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SMALL BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT B1

Robert Cooper of Cooper’s Automotive Service on Old Taylor Mill Road, Independence.

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County E-mail: kynews@communitypress.com T h u r s d a y, J u n e

Volume 14 Issue 32 © 2010 The Community Recorder ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

3, 2010

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Shelter volunteers to create nonprofit By Regan Coomer rcoomer@nky.com

Field days

It’s a ritual all children look forward to as the school year draws to a close: Field days and the approaching beginning of summer fun. Students at River Ridge Elementary in Villa Hills tossed balloons, played tug-of-war, and just had a good time in general. See pictures from the day. SCHOOL, A7

Sticker shock

A program in Kenton County to raise awareness about responsibility and preventing underage drinking continues to grow. Sticker Shock will be back in participating stores, applying labels and reminding adults it is their job to keep adult beverages out of the hands of kids. LIFE, B1

Find your online community

Visit NKY.com/community to find news, sports, photos, events and more from your community. You’ll find content from The Community Recorder, The Kentucky Enquirer and your neighbors. While you’re there, check out Share, and submit stories and photos of your own.

Sportsman of the year

Our readers created the ballot and now it’s time to vote for the 2010 Kenton County Sportsman and Sportswoman of the Year. Go online to www.nky.com/preps and find the yellow and green Community Recorder Sportsman of the Year icon on the right-hand side of the page. Find your ballot by newspaper and vote as often as you like through June 10. Top vote-getter wins.

To place an ad, call 283-7290.

Kenton County Animal Shelter volunteers plan to start their own 501-C3 nonprofit to keep track of donations and purchase extras for the shelter. Volunteer Janet Scanlon said the nonprofit is needed because using the fiscal court’s system of dolling out donation money is inconvenient for the day-to-day business of the shelter. “When we do something and need to pay for it, the fiscal court only meets twice a month and if we miss that, it could be a month. The people we deal with can’t wait that long to get the bills paid,” she said. Currently, when donations are made to the animal shelter and shelter employees want to expend that money, it must first be approved by the fiscal court. Scanlon said some people hesitate to donate to the shelter because they’re not sure where the money is going or if it will be spent in the way they’d like it to be spent. “How can we run any kind of program like that?” Scanlon asked. County Treasurer Jerry REGAN COOMER/STAFF Knochelmann said starting a 501- Kenton County Animal Shelter volunteer Janet Scanlon plans to start a nonprofit organization that will provide extras for the shelter’s inhabitants. C3 is an “excellent solution,” tesy of donations, are a reasonmoney like we have.” adding it’s diffiMore information Scanlon also plans to start a ably-priced spay and neuter procult for the counwebsite for the nonprofit to keep gram for the community, a new Kenton County Animal Shelter volunteer Janet Scanlon ty to track dona- recently shared 2009 shelter statistics with the Kenton people up-to-date and share sound system and commercials tions year to County Fiscal Court: happy “tails” with shelter support- advertising the shelter as a comyear if they’re In 2009, 6,097 animals stayed in the shelter. There were munity resource similar to the ers. not spent, espe- 24,000 visitors and more than 4,000 volunteer hours. “The whole reason I brought Kenton County Extension Office. Therapy animals visited nursing homes 45 times and 30 cially if there are If anyone is interested in helpthis to the attention of the court is caveats attached girl scout troops visited the shelter, earning badges. I think people who donate their ing out with the in-progress 501to that money. e-mail Scanlon at money intend for it to go to things C3, “We don’t want to not fulfill set up for that kind of tracking,” above and beyond what the coun- jrsnature@fuse.net. the requirements of the people he said. “The nonprofit won’t ty would provide,” she said. who donate money, but we’re not have restrictions on spending Coming up for the shelter, cour-

Teacher chosen for international summit By Regan Coomer rcoomer@nky.com

St. Joseph School teacher Kathy Schlachter’s classroom is SMART(er) than the average board. Schlachter incorporates her interactive, electronic SMART Board into about 70 percent of her student’s course work to help them be more interested and invested in the material. “My kids would be lost without the SMART Board. School would really boring for them, I think,” she laughed. Now Schlachter will get the chance to showcase her skills at a SMART Board Exemplary Educator Summit in July in Alberta, Canada. The SMART Exemplary Educator program recognizes educators internationally who are using SMART products in innovative ways. Schlachter was one of 50 Exemplary Educators chosen from around the world to attend the summit, which will introduce new SMART technologies and feature training workshops, project planning and the opportunity to network with other educators, some-

REGAN COOMER/STAFF

Students hurried to beat the clock in a counting change game on St. Joseph School teacher Kathy Schlachter’s SMART board May 28. Schlachter was one of 50 educators recently chosen to attend a SMART board conference in Canada this summer. thing Schlachter is excited about. “We’re going to get to play with all the new stuff that hasn’t come out yet; I’m so psyched about that,” she said. “I know I’m going to learn more and I can’t wait to get up there to be with other teachers and share files back and forth.” Schlachter uses the SMART Board for activities ranging from

the simple, such as taking attendance, to the more complex games that teach necessary skills. The attendance program is fun for students because each one has his or her name on a piece of season-appropriate clipart which they then drag to the “present” box. “They know it’s the first thing I want them to do in the morning. It has instructions on it about

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whether or not I want homework collected or if I want them to do a workbook page,” Schlachter explained. But the program also just makes attendance fun for students, who are eager to see the clipart change each month - from elves in December to kids in bathing suits close to summertime. “The first day of the month they can’t wait to see what the new thing is going to be,” she said. Next school year Schlachter will help students in the computer club make similar attendance programs for other teachers. “They’ll love doing it, teachers love the program so it’s a win-win all around,” she said. St. Jo Principal Cathy Stover wasn’t surprised Schlachter was chosen for the summit. “Kathy has attended several workshops on the use of the SMART Board in the classroom. She has shared her knowledge not only with the teachers here at St. Jo’s, but also with teachers in other schools.”


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Community Recorder

June 3, 2010

News

Safety is focus of upcoming bike rodeos By Jason Brubaker jbrubaker@nky.com

Whether you’re on two wheels or three, there’s never a bad time to learn about safety. That’s why the police departments in Villa Hills and Edgewood will again be sponsoring their annual Bike Rodeos this month, designed to teach kids about the importance of bicycle safety. The rodeos will include safety inspections and obstacles course for the kids, whether they’re on bikes or tricycles. “It’s just a way to ensure that all of the kids learn about safety,” said Villa Hills Officer Mel Wright. “It’s always a fun event for the kids, and it’s something we enjoy doing.” In Edgewood, Office Terry Chinn said their event will once again be dubbed the “Justin Schumacher

JASON BRUBAKER/STAFF

Jonathan and Christopher Fitz ride through an obstacle course at Freedom Park during the Justin Schumacher Rodeo on Wheels bike safety program in 2009. JASON BRUBAKER/STAFF

Villa Hills Explorer Broderick Schmeing helps Will Bolin through the obstacle course during the Villa Hills Bike Rodeo last year. Rode on Wheels,” in a tribute to former Edgewood resident Justin Schumacher,

who was killed in 1992 at the age of 12 while riding rollerblades near Dixie

Highway. The event will be held at Freedom Park on June 8, and will start at 10

A Picture of My Heart. In a Heartbeat.

a.m. There will be an obstacle course for both the younger and older children, and bikes will be provided for any child who doesn’t have one and wants to participate. “It’s a fun event for them, but it also really important for the kids to learn the proper signaling and how to tighten their helmets - things like that,” said Chinn. “We usually have a pretty good turnout, and we hope that’s the case again this year.” In Villa Hills, Wright said the department will have a brief safety lecture before inspecting the equipment and putting the kids

BRIEFS Large-item pickup June 7

The city of Park Hills will hold its large-item pickup along with regular trash pickup Wednesday June 7. Residents may sit out their large items on Tuesday evening. If residents have any questions about which items are acceptable, they should call the city building at (859) 431-6252.

Spring Fling show

Organizers have released the list of winners of the Second Annual Spring Fling Juried Arts & Craft Show. The last day to view the show is Friday May 28 at the Crescent Springs Presbyterian Church, 710 Western Reserve Road. Best of Show and a cash prize of $150 went to Marianna Lutes Briner’s oil painting, “Dr. Tom.” First place and $75 went to Sandy Kent for her

Index

Calendar ......................................B2 Classifieds.....................................C Food.............................................B4 Obituaries....................................B9 Police.........................................B11 Schools........................................A7 Sports ........................................A10 Viewpoints ................................A12

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through an obstacle course in the Tom Braun Field parking lot on June 16. Although the younger kids will have a truncated course, he said he is trying to make the obstacle course for the older children more challenging this year. “I think last year, it was a little to easy for them, so we’re going to change it up a bit,” he said. Both rodeos are free to attend, and registration is not required. For more information, contact the Villa Hills Police Department at 341-3535 or the Edgewood Police Department at 331-5910.

acrylic painting, “Nature Trail 2.” Second place and $50 went to Joel Rader for his pastel painting, “3-year-old Portrait.” Third place and $25 went to Margie Lakeberg for her oil painting, “Devou Guards.” Certificates of Merit Awards went to: • Becky Burdick, acrylic painting, "Pink Cornflowers" • Evelyn Elliott, acrylic painting, “Tidal Pools” •Patricia Foxworthy, watercolor painting, “The Pecking Order” • Donald Koos, oil/bead painting, “Choices” • Debby Raymond, oil pastel, “Eastern by Eden” • Elmira Scott, painted porcelain vase, “Tulips” • Holly Spraul, oil painting, “New Delhi” • Grace Thoeny, fabric paper mache sculpture, “Study in Blue”

Villa celebrates birthday

The city of Villa Hills will celebrate their 48th anniversary with a party at the Villa Hills Civic Club on June 12. The party will run from 11 a.m. until around 3 p.m., and is open to all residents. For more information, call 341-1515, or visit www.villahillsky.org.

RECORDER

Find news and information from your community on the Web Kenton County– nky.com/kentoncounty News Brian Mains | Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1062 | bmains@nky.com Jason Brubaker | Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1060 | jbrubaker@nky.com Regan Coomer | Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1061 | rcoomer@nky.com Melanie Laughman | Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . 513-248-7573 | mlaughman@nky.com James Weber | Sports Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1054 | jweber@nky.com Advertising Debbie Maggard | Advertising Manager. . . . . . 578-5501 | dmaggard@nky.com Deb Kaya | Account Rep . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-5507 | dkaya@nky.com Josh Bishop | Account Rep. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-5506 | jbishop@nky.com Delivery For customer service. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 781-4421 Sharon Schachleiter | Circulation Manager . . 442-3464 | sschachleiter@nky.com Classified To place a Classified ad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283-7290 | www.communityclassified.com To place an ad in Community Classified, call 283-7290.


News

June 3, 2010

Community Recorder

A3

Kimmich’s job doesn’t violate Hatch Act

By Regan Coomer rcoomer@nky.com

While a statement from the Office of Special Counsel finds that former Kenton County Deputy Judge-executive Scott Kimmich does not violate the Hatch Act in his recent employment with the county, some find his new job as Human Resources Director suspect. “I think it’s really inappropriate based on the way he left his position at the county and the ongoing lawsuit that is HR related,” said Democratic candidate for Kenton County Commissioner Tom Elfers, referring to the suit brought

against Kimmich by a former county secretary. Kimmich resigned as deputy judge-executive in February when an opinion from the OSC stated he could violate the federal Hatch Act if he continued his employment and running for office. The Hatch Act restricts the political activity of individuals employed by state, county or municipal executive agencies who have a connection with programs financed by federal dollars. Nicole Eldredge, the Hatch Act attorney who wrote a letter to Kimmich about his possible violation, answered a query by his Attorney Rick Robinson stating Kimmich’s employment with the

county is not a violation. Elfers, however, is more concerned with Kimmich’s pay as HR Director, which is $85,000 annually or a little more than $7,000 for each month. “Essentially what it means is the county is paying him $7,000 a month to do a job being done for nothing before that,” Elfers said. Considering that Kimmich’s employment will cease when the new judge-executive takes office, Elfers said it’s a “waste of taxpayers’ money.” However, Deputy Judge-executive Joe Shriver says the county’s payroll is under budget. Shriver, who made $81,700 as HR director and was given an

extra $10,000 when he took over Kimmich’s position in February, said if you subtract his and Kimmich’s new HR salary from what they would have been paid, the county is saving more than $20,000. “We’re $20,000 lighter in salary right now than we were back in January,” he said. Republican candidate for Kenton County Commission Jon Draud, unlike Elfers who he will face in this fall’s general election, said he understands both sides of the issue when it comes to Kimmich’s employment. “I have mixed emotions about it because I don’t know that he should have had to resign in the

Local singer music honoree By Regan Coomer rcoomer@nky.com

Mainstrasse resident Kelly Thomas embodies the spirit of music. So says the Taste of Cincinnati, which honored Thomas with the 2010 Katie Reider Spirit of Music Award at the event May 29. Taste organizers created the award in memory of local musician Katie Reider, who died from complications of a rare tumor in 2008. The award is given to an individual who personifies Reider’s life, spirit and strength. “It’s an amazing, really cool thing and I’ve never won anything before,” Thomas laughed. Thomas, a teacher of job readiness in Cincinnati Public

Schools, hopes Reider’s family and loved ones get closure from the award. “I know that’s the intention of the award and I do hope that it is a happy thing that gives them peace - that reassurance that nobody’s forgetting Katie Reider,” she said. While Thomas didn’t know Reider personally, she followed the blog kept by the singer that chronicled her illness. “That’s how I got to know her,” Thomas said. “I have so much respect for her to be strong enough to share something like that.” Later, Thomas performed at the 2008 memorial to Reider, where Reider’s partner, Karen, and bandmates heard Thomas sing her song “Trusted Eyes.” They were so impressed

they asked her to perform more of Reider’s songs with them at last year’s Taste of Cincinnati. “It was an amazing experience and I am truly blessed to have been a part of it. I will always feel a strong connection to Katie and hope that I can learn from her grace and spirit,” Thomas said. “Kelly is a great choice to be the first to receive this award in Katie’s name,” said Karen Reider. “She’s been an amazing presence on the local music scene.” Thomas, who has performed her mix of blues, roots country and Americana in Cincinnati since 1998, is a member of the Kelly Thomas and the Fabulous Pickups band and has just finished a collaboration with other local artists on a gospel album.

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first place, though I’m not that familiar with the Hatch Act. It’s not a very used bill as far as I know,” he said. Draud had no comment on Kimmich’s salary. As for Kimmich, he is confident of his abilities to take over as HR director. “I think it’s important we wind down this administration and open the door of opportunity for the new administration in as seamless a way as possible. I’m looking forward to going back and having a positive opportunity for transitioning and moving on,” he said.

Neighborhood hosting its own Monday mile By Regan Coomer rcoomer@nky.com

REGAN COOMER/STAFF

Mainstrasse Village resident Kelly Thomas, a singer songwriter, was just honored as the 2010 recipient of the Katie Reider Spirit of Music Award at the Taste of Cincinnati. Reider died from complications of a rare tumor in 2008. The Taste of Cincinnati created the award in Reider’s memory. “I’m so tickled. It’s been a really fun project,” she said, adding she and the other musicians practiced a few times and went straight to the recording studio. For more information about Thomas, visit kellythomasonline.com.

Mondays are going to be a little healthier in Covington’s neighborhoods. The city recently invested in Healthy Monday, a national campaign to get Americans to adopt healthy behaviors starting on Monday. According to the healthymonday.org., people are more likely to continue healthy behaviors throughout the week if they begin on Mondays. Covington Recreation Director Natalie Gardner said the city has recently asked individual neighborhoods to hold their own Healthy Monday Mile Walks. Latonia held its own Healthy

Monday Mile May 24. “To promote healthy living within Covington we need strong advocates, and where better to start than with our dedicated and involved neighborhoods?” she asked. Helentown is one of the neighborhoods planning its own Healthy Monday Mile, which will kickoff at 6:30 p.m. Monday June 7. Organizer and Helentown resident Krista Athey said depending on interest, the walks could happen monthly as a neighborhood or residents can connect with one another to walk on their own. For more information, email Athey at krista.athey@hotmail.com.

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A4

Community Recorder

June 3, 2010

News

Girl Scouts Katie Warner, 6 of Independence and Isabella Baker, 7 of Walton, from troop 1333, wave their flags from the float in the Erlanger Memorial Day parade. The parade was hosted by the communities of Erlanger and Elsmere, along with the Ralph Fulton VFW Post 6423 located in Erlanger.

PATRICIA SCHEYER/ CONTRIBUTOR PATRICIA SCHEYER/CONTRIBUTOR

PATRICIA SCHEYER/CONTRIBUTOR

Five-year-old Brooklyn Stoffel of Erlanger waves at the parade on Memorial Day. There were multiple parades held throughout Kenton County on Monday, May 31.

Alex Ward, 7, of Erlanger, and his brother, Max, sport antique military hats as they watch the Erlanger Memorial Day parade. The parade was hosted by the communities of Erlanger and Elsmere, along with the Ralph Fulton VFW Post 6423 of Erlanger.

Good day for parades

Parades marked a day of community and rememberance throughout Kenton County Monday, May 31. Almost every community in the county had celebrations. Here are a select few held along Dixie Highway.

PATRICIA SCHEYER/CONTRIBUTOR

Spc. Matthew Hurst holds his daughters, Kaylyn, 2, and Piper, 1, as they watch the Memorial Day parade. The parade was hosted by the communities of Erlanger and Elsmere, along with the Ralph Fulton VFW Post 6423 located in Erlanger. PATRICIA SCHEYER/CONTRIBUTOR

Gabrielle Baker, 4 of Fort Wright and her sister Katherine, 7, wave to the parade in Park Hills. The Park Hills Memorial Day parade began at the Northern Kentucky University Covington Campus at 10:30 a.m. Memorial Day.

Riley Hurst, 7 of Fort Wright, and his brother Lucas, 5, watch the Memorial Day parade with their dog Echo, a one and a half year old boxer. The Park Hills Memorial Day parade began at the Northern Kentucky University Covington Campus at 10:30 a.m. Memorial Day.

See PARADES on page A5

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News

Parades

June 3, 2010

Community Recorder

A5

Continued from A4

PATRICIA SCHEYER/CONTRIBUTOR

An Army truck sports the sign, Support Our Troops in the Park hills Memorial Day parade. PATRICIA SCHEYER/CONTRIBUTOR

The Veterans of Foreign Wars color guard in the Park Hills Memorial Day parade.

The grand marshalls, Dave and Char Fangman at the Park Hills Memorial Day Parade.

PATRICIA SCHEYER/ CONTRIBUTOR

PATRICIA SCHEYER/CONTRIBUTOR

Park Hills Civic Association's float is Thomas the Train, in the Park Hills Memorial Day parade.

PATRICIA SCHEYER/CONTRIBUTOR

Brayden Wulfeck, 8 of Edgewood and his siblings, Brian, 11, and Briana, 13, pet Ready, the horse, after the Covington Mounted Police took part in the Edgewood Memorial Day celebration. Spc. Eric Higgins rides Ready, while Spc. Jon Mangus is mounted on Bull.

PATRICIA SCHEYER/CONTRIBUTOR

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Boy Scouts from troop 779, Mark Ryan, 12, from Edgewood, Anthony Kruetzkamp, 12, Elsmere, Hayden Skinner-Fine, 14 Villa Hills, Eddie Kruetzkamp, 16, Elsmere, and Tim Garcia, 14, Walton, stand at attention after the wreath has been placed at the Edgewood Memorial.

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A6

Community Recorder

June 3, 2010

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SCHOOLS

Community Recorder

June 3, 2010

ACHIEVEMENTS

Editor Brian Mains | bmains@nky.com | 578-1062

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NEWS

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RECORDER

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

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A7

unit

River Ridge students enjoy Field Day

By Jason Brubaker jbrubaker@nky.com

River Ridge firstgrader Noah Jefferson took one final look at the yellow water balloon in his hand before glancing, hesitantly, back across the approximately 15 feet of grass separating him from classmate Brady Macke. “Okay, don’t drop this one,” he cautioned, preparing to throw it. “Well make sure it’s a good throw then,” Macke replied, barely getting the words out before the balloon landed short of him and burst on the ground. “Oh no, I guess that’s it!” Flying water balloons and smiles filled the air at River Ridge on May 26-27, as the students took part in the annual Field Day activities. The students played a number of fun games in the large field behind the school, including the water balloon toss, hula hoop race, tug-of-war and bean bag toss. The students rotated through the games, their shouts filling the humid afternoon air. “This has been fun,” confirmed firstgrader Avery Hicks, trying to catch his breath after the hula hoop race. “I wish we could do it every day!”

Volunteer Charles Frazier encourages a group of River Ridge first-graders during the Tug-of-War on Field Day.

JASON BRUBAKER/STAFF

JASON BRUBAKER/STAFF

River Ridge first-graders Avery Hicks and Zach Ernst try to keep their balance during the hula hoop race on Field Day on May 26.

JASON BRUBAKER/STAFF

River Ridge first-grader Drake Pitz sizes up the target in the bean bag toss during Field Day.

River Ridge firstgraders Noah Jefferson and Brady Macke carefully toss a water balloon during Field Day on May 26. They ended up winning the event.

JASON BRUBAKER/STAFF

Notre Dame Academy student achieves first place Notre Dame Academy student, Kelly Kleier, took first place at the National Junior Science and Humanities Symposium in environmental science in Bethesda, Maryland, Saturday, May 1. Kleier was awarded a $12,000 scholarship to the school of her choice from the Department of Defense and an all-expensepaid two-week trip to the London International Youth Science Forum where she will represent the U.S. this summer. Two NDA students attended the symposium. Kelly, a junior at NDA, presented her research on the “Prototype Solar-Powered Liquid Piston Engine” and Monica McFadden, an NDA freshman, presented her research “Nitrate Removal by Biobarriers.” Under the direction and guidance of Sister Mary Ethel Parrot, SND, both students also

recently participated in the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair in San Jose, California. The National Junior Science and Humanities Symposia (JSHS) Program promotes original research and experimentation in the sciences, engineering and mathematics at the high school level and publicly recognizes students for outstanding achievement. The National JSHS is jointly sponsored by the United States Departments of the Army, Navy, and Air Force in cooperation with leading research universities throughout the nations. The national competition included the winning projects from 49 regions including the Department of Defense schools abroad.

Kelly Kleier and Monica McFadden at ISEF.

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A8

Community Recorder

Schools

June 3, 2010

Kenton students dance for greener tomorrow By Regan Coomer rcoomer@nky.com

Need to blow off steam from the school year? Dancing around in lab coats to “The Electric Slide” should just about do it. More than 200 students slid around to the time-honored dance at Kenton County Schools’ Third Annual E=WISE2 luncheon May 26. When the dance was over, school officials got to the real business of the luncheon – giving out awards to Energy Wise teams across the district for their accomplishments toward a greener, more environmentally-friendly school. “In our district, teachers and staff members used to take energy for granted. But that has changed,” said Chris Baker, the district’s Energy Systems Coordinator. “School districts in Ohio, Kentucky, Indiana, Tennessee and North Carolina are using the E=WISE2 program as a model to create their own energy awareness programs.” Superintendent Tim Hanner and Board of Education President Karen Collins gave out the bronze, silver and gold awards to each elementary, middle and

REGAN COOMER/STAFF

Kenton County Schools hosted the Third Annual E=WISE2 luncheon Wednesday, May 26. Kenton County Administrator Gary McCormick “entertained” students with a not-so-interesting talk about energy while the E=WISE2 mascot, Wise Guy, snuck up behind him and held up signs reading “Let’s pull the plug on this guy”, much to the delight of students present. high school. Summit View Elementary was the big winner of the luncheon: the school was named the Gold school in the elementary category and awarded $750. Later, the school was named the Green School of the Year across the district and

hard work, he was glad they got a chance to cut lose: “The focus was on the kids. They were getting out of their chairs and dancing and really celebrating all the work they’ve done this year.” The luncheon was also attended by members of the Kentucky School Board Association. KSBA member Ron Willhite is the director of the association’s School Energy Manger’s Project (SEMP), which is working to hire energy managers like Baker to 132 districts across the state using federal stimulus money. “It’s really going to be a great thing for districts,” Willhite said. “By saving energy you save costs. These costs savings can then be transferred by to the classroom.” Willhite said the energy managers will be in place by July 1.

awarded an additional $1,000. Summit View Elementary was honored for their work hosting a Go Green Week during the school year in which more than 800 parents participated. While Hanner said he is proud of students for their

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Kenton County Schools hosted the Third Annual E=WISE2 luncheon Wednesday, May 26. The district’s Wise Guy literally pulled the plug on Gary McCormick’s talk: at the event the lights were dimmed and the Wise Guy single-handedly dragged McCormick, a district literacy administrator, off the stage.

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Students celebrated the end of another successful E-WISE2 team year a dance of The Electric Slide May 26.

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Piner Elementary student Curtis Kinman explained his school's display, a model house with a ceiling fan powered by solar panels, activated when a light is held over the model. REGAN COOMER/STAFF


Schools

Caywood students get life lessons from D.A.R.E. By Jason Brubaker jbrubaker@nky.com

PROVIDED

The Regional Youth Leadership Class of 2010 celebrated its graduation on March 7 at The Phoenix.

The Regional Youth Leadership Class of 2010 celebrated its graduation on March 7 at The Phoenix. The students recently completed the eight-month program which helps build leadership skills and encourages community involvement among young people. Students were exposed to complex issues and challenges facing the region through interactive sessions with community leaders and decision makers. The sessions covered diversity, local government, economic development, law, arts and culture, money, health care and community service. The Class of 2010 consists of 41 students representing 40 different Northern Kentucky/Greater Cincinnati area high schools.

Regional Youth Leadership is a nonprofit program. The title sponsor for this year's program was Ohio National Financial Services; presenting sponsors were KeyBank Foundation, Walmart (Fort Wright, Florence and Alexandria) and Turner Construction. Members of the Class of 2010 from local Kenton County schools are: Robin Brundage - Villa Madonna Academy Addison Cain - Covington Latin School Michael Danahy - St. Henry District High School Hannah DeJarnette - Calvary Christian School Lauren Harrett - Notre Dame Academy Matthew Judy - WaltonVerona High School Sungkwon Kudo - Lloyd Memorial High School Brianna McCarthy -

B.E.S.T celebrated Education Alliance of Northern Kentucky recently recognized the impact made by B.E.S.T. partnerships across the region at a special Eggs ‘N Issues event, the B.E.S.T. Celebration Breakfast on Tuesday, May 11. The breakfast was a wonderful opportunity to congratulate the partnerships on their success throughout the year, while also allowing special achievements of the partnerships to be celebrated.

2010 B.E.S.T. Award recipients included:

Outstanding Work Ethic K-8 Award: Piner Elementary and Ticona Ockerman Middle School and Schwan Food Company

B.E.S.T. Service Learning Partnership Award:

Walton Verona Middle School and McDonalds

BEST “Rookie” Outstanding Partnership of the Year:

New Haven Elementary and Skyline Twenhofel Middle School and NKY Health Department

BEST Outstanding Projects of the Year:

Boone County High School and Citi Holmes High School and Citi

B.E.S.T. Hall of Fame Inductees included:

Goodridge Elementary and Citi, Ockerman Middle School and Schwan Food, 6th District Elementary and Gateway Community and Technical College, and Boone County High School and Citi.

In addition to annual awards, a new honor was presented to Gold Standard B.E.S.T. Partnerships, based on their focus throughout

the year to producing measurable results, implementing high impact partnership activities, providing equal benefits to the school and business partner and displaying identifiable community impact. These partnerships for the 2009-2010 school year were selected based on the data that was submitted on the partnership tracking tools and include: Twenhofel Middle School and NKY Health Department, St. Augustine and PNC Bank, Holmes High School and Citi, Ockerman Middle School and Schwan’s Global Supply Chain, Inc., Piner Elementary and Ticona Engineering Solutions, Conner High School and Citi, New Haven Elementary and Skyline Chili, Boone County High School and Citi, Sixth District Elementary and Gateway Community and Technical College, and Goodridge Elementary and Citi. The event was presented by PNC Bank and The Bank of Kentucky with The Kentucky Enquirer/NKY.com serving at the title sponsor. The B.E.S.T. Awards sponsors were Central Bank, City of Crestview Hills, Toyota, and C.K. Ash Insurance. For questions or more information about the B.E.S.T. program and how to get involved, please contact Amanda Dixon at adixon@nkychamber.com or 859-578-6396.

Beechwood High School Emma McGregor - Dixie Heights High School Quentin Muth - Scott High School Brett Riedinger - Covington Catholic High School Katelyn Stenger - Notre Dame Academy Ellen Sterry -Ludlow High School

Community Recorder

Chance Currington

A9

Kelsey Glacken

“If you do drugs, it isn’t just bad for you, but it’s bad for people around you.”

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“D.A.R.E. is important - it keeps the world safe from drugs and violence, and teaches kids what they need to know about the outside world.”

“I know that I will never choose to use drugs. It will only mess my body up and I never want to be addicted to anything.” To place an ad call 513.242.4000 or 859.283.7290, or visit CommunityClassified.com

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Youth leadership class graduates

Edgewood Police Officer Terry Chinn always enjoys reading over the D.A.R.E. student essays each year, wanting to see what the kids have learned. However, picking the best ones is not always an easy chore. “We had a lot of terrific kids this year, and it was a hard decision,” he said. “So I’m proud of all of the kids and the work they did this year.” Here are some excerpts from the winning essays from Caywood Elementary fifth-graders.

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SPORTS

A10

Community Recorder

June 3, 2010

HIGH SCHOOL | Editor Melanie Laughman | mlaughman@nky.com | 513-248-7573

YOUTH

|

RECREATIONAL

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

N K Y. c o m

RECORDER

Pandas, Roebker best in Kentucky By James Weber jweber@nky.com

Rob Hardin is looking forward to a formal celebration this week. His Notre Dame Academy tennis team did something the program has not done since 1998: Win the team state title. The Pandas claimed the overall championship in the tourney May 29 in Lexington. The team was planning a gathering to celebrate June 3. “I feel real good. It’s great for the kids,” Hardin said. “There were a lot of smiles, a lot of hugs. A lot of our other players and parents were there, then after the match everybody went off in different directions, so we’ll get together and reminisce.” The Pandas scored 13 points to edge Lone Oak and Assumption by one in the tourney. Teams earned a point for each match win. Senior Ally Westling, a Xavier University signee, reached the semifinals before falling to the eventual runner-up in three sets. By then, the Pandas had already clinched the title when both of Lone Oak’s semifinalists – one singles, one doubles – lost their matches. The key matches came

MATT BARTON/CONTRIBUTOR

Jimmy Roebker of Covington Catholic reacted in his match against Beck Pennington of Greenwood in the semifinals of the 2010 KHSAA State Tennis Tournament May 29 in Lexington, Ky. from both Panda doubles teams. Freshmen Laura Irons and Catriona Shaughnessy, and the pair of Amy Beischel (senior) and Alyssa Kennedy (sophomore) all made the quarterfinals in doubles. Both teams pulled off an upset in the previous round to get there, beating higher seeded teams from Assumption and Lone Oak, respec-

tively. If either match had gone the other way, NDA would have lost the team title. “We were underdogs going into the tournament, but we saw we had a chance to knock off some of our competitors in the round of 16,” Hardin said. “That turned our whole tournament around. Once we won those two doubles matches, we went from last to first.” In Shaughnessy’s case, she became the fourth sister in her Panda tennis family to reach the state quarterfinals in doubles. “They believed in themselves,” Hardin said. “We were telling them they could beat those teams. They had played the top seeds, so they were playing tough competition.” Madie Cook reached the quarterfinals before losing to the eventual state champ 6-1, 6-0. Westling was NDA’s first singles semifinalist since the Pandas sent both Jackie Vilines and Molly Molony to that round in 2002. She and Beischel were the two starting seniors. Others were Kate Worland and Krista Noll. “Ally has been a phenomenal player for the Notre Dame program,” Hardin said. “She played doubles for three years and

she could have played singles and done well, but we needed her in doubles. When (Beischel) came in as a freshman, she didn’t have much experience. To see how far she’s come has been phenomenal.” This is the last year the team title will be decided in this manner. Starting in 2011, a separate tourney of dual matches will decide the team championship. The current format will remain to determine the singles and doubles honors. Another upset run boosted Covington Catholic senior Jimmy Roebker to his second state singles title. The third seed going in, Roebker beat fourth seed Grant Roberts of Tates Creek in a rematch of the 2009 final. Roebker won in a three-set thriller like last year, 4-6, 6-2, 6-3. Roebker had beaten the top seed from Greenwood in the semis, 7-6, 4-6, 6-1. Roebker will head to Xavier to play tennis next year. He leaves with four Ninth Region singles titles. Sophomore Stephen Schafer beat rival Highlands player Atlee Mitchell in three sets in the first round, 7-6, 0-6, 6-4. Schafer then lost to eighth seed Alex Menzel of Manual 6-0, 6-1. Senior Jacob Litmer and junior Andrew Schult lost in

MATT BARTON/CONTRIBUTOR

Ally Westling of Notre Dame returned a ball to CeCe Witten of Boyle County in the semifinals of the 2010 KHSAA Girls State Tennis Tournament May 29 in Lexington, Ky. the second round to the fifth seed from Paducah Tilghman, 6-2, 6-3. They won their first-round match over Estill County, 6-2, 6-0. Haden Cotton and Daniel Sullivan lost to the sixth seed from St. Xavier in the third round. Calvary senior Pierce Kohls lost in the third round to fifth-seeded Maks Gold of Kentucky Country Day, 6-1, 6-1. Dixie Heights junior Eric Thompson and seventhgrader Laine Harrett win their first match over Corbin, 6-0, 6-2. The Colonels lost in the second round to the fourth-seeded team from Trinity 6-1, 6-0. Villa Madonna sopho-

more Andres Garcia and freshman Deuce Gibson lost to the seventh seed from Manual in the first round 60, 6-0. Beechwood senior Carly Wilson lost in the third round to the fifth seed from CAL, 6-4, 6-1. Emily Pawsat and Ellen White lost in the first round to Henry Clay, 6-2, 7-5. Senior Kelsie Peckham and sophomore Katherine Hahnel lost to fourth seed Lone Oak in the first round, 6-1, 6-2. Holy Cross senior Taylor Reynolds lost to eighth seed Meredith Laskey of Highlands in the first round, 6-2, 6-1.

Red, blue Colonels advance in regionals, semifinals By James Weber jweber@nky.com

This week’s Ninth Region baseball tournament format could be a boon or a bust for the Dixie Heights Colonels. With four days separating the quarterfinals and semifinals, Dixie could use ace starter Brice Smallwood in both games. But other teams could use their aces more often as well. The Colonels will take their chances as they enter the Ninth Region semifinals at Champion Window Field in Florence. Dixie plays Conner 5 p.m. Friday, June 4. The final is noon Saturday, June 5, with the winner taking on Covington Catholic or Boone County. Dixie is there after routing Newport 12-0 May 31. Smallwood, the Morehead State recruit, pitched four innings and is eligible to pitch in the semifinals if head coach Chris Maxwell decides to use him. “We thought we were stronger than them, but in a one-and-out situation, you never know,” Maxwell. “We

MATTHEW BECK/CONTRIBUTOR

Senior pitcher Chelsea Dietz of Dixie Heights starts her wind-up while pitching in the district championship against St. Henry May 28.

had a rough first inning but we adjusted to it.” Covington Catholic routed Bellevue 11-1 to advance. Brett Stayton hit a threerun triple in the first inning to stake the Colonels to a 30 lead. Cov Cath would score six runs in the inning and control the game from there. “We’re the type of team that we really don’t hit the ball well,” Covington Catholic head coach Bill Krumpelbeck said. “We kind of hang around and hopefully we’re there at the end of the game.” Krumpelbeck was glad his team was able to avoid the adventures of the day’s previous game in the tournament, as the Colonels were able to hold on to their big lead. That previous game was a 17-12 loss by Holy Cross to Conner. HC trailed 13-1 in the fourth inning before rallying for eight runs in the fourth. Andy Roenker had three RBI. Nick Ritter and Conner Callery each had three hits, with Callery driving in three runs. “Baseball is a funny game,” HC head coach Mike Holtz said. “It would have been very easy for us to quit. These guys fought and never gave up. We just couldn’t get over the hump.” The loss ended a landmark season for the young Indians. They won the 35th District title for the first time since 1987. Earlier, they won the Doc Morris and Connor Classic tourneys for the first time ever. All three of those tourney wins ended with wins over Covington Catholic. Holtz credited the leadership of seniors Roenker, Ben

after deadline. The semifinals are 5 and 6:30 p.m. Thursday, June 3, at Northern Kentucky University. The first semi will be the winners of Conner/Newport Central Catholic and St. Henry/Holmes. The second game feature the Dixie Heights/Holy Cross and Ryle/Highlands winners. The final is 5 p.m. Friday, June 4. MATTHEW BECK/CONTRIBUTOR

Morgann Lubbe of Dixie Heights slides into third base safely during the district championship game against St. Henry Friday, May 28. Bolton, Keith Egan and Drew Schneider for leading a very young team that lost almost every starter from last year. “I’m proud of these guys and our seniors,” Holtz said. “We told them they had to lead and they answered the challenge. Without those four seniors, we don’t make it here this year.” St. Henry fell to Boone County 14-2 in a regional quarterfinal Monday. St. Henry seniors are Travis Miller, John Nortmann, Daniel Markgraf, Brian Carroll, Jeremy Conley, Nick Knoebel, Alan Schaber, Brandon Schwarte, Danny Seifried, Alex Thorburn and Jacob Zerhusen. Simon Kenton fell in the Eighth Region tourney Monday to Anderson County, 11-10. Mike Reynolds and Josh Berger each had a homer and three RBI. Seniors are Joe Sester, Matt Nachazel, Gary Melton and Mike Reynolds. SK had won the 32nd District title with a 7-3 win over WaltonVerona.

Softball regional

The Ninth Region tourney started Tuesday, June 1,

Baseball districts

Villa Madonna lost to Lloyd 8-6 in the 34th District quarterfinals. Seniors are Ryan Schroth, Blake Bryan, and Zach Steinkoenig. Lloyd lost to Dixie Heights 4-1 in the 34th semifinals. Seniors are Joe Neiheisel, Dylan McGuire, Jeremy Willett, Jerry Moore, Trevor Gregory, Sam Banta, Jeremy Pittman and Aaron Warren. Ludlow lost 10-0 to St. Henry in the 34th semifinals. Seniors are Jordan Webster, Zach Stegemoller, Chuck Penick and Luke Huling. Holmes lost to Covington Catholic 9-4 in the 35th semifinals. Seniors are Nick Fuller, Tyler Gregory and Jacob Wells. Beechwood lost 6-4 to Holy Cross in the 35th semifinals, ending the Tigers’ run as Ninth Region champions. Beechwood had no seniors. Calvary lost to Campbell County 12-6 in the 37th District tourney. Seniors are Zak Duty, Mitch Davenport, Pierce Kohls, Aaron Hatfield, Ryan Grinstead, and Sam Thompson. Scott lost 6-5 to Brossart in the 37th District Tournament. Seniors are Zach Sowder, Joe Adkins, Mark Hoskins and George Sparks.

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

Villa Madonna senior Ryan Schroth doubles up a Lloyd Memorial runner after Schroth dove to catch a bunt May 24 at St. Henry. Lloyd won, 8-6 in a 34th District quarterfinal to end VMA’s season.

Softball districts

Simon Kenton lost to Walton-Verona 6-0 in the 32nd District semifinals. Seniors are Lindsey Bridges, Nikki Brown, and Prudence Turner. Villa Madonna lost to Ludlow in the 34th District Tournament, 4-3 in eight innings. Seniors are Morgan Cook and Emily Duggan. Lloyd to Dixie Heights 54 in the 34th District semifinals. Kristina Botts is the

lone senior. Beechwood lost to Holy Cross in the 35th District semifinals. Alexis Feltner and MacKinley Motzer were the seniors. Notre Dame lost to Holmes 10-4 in the 35th District semifinals. The team had no seniors. Calvary lost to Bishop Brossart 15-0 in the 37th District Tournament. Kara Heineman is the lone senior.

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

Villa Madonna freshman Thomas Steinkoenig swings the bat May 24 at St. Henry. Lloyd won, 8-6 in a 34th District quarterfinal to end VMA’s season.


Sports & recreation

June 3, 2010

Community Recorder

A11

Pandas celebrate future college athletes By James Weber

Katie Russo, Lincoln Memorial. She was an allstate pick last fall and a three-year varsity player. She was a four-time academic all-state pick. Her proudest moment is playing in the finals last year. Jessie Russo, Lincoln Memorial. A three-year varsity player, her proudest moment was being in the state finals last year.

jweber@nky.com

Swimming

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

Ten of the 12 Notre Dame Academy seniors who will play sports in college: Front row, from left: Megan Berberich, Catie Ammerman, Leslie Schellhaas, Courtney Clark, Kia Bakunawa. Back row: Tully Bradford, Ally Westling, Torrie Lange, Morgan Ebner, Katie Russo. www.caringbridge.org/visit/ jessicarusso. The family recently had a fundraiser and is accepting donations for medical expenses at Fifth Third Bank locations. The Maria Schaffstein Scholarship Fund continues to accept donations at the school or any Bank of Kentucky branch. Gunning said all the senior signees continue the championship tradition at NDA, noting there are 52 Pandas currently playing college sports. This year’s 12 signees represent six different sports. “We wanted to appreciate and recognize the four years the seniors have given to the athletic program,” Gunning said. “We have such a strong tradition here. Each and every one of them are very deserving of

being recognized.” Gunning said the support from the community since the accident has given strength to the students. “The community at large has been so wonderful in reaching out to the families,” she said. “It has strengthened our own spirits. It’s a reminder we’re not in it alone.” A list of the college commitments:

Basketball

Catie Ammerman, DePauw. She also played soccer for NDA and was a conference all-star in hoops this past season. Her proudest moment was winning the 35th District title this season.

Golf

Kia Bakunawa, Bellarmine. She was academic all-state this year and fin-

ished second in the conference championships and seventh in the regional tourney. Her proudest moment was being part of the school’s sixth straight regional title last fall.

jweber@nky.com

Track and field teams are set for the state meets this week at the University of Louisville. The Class 2A meet begins 4:30 p.m. Thursday, June 3, at the U of L track facility. Class 1A is 9:30 a.m. Saturday, June 5; and 3A is 4:30 Saturday, June 5. In each meet, the throws begin 90 minutes earlier at a separate facility a few blocks from the track. The 2A meet is on Thursday to accommodate several schools around the state who have graduations June 4. St. Henry won both the boys’ and girls Class 1A, Region 4 titles. In boys’, the Crusaders scored 139 points to 119 for second-place WaltonVerona. Newport was third with 85. The St. Henry girls scored 163 to 141.5 for Newport Central Catholic. Covington Catholic won the Class 2A, Region 4 title with 177 points to 109 for Western Hills. The 2009 state champion Colonels will try to repeat Thursday. Here is a list of individual regional champs and state qualifiers for each team:

St. Henry boys

Ross Emerson won the 300 hurdles (42.24). St. Henry won all four relays. The 4x800 group is the top seed at state based on regional times. Two-time state champ Ben Bessler won the regional at 6-6 and is the top seed at state. Justin Ziegler won the shot put (48-1.75). 4x800 (top seed), 4x200, 4x100, 4x400. Ross Emerson: 110 hurdles, 300 hurdles, triple jump. Armand Frigo: 1,600, 3,200. Nathan Mark: 1,600. Alexander Haacke: Pole vault.

Zach Haacke: 800, pole vault. Brendan Dooley: 3,200. Justin Ziegler: Shot put, discus. John McCoy: Shot put. Ben Bessler: High jump (top seed). Craig Aldridge: High jump.

St. Henry girls

Maria Frigo won the 800 (2:28.04) and the 1,600 (5:29.74). Lindsey Hinken won the 3,200 (12:53.24). Katie Addler won the pole vault (86). 4x800, 4x200, 4x400. Meghan Helmer: Shot put, discus. Jennifer Helmer: Shot put, high jump. Katie Addler: Discus, pole vault. Jackie Brockman: Pole vault. Kammy Jenkins: Triple jump, high jump. Paige Dooley: 100 hurdles, 300 hurdles, triple jump. Abby Felthaus: 100 hurdles, 300 hurdles, long jump. Maria Frigo: 1,600, 800, 3,200. Lindsey Hinken: 3,200. Ashley Svec: 1,600, 800. Carly McArtor: 400, long jump. Marissa Vujnovich: 400, 200.

Calvary

Christina Sandberg: 1,600, 800.

Covington Latin

4x400: Lily Rodgers: 1,600, 800. Christine Smith: 800. Anna Matchinga: 300 hurdles.

Beechwood girls

Hillary Miniard won the long jump (15-10). Brianna McCarthy won the discus (116-8). Ellie Vittetoe: 100 hurdles. Robin Hood: 200. Brianna McCarthy: Shot put, discus (top seed). Lauren Miller: Shot put. Hillary Miniard: Long jump. 4x100.

4x100 relay, 4x400 and 4x800. Alex Connelly, defending state champ, won the high jump at 6-2. Michael Bowdy won the long jump (21-5.5). Ryan Cahill won the triple jump (41-2). 4x800, 4x200, 4x100, 4x400. Paul Cusick: 110 hurdles, 300 hurdles. Austin Hudepohl: 110 hurdles. Matt Smith: 1,600. Khang Le: 1,600. Stephen Ruh: High jump. Alex Connelly: High jump. James Simms: 3,200. Brayden Schlagbaum: 3,200. Andy Deglow: Shot put. Brayden Erpenbeck: Shot put, discus. Michael Bowdy: Long jump. Connor Maschinot: Long jump. Ryan Cahill: Triple jump. Steven Knapik: Pole vault.

Dixie Heights boys

Megan Berberich, Louisville. She was first team all-state last year and the team’s defensive MVP. Her proudest moment was playing in NDA’s state final loss to Sacred Heart last fall. Courtney Clark, Thomas More. She was the team’s offensive player of the year and MVP. Her proudest moment was winning those awards. Torrie Lange, Western Kentucky. A four-year varsity starter, she was first team all-state last year. Her proudest moment was playing in the state finals last year.

Notre Dame

4x800, 4x200, 4x100, 4x400 Sullivan Culbertson: 100. Melissa Koch: 300 hurdles. Morgan Stenger: 3,200. Jamie Bramlage: Long jump. Leah Bramlage: Pole vault. Lindsey Hartman: Triple jump, high jump.

Ally Westling, Xavier. A four-time academic all-state

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Scott boys 4x800.

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Scott girls

Jenna Lehkamp won the shot put (33-9.25). Taylor Jackson: 100 hurdles. Jenna Lehkamp: Shot put. Katie Bell: Long jump. Eva Ross: Long jump, high jump. Jen Fredley: High jump.

SK boys

Nathan McKinney won the 400 (50.24). The Colonels won the 4x200 (1:31.34). 4x200, 4x100, 4x400. Ryan Smith: 1,600, 800, 3,200. Matt Reekers: 1,600. Nathan McKinney: 400. Stephen Zumdick: Discus. Chris Sikra: Pole vault.

The Pioneers won the 4x100 relay (44.85). Sage Powell won the long jump (20-11.5) and triple jump (4510.25). Jordon Hansel won the shot put (45-1.75) and discus (136-11). 4x800, 4x100, 4x400. Nik Brown: 200. Jordon Hansel: Shot put, discus. Derek Piccirillo: Discus. Sage Powell: Long jump, triple jump.

Dixie Heights girls

SK girls

McKenna Edgett won the 100 hurdles (16.82). Hillary Jamison won the high jump (5-0). 4x800, 4x200, 4x100, 4x400. McKenna Edgett: 100 hurdles, 300 hurdles. Ally Tekulve: 1,600. Anna Ochs: 400. Lyndsay Wehage: 800. Hillary Jamison: High jump. Paige Turner: Pole vault. Marissa Lopez: Pole vault.

Tennis

Liz Barton, South Florida. She was a starter on last year’s state semifinalists. Morgan Ebner, Quincy. She was first team all-conference and four-time honorable mention academic all-state. Her proudest moment was beating Sacred Heart in the regular season last fall in a five-set match. Leslie Schellhaas, Morehead State. She was the Ninth Region player of the year last year and first team all-state. Her proudest moment was beating Mercy and Sacred Heart in 2009.

Soccer

CovCath wins regional track title By James Weber

Tully Bradford, Denison. She was an Academic AllAmerican for four years and her proudest moment was qualifying for state as a freshman.

Volleyball

Senior Allison Ponzer won three regional titles. She claimed the 100 meters in 12.90, then won the long jump (17-7.5) and triple jump (359.5). She is the top seed at state in both jumps based on regional performances. Allison Ponzer: 100, long jump, triple jump. Christina Cook: 200, 400. Sarah Austin: Shot put, discus. Amber Ford: High jump.

Villa Madonna boys

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While it has been a sad month for students at Notre Dame Academy, they found room for celebration May 25. A few days before the school’s graduation ceremony, NDA honored 12 seniors who committed to compete in college athletics next school year. Four of the signees were involved in an auto accident April 16 in Alabama that claimed the life of fellow NDA senior Maria Schaffstein. One of those four, Jessie Russo, was in an induced coma for several weeks and is currently at a rehabilitation facility in Atlanta. Jessie was honored with the rest of the group during a signing ceremony at the school. While Athletic Director Kim Gunning read a list of her accomplishments, the other signees, including twin sister, Katie, bowed their heads in silence. Gunning said a videotape of the ceremony would be sent to Jessie. “When she fully recovers, she can watch the ceremony and feel like she was recognized in a special way,” Gunning said. “The family has a lot of high hopes that she can make a full recovery. Time will tell.” The Russo family is updating Jessie’s condition on a public website:

selection and a state semifinalist doubles, her proudest moment is playing in the soccer state final as well.

INTRODUCING

4x400. Daniel Block: 200, 400. Jake Schubert: 400.

Villa Madonna girls

4x800, 4x200, 4x100, 4x400. Kelsi Pickens: 100 hurdles, 300 hurdles, high jump. Cathy Holt: 100. Lauren Dumaine: Shot put. Melissa Cunha: 1,600. Emily Hurtt: Long jump.

Now you can find all of your favorite Cincinnati.Com sports blogs at one place — SportsTalkCentral. We’ve got the Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky sports scene covered. Our team of sports bloggers will keep you informed and entertained. From Paul Daugherty’s latest thoughts to John Fay’s game updates during Reds games, SportsTalkCentral has it all.

Covington Catholic

Stephen Schwab won the 800 (2:01.62). The Colonels won the

Follow Northern Kentucky sports on Twitter twitter.com/ crkysports

Start the conversation today!

Visit: Cincinnati.Com/stc or search: SportsTalkCentral

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VIEWPOINTS

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Community Recorder

June 3, 2010

EDITORIALS

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LETTERS

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COLUMNS

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CH@TROOM

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

N K Y. c o m

Editor Brian Mains | bmains@nky.com | 578-1062

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RECORDER

CH@TROOM

Does the Reds’ early-season success make it more likely that you will go to a game, or more games, this season? Why or why not? “It doesn’t influence my decision to go or not to go. I love going to the Reds games and try to catch a game (at least) once a year. It’s always fun and the stadium is (still) so beautiful with a great view. If they don’t win the night I’m there, no big deal – you win some and you lose some. I’m a Reds fan through the highs and lows.” J.K. “My son and I were making plans for going to at least one Reds game this summer. It would be our third since The Great American Ball Park opened a few years ago. Obviously we’re glad the Reds are doing so well. We might go to more than one game due to that.” R.V. “I really don’t care where the Reds are in the standings. I like to go anytime the Cubs are in town. Was born and raised in Wrigley and am sticking with them till they win.

Next question What was the best advice your father gave you, and did you follow it? What happened? Send your answer to “bmains@nky.com” with Chatroom in the subject line. “However, Great American Ballpark, while not Wrigley Field, is a great venue for baseball, especially compared to that stadium monstrosity called Riverfront. Went just a week ago to see St. Louis and really enjoyed the atmosphere. So support your team, the facilities, the city, even if they are the Reds.” J.Z. “It has been years since I enjoyed a Reds game. I was there when Pete hit 4,192 and I also went to a World Series game years ago. “I enjoyed the Big Red Machine of the 1970s. The Reds of the last 25 years have not impressed me very much. However, if they continue to perform I could take in a day game.” J.S.D.

Reasons for not buckling up don’t add up Excuses, excuses. Those who drive or ride without using seat belts often have excuses. But how do excuses stack up against statistics that show seat belts save lives? As Kentuckians prepared to travel this Memorial Day weekend, the Kentucky Office of Highway Safety (KOHS) wants all motorists to forget the excuses and listen to the facts. “Thousands of lives could be saved and critical injuries could be prevented if occupants would just buckle up,” said KOHS Executive Director Chuck Geveden. Statistics for 2009 indicate 398 (61.3 percent) of the 649 people who were killed in motor vehicles last year in Kentucky were not wearing a seat belt. When worn correctly, seat belts are proven to reduce the risk of fatal injury to front-seat occupants by 45 percent – and by 60 percent in pickup trucks, SUVs, and minivans. Despite a wealth of data showing that seat belts save lives – and also despite implementation of a primary seat belt law – Kentucky’s 80 percent seat belt usage rate lags behind the national rate of 84 percent. What reasons do people give for not using a seat belt? • Seat belts can cause injuries, such as a broken collar bone. Seat belts reduce the risk of fatal injury to front-seat passenger car occupants by 45 percent and the risk of moderate to critical injury by 50 percent. • I don’t need a seat belt when driving at slow speeds or on short trips. Most crash deaths occur within 25 miles of home and at speeds less than 40 mph. • I might be trapped if my car catches fire or becomes submerged. Crashes involving fire or water amount to one-half of 1 percent of all crashes. • I don’t need to wear a seat belt because my vehicle has air bags. Air bags are designed to work in combination with seat belts, providing supplemental protection during certain types of crashes. • It makes me feel restrained. That’s the function of a seat

belt! All seat belts allow free movement of the occupant until a crash occurs or until you slam the brakes. Nationwide, 75 Nancy percent of people Wood ejected from a Community motor vehicle are Recorder killed. • It irritates the guest columnist schkiensto. n my neck or Most vehicles have adjustable shoulder belts that can be raised or lowered for comfort. • I am too big to wear a seat belt; it doesn’t fit. Purchasing a seat belt extender may solve this issue. • This is just government trying to control individuals. Every state has traffic laws that set limits on individual behavior. For instance, it is illegal to drink and drive or to speed. It also is illegal to drive or ride without a seat belt. Driving is a privilege, not a right. • I can’t reach my children if they should need attention. If you’re trying to feed, calm or play with your baby in the backseat, attention is not focused on the road and both lives are at risk. Please pull over to a safe location if you need to tend to your child. • I have a medical condition, I can’t wear it. This can be a valid excuse but only if a doctor provides you with a written medical note. The KOHS is coordinating the annual Click It or Ticket campaign in partnership with over 260 law enforcement agencies, including Kentucky State Police. Traffic safety checkpoints and saturation patrols began Monday, May 24, and will run through June 6. “Although the title of the campaign emphasizes the law – that if you don’t wear a seat belt you will be ticketed – the goal of the campaign is to educate the public about the importance of wearing a seat belt and, most importantly, save lives” Geveden said. Nancy Wood is the Public Information Officer for the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet District 6 Office.

PROVIDED

Walk along

Father Mario Tizziani gives the students encouragement and a high five as they begin the Walk-A-Thon held on Friday, May 21, at St. Cecilia school and Memorial Park in Independence. The students and senior members of St. Cecilia's parish raised money to help upgrade the school library into a state-of-the-art media center.

Mall Road a continued success

It was an early Sunday morning in October 1977, 6:30 a.m. I had just reported for my first day’s work on the Florence Police Department. At that time I was living in a rooming house in Newport and would move to the Normandy Green Apartments several weeks later to begin my 33-year love affair with Boone County. My training sergeant, Chester Snow, said, “Let’s take a ride around and I’ll show you the town.” We went west on U.S. 42 and turned right on Mall Road. The sun was just coming up over the famous “Florence Y’all” water tower, and Sgt. Snow told me that the city hoped the road would be developed for retail someday. Florence Mall had just opened and he explained to me how the water tower had originally read “Florence Mall” but since the mall was not yet built when the water tower was done, the state highway department said it would

have to be changed. Then-Mayor “Hop” Ewing simply changed the “M” to a “Y,” added an apostrophe, and the rest is history. “Hop” Ewing State Sen. John was the father Schickel of the current mayor, Diane Community Whalen, and he, Recorder along with Floguest rence City CounDon columnist cilmen Mager, W.A. Brown, and John Woods, Commissioner Irene Patrick, and State Sen. John Weaver, were living examples of what public service is all about. All are no longer with us. Mall Road exceeded their dreams and soon became the retail shopping destination for the area and the front door of Flo-

rence and Boone County. Last week Florence officials were justifiably proud when the governor officially dedicated the construction of the long-awaited $13 million improvements paid for by the state. This is an excellent investment. Businesses in the Mall Road area generate $26 million in taxes annually and employ 4,000 people with nearly $120 million in wages. More important than this, it updates the front door of our community in a way that would make those great public servants of yesteryear proud of us. State Sen. John Schickel, R-Union, represents the 11th Senate District which includes Boone and Gallatin counties and part of Kenton County. He welcomes your concerns or comments toll-free at 1-800-372-7181 or online at http://www.lrc.ky.gov/Mailform/S011.h tm.

Uniform supply of nutrients needed Question: Now that my vegetable garden is all planted and growing well, I’m wondering when and how I should fertilize it. Is it OK to fertilize all the different vegetables the same way and at the same time, or do they have different requirements? Answer: The type of fertilizer used should be based on the results of your soil test (a free service through your local county extension office). If you don’t have soil test results, at least apply nitrogen, since that nutrient is used up quickly by the plants, and eventually leaches out of the root zone. A good source of nitrogen for vegetable gardens is ammonium nitrate (34-0-0), which is 34 percent nitrogen, by weight. If a fertilizer containing only 10 percent nitrogen is used, such as 10-1010, or a 12 percent nitrogen fertilizer is used, such as 12-12-12,

then you will need to apply approximately three times as much fertilizer as you would if using ammonium nitrate, since these ferMike Klahr tilizers contain Community only about oneas much Recorder third nitrogen as the columnist a m m o n i u m nitrate. For vegetables to produce lush, continuous growth throughout the season, they need a uniform supply of nutrients. However, many chemical fertilizers are very soluble, so the initial application may leach beyond the root zone before the growing season ends. Thus, many gardeners “sidedress” their crops with an extra application of fertilizer during the growing season. The usual rate is

5 tablespoons of ammonium nitrate/10 feet of row. Asparagus and onions require twice as much, and potatoes should receive about 7 tablespoons/10 feet row. Place the fertilizer in bands about 6 inches to both sides of the rows, then rake it in and water. A combination of chemical fertilizer, organic fertilizer and mulch makes a good side-dressing. The chemical fertilizers give the initial boost required by young plants; organic fertilizers provide nutrients uniformly throughout the season; and mulch keeps the soil more evenly moist and the nutrients more uniformly available. The accompanying table gives the recommended times for sidedressing different vegetables. Mike Klahr is the Boone County Extension Agent for Horticulture.

Working hard

Sydney Egan, a fourth-grade student at White's Tower Elementary, was awarded the "Work Ethic Award" and fulfilled her community service hours at the Kenton County Library in Erlanger on May 18. She created party favors and name tags for an event at the library. She is the daughter of Gretchen and Chris Egan of Independence. PROVIDED

A publication of

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

RECORDER

Community Recorder Editor . .Brian Mains bmains@nky.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .578-1062

s

Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Friday | See page A2 for additional contact information.

283-0404 | 228 Grandview Drive, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017 | 654 Highland Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075 | e-mail kynews@nky.com | Web site: www.nky.com


SMALL BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT B1

Robert Cooper of Cooper’s Automotive Service on Old Taylor Mill Road, Independence.

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County E-mail: kynews@communitypress.com T h u r s d a y, J u n e

Volume 14 Issue 32 © 2010 The Community Recorder ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

3, 2010

RECORDER

W e b s i t e : N K. Y . c o m

B E C A U S E C O M M U N I T Y M AT T E R S

50¢

Shelter volunteers to create nonprofit By Regan Coomer rcoomer@nky.com

Field days

It’s a ritual all children look forward to as the school year draws to a close: Field days and the approaching beginning of summer fun. Students at River Ridge Elementary in Villa Hills tossed balloons, played tug-of-war, and just had a good time in general. See pictures from the day. SCHOOL, A7

Sticker shock

A program in Kenton County to raise awareness about responsibility and preventing underage drinking continues to grow. Sticker Shock will be back in participating stores, applying labels and reminding adults it is their job to keep adult beverages out of the hands of kids. LIFE, B1

Find your online community

Visit NKY.com/community to find news, sports, photos, events and more from your community. You’ll find content from The Community Recorder, The Kentucky Enquirer and your neighbors. While you’re there, check out Share, and submit stories and photos of your own.

Sportsman of the year

Our readers created the ballot and now it’s time to vote for the 2010 Kenton County Sportsman and Sportswoman of the Year. Go online to www.nky.com/preps and find the yellow and green Community Recorder Sportsman of the Year icon on the right-hand side of the page. Find your ballot by newspaper and vote as often as you like through June 10. Top vote-getter wins.

To place an ad, call 283-7290.

Kenton County Animal Shelter volunteers plan to start their own 501-C3 nonprofit to keep track of donations and purchase extras for the shelter. Volunteer Janet Scanlon said the nonprofit is needed because using the fiscal court’s system of dolling out donation money is inconvenient for the day-to-day business of the shelter. “When we do something and need to pay for it, the fiscal court only meets twice a month and if we miss that, it could be a month. The people we deal with can’t wait that long to get the bills paid,” she said. Currently, when donations are made to the animal shelter and shelter employees want to expend that money, it must first be approved by the fiscal court. Scanlon said some people hesitate to donate to the shelter because they’re not sure where the money is going or if it will be spent in the way they’d like it to be spent. “How can we run any kind of program like that?” Scanlon asked. County Treasurer Jerry REGAN COOMER/STAFF Knochelmann said starting a 501- Kenton County Animal Shelter volunteer Janet Scanlon plans to start a nonprofit organization that will provide extras for the shelter’s inhabitants. C3 is an “excellent solution,” tesy of donations, are a reasonmoney like we have.” adding it’s diffiMore information Scanlon also plans to start a ably-priced spay and neuter procult for the counwebsite for the nonprofit to keep gram for the community, a new Kenton County Animal Shelter volunteer Janet Scanlon ty to track dona- recently shared 2009 shelter statistics with the Kenton people up-to-date and share sound system and commercials tions year to County Fiscal Court: happy “tails” with shelter support- advertising the shelter as a comyear if they’re In 2009, 6,097 animals stayed in the shelter. There were munity resource similar to the ers. not spent, espe- 24,000 visitors and more than 4,000 volunteer hours. “The whole reason I brought Kenton County Extension Office. Therapy animals visited nursing homes 45 times and 30 cially if there are If anyone is interested in helpthis to the attention of the court is caveats attached girl scout troops visited the shelter, earning badges. I think people who donate their ing out with the in-progress 501to that money. e-mail Scanlon at money intend for it to go to things C3, “We don’t want to not fulfill set up for that kind of tracking,” above and beyond what the coun- jrsnature@fuse.net. the requirements of the people he said. “The nonprofit won’t ty would provide,” she said. who donate money, but we’re not have restrictions on spending Coming up for the shelter, cour-

Teacher chosen for international summit By Regan Coomer rcoomer@nky.com

St. Joseph School teacher Kathy Schlachter’s classroom is SMART(er) than the average board. Schlachter incorporates her interactive, electronic SMART Board into about 70 percent of her student’s course work to help them be more interested and invested in the material. “My kids would be lost without the SMART Board. School would really boring for them, I think,” she laughed. Now Schlachter will get the chance to showcase her skills at a SMART Board Exemplary Educator Summit in July in Alberta, Canada. The SMART Exemplary Educator program recognizes educators internationally who are using SMART products in innovative ways. Schlachter was one of 50 Exemplary Educators chosen from around the world to attend the summit, which will introduce new SMART technologies and feature training workshops, project planning and the opportunity to network with other educators, some-

REGAN COOMER/STAFF

Students hurried to beat the clock in a counting change game on St. Joseph School teacher Kathy Schlachter’s SMART board May 28. Schlachter was one of 50 educators recently chosen to attend a SMART board conference in Canada this summer. thing Schlachter is excited about. “We’re going to get to play with all the new stuff that hasn’t come out yet; I’m so psyched about that,” she said. “I know I’m going to learn more and I can’t wait to get up there to be with other teachers and share files back and forth.” Schlachter uses the SMART Board for activities ranging from

the simple, such as taking attendance, to the more complex games that teach necessary skills. The attendance program is fun for students because each one has his or her name on a piece of season-appropriate clipart which they then drag to the “present” box. “They know it’s the first thing I want them to do in the morning. It has instructions on it about

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whether or not I want homework collected or if I want them to do a workbook page,” Schlachter explained. But the program also just makes attendance fun for students, who are eager to see the clipart change each month - from elves in December to kids in bathing suits close to summertime. “The first day of the month they can’t wait to see what the new thing is going to be,” she said. Next school year Schlachter will help students in the computer club make similar attendance programs for other teachers. “They’ll love doing it, teachers love the program so it’s a win-win all around,” she said. St. Jo Principal Cathy Stover wasn’t surprised Schlachter was chosen for the summit. “Kathy has attended several workshops on the use of the SMART Board in the classroom. She has shared her knowledge not only with the teachers here at St. Jo’s, but also with teachers in other schools.”


A2

Community Recorder

June 3, 2010

News

Safety is focus of upcoming bike rodeos By Jason Brubaker jbrubaker@nky.com

Whether you’re on two wheels or three, there’s never a bad time to learn about safety. That’s why the police departments in Villa Hills and Edgewood will again be sponsoring their annual Bike Rodeos this month, designed to teach kids about the importance of bicycle safety. The rodeos will include safety inspections and obstacles course for the kids, whether they’re on bikes or tricycles. “It’s just a way to ensure that all of the kids learn about safety,” said Villa Hills Officer Mel Wright. “It’s always a fun event for the kids, and it’s something we enjoy doing.” In Edgewood, Office Terry Chinn said their event will once again be dubbed the “Justin Schumacher

JASON BRUBAKER/STAFF

Jonathan and Christopher Fitz ride through an obstacle course at Freedom Park during the Justin Schumacher Rodeo on Wheels bike safety program in 2009. JASON BRUBAKER/STAFF

Villa Hills Explorer Broderick Schmeing helps Will Bolin through the obstacle course during the Villa Hills Bike Rodeo last year. Rode on Wheels,” in a tribute to former Edgewood resident Justin Schumacher,

who was killed in 1992 at the age of 12 while riding rollerblades near Dixie

Highway. The event will be held at Freedom Park on June 8, and will start at 10

A Picture of My Heart. In a Heartbeat.

a.m. There will be an obstacle course for both the younger and older children, and bikes will be provided for any child who doesn’t have one and wants to participate. “It’s a fun event for them, but it also really important for the kids to learn the proper signaling and how to tighten their helmets - things like that,” said Chinn. “We usually have a pretty good turnout, and we hope that’s the case again this year.” In Villa Hills, Wright said the department will have a brief safety lecture before inspecting the equipment and putting the kids

BRIEFS Large-item pickup June 7

The city of Park Hills will hold its large-item pickup along with regular trash pickup Wednesday June 7. Residents may sit out their large items on Tuesday evening. If residents have any questions about which items are acceptable, they should call the city building at (859) 431-6252.

Spring Fling show

Organizers have released the list of winners of the Second Annual Spring Fling Juried Arts & Craft Show. The last day to view the show is Friday May 28 at the Crescent Springs Presbyterian Church, 710 Western Reserve Road. Best of Show and a cash prize of $150 went to Marianna Lutes Briner’s oil painting, “Dr. Tom.” First place and $75 went to Sandy Kent for her

Index

Calendar ......................................B2 Classifieds.....................................C Food.............................................B4 Obituaries....................................B9 Police.........................................B11 Schools........................................A7 Sports ........................................A10 Viewpoints ................................A12

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through an obstacle course in the Tom Braun Field parking lot on June 16. Although the younger kids will have a truncated course, he said he is trying to make the obstacle course for the older children more challenging this year. “I think last year, it was a little to easy for them, so we’re going to change it up a bit,” he said. Both rodeos are free to attend, and registration is not required. For more information, contact the Villa Hills Police Department at 341-3535 or the Edgewood Police Department at 331-5910.

acrylic painting, “Nature Trail 2.” Second place and $50 went to Joel Rader for his pastel painting, “3-year-old Portrait.” Third place and $25 went to Margie Lakeberg for her oil painting, “Devou Guards.” Certificates of Merit Awards went to: • Becky Burdick, acrylic painting, "Pink Cornflowers" • Evelyn Elliott, acrylic painting, “Tidal Pools” •Patricia Foxworthy, watercolor painting, “The Pecking Order” • Donald Koos, oil/bead painting, “Choices” • Debby Raymond, oil pastel, “Eastern by Eden” • Elmira Scott, painted porcelain vase, “Tulips” • Holly Spraul, oil painting, “New Delhi” • Grace Thoeny, fabric paper mache sculpture, “Study in Blue”

Villa celebrates birthday

The city of Villa Hills will celebrate their 48th anniversary with a party at the Villa Hills Civic Club on June 12. The party will run from 11 a.m. until around 3 p.m., and is open to all residents. For more information, call 341-1515, or visit www.villahillsky.org.

RECORDER

Find news and information from your community on the Web Kenton County– nky.com/kentoncounty News Brian Mains | Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1062 | bmains@nky.com Jason Brubaker | Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1060 | jbrubaker@nky.com Regan Coomer | Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1061 | rcoomer@nky.com Melanie Laughman | Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . 513-248-7573 | mlaughman@nky.com James Weber | Sports Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1054 | jweber@nky.com Advertising Debbie Maggard | Advertising Manager. . . . . . 578-5501 | dmaggard@nky.com Deb Kaya | Account Rep . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-5507 | dkaya@nky.com Josh Bishop | Account Rep. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-5506 | jbishop@nky.com Delivery For customer service. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 781-4421 Sharon Schachleiter | Circulation Manager . . 442-3464 | sschachleiter@nky.com Classified To place a Classified ad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283-7290 | www.communityclassified.com To place an ad in Community Classified, call 283-7290.


Life

June 3, 2010

Community Recorder

B3

How well do we handle the uncertainties of life? Father Lou Guntzelman Perspectives

nently knowable condition. T h e younger or less mature we are the more we become frustrated by the absence of

clarity. The older and more mature we become doesn’t banish the ambiguities and anxieties of life, but we are more able to tolerate them as part of life. Our experiences and maturation render us more humble, understanding of the human condition, and familiar with mysteries. Ambivalence is experiencing contradictory feelings or attitudes toward the same person, object, event or situation. Conflicting feelings are often strong toward parents since they are agents of both discipline and affection. Spouses may also notice sporadic love/hate sentiments toward the other. The polarity of such feelings can be temporarily disturbing when they occur. Some find them so troublesome to admit that they often repress one of the poles of the tension. There are other kinds of

ambivalence besides relational ones – such as uncertainty or indecisiveness about a certain course of action, ambivalence about a job, religion, sibling, etc. Children at first need unequivocal messages as they begin to grow. Before maturity we are not in possession of capacities for dealing with the ambiguities and ambivalences of life. We encounter them as painful contradictions. Even at a tender age we experience both gratification and frustrations from the same parents. At first we attempt to manage our ambiguity and ambivalence with various strategies, many of them unhealthy. We may blunt

written in a foreign language. Don’t dig for answers that can’t be given you yet: you cannot live them now. For everything must be lived. Live the questions now, perhaps then, someday, you will gradually, without noticing, live into the answer.” Father Lou Guntzelman is a Catholic priest of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati. Contact him at columns@community press.com or P.O. Box 428541, Cincinnati, OH 45242.

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struggling for wholeness as a person. Life contains many rich experiences as well as paradox and challenging mysteries. In the midst of living our questions, which are often enveloped in anxiety, ambiguity and ambivalence, poet Rainer Maria Rilke offers practical advice: “Bear with patience all that is unresolved in your heart, and try to love the questions themselves, as if they were rooms yet to enter or books

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our feelings, repress, distract ourselves, dissociate, deny, and later on develop addictions or personality traits. Eventually we’re meant to learn healthier ways. We learn to recognize and hold the tensions between opposites such as love/hate, dark side/good side, vindictiveness/forgiveness, and choose to acknowledge but discipline the undesirable. We come to see we are imperfect humans living in am imperfect world, yet

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How grown up are we? At old-time county fairs young men sought to demonstrate their physical strength by swinging a huge mallet and striking a mat. It propelled a weight upward. If it hit and rang the bell, it was evidence they were macho. What are some ways to measure how developed we are inside? “The test of a psychologically mature person, and therefore spiritually mature, will be found in his or her capacity to handle what one might call the Triple As: anxiety, ambiguity and ambivalence,” writes Dr. James Hollis in “Creating A Life.” Anxiety, as we well know, is the agitation and stress we feel when we anticipate impending risk, danger, catastrophe or misfortune. The future threat may be real or imagined, internal or external, but always uncomfortable. Recall how we feel when called upon to speak to a crowd. Ambiguity is a confusing grayness. It flows from our ego’s desire for clarity and security. Yogi Berra creates ambiguity when he advises, “If you come to a fork in the road – take it!” We want life, God, and the world to be in a perma-

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A4

Community Recorder

June 3, 2010

News

Girl Scouts Katie Warner, 6 of Independence and Isabella Baker, 7 of Walton, from troop 1333, wave their flags from the float in the Erlanger Memorial Day parade. The parade was hosted by the communities of Erlanger and Elsmere, along with the Ralph Fulton VFW Post 6423 located in Erlanger.

PATRICIA SCHEYER/ CONTRIBUTOR PATRICIA SCHEYER/CONTRIBUTOR

PATRICIA SCHEYER/CONTRIBUTOR

Five-year-old Brooklyn Stoffel of Erlanger waves at the parade on Memorial Day. There were multiple parades held throughout Kenton County on Monday, May 31.

Alex Ward, 7, of Erlanger, and his brother, Max, sport antique military hats as they watch the Erlanger Memorial Day parade. The parade was hosted by the communities of Erlanger and Elsmere, along with the Ralph Fulton VFW Post 6423 of Erlanger.

Good day for parades

Parades marked a day of community and rememberance throughout Kenton County Monday, May 31. Almost every community in the county had celebrations. Here are a select few held along Dixie Highway.

PATRICIA SCHEYER/CONTRIBUTOR

Spc. Matthew Hurst holds his daughters, Kaylyn, 2, and Piper, 1, as they watch the Memorial Day parade. The parade was hosted by the communities of Erlanger and Elsmere, along with the Ralph Fulton VFW Post 6423 located in Erlanger. PATRICIA SCHEYER/CONTRIBUTOR

Gabrielle Baker, 4 of Fort Wright and her sister Katherine, 7, wave to the parade in Park Hills. The Park Hills Memorial Day parade began at the Northern Kentucky University Covington Campus at 10:30 a.m. Memorial Day.

Riley Hurst, 7 of Fort Wright, and his brother Lucas, 5, watch the Memorial Day parade with their dog Echo, a one and a half year old boxer. The Park Hills Memorial Day parade began at the Northern Kentucky University Covington Campus at 10:30 a.m. Memorial Day.

See PARADES on page A5

PATRICIA SCHEYER/CONTRIBUTOR

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News

Parades

June 3, 2010

Community Recorder

A5

Continued from A4

PATRICIA SCHEYER/CONTRIBUTOR

An Army truck sports the sign, Support Our Troops in the Park hills Memorial Day parade. PATRICIA SCHEYER/CONTRIBUTOR

The Veterans of Foreign Wars color guard in the Park Hills Memorial Day parade.

The grand marshalls, Dave and Char Fangman at the Park Hills Memorial Day Parade.

PATRICIA SCHEYER/ CONTRIBUTOR

PATRICIA SCHEYER/CONTRIBUTOR

Park Hills Civic Association's float is Thomas the Train, in the Park Hills Memorial Day parade.

PATRICIA SCHEYER/CONTRIBUTOR

Brayden Wulfeck, 8 of Edgewood and his siblings, Brian, 11, and Briana, 13, pet Ready, the horse, after the Covington Mounted Police took part in the Edgewood Memorial Day celebration. Spc. Eric Higgins rides Ready, while Spc. Jon Mangus is mounted on Bull.

PATRICIA SCHEYER/CONTRIBUTOR

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Boy Scouts from troop 779, Mark Ryan, 12, from Edgewood, Anthony Kruetzkamp, 12, Elsmere, Hayden Skinner-Fine, 14 Villa Hills, Eddie Kruetzkamp, 16, Elsmere, and Tim Garcia, 14, Walton, stand at attention after the wreath has been placed at the Edgewood Memorial.

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A6

Community Recorder

June 3, 2010

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SCHOOLS

Community Recorder

June 3, 2010

ACHIEVEMENTS

Editor Brian Mains | bmains@nky.com | 578-1062

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NEWS

|

ACTIVITIES

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HONORS

RECORDER

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

N K Y. c o m

E-mail: k

ws@

A7

unit

River Ridge students enjoy Field Day

By Jason Brubaker jbrubaker@nky.com

River Ridge firstgrader Noah Jefferson took one final look at the yellow water balloon in his hand before glancing, hesitantly, back across the approximately 15 feet of grass separating him from classmate Brady Macke. “Okay, don’t drop this one,” he cautioned, preparing to throw it. “Well make sure it’s a good throw then,” Macke replied, barely getting the words out before the balloon landed short of him and burst on the ground. “Oh no, I guess that’s it!” Flying water balloons and smiles filled the air at River Ridge on May 26-27, as the students took part in the annual Field Day activities. The students played a number of fun games in the large field behind the school, including the water balloon toss, hula hoop race, tug-of-war and bean bag toss. The students rotated through the games, their shouts filling the humid afternoon air. “This has been fun,” confirmed firstgrader Avery Hicks, trying to catch his breath after the hula hoop race. “I wish we could do it every day!”

Volunteer Charles Frazier encourages a group of River Ridge first-graders during the Tug-of-War on Field Day.

JASON BRUBAKER/STAFF

JASON BRUBAKER/STAFF

River Ridge first-graders Avery Hicks and Zach Ernst try to keep their balance during the hula hoop race on Field Day on May 26.

JASON BRUBAKER/STAFF

River Ridge first-grader Drake Pitz sizes up the target in the bean bag toss during Field Day.

River Ridge firstgraders Noah Jefferson and Brady Macke carefully toss a water balloon during Field Day on May 26. They ended up winning the event.

JASON BRUBAKER/STAFF

Notre Dame Academy student achieves first place Notre Dame Academy student, Kelly Kleier, took first place at the National Junior Science and Humanities Symposium in environmental science in Bethesda, Maryland, Saturday, May 1. Kleier was awarded a $12,000 scholarship to the school of her choice from the Department of Defense and an all-expensepaid two-week trip to the London International Youth Science Forum where she will represent the U.S. this summer. Two NDA students attended the symposium. Kelly, a junior at NDA, presented her research on the “Prototype Solar-Powered Liquid Piston Engine” and Monica McFadden, an NDA freshman, presented her research “Nitrate Removal by Biobarriers.” Under the direction and guidance of Sister Mary Ethel Parrot, SND, both students also

recently participated in the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair in San Jose, California. The National Junior Science and Humanities Symposia (JSHS) Program promotes original research and experimentation in the sciences, engineering and mathematics at the high school level and publicly recognizes students for outstanding achievement. The National JSHS is jointly sponsored by the United States Departments of the Army, Navy, and Air Force in cooperation with leading research universities throughout the nations. The national competition included the winning projects from 49 regions including the Department of Defense schools abroad.

Kelly Kleier and Monica McFadden at ISEF.

PROVIDED


A8

Community Recorder

Schools

June 3, 2010

Kenton students dance for greener tomorrow By Regan Coomer rcoomer@nky.com

Need to blow off steam from the school year? Dancing around in lab coats to “The Electric Slide” should just about do it. More than 200 students slid around to the time-honored dance at Kenton County Schools’ Third Annual E=WISE2 luncheon May 26. When the dance was over, school officials got to the real business of the luncheon – giving out awards to Energy Wise teams across the district for their accomplishments toward a greener, more environmentally-friendly school. “In our district, teachers and staff members used to take energy for granted. But that has changed,” said Chris Baker, the district’s Energy Systems Coordinator. “School districts in Ohio, Kentucky, Indiana, Tennessee and North Carolina are using the E=WISE2 program as a model to create their own energy awareness programs.” Superintendent Tim Hanner and Board of Education President Karen Collins gave out the bronze, silver and gold awards to each elementary, middle and

REGAN COOMER/STAFF

Kenton County Schools hosted the Third Annual E=WISE2 luncheon Wednesday, May 26. Kenton County Administrator Gary McCormick “entertained” students with a not-so-interesting talk about energy while the E=WISE2 mascot, Wise Guy, snuck up behind him and held up signs reading “Let’s pull the plug on this guy”, much to the delight of students present. high school. Summit View Elementary was the big winner of the luncheon: the school was named the Gold school in the elementary category and awarded $750. Later, the school was named the Green School of the Year across the district and

hard work, he was glad they got a chance to cut lose: “The focus was on the kids. They were getting out of their chairs and dancing and really celebrating all the work they’ve done this year.” The luncheon was also attended by members of the Kentucky School Board Association. KSBA member Ron Willhite is the director of the association’s School Energy Manger’s Project (SEMP), which is working to hire energy managers like Baker to 132 districts across the state using federal stimulus money. “It’s really going to be a great thing for districts,” Willhite said. “By saving energy you save costs. These costs savings can then be transferred by to the classroom.” Willhite said the energy managers will be in place by July 1.

awarded an additional $1,000. Summit View Elementary was honored for their work hosting a Go Green Week during the school year in which more than 800 parents participated. While Hanner said he is proud of students for their

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Kenton County Schools hosted the Third Annual E=WISE2 luncheon Wednesday, May 26. The district’s Wise Guy literally pulled the plug on Gary McCormick’s talk: at the event the lights were dimmed and the Wise Guy single-handedly dragged McCormick, a district literacy administrator, off the stage.

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Students celebrated the end of another successful E-WISE2 team year a dance of The Electric Slide May 26.

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Piner Elementary student Curtis Kinman explained his school's display, a model house with a ceiling fan powered by solar panels, activated when a light is held over the model. REGAN COOMER/STAFF


Schools

Caywood students get life lessons from D.A.R.E. By Jason Brubaker jbrubaker@nky.com

PROVIDED

The Regional Youth Leadership Class of 2010 celebrated its graduation on March 7 at The Phoenix.

The Regional Youth Leadership Class of 2010 celebrated its graduation on March 7 at The Phoenix. The students recently completed the eight-month program which helps build leadership skills and encourages community involvement among young people. Students were exposed to complex issues and challenges facing the region through interactive sessions with community leaders and decision makers. The sessions covered diversity, local government, economic development, law, arts and culture, money, health care and community service. The Class of 2010 consists of 41 students representing 40 different Northern Kentucky/Greater Cincinnati area high schools.

Regional Youth Leadership is a nonprofit program. The title sponsor for this year's program was Ohio National Financial Services; presenting sponsors were KeyBank Foundation, Walmart (Fort Wright, Florence and Alexandria) and Turner Construction. Members of the Class of 2010 from local Kenton County schools are: Robin Brundage - Villa Madonna Academy Addison Cain - Covington Latin School Michael Danahy - St. Henry District High School Hannah DeJarnette - Calvary Christian School Lauren Harrett - Notre Dame Academy Matthew Judy - WaltonVerona High School Sungkwon Kudo - Lloyd Memorial High School Brianna McCarthy -

B.E.S.T celebrated Education Alliance of Northern Kentucky recently recognized the impact made by B.E.S.T. partnerships across the region at a special Eggs ‘N Issues event, the B.E.S.T. Celebration Breakfast on Tuesday, May 11. The breakfast was a wonderful opportunity to congratulate the partnerships on their success throughout the year, while also allowing special achievements of the partnerships to be celebrated.

2010 B.E.S.T. Award recipients included:

Outstanding Work Ethic K-8 Award: Piner Elementary and Ticona Ockerman Middle School and Schwan Food Company

B.E.S.T. Service Learning Partnership Award:

Walton Verona Middle School and McDonalds

BEST “Rookie” Outstanding Partnership of the Year:

New Haven Elementary and Skyline Twenhofel Middle School and NKY Health Department

BEST Outstanding Projects of the Year:

Boone County High School and Citi Holmes High School and Citi

B.E.S.T. Hall of Fame Inductees included:

Goodridge Elementary and Citi, Ockerman Middle School and Schwan Food, 6th District Elementary and Gateway Community and Technical College, and Boone County High School and Citi.

In addition to annual awards, a new honor was presented to Gold Standard B.E.S.T. Partnerships, based on their focus throughout

the year to producing measurable results, implementing high impact partnership activities, providing equal benefits to the school and business partner and displaying identifiable community impact. These partnerships for the 2009-2010 school year were selected based on the data that was submitted on the partnership tracking tools and include: Twenhofel Middle School and NKY Health Department, St. Augustine and PNC Bank, Holmes High School and Citi, Ockerman Middle School and Schwan’s Global Supply Chain, Inc., Piner Elementary and Ticona Engineering Solutions, Conner High School and Citi, New Haven Elementary and Skyline Chili, Boone County High School and Citi, Sixth District Elementary and Gateway Community and Technical College, and Goodridge Elementary and Citi. The event was presented by PNC Bank and The Bank of Kentucky with The Kentucky Enquirer/NKY.com serving at the title sponsor. The B.E.S.T. Awards sponsors were Central Bank, City of Crestview Hills, Toyota, and C.K. Ash Insurance. For questions or more information about the B.E.S.T. program and how to get involved, please contact Amanda Dixon at adixon@nkychamber.com or 859-578-6396.

Beechwood High School Emma McGregor - Dixie Heights High School Quentin Muth - Scott High School Brett Riedinger - Covington Catholic High School Katelyn Stenger - Notre Dame Academy Ellen Sterry -Ludlow High School

Community Recorder

Chance Currington

A9

Kelsey Glacken

“If you do drugs, it isn’t just bad for you, but it’s bad for people around you.”

“Since I learned from my D.A.R.E. officer that drugs are dangerous, I’ll choose never to do drugs!”

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“D.A.R.E. is important - it keeps the world safe from drugs and violence, and teaches kids what they need to know about the outside world.”

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Youth leadership class graduates

Edgewood Police Officer Terry Chinn always enjoys reading over the D.A.R.E. student essays each year, wanting to see what the kids have learned. However, picking the best ones is not always an easy chore. “We had a lot of terrific kids this year, and it was a hard decision,” he said. “So I’m proud of all of the kids and the work they did this year.” Here are some excerpts from the winning essays from Caywood Elementary fifth-graders.

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B10

On the record

Community Recorder

POLICE REPORTS Covington

Arrests/citations

Delmar L. Allen, 2399 Harrison Ave., no. 204, operating motor vehicle under the influence of alcohol or drugs, failure to or improper signal, possession of marijuana, trafficking in marijuana at 207 W. 4th St., May 17. Marquez Moore, 1529 Russell St., first degree criminal trespassing, receiving stolen property, giving officer false name or address at 1504 Woodburn St., May 18. Marilyn G. Centers, 727 Saratoga St., no. 1, alcohol intoxication in a public place, possession of marijuana, third degree possession of a controlled substance at 531 Madison Ave., May 17. Matthew C. Robertson, 2429 Alexandria Pike, possession of marijuana at 1620 May St., Apt. 1, May 17. Mark J. Oliver, 601 York St., possession of marijuana, assault at 1716 Banklick St., May 17. Stephen C. Marksberry, 126 W. 34th St., second degree disorderly conduct, third degree terroristic threatening at 126 W. 34th St., May 19. Thomas J. Ohmer, 260 W. Pike St., failure to notify address change to department of transportation at 600 block of 4th St., May 19. Robert E. Rich Jr., No Address Given, receiving stolen property, burglary at 309 E. 42nd St., rear garage, May 19. Hilary A. Hensley, 402 5Th Ave., second degree possession of a controlled substance, possession of marijuana at 400 E. 12th St., May 23. Robert E. Clem Jr., 420 General Dr., theft at 4220 Pike St., May 23. Theresa L. Messmer, 1164 Waterworks Rd., prescription for a controlled substance not in proper container at 729 Scott St., May 22. Matthew R. Rowland, 435 Chestnut Way, possession of marijuana at W. 3rd St., May 22. Christopher G. Dew, 119 Pleasant , possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia, serving warrant at 1313 Greenup St., May 22. Steven Woods, 71 Karen Dr., prescrip-

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tion for a controlled substance not in proper container at 438 W. Pike St., May 22. Jeremaine A. Hersey, 2852 W. Mcmicken Ave., possession of marijuana, serving bench warrant for court at 21 E. 32nd St., May 22. Richard R. Deaton, No Address Given, second degree fleeing or evading police, second degree criminal trespassing, first degree possession of a controlled substance at 1320 Banklick St., May 21. Jose Tol, 1409 Russell St., first degree criminal possession of a forged instrumetn at 1 W. 10th St., May 21. Rickey L. Walls, 1536 Holman Ave., no. 2, fourth degree assault at 1536 Holman Ave., May 21. Thomas J. Ohmer, No Address Given, second degree assault, second degree possession of a controlled substance at 1320 Banklick St., May 21. Crystal L. Steinmetz, 1536 Nancy St., second degree assault at 1320 Banklick St., May 21. William H. Jennings, 1412 Wheeler St., fourth degree assault at 2624 Crisnic Ct., May 20. Marcus J. Rice, 331 E. 13Th St., possession of marijuana at 300 block of Byrd St., May 22. Dennis G. Bryant, 1423 Lexington St., possession of drug paraphernalia, endangering the welfare of a minor at 1423 Lexington St., May 17. Jeremy W. Miller, 731 Main St., Apt. 3, fourth degree assault at 731 Main St., Apt. 3, May 18. Timothy D. Collins, 111 Brent Spense Square, no. 404, first degree possession of a controlled substance, possession of drug parapheranalia at 600 W. 5th St., May 18.

Incidents/investigations Assault

A man was punched in the face at 1447 Madison Ave., May 20. A woman reported being assaulted at 721 Scott St., May 20. A man was struck in the head with a tire iron at 410 Philadelphia St., May 19. A man assaulted a woman at 4301 Win-

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Assault, menacing

A woman was assaulted and had a pistol pointed at her at 200 block of E. 12th St., May 23.

Burglary

A game system, games, jewelry, and a cell phone was stolen at 3317 Grace St., May 18. Copper piping was stolen from a residence at 119 E. 24th St., May 20. $20, prescription medication, and several bottles of perfume were stolen at 109 Promontory Dr., no. B, May 23. A computer, CDs, and DVDs were stolen at 1932 Pearl St., May 23. A bike, TV, game system, $50, and a tattoo gun kit were stolen at 731 Main St., Apt. 2, May 22. $225 was stolen at 101 E. Southern Ave., May 18.

Burglary, criminal mischief

Copper piping and wiring were stolen at 1821 Madison Ave., May 18.

Criminal mischief

Someone threw a bucket of human waste on another building at 803 Bakewell St., May 17. Two windows of a vehicle were broken out at 1200 block of Chesapeake St., May 17. The rear window of a vehicle was broken out at 1001 Highway Ave., May 17. The tire of a vehicle was punctured at Indiana Dr., May 22. A fence was damaged at 1514 Woodburn St., May 22. A door was kicked and damaged at 1633 May St., May 18. A vehicle was scratched at 1736 Jefferson Ave., May 18. A window was damaged at 210 E. 13th St., May 18. A large piece of concrete was thrown into a vehicle windshield at 627 W. 11th St., May 21. A screen and door was damaged at 2030 Mackoy Ave., May 20. Someone threw a rock at a vehicle at 323 E. 18th St., May 23.

Criminal mischief, criminal trespassing

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Fraudulent use of a credit card

Several charges were made to a stolen credit card number at 3908 Huntington Ave., May 17.

Harassment

A woman reported being harassed at 3711 Winston Ave., May 18.

Harassment, criminal mischief

A rock was thrown through the window of a residence at 2315 Madison Ave., May 22.

Robbery

A man had his cell phone taken from him at 596 W. 3rd St., May 20. A man had $20 taken from him at North-South alley between 217 and 219 Pleasant Ave., May 21.

A man was on property without permission at 100 Magellan Dr., May 20.

at 815 Philadelphia St., no. 1, May 17.

Theft of services

Services delivered were not paid for at 105 Promontory Dr. C., May 19.

Theft, criminal mischief

Two purses were stolen from a vehicle at 16 W. Robbins St., May 22.

Theft, criminal trespassing

Steel shelving and barrier pieces were stolen at 200 W. 43rd St., May 21.

Unauthorized use of a motor vehicle

A vehicle was stolen at 1500 James Simpson Way, May 22.

Erlanger/Crescent Springs

Incidents/investigations

Terroristic threatening

Assault Reported at Lexington Drive, May 25.

Theft

Assault, tampering with evidence, terroristic threatening Reported at 3316 Crescent Avenue, May 26.

A man made a bomb threat at 300 W. 4th St., May 18. A vehicle was stolen at 222 Covington Ave., May 18. A purse was snatched at W. 6th St., May 17. A social security card was stolen at 1331 Highway Ave., May 20. A vehicle was stolen at 1700 Scott St., May 19. A purse was stolen from a vehicle at 3980 Madison Pike, May 23. A radar detector, GPS unit, pool cue, and prescription medication were stolen from a vehicle at 329 Delmar Pl., May 23. A wallet was stolen at Riverside Dr., May 22. A cell phone was stolen at 260 W. 7th St., May 22. A vehicle was stolen at 410 E. 18th St., May 22. Bicycles were stolen at 342 W. 17th St., May 23. A debit card was used without permission at Madison Ave., May 18. A wallet was stolen at 2490 Landview Dr., May 21. A vehicle was stolen at 808 Willard St., May 21. A bicycle was stolen at 16 Shaler St., May 21. Two business checks were stolen at 315 E. 15th St., May 18.

Theft of a controlled substance

Prescription medication was stolen at 722 Scott St., May 21.

Someone tried to pass a counterfeit $100 bill at 1616 Madison Ave., May 17. Someone tried to pass a counterfeit $50 bill at 613 W. 4th St., May 22.

Criminal trespassing

A firearm had its serial number scratched off at 3314 Frazier St., May 18.

Theft by deception

Someone entered a residence by prying open a dead bolt at 333 E. 47th St., no. 2, May 20.

Criminal possession of a forged instrument

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Theft of identity of another

Another person's identity was used to rent property at 818 Main St., Apt. 2, May 18.

Theft of identity of another, burglary

Tax papers, a food stamp card, driver's license, and a credit card were stolen

Criminal mischief $150 worth of damage to structure at 800 Buttermilk Pike, May 25. $100 worth of damage to structure reported at 340 Lindenwood Drive, May 27. Reported at 3276 Woodlyn Hills Drive, May 27. $300 worth of vehicle damage reported at 3502 Misty Creek Drive, May 22. $20 worth of damage to structure reported at 3150 Hickory lane, May 26. $600 worth of damage to structure reported at 3717 Jacqueline Drive, May 22. Criminal mischief, theft by unlawful taking $25 worth of computer hardware reported stolen at 4061 Woodchase Drive, May 24. Criminal mischief, criminal trespassing $50 worth of vehicle damage reported at 3515 Jacqueline Drive, May 27. Criminal possession of forged instrument Reported at 312 McAlpin Avenue, May 24. Harassment Reported at 3535 Mitten Drive, May 25. Possession of marijuana $10 worth of drugs/narcotics seized at 3169 Woodward Avenue, May 27. Possession of marijuana, operating on suspended license $40 worth of drugs/narcotics seized at Hallam Avenue, May 24. Theft Reported at 2328 Crestbrook Drive, May 22. $150 worth of radios/TVs/VCRs reported stolen at 4 Short Hill Lane, May 22.

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Theft of motor vehicle registration plate $40 worth of vehicle parts reported stolen at 628 Perimeter Drive, May 25.

Fort Mitchell

Arrests/citations

Ricky Mayberry, 58, 1001 Locust Street, first degree driving under the influence, no insurance, May 22. Robert L Dempsey, 36, 5128 East River Road, alcohol intoxication, May 22. Glenda A Perez, 18, 1227 Russell Street, no insurance, no operator's license, May 24. Donald L Chambers, 39, 2727 Birch Street, operating on suspended license, May 25. Francisco X Virella, 20, , theft by unlawful taking, May 26. Katrina L Flores, 31, 3604 Warsaw Avenue, no seatbelt, no insurance, no operator's license, May 26. Melissa A Harding, 42, 303 Pershing Avenue, operating on suspended license, May 27.

Incidents/investigation Criminal mischief

$100 worth of damage to structure reported at 88 Burdsall Avenue, May 14. $1,000 worth of vehicle damage reported at 161 Pleasant Ridge Avenue, May 14.

Independence

Arrests/citations

Chaz M. Kruse, 32, 1820 Bullock Pen Road, execution of bench warrant for probation violation at Independence Post office parking lot, May 26. Orland R. Marsh, 41, 4081 Elizabeth Drive, execution of warrant for violation of a ky epo/dvo at Beechgrove Drive, May 26. Brian A. Dillon, 45, 3318 Summit Run Drive, execution of warrant for nonpayment of fines, execution of warrant for theft by deception at 3318 Summit Run Drive, May 26. Brandon J. Arce, 25, 9978 Cobblestone Blvd, assault domestic violence at 9978 Cobblestone Blvd, May 22. Samuel M. Campbell Jr., 35, 619 Mulberry, operating on suspended/revoked license at 6425 Taylor Mill Road, May 23. Charles W. Davis, 26, 960 Regal Ridge Drive, robbery at 960 Regal Ridge Drive, May 19. Chris J. Fenton, 44, 1024 Orchard Street, execution of warrant for flagrant nonsupport, execution of bench warrant for failure to appear at Galviston, May 15. Jose J. Ibarra, 32, 3513 Steep Creek Road, operating on suspended/revoked license, failure of owner to maintain required insurance at Cox Road, May 15. Paul A. Feldman, 35, 5673 Neptune , contempt of court libel at 5661 Saturn Road, May 13. Dorothy J. Creamer, 31, 2756 Latonia Avenue, contempt of court libel at Regal Ridge Road, May 17. David I Otis, 18, 725 Meadow Wood Apt. 1, execution of warrant for burglary dwelling grand theft at 725 Meadow wood Dr no. 1, May 17. Charles V. Becker, 25, 129 Barren River Drive no. 2, criminal trespassing at 4033 Charwood H6, May 13. John W. Lee, 42, 5663 Saturn Drive, execution of warrant for failure to appear at 5663 Saturn Drive, May 14. Jonathan C. Thompson, 18, 896 Regal Ridge, execution of warrant for failure to appear at 705 Lakefield Drive, May 19.

Reported at Charwood Circle, May 23.

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Theft of mail matter Reported at 599 Donaldson Highway, May 23.

Incidents/investigations Assault

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Reported at 846 Winbourne Lane, May 26. Reported at 31 Price Avenue, May 26. $68 reported stolen at 3147 Dixie Highway, May 25. $450 worth of jewelry reported stolen at 13 Glenda Drive, May 24.

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Criminal mischief, assault

Reported at 3930 Wynnbrook Drive, May 25. Theft Reported at 9549 Apple Valley Drive, May 16. Reported at 4260 Catalpa Drive, May 16. Reported at 907 Regal Ridge, May 22. Reported at 1045 Wedgewood Drive, May 16. Reported at 1265 Harbor Court, May 17. theft of controlled substance under $300 at 9529 Apple Valley Drive, May 16.

Theft of property mislaid or delivered by mistake

Reported at 6441 Taylor Mill Road, May 19.


Community | On the record

Community Recorder

June 3, 2010

B11

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES heartprints inc., Cincinnati. Call 5132953533. Mentor Tutor Listen Teach Arts, Crafts, and Other Make positive impact

Life Coach

Ex-Change House, Inc., Mentoring Plus, Dayton. Call 859-982-5895. Mentor a teen once each week for a minimum of one year at the Salvation Army in Newport Kentucky

Erlanger. Call 859-802-4881. Volunteers needed to help plan & work 2010 Fundraising Events

More info

For more information and a complete listing of volunteer opportunities in the area visit www.nkyhelps.org on the web. Also sign up to share your organizations events, list donation and volunteer opportunities.

Gift Shop Cashier

Frankies Furry Friends Rescue Inc., Alexandria. Call 859-635-9114. Planning for fundraisers throughout the year.

St. Elizabeth Healthcare - Ft. Thomas, Ft. Thomas. Call 859301-2140. To staff the Gift Shop and providing service to all customers. Accept responsibility for shop operation and ringing in all sales on the register.

Youth Transportation

Teen/Young Adult AA/NA Class

Fundraising

Brighton Center Inc., Newport. Call 859.491.8303. We are looking for responsible adults who are free during the day to transport youth (ages 11-17) to school and doctor's appointments.

Brighton Center Inc., Newport. Call 859.491.8303. Lead an AA and or NA group for youth and young adults ages 1521 at Brighton Center's facility for homeless youth.

Campaign against underage drinking - Project Sticker Shock

Brighton Center Inc., Newport. Call 859-491-8303. Plan and execute weekly and monthly activities for senior residents living independently, such as bingo, birthday parties, exercise routines. Provide transportation to local stores, banks and doctor appointments.

Kenton County Alliance to Prevent Substance Abuse, Erlanger. Call 859-760-2051. Volunteers will apply warning stickers to packages of beer (6 packs and larger) in Kenton County stores with permission of store owners. The stickers inform customers that it is illegal to provide alcohol to minors. Most youth get alcohol from adults who are of legal age. This is a prevention project designed to educate and raise awareness of underage drinking. "Stickering" times are flexible - you choose what works for you.

Summer Series Volunteers

Kentucky Symphony Orchestra, Newport. Call 859 431-6216. The Kentucky Symphony Orchestra is actively seeking volunteers for its 2010 Summer Series, July 10, August 7 & September 4. The KSO's Summer Series concerts are held at Devou Park in Covington, Kentucky.

Senior Support

Administrative

Frankies Furry Friends Rescue Inc., Alexandria. Call 859-635-9114. Need of someone with computer experience to help with data entry, checking emails, mailings, fundraising, event planning etc.

Need crafters

Frankies Furry Friends Rescue Inc., Alexandria. Call 859-635-9114. If you are a crafter and would like to help with the animals in our care we are in need of people with the special talents such as: sewing, crocheting, and knitting items for the animals.

Fosters for small breed dogs

Frankies Furry Friends Rescue Inc., Alexandria. Call 859-635-9114. Foster homes are needed for the small breed dogs this would include taking care of the dog until he/she has found a forever home. We provide all supplies for this dog until it is adopted. You would need to possibly transport the dog to a vet appointment or an adoption event.

Sisters of Notre Dame 4th of July Festival & Social

Sisters of Notre Dame, Covington. Call 859-291-2040. Booth Chairs, Booth workers, set up & Clean up

Youth Mentor

Fundraiser Door to Door Solicitation

The Pet Castle, Inc. Animal Rescue, Florence. Call 859-760-7098. Walk door to door to hand out information on Hand out "We have a dream compaign" material and try to get a donation for the project. Must be able to Display HONESTY and INTEGRITY in all our discussions. Going with a friend is prefer, two solicitors, one can pick up the ball when the other runs out of steam, and for safety (never go into a home)

Volunteers Need For 2010 Fundraising Events

Scarf It Up For Those In Need,

Ohio Valley Goodwill Industries, Cincinnati. Call 513-771-4800. Purpose: By engaging youth in positive activities with adults who are strong role models, youth receive the encouragement and support they need to maximize their potential. GoodGuides™ engages adult volunteers who are expected to commit to supporting, guiding, and being a friend to a young person for a period of at least one year. By becoming part of the social network of adults and community members who care about youth in the community, the mentor can help youth develop and reach positive academic, career, and personal goals. Types of Men-

Kick-off to summer party June 5 On Saturday, June 5 beginning at 5 p.m., and following the Kids Fishing Derby, Kenton County Park & Recreation will partner with the Kenton County Public Library and Dominach’s Taekwondo Academy to present a special Kick-Off To Summer Party. This year’s entertainment guests are FamilyTime Entertainment and The Water Show, presented by Dominach’s Taekwondo Academy. Here’s the inside scoop: Wear your swim suit. Additional entertainment will include a 9-hole mini golf challenge. The library will use the event to help promote this year’s summer reading program, ‘Go Reading’, in which adults, teens, and

children are invited to participate. Sign up and earn great prizes just for reading books this summer. Entertainment and parking for the Party are free. Northern Kentucky Youth Association will be cooking up the good summer party stuff (hotdogs and hamburgers!) and operating a picnic concession starting at 5 p.m. so come hungry. Purchase of refreshments benefit the Northenr Kentucky Youth Athletics sports program. It all happens at Middleton-Mills Park, located at 3415 Mills Rd., Covington. Directions are easy. From I275, take Exit 79 (Covington-Taylor Mill) and go seven miles south on KY Hwy. 16 to Mills Road. Turn

left on Mills and go about one mile to the park. The party will be at Shelterhouse 2 ~ just follow the signs. It’s BYOLC ~ Bring Your Own Lawn Chair! A play area, sand volleyball court (beach, or world’s largest sandbox, depending on the age of those inside!), horseshoes courts, hiking trails, and a fishing pond are all nearby too! Call Kenton County Recreation at 859-525PLAY (7529) to see how you can help. For news of upcoming programs, activities, and events to be held in Kenton County’s parks, call the Recreation office at 859525-PLAY (7529).

toring: GoodGuides™ mentors can mentor youth in a one-on-one relationship, or engage in group mentoring with small groups of young people (five or less). Young mentors may serve as peer mentors who can demonstrate how positive choices result in opportunities and the realization of dreams. Volunteer Mentor Role • Serve as a positive role model and friend. • Build the relationship by planning and participating in activities together. • Be willing to share information about your career and career path and explore career options with your mentee(s). • Strive for mutual respect. • Help your mentee build self-esteem and motivation. • Promote and exhibit personal and social responsibility. • Help set goals and support youth as they work toward accomplishing them. • Be respectful of the mentee’s time, opinions, and decision-making. • Serve as a positive role model by modeling desirable behaviors e.g. patience, tolerance, and reflective listening. • Be comfortable and able to establish appropriate boundaries with the mentee and his or her family.

Emergency Assistance Receptionist

Welcome House, Covington. Call 859-431-8717. The person in this position is primarily responsible for greeting clients, donors and others who utilize the entry area of the Welcome House. Additionally, the receptionist assists with filing, making food pantry appointments, and other tasks related to the operation of the food pantry. This opportunity is for Mondays from 9am to 12 p.m or Tuesdays from 1-4 p.m.

Shuttle Driver

St. Elizabeth Healthcare - Edgewood, Edgewood. Call 859-301-2140. Operate the Shuttle Service mini-van in a safe manner to provide courteous, convenient transportation to and from the hospital parking lot.

Gym Assistant

Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Cincinnati, Cincinnati. Call 513-4218909. The Gym in a Boys & Girls Club is an active and busy place. Members

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VIEWPOINTS

A12

Community Recorder

June 3, 2010

EDITORIALS

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LETTERS

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COLUMNS

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CH@TROOM

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

N K Y. c o m

Editor Brian Mains | bmains@nky.com | 578-1062

E-mail: k

ws@

unit

RECORDER

CH@TROOM

Does the Reds’ early-season success make it more likely that you will go to a game, or more games, this season? Why or why not? “It doesn’t influence my decision to go or not to go. I love going to the Reds games and try to catch a game (at least) once a year. It’s always fun and the stadium is (still) so beautiful with a great view. If they don’t win the night I’m there, no big deal – you win some and you lose some. I’m a Reds fan through the highs and lows.” J.K. “My son and I were making plans for going to at least one Reds game this summer. It would be our third since The Great American Ball Park opened a few years ago. Obviously we’re glad the Reds are doing so well. We might go to more than one game due to that.” R.V. “I really don’t care where the Reds are in the standings. I like to go anytime the Cubs are in town. Was born and raised in Wrigley and am sticking with them till they win.

Next question What was the best advice your father gave you, and did you follow it? What happened? Send your answer to “bmains@nky.com” with Chatroom in the subject line. “However, Great American Ballpark, while not Wrigley Field, is a great venue for baseball, especially compared to that stadium monstrosity called Riverfront. Went just a week ago to see St. Louis and really enjoyed the atmosphere. So support your team, the facilities, the city, even if they are the Reds.” J.Z. “It has been years since I enjoyed a Reds game. I was there when Pete hit 4,192 and I also went to a World Series game years ago. “I enjoyed the Big Red Machine of the 1970s. The Reds of the last 25 years have not impressed me very much. However, if they continue to perform I could take in a day game.” J.S.D.

Reasons for not buckling up don’t add up Excuses, excuses. Those who drive or ride without using seat belts often have excuses. But how do excuses stack up against statistics that show seat belts save lives? As Kentuckians prepared to travel this Memorial Day weekend, the Kentucky Office of Highway Safety (KOHS) wants all motorists to forget the excuses and listen to the facts. “Thousands of lives could be saved and critical injuries could be prevented if occupants would just buckle up,” said KOHS Executive Director Chuck Geveden. Statistics for 2009 indicate 398 (61.3 percent) of the 649 people who were killed in motor vehicles last year in Kentucky were not wearing a seat belt. When worn correctly, seat belts are proven to reduce the risk of fatal injury to front-seat occupants by 45 percent – and by 60 percent in pickup trucks, SUVs, and minivans. Despite a wealth of data showing that seat belts save lives – and also despite implementation of a primary seat belt law – Kentucky’s 80 percent seat belt usage rate lags behind the national rate of 84 percent. What reasons do people give for not using a seat belt? • Seat belts can cause injuries, such as a broken collar bone. Seat belts reduce the risk of fatal injury to front-seat passenger car occupants by 45 percent and the risk of moderate to critical injury by 50 percent. • I don’t need a seat belt when driving at slow speeds or on short trips. Most crash deaths occur within 25 miles of home and at speeds less than 40 mph. • I might be trapped if my car catches fire or becomes submerged. Crashes involving fire or water amount to one-half of 1 percent of all crashes. • I don’t need to wear a seat belt because my vehicle has air bags. Air bags are designed to work in combination with seat belts, providing supplemental protection during certain types of crashes. • It makes me feel restrained. That’s the function of a seat

belt! All seat belts allow free movement of the occupant until a crash occurs or until you slam the brakes. Nationwide, 75 Nancy percent of people Wood ejected from a Community motor vehicle are Recorder killed. • It irritates the guest columnist schkiensto. n my neck or Most vehicles have adjustable shoulder belts that can be raised or lowered for comfort. • I am too big to wear a seat belt; it doesn’t fit. Purchasing a seat belt extender may solve this issue. • This is just government trying to control individuals. Every state has traffic laws that set limits on individual behavior. For instance, it is illegal to drink and drive or to speed. It also is illegal to drive or ride without a seat belt. Driving is a privilege, not a right. • I can’t reach my children if they should need attention. If you’re trying to feed, calm or play with your baby in the backseat, attention is not focused on the road and both lives are at risk. Please pull over to a safe location if you need to tend to your child. • I have a medical condition, I can’t wear it. This can be a valid excuse but only if a doctor provides you with a written medical note. The KOHS is coordinating the annual Click It or Ticket campaign in partnership with over 260 law enforcement agencies, including Kentucky State Police. Traffic safety checkpoints and saturation patrols began Monday, May 24, and will run through June 6. “Although the title of the campaign emphasizes the law – that if you don’t wear a seat belt you will be ticketed – the goal of the campaign is to educate the public about the importance of wearing a seat belt and, most importantly, save lives” Geveden said. Nancy Wood is the Public Information Officer for the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet District 6 Office.

PROVIDED

Walk along

Father Mario Tizziani gives the students encouragement and a high five as they begin the Walk-A-Thon held on Friday, May 21, at St. Cecilia school and Memorial Park in Independence. The students and senior members of St. Cecilia's parish raised money to help upgrade the school library into a state-of-the-art media center.

Mall Road a continued success

It was an early Sunday morning in October 1977, 6:30 a.m. I had just reported for my first day’s work on the Florence Police Department. At that time I was living in a rooming house in Newport and would move to the Normandy Green Apartments several weeks later to begin my 33-year love affair with Boone County. My training sergeant, Chester Snow, said, “Let’s take a ride around and I’ll show you the town.” We went west on U.S. 42 and turned right on Mall Road. The sun was just coming up over the famous “Florence Y’all” water tower, and Sgt. Snow told me that the city hoped the road would be developed for retail someday. Florence Mall had just opened and he explained to me how the water tower had originally read “Florence Mall” but since the mall was not yet built when the water tower was done, the state highway department said it would

have to be changed. Then-Mayor “Hop” Ewing simply changed the “M” to a “Y,” added an apostrophe, and the rest is history. “Hop” Ewing State Sen. John was the father Schickel of the current mayor, Diane Community Whalen, and he, Recorder along with Floguest rence City CounDon columnist cilmen Mager, W.A. Brown, and John Woods, Commissioner Irene Patrick, and State Sen. John Weaver, were living examples of what public service is all about. All are no longer with us. Mall Road exceeded their dreams and soon became the retail shopping destination for the area and the front door of Flo-

rence and Boone County. Last week Florence officials were justifiably proud when the governor officially dedicated the construction of the long-awaited $13 million improvements paid for by the state. This is an excellent investment. Businesses in the Mall Road area generate $26 million in taxes annually and employ 4,000 people with nearly $120 million in wages. More important than this, it updates the front door of our community in a way that would make those great public servants of yesteryear proud of us. State Sen. John Schickel, R-Union, represents the 11th Senate District which includes Boone and Gallatin counties and part of Kenton County. He welcomes your concerns or comments toll-free at 1-800-372-7181 or online at http://www.lrc.ky.gov/Mailform/S011.h tm.

Uniform supply of nutrients needed Question: Now that my vegetable garden is all planted and growing well, I’m wondering when and how I should fertilize it. Is it OK to fertilize all the different vegetables the same way and at the same time, or do they have different requirements? Answer: The type of fertilizer used should be based on the results of your soil test (a free service through your local county extension office). If you don’t have soil test results, at least apply nitrogen, since that nutrient is used up quickly by the plants, and eventually leaches out of the root zone. A good source of nitrogen for vegetable gardens is ammonium nitrate (34-0-0), which is 34 percent nitrogen, by weight. If a fertilizer containing only 10 percent nitrogen is used, such as 10-1010, or a 12 percent nitrogen fertilizer is used, such as 12-12-12,

then you will need to apply approximately three times as much fertilizer as you would if using ammonium nitrate, since these ferMike Klahr tilizers contain Community only about oneas much Recorder third nitrogen as the columnist a m m o n i u m nitrate. For vegetables to produce lush, continuous growth throughout the season, they need a uniform supply of nutrients. However, many chemical fertilizers are very soluble, so the initial application may leach beyond the root zone before the growing season ends. Thus, many gardeners “sidedress” their crops with an extra application of fertilizer during the growing season. The usual rate is

5 tablespoons of ammonium nitrate/10 feet of row. Asparagus and onions require twice as much, and potatoes should receive about 7 tablespoons/10 feet row. Place the fertilizer in bands about 6 inches to both sides of the rows, then rake it in and water. A combination of chemical fertilizer, organic fertilizer and mulch makes a good side-dressing. The chemical fertilizers give the initial boost required by young plants; organic fertilizers provide nutrients uniformly throughout the season; and mulch keeps the soil more evenly moist and the nutrients more uniformly available. The accompanying table gives the recommended times for sidedressing different vegetables. Mike Klahr is the Boone County Extension Agent for Horticulture.

Working hard

Sydney Egan, a fourth-grade student at White's Tower Elementary, was awarded the "Work Ethic Award" and fulfilled her community service hours at the Kenton County Library in Erlanger on May 18. She created party favors and name tags for an event at the library. She is the daughter of Gretchen and Chris Egan of Independence. PROVIDED

A publication of

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

RECORDER

Community Recorder Editor . .Brian Mains bmains@nky.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .578-1062

s

Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Friday | See page A2 for additional contact information.

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