,

www.oakhillsathletics.org.

FOOTBALL • SWIMMING • CHEERLEADING • SOCCER BASKETBALL • WRESTLING • TRACK • VOLLEYBALL Coming Soon... BASEBALL • SOFTBALL • LACROSSE

CE-0000553270

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VIEWPOINTS A10 • DELHI PRESS • APRIL 17, 2013

COMMUNITY

PRESS

Editor: Marc Emral, memral@communitypress.com, 853-6264

EDITORIALS | LETTERS | COLUMNS | CH@TROOM

CommunityPress.com

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Writer: Support parks levy

Delhi Parks and Recreation is the heartbeat of this community. It’s the place to be for fun, fitness and recreation. As a mom of five kids, my family uses the parks daily. We are so fortunate to have such a beautiful park in the heart of Delhi as well as Story Woods, Veterans Memorial Park, and more. The parks are the only place of destination we have in Delhi. Knowing that $22.68 a year is all they are asking to keep our parks safe and beautiful is a value for the dollar that I can afford. In fact, as a community, for less than $2 a month, we will all reap the benefits that our parks give us, such as increased property values, economic benefits to the business district and a safe place for our children.

Please join me in voting “Yes to Delhi Parks” on May 7. Thank you.

Heather Kuhling Delhi Township

Local Tea Party endorses fire levy

Having reviewed the financial information and spoken with the fire chief and fiscal officer of Delhi Township, the SouthWest Cincinnati Tea Party has chosen to endorse the 2013 Delhi Township Fire Levy. The SouthWest Cincinnati Tea Party has more than 400 members across Delhi Township, Green Township and western Cincinnati dedicated to advancing the principles of fiscal responsibility, limited government and free markets. The primary responsibilities of local government are roads and public safety – police and fire. Support of these activities

through taxpayer funding is appropriate as long as the money is managed efficiently and is not being used for other nonessential services. The previous fire levy was proposed to last five years and was stretched to eight years through cuts and other cost management. The 2013 levy is expected to last five years, until 2018. The assumptions on union negotiations of salary and benefits, utility expenses and cost of living adjustments are based on conservative but reasonable projections. Fire Chief William Zoz was very open during our discussions and is looking for savings through shared resources, pooled purchasing and every other avenue we were able to suggest. We commend Chief Zoz on his stewardship of the taxpayer resources.

built a home nearby. At the Gaff and Fleischmann Co., Charles and Max put corn, rye and barley mixed with sugar in a copper vat. The malt grew and organisms absorbed the mixture and yeast resulted. Water was filtered out of the brew and it was pressed into cakes, handwrapped and delivered to customers in a basket. Americans were skeptical of this new yeast, but there was a big influx of European immigrants who grew up with this yeast and bought it. Another brother, Henry, came to the United States in 1870 to help manage the company and get patents. A big setback hit the business in 1871 when the factory burned to the ground. It was rebuilt with newer equipment that cut and wrapped the cakes in foil. In 1876, they exhibited a model Vienna bakery at the Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia. Visitors saw dough rise and sampled baked bread. They won a prize for excellence and won international publicity, and sales dramatically increased. Bread started being mass produced. Charles helped to organize the Market National Bank and was its president from 1887 until his death in 1897. When a cashier embezzled $160,000, Charles covered the loss. He was afraid depositors would run on the bank and cause it to

Can’t trust Oak Hills board

First of all, I want to say I totally support the Delhi Township fire levy and I understand the need to get the parks out of the general fund. However, I am not supportive of the Oak Hills school levy. I am not convinced that the Oak Hills school board has done all they can to eliminate waste as the trustees and department heads in Delhi have. Additionally, in the past, the school board has either found money or used sneaky methods to raise our taxes. Until I can trust them, I cannot or will not support their levies.

Mike Rosenthal Delhi Township

George Brunemann

Fleischmann brothers changed baking from Riverside Charles Louis and Maximilian Fleischmann were Hungarian immigrants who revolutionized the baking industry in the United States in the 1868 by mass-producing yeast. Bread was being made in family kitchens by sitting a mixture of flour and water in the open air to capture airborne yeast or by obtainBetty Kamuf COMMUNITY PRESS ing yeast from a distiller. GUEST COLUMNIST Charles Fleischmann was managing a yeast factory on a large estate in Hungary in 1866 when his sister got married in New York. He came for the wedding, tasted American bread and thought it was flavorless and heavy. Two years later, he immigrated to America with his brother Max. In his vest pocket, he carried a test tube containing live yeast plants. The brothers worked in New York for distillers using the Hungarian method. Their dream was to run a distillery and to manufacture compressed yeast. James Gaff from the T. & J.W. Gaff Co., a distiller from Aurora, Ind., liked the idea and invested $40,000 in their yeast factory. It was located on the riverbank off of South Side Avenue in Riverside. They

Lea der, SouthWest Cincinnati Tea Party

fail. He demanded a deed to the cashier’s house, and returned it to the widow when the cashier died. James Gaff died in 1879 and his share was bought out by Charles, who also bought out his brothers. The company name changed to the Fleischmann Co. Charles became good friends with Ohio Gov. William McKinley and ran for the United States Senate after McKinley was elected president in 1879. Charles met and married Henrietta Robinson, a Prussian immigrant from New York in 1866. They had three children: Bettie, Julius and Max. The family home was taken over by the business, so the family moved to Price Hill at the corner of Price and Mount Hope avenues. Charles loved music and after supper the family gathered around the piano and sang opera melodies and folk songs from his native country. By 1890, there were 14 manufacturing facilities and Charles was a rich man. He owned a large estate in the Catskill Mountains and filled it with paintings, a yacht and a stable of race horses. He died in 1897 and his two sons took over the business. Betty Kamuf is a winner of Griffin Yeatman Award for Historical Preservation. She lives in Sayler Park.

ABOUT LETTERS AND COLUMNS We welcome your comments on editorials, columns, stories or other topics important to you in The Community Press. Include your name, address and phone number(s) so we may verify your letter. Letters of 200 or fewer words and columns of 500 or fewer words have the best chance of being published. All submissions may be edited for length, accuracy and clarity. Deadline: Noon Friday E-mail: memral@ communitypress.com Fax: 853-6220 U.S. mail: See box below Letters, columns and articles submitted to The Community Press may be published or distributed in print, electronic or other forms.

MEETINGS » Cincinnati City Council meets at 2 p.m. every Wednesday in room 300 at Cincinnati City Hall, 801 Plum St. When there is a Monday holiday, all meetings including committee meetings are pushed back a day. City Manager: Milton Dohoney Jr. Mayor: Mark Mallory. » Cincinnati Public Schools Board of Education usually meets at 7 p.m. the second and fourth Mondays of the month at 2651 Burnet Ave. Board of Education phone: 475-7000. Superintendent: Mary Ronan. Board President: Eve Bolton. » East Price Hill Improvement Association meets the third Monday of each month at 7:30 p.m. at Holy Family Church, 814 Hawthorne Ave., Phone: 549-3744. Association President: Tom Gamel. » Delhi Township Trustees meet at 6 p.m. the second and last Wednesday of the month at township offices, 934 Neeb Road. Phone: 922-3111. Administrator: Pete Landrum and President: Marijane Klug. » Oak Hills Local School District Board of Education members meet the first Monday of the month at 7 p.m. at various locations within the district. District office: 6325 Rapid Run Road. Phone: 5743200. Superintendent: Todd Yohey. Board President: Jeannie Schoonover. » Price Hill Civic Club meets the second Tuesday of each month at 7:30 p.m. at Seton K of C Hall on West Eighth St. (across from St.

William Church), Phone: 2510880. Club President: Charles Bazeley. Hamilton County » Board of County Commissioners meet at 9:30 a.m. every Wednesday in Room 603 of the County Administration Building, 138 E. Court St., downtown. Call 946-4400 for information. » Educational Service Center Governing Board meets on the third Wednesday of the month at 11083 Hamilton Ave. Call 672-4200 for information. » General Health District meets at 6:30 p.m. the second Monday of the month at 250 William Howard Taft Road, Clifton. Call 946-7800 for information. » Regional Planning Commission meets at 12:30 p.m. the first Thursday of the month at the County Administration Building, eighth floor, 138 E. Court St., downtown. Call 946-4500 for information. » Rural Zoning Commission meets at 1 p.m. on the third Thursday of the month at the County Administration Building, 138 E. Court St., downtown. Call 946-4501 for information. » Board of Zoning Appeals meets at on the second and fourth at Wednesday at the County Administration Building, 138 E. Court St., downtown. Call 946-4502 for information.

If you would like your meeting to be considered for this, send the information to memral@communitypress.com.

Reduce, reuse, recycle and compost this Earth Day In 1970, the first Earth Day was celebrated in the United States as a bipartisan congressional effort, bringing environmental concerns front and center. Since 1970, Earth Day has Holly grown to be Christmann COMMUNITY PRESS celebrated in 184 countries GUEST COLUMNIST and reaching millions of people. Although

the magnitude of the day has grown, the original goal of teaching citizens how to live sustainably has remained the same. This Earth Day and every day, you can celebrate the Earth by reducing, reusing, recycling and composting. By reducing the amount of waste created, you can save material, energy and prevent pollution and waste. You can reduce waste by buying products in bulk or with less packaging, by borrowing, renting or sharing items with others

DELHI

PRESS

A publication of

and by reusing items. Consider buying reusable bags or reusable containers or shopping at a local thrift store. When you reuse, you reduce waste and cost. Recycling also helps to reduce waste and pollution. Using recycled materials in the manufacturing process conserves energy, saves natural resources and reduces pollution. Remember, not everything is recyclable in your curbside bin or cart. For a complete list of what can be recycled and outlets for odd

items, call our recycling hotline at 513-946-7766 or visit HamiltonCountyRecycles.org. Composting is nature’s way of recycling. Backyard composting is a great way to use yard trimmings and food scraps to provide a free soil amendment. For more information on how you can start composting today, visit HamiltonCountyRecycles.org. If you choose not to backyard compost, bring yard trimmings to our free drop-offs open on Saturdays and Sundays from 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m. at

5556 Cheviot Road Cincinnati, Ohio 45247 phone: 923-3111 fax: 853-6220 email: delhipress@communitypress.com web site: www.communitypress.com

Bzak Landscaping, Kuliga Park and Rumpke Sanitary Landfill. These are just a few ways you can live sustainably this Earth Day. Learn more about how you can improve the Earth by joining us for Sawyer Point’s Earth Day celebration on Saturday, April 20, from noon to 5 p.m. Stop by to talk with us about your recycling and composting efforts. Holly Christmann is the program manager for the Hamilton County Recycling and Solid Waste District.

Delhi Press Editor Marc Emral memral@communitypress.com, 853-6264 Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday See page A2 for additional contact information.


WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 2013

LIFE

COMMUNITY PRESS

PEOPLE | IDEAS | RECIPES

Hundreds of children collected eggs at the annual Delhi Business Association's Easter Egg Hunt. MONICA BOYLSON/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Delhi Business Association Easter Egg Hunt

By Monica Boylson mboylson@communitypress.com

More than 400 children and their families attended the 23rd annual Delhi Business Associationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Easter Egg Hunt Saturday, March 23, at Delhi Park. Despite chilly temperatures, the group gathered more than 6,000 eggs that contained candy and tickets for 200 prizes. Ticket winners walked away with gifts including board games, soccer balls, squirt guns and stuffed animals. Delhi Business Association members donated more than $2,100 to buy the candy and prizes for the hunt.

Photos by Monica Boylson/The Community Press

Delhi Township resident Janet Luthy, 70, and John Froehle, 49, Price Hill, pass out chocolate bunnies after the egg hunt. MONICA BOYLSON/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Delhi Township resident Bo Williams, 4, hauled off with a big win at the Delhi Business Association's annual Easter Egg Hunt. MONICA BOYLSON/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Rylee Williamson, 2, Delhi Township filled a basket full of eggs at the Delhi Business Association's annual Easter Egg Hunt. MONICA BOYLSON/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Happy with the eggs they collected at the Delhi Business Association's annual Easter Egg Hunt, are, from left, Joe Heenan, 4, Delhi Township, Anyla Bell, 3, Western Hills, Shaylin Lester, 6, Western Hills, and Liam Dragston, 2, Cheviot. MONICA BOYLSON/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Winning board games at the Delhi Business Association's annual Easter Egg Hunt are, front row, from left Hailey Flaherty, 3, Eastgate, Alyssa Dennis, 6, Delhi Township, Addyson Dennis, 2, Delhi Township; back row, Nikki and Cameron Flaherty who is 11 months old, both of Eastgate and Carol Flaherty of Delhi Township. MONICA BOYLSON/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

The Easter Bunny stops to say hi to Caden Montag, 3, Bridgetown, at the Delhi Business Association's annual Easter Egg Hunt. MONICA BOYLSON/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Sorting their haul of easter eggs, from left, are Shyrese Pierce, 13, Green Township, Rylynn Esterkamp, 7 months, Delhi Township, Brayden Davenport, 7, Delhi Township, Brody Esterkamp, 10, Delhi Township, Ashley Davneport, 21 Delhi Township, Rebecka Esterkamp, 7, Price Hill and Keyen Esterkamp, Delhi Township. MONICA BOYLSON/THE COMMUNITY PRESS


B2 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • APRIL 17, 2013

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD THURSDAY, APRIL 18

tation hosted by Dr. Henry Cloud and Dr. John Townsend. Variety of topics addressing everyday issues such as communication, conflict and more. 922-7897; www.cloudtownsend.com/resources/solutions. Cheviot. Free Community Meal, 5:306:30 p.m., Central Church of Christ, 3501 Cheviot Ave., Free. 481-5820; www.centralchurchofchrist1.com. Westwood.

Art Exhibits Senior Degree Project: Graphic Design, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Studio San Giuseppe Art Gallery at the College of Mount St. Joseph, 5701 Delhi Road, Thesis I works by 18 students executing comprehensive projects. Presented by College of Mount St. Joseph. 244-4314; www.msj.edu. Delhi Township.

Senior Citizens

On Stage - Student Theater

Zumba Gold, 1-2 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Modified Zumba for seniors and beginners with standing and chair participation. For seniors. $3, $25 for 10 classes. Presented by Deb’s Fitness Party. 205-5064; www.debsfitnessparty.com. Green Township.

The Man Who Came to Dinner, 7 p.m., Oak Hills High School, 3200 Ebenezer Road, More than two dozen characters collide in a non-stop-romp. $10. Through April 20. 378-7789; jlfox@fuse.net. Green Township.

On Stage - Theater Legally Blonde, 8 p.m., Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, 4990 Glenway Ave., Sorority star Elle Woods doesn’t take “no” for an answer and proves that being true to yourself never goes out of style. $23, $20 students and seniors. Through May 5. 241-6550; www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. West Price Hill.

FRIDAY, APRIL 19 Art & Craft Classes Paint a Jell-O Mold Flower, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Broadhope Art Collective, 3651 Harrison Ave., Paint a flower made of preassembled up-cycled Jell-O molds for a finished product you can add to your garden. All materials provided. For ages 12 and up, 8 and up with adult. $25. 225-8441; www.broadhopeartcollective.com. Cheviot.

Art Exhibits Senior Degree Project: Graphic Design, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Studio San Giuseppe Art Gallery at the College of Mount St. Joseph, 244-4314; www.msj.edu. Delhi Township.

Exercise Classes FitChixx, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Sayler Park Community Center, 6720 Home City Ave., Full-body workout consisting of weights, cardio and core work. All ages and abilities welcome. $45 per month. Presented by FitChixx. Through April 29. 205-9772; www.fitchixx.com. Sayler Park.

Farmers Market Lettuce Eat Well Farmers Market, 3-7 p.m., Cheviot United Methodist Church, 3820 Westwood Northern Blvd., Locally produced food items. Free. Presented by Lettuce Eat Well. 481-1914; www.lewfm.org. Cheviot.

Music - R&B Basic Truth, 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m., Drew’s on the River, 4333 River Road, $3. 451-1157; basictruth.webs.com. Riverside.

On Stage - Student Theater The Man Who Came to Dinner, 7 p.m., Oak Hills High School, $10. 378-7789; jlfox@fuse.net. Green Township.

On Stage - Theater Legally Blonde, 8 p.m., Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, $23, $20 students and seniors. 241-6550; www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. West Price Hill.

Seminars Basic Banking: Bank on It, 10 a.m.-1 p.m., Price Hill Financial Opportunity Center, 2918 Price Ave., Learn how to be a smart bank account user, more about Chex Systems and second chance accounts and find out how to write checks, use debit and check cards and avoid overdraft fees. Pizza lunch included. Free. Presented by Santa Maria Community Services. 587-6920; www.santamaria-cincy.org. East Price Hill.

SATURDAY, APRIL 20 Dining Events Cub Pack 107 Pancake Breakfast, 8 a.m.-noon, Westwood First Presbyterian Church, 3011 Harrison Ave., Boys serving pancakes and sausage with orange juice and coffee. Benefits Cub Pack 107. Suggested donation: $5, $3 children. Presented by Cub Pack 107. 661-6846. Westwood.

Exercise Classes

P.D. Eastman’s children’s book comes to life in Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park’s Off the Hill Family Series production of “Go, Dog. Go!” at 2 p.m. Saturday, April 20, at the Arts Center at Dunham, 1945 Dunham Way. Tickets are $5. For more information, call 588-4988; or visit www.sunsetplayers.org. Pictured are Jamal Crowelle (MC Dog), Datus Puryear (Red Dog), Betsy Rosen (Blue Dog), Kevin Percival (Yellow Dog), Suzanne Blunk (Green Dog) and Heather Petersen (Hattie). PROVIDED. Spinning, 9-10 a.m., Western Sports Mall, 2323 Ferguson Road, Racquetball Center. Group cycling workout. Ages 14-99. $8-$10. Presented by SpinFit LLC. 451-4920; www.spinfitcincinnati.com. Westwood.

Garden Clubs Hillside Community Garden Regular Gardening Day, 9 a.m.-noon, Hillside Community Garden, 5701 Delhi Road, Garden together in unique hillside edible garden. All experience levels welcome. Dress for weather and bring water to drink. Work gloves and boots recommended. Other useful items are pruning shears and shovels. Free. Presented by Hillside Community Garden Committee. 400-4511; hillsidegardendelhi.com. Delhi Township.

Holiday - Earth Day Players for the Planet Recycling Event, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., PNC Bank-Glenway Crossing, 5535 Glenway Crossing, Personal computers, televisions, monitors, VCRs, radios, hard drives, etc. accepted. The first 200 cars at each event will receive two view level tickets to a future Cincinnati Reds game while supplies last. $10 donation per vehicle. Presented by Players for the Planet. 859-494-4264; www.playersfortheplanet.org. Westwood.

Home & Garden Hamilton County Recycling and Solid Waste District Yard Trimmings Drop-Off, 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Kuliga Park, 6717 Bridgetown Road, Hamilton County residents can drop off yard trimmings for free. Free. Presented by Hamilton County Recycling and Solid Waste District. 598-3089; bit.ly/11UQb9r. Green Township.

Nature Beginners’ Birding Walk, 9 a.m., Shawnee Lookout Park, 2008 Lawrenceburg Road, Learn tips and techniques for birding and learn to identify several local birds on the Blue Jacket Trail. Bring binoculars if you have them. Free, vehicle permit required. Presented by Hamilton County Park District. 5217275; www.greatparks.org. North Bend. Local Wildlife, 2-4 p.m., Fernbank Park, 60 Thornton Ave., Playground. Meet and greet some local animals at this ongoing picnic table talk. Free. Presented by Hamilton County Park District. 521-7275; www.greatparks.org. Sayler Park.

On Stage - Student Theater The Man Who Came to Dinner, 2 p.m. and 7 p.m., Oak Hills High School, $10. 378-7789; jlfox@fuse.net. Green Township.

On Stage - Theater Legally Blonde, 8 p.m., Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, $23, $20 students and seniors. 241-6550; www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. West Price Hill. Go, Dog. Go!, 2-3 p.m., Arts Center at Dunham, 1945 Dunham Way, Part of Playhouse in the Park Off the Hill Family Series. $5. Presented by Playhouse in the Park. 588-4988;

ABOUT CALENDAR To submit calendar items, go to www.cincinnati.com and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to life@communitypress.com along with event information. Items are printed on a spaceavailable basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to www.cincinnati.com and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page.

Support Groups Western Hills Job Search Satellite Group, 9-11 a.m., Westwood First Presbyterian Church, 3011 Harrison Ave., Community members welcome to learn from and support each other in job-seeking process. Speakers present valuable content about latest in electronic resumes, LinkedIn, effective networking, interview skills, available funding and community resources. Group members provide support and accountability to one another during this stressful time. Free. 6089359. Westwood.

Youth Sports www.sunsetplayers.org. West Price Hill.

Shopping Rummage Sale, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., Cheviot United Methodist Church, 3820 Westwood Northern Blvd., Large selection of personal and household goods. No early admissions. Free. 662-2048; www.cheviotumc.org. Cheviot. Up for Grabs, 10 a.m.-1 p.m., My Neighbor’s Place, 3150 Harrison Ave., Community recycling event. Bring two gently used items and you are free to take anything others have donated. Free. Presented by Westwood Works. 661-3169; www.westwoodworks.org. Westwood.

SUNDAY, APRIL 21 Art & Craft Classes Spring Green Cleaning, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m., Broadhope Art Collective, 3651 Harrison Ave., Make your own “green cleaners” using commonly found household supplies. Make laundry detergent, dishwasher detergent, counter disinfectant and scented soy candle. All supplies included. For ages 12 and up, 6 and up with adult. $25. 225-8441; www.broadhopeartcollective.com. Cheviot. Stained Glass Dragonfly, 2-4:30 p.m., Broadhope Art Collective, 3651 Harrison Ave., Learn basic stained glass-making skills like cutting glass, foil wrap and using welding iron to make dragonfly garden stake decoration for your garden. Supplies included, class limited to six participants. For ages 12 and up. $25. Registration required. 225-8441; www.broadhopeartcollective.com. Cheviot.

Home & Garden

Common Issues During Pregnancy/Antepartum, 6-7 p.m., Mercy HealthPlex Western Hills, 3131 Queen City Ave., Rooms A and B. With Dr. Sarah Sabin. Free. Registration required. Presented by Mercy Health Partners. 956-3729; www.e-mercy.com. Westwood.

Home & Garden Year Round Gardening: Tropical Treasures, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Monfort Heights Branch Library, 3825 West Fork Road, Learn new ideas for planning and maintaining your garden throughout the year from staff of White Oak Gardens. Tropical plants for your garden or containers. Free. Presented by White Oak Garden Center. 385-3313; www.whiteoakgardens.com. Monfort Heights.

Five Star Volleyball, 5:15-8:30 p.m., Seton High School, 3901 Glenway Ave., Gymnasium. Weekly through May 22. Volleypop Volleyball or Grade School Refresher Clinic. $45-$100. Registration required. Presented by Five Star Volleyball. 251-0809; www.fivestarvolleyball.com. West Price Hill.

THURSDAY, APRIL 25 Art & Craft Classes An Evening of Needle Felting, 6-8 p.m., Broadhope Art Collective, 3651 Harrison Ave., Learn how to needle felt and experience magic of turning pile of wool into finished project. $20. 225-8441. Cheviot.

Health / Wellness

Faith-Based Yoga, 6:45-7:45 p.m., Vineyard Westside Church, 3420 Glenmore Ave., Second Floor Green Room. Faith-based yoga class open to all levels. Free, donations requested. 295-5226; www.tailoredfitonline.com. Cheviot.

Health Seminar, 6 p.m., Mercy HealthPlex Western Hills, 3131 Queen City Ave., Classrooms A and B. Learn how to prevent injury to hands and arms and discuss treatment options for common hand and arm ailments. Presented by Mercy Health and Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra. Free. Presented by Mercy Health Partners. 9563729; www.e-mercy.com. Westwood.

Health / Wellness

On Stage - Theater

Pre-Diabetes Class, 10 a.m.noon, Mercy Hospital Western Hills, 3131 Queen City Ave., Information on making healthy food choices, exercise and blood sugar control and monitoring blood sugar levels. $20. Presented by Mercy Health Partners. 956-3729; www.e-mercy.com. Westwood.

Legally Blonde, 8 p.m., Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, $23, $20 students and seniors. 241-6550; www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. West Price Hill.

TUESDAY, APRIL 23 Exercise Classes

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24 Dance Classes

Special Events Teachers of Excellence Banquet, 5:30 p.m., Cincinnati Christian University, 2700 Glenway Ave., Ten teachers from Greater Cincinnati will be honored. One will be chosen as the Outstanding Teacher of Excellence and receive $1,000 for his or her classroom or school. Free. 244-8100; www.ccuniversity.edu. East Price Hill.

Dance Class, 4:30-8:30 p.m., Douce Dance Studio, 3772 Shady Lane, Dance instructions. Ages 2 1/2-adult. Tap, ballet, jazz/hip-hop, gymnastics, baton twirling. $25 monthly. Registration required. 941-0202. North Bend.

FRIDAY, APRIL 26

Exercise Classes

Art Openings

MONDAY, APRIL 22

FitChixx, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Sayler Park Community Center, $45 per month. 205-9772; www.fitchixx.com. Sayler Park. Zumba Fitness, 4-5 p.m., College of Mount St. Joseph, $3. 288-6268. Delhi Township.

Exercise Classes

Health / Wellness

FitChixx, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Sayler Park Community Center, $45 per month. 205-9772; www.fitchixx.com. Sayler Park. Spinning, 5:45-6:45 p.m., Western Sports Mall, $8-$10. 4514920; www.spinfitcincinnati.com. Westwood. Zumba Fitness, 4-5 p.m., College of Mount St. Joseph, 5701 Delhi Road, EarthConnection. Fitness party. $3. Presented by EarthConnection. 288-6268. Delhi Township.

Shoulder Pain? What Are Your Options for Relief?, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Beacon Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine-West, 6480 Harrison Ave., Learn about surgical options. Refreshments provided. Free. Reservations required. Presented by Beacon Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine. 354-7635; www.beaconortho.com. Green Township.

Senior Thesis II: Art/Fine Arts; Interior Architecture and Design, 6-9 p.m., Studio San Giuseppe Art Gallery at the College of Mount St. Joseph, 5701 Delhi Road, Lettering, fabric design, painting, fabric design, mixed media, ceramics, sculpture-glass and photography on display by 16 students. Exhibit continues through May 11. Presented by College of Mount St. Joseph. 244-4314; www.msj.edu. Delhi Township.

Hamilton County Recycling and Solid Waste District Yard Trimmings Drop-Off, 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Kuliga Park, Free. 598-3089; bit.ly/11UQb9r. Green Township.

On Stage - Theater Legally Blonde, 2 p.m., Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, $23, $20 students and seniors. 241-6550; www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. West Price Hill.

Health / Wellness Understanding and Treating

Exercise Classes FitChixx, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Sayler Park Community Center, $45 per month. 205-9772; www.fitchixx.com. Sayler Park.

Religious - Community

Farmers Market

Wednesday Night Solutions, 7-8:30 p.m., Vineyard Westside Church, 3420 Glenmore Ave., Weekly interactive DVD presen-

Lettuce Eat Well Farmers Market, 3-7 p.m., Cheviot United Methodist Church, Free. 481-1914; www.lewfm.org.

Cheviot.

Music - Acoustic Bob Cushing, 8 p.m., Holy Grail Tavern & Grille West, 1278 Ebenezer Road, 941-5555; www.holygrailwest.com. Delhi Township.

Music - Blues Ralph and the Rhythm Hounds, 8 p.m.-midnight, Legends, 3801 Harrison Ave., $5. 490-9467; www.legendscincinnati.com. Cheviot.

Music - Religious An Evening with Tammy Trent, 7:30-9 p.m., Whitewater Crossing Christian Church, 5771 Ohio 128, $10 in advance, $12 at the door. 661-5811; www.whitewatercrossing.org. Cleves.

On Stage - Student Theater Solid Gold Memories, 7:30 p.m., Taylor High School, 36 E. Harrison Ave., Auditorium. Benefits Taylor High School scholarships. $8, $4 students. 520-8465. North Bend.

On Stage - Theater Legally Blonde, 8 p.m., Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, $23, $20 students and seniors. 241-6550; www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. West Price Hill. Barefoot in the Park, 8 p.m., Glenmore Playhouse, 3716 Glenmore Ave., Classic romantic comedy chronicles first six days of marriage for pair of newlyweds in fifth-floor apartment in Greenwich Village in 1964. They find marriage includes not only love but leaky skylights, nosy neighbors and interfering in-laws. $15. Presented by The Drama Workshop. Through May 12. 598-5303; www.thedramaworkshop.org. Cheviot.

SATURDAY, APRIL 27 Art & Craft Classes Fanciful Fairies, 11 a.m.-1 p.m., Broadhope Art Collective, 3651 Harrison Ave., Make your own tiny fairy to be hung as decoration or to play with. All supplies included. For ages 6 and up. $20. 225-8441; www.broadhopeartcollective.com. Cheviot. Paper Clip Birds, 1-2 p.m., Broadhope Art Collective, 3651 Harrison Ave., Make birds from decorative paper and paperclips in relaxing craft that will leave you with spring decoration for your windowsill. For ages 8 and up. $10. 225-8441; www.broadhopeartcollective.com. Cheviot. Bird Collage, 2-4 p.m., Broadhope Art Collective, 3651 Harrison Ave., Create bird mixedmedia piece using collage. All materials included. For ages 8 and up. $25. 225-8441; www.broadhopeartcollective.com. Cheviot.

Art Exhibits Senior Thesis II: Art/Fine Arts; Interior Architecture and Design, 1-5 p.m., Studio San Giuseppe Art Gallery at the College of Mount St. Joseph, 5701 Delhi Road, Lettering, fabric design, painting, fabric design, mixed media, ceramics, sculpture-glass and photography on display by 16 students. Presented by College of Mount St. Joseph. 244-4314; www.msj.edu. Delhi Township.

Exercise Classes Spinning, 9-10 a.m., Western Sports Mall, $8-$10. 451-4920; www.spinfitcincinnati.com. Westwood.

Garden Clubs Hillside Community Garden Regular Gardening Day, 9 a.m.-noon, Hillside Community Garden, Free. 400-4511; hillsidegardendelhi.com. Delhi Township.

Health / Wellness Mobile Mammography Unit, 7 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Robben Florist and Greenhouses, 352 Pedretti Road, Fifteen-minute screenings. Cost varies per insurance plan. Financial assistance available for qualified applicants. Appointment required. Presented by Jewish Hospital. 686-3300; www.e-mercy.com. Delhi Township.

Home & Garden Hamilton County Recycling and Solid Waste District Yard Trimmings Drop-Off, 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Kuliga Park, Free. 598-3089; bit.ly/11UQb9r. Green Township.


LIFE

APRIL 17, 2013 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • B3

Simple yeast roll great for beginners Mother Nature is letting me know that spring is really here. Looking out my kitchen window into the woods, I see trees budding out and the forsythia is in bloom. That tells me the Rita ground and Heikenfeld air are warmer, RITA’S KITCHEN about 50 degrees or so. My husband Frank got the garden plowed and also plowed gardens for our neighbors, so everyone is eager to start planting. We got most of our root veggies planted, including potatoes, radishes and onions. The salad greens are already popping up, as are the peas. I worked in my herb garden for days hoeing out the chickweed, which is in fact a winter annual. I gave as much to the chickens as they would eat, and I also put some in our salads. Chickweed contains calcium, zinc, iron, vitamins A and C and some B vitamins.

en, about 11-15 minutes. Brush with butter.

Plus it’s an appetite suppressant! Our ancestors happily picked chickweed and dandelion leaves to replace vitamins and minerals lost during a meager winter diet devoid of fresh greens. As long as you have a positive identification and the plants are “clean," enjoy them while they are young and tender.

Yeast 101

Regular yeast: For the most part, this needs to be proofed in warm water (105-115 degrees) for several minutes until it starts to foam. Fast/rapid rise/quick yeast: A more aggressive strain that can be mixed in with dry ingredients. It also tolerates higher heat. Step by step photos for rolls: Check out my blog.

Simple yeast rolls

I was trying to make rolls similar to the Hawaiian sweet yeast rolls that you buy. I didn’t quite make it texture wise, but the taste is similar. If you’re new to baking or intimidated by it, try these. I think you’ll be pleased with results. I’m using fast/rapid rise yeast here, not regular yeast. 21⁄4cups flour ⁄4cup sugar 1 package (1⁄4oz.) fast/rapid rise/quick-rise yeast 1 ⁄2teaspoon salt 3 ⁄4cup warm water (120-130 degrees) 3 tablespoons butter, melted, plus extra for brushing on rolls 1

Give Rita’s simple yeast rolls a try if you are a beginner or intimidated by making homemade rolls. THANKS TO RITA HEIKENFELD

Combine 11⁄2 cups flour, sugar, yeast and salt. Add water and 3 tablespoons butter and beat on medium speed until smooth, a few minutes. Blend in rest of flour to form soft dough. Knead a few minutes. This makes dough smooth and develops gluten for texture. (Bless the dough by making a cross with your hand. It’s a way to thank the Lord for your abundant bless-

ings). Cover, let rest for 10 minutes. Roll to a 1 ⁄2-inch thick or so, cut with biscuit cutter or glass. You’ll get nine circles of dough if you use a 21⁄2-inch biscuit cutter. Place 2 inches apart on sprayed cookie sheet. Brush with butter. Cover and let rise in warm place until doubled, about 40-50 minutes. Preheat oven to 375 and bake until light gold-

Parks club learns of history, animals and more Adults age 50 and older are invited to join the Hamilton County Park District Great Parks Club. The club includes various programs that entertain and educate about the parks and other fun recreational activities around Cincinnati. There is still room available for: » Friday, April 26, 10 a..-4 p.m.: Spring in Spring Grove During this tour of Spring Grove Cemetery, study some hidden meanings behind gravestone symbols and learn of the stories of the ones buried beneath the stones. The program will begin at Winton Woods. Cost is $45 per adult. Registration is required by April 11. » Wednesday, May 8, noon-2 pm: Lunch & Learn: History of shoes Do you love shoes? Then you will be head over heels for this program. Join the tour for a step-by-step walk through the history of footwear from the natural materials of ancient times to today’s modern creations. Please wear or bring your favorite pair of shoes. This program is at Winton Woods. Cost is $20 per adult. Registration is

required by April 24. » Friday, May 31, 8:30 am – 5 pm: Red Wolf Sanctuary tour Wolves, wildcats, black bear, cougars and much more. Join the tour for a walk on the wild side to visit the Red Wolf Sanctuary and Rehabilitation Center in Rising Sun, Ind. There will be a staff-led tour for an up-close look at these remarkable animals. This program is at Winton Woods. Cost is $65 per adult. Registration is required by May 17. Registration for these programs can be done at www.greatparks.org or by sending name, address, daytime phone number and the appropriate fee to: Great Parks Club, Hamilton County Park District, 10245 Winton Road, Cincinnati, OH, 45231. Make checks payable to the Hamilton County Park District. A valid Hamilton County Park District motor vehicle permit ($10 annual; $3 daily) is required to enter the parks. Armleder and Fernbank parks are cooperative ventures with the Cincinnati Park Board; a motor vehicle permit is not required. For additional infor-

differently about your life and difficult situations. » The Not-so Afforadable Health Care Act Thursday, April 25, 78:30 p.m. at Clippard Instrument Laboratory, 7390 Colerain Ave. The IRS estimates for a family of four it will cost $20,000 annually to purchase health care. How can this cost be so large? Why are physicians considering leaving their practices? Why would businesses not want to provide Health Care? Jennifer Clippard brings you up to date on the myriad of changes about to happen in Health Care.

You are the best readers and once again, came to the rescue. If you recall, Kim Martin wanted to make Kroger’s Jarlsberg cheese spread at home. Gail C., a Burlington reader, told me she had asked one of Kroger’s deli employees a couple years ago about the spread and was told it contained just shredded Jarlsberg, mayo and red onion. Andre, another reader, forwarded his version and I’m sharing that today. He said he

10 oz. or so Jarlsberg cheese 1 ⁄2large red onion, 1⁄4-inch dice Mayonnaise to taste

en

Tip from Rita’s kitch-

Jarlsberg is mild, buttery, nutty and slightly sweet.

Can you help?

Eddie Merlot’s “Eddie’s potatoes.” Linda would like a clone for this recipe from this Montgomery, Ohio, restaurant. “Creamy and delicious,” she said.

Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator and author. Find her blog online at Cincinnati.Com/blogs. Email her at columns@communitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-248-7130, ext. 356.

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mation, visit greatparks.org or call 513-521PARK (7275). Also, be sure to check the Facebook page and follow the district on Twitter.

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Empower U schedules April classes Empower U has the following classes this month on the West Side. To register for any class, go to empoweruohio.org. » Crucial Conversations – Tools for Talking When Stakes are High Wednesday, April 17, 78:30 p.m. at Green Township Library, 6525 Bridgetown Road. Based on the book “Crucial Conversations – Tools For Talking when Stakes are High” this interactive course will cover the seven basic principles of successful dialogue. Jane Steinmetz, owner of Splendid Work, will enable you to think

Andre’s Jarlsberg cheese spread

and others in his family agree “it is just as good as store bought." Andre grates the cheese with the Cuisinart grating blade. He chops the onion fine (about a 1/4 inch) by hand since Andre feels like hand dicing will result in less liquid onion. Smart tip! Blend together

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LIFE

B4 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • APRIL 17, 2013

DEATHS Mary Patricia Broderick Mary Patricia Mulvihill Broderick, 86, died April 10. She was a homemaker. Survived by children Catherine (George Broderick Zink) Holiday, Patricia (Jerry Joffe), Mary Ann, Colleen (Tom Knight), Robert (Jeanine), Michael (Sherry) Broderick, Susan (Aldo) Torboli, Jane Klumb; brother William Mulvihill; cousin Rosemary Mullen; 14 grandchildren; seven great-grandchildren. Preceded in death by husband Robert Broderick, son Thomas Broderick. Services were April 13 at Holy Family. Arrangements by B.J. Meyer Sons Funeral Home. Memorials to: St. Vincent de

Paul/Holy Family Food Pantry, 3006 W. Eighth St., Cincinnati, OH 45205 or Hospice of Cincinnati, P.O. Box 633597, Cincinnati, OH 45263-3597.

Shelton, brother Billy Joe Shelton. Services were April 16 at Walker Funeral Home.

Basic obituary information and a color photograph of your loved one is published without charge by The Community Press. Please call us at 853-6262 for a submission form. To publish a larger memorial tribute, call 242-4000 or pricing details.

Marvin Figg

Donna Brunner

Marvin E. Figg, 60, Price Hill, died April 2. He worked in the restaurant industry. Survived by brother Donny Figg; brotherFigg in-law George Nunlist Jr.; nephew George Nunlist III. Preceded in death by parents John, Geneva Figg, siblings Donna Nunlist, Tommy Figg. Arrangements by Ralph Meyer & Deters Funeral Home.

Donna Jean Brunnner, 49, Price Hill, died April 8. Survived by husband Larry Brunner; children Michelle, Keith, Brunner Misty, Kelly, Kyle Brunner; grandchildren Brian Kelly, Macie, Kylee, Nathalie, Max Brunner, Carmen Dowing, Callie, Carly Gibbs, Payton Freeman, Cadan Carmack; siblings Vickie Steinmetz, David, Mike, Tammy, Robert, Mark Shelton, Dusty Sharp. Preceded in death by parents Mary, Don

Margaret Hennies Margaret Hennies, 90, died April 7. Survived by children Daniel, Robert Hennies, Geraldine Mays, Paula Hennies Eggleston, Karen Hensley; 15 grandchildren. Preceded in death by husband William Hennies, daughter Christine Lysaght. Services were April 10 at St. Aloysius-on-the-Ohio. Arrangements by Brater-Winter Funeral Home. Memorials to the Alzheimer's Association or American Diabetes Association in care of Brater-Winter Funeral Home, 138 Monitor Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45233.

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Georgiana Krull Georgiana Moore Krull, 97, Delhi Township, died April 4. She was a clerical worker. Survived by Krull children Bernard (Betsy), David (Nancy), Mary Krull, Alice (Terry) Burnett; nine grandchildren; seven great-grandchildren. Preceded in death by

Eggs • Ham • Sausage • Danish Rolls • Donuts Fruit • French Toast • Biscuits & Gravy Potatoes • Roast Beef •New Potatoes • Chicken Chicken Fettuccine • Green Beans • Salad Rolls • Butter • Dessert Children 4-9 - 1/2 Price • Under 3 - Free

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Preceded in death by parents William Weaver, Anna WellsWeaver-McArtor, siblings Harold, Charles, George Weaver, Beatice Martin, friends Helen Heekin, Mary Strotmeyer. Arrangements by Radel Funeral Home. Memorials to the Boys and Girls Club of Cincinnati.

ABOUT OBITUARIES

husband Bernard Krull, children Carolyn (Thomas) McGoy, Jeffrey, Kathleen Krull, siblings Jessie Stumpf, May Wallace. Services were April 9 at Bayley. Arrangements by Vitt, Stermer & Anderson Funeral Home. Memorials to: Bayley, 990 Bayley Place Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45233.

Harold Melton Harold D. Melton, 76, died March 30. He was a foreman for Ryerson Steel. He was an Army veteran. Survived by Melton children David, Michael, Robert Melton, Ingrid Horst, Evelee Gilbert; brother James Melton; seven grandchildren; three great-grandchildren. Preceded in death by wife Rosa Melton, son Hans Horst, parents Austin, Laura Melton. Services were April 5 at Ralph Meyer & Deters Funeral Home.

Andrew Offutt Andrew J. Offutt, 77, died April 9. He was a Marine Corps veteran, past state commander and life member of Disabled American Veterans, and a life member of the National Order of Trench Rats and Catholic War Veterans. Survived by brother Bill Offutt; nieces and nephews Mary, Duke, Vince Kerley, Ann Zupan, Bill, Jim, Andy Offutt, Melissa Smith, Nancy Killeen, Mary Heideman; many great- and great-great-nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by parents Vincent, Elizabeth “Betty” Offutt, sisters Ginny Kerley, Nancy Offutt. Services were April 15 at St.

William Church. Arrangements by Meyer & Geiser Funeral Home. Memorials to: Steins Hospice, 2003 Veterans Blvd., Georgetown, OH 45121 or Joseph House for Homeless Veterans, P.O. Box 14608, Cincinnati, OH 45250.

JOURNEY MAINSTREET

Rose Kauffman White, 82, Delhi Township, died April 5. She was a homemaker. Survived by White husband Robert White; children Bob (Mary), Bill White, Linda (Van) Gunkel, Missy (Jim) Harper, Mary (John) Seibert; grandchildren Mindy (Mark), Chrissy, Jenn (Brian), Laura (Tim), Joe, Emily, Karen (Dan), Brittany (John), Mandy, Matt, Robby, Mike, Sam, Amber, Alex, Ashley, William, Dylan; greatgrandchildren Olivia, Brad, Austin, Kellyn, Aidan, Leah, Anna, Spencer, Mark Jr., Ryan. Preceded in death by brother Victor Kauffman. Services were April 9 at St. William. Arrangements by Vitt, Stermer & Anderson Funeral Home. Memorials to the St. William Education Fund.

Randy Short Walter R. “Randy” Short, 58, died April 8. He was a production supervisor for General Motors. Short Survived by wife Karen Short; sons Anthony (Nehimhia) Chismar, Christopher (Shelly), Kevin, Alexander Short; parents William, Thelma Short; brother Timothy Short; six grandchildren. Arrangements by Ralph Meyer & Deters Funeral Home.

Juanita Terrell Juanita Valentine Terrell, 57, died April 4. Survived by children Keith, James Terrell, Rhonda (Scott) Saylor; siblings Mary Bond, Herschel Valentine, Robert, Susie Perry; grandchildren Kaitlyn, Scottie, Tiffany, Alyssa. Preceded in death by husband Keith Terrell, mother Anna Mae Valentine, friend Jay Meyer. Services were April 8 at Vitt, Stermer & Anderson Funeral Home.

Barbara Yohman Barbara Pratt Yohman, 91, died March 1 in Sanford, Maine. She was a secretary. Survived by children J. Robert, Donald, Douglas, Jeffrey Yohman, Judith Oetzel; sisters Marilyn Ward, Marian Shipulski; grandchildren Andrew, Chance, Alyssa, Zachary Yohman, Abbie, Lana Oetzel; great-grandchildren Tyler, Madelyn Yohman, Jaxon Boatright. Preceded in death by husband Joseph Yohman, Evelyn Hansen. A memorial service will be held in Cincinnati in May. Arrangements by Black Funeral Home. Memorials to: Kennebunk Land Trust, 11 York St., Kennebunk, ME 04030.

Marie Weaver Marie A. Weaver, 81, West Price Hill, died April 1. She worked for Golden Rule Electric. Survived by daughter Terrie Collins (Joe) Laytart; grandchildren Angala (Bill) Chipman, Johnny Collins; great-grandchilddren James, Rose Chipman.

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LIFE

APRIL 17, 2013 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • B5

Rey Of Light Shines At DePaul Cristo Rey

Rey of Light, a scholarship benefit for students, will shine at DePaul Cristo Rey High School Saturday, April 27. This gala evening will begin at 6 p.m. in the DPCR Student Center and include dinner as well as silent and oral auctions. Rey of Light is presented by the Sisters of Charity of Cincinnati, the SC Ministry Foundation, and Susie & John Lame/Lenox Wealth Management.. Two community leaders who have been strong supporters of DePaul Cristo Rey from its inception are serving as the honorary co-chairs: Sister Joan Elizabeth Cook, SC, president of the Sisters of Charity of Cincinnati, and Rev. Eric Knapp,

Knapp

Cook

SJ, pastor of St. Xavier Church in downtown Cincinnati. There will be more than 150 items available for bid through the silent auction which opens at 6 p.m. The oral auction will begin after dinner with bidding on more than 25 valuable gifts and packages including a Reds box package for 12; an Umbrian dinner for six prepared by DPCR president Sister Jeanne Bessette; a Broadway in Cincinnati package for “Flashdance,

the Musical;” and a week’s stay in a restored 1880s sea captain’s cottage on Prince Edward Island. For reservations or more information on Rey of Light, contact Development Director Sparkle Worley at 513-861-0600 or sparkle.worley@depaulcristorey.org. DePaul Cristo Rey is an affordable, Catholic, college preparatory high school for underserved students. It is sponsored by the Sisters of Charity of Cincinnati and is one of 25 schools in the national Cristo Rey Network which serves 7,400 urban young people who live in communities with limited education options. Most of the students qualify for the Federal Free

KNIGHT DONATION

or Reduced Lunch Program. All DPCR students participate in the Corporate Work Study Program (CWSP) to help finance a portion of their education costs. However as a new school which serves only those families who can’t afford other private, college-preparatory schools, the cost to educate students far outweighs their CWSP earnings. Rey of Light supports the scholarships that enable students from economically challenged families to afford this nationally recognized dualfocus educational program now offered in Cincinnati at DPCR and not available at any other local high school.

St. Dominic Delhi Knights of Columbus hosted Rachel Renner, executive director of Pregnancy Center West on March 19. Renner detailed the programs that PCW offers young women facing difficult circumstances; and the educational, peer-counseling, and material support that PCW makes available to young families. Items were donated by the K of C for the Earn While You Learn program, which provides new and expectant moms and dads much needed items for their babies, as well as valuable parenting and life skills information. Shown are Renner and St. Dominic K of C Grand Knight Ken Gardner and Culture of Life Chairman Grant Honnert.

Still time to sign up for painting retreat evening of the retreat, participants attend a banquet and then enjoy activities that will include Make-it/Take-it projects, a cornhole tournament and other picnic games, dancing and line dance instruction, an art show and the raffle of generously-filled themed gift baskets. For more information about the retreat, contact Retreat Chairman, JoAnn Heurich at tulip@zoomtown.com. GCDA is a branch chapter of the National Society of Decoration Painters (SDP), and its purpose is to provide a fun meeting ground for those who enjoy painting. GCDA sponsors classes, workshops, the annual painting retreat, publishes a monthly newsletter and contributes to philanthropic community concerns and activities through financial gifts and active member participation. Membership includes the tri-state areas of Ohio, Kentucky, Indiana and beyond.

Members range in experience and skill level from beginner to advanced and represent just about every medium and art style from traditional to whimsical. There is truly something for everyone in GCDA. Meetings are held at the Springfield Township Senior Center on 9158 Winton Road, at noon on the second Sundays of each month with some exceptions: no meeting in April due to retreat and the May meeting will be on the third Sunday because of Mother’s Day. For more information, go to www.gcdapainter-

s.org, visit our Facebook page, and also go to the SDP website at www.decorativepainters.org

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The annual decorative painting retreat hosted by the Greater Cincinnati Decorative Artists (GCDA) is just less than four weeks away, but the good news is that there is still time to register. Registration is open to anyone who is interested in decorative art. This year’s painting retreat will be Friday, Saturday and Sunday, April 19, 20 and 21, at the Higher Ground Conference Center in West Harrison, Ind. The theme of the retreat is “Painting is a Picnic.” Retreat attendees can sign up for classes in acrylic, oil, watercolor and pen and ink projects that range from beginner to advanced levels. To view photos of available classes and the registration form, go to the GCDA website at www.gcdapainters.org, click on Painting Retreat and then on the Retreat Catalog. All meals are served on site and free drink and eats are available during class time. On Saturday

PRESBYTERIAN OAK HILLS PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 6233 Werk Rd. (Enter off Werkridge) 922-5448 Rev. Jerry Hill 10:00 a.m Worship & Sunday School Nursery Care Avail.

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LIFE

B6 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • APRIL 17, 2013

POLICE REPORTS CINCINNATI DISTRICT 3 Arrests/citations Lonnie III Jackson, born 1989, telecommunication harassment, 3201 Warsaw Ave., March 27. Shon Turnbow, born 1994, possession of drug paraphernalia, 1000 Ross Ave., March 29. Stephanie L. Prichard, born 1992, theft under $300, 3609 Warsaw Ave., March 29. William Starks, born 1994, possession of drugs, 4300 Glenway Ave., March 29. Brittany Adkins, born 1994, possession of drugs, 2949 Bodley Ave., March 30. Darren P. Lally, born 1991, possession of drugs, 944 Chateau Ave., March 31. Floyd Edward Conner, born 1960, domestic violence, 547 Woodlawn Ave., March 31. Andre Thomas, born 1990, misdemeanor drug possession, 3598 Warsaw Ave., April 1. Brittany Ingram, born 1987, aggravated menacing, telecommunication harassment, 1018 Fairbanks Ave., April 1. Cortez Pope, born 1993, aggravated menacing, carrying concealed weapons, having a weapon under disability, receiving a stolen firearm, 3109 Warsaw Ave., April 1. Eran Thomas, born 1992, city or local ordinance violation, possession of drugs, 3538 Warsaw Ave., April 1. Jacqueline A. Gillespie, born 1980, soliciting prostitution, 5030 Rapid Run Pike, April 1. Jeremy Stigall, born 1993, intimidating a victim or witness, 3050

Mickey Ave., April 1. Khalic Milton, born 1994, aggravated menacing, domestic violence, 1241 Manss Ave., April 1. Charles Jones, born 1972, possession of drugs, 951 Woodlawn Ave., April 2. Cotrill Dumas, born 1977, aggravated menacing, having a weapon under disability, misdemeanor drug possession, 3501 Warsaw Ave., April 2. Donnell Wysinger, born 1989, assault, criminal damaging or endangering, domestic violence, 3201 Warsaw Ave., April 2. Latasha Morris, born 1974, domestic violence, 2303 Wyoming Ave., April 2. Michael Terry Buttram, born 1978, theft under $300, 3201 Warsaw Ave., April 2. Rachel Young, born 1985, telecommunication harassment, 1905 Wyoming Ave., April 2. Terry Messer, born 1976, assault, 3201 Warsaw Ave., April 2. Bobby Ray Merida, born 1978, receiving stolen checks, 6831 Gracely Drive, April 3. Danielle White, born 1989, criminal damaging or endangering, 3201 Warsaw Ave., April 3. Scott A. Johnson, born 1976, violation of a temporary protection order, 5065 Sidney Road, April 3. Shaun Michael Roberts, born 1978, domestic violence, 2211 Ferguson Road, April 3. Chanel J. Claxton, born 1990, 959 Hawthorne Ave., April 4. Deandre Williams, born 1994, receiving a stolen motor vehi-

ABOUT POLICE REPORTS The Community Press publishes the names of all adults charged with offenses. The information is a matter of public record and does not imply guilt or innocence. To contact your local police department: » Delhi Township: Chief Jim Howarth, 922-0060 » Cincinnati District 3: Capt. Russell A. Neville, 263-8300 cle, 4318 Glenway Ave., April 4. Dennis L. Winningham, born 1986, illegal possession of a prescription drug, 7420 Wynne Place, April 4. Hakeem Anderson, born 1994, aggravated robbery, 1216 Quebec Road, April 4. Danico Dangerfield, born 1989, obstructing official business, 1230 Elberon Ave., April 5. Daniel Hutcheon, born 1990, carrying concealed weapons, firearm in motor vehicle, 3300 Glenway Ave., April 5. Kayla Trivette, born 1993, receiving a stolen motor vehicle, 3714 Warsaw Ave., April 5. Latifa Collins, born 1990, criminal damaging or endangering, disorderly conduct, 826 Considine Ave., April 5. Nakia Stacy, born 1980, drug abuse, 3600 Warsaw Ave., April 5. Nichole Baker, born 1979, falsification, 1100 Grand Ave., April 5. Jeffrey Kenney, born 1993, falsification, 3771 Warsaw Ave., April 6. Jenna Marissa James, born 1994, criminal trespassing, 3609 Warsaw Ave., April 6. Ronald Hines, born 1989, domestic violence, 3050 Mickey Ave.,

April 6. Bruce Thompson, born 1984, domestic violence, falsification, 1178 Kuhlman Ave., April 7. Epple Boyd, born 1989, obstructing official business, 1002 Woodlawn Ave., April 7. Justin Steele, born 1991, possession of drug abuse instruments, 3417 Warsaw Ave., April 7. Kevin Anderson, born 1984, assault, criminal trespassing, 2670 Lehman Road, April 7.

Incidents/reports Aggravated menacing 1117 Woodlawn Ave., March 29. 3400 Warsaw Ave., April 3. 3430 Warsaw Ave., April 1. 3501 Warsaw Ave., April 2. 4021 St. Lawrence Ave., March 30. Aggravated robbery 3537 Warsaw Ave., April 4. Assault 1020 Seton Ave., April 3. 1148 Considine Ave., April 1. 3021 Warsaw Ave., April 2. 3050 Mickey Ave., April 4. 3050 Mickey Ave., March 30. 3323 Warsaw Ave., March 29. 3330 Glenmore Ave., April 2. 729 Woodlawn Ave., March 30. 951 Kirbert Ave., April 2.

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1275 Sunset Ave., March 30. Robbery 3050 Mickey Ave., April 4. 1621 First Ave., March 30. 3759 W. Liberty St., April 3. Theft 1006 Woodlawn Ave., April 1. 1011 Purcell Ave., April 4. 1021 Rapid Ave., April 3. 2670 Lehman Road, March 31. 3422 Price Ave., March 29. 3812 W. Eighth St., April 2. 457 Elberon Ave., April 2. 743 Terry St., March 30. 958 Kirbert Ave., March 29. 7005 Gracely Drive, March 28. 7420 Wynne Place, April 4. 1017 Covedale Ave., March 27. 1037 Rosemont Ave., April 2. 1257 Dewey Ave., March 30. 1656 Iliff Ave., April 2. 3726 Westmont Drive, April 1. 3836 St. Lawrence Ave., April 2. 3951 W. Eighth St., March 30. 3961 W. Eighth St., March 31. 4108 W. Eighth St., April 2. 4108 W. Eighth St., April 3. 4116 Francis Ave., April 2. 4320 Foley Road, April 4. 4323 Glenway Ave., March 31. 4460 Guerley Road, March 30. 4522 W. Eighth St., April 1. 575 Rockwell Road, March 29. 814 Rosemont Ave., April 2. Violation of a protection order/consent agreement 4813 Rapid Run Road, April 2. 5065 Sidney Road, April 1.

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4500 Glenway Ave., April 1. 4743 Green Glen Lane, March 30. Breaking and entering 2812 Warsaw Ave., April 1. 3750 Warsaw Ave., April 4. 1763 Ashbrook Drive, March 30. 5215 Highview Drive, March 30. Burglary 1136 Wells St., April 1. 2912 Lehman Road, April 2. 3050 Mickey Ave., March 30. 3414 W. Eighth St., March 29. 445 Purcell Ave., April 2. 750 Grand Ave., April 4. 930 Summit Ave., April 4. 3761 Westmont Drive, March 31. 3804 W. Liberty St., April 3. 956 Edgetree Lane, April 3. Criminal damaging/endangering 1038 Grand Ave., April 2. 1100 Woodlawn Ave., March 31. 2903 Lehman Road, March 28. 1059 Schiff Ave., April 2. 1288 McKeone Ave., April 3. 1643 First Ave., March 29. 4410 Rapid Run Road, March 31. 5023 Sidney Road, March 31. 901 Kreis Lane, March 27. Domestic violence Reported on Purcell Avenue, April 4. Reported on Woodlawn Avenue, March 31. Reported on Woodlawn Avenue, March 31. Reported on Dewey Avenue, March 30. Reported on Ferguson Road, April 2. Reported on Manss Avenue, April 1. Reported on Westmont Drive, April 1. Reported on Wyoming Avenue, April 2. Felonious assault 1259 Quebec Road, March 30. 3050 Mickey Ave., April 4. 959 Hawthorne Ave., April 3. 1158 Coronado Ave., April 2. Interference with custody 4452 Glenway Ave., March 29. Intimidation 3050 Mickey Ave., March 30. Menacing 743 Terry St., March 30.

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LIFE

APRIL 17, 2013 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • B7

REAL ESTATE 5020 Troubador Court: Kerber, Lawrence C. and Jane M. to Stockelman, Anthony R. Jr.; $112,000. 498 Lobob Court: U.S. Bank NA Tr. to Sandman, Mike and Bobbi; $53,000. 352 Robben Lane: Nartker, Cecilia A. to McDevitt, Dianne; $103,000. 4748 Basil Lane: Hassenger, Mark T. to GMAC Mortgage LLC; $61,600. 214 Yorkwood Lane: Kiely, Eleanora M. to Lawhorn, Vernon C. and Janet F.; $102,000. 424 Leath Ave.: Andrea, Gregory S. to J.P. Morgan Chase Bank NA; $44,000. 1179 Neeb Road: Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation to Doan, Sue L.; $34,900. 1186 Balmoral Drive: Samad, Ronald S. to Rowland, Kerry R. and Colleen T.; $239,000. 1034 Beechmeadow Lane: Federal National Mortgage Association to Duncan, Courtney; $22,000. 907 Fashion Ave.: U.S. Bank NA ND to Aris Investments LLC; $50,100. 5338 Foley Road: JA Rental LLC to Advantage Bank; $42,000. 6465 Mapleton Ave.: Kemen, Thomas E. and Marcia A. to Long, Ryan C. and Kathleen M.; $285,000. Panther Court: Panther Creek LLC to Kinzeler, Charles R.; $177,000. 6513 Rapid Run Road: Reynolds, Wesley D. and Cynthia A. to Ryan, Richard J. Tr.; $70,000. 4795 Shadylawn Terrace: Combs, Matthew A. and Michael Jenkins to Jenkins, Michael D.; $32,300.

1015 Wells St.: Penklor Properties LLC to Cincinnati Revitalization LLC; $20,000. 517 Woodlawn Ave.: Guardian Savings Bank to Levi, Omri; $10,500. 3424 Price Ave.: Kennett, Karen A. and Chester Moody to U.S. Bank NA Tr.; $24,000. 1246 Drott Ave.: North Side Bank and Trust Company to Flynn, Monica A.; $5,000. 648 Fairbanks Ave.: Dunn, Barbara L. to MVB Mortgage Corporation; $14,000. 1314 Manss Ave.: Cannedy, Jonathan III to Clarke, Christopher; $7,000. 966 Mansion Ave.: Deutsche Bank Trust Company Americas Tr. to Lex Rentals LLC; $5,751. 466 Purcell Ave.: Brown, Job to Shelton, James; $7,500. 3413 Liberty St.: Boehme, Kenneth W. and Barbara Jean to Schmidt, Thomas M.; $10. 3308 Lehman Road: Barker, A.G. to Re Recycle It; $4,500. 1045 Purcell Ave.: Raab, Frank Edward III and Susan M. to Build Up Properties LLC; $12,000. 1520 Beech Ave.: KAK LLC to Lampkin, Cedric F.; $7,500. 2715 Price Ave.: Johnson, Chephren to Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation; $24,000. 1415 Beech Ave.: Johnson, Jason J. to Larroni Properties LLC; $14,900. 327 Crestline Ave.: Barkley, Racquel to Hill, James C.;

$21,000. 3038 Glenway Ave.: At Homes Limited Partnership to Jones, John Tr.; $20,000. 3654 Glenway Ave.: Deutsche Bank Trust Co. Americas Tr. to Valerius, Nathan E. Tr.; $4,500. 452 Grand Ave.: Coleman, Natalie and Marietta C. to Lalosh, Janet C.; $36,000. 2500 Warsaw Ave.: Heimbrock, Rob to Dziadkowiec, Marek A.; $18,700.

SAYLER PARK

7426 Gracely Drive: Bee, Stephen G. to Yemma, Angela E.; $110,200. 6831 Sayler Ave.: Carter, Diane Tr. to Toberg, Christopher J.; $85,000. 6425 Gracely Drive: Voll, Mary Jacqueline to Anneken, Anthony J. and Robin; $102,500. 119 Catalpa Road: Hase, John C. and Mary Jo to Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation; $38,000. 6406 Gracely Drive: Acres Properties LLC and WRH Investments LLC to WT Group LLC; $675,000. 6390 Gracely Drive: Acres Properties LLC and WRH Investments LLC to WT Group LLC; $675,000. Gracely Drive: Acres Properties

WEST PRICE HILL

4142 Jamestown St.: Federal National Mortgage Association to Urban Plunge Properties LLC; $60,000. 2451 Oaktree Place: Nguyen, Tao and Teresa to Kebede, Mekonene Tr.; $142,750. 4142 Jamestown St.: Federal National Mortgage Association to Urban Plunge Properties LLC; $60,000. 645 Overlook Ave.: Renken, Sharen P. to Abel, David Joseph and Ladonna Daphine; $70,950. 1211 Manss Ave.: Brown, Albert L. to Act Community Development LLC; $25,150. 1002 Covedale Ave.: Borgemenke, Troy to Born, Tina M.; $82,500. 2404 Bluffcrest Lane: Federal National Mortgage Association to Wheeler, Michael; $62,500. 4774 Clevesdale Drive: Zimmerman, Mary Ellen to Williams, Donald O. and Vicki A.; $79,000. 1240 Rosemont Ave.: Gray, Joseph to Corporate Savings Solutions LLC; $11,900. 4711 Clevesdale Drive: Steinriede, Harry to Steinriede, Harry E. Jr.; $80,000.

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1504 Beech Ave.: Skyline Real Estate Ltd. LLC to Robbins Sid; $2,300. 1154 Grand Ave.: Newrath David Sr. to Federal National Mortgage Association; $24,000. 810 Matson Place: Queens Tower LLC to Vogt Properties LLC; $90,000. 813 Summit Ave.: Bank of America NA to Coleman Jevonna; $500.

Queen City Ave, Apt. 24, driving under suspension at 500 Pedretti Ave., April 4. Ricky A. Raider, 26, 330 Lilienthal St., driving under suspension at 4501 Foley Road, April 5. Robert Stanley, 46, 8767 Plane Tree, driving under suspension at 6000 Bender Road, April 6. Eric Armstrong, 40, 1034 Covedale Ave., driving under suspension at 1200 Covedale Ave., April 7. Edward A. Parobek, 29, 7740 Hopper Road, drug offense at 1299 Anderson Ferry Road, April 4. Timothy R. Rueve, 40, 515 Allenford Court, violation court order at 515 Allenford Court, April 4.

LLC and WRH Investments LLC to WT Group LLC; $675,000.

Tom and Rita Siemer celebrated their 60th anniversary with a mass at St. William and a brunch afterward. They were married April 11th, 1953, at St. Martin. They are retired and live in Delhi.

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Burglary Blower stolen at 5180 Locust Ave., April 7. Criminal damaging Hole cut in fence around skate park at 5125 Foley Road, April 6. Theft Unknown person stole prescriptions from mailbox at 564 Orchard View Lane, April 1. Bicycle stolen at 317 Anderson Ferry Road, April 4. Gun stolen from residence at 241 Halidonhill Drive, April 5. Vehicle window shattered, cigarettes stolen at 352 Glen Oaks Drive, April 6. Blower and buckets stolen from garage at 5096 Foley Road, April 6. Bicycles stolen at 5125 Foley Road, April 6. Purse and money stolen at 4588 Fehr Road, April 7.

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LIFE

B8 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • APRIL 17, 2013

Mount makes community service honor roll The College of Mount St. Joseph has been named to the 2013 President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll by the Corporation for National and Community Service. The honor roll recognizes higher education institutions that reflect the values of exemplary community service and achieve meaningful outcomes in their communities. The Mount has made the list every year since 2009.

The Mount’s commitment to community service is part of the college’s mission. A service event takes place each year during Welcome Weekend to introduce incoming freshman to the mission of service. For 22 years, Mount students have participated in the Christian Appalachian Project’s Spring Break WorkFest where they rehab homes for some of the poorest families. Mount students and faculty travel to the United Nations in the

summer as part of a class that learns about the UN Millennium Development Goals and works with organizations to support the goals. Student clubs include Habitat for Humanity and Campus Ministry, which takes students to New Orleans each year to help rebuild the Ninth Ward and St. Bernard Parish areas, in addition to rehabbing homes in the Chicago south suburbs. This year, five Mount students and a staff member worked as

VITA volunteers for United Way’s volunteer tax preparer program. In addition, many Mount athletic teams participate in service opportunities, and education majors go to inner-city schools for tutoring and mentoring support. “Service is an important part of who we are,” said Kristen Hedgebeth, service learning coordinator at the Mount. “Our academic departments, student organizations, athletic teams, and more engage in meaningful community projects throughout the year. We know that serving is an important part of students’ learning and development.”

Carly Ruwan and Austin Brown, Mount students who served with The Women’s Connection in Price Hill “papering” the neighborhood to advertise TWC services. PROVIDED

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LIFE

APRIL 17, 2013 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • B9

Mount offers disposal of ‘e-waste’

Residents who would like to recycle their electronic devices or safely dispose of larger products such as televisions and computers are welcome to drop off their items at the Community Recycling Day from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday, April 27 in the College of Mount St. Joseph’s west parking lot off Delhi Road by the College Theatre. The Mount’s Environmental Action Committee (EAC) is working with Recycle Force, a company from Indianapolis, which will dispose of the materials in a safe way. The EAC will accept cell phones, charging cords and phone accessories for the Cincinnati Zoo’s “Project Saving Spe-

cies” program, which helps protect gorillas and their habitat in Africa by minimizing the amount of coltan (an ore used in cell phones) that needs to be mined. The goal is to collect 200 cell phones. In addition to cell phones, some of the items that will be accepted include anything with an electrical cord – telephone systems, computers, monitors, scanners, laser disc players, computer keyboards, printers, VCR/DVD/CD players, fax machines, game systems, copiers, microwaves, surge protectors, cash registers, power cables, electronic wiring, and satellite components. Larger items such as refrigerators, washers, dry-

ers, and dishwashers also accepted. A $10 donation is requested for all CRT televisions and monitors and $20 donation for all refrigerant-containing appliances. Recycle Force will demanufacture highergrade materials such as televisions, computers and monitors and will wipe hard-drives clean of all data to address any privacy concerns. Broken down scrap metals are collected, packaged and sold to build new components. Electronic waste contains a number of toxic elements, such as lead and mercury, which should be disposed of carefully If you have questions, please call 244-4864.

Mercy Health offering seminars Mercy Health will have a series of free community seminars. To register, call 513-95MERCY (513-956-3729), them press option two, then option one. For the weight management seminars only, call 513-682-6980 or visit www.e-mercy.com and scroll down to “FREE Surgical & Non-Surgical Weight Loss Information

Sessions” to register. Seminars on the west side are: Orthopaedics » Treatment Options for Conditions of the Hands and Wrists; Tuesday, April 23, 6-7 p.m. with Dr. Craig B. Willis at Mercy Health – Mount Airy Hospital, Rooms ABCD, 2446 Kipling Ave. Women’s Health » Understanding and

Treating Common Issues During Pregnancy/Antepartum; Monday, April 22, 6-7 p.m. with Dr. Sarah Sabin at Mercy Health — Western Hills HealthPlex, Rooms A&B, 3131 Queen City Ave. » My Pap Test is Abnormal. What Does This Mean? Wednesday, April 25, 6-7 p.m. with Dr. Robert Flick at Mercy Health – Mount Airy Hospital.

Farmers market offering special events computer products, including old computers, laptops, servers, LCD monitors, speakers, keyboards, mice, printers, copiers fax machines, scanners, cell phones, phone equipment, docking stations, computer parts for recycling. The Hamilton County Solid Waste District will present “Landfill Models and their Alternatives.” » May 10 – “Renewable Energy Sources – Kicking the Fossil Fuel Habit” Various renewable energy options is the topic of a presentation by Larry Feist, program chair and professor of the Renewable Energy program at Cincinnati State. A GoMetro Hybrid Bus will be on the grounds for visitors to walk through as Metro

Bus Company provides information on its green efforts. » May 17 – “Urban Farming: A Better Use for Your Land than just Grass” Learn ways to grow your own food on your own land. » May 24 – “Composting: A Great Way to Feed your Food.” Learn how to turn your leftover fruits and vegetables into rich compost.

The College of Mount St. Joseph’s Music Academy is offering new Class Experiences geared toward musicians of all ages. Students in grades six-10 can register for Jazz Enthusiasm. The class meets twice a month on Sundays from 2-3:30 p.m. through May. The class teaches everything from jazz techniques to rock history to modern recording methods and how to implement them into performance and improvisation. Students will have access to computers and learn how to compose their own music. The class, taught by Joel Greenberg, music educator and professional guitarist, costs $225. Music for Munchkins is a brand new opportunity for children ages 4-6 to learn basic fundamentals of music through movement, rhythm, singing, group participation, and playing instruments. Chelsey Sweatman, music teacher at

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Delshire Elementary School and the director of the Cincinnati Children’s Choir’s west satellite, will teach this sixweek session which starts Tuesday, June 11, from 10-11 a.m. The cost is $100. Group Piano for Adults is a brand new opportunity in September for anyone over the age of18 to learn basic fundamentals and chords necessary to be able to play and enjoy music of all genres. This will be taught in a relaxed, social atmosphere. “Our new Class Expe-

riences are excellent opportunities for musicians of all ages to have additional instruction in music, or even for those who enjoy trying something new,” said Bryan Crisp, artistic director for the music academy. “We also offer private music lessons on all instruments, including voice, for all ages and abilities.” Class Experiences offer discounts for multiple children and for Mount employees as well. For more information visit www.msjmusicacademy.com.

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Celebrating the arrival of spring, the Lettuce Eat Well Farmers Market is featuring a variety of events and special guests focusing on various aspects of sustainability: recycling, composting, renewable energy and turning land and lawns into gardens. Activities will take place 3-7 p.m. every Friday in May on the grounds of Cheviot United Methodist Church, 3820 Westwood Northern Blvd. » May 3 – “Transform your Trash – Reduce your Impact on our Landfills” eCycleIT, a local IT and computer recycling company, will be on hand to accept old electronic and computer equipment. Accepted items include outdated IT and

Mount’s Music Academy offers Class Experiences for all ages

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LIFE

B10 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • APRIL 17, 2013

Students paint rain barrels for auction Fundraiser for Save Local Waters By Monica Boylson mboylson@communitypress.com

Students in Sandra Federman’s mixed media and painting class at Oak Hills High School transformed rain barrels into works of art as part of a

fundraising effort for Save Local Waters, a regional storm water collaborative to raise awareness about environmental quality issues in the Ohio River Valley. Rain barrels painted by the students at Oak

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Hills, as well as students from Colerain High School, Bethel-Tate High School, Seton High School and Kings High School will be auctioned off at a Fundraising Gala and Expo at 5 p.m. Thursday, April 18, during Party for the Planet at the Cincinnati Zoo’s Go Green Garden. There will be 42 barrels at the auction. Ken Perica, project manager for Environmental Quality Management Inc., said he gathered some inspiration for the rain barrels after seeing the success of the painted Cincinnati pigs. “We wanted to promote the use of rain barrels but one of the drawbacks is that they’re not the prettiest thing in the world. They look like trash cans,” he said. “We got the idea that if we could mimic the flying pig contests to decorate the pigs then people would be more motivated to use them.” Inspired by famous

Standing in front of their rain barrel inspired by A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte by Georges Seurat are, from left, Megan Heis, 16, Donja Shahi, 16, Taylor Helms, 15, Elise Wilcox, 14, and Caleb Cornelius, 17. MONICA BOYLSON/THE COMMUNITY PRE

artists, eight student groups at Oak Hills High School created work similar to the artist’s style with a Cincinnati theme. The barrel paintings were created to mimic the style of Georges Seurat, Claude Monet, Keith Haring, Andy Warhol, Georgia Okeeffe, Paul Cezanne, Vincent Van Gogh and Salvador Dali.

“I tried to create a mix of famous artists that the audience would recognize,” Federman said. People can find traces of Eden Park, Cincinnati Union Terminal and the city skyline in many of the painted barrels. “I’m amazed at what the kids have done,” she said. “The end result was phenomenal.”

The class devoted hundreds of hours to completing the barrels. “We didn’t only do it for the grade,” junior Donja Shahi, 16, said. “We did it for the community.” For more information about the event and the rain barrel project, visit www.savelocalwaters.org.

Dinner honors Oak Hills alumni, staff

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The 15th annual Alumni & Educational Foundation dinner is set for Thursday, May 2, at the Western Hills Country Club. The dinner honors Gray and Tate Scholars as well as Oak Hills alumni and staff award winners. The cocktail reception begins at 5:30 p.m. followed by dinner and the awards program at 6 p.m. The 2013 award win-

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ners: Distinguished alumni: Joel P. Reginelli ‘86 Distinguished alumni: Diane Weidner ‘85

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Distinguished staff: Kim Dobbs ‘74 Hall of Honor: Jan Wilking ‘89 Tickets are $75 per per-

son; patron tickets are $150 which includes special recognition; a table of 10 is $750. All tickets include dinner and one drink ticket. Make checks payable to OHAEF and mail reservations to: OHAEF Dinner, 6325 Rapid Run Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45233. For more information contact 513-598-2682 or email ohedfoundation@ohlsd.org.

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