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MAKING NEWCOMERS FEEL WELCOME B1

New Friends of Northern Kentucky has been around since the 1980s, and the organization has evolved over the years.

Tell us why your mom rocks The Community Recorder wants to know “Why Your Mom Rocks.” We’re accepting reader essays under 100 words about why your mother is special. Deadline is Friday, April 27. A selection of essays will be published in the Recorder before Mother’s Day, which is on May 13 this year. Send your essay to ndaly@nky.com or to: Mother’s Day, Community Recorder, 228 Grandview Drive, Fort Mitchell KY 41017. If you like include a photo and you and your mother. Please include your name, community and phone number. Also tell us where your mother lives and give her first and last name. Questions? Call 578-1059.

COMMUNITY

RECORDER THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

BECAUSE COMMUNITY MATTERS

Remodeling controversy discussed at meeting

By Cindy Schroeder cschroeder@nky.com

INDEPENDENCE — A divided Kenton Fiscal Court again refused to pay bills for a controversial remodeling project at its meeting April 10. Kenton County Attorney Garry Edmondson recently claimed in a lawsuit that Judge-executive Steve Arlinghaus illegally spent public funds to renovate county offices. He’s seeking reimbursement of $23,314 from Arlinghaus, as well as interest and costs and reimbursement of 115 hours of paid staff time for claims that he says were illegal because they were not autho-

rized by Kenton Fiscal Court. Nearly half of that money has yet to be paid to contractors. Arlinghaus, who’s hired a private attorney to represent him in the matter, said that he did nothing wrong when he authorized the renovation of a break room and the entryway to secondfloor county administrative offices in the county administration building in Covington. The county judge-executive says politics and his fellow elected officials’ desire to micro-manage county government are to blame for the dispute, claims they deny. Meanwhile, Kenton County Commissioner Jon Draud says

he wants to pay contractors money they’re still owed for the disputed renovations. “... I would like to make a motion that (Acting County Treasurer) Doug (Bramlage) be authorized to pay these bills and end this issue once and for all,” Draud said April 10. “We need to end the wasting of taxpayers’ money. I just think this lawsuit is ridiculous. I make a motion that we pay the controversial construction bills.” The April 10 meeting was the fourth in a row that county officials have debated the issue. The Fiscal Court again split 2-2, with Draud and Arlinghaus voting to let the treasurer pay the out-

Share summer festival listings Want your summer event/ festival included in our Northern Kentucky 2012 summer festival listing? Send the following information to kynews@com munitypress.com by May 9: event title, location with address, cost, contact information, short description of event and list of all dates and times.

Contact us

News .........................283-0404 Retail advertising .......513-768-8196 Classified advertising ........283-7290 Delivery .......................781-4421 See page A2 for additional information

Vol. 16 No. 24 © 2012 The Community Recorder ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

standing bills for the renovations, and Commissioners Kris Knochelmann and Beth Sewell voting against the payment. Knochelmann said he’s in favor of paying the contractors, but he first wants to fix “some inconsistencies and gray areas in (the county’s) policies and procedures” regarding the authority of the judge-executive and staff to purchase goods and services that are out of the ordinary. At a special Fiscal Court meeting recently, Edmondson and several county employees were named to a committee that will review the county’s internal See REMODEL, Page A2

Scouts honor Thomas with Trailblazer Award

Send us your prom photos April kicks off prom season in Northern Kentucky and we want to see your photos from the big night. The best of your submissions will appear in photo galleries at NKY.com and some may also be used in The Kentucky Enquirer and Recorder newspapers. Email your digital photos, with names and high schools of everyone appearing in them, to nkyproms@gmail.com. Please put which school’s prom your shots are from in the subject line of the email.

By Amy Scalf ascalf@nky.com

Kenton County Alliance’s new phone line to report underage drinking is an extension of the organization's Project Sticker Shock, which alerts beer buyers that underage drinking is illegal. THANKS TO KATHY NAFUS

Programs target underage drinking By Amy Scalf ascalf@nky.com

Kenton County officials have a new weapon in their fight against underage drinking: a 24hour tip line. The Kenton County Alliance to Prevent Substance Abuse has produced an informative poster, which features 12 law enforcement officers from 11 local agencies and Kenton County Attorney Garry Edmondson. It encourages people to “call 859-392-1962 to report any party in Kenton County where underage drinking is planned or suspected.” "Anybody can call. You don’t have to give your name,” said Kathy Nafus, Kenton County Alliance coordinator. She said the number goes to a message line

housed at the Kenton County Police Department and is checked daily. Information is then referred to the appropriate police jurisdiction. Kenton County Police Chief Brian Capps said the number has been a crime tip line for almost a decade, but messages were only checked once or twice a week. “We just changed our protocol so that number is checked daily,” said Capps. “It doesn’t help if someone calls on Thursday to report a party on Friday and we don’t check it until Monday. This way, we won’t miss anything.” He said the line is good when people have advance warning of underage drinking at parties, but he hopes residents also report underage drinking at a party going on right at that moment.

“We don’t always have advance warning. It’s nice when we do, but if you know kids are drinking at a party right then, call your local police department,” said Capps. The Alliance is also partnering with the Northern Kentucky Youth Foundation and the Kenton County Sheriff’s Department to present a Town Hall Meeting to prevent underage drinking at 78:15 p.m. Monday, April 23, at the Kenton County Library Erlanger Branch, 401 Kenton Lands Road. These aren’t the organization’s first attempts to increase awareness of underage drinking. They also promote “Project Sticker Shock,” which places warning stickers on packages of See DRINK, Page A2

FORT WRIGHT — Trailblazers rarely worry about recognition. They just follow their dreams and do what they think is right. Lytle Thomas was recognized for his community service efforts March 15 with a Trailblazer Award from the Boy Scouts of America’s Dan Beard Council. The Fort Wright resident is president and chief executive officer of Heritage Bank. He founded the Sporting Clays Charity Cup, combining passions for the shooting Thomas sport and local volunteer work. This charity has contributed more than $500,000 to local charities . Thomas is board chair-elect of Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce and serves as board treasurer for Leadership Kentucky and board chair for Junior Achievement of Kentucky, Ohio and Indiana. “This recognition is deeply meaningful to me,” said Thomas. “My involvement in the Scouts as a young person helped to shape my character and values. I hope to pass that same opportunity onto the young people in our community. The future community leaders we hope to have would do well to carry the values of the Scouts.”

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NEWS

A2 • COMMUNITY RECORDER • APRIL 19, 2012

Recovery Ky. helping end addictions

Drink

Lcunningham@nky.com

beer and wine coolers. The bright orange stickers warn “Providing alcohol to minors is illegal. Fines up to $500 and/or up to one year in jail.” Nafus said volunteers placed the stickers on packages in around a dozen stores in 2008, and the number of participating businesses grew to 90 in 2011. She counts two different ways the program has been effective. First, she said she’s seen a decrease in youth-reported alcohol use among high school seniors. Also, several store owners are applying the stickers themselves. Nafus said she’s always looking for volunteers. For more information, call 859-7602051.

By Libby Cunningham

Irony danced in Teresa Smith’s veins along with her addictions. She moonlighted as a drug dealer while working in Frankfort for the Kentucky Department of Corrections and spent her off hours selling and snorting cocaine. Falling into addiction at a young age, an injury made her dependency bloom, until she found herself at work, but no longer behind the scenes. “The Parole Board,” she remembers. “I was going in front of them.” Caught. But a statewide initiative saved Smith from be-

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ing hopeless. Smith’s not alone, and Jane Beshear, Kentucky’s first lady, knows that. She’s a proponent of Recovery Kentucky, a substance abuse program that has seen a 75 percent success rate since its inception in 2008. The University of Kentucky studied the substance abuse treatments from 2009 to 2010 and released a report on the program. “It verifies that this program is working,” Beshear said of the numbers produced by the University of Kentucky Center on Drug and Alcohol Research. Recovery Kentucky helps the addicted by providing peer-guided treat-

Remodel Continued from Page A1

purchasing/policy code and recommend changes in policies or procedures. Sewell said she doesn’t plan to change her mind about authorizing payment of outstanding bills for the disputed renovations until county officials clarify the county’s policy on purchases and make it more detailed. She said that Arlinghaus withdrew money out of accounts that

Bobby Schabell sits with David Waters, director of the Grateful Life Center in Erlanger, on March 29. Schabell's made the commitment to stay sober and discusses his strengths and struggles. LIBBY CUNNINGHAM/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

ment in residential facilities. Northern Kentucky has two centers, Brighton Center in Florence and The Grateful Life Center in Er-

langer. The report, released on March 27, follows 206 Kentuckians enrolled in Recovery Kentucky. It shows it’s saving tax-

were not intended for remodeling offices, claims the judge-executive has denied. “As I said earlier, ‘Why not pay the bills and then clean up these procedures and avoid all this legal stuff?’ ’’ Draud asked. On another issue, Sewell asked why reimbursement of her travel expenses for a March trip to the annual conference of the National Association of Counties had not yet been included on claims presented to Fiscal Court. Sewell is seeking $659.58

for reimbursement of her hotel room, food and other expenses, and Knochelmann is seeking reimbursement of $605.01 for the trip, which is part education and networking for county officials. Sewell later said: “What bothers me is that this is sort of a quid pro quo. I’m not going to pay your bill, if you’re not going to pay mine.” Before the meeting ended, Arlinghaus had three directors of county departments come before Fiscal Court and present expenditures for unexpected purchases totaling

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Continued from Page A1

COMMUNITY RECORDER

Find news and information from your community on the Web Kenton County • nky.com/kentoncounty

News

Nancy Daly Senior Editor ......................578-1059, ndaly@nky.com Libby Cunningham Reporter .................578-1056, lcunningham@nky.com Amy Scalf Reporter ............................578-1055, ascalf@nky.com Melanie Laughman Sports Editor ............513-248-7573, mlaughman@nky.com James Weber Sports Reporter ................578-1054, weber@nky.com

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NEWS

A4 • COMMUNITY RECORDER • APRIL 19, 2012

Carnegie grant to help promote brand

People Working Cooperatively in need of donations, volunteers By Libby Cunningham It’s hard to build a home with missing resources. Those with People Working Cooperatively, a nonprofit organization that provides housing modifications to low-income seniors, know this. Right now 22 residents are on a waiting list for home repairs in Northern Kentucky. More than 200 seniors in the Tristate are in the same position. “The waiting list is growing,” said president Jock Pitts. “It’s a service people are desperate to have. If you can’t get in or out of your home, steps, carry your things up or down stairs. We literally find people that for years have not been out of their homes.” PWC has three main areas of service, in home modifications, emergency repairs and energy conservation with weatherization programs. In Kenton County there are 10 people on the waiting list, seven hoping for ramp installation and three waiting for modifications. In Campbell, there are nine waiting, six requesting ramps and three asking for modifications. Boone has three requests, all for ramps.

Katie Brass and Scott Lucas stand on stage at The Carnegie. A grant from Interbrand will provide resources to help market the performing arts venue. LIBBY CUNNINGHAM/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

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mote,” Brass explained. “... It needed something a little bit more, so that people who come to the theater know what we do in the education center, know we provide arts education for the 89 percent of people at or below the poverty level.” Interbrand will likely be able to help with that. “How do we communicate The Carnegie collectively, so they don’t just think of the art gallery, don’t just think of the education center,” Brass said. “(They think of) the largest arts organization in North-

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COVINGTON — Upon meeting company directors it seems as if The Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center and Interbrand have always been in a partnership. Katie Brass, executive director of Covington’s arts venue, and Scott Lucas, director of Interbrand’s Cincinnati location, seem like old friends as they sit on the Carnegie’s stage, which is decorated like a diner for an upcoming production. Their meeting is not any accident though. Interbrand has given the Carnegie a $45,000 grant and the resources will be used to develop new branding. “It’s really scary, because it’s a very vulnerable experience,” Brass said. “You’re giving somebody your organization and telling them to come back with something.” Interbrand does consulting for companies such as Kroger and Procter & Gamble and chose to donate to the Carnegie thanks to a partnership with ArtsWave. ArtsWave is Greater Cincinnati’s fine arts fund that provides resources to artistic programming. The venue offers an art gallery, a theater and education in the arts. Interbrand will find a way to brand the facility highlighting each aspect. “We needed to hire someone to help us pro-

People Working Cooperatively employee Elliot Mayhon builds a ramp. Currently the group, which provides free housing modifications and weatherization services to low-income seniors, has a waiting list of more than 200 people. THANKS TO KIM

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SCHOOLS

APRIL 19, 2012 • COMMUNITY RECORDER • A5

COMMUNITY

RECORDER

Editor: Nancy Daly, ndaly@nky.com, 578-1059

ACHIEVEMENTS | NEWS | ACTIVITIES | HONORS

CommunityPress.com

Notre Dame writers honored Community Recorder

Notre Dame Academy students Szofia Komaromy-Hiller, Megan Beischel and Katie Gatti have received national recognition in the Scholastic Art and Writing Award 2012 competition for their creative writing pieces. Szofia, a sophomore, won a National Gold Medal and Best in Grade for her original work entitled, “In That Case, I’ll Stick to Politics;” a humorous essay written in an epistolary (letter) format, profiling Thomas Jefferson’s futile attempts to submit the Declaration of Independence to the Scholastic Art and Writing Awards for contest consideration. Notre Dame Academy juniors Megan Beischel and Katie Gatti both received National Silver

From left are Katie Gatti, Megan Beischel and Szofia Komaromy-Hiller. THANKS TO ANNA HEHMAN

Medals for their pieces in the poetry category. Beischel’s piece was titled “I Am/Learning,” while Gatti won with a piece called “The Mirror, The Ride, Framed

and Fallen.” “We are so proud of Szofia, Megan and Katie for having demonstrated their mastery of creative writing and spotlighting the

talent we try hard to hone in our students at Notre Dame,” said Notre Dame Academy English teacher Linda Bricking. The winning students are invited to receive their awards at a ceremony at Carnegie Hall in New York in June. The Scholastic Art and Writing Awards competition is the largest, longest-running and most prestigious scholarship and recognition program for teen writers Such notables as Robert Redford, Sylvia Plath, Truman Capote and Joyce Carol Oates were once winners of this contest. Notre Dame Academy, Northern Kentucky’s only all-girl Catholic college preparatory high school, boasts three of the six regional Scholastic winners who went on to win in the national competition.

Woodland forensics team nabs 1st Community Recorder

Woodland Middle School Forensics team came in first place overall in the small school division at the Kentucky Education and Speech and Drama Association (KESDA) competition March 4-5. The team, coached by Jonna Parsons, scored a record high 133 points with only 18 entries and 12 team members. The designation for small school is 20 or less entries in the competition. Eighth-grader Alexandra “Alex” Johnston placed first in the storytelling category and is in the running for the state championship at KHSSL for the second year in a row. She won last year at regional and state. Her story is “A Fractured Fairy Tale” by A.J. Jacobs from “The Adventures of Rocky & Bullwinkle Show 19591961.” The Woodland team took fourth place in team efficiency and eighth place overall. KESDA individual highlights: Top novice - Taylor Goetz in prose. Quarter finalist - Trey Burns in

The Woodland Middle School Forensics team came in first place overall in the small school division at the Kentucky Education and Speech and Drama Association (KESDA) competition March 4-5. The team, coached by Jonna Parsons, scored a record high 133 points with only 18 entries and 12 team members. Pictured, form left, are Lindsay Allen, Maddie Berberich, Trey Burns, Madison Faselt, Declan Glynn, Erin Glynn, Taylor Goetz, Ty Grubb, Alex Johnston, Mallory Mitchell, Caitlin Moore, Stuart Nicholas, Brianna Parsons and Lizzie Rinken. THANKS TO TERESA WILKINS

prose. Semifinalists - Mallory Mitchell, interpretation of literature and poetry; and Lizzie Rinken, inter-

pretation of literature. Finalists - Mallory Mitchell and Lizzie Rinken, sixth in improvisation pairs; Trey Burns and Lindsay

Allen, third in improvisation pairs; and Alex Johnston, sixth in impromptu speaking and first in the state for storytelling.

The Academic Team at St. Joseph School Elementary in Crescent Springs won regionals and came in second overall at the district competition in the Governor's Cup. Pictured are members Luke Eisner, Jonah Fessler, Amelia Coomes, Nick Gettelfinger, Peter Roesel, Zoe Moellering, Sam Strange, Onali Fernanco, Haley Planicka, Isabel Coomes, Whitney Campbell, Annalese Cahill, Harrison Farrar, Patrick Thelen, Bella Howard and Natalie Pope. THANKS TO JILL CAHILL

Addison Bosley explains orinteering, his sport of choice, to his peers and their parents. He was recognized for competing in the Tristate Regional Orienteering League at the April Erlanger-Elsmere Schools meeting. He traveled to Georgia the day after to compete in the sport where he uses navigational skills. The 14-year-old from Florence often competes against older athletes due to his skill. LIBBY CUNNINGHAM/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

COLLEGE CORNER Western Kentucky University senior David Thomas, an accounting major from Edgewood, was awarded a Beta Gamma Sigma (BGS) Scholarship at the BGS spring banquet.

Community Recorder The Beechwood High School Drama Department will present the musical “The Sound of Plaid” April 19-22. The musical will showcase students in grades 7-12 on stage and behind the scenes. “The Sound of Plaid” is the high school version of the Broadway hit “Forever Plaid” and will feature hit songs from the ‘50s and ‘60s. Show times are 7 p.m. Thursday through Saturday, April 19-21, and 2 p.m. Sunday, April 22. Student and senior tickets are $8; $10 for adult. Tickets can be purchased in the high school office or by calling 859-331-1220.

Notre Dame students advance Community Recorder

STUDENT DEMONSTRATES ORIENTEERING

Thomas awarded honor society scholarship

Beechwood to present ‘The Sound of Plaid’

Thomas was a 2012 BSG inductee. Beta Gamma Sigma is an international business honor society reserved for the top students in business colleges that are accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business.

St. Joe academic team wins regionals Community Recorder The Academic Team at St. Joseph School Elementary in Crescent Springs won regionals and came in second overall at the district competition in the Governor’s Cup. The Quick Recall Team placed first at districts and regionals. The Future Problem Solving Team, composed of Annalese Cahill, Isabel Coomes, Jonah Fessler and Zoe Moellering, placed second at regionals. The following students were

awarded medals for their performance at regionals: Math: Onali Fernando, fourth. Science: Whitney Campbell, first. Language Arts: Whitney Campbell, first; Nick Gettelfinger, second; and Isabel Coomes, fourth. Arts and Humanities: Sam Strange, first at regionals and first in the state scores. The team is composed of students in third-fifth grades and is led by coaches Andy and Melissa Strange.

More than 40 Notre Dame Academy students placed in the top five at the Kentucky Junior Historical Society 2012 Kentucky History Day District 6 contest at Northern Kentucky University on March 24. All finishers will advance to state competition on Saturday, April 28, in Frankfort. Senior paper - Katie Whitehouse, “Tennis Court Oath,” second; Abigail Wittmer, “Treaty of Versailles,” third; and Ansley Sheridan, “German Revolution of 1918,” fourth place tie. Senior individual website - Paige Drees, “Coca-Cola Reform,” second; and Peri Crush, “Independence by Salt,” third. Senior group website - Alli Darpel, Abby Roebker, Maddie Rose, Molly Mayer and Ellie Fathman, “Germ Theory: Revolution in Medicine,” first; and Megan Sullivan, Tessa Farrar and Maddie Tierney, “The Revolution of Contemporary Art,” second. Senior individual exhibit Kassandra Neltner, “The Cube of Influence,” first. Senior group exhibit Amanda Macke and Maggie Flanagan, “Fashion Flip: Fussy to Flirty,” first; Abigail Martin, Laura Finke and Marie Schaefer, “The Polish Worker’s Revolution,” second; Alli Sweitzer, Ana Calvopiña, Emma Jacobs and Bridget Stewart, “The Green Revolution,” third; Hayley Zeis, Lily Weber and Sydney Lenhof, “A Doll’s House by Henrik Ibsen,” fourth; and Stephanie Hacker and Maggie McLeod, “Cosmic Conflicts: Universal Views,” fifth. Senior group documentary - Caroline Miller, Lexie Steigerwald and Savannah Hemmer, “Pablo Picasso: Revolution in Art,” first; Jessica Vogt, Erin Nurre, Caroline Krumme, Sara Borchers and Emily Bauttista, “The Invention of the Jet Engine: A Revolution in the World of Aviation,” second; and Moriah Frommeyer, Sarah Gregory, Ashley Donovan, Anna Bradtmueller and Jane Rudnik, “The Eradication of Smallpox,” third.


SPORTS

A6 • COMMUNITY RECORDER • APRIL 19, 2012

Editor: Melanie Laughman, mlaughman@communitypress.com, 513-248-7573

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | RECREATIONAL

By James Weber ERLANGER When Riley Cantrall started playing for the softball team at St. Henry District High School, the team won three games all season. After sticking with it through the tough times, Cantrall is not only enjoying a team that wins a lot more often, but she gets to enjoy days like April 12, when the senior celebrated her 18th birthday by helping the Crusaders beat Beechwood 14-1 at home. Cantrall’s teammates sung Happy Birthday to her after they enjoyed their sixth win against two defeats in the early season. “I love it. It’s a good day,” Cantrall said. “I’ve been in a hitting slump but I finally had a good game offensively and defensively.” Cantrall started with the Crusaders during her seventh-grade year in 2007, when the team went 3-24. Since then, the Crusaders have racked up the wins during the head coaching tenure of Kyla Brady, who is in her fourth season. They won the All “A” Ninth Region in 2010, and have been on the

cusp of contention in the postseason regional. Each of the last two seasons, the Crusaders’ season has ended against Conner in an extra-inning defeat in the regional semis. “We have come miles and miles,” Cantrall said. “I think we’ll have a great season. Playing Conner in the semifinals the past two years and losing in extra innings was rough. To be able to pull it out this year would be awesome.” Cantrall credits her 2012 classmates who eventually joined her on the varsity level, including Jill Bauer, Allysa Brady, Sami Ives, Abbey Kirkwood and Mamee Salzer. Salzer and junior Noelle Butts have anchored the mound together for the past four years. Salzer, the No. 1, is 2-2 with a 1.50 ERA so far, having lost to Conner and Grant County. Butts is 4-0, 1.40. “We’re very lucky,” Brady said. “Most teams don’t have one really high quality pitcher and we’re lucky to have both Mamee and Noelle. They’re different kind of pitchers. Mamee is overpowering and Noelle’s ball has a lot of movement although Mamee’s has movement, too. They’re different in their approach so that

PRESS PREPS HIGHLIGHTS By James Weber jweber@nky.com

Baseball

St. Henry junior Noelle Butts pitches to Beechwood. St. Henry beat Beechwood 14-1 in softball April 12 at St. Henry District High School. JAMES WEBER/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

when we play a team that sees them both it keeps them off balance.” Freshman Jordan Kramer, who is battling a knee injury, is the third pitcher. The Crusaders have five eighth-graders who will start building for the future. “We’ll have a young team next year but our veterans will help them mature,” Cantrall said. “I love this team. They’re hysterical and always very funny.” St. Henry lost 5-3 to Conner April 6 and will have several upcoming games against regional powers soon. “I’m glad we had that game

early in the season,” Brady said. “I told them it would let us see where we’re at and what we have to work on. Overall, they’re coming around and the bats are finally starting to get going.” Of the most urgency is the All “A” regional, in which St. Henry was set to start play April 16. That follows a weekend tournament in Frankfort which should prepare the Crusaders for future tourneys. “It allows you to move people around a little bit,” Brady said. “We’re seeing different pitchers, different types of teams, teams with speed or good power hitting.”

Focus leads Dixie track to county meet win By James Weber jweber@nky.com

EDGEWOOD — The girls track and field team at Dixie Heights High School has a lot of depth. But the Colonels also have focus, which helped them to a big win April 10. Dixie won the Kenton County championships April 10 at its home track, completing a boy/ girl sweep of the team titles. Dixie edged Simon Kenton by a single point in the girls competition and the boys team beat SK by 11 points. “Like I told the girls, it showed a team effort,” said Dixie girls head coach Ed Cook. “Everyone did their job. They focused on the event they were in at the time, they didn’t worry about the event they had after that. I told them everything else will take care of itself. You never know if you need that one point.” The county meet featured the three schools in the Kenton school district - Dixie, SK and Scott. Each school could enter as many athletes in each event as it wanted but only two of them could score points. Dixie’s depth helped as the Colonels won seven of the 18 events on the girls side, with SK taking nine titles. Chelsea Perdue won the 100 meters in 12.76 seconds and anchored the 4x100 and 4x400 relays that won. Brittney Turner was on the 4x100 that won and also claimed the 100 hurdles. Anna Ochs was on all three victorious relays including the 4x800. Molly Diamon won the shot put and Ella Edgett, the pole vault. Margo McGehee was on two of the relays. Mary Conti, Courtney Hutchison and Ally Tekulve were

each on one. Jenna Hoffman (sprints and hurdles) and Lindsey Cook (pole vault) are two of the top seniors on the team. “That is our biggest area of strength: The sprinters and middle distance,” Cook said. “Our conditioning is getting better and we have a young but solid team.” The Dixie boys team won six events. Max McGehee won the 1,600 and 3,200. Trey Simmons won the 200 and was part of the victorious 4x100 relay. Charley Cornett won the shot put. The 4x400 also took victory. SK won seven events in the boys meet. Brent Russell claimed both hurdles events to lead the way. Trevor Keene won the 400 and was part of the victorious 4x200 relay. Austin Kelly won the triple jump and Hunter Ramos the pole vault. The Pioneers also won the 4x800. The girls won nine events with three Pioneers winning two solo events and teaming up to win the 4x200 relay. Mackenzie Hester won the 800 and1,600. Christina Cook claimed the 200 and 400, and Kelsey Baker won the long jump and triple jump. Those three ran with Taylor Cole to win the 4x200. Katrina Hellmann won the 3,200 and Alexis Haggard the high jump. Scott won five boys events and two girls events. Jake Groeschen broke a 25-year old school record in the discus (141-11) to lead the way. Also enjoying wins were Matt Johnson, Jeremy Jackson, Sam Green, Colin Myers, Vivian Sowder and Brooke Kitinic. The next major meet for the three district rivals is the Northern Kentucky Athletic Conference big-school championships April 24 at Scott. “Conference is another true

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CommunityPress.com

Senior class lifts St. Henry softball jweber@nky.com

COMMUNITY

» Cov Cath beat NewCath 6-2 and Letcher County Central 10-0 April 10. A.J. Schreiver had three hits and six RBI against Letcher. Tommy Arnzen and Charlie Mader got the wins. Cov Cath is 12-1 through April 13 after beating Ryle 6-0. Brian Fagel pitched a complete-game shutout. » Dixie beat VMA 5-0 April 10 in a 34th District seeding game. Ryan Sexton got the win. Seth Caple had his second homer of the year. » Holy Cross beat Beechwood 8-3 April 9. Blake Tiberi, Kyle Fuller, Justin Kohake and Jeff Guidugli all had three hits. HC beat Highlands 6-0 April 11 with Joe Woeste getting the win. HC is 9-3 after beating Newport 8-0 April 13. Jake Burger improved to 2-0 o the mound and Kyle Fuller drove in three runs. » Lloyd beat Beechwood 5-2 April 10. Addison Brown got the win. Tyler Beschman drove in three. » Scott beat Cooper 6-2 April 9. Josh Castleman had a home run. Scott beat Campbell County 4-2 April 11 in a 37th District seeding game. Ray Everett got the win to improve to 3-0. » St. Henry beat VMA 9-2 April 9. Mitchell Kuebbing had three hits.

Softball

» Dixie Heights beat Holy Cross 12-2 April 10 and Mason County April 12. » Notre Dame beat Reading 4-1 April 13. Bridget Stewart got the win as NDA improved to 6-3. » Lloyd beat Beechwood 7-3 April 10. Staci Stewart got the win and three hits. » St. Henry beat Holmes 11-0. Noelle Butts struck out 13 in five innings to go 3-0. Sami Ives had a homer and four RBI.

Boys tennis

Ally Tekulve, front, and Courtney Hutchison of Dixie Heights run the 1,600 at the Kenton County track and field championships April 11 at Dixie Heights. JAMES WEBER/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER test of a team,” Cook said. “It will take a team effort because everything is relays and the field events are two people. When it’s your turn in the box, just go for it.”

Team scores

Girls: Dixie Heights 75, Simon Kenton 74, Scott 35. Boys: Dixie 70, SK 59, Scott 57. Dixie boys 4x100 (47.10): Alex Furman, Trey Simmons, Jake Easterling, Miles Payne. 4x400 (3:41.24), Austin Althaver, Jacob Hartman, Miles Payne, Jackson Stanek. Trey Simmons: 200 (24.14). Max McGehee: 1,600 (4:41.04), 3,200 (10:10.84). Charlie Cornett: Shot put (37-5). Dixie girls

4x100 (53.62): Brittney Turner, Anna Ochs, Rachel Wilson, Chelsea Perdue. 4x400 (4:27.64): Anna Ochs, Mary Conti, Margo McGehee, Chelsea Perdue. 4x800 (11:00.12): Ally Tekulve, Margo McGehee, Courtney Hutchison, Anna Ochs. Brittney Turner: 100 hurdles (17.29). Chelsea Perdue: 100 (12.76). Molly Diamon: Shot put (30-6). Ella Edgett: Pole vault (7-6). Scott boys Matt Johnson: 100 (11.67). Jeremy Jackson: 800 (2:11.44). Jake Groeschen: Discus (14111). Sam Green: Long jump (179.5). Colin Myers: High jump (5-2). Scott girls Vivian Sowder: 300 hurdles (52.84). Brooke Kitinic: Discus (78-9).

» Beechwood beat Cooper 4-1April 9. Richardson and Burns won in singles, Barry/ Richardson and Miniard/Yokokura in doubles. » Calvary beat Scott 3-2 April 10. Ham and Garbig won in singles for Calvary, and Main/Woughter in doubles. Scott winners were Burke and Fox/Henry. Calvary won 5-0 over Lloyd April 9. » Dixie Heights beat Conner 3-2 April 10. Dixie winners were Middendorf, Boyd/Schoettker and Jackson/Feltner.

Girls tennis

» Beechwood beat Cooper 3-2 April 10. Melville, Pawsat/Pawsat and Wessel/Bushey won for the Tigers. » Dixie Heights beat Boone 3-2 April 9. Dixie winners were Warden and Petty in singles, Nowland/Graves in doubles. » Scott beat Simon Kenton 4-1 April 10 to improve to 5-1. Scott swept singles with Manning, Hillmann and Flynn. Sparks/Bishop won in doubles.

Boys basketball

» Dixie Heights sophomore Brandon Hatton was named second team all-state by the Associated Press, the Louisville Courier-Journal and Lexington Herald-Leader.


SPORTS & RECREATION

APRIL 19, 2012 • COMMUNITY RECORDER • A7

Covington Catholic Hall welcomes 5

Boone County High School senior Brad Hightchew of Erlanger assisted in an instructional video with Kelly Kulick, top professional female bowler, filmed at Crossgate Lanes in Blue Ash, Ohio, March 21. Hightchew carried a 221 high school average in the winter and recently bowled a perfect 300 game. THANKS TO TERRENCE HUGE

Erlanger bowler assists pro with video Kelly Kulick, the world’s top professional female bowler, teamed up with Boone County High School senior Brad Hightchew at Crossgate Lanes in Blue Ash to create a new training film. Hightchew helped demonstrate the proper techniques she described in the film. Hightchew was chosen because,

“he’s already an experienced and talented bowler,” explained his father, Bruce. “Brad carried a 221 high school average this winter and recently bowled a perfect 300 game.” Brad and his Rebel teammates bowled the following weekend in the Kentucky state tournament.

Boone County High School senior Brad Hightchew of Erlanger assisted in an instructional video filmed at Crossgate Lanes in Blue Ash, Ohio.

The Covington Catholic High School Athletic Hall of Fame inducted four alumni and one coach Jan. 24. Tim VanSant, 1974: VanSant was a four-year varsity letterman in swimming. During his sophomore year, he won an individual state championship in the 100-yard breast stroke and was on a winning relay team. As a senior, he won the 100-yard back stroke in the state meet while leading the team to a state title. Dave Legeay, 1988: Legeay was a three-year varsity letterman in football on teams that combined for a 30-6 record. As a two-way starter in his senior year, he caught 33 passes and scored seven touchdowns from his tight end position, and was a major force on defense. He was on the 1987 team that compiled a 14-1 record and won the first football state championship for Cov Cath. Legeay was selected to numerous all-state teams, most notably first-team all-state by the CourierJournal and second-team all-state by the Associated Press. He earned two varsity letters in basketball. Tom Beechem, 1999: Beechem played both baseball and football. He

Covington Catholic High School alums Dave Legeay, Tim VanSant, Tom Beechem and Kurt Kreyling, and alumni and coach Pat Anneken were inducted into the school's Athletic Hall of Fame Jan. 24. THANKS TO MARY ELLEN MITCHELL was a three-year varsity letterman in football. He was a starting safety on the 1997 state championship team, setting a school record for most interceptions in a season, nine. As a senior, he was named to numerous all-star teams including Northern Kentucky's. He was Top 24, which led to his selection as the recipient of the prestigious “That’s My Boy” award. In baseball, Beechem was a two-year starter in center field where he led the team to a regional championship his junior year and was named MVP of the tournament. In his senior year, he became the first Colonel to hit over .500 for a season. His ca-

reer offensive statistics place him in the top 10 in five categories: batting average, .432; runs scored, 108; doubles, 25: stolen bases, 44; and bases on balls, 59. Kurt Kreyling, 1999: Kreyling was a four-year varsity letterman as a goalkeeper on the soccer team from 1995-98. In his junior and senior seasons Cov Cath won back-to-back regional titles, and finished as state runner-up in 1998. During his senior year, he received numerous accolades, including all-region and all-state. In addition to soccer, Kreyling set school records in both the triple jump and high jump on the track team. As a senior, he

won the individual state championship in the high jump and was fourth in the triple jump. He was selected to both the all-region and all-state teams. Pat Anneken, 1985: Anneken ran cross country his junior and senior year and was a member of the 1984 state runner-up team. In 1989, he returned to Covington Catholic to assist Coach Jack Kaelin. For the next 13 seasons, he served in that role and in 2001 became head coach. He held that position through the 2010 season. During those 22 years, the Cov Cath cross country teams won seven regional titles, a state title, and were state runner-ups twice.

BEITLER GOES TO NATIONALS

THANKS TO TERRENCE HUGE

SIDELINES Special Olympics » Bocce Ball will be April and May at Boone Woods Park in Burlington. Call Debbie Wagner at 859-491-7179. » Softball will be May through September with registration due May 1. Contact Mark Staggs at staggsm@fuse.net or 859525-7705, or John Foppe at 859-743-1371. Joe Walter Celebrity Golf Tournament The 12th annual Joe Walter Celebrity Golf Tournament will be Friday, May 11, at The Golf Courses of Kenton County. Proceeds benefit the Special Olympics of Northern Kentucky. Cost is $125-$250 depending on the course. There will be games, split the pot, raffles, a live auction, lunch at the turn and refreshments on the course. A celebrity tailgate party will be 7 p.m. Thursday, May 10, at Barleycorn's in Florence. Event will include appetizers, cash bar and silent auction. Visit www.sonky.org or email drutterer@insightbb.com. OPT Golf Outing The Omega Phi Tau Sorority, a philanthropic group that raises money for local charities, will

host a golf outing at 12:30 p.m. May 19 at the Kenton County Pioneer Golf Course in Independence. The outing is a fourperson, shotgun start 18hole scramble. The cost is $65 and includes golf, cart, refreshments, appetizers, dinner, door prizes and specialty hole prizes. All proceeds from the outing will go to local charities, including the Grateful Life Foundation and Peggy Foster Memorial Fund. To reserve a spot, call Martha at 859-331-4233 or Amy at 859-620-4446. Adult baseball league Accepting new teams and players (age 18 and older) for summer season starting in May. Visit www.NKABL.com. Town & Country camps Town & Country Sports & Health Club in Wilder will offer summer camp programming for children ages 3–12. Camps include full and half-day Adventure Camps, Tiny Tots Adventure Camp, and a variety of sports camps, including Kings Soccer Academy, volleyball, Kings Basketball Academy and karate. Camps start the week of June 4. To register online, visit www.towncountrysports.com or call 859-4425800.

The Pittsburgh Penguins Elite Girls U12 ice hockey team won the USA Hockey Mid American District Championship on March 4 in Pittsburgh. Beechwood seventh-grader Madelyn Beitler of Fort Mitchell plays center for the team. The Penguins move on to the USA Hockey National Girls Championship March 28 - April 1 in Boston. MyHockeyRankings.com currently ranks the Penguins No. 11 in the country for U12. Madelyn Beitler is third from left in the middle row next to the banner. THANKS TO BILL BEITLER

LLOYD’S DUNCAN SIGNS WITH NKU

Lloyd Memorial High School senior Torey Duncan (front row, center) will run track and cross country for soon-to-be Division I Northern Kentucky University. She plans to major in biology and work for a zoo. She is with (seated) parents, Kevin and Lisa; teammate, Matt Lemox; and sister, Sarah Duncan. Standing, from left, are coaches Erin Pifer, Greg Duty and Danielle Dierig. JAMES WEBER/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER


VIEWPOINTS A8 • COMMUNITY RECORDER • APRIL 19, 2012

COMMUNITY

RECORDER

Editor: Nancy Daly, ndaly@nky.com, 578-1059

EDITORIALS | LETTERS | COLUMNS | CH@TROOM

CommunityPress.com

SWAT team shares skills, smiles Dynamic entry: That’s what they call it when a SWAT Team bursts through a closed door, yelling with raised riot shields and drawn weapons to complete a mission. For the Independence Citizen’s Police Amy Academy class, Scalf it’s downright scary. But, the REPORTER’S NOTEBOOK SWAT Team’s mission was accomplished without loss of life or even a soiled chair. Kenton County’s SWAT Team, made up of police officers from departments throughout the county and led by Commander Eric Nelson, cheerfully answered questions, demonstrated techniques and also let the class members try on their equipment. In order to qualify for the team, members must submit a

resume, undergo a psychological exam, pass an interview board, ace a firearms test and complete a variety of physical training standards, which include running a mile in less than 12 minutes while wearing approximately 50 pounds of gear. They train for 10 hours a month, and the forward observer team (better known as snipers) complete an additional four hours of marksmanship training each month. Most of the team members don’t get additional pay for this training time but the majority of these guys smiled the entire time they talked about their work to our class. “It’s fun, to be honest. I love it,” said Nelson. They made our sixth class fun, too. Amy Scalf is a South Kenton Recorder reporter who will participate in the Independence Citizen’s Police Academy and write about her experiences each week. She does not live in Independence.

Members of the Kenton County SWAT Team, including Independence Police's Capt. John Lonaker and Lt. Col. Dave Nichols, Ludlow Police Department's Bart Beck and Commander Eric Nelson, demonstrated techniques and answered questions during the Independence Citizen's Police Academy April 10. AMY SCALF/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

U.S. must adopt responsible budget

House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan put it best: “This coming debt crisis is the most predictable crisis we’ve ever had.” We have a choice of two directions for our country: we can adopt a responsible budget that preserves our future or continue to spend ourselves into a Greek-style disaster. In the House, Republicans for the second straight year passed a long-term, fact-based budget plan that addresses our debt burden. Chairman Ryan’s budget, “The Path to Prosperity,” grabs control of our deficits now and reins in exploding health care costs – all without raising taxes. The president is constantly in search of a “fair” solution, and we have one with this blueprint. The Path to Prosperity treats our debt burden as the spending problem it is instead of an excuse to raise more revenue from job creators. With four straight years of trillion-dollar deficits

and a total debt in excess of $15 trillion, Washington has spent well beyond its means for far too long. The House RepubGeoff lican plan cuts Davis spending by COMMUNITY over $5 trillion RECORDER GUEST COLUMNIST relative to the president’s budget, and it does so in a responsible manner that protects seniors. This proposal does not alter Medicare for current beneficiaries or those nearing retirement. In addition, it gives future retirees the flexibility to choose the plan that best fits their needs or to stick with the traditional Medicare plan, and it does so without bankrupting the system. By ensuring that Medicare is on a more sustainable path, we can preserve and strengthen the

YOUR REPRESENTATIVES U.S. Senators Mitch McConnell Washington, D.C., phone: 202-2242541 Local phone: 859-578-0188 Website: http://mcconnell. asenate.gov. Rand Paul Washington, D.C., phone: 202-2244343 Local phone: 859-426-0165 Website: http://paul.senate.gov

U.S. House Geoff Davis, Fourth District Washington, D.C., phone: 202-2253465

Local phone: 859-426-0080 Website: geoffdavis.house.gov Email: Though website http://geoffdavis.house. gov/Contact/

State Representatives Alecia Webb-Edgington, District 63 Frankfort phone: 502-564-8100 Ext. 701 Local phone: 859-426-7322 Website: www.lrc.ky.gov/legislator/ h063.htm Email: alecia.webb-edgington@lrc.ky.gov

We welcome your comments on editorials, columns, stories or other topics important to you in the Recorder. Include your name, address and phone number(s) so we may verify your letter. Letters of 200 or fewer words and columns of 500 or fewer words have the best chance of being published. All submissions may be edited for length, accuracy and clarity. Deadline: Noon Monday E-mail: kynews@communitypress.com Fax: 859-283-7285 U.S. mail: See box below Letters, columns and articles submitted to the Recorder may be published or distributed in print, electronic or other forms.

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A publication of

and the Senate are on a different page. The president’s blueprint, which imposes $2 trillion in tax increases and adds $11 trillion to our debt, falls woefully short of addressing our fiscal or economic challenges. The president’s budget has not received a single “yes” vote in Congress. While the president’s budget proposal is impractical and unpopular, the Senate Democrats have not even bothered to offer one. They have not passed a budget in over 1,000 days. By the year 2037, the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office projects that the U.S. economy will collapse – if we fail to adopt a solution to our fiscal challenges. Given the options before the Congress, the question of which budget is our best choice is clear: The Path to Prosperity. U.S. Rep. Geoff Davis, R-Hebron, is a member of the U.S. House of Representatives.

WHEN THEY MEET Kenton Fiscal Court

Meetings: Second Tuesday at 9 a.m. at Independence Court House, 5272 Madison Pike Meetings: Fourth Tuesday at 9 a.m. at Kenton County Courthouse, 303 Court St., Covington Address: 303 Court St., Covington Phone: 859-392-1400 Judge-executive Steve Arlinghaus Commissioner Beth Sewell, First District Commissioner Jon Draud, Second District Commissioner Kris Knochelmann, Third District http://www.kenton county.org

Crescent Springs City Council

ABOUT LETTERS AND COLUMNS

COMMUNITY

system for current and future beneficiaries. The budget also proposes to strengthen our economy by enacting pro-growth tax reform. The Path to Prosperity simplifies the tax code and reduces rates for everyone. This plan moves from the current six individual tax brackets to two at rates of 10 and 25 percent. In addition, it reduces our corporate tax rate – currently the highest in the industrialized world – to a competitive 25 percent. In these times of financial strain and low growth, this tax reform proposal would get our economy moving again and keep more money in the pockets of hardworking Americans. The Path to Prosperity puts us on the road to a balanced budget, a growing economy, and a smaller, more manageable debt. These are the goals we need to achieve to position our nation for a stronger future. Unfortunately, the president

Meetings: Second Monday at 7 p.m. Address: 739 Buttermilk Pike Phone: 859-341-3017 Mayor: Jim Collett www.crescent-springs. ky.us/

Crestview Hills City Council

Meetings: Second Thursday at 7:30 p.m. Address: 50 Town Center Blvd. Phone: 859-341-7373 Mayor: Paul Meier http://www.crestview hills.com

Edgewood

Meetings: First and third Mondays at 6:30 p.m. Address: 385 Dudley Road Phone: 859-331-5910 Mayor: John Link http://www.edgewood ky.com/

Erlanger City Council

Meetings: First Tuesday at 7p.m. Address: 505 Commonwealth Ave. Phone: 859-727-2525 Mayor: Tom Rouse http://www.friendship city.com/

Election guest columns Candidates on the May 22 primary ballot are invited to write up to two guest columns in the Community Recorder prior to the primary. Guest columns are 500 words

or less. Please provide a color headshot. Columns should be emailed to ndaly@nky.com. The deadline for candidate guest columns is Friday, May 11.

228 Grandview Drive, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017 654 Highland Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075 phone: 283-0404 email: kynews@communitypress.com web site: www.nky.com

Blind group running marathon

This weekend the American Council of the Blind of Ohio, Greater Cincinnati Chapter, will participate in the Flying Pig Marathon for the third time. We started with 12 participants in 2010, had 18 in 2011, and now will have 40 in 2012. We will be walking the 5K, 10K, or half marathon, with our sighted guides and raising funds for our nonprofit organization as will over 100 other nonprofit organizations participating in the Flying Pig Marathon. All sponsorship donations go directly and completely to ACJoyce BOGCC as Rogers is the case COMMUNITY with any RECORDER GUEST COLUMNIST participating organization. If you want to sponsor us as Flying Pig walkers, please send donations to Joyce Asher, 620 Ridgestone Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45255. Make checks payable to ACBOGCC and indicate that the check is for a Flying Pig Marathon donation. The mission of ACBOGCC is to improve the quality and equality of life for people who are blind or visually impaired in the Greater Cincinnati area. We carry out our mission by promoting equal access to employment, transportation, cultural events and to all aspects of life for people who are blind or visually impaired. For example, a few years ago, we worked with Tim Perrino at the Covedale Theater to establish audio described plays. Also, our ACB Walkers group is just one of our many other activities that give people who are blind or visually impaired the opportunity to improve our lives by walking with guides on a regular basis for fun, fitness and friendship. If you want to join the ACB Walkers group, contact Joyce Rogers at jarogers@one.net or 513-9213186. We already have 20 walkers who are blind walking in the Flying Pig this year, and we have more than enough sighted guides to walk with them. The word has spread to friends everywhere. Ola, an 85-year-old woman who is visually impaired from Mason, Ohio, heard about ACBOGCC's participation in the Flying Pig, and she decided to join us. Jean, her volunteer sighted guide from Newport, has walked together several times with Ola as they train for the 5K. In fact, we had more volunteer guides this year than we could match with walkers who are blind or visually impaired as a result of so many caring people responding to our request for guides. Joyce Rogers lives in Covedale, Ohio.

Community Recorder Editor Nancy Daly ndaly@nky.com, 578-1059 Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday See page A2 for additional contact information.


THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

LIFE

COMMUNITY RECORDER

PEOPLE | IDEAS | RECIPES

Nancy Bridges of Lakeside Park, Ruth Smith of Villa Hills, Louise Feeny of Crestview Hills, Patti Hastings of Burlington and Joan Parness of Crestview Hills are members of the New Friends of Northern Kentucky. Bridges, Smith and Feeny first became members of the group, then known as the Welcome Wagon of Northern Kentucky, in 1970. STEPHANIE SALMONS/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

‘New Friends’ group is not just for newcomers

By Stephanie Salmons ssalmons@nky.com

They’re no longer new to the area, but Nancy Bridges of Lakeside Park, Louise Feeny of Crestview Hills and Ruth Smith of Villa Hills first became members of what was originally the Welcome Wagon of Northern Kentucky in 1970. "The three of us came here in ’70, and (the group) was already in existence then,” Feeny said. “Someone told me it happened about 10 years before we got here.” Known as the New Friends of Northern Kentucky since the 1980s, the organization has evolved over the years. "They found the Welcome

Wagon had restrictions on how long you could be a member,” current president Patti Hastings, of Burlington, said. Now a social group with a variety of activities available for members, the organization has branched out over the years and now donates to charities each year. The group now has about 170 members, Hastings said. It used to be for new residents but it’s now open to any resident anywhere in Northern Kentucky. “That’s what it’s graduated into, but originally when it was Welcome Wagon, it was strictly for new people that came into the area that didn’t have anybody (here),” Smith said. Most of the members now are

older with grown children “because most of the younger people are working today,” Bridges said. Their oldest member is 97 and “very active.” “Our big thing is to be social and also give back to the community because it does so much,” Hastings said. “We’re a philanthropic organization,” Smith said “But we didn’t start that way,” Bridges quickly follows. “But now we are and I like it because it’s good,” Smith finishes. Joan Parness of Crestview Hills moved to the area in 2007. Her daughter searched for activities online but couldn’t find anything for Parness to join before she eventually found out

about New Friends. When Parness called, she found out they played mahjong, a game that’s big in New York, where she was living before, and one she has been playing for 60 years. “I called and I joined and it has made my life complete,” Parness said. Now she also plays canasta and goes to the regular meetings. The group has also allowed her to make friends she never would have otherwise met, she said. That’s something Bridges noted as well. “I mean, people are coming in from all different walks of life and joining this organization because they’re moving from all over,” she said.

Smith said she likes the social activity “with people that are not always people who have lived in one place.” “I like people that move around and this group is a group of people that’s pretty diverse because we’ve lived in lots of places,” she said. As someone who’s relatively new to the area as well, Hastings said she’s now in about seven different groups because of the people she’s met through New Friends. “I didn’t know a soul when I got transferred here,” she said. “I feel like I’ve got some really lifelong friends.” For more information about joining and meeting dates, visit www.newfriendsnky.org.

BEST FRIENDS FOREVER

Friends still laugh together after almost 80 years By Amy Scalf ascalf@nky.com

CRESTVIEW HILLS — Delores Barnes and Norma Works spent so much time together as children that Norma was traumatized when Delores got to go to school and she couldn’t. That was 1935, and the two best friends now named Delores Ellzey and Norma Webster still spend time together whenever possible. Through 79 years of school years and marriages, children and grandchildren, the pair have shared baby clothes, part-time

jobs, heartfelt cards, family recipes and tropical vacations with each other. “My parents loved Norma like she was in our family, and her grandparents did the same for me,” said Ellzey, who now lives in Crestview Hills. Webster, who lives in Taylor Mill, said she liked going to her friend’s house to play. “We’d play dishes and we’d do the laundry. We had fun and we laughed,” she said. “We didn’t have phones. We just yelled back and forth.” “Our life was so simple then.

We had to improvise our own play, and you didn’t hear about drugs then. You didn’t hear about violence. We didn’t have the challenges that young people have today,” said Ellzey. Keeping those simple values in mind, values they also shared, helped keep these lifelong friends together. “They helped a lot of people stay together,” said Webster. And they’re still laughing. “Best Friends Forever” is an occasional feature in The Community Recorder.

Norma Webster and Delores Ellzey have been friends for almost 80 years. AMY SCALF/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER


B2 • COMMUNITY RECORDER • APRIL 19, 2012

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD FRIDAY, APRIL 20 Exhibits Our Rivers’ Fury: Past and Present Ohio Valley Floods, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., BehringerCrawford Museum, 1600 Montague Road, Taking special look at regional floods, including the flood of 1937, exhibit explores how floods changed landscape of Ohio River Valley. Multisensory experiences through interactive components and documentaries produced by Local 12 and Dan Hurley. Family friendly. $7, $6 seniors, $4 children. 859-491-4003. Covington.

The sixth annual Dogwood Dash 5K run/walk will be 9 a.m. Saturday, April 21, at the Boone County Arboretum at Central Park, 9190 Camp Ernst Road in Union. Registration starts at 7:30 a.m. For more information or to register, visit www.bcarboretum.org. Pictured are Janet Sullivan and Nikki Roehrich of Cincinnati stretching before a previous Dogwood Dash. FILE

Music - Acoustic Bob Cushing, 10 p.m., Down Under Cafe, 126 Park Place, 859-261-9393. Covington.

Music - Benefits Roger Drawdy & the Firestarters, 7-10 p.m., Molly Malone’s Irish Pub and Restaurant, 112 E. Fourth St., Third Floor. Irish rock. Ages 21 and up. Benefits Keegan’s Spirit Foundation. $10, cash/check only. Presented by Keegan’s Spirit Foundation. 859-491-6659; www.keegansouthers.org. Covington.

Music - Choral Sweet Adelines International: Region No. 4 Quartet Competition, 1-5 p.m., Northern Kentucky Convention Center, 1 W. RiverCenter Blvd., Women from four states perform songs in close four-part harmony and sung a cappella, presented in costumed, choreographed production numbers. $30. Presented by Sweet Adelines International Region No. 4. 513-554-2648; www.sai-region4.org. Covington.

Music - Jazz New Sleepcat Band, 7:30 p.m., Dee Felice Cafe, 529 Main St., Directed by Bill Gemmer and features John Von Ohlen. 859261-2365; www.deefelice.com. Covington.

Music - Latin Javier Mendoza, 8 p.m.-1 a.m., The Avenue Lounge, 411 Madison Ave., With Jim Peters. Free. 859-261-6120. Covington.

On Stage - Theater Pump Boys and Dinettes, 7:30 p.m., Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, 1028 Scott Blvd., A piece down Highway 57 from Frog Level is a shabby gas station (with a hot tub out back), the Double Cupp Diner, and the best foot-stompin’ good time you’ve ever had at the theatre. Five rowdy filling station boys and sassy diner waitresses sing and play their own instruments in this hilarious and heartwarming country western music revue, with songs including “Farmer Tan”€ and “The Night Dolly Parton Was Almost Mine”. $26; $19 Enjoy The Arts Members, WVXU Perks Card Members, and Students. Through April 29. 859-957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

Saturday, April 21 Benefits A Day at the Races: Kids Count Keeneland Outing, 10 a.m.-7:30 p.m., MainStrasse Village Pub, 619 Main St., Bus trip to Keeneland Horse Park for live horse racing. Includes snacks and drinks. Leaves track at 6 p.m. Returns to Village Pub for dinner buffet, drinks and afterparty with raffle prizes. Benefits Kids Count Inc. Family friendly. $60. Registration required. Presented by Kids Count Inc.. 859-342-0655. Covington. Brighton Center’s Spring Fling Gala, 6-11 p.m., Drees Pavilion, 790 Park Lane, Gourmet dinner by Jeff Thomas, music and live and silent auctions. Benefits Brighton Center. Ages 21 and up. $100. Registration required. Presented by Brighton Center. 859-491-8303; www.brightoncenter.com. Covington. Derby Warm-Up, 7 p.m.-midnight, The Grand, 6 East Fifth Street, Simulated horse racing and live auction items. Dinner, beer, wine and non-alcoholic beverages included. Derby/ casual attire. Ages 21 and up. Benefits Malia’s Cord Foundation. $65. Reservations required. Presented by Malia’s Cord Foundation. 859-426-1952; www.cordfoundation.org. Covington.

Grammy, Tony and Emmy award-winning recording artist Barry Manilow, pictured, will be at The Bank of Kentucky Center in Highland Heights at 7:30 p.m. Friday, April 20. Tickets are $9.99 - $124.99. For more information, visit www.bankofkentuckycenter.com. THANKS TO MATT MERCHANT

Turkey Dinner Fundraiser, 8:30 a.m.-8 p.m., Summit View Middle School, 5002 Madison Pike, Dinner or carryout 4-8 p.m. Flea market 8:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m., silent auction at 4 p.m. and County Cruiser Car Show 8:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Benefits Boy Scouts of America Troop 8. Dinner: $7 each; $25 for four. Presented by Boy Scouts of America Troop 8. 859-363-4800. Independence.

Health / Wellness

Jorge Wojtas, 7-10 p.m., Argentine Bean Bistro and Wine Bar, 2875 Town Center Blvd., Free. 859-426-1042; www.argentinebean.net. Crestview Hills.

Music - R&B Basic Truth, 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m., KJ’s Pub, 2379 Buttermilk Crossing, 859-344-1413; basictruth.webs.com. Crescent Springs.

On Stage - Comedy Double Talk 2012, 2-4 p.m. 7:30-9:30 p.m., Notre Dame Academy, 1699 Hilton Drive, Family friendly show featuring four ventriloquists: Megan Piphus, Mike Hemmelgarn, Kevin Johnson and Tom Ladshaw. Family friendly. Benefits Vent Haven Museum. $20. Presented by Vent Haven Museum. 859-341-0461; www.ventshow.com. Park Hills.

On Stage - Theater Pump Boys and Dinettes, 7:30 p.m., Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, $26; $19 Enjoy The Arts Members, WVXU Perks Card Members, and Students. 859-957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

SUNDAY, APRIL 22 Antiques Shows 4th Sunday MainStrasse Antiques, Etc., 9 a.m.-3 p.m., MainStrasse Village, Main Street, Sixth Street Promenade. More than 30 antique and vintage collectible dealers. Parking in Fifth Street lot free. Rain or shine. Free. Presented by MainStrasse Village Association. 859-468-4820; e-mail 4thsunday@fuse.net; www.mainstrasseantiques.blogspot.com. Covington.

Dining Events Sunday Brunch, 9:30 a.m.-2 p.m., Kroger Fort Mitchell, 2156 Dixie Hwy., Bistro. Variety of brunch items to choose from, including eggs cooked to order,

La Vian Fine Jewelry Event, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Jared The Galleria of Jewelry, 2935 Dixie Highway, New designs for spring and summer as well as classic favorites. Refreshments. 859-3441060; www.jared.com. Crestview Hills.

SwinGallery, 8-11:30 p.m., Step-N-Out Studio, 721 Madison Road, All ages. No partner required. Free beginner East Coast Swing lesson 8-9 p.m. Dancing to music by DJ 9-11:30 p.m. Family friendly. $5. Presented by SwinGallery. 513-2909022; www.swingallery.com. Covington.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25

Dining Events

Art Exhibits

Civil War Blue-Gray Benefit Dinner, 6-10 p.m., Gardens of Park Hills, 1622 Dixie Highway, Benefits James A. Ramage Civil War Museum. $45, $80 per couple. Reservations required. Presented by James A. Ramage Civil War Museum. 859-3312499. Park Hills.

Layered Abstractions, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Artisans Enterprise Center, Free. 859-292-2322; www.covingtonarts.com. Covington.

Business Meetings

TUESDAY, APRIL 24

Eggs ’N’ Issues: Administrative Professionals Day Awards and Expo, 7:30-10 a.m., Receptions Banquet and Conference Center Erlanger, 1379 Donaldson Road, Honor the ’s best administrative professionals on National Administrative Professionals Day. $15 for NKY Chamber Members, $30 future members. Registration required. Presented by Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce. 859-426-3652; www.nkychamber.com/events. Erlanger.

Community Dance

Health / Wellness

Music - Choral

Music - Latin

To submit calendar items, go to www.NKY.com and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to life@communitypress.com along with event information. Items are printed on a space-available basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to www.NKY.com and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page.

Shopping

Parkinson’s Wellness Forum, 10 a.m., METS Center, 3861 Olympic Blvd., Includes lunch. Dr. Becky Farley, nationally known speaker and researcher, addresses the exercise programs she developed that target motor/sensory/cognitive/emotional deficits. $10. Presented by Tri-State Parkinson’s Wellness Chapter. 513-558-0113; www.parkinsonswellness.org. Erlanger. Sweet Adelines International: Region No. 4 Chorus Competition, 1 p.m., Northern Kentucky Convention Center, 1 W. RiverCenter Blvd., Small, midsize and large choruses from Ohio, Kentucky, Indiana and West Virginia compete with groups in Sweet Adelines. $30. Presented by Sweet Adelines International Region No. 4. 513-554-2648; www.sai-region4.org. Covington.

ABOUT CALENDAR

The new season of 4th Sunday MainStrasse Antiques, Etc. will be 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday, April 22, outside on the Sixth Street Promenade in Covington. Janice T. Sunflower, pictured, will provide music on native flutes starting at 11 a.m. There will be seed giveaways in recognition of Earth Day. THANKS TO DONNA KREMER entrees, side dishes, fresh fruit, breakfast breads and more. Milk, juice and coffee included. Family friendly. $7.99, $2.99 ages 9 and under. 859-331-0080. Fort Mitchell.

Exercise Classes Wrestling Open Mats, 5-6:30 p.m., All Star Performance Training, 8419 U.S. 42, Designed for the committed wrestler, grades K-12, who want to reach full potential. Intense drilling and live wrestling to prepare you for your upcoming season. $6. Registration required. 859912-0764; www.allstarperformancetraining.com. Elsmere.

Youth Sports Volleyball Training Team Session II, 7:30-9 p.m., The Fun Center at Pleasure Isle, 313 Madison Pike, Open to girls, grades 6-8. Teams divided by skill level and grade level. Training team participants will not have uniforms, but will receive a T-shirt. $300. Registration required. Presented by Northern Kentucky Junior Volleyball. 859-620-6520. Independence.

MONDAY, APRIL 23 Health / Wellness Look Good, Feel Better, 4 p.m., Oncology Hematology Care, 651 Centre View Blvd., Beauty techniques taught to women undergoing cancer treatments. Free. Presented by American Cancer Society - Kentucky. 800-227-2345. Crestview Hills.

Karaoke and Open Mic Open Mic Night, 7:30 p.m., The Pub Crestview Hills, 2853 Dixie Highway, With Mike Liggett. 859-426-7827; www.experiencethepub.com/crestview-hills. Crestview Hills.

Recreation Duplicate Bridge, 11:30 a.m.-3 p.m., Elsmere Senior Center, 179 Dell St., Lower Level. Open to all players. Family friendly. $5. Presented by Boone County Bridge Center. 859-391-8639; www.boonecountybridgecenter.com. Elsmere.

Line Dancing, 7-9 p.m., Lookout Heights Civic Club, 1661 Park Road, Holly and Bernie Ruschman, instructors. Beginners welcome. Smoke-free. Family friendly. $6, $3 for first-timers. Presented by H & B Dance Co.. Through Dec. 18. 859-727-0904. Fort Wright.

Weight Loss Class, 5:30-6 p.m., Lakeside Christian Church, 195 Buttermilk Pike, $60 for 12-week membership. First class free. Presented by Equipped Ministries. 859-802-8965; www.facebook.com/equippedministries. Lakeside Park.

Exercise Classes

Music - Rock

Zumba Class, 7:30-8:30 p.m., Turkey Foot Middle School, 3230 Turkey Foot Road, Cafeteria. Exotic rhythms set to highenergy Latin and international beats. All fitness levels welcome. $5. Presented by Zumba with Gabrielle. 513-702-4776. Edgewood.

Health / Wellness Weight Loss Class, 6:30-7 p.m., Hickory Grove Baptist Church, 11969 Taylor Mill Road, $60 for 12-week membership. First class free. Presented by Equipped Ministries. 859-802-8965; www.facebook.com/equippedministries. Independence.

Karaoke and Open Mic Open Mic/College Night, 6 p.m.-1 a.m., Mahogany’s Coffee House and Bar, 3715 Winston Ave., Hosted by Pete Wallace. Free. 859-261-1029. Latonia.

Literary - Libraries Zen Meditation, 7 p.m., Florence Branch Library, 7425 U.S. 42, Listen to short talk, receive basic instructions on Zen sitting meditation and experience session of actual meditation. Ages 18 and up. Free. Registration required. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-342-2665. Florence.

Music - Bluegrass Northern Kentucky Bluegrass Band, 9 p.m.-midnight, Zola, 626 Main St., Free. 859-261-7510. Covington.

Music - Jazz Mike Darrah, 7 p.m., Dee Felice Cafe, 529 Main St., Pianist. 859-261-2365; www.deefelice.com. Covington.

Birdbrain Crash, 10 p.m.-1 a.m., Sidebar, 322 Greenup St., Country/rock music. Ages 21 and up. Free. 859-431-3456. Covington.

Schools College Fair, 7-8:30 p.m., Covington Latin School, 21 E. 11th St., More than 25 colleges/ universities available. High school students and parents are welcome. Ages 9-11. Free. 859291-7044. Covington.

Senior Citizens Tai Chi for Seniors, 10-11 a.m., Elsmere Senior Center, 179 Dell St., Designed to help improve quality of life for people with arthritis, limited mobility or anyone wanting to work on balance, strength and/or breathing issues. Slow-paced, graceful, low-impact form of exercise. Family friendly. $1. 859-7272306. Elsmere.

THURSDAY, APRIL 26 Art Exhibits Layered Abstractions, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Artisans Enterprise Center, Free. 859-292-2322; www.covingtonarts.com. Covington.

Benefits Toast for Hope, 5:30-7:30 p.m., Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, 1028 Scott Blvd., Gourmet hors d’oeuvres, wine selections and music. Wine paired with cuisine by Jeff Thomas Catering. Benefits Women’s Crisis Center. $70, $65 advance. Registration required. Presented by Women’s Crisis Center. 859-372-3571; areddy@wccky.org. Covington.

Community Dance

Exercise Classes Zumba Class, 6-7 p.m., Step-NOut Studio, $55 for 10-class punch card, $40 for unlimited monthly, $30 for 5-class punch card; $8 drop in. First class free. 859-291-2300; www.stepnoutstudio.com. Covington. Zumba Class, 7:30-8:30 p.m., Turkey Foot Middle School, $5. 513-702-4776. Edgewood.

Exhibits Our Rivers’ Fury: Past and Present Ohio Valley Floods, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., BehringerCrawford Museum, $7, $6 seniors, $4 children. 859-4914003. Covington.

Music - Acoustic The Turkeys, 10 p.m.-2 a.m., Zola, 626 Main St., Folk rock. Free. 859-261-7510. Covington. Bob Cushing, 8 p.m., Geez’l Pete’s, 508 Madison Ave., 859261-1030; www.geezlpetes.com. Covington.

Music - Jazz Lee Stolar Trio, 7 p.m., Dee Felice Cafe, 529 Main St., 859261-2365; www.deefelice.com. Covington. Music@BCM Wine ’n’ Spring: Triage, 6-9 p.m., BehringerCrawford Museum, 1600 Montague Road, Low impact jazz group. $5. 859-491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

Music - Rock Mongoloids, 7 p.m. With Expire, Rotting Out, Relentless and FocusedxMinds., Bangarang’s of Covington, 620 Scott Blvd., $14, $11 advance. 513-460-3815; www.bangarangsmusic.com. Covington.

Senior Citizens Zumba Gold, 9:30-10:15 a.m., Elsmere Senior Center, 179 Dell St., Lower Level. Latin-inspired dance/aerobic class toned-down and designed to fit needs of older adults, beginners or anyone with limited mobility. Ages 21 and up. $1. 859-7272306. Elsmere.

Shopping Thrift Sale, 7 a.m.-noon, United Christian Volunteers of Elsmere, 15 Kenton St., Weekly thrift sale. Family friendly. 859-727-4417. Elsmere.

Youth Sports Volleyball Training Team Session II, 7:30-9 p.m., The Fun Center at Pleasure Isle, $300. Registration required. 859-6206520. Independence.


LIFE

APRIL 19, 2012 • COMMUNITY RECORDER • B3

Abundant asparagus inspires spring recipe If someone would ask what my dream job is, I’d have to say I have two in mind. One would be working with Chris Kimball in the Cook’s Country test kitchen. I’d get paid to cook to my heart’s content, Rita with the Heikenfeld best kitchRITA’S KITCHEN en equipment available, and mistakes would occur during paid time. I really enjoy the heirloom recipes that Cook’s Country perfects. The other would be working with Frank Farmer Loomis, our own antique expert who is internationally known. Frank and I did a TV show a long while back and the theme was a tea party. I made tea party treats and teas, and Frank gave his expert opinion on the china and silver service I used. I like things connected with history, and antique china, furniture, and cookbooks all fill the bill.

In fact, the recipe I’m sharing today for the Netherland Salad has quite a history. It dates back over 50 years and it’s from the Netherland Plaza, now the Cincinnati Netherland. This is from Fern Storer’s wonderful cookbook “Recipes Remembered.” Fern was the popular food editor of the Post, and my mom used to love reading her column. Fern’s book was published in 1989 and reader Pauline Dunn was one of the people who helped edit and type the recipes.

Netherland/Maurice salad

This is “the one and only original Maurice salad,” sent to Fern from Maurice J. Koch, the insurance agent who sold Peter Mauridon, the onetime maitre d’ of the Netherland Plaza, a policy. The recipe doesn’t say what kind of vinegar or pickles to use. I’d tend to use clear vinegar and dill pickles, but you do what suits you. Serves two. Dressing: Stir together:

3 tablespoons ea: real mayonnaise and olive oil 2 tablespoons vinegar 1 teaspoon Worcestershire Then add: 1 chopped hard boiled egg 1 teaspoon minced chives

Salad: Combine: 3/4 head crisp lettuce, julienned 1/2 cup ea: julienne of chicken and ham 1/3 cup julienne tomatoes, seeds discarded 1 tablespoon chopped pickle Tomato quarters and hard cooked egg slices for garnish

Toss salad with dressing. Put on plates and garnish.

Asparagus with rainbow peppers

I’ve been making variations of this for a couple of weeks because we are still getting asparagus from our little patch almost daily. If you have a bit of mint, chop that up and add it to the dressing. I’ll either roast the asparagus (toss with a little olive oil) in a 425 degree oven just until it starts to wrinkle or

steam it on top of the stove. 1 bunch asparagus, trimmed and cooked (see above) Bell pepper, diced: I use two kinds for color

Dressing Whisk together:

Can you help?

ON MY BLOG

Spaghetti salad. For Kentucky reader Janice Wallace. “It had thin spaghetti and tasted like pasta salad.”

Promount Museum’s asparagus roll-ups.

anti-aging nutrients.

2-3 tablespoons white wine vinegar 1 tablespoon of Dijon mustard ½ cup olive oil Honey, agave syrup or sugar to taste – not too much

Place asparagus in single layer and sprinkle peppers on top. Drizzle dressing over and let marinate several hours or overnight.

Tip from Rita’s kitchen

Asparagus can help detoxify the system, reduce risk of heart disease and birth defects, and has

Whoops!

Readers want to know

My apologies for not returning calls. I had just finished typing in all the calls when my computer crashed. They were lost, so please call again.

What are Marcona almonds? These wide, tear drop-shaped nuts from Spain are showing up in trendy recipes. Marcona almonds have a higher fat content than California almonds. This makes them tender, crunchy and moist all at the same time. The flavor is savory and some consider it to be “steaklike.” They are usually fried in olive oil, and then seasoned with salt and/or herbs. So what’s not to love, except the price tag, about twice as much as common almonds.

Earth Day is April 22

Celebrate by planting something edible. It can be as simple as lettuce planted in an old colander, or as artsy as a pizza, salad, soup or edible flower garden. Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator and author. Email her at columns@communitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchen.”

Cleaning on a schedule The warmer days of spring often find us spending a bit more time cleaning our houses. Our cleaning standards can be influenced by the opinions of others, the time, energy and money we have, and our own knowledge Diane and skills Mason for cleanEXTENSION ing. It is NOTES important that we pass skills and knowledge of the importance of cleaning to our children. Housecleaning reduces bug and vermin infestation, asthma triggers, and the risk of illness from bacteria and viruses. Additionally, a clean, organized space is more enjoyable to spend time in. Have you ever wondered how often you should be cleaning something? There are recommendations for common household cleaning tasks.

Of course, every household is different. Those with children, pets, or frequent visitors will find the need to clean more frequently. As a general guide consider the following.

Daily

Make the beds Wash and store dishes Pick up and straighten common living areas Put away clothes

Weekly

Vacuum carpets Sweep or clean tile and wood floors Dust or polish wood furniture and other decorative objects Clean entire bathroom Change sheets and pillow cases Remove trash and garbage Wipe out trash cans as needed

Monthly or as needed

Wipe out refrigerator Clean stove Dust light fixtures Vacuum furniture

Chick-fil-A chief to speak Community Recorder Dan T. Cathy, president and chief operating officer of Chick-fil-A, will deliver his nationally known seminar on customer service, “The Five-Step Recipe for Success” on Wednesday, April 25. The seminar will take place from 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. at Receptions Banquet

Center on 1379 Donaldson Road in Erlanger. The program is being offered at no charge by the Business Support Committee of the St. Elizabeth Healthcare Foundation. Seating is limited. RSVP to the St. Elaizabeth Healthcare Foundation at 859-3013920 or foundation1@ stelizabeth.com.

BUSINESS UPDATE Ginter promoted to officer

Christopher Ginter of Edgewood has been promoted to officer by the Fifth Third Bancorp Board of Directors. Ginter, an intermediate

trader in the Investment Management Group, joined the bank in 2009. He earned his bachelor’s degrees in economics and political science from Northern Kentucky University. Ginter and his wife live in Edgewood.

Quarterly Clean refrigerator Dust floor boards and doors Vacuum mattresses and drapes Wash windows inside and out

Annually

Clean carpets Thoroughly clean kitchen cabinets Clean and organize the garage Consider making your own chart or schedule for cleaning tasks around your house. Involve all family members and assign cleaning tasks as appropriate. No matter how you organize your cleaning schedule it is important to your health and safety to keep a clean, clutter free, and organized home.

Diane Mason is county extension agent for family and consumer sciences at the Boone County Cooperative Extension Service.

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LIFE

B4 • COMMUNITY RECORDER • APRIL 19, 2012

Thank a volunteer during April 16-22

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Community Recorder Girl Scouting wouldn't be possible without its volunteers. The week of April 16-22 is Volunteer Appreciation Week. Take time to thank the Girl Scout volunteers who made a difference in your life, or in the lives of your daughter, sister, granddaughter or niece. Without a paycheck and without any fanfare, volunteers devote themselves to girl leadership. They put in long hours, stay patient as girls lead their own activities, and bring fun and spirit to everything girls do. Girl leadership isn't

From left are Madison Hoskinds, 8, of Independence, Cookie Willaman, Girl Scouts alumnae, and Haleigh McNerney, 6, Fort Mitchell. THANKS TO RUBY WEBSTER only about being class president or volleyball captain. Not every girl will grow up to run a company, be a politician, or manage a science lab, if that's not her passion. But every girl can be a leader in her own

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life, so that she – and everyone around her – blossoms into their full potential. A girl leader not only avoids going along with friends who want to skip class or shoplift, but also convinces them not to do it themselves. She supports the aspirations of other girls even if she doesn't share those aspirations. And she steps in when she sees others making fun of a fellow student who doesn't find herself among the popular crowd. Beginning with Juliette Lowe 100 years ago and continuing today, Girl Scout volunteers make a difference. If you’re interested in becoming a short-term volunteer or a troop leader, contact Ruby Webster at rwebster@gswrc.org or by calling 859-342-6263.

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During these tough economic times, debt collectors are targeting consumers in droves. But in some cases federal officials are finding the consumers don’t owe anything at all. However, unless you’re careful, you could end up paying anyway. Gerald Blanchard of Amelia says he was shocked when he got a letter saying his paycheck was being garnished to pay a debt. He recalls getting a letter from a debt collector more than two years ago. “The letter stated that I had a debt that I owed to them, to a company called Tribute MasterCard, for $1,800. I’ve never had a credit card through this company, period,” Blanchard says. Blanchard says the bill collector failed to send him convincing proof he owed that debt, so he called the alleged creditor. “I called Tribute MasterCard Co. and the Tribute MasterCard Co. said, ‘Gerald Blanchard you have no credit card through our company. You’ve never had a credit card through our company’ … I threw the stuff away because I thought, ‘It’s a scam.’ I get junk mail all the time,”

Blanchard said. The bill collector ended up taking Blanchard to court and got a Howard default Ain judgment HEY HOWARD! against him – that’s when judgment is granted for the plaintiff when the defendant fails to show up for the hearing. Blanchard says he was simply never notified of the hearing so he knew nothing about it. Court records show he never received notice he was being sued and should appear in court to defend himself. The debt collector obtained a judgment against Blanchard for more than $1,800 and then tried to garnish his wages. Blanchard had worked for several companies and it took all this time until the current employer was found and contacted. At one point, Blanchard says the debt collector tried to put a lien on his house, but that didn’t work because his house is owned by his father. Now, having found Blanchard’s current employer, the garnishment paperwork

was sent there and Blanchard was notified. “This letter basically states, from a court document, that they’re going to garnish my wages. They’re going to take 25 percent of my income per paycheck,” Blanchard says. At this point it’s too late for Blanchard to fight the garnishment. Instead, he needs to get an attorney and fight the judgment against him from 2009. The first thing he needs to do is get a letter from the credit card company stating he never had a credit card and thus never owed it any money. If he wins the case in court, he’ll get back all his money – and can get reimbursed for his attorney fees and court costs. The bottom line, if you get a letter saying, “This is an attempt to collect a debt,” don’t throw it away. If you believe you don’t owe the debt, tell that to the bill collector – in writing – within 30 days. If the bill collector still insists you owe the money, consult an attorney. Howard Ain answers consumer complaints weekdays on WKRC-TV Local 12. Write to him at 12 WKRC-TV, 1906 Highland Ave., Cincinnati 45219.

Help send Thundercats to the world competition Community Recorder Join the Kentucky Senior Coed Thundercats for a night of fun at Tom’s Papa Dino’s, 288 Main St., Florence, on Friday, April 20. Hours are 6 p.m. to 1 a.m. A portion of sales will help the Kentucky AllStars Senior Thundercats attend the world’s cheer competition at ESPN Disney World in Orlando, Fla. There will be a silent auction, raffles and split the pot drawings. Dance to the music of D&K Entertainment. The Kentucky All-Star Senior Coed Thundercats are 25 athletes who have worked very hard this year receiving the national champion title and two world bids to the prestigious Cheerleading Worlds 2012 in Orlando at the end of April.

Shown are Carly Wood, Erlanger; Jackson Wood, Erlanger; Gary Rapp, Erlanger; Dylan Tribble, Erlanger; Alec Gaukel, Fort Mitchell; Hunter Thomas, Fort Mitchell; Savannah Larimore, Fort Mitchell; Kelsey Davis, Independence; Lexi Kirkland, Union; Callie Rich, Union; Haley Stacy, Union; Allie Ridge, Ludlow; Alexis Haggard, Independence; Courtney Eversole, Independence; Jon Webster, Walton; Taylor Bisig, Florence; Brittany Dickman, Edgewood; Delaney Wright, Walton; Brittany Bedel, Burlington; Brandi Bedel, Burlington; Alexis Reynolds, Crittenden; Kaylynn Phillips, Erlanger; Kit Sikra, Edgewood; Sara Farrar, Villa Hills; and Jenna Cottengim, Edgewood. THANKS TO RUBY WEBSTER

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LIFE

APRIL 19, 2012 • COMMUNITY RECORDER • B5

Take lightning strikes seriously Question: Lightning struck a tall tree in my yard, blowing off a strip of bark. Will the tree survive? Also, is it really true that lightning can enter your home over a phone line? Answer: The tree may leaf out, but Mike then indiKlahr vidual HORTICULTURE branches CONCERNS on the lightning-struck side may die, either suddenly or gradually over a period of up to 10 years. Other times, the whole tree dies within a few weeks. When lightning strikes a tree, it instantly boils the sap inside the trunk, causing some of the bark to explode outwards. Sometimes the width of the vertical strip of bark that is blown off the tree represents the width of the actual lightning bolt that hit it. An average lightning charge provides enough energy to keep a 100-watt light bulb burning for more than three months. It is true that lightning can enter a home through telephone lines. Telephone use is a leading cause of indoor lightning injuries in America because the charges can travel a long way in telephone and electrical wires, especially in rural areas. If you are indoors during a lightning storm, remember lightning can enter buildings through a direct strike, or through

UPCOMING EVENTS 5K Dogwood Dash: Saturday, April 21, 7:30 a.m. registration, race (walk or run) at 9 a.m., Boone County Arboretum, 9190 Camp Ernst Road, Union. Visit www.bcarboretum.org or call 586-6101 for information. Landscaping with Native Trees and Shrubs: 6:30-8 p.m. Thursday, April 26, Boone County Extension Office. Free, but call 859-5866101 to register, or enroll online at www.ca.uky.edu/boone Arbor Day at Boone County Arboretum: noon to 3 p.m. Saturday, April 28, Boone County Arboretum, 9190 Camp Ernst Road, Union. Free tree seedlings, plant talks and guided tours of the arboretum. Learn how to plant and prune trees. Visit www.bcarboretum.org or call 586-6101 for more information.

pipes and wires extending outside, or even through the ground. Windows and doors provide a direct path for lightning to enter a building; so avoid them. During a thunderstorm, stay away from laundry appliances because they are connected to plumbing and electrical systems. Dryer vents offer a direct electrical pathway outdoors. Also remember pet safety. Lightning can easily strike animals chained to a tree or wire runner. Doghouses generally are not protected against

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It is true that lightning can enter a home through telephone lines. FILE PHOTO lightning strikes. Thunder results from a shock wave caused by rapid heating and cooling of air near the lightning channel. Do you know how to estimate the miles between yourself and a lightning flash? Simply count seconds between lightning and thunder and divide this time by five. Sound travels about a mile every five seconds. So if you count 30 seconds between lightning and thunder, lightning has flashed within six miles of you. This puts you within lightning striking distance. Lightning can strike water and travel a long distance in it. So standing

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LIFE

B6 • COMMUNITY RECORDER • APRIL 19, 2012

DEATHS Emilio ‘Al’ Allegrini Emilio “Al” Allegrini, 90, of Southgate, died April 2, 2012, in Plantation, Fla. He was a U.S. Navy lieutenant and World War II veteran. He served in the Pacific on the USS Charleston. He worked as an engineer for the U.S. Bureau of Mines, Olin Matheson, Vulcan Engineering, and A and E Engineers. He served on the Brighton Center Board and the board of education for St. Thomas School and Newport Catholic. After retiring, he worked as a consultant until the age of 80. His wife, Amelia; and brother, Arnold Allegrini, died previously. Survivors include his children, Mary Hedger and Lisa Harrell, both of Lakeside Park, Fran Lewis of Cincinnati, Michael of Branford, Conn., Amelia Ann of Frankfort, Paula of Seattle, Tina of Lexington, Becky Allegrini of Fort Wayne, Ind., Julia of Newport, Teresa Radcliff of Crescent Springs, Monica Steffen of Alexandria, Elizabeth of Fort Thomas and Anne Northcutt of Plantation, Fla.; 29 grandchildren; and eight great-grandchildren. Burial was at St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas. Memorials: Honor Flight Tri-State Headquarters, 8627 Calumet Way, Cincinnati, OH 45249 or The Sisters of Divine Providence, 1000 St. Anne Drive, Melbourne, KY 41059.

Gene Barnes Gene Barnes, 81, of Erlanger, died April 8, 2012. He worked for General Electric as an aircraft inspector for more than 30 years. He was a member

of Erlanger Church of Christ and served in the U.S. Air Force. Survivors include his wife, Dolly Barnes; sons, Michael Barnes of Crittenden and Mark Barnes of Erlanger; daughter, Michele Leach of Crittenden; brother, Floyd Barnes of Harrison County, Ky.; four grandchildren; and six great-grandchildren. Burial was at Forest Lawn Memorial Park, Erlanger. Memorials: Erlanger Church of Christ, 458 Graves Ave., Erlanger KY 41018 or American Cancer Society, 297 Buttermilk Pike, Ft. Mitchell, KY 41017.

Rita Brown Rita Ann Hamm Brown, 73, of Springdale, Ohio, formerly of Covington, died April 9, 2012. She was an avid golfer and bowler, and enjoyed working puzzles and gardening. She was a supervisor at the U.S. Post Office and worked in environmental services at West Chester Hospital. Her son, John King Jr.; and three brothers, Robert, Richard and Russell Hamm, died previously. Survivors include her husband, Kenny; daughter, Tina; brother, Ronald Hamm of Fort Wright; sisters, Roberta Perez of Fort Mitchell, Rosalee Gausepohl and Rebecca Hill, both of Florence, and Cindy Dilley of Erlanger; seven grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren. She donated her body to the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. Memorials: Vitas Healthcare Corp. of Ohio, 11500 N. Lake Drive, Suite 400, Cincinnati, OH 45249.

ABOUT OBITUARIES Basic obituary information and a color photograph of your loved one is published without charge by The Community Press. Please call us at 283-0404 for more information. To publish a larger memorial tribute, call 513-2424000 for pricing details. For the most up-to-date Northern Kentucky obituaries, click on the “Obituaries” link at NKY.com.

Janet Dahl Janet “Jan” Schwuchow Dahl, 65, of Erlanger, died April 7, 2012, at the University of Kentucky Medical Center in Lexington. She was a teacher at Ockerman Elementary School and a member of Faith Community United Methodist Church. She enjoyed traveling. Her parents, William and Martha Schwuchow; and her twin sister, Joyce Fox, died previously. Survivors include her husband, Tom Dahl; daughters, Elizabeth Ann Curran and Kristen Marie Gable, both of Chicago, and Susan Kathleen Dahl of Cincinnati; and four grandchildren. Entombment was in Kentucky Veterans Cemetery North, Williamstown. Memorials: Kidney Foundation, Kentucky Region, 250 E. Liberty, Suite 710, Louisville, KY 40202.

Richard Day Richard A. Day, 42, of Cincinnati, died April 5, 2012, at his residence. He served in the U.S. Air Force. Survivors include his wife, Savy Day; children, Brittany Day of Edgewood, Cameron Day of Richwood, and Corie Day, Ian Day and Brianna Day, all of Cincinnati; stepchildren, Jay and

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Charles Greene Charles Johnson Greene, 86, of Edgewood, died April 5, 2012, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He retired after 30 years of service as IT manager for Litton Computer Systems and was formerly employed in IT with the Wiedeman Brewery Corp. He attended the Taylor Mill Congregation of Jehovah's Witnesses. Survivors include his wife, Virginia Fisk Greene; son, Stephen Greene of Edgewood; daughter, Shana Renaker of Florence; six grandchildren; and seven great-grandchildren. Interment was at Highland Cemetery.

Joy Harvey Joy Ruth Hardin Harvey, 75, of Erlanger, died April 8, 2012, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. She was a self-employed antique dealer and a member of First Church of God in Florence. She enjoyed playing bingo, traveling and being a member of

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Virgil Lewis Virgil Lewis, 83, of Elsmere, died April 9, 2012, at his home. He served in World War II and was the owner of Lewis Imports in Covington. Survivors include his wife, Lelia Griggs Lewis; daughters, Terri Newman, Connie Frankenstein and Karen Derrer, all of Elsmere; six grandchildren; and six greatgrandchildren. Burial was at Highland Cemetery, Fort Mitchell. Memorials: Hospice of the Bluegrass Online, 7388 Turfway Road, #202, Florence, KY 41042. Jack T. Miller, 66, of Florence, died April 8, 2012, at his residence. He was a retired sergeant with the Fort Mitchell Police Department and served in the U.S. Air

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Timothy Fortunato Pangallo, 51, of Fort Wright, died April 7, 2012. He was an IT security operations manager at Great American Insurance Co. for 20 years and a longtime coach of MathCounts at St. Agnes Grade School. He previously coached St. Agnes baseball, soccer and basketball, and Fort Wright girls softball. Survivors include his wife, Jeanne Grogan Pangallo; children, Tiffany Chalk, David Pangallo and Tricia Pangallo; parents, Anthony and Marcella Pangallo; and siblings, Maria Fisk, Linda Miller, Tony Pangallo and Dino Pangallo. Memorials: Neuroscience Pathology Fund, Attn: Dr. Robert Albright, St. Elizabeth Cancer Care Center, 1 Medical Village, Edgewood, KY 41017 or St. Agnes Faith for Generations/Cafeteria Renovation Fund, 1680 Dixie Hwy., Ft. Wright, KY 41011.

John Ramler John Robert Ramler, 56, of Elsmere, died April 5, 2012, at his residence. He was a Kentucky Colonel and a Maker’s Mark Ambassador. He worked at the Gates Corp. for more than 35 years and was an avid hunter. He loved summer, boating and spending time at his river camp. His father, Clarence Ramler, died previously. Survivors include his wife, Jan Rauch Ramler; mother, Margaret Ramler of Elsmere; and sisters, Sandra Sandel and Kerri Carter, both of Elsmere, and Carla Burkart of Florence. Entombment was at Forest Lawn Memorial Park, Erlanger. Memorials: St. Elizabeth Home Hospice, 483 S. Loop Road, Edgewood, KY 41017. Charles W. “Bill” Ratchford, 90, of Covington, died April 6, 2012. He worked for General Motors in the payroll department and was a U.S. Army World War II veteran. His wife, Jean Siemer Ratchford, died previously. Burial was at St. Mary Cemetery. Memorials: Blessed Sacrament Church, 2409 Dixie Hwy., Ft. Mitchell, KY 41017 or Rosedale Manor, 4250 Glenn Ave., Covington, KY 41015.

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James Tipton, 86, of Erlanger, died April 8, 2012. He was a seaman first class on the USS Lexington during World War II and retired from the Clow Corp. in Florence. His brother, Harold Tipton, and a sister, Wilma Jean Shamblin, died previously. Survivors include his wife, Ruth Jean Fee Tipton; and sister, Iris Epperson.

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Euretta E. “Babe” Gripshover Wheeler, 94, of Edgewood, died April 7, 2012. She was a homemaker. Her husband, Charles A. Wheeler, died previously. Survivors include her children, Patricia Meier and Gail Lang; siblings, Henry Gripshover and Juanita Chapman; seven grandchildren; 11 great-grandchildren; and two great-great-grandchildren. Memorials: St. Pius X Church Building Fund, 348 Dudley Road, Edgewood, KY 41017.

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Sally Johnson Kidd, 94, of Union, died April 11, 2012, at St. Elizabeth Florence. She was a retired tax examiner for the Internal Revenue Service and a longtime member of Latonia Baptist Church. Her husband, Louis Ray Kidd, died in 1986. Survivors include her sons, Robert Kidd of Union and James Kidd of Villa Hills; seven grandchildren; eight great-grandchildren; and six great-greatgrandchildren. Interment was at Floral Hills Cemetery, Taylor Mill. Memorials: Charity of donor’s choice.

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1-7 Affordable, Deluxe Chalets & Cabin Rentals. Pigeon Forge in the Smokies. Vacation/Dollywood Specials. Free brochure. Call 1-800-833-9987. www.firesidechalets.com

Rebecca Spaulding and Rod Nolting were married on January 23, 2012 at the Abiding Grace Chapel in Gatlinburg, TN. Rebecca graduated from Franklin High School and Sinclair College. She is currently employed by Coldwell Banker. Rod graduated from Dixie High School and is currently employed by Adams Heating and Air Condition.The couple will make their home in Liberty Township, OH

Daniel “Sonny” Yager, 71, of Covington, died April 6, 2012, at St. Elizabeth Florence. He was a retired machinist for Precision Truing Tool and a guard at Perry Park Resort. A daughter, Deborah Runge; and a granddaughter, Lauren Yager, died previously. Survivors include his wife, Geneva Jones Yager; daughters, Danielle Leeke of Florence, Dena Moore of Crittenden and Denise Kampe of Covington; seven grandchildren; and three greatgrandchildren. Memorials: American Diabetes Association.


LIFE

APRIL 19, 2012 • COMMUNITY RECORDER • B7

A hard-earned degree from Strayer University can give you the competitive advantage you need. From bachelor’s to master’s programs, our rigorous coursework prepares students for the future. Find out why 95% of our alumni say their degree has helped them meet their academic goals. Visit discover.strayeruniversity.edu or call 1.866.324.5917.

CINCINNATI CE-0000506242 Ohio Reg. number: 10-05-1933B; 2135 Dana Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 44230

FLORENCE

MASON CE-0000506242


LIFE

B8 • COMMUNITY RECORDER • APRIL 19, 2012

UK alumni host scholarship dinner Community Recorder Join fellow alumni and friends to give a Big Blue welcome to the 12th president of the University of Kentucky. The Northern Kentucky/Greater Cincinnati UK Alumni Club will have its Scholarship Recognition Dinner on Thursday, April 26, at Fort Mitchell Country Club, 250 Fort Mitchell Ave., Fort Mitchell. The reception is at 6 p.m. Dinner will be 6:45 p.m. followed by the program. President Eli Capilouto will be on hand to share the many exciting things happening at UK.

The 201213 Alumni Club Scholarship recipients will also be recognized at this event. Capilouto Cost to attend is $30 for UK Alumni Association members and $35 for nonmembers. Cost includes dinner and admission to the event. RSVP by Friday, April 20, if you plan to attend. Reservations can be made by calling1-800-269ALUM. Attire is business. For questions, call Donna Brautigan at 859356-2326.

TUBAL LIGATAION AVAILABLE

POLICE REPORTS FORT WRIGHT Arrests/Citations Charlene P. Northup, 26, 1 E. 28th St., excuted Kenton County warrant for driving with suspended license at Valley Plaza Pkwy., March 29. Charlene P. Northup, 26, 1 E. 28th St., no seat belt, driving with suspended license at Highland Pike and Madison Pike, March 29. Charlene P. Northup, 26, 1 E. 28th St., executed Campbell County warrant for driving with suspended license at Highland Pike and Madison Pike, March 29. Bruce W. Taylor II, 29, unknown, executed Clark County warrant for theft at 3450 Valley Plaza Pkwy., March 30. Joanna Y. Roland, 18, 405 E. 15th St. , shoplifting, giving officer false name or address, display of fake identification at 3450 Valley Plaza Pkwy., March 30. Patrick-Isaac T. Soliman, 29, 255 Mar Kim Dr., No. 4, executed Grant County warrant for one headlight at Alexis Cir., April 3.

FACOG Board Certified Gynecologist offers the following services: • Tubal Ligations • Birth Control • Endometrial Ablation (for abnormal bleeding • Infertility • Menopause • Pelvic Pain • Laparoscopic Surgery

Sarah Rains, 31, and Jay Boise, 32, both of Covington, issued April 2. Patricia Tobin, 61, and Robert Meyer, 53, both of Cincinnati, issued April 2. Laura Bohrer, 24, and Zachary Kress, 26, both of Cincinnati, issued April 3. Tiffany McWilliams, 23, and Martin Kersting, 23, both of Edgewood, issued April 5.

$10 OFF

ALL INSURANCES ACCEPTED TWO LOCATIONS

10 Youell Street Florence, KY 41042 859-525-6730

WWW.AASEALES.COM

Next Payday Advance (Min. $200 loan)

CE-0000502715

CE-0000506708

Grant County warrant for shoplifting at 3450 Valley Plaza Pkwy., April 3. Haley M. Chaney, 21, 1190 Mosswood Ct., shoplifting at 3450 Valley Plaza Pkwy., April 5. Jonathan B. Ewing, 23, 220 E. 10th St., No. 2, executed Boone County warrant for shoplifting at Madison Pike, April 6. James D. Noel, 69, 1447 Madison Pike, public drunkenness at Dixie Hwy., April 4. Adam C. Hagan, 21, 1060 Tamarack Cir. Apt. J, shoplifting at 3450 Valley Plaza Pkwy., April 4. Mark F. Mullins, 29, 1302 Holman Ave., shoplifting at 3450 Valley Plaza Pkwy., April 8.

Check Exchange Turfway 859-647-2160 Latonia 859-431-8666 Newport 859-491-6888 Florence 859-746-0966

Drugs Possession of marijuana at Emery Dr., April 1. Shoplifting Merchandise stolen at 3450 Valley Plaza Pkwy., March 23. Merchandise stolen at 3450 Valley Plaza Pkwy., April 3. Merchandise stolen at 3450 Valley Plaza Pkwy., April 3. Merchandise stolen at 3450 Valley Plaza Pkwy., April 3.

Baker Hunt to offer summer classes

Cahterine Kennedy, 33, of Fort Mitchell and Dennis Rider, 43, of Independence, issued April 5. Autumn Stanton, 24, of Fort Mitchell and Casey Conner, 25, of Erlanger, issued April 5. Juliana Petersen, 30, and Joshua Dunn, both of Newport, issued April 5. Michelle Thomason, 44, of Villa Hills and Joshua Jump, 31, of Erlanger, issued April 6. Jennifer Geraci, 32, of Ludlow and Ryan Pfeiffer, 32, of Covington, issued April 6. Pamela Vigilante, 52, and Larry Howard, 53, both of Powell, issued April 4. Kristen Wirth, 22, and Christopher Lokesak, 25, both of Ludlow, issued April 6. Lindsey Hudson, 24, and Ryan Ware, 26, both of Taylor Mill, issued April 9.

TOLL FREE

Merchandise stolen at 3450 Valley Plaza Pkwy., April 3. Merchandise stolen at 3450 Valley Plaza Pkwy., April 4. Electronics stolen at 3450 Valley Plaza Pkwy., April 8. Theft Televisions stolen at 3450 Valley Plaza Pkwy., March 20. DVD player stolen from car at 5 Kennedy Rd., March 26. Jewelry and electronics stolen at 941 Kyles Ln., March 30. Cash stolen from car at 17 Crittenden Ave. W, March 31. Travel home stolen from storage lot at 3396 Madison Pike, April 2. Tools stolen from car at 7 Rosa Ct., April 1. Watch stolen at 3339 Madison Pike, April 2. Electronics stolen from car at 3450 Valley Plaza Pkwy., April 3. Gas trimmer and blower stolen at 10 Augusta Ave. S., April 5. Cash stolen at 2033 Lakeview Dr., April 6. Electronics stolen at 1729 Valley Dr., April 8. Electronics stolen from car at 20 Kyles Ln., April 8.

Incidents/Investigations

MARRIAGE LICENSES

A.Allan Seales, MD

806 Scott Street Covington, Ky. 41011 859-491-6411

Patrick-Isaac T. Soliman, 29, 255 Mar Kim Dr., No. 4, executed Fayette County warrant for disregarding traffic light at Alexis Cir., April 3. Amber L. Kleiman, 32, 3743 Herbert Ave., executed Kenton County warrant for disorderly conduct at 3450 Valley Plaza Pkwy., April 3. Jennifer L. Creech, 29, 1697 State Ave., shoplifting, possession of marijuana and drug paraphernalia at 3450 Valley Plaza Pkwy., April 3. Brian L. Iles, 31, 819 Cox Rd., shoplifting at 3450 Valley Plaza Pkwy., April 3. Scott Hatfield II, 32, 5942 Peoples Ln., shoplifting at 3450 Valley Plaza Pkwy., April 3. Sara E. Hale, 34, 5942 Peoples Ln., shoplifting at 3450 Valley Plaza Pkwy., April 3. Krista N. Thomas, 23, 211 Southern Dr., shoplifting at 3450 Valley Plaza Pkwy., April 3. Patrick-Isaac T. Soliman, 29, 255 Mar Kim Dr., No. 4, shoplifting at 3450 Valley Plaza Pkwy., April 3. Patrick-Isaac T. Soliman, 29, 255 Mar Kim Dr., No. 4, executed

Community Recorder The Baker-Hunt Art & Cultural Center will celebrate 90 years of art education and cultural enrichment by offering more than 60 art classes and workshops for the “Summer to Remember” term. Baker Hunt, located at 620 Greenup St. in Covington, will have a variety of new classes for both youth and adults beginning June 11. More than 40 different art classes and one day workshops designed for both beginning and more

experienced adult artists will be offered, as well as 24 classes, workshops and camps for youth, ages four and older. Adult offerings include oil, acrylic, and watercolor painting, stone and wood carving, creative writing, photography, yoga, dance and fabric arts. Classes for youth include painting, animation, preschool art, sculpture and movie making. Programs designed specifically for homeschooled youth are available as well.

1-855-295-3642 5815 DIXIE HWY (RT 4), FAIRFIELD

Come Experience the Jeff Wyler Cadillac Difference! A Better Way to Buy a Vehicle

JeffWylerFairfieldCadillac.com

INTRODUCING THE NEW STANDARD OF LUXURY OWNERSHIP.

Premium Care Maintenance Standard on all 2011 and newer Cadillac vehicles, Premium Care Maintenance is a fully transferable maintenance program that covers select required maintenance services during the first 4 years or 50,000 miles.[1]

Connections by OnStar Hands Free Calling capability from OnStar[3] allows you to safely make and receive calls from your Cadillac. With MyCadillac and OnStar MyLink[4] mobile apps, you can access and control your Cadillac from anywhere you have cell phone service. All Cadillac models come with 1 year of OnStar service.

Warranty Protection Cadillac Powertrain Warranty[2] is 30K miles more than Lexus and 50K more than BMW and Mercedes-Benz. The 4-year/50,000-mile[1] Bumper-To-Bumper Limited Warranty covers repairs on your entire vehicle, including parts and labor, to correct problems in materials or workmanship.

Emergency by OnStar In a crash, built-in sensors can automatically alert an OnStar[3] Advisor who is immediately connected into your Cadillac to see if you need help sent to your exact location. Other OnStar emergency services include Injury Severity Predictor and First Assist. All Cadillac models come with 1 year of OnStar service.

Diagnostics by OnStar With best-in-class diagnostics from OnStar[3], maintaining your Cadillac can be as simple as checking your email or your OnStar MyLink mobile app. Every month you can receive an email with the status of key operating systems. All Cadillac models come with 1 year of OnStar service.

Security by OnStar If you’ve reported your Cadillac stolen, OnStar[3] can use GPS technology to help authorities quickly locate and recover it. On most Cadillac models, an Advisor can send a Stolen Vehicle Slowdown® or Remote Ignition Block signal to help authorities safely recover it. All Cadillac models come with 1 year of OnStar service.

2012 Cadillac

CTS

LEASE

328

$

PER MONTH

CTS

COUPE

MSRP DISCOUNT

$39,725 -$2,730

36,995

$

Courtesy Transportation During the warranty coverage period, this Cadillac program provides alternate transportation and/or reimbursement of certain transportation expenses if your Cadillac requires warranty repairs.

LEASE

409 PER MONTH

$

6

39 MONTHS $0 DUE AT SIGNING NO SECURITY DEPOSIT

STOCK # M42384

2011 Cadillac

Roadside Assistance Among leading automotive luxury brands, Cadillac is the only brand to offer standard 5-year Roadside Assistance that provides lock-out service, a tow, fuel, Dealer Technician Roadside Service and more.

SRX

5

39 MONTHS $0 DUE AT SIGNING NO SECURITY DEPOSIT

STOCK # M42394

2012 Cadillac

2012 Cadillac

Navigation by OnStar Just push the OnStar[3] button and ask the Advisor to download directions to your Cadillac, and a voice will call out every turn. You can also plan routes from Google Maps™ or MapQuest.com® to your Cadillac. All Cadillac models come with 1 year of OnStar service.

CTS-V

MSRP DISCOUNT REBATE

$71,285 -$5,334 -$4,000

61,951

$

(1) Whichever comes first. See dealer for details.(2) See dealer for limited warranty details.(3) Visit onstar.com. for coverage map, details and system limitations. Services vary by model and conditions. (4) OnStar MyLink is available on 2011 and newer vehicles, excluding STS. (5) CTS closed end lease 39 months/10k per year lease $328 mo. $0 due at signing, no security deposit required with highly qualified approved credit. Total of payments $12792. (6) SRX closed end lease 39 months/10k per year lease $409 mo. $0 due at signing, no security deposit required with highly qualified approved credit. Total of payments $15951. $.30 cents per mile penalty overage. Purchase option at termination. All offers are plus tax license and fees. Not available with some other offers. See dealer for details. Vehicle / equipment may vary from photo. In stock units only, while supplies last. Expires 4/24/2012


community-recorder-041912  

Contactus NewFriendsofNorthern Kentuckyhasbeenaround sincethe1980s,andthe organizationhasevolvedover theyears. ByAmyScalf ByAmyScalf SeeREMO...

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