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RECORDER

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

THURSDAY, MARCH 14, 2013

FIRST SWING A5 Kenton baseball teams battle the elements.

BECAUSE COMMUNITY MATTERS

Consolidated dispatch savings may be lost

INDEPENDENCE — When Kenton County leaders started talking about dispatch consolidation, they said up to $4.5 million could be saved during the first five years, but as long as more than one center operates, those savings continue to disappear. A document on the county website, www.kentoncounty.org, compares the costs of building a new dispatch center for a combined operation, moving in or adding on to an existing building, or continuing to operate two centers. The cost comparison, prepared by county staff and reviewed by Erlanger representatives at joint meetings, shows an estimate of more than $1.6 million to build a new structure or $450,000 to add on to the current center. In January, the Kenton County Fiscal Court approved a $530,916 contract to add 2,700 square feet to the Kenton County Police Department, at 11777 Madison Pike, which houses the dispatch center. Five years of operating a single countywide dispatch center was projected to cost $23,754,235, compared to $28,279,079 to continue both the Erlanger and Kenton County operations. That difference yields the $4,524,844 savings touted by Kenton County Judge-executive Steve Arlinghaus. “All the numbers that we talk about in that savings are under the assumptions that we have one single center, not two,” he said. Arlinghaus said costs are saved by staffing one center and having to upgrade only one center’s computers every six years at a cost of $1 million per center. Erlanger Mayor Tom Rouse said he’s not ready to join the county system, and that Erlang-

er residents support that decision. “Erlanger has always dispatched its own personnel since the walkie-talkie was invented. Our police, fire, rescue and maintenance folks are used to having hands-on emergency communications, and we’ve always been able to afford it ourselves. It’s served Erlanger very well,” said Rouse. Before Covington joined Kenton dispatch in September 2012, the center provided communications for Fairview, Independence, Kenton Vale, Ryland Heights, Taylor Mill and unincorporated parts of the county. Bromley, Fort Wright, Ludlow and Park Hills joined March 1. According to Kenton County Executive Director of Emergency Communications Ed Butler, the cities of Crestview Hills, Edgewood, Fort Mitchell, Lakeside Park and Villa Hills have dropped their land-line fees, but have taken no formal action to join county operations. Arlinghaus said representatives of Kenton, Erlanger and Covington dispatch centers agreed none of their existing sites could house countywide operations. Anticipating a countywide dispatch center, Kenton County leaders approved an $85 parcel fee in August 2012 for every county property to replace the land-line telephone fees, and four months later $604,000 was refunded to residents of Erlanger and Crescent Springs because their cities chose not to move to the county center. Arlinghaus said that loss, along with exemptions granted for individual property owners, was not anticipated in the original calculations. He said the $4.5 million savings may no longer be available. “With Erlanger not wanting to join, the savings we would have had, that $4.5 million, begins to get eroded. ” he said.

A TOAST

TO ST. PATRICK

Rick Robinson of Fort Mitchell hoists a pint in honor of St. Patrick during a performance of Phil’s Five & Dime at Pee Wee’s Place on March 9 in Crescent Springs. MARTY WHITACRE FOR THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

From left, Phil Tatro of Fort Mitchell, Dennis Hetzel of Hebron and Marshall Tatro of Fort Mitchell perform as Phil’s Five & Dime at Pee Wee’s Place on March 9 in Crescent Springs. MARTY WHITACRE FOR THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Community Recorder

Phil’s Five & Dime got warmed up for St. Patrick’s Day in a March 9 performance at Pee Wee’s Place in Crescent Springs. The band, consisting of Phil Tatro, Rick Robinson and Dennis Hetzel, describes its music as “a regular show of songs you can’t live without.”

See DISPATCH, Page A2

ALL PRO DADS

RITA’S KITCHEN

Fathers make time for Twenhofel family program. A4

Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day with champ, soda bread. B3

Contact us

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NEWS

A2 • COMMUNITY RECORDER • MARCH 14, 2013

BRIEFLY St. Henry students present musical

ERLANGER — St. Henry District High School Drama Department will present the musical production “Bye Bye Birdie” in the school’s Millay Hall from Friday, March 22, through Sunday, March 24. Tickets cost $8 for adults and $5 for seniors and students through 12th grade. Tickets can be purchased at the door or in the school office, 3755 Scheben Drive. Info: 859-525-0255.

Park Hills seniors plan to meet

PARK HILLS — A senior citizen social group will begin meeting at 11 a.m. Thursday, March 21, at the Griffin Center on Covington Catholic High School’s campus, 1600 Dixie Hwy. The group is open to

adults aged 55 and older. Residents of Park Hills will be given membership preference, but other Northern Kentucky residents are invited to join. Meetings are to include card games, physical activities and future travel opportunities. Registration forms are available at the Park Hills City Building. Info: 859-581-0022.

Independence plans Easter egg hunt

INDEPENDENCE — The city of Independence will host its annual Easter egg hunt at Memorial Park, adjacent to the Independence Senior and Community Center, 2001 Jack Woods Pkwy., at noon Saturday, March 23, for children ages 2-9. The free family event is open to the public.

COMMUNITY RECORDER

Find news and information from your community on the Web Kenton County • nky.com/kentoncounty

For more information, call Nita Brake, director of the city’s Parks and Recreation Department, at 859-363-2934.

Taylor Mill Easter events planned

TAYLOR MILL — The annual Easter Bunny Breakfast will be 8-10 a.m. Saturday, March 16, at Park Place Community Center, 5614 Taylor Mill Road. Photos with the Easter Bunny cost $2 each and the breakfast is $5 per person. The Taylor Mill Easter egg hunt will start at 1 p.m. at Pride Park for kids up to age 12. Participants need to bring their own bags or baskets to collect free candy. In case of rain, the egg hunt will be moved to Saturday, March 23.

Dispatch Continued from Page A1

News

The Erlanger center’s staff has been reduced by attrition, according to

Advertising

Index

Nancy Daly Senior Editor ......................578-1059, ndaly@nky.com Amy Scalf Reporter ............................578-1055, ascalf@nky.com Melanie Laughman Sports Editor ............513-248-7573, mlaughman@nky.com James Weber Sports Reporter ................578-1054, jweber@nky.com Lisa Lawrence Sales Manager ...............................513-768-8338, llawrence@enquirer.com

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For customer service .........................781-4421 Sharon Schachleiter Circulation Manager .........................442-3464, sschachleiter@nky.com

Classified

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STUDYING WITH PASSION

Calendar .................B2 Classifieds ................C Food ......................B3 Life ........................B1 Police .................... B6 Schools ..................A4 Sports ....................A5 Viewpoints .............A8

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Rouse, so their staffing level “is appropriate for our partner cities,” but the center’s costs continue to exceed the funds garnered by telephone land-line fees. “There will still be deficits because we know the 911 fees aren’t covering dispatch costs, and they never have and they never will. It’s a horrible funding source that just doesn’t work,” said Rouse. He said each of Erlanger’s partner cities had paid a portion of the deficit based on their population, and that’s the way it will continue until a new

funding mechanism is put into place. “It looks like we’ll get to a point where we’re going to be down to us and Crescent Springs and, perhaps, Elsmere, and that’s back where it was before all this started six years ago,” said Rouse. No matter what, Arlinghaus maintains that dollars are not the most important savings to be had. “My number one reason for this merger is the safety factors that come with it. The ability for the first line responders to have better communica-

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NEWS

MARCH 14, 2013 • COMMUNITY RECORDER • A3

Fort Wright’s flood plain flub gets fixed By Amy Scalf ascalf@nky.com

FORT WRIGHT — For more than a decade, federal flood maps have been wrong for the area between Highland Pike and Orphanage Road along Madison Pike. Representatives of the Northern Kentucky Area Planning Commission visited the March 6 Fort Wright City Council meeting to discuss the map change and other items. NKAPC Director of Planning and Zoning Administration Martin Scribner, who also serves as flood plain administrator for the city of Fort Wright, said the dilemma

was one of “practical versus legal” requirements for the area, which is adjacent to the Banklick Creek and Horse Branch tributary. “We know that when they developed that whole area, they put in a culvert you can drive a truck through. So, we know from a practical standpoint, there is no flood plain down there. We all know that’s not going to flood,” said Scribner. Fort Wright City Administrator Gary Huff said development in the area hasn’t been slowed, but it has been complicated by the error, which has been an issue since the Walmart Super Center

was built near the turn of the century. “Nothing is in jeopardy,” said Huff. “The actual flood plain map is wrong, but the new one effective July 15 is correct. Nothing has ever been in jeopardy of flooding down there. It’s just paperwork.” The paperwork is important because flood insurance premiums are based on how well protected buildings are from potential floods, according to the Federal Emergency Management Agency, which oversees the Federal Insurance Rate Map and the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP).

“The NFIP underwrites flood insurance coverage only in those communities that adopt and enforce floodplain regulations that meet or exceed NFIP criteria. Buildings built in accordance with these regulations have a lower risk of flooding and can be insured at lower rates,” according to

www.fema.gov. Huff said, according to the current map, the Fifth Third Bank on Highland Pike “is clearly sitting in the 100-year flood plain,” but Scribner said the site’s elevation is above the recommended clearance. The future site of Izzy’s Restaurant along Highland is also in the affected

area, as is a shopping center on the opposite side of Walmart, off Orphanage Road. Scribner said he didn’t know of any other properties “right now in this area that have contingencies of this nature.”

Want to continue the conversation? Tweet at @AmyScalfNky

State unemployment rate drops below 8 percent By Brenna R. Kelly bkelly@nky.com

FRANKFORT — Kentucky’s unemployment rate has fallen below 8 percent for the first time in four years, the state reported March 7. The Office of Employment and Training reported that the January rate was 7.9 percent. The last time the state’s jobless rate was below 8 percent was November 2008, when it was 7.8 percent. While the number shows the economy is improving, the state needs to help employment grow faster, said Janet Harrah,

senior director of the Center for Economic Analysis and Development at Northern Kentucky University. “Obviously it’s good news that the state unemployment rate is coming down; we all want to see that,” Harrah said. “But that’s not the pace of employment growth we want to see. At that pace it’s going to take us years to get down to a 4 or 5 percent rate.” In January 2013, Kentucky’s civilian labor force was 2,085,509, a decrease of 820 individuals compared to the previous month.

“While certainly we are happy that it’s headed in the right direction, I don’t think that anyone would say that that’s the speed at which we want that change to occur,” she said. State economist Manoj Shanker said the jobless rate has been improving steadily over the past year. “With the exception of a few blips, the unemployment rate has been improving quite steadily over the last year,” Shanker said. “The improvement in the labor market has been steady, though painfully slow.”

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SCHOOLS

A4 • COMMUNITY RECORDER • MARCH 14, 2013

COMMUNITY

RECORDER

Editor: Nancy Daly, ndaly@nky.com, 578-1059

ACHIEVEMENTS | NEWS | ACTIVITIES | HONORS

CommunityPress.com

Caywood takes first place Community Recorder

James A. Caywood Elementary placed first overall in the District Governor’s Cup held March 2 in Fort Mitchell. Caywood competed against Blessed Sacrament, Dorothy Howell and St. Pius in the areas of Quick Recall and Written Assessments. Medals were awarded to Caywood students for their Outstanding Achievements in these content areas : Social Studies: second, A’lasia Faehr; fifth, Shelby Stortz.

Math: second, Keegan Hennessy; fifth, Brad Cotcamp. Language Arts: second, Keegan Hennessy; third (tie), Abby Lucas. Arts and Humanities: first, Kaitlyn King; fifth, Irene Wogenstahl. Composition: first, Kaitlyn King; second, Abby Lucas; third, Alyssa Bosley. This marks the first time that Caywood Elementary has received this distinguished honor of District Governor’s Cup Champions.

James A. Caywood Elementary placed first overall in the District Governor's Cup. Seated is Principal Kelly Conner. Front row: Keegan Hennessy, Alyssa Bosley, Kaitlyn King, Brad Cotcamp, Shelby Stortz, A'lasia Faehr, Irene Wogenstahl and Abby Lucas. Middle row: Chace Washington, Olivia Weisemann, Waleehjah Rana, Carol Moctezuma, Ty Hopping and Zach Hart. Back row: Coach Abby Mullins, Assistant Principal Kim Mott and coach Kathleen King. Not pictured are Keegan Bush, Kaylee Frederick and Ella Hageman. PROVIDED

Dads make time for Twenhofel family program By Amy Scalf ascalf@nky.com

INDEPENDENCE — Mike and Rachel Bush both have busy lives, full of activities and responsibilities, but the father and daughter team up once a month for an All Pro Dad program at Twenhofel Middle School. All Pro Dad is a national program that provides resources for men through 974 Chapters in 43 states and on the website, www.allprodads.com. There are 26 chapters in Kentucky, including programs at Kenton, River Ridge, Ryland Heights and Taylor Mill elementary schools. “We’ve always put a lot of focus on doing things together as a family, so whenever my kids ask me to go to something, I wouldn’t miss the opportunity,” he said. “My kids are some of my best friends.” Their family also includes mom, Mary, and Rachel’s older brother, Jacob, who attends the University of Kentucky in Lexington. The Twenhofel All Pro Dad program took place at 7 a.m. on Friday, March 1, and featured the topic “Enjoy Life.” The school’s Youth Service Center Coordinator Jamie Gastright said 35 dads and 39 children participated in the program, which included breakfast from the Houston Road Chickfil-A in Florence. She said the dads were encouraged “to discuss the silly times with their children and to be reminded how fun it is to be a dad.” Bush said the morning meeting time was convenient for him, but he’d make sure the program fit into his schedule no matter what. “For something like that, any time of the day I would set aside time,” he said. “It was nice, be-

COLLEGE CORNER Brunson receives award

Clair Brunson of Fort Wright has received a Dean’s Award from Xavier University. The daughter of Kelly and Steve Brunson, she will graduate from Notre Dame Academy this spring. She is active in athletics and service, and plans to major in middle childhood education.

Kenton residents make dean’s list

Torie Dimartile, daughter of Arthur and Patricia Dimartile of Fort Mitchell; Julia Fleming, daughter of Don and Mary Kay Fleming of Crescent Springs; and Greg Nicaise, son of Kurt Nicaise and Susan Mospens of Covington, have been named to the Centre College dean’s list for the fall term. The list includes students who have maintained at least a 3.60 grade-point average.

Kenton residents graduate

One of the famous Chick-fil-A cows greeted Twenhofel students including Rachel Bush at the school's All Pro Dad program. THANKS TO TWENHOFEL MIDDLE SCHOOL

ing at the start of the day where not a lot of things can get in the way. You know how things pop up.” He said the activities encouraged Rachel to suggest something for them to do together, and she picked go-karts. “I keep the card in the car, and I have every intention of going with her,” he said. During the program, Bush was also able to share reasons he was proud of Rachel. “I’m proud of her dedication

and endurance. She’s involved in multiple activities: band, basketball, dance, gymnastics. It’s like we’re constantly on the go. There’s always somewhere to be and something to do. With as busy as she is and we are, she just gets up and puts a smile on her face and never complains. She gets good grades, too,” he said. “It was definitely enjoyable and we’ll keep going.”

ST. PIUS TEAM HEADS TO REGIONALS

Want to continue the conversation? Tweet at @AmyScalfNky

St. Pius X School’s varsity academic team finished first in quick recall at the District Governor’s Cup Competition. The team finished second overall with many individual accomplishments. The team will go on to compete in regionals. Pictured are (first row) Jaret Schreiver, Alec Ballman, Connor Herbert (second row) Lauren Reinersman, Emily Schutzman (third row) Malone Simpson, Molly Bilz, Tyler MacKnight (fourth row) Michael Litteral and Jeff Mollman. THANKS TO AMY WALLOT

The following Kenton County residents graduated from Eastern Kentucky University: Crescent Springs: Brandi Jo Hunt. Crestview Hills: Michael William Erlanger: Richard G. Quant. Fort Mitchell: Rachel Lynn Holloran. Independence: Erica Kay Childress, Elizabeth Katherine Reilly, Cammie Rose Tuemler and Marie Katherine Weeks. Villa Hills: Nicholas Tyler and Richard Yi Zhe Ooi.

McCauley receives award

Joseph McCauley of Villa Hills received a Buschmann Award from Xavier University. The son of Christine and Patrick McCauley, he will graduate from Covington Catholic High School this spring. He is active in athletics, tutoring and mentoring, and plans to major in prepharmacy.

Specht-Bird makes honor list

Sarahmarie Specht-Bird of Villa Hills was named to the honor list of Oxford College for the fall semester. The list includes students who have a cumulative gradepoint average of 3.5 or higher.

Kenton residents earn dean’s award

The following Kenton County residents earned a dean’s award from Eastern Kentucky University for the fall semester dean’s list: Covington: Krista Noel

Clark and Jonathan Daniel Gaupel. Crescent Springs: Molly Katherine Kaiser and Catherine Claire Macke. Edgewood: Emily Marie Bohn and Kristen Marie Klensch. Elsmere: Emily Carol Bartee and Dylan Richard Bogard. Erlanger: William Patrick Legg and Kaysie Taylor Worley. Independence: Kristina Ray Beighle, Erica Kay Childress and Elizabeth Katherine Reilly. Park Hills: Justin Jeremy Schultz. Taylor Mill: Kirsten Rochelle Franxman. Villa Hills: Krista Katherine Waugaman. To earn a dean’s award, students must achieve dean’s list honors at for three semesters, not necessarily consecutive. A lapel pin is presented to students by the dean of their academic college.

Kenton residents on president’s list

The following Kenton County residents were named to the Eastern Kentucky University fall semester president’s list: Crescent Springs: Molly Katherine and Catherine Claire Macke. Edgewood: Victoria Grace Critcher, Kristen Marie, Lindsey Morgan Otis, and Samantha Lynn Utz. Erlanger: William Patrick Legg, Katelyn Nicole Powell and Kaysie Taylor Worley. Fort Mitchell: Brock Christopher Hart. Independence: Erica Kay Childress and Elizabeth Katherine Reilly. Villa Hills: Michelle Ann Butler, Kristen Elizabeth Koeninger and Krista Katherine Waugaman. The list includes full time students who attain a perfect 4.0 grade-point average for a semester.

Kenton residents graduate

These Kenton County residents graduated from Eastern Kentucky University: Crescent Springs: Brandi Jo Hunt. Crestview Hills: Michael William Hudson. Erlanger: Richard G. Quant. Fort Mitchell: Rachel Lynn Holloran. Independence: Erica Kay Childress. Elizabeth Katherine Reilly, Cammie Rose Tuemler and Marie Katherine Weeks. Villa Hills: Nicholas Tyler Kuertz and Richard Yi Zhe Ooi. Taylor Mill: Lindsay Elizabeth Jehn.


SPORTS

MARCH 14, 2013 • COMMUNITY RECORDER • A5

Editor: Melanie Laughman, mlaughman@communitypress.com, 513-248-7573

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | RECREATIONAL

COMMUNITY

RECORDER

CommunityPress.com

FIRST SWING AT THE 2013 BASEBALL SEASON

Scott junior first baseman Pete Ohmer, right, is one of the Eagles’ top returners. FILE PHOTO

KENTON BASEBALL TEAMS

BATTLE

THE ELEMENTS By James Weber jweber@nky.com

KENTON COUNTY — The Reds may be in the desert comfort of Arizona, but Northern Kentucky baseball players have to deal with the distinct discomfort of March weather in this area. Teams were allowed to play their first games March 6 but most locals are waiting until later when March becomes more lamb-like than lion. Here is a look at local teams:

Beechwood

Bob Mullins takes over as head coach for longtime head man Bob Myerhoff. He inherits a Tigers team that went 16-19 last season. His top returners include junior shortstop/pitcher Jason Suchanek, senior outfielder Justin Parker, senior pitcher/first baseman Blake Schuman, junior second baseman Trevor Booth and senior outfielder/infielder Ryan Rengering. He has five starters returning overall. Mullins said the team should have good speed and be strong defensively.

Covington Catholic

Bill Krumpelbeck wins 20 games a season like clockwork. The longtime Colonels head coach has maintained that streak by being able to reload when necessary. That will be the task this year after the Colonels graduated a nearly all-senior starting lineup from last year’s 33-6 team that won the 35th District title before losing to Dixie Heights in the Ninth Region quarterfinals. Junior Grant Schreiver is the top returning starter, and one of the top hitters in the area. He has verbally committed to Louisville. Seniors listed on this year’s roster include pitcher Nick Davis, catcher Nate Kunkel, infielder Matt Litzler, pitcher/infielder Daniel Schumate and pitcher/outfielder David Zalla. CovCath will start the season playing Bishop Brossart and Louisville St. Xavier at Lexing-

Holy Cross senior Blake Tiberi (25) is one of the top players in the area. FILE PHOTO

ton Catholic March 15-16. CCH’s first home game is April 3 against Cooper.

Covington Latin

Joe Gray takes over as head coach for the Trojans who are looking to make up for a winless 2012. Returning starters are senior catcher Patrick Clancy, senior third baseman George Rice, senior shortstop Nick Pilcher, senior outfielder Daniel James, senior outfielder Nick Roettker, senior David Nussman, junior first baseman Tyler Schriver, junior pitcher Jude Noel and junior infielder Alex Green. Top newcomers include freshman second baseman Michael Elmlinger, prep year catcher River Carpenter and prep-year pitchers Josh Frommeyer and Micah Gray.

Dixie Heights

Chris Maxwell returns for his 31st season as head coach, looking for his 600th win as he enters this season 15 away with 585 victories. His top returners are senior catcher/pitcher/first baseman Eric Elkus, senior pitcher/left fielder Garrett Combs, senior center fielder Casey Cox, junior

catcher Seth Caple and junior pitcher/third baseman/center fielder Nick King. Dixie has had strong catchers in recent years and Maxwell expects his Caple and Elkus to carry that tradition.

Holmes

Dave Mumm takes over as head coach this year. He inherits two seniors in first baseman/ pitcher Tanner Watts and pitcher/infielder Nick Long. He expects good seasons from both. Other players to watch include junior catcher Austin Simpson, freshman pitcher/outfielder Kyrie Glover and pitcher/infielder David Varney. Mumm said the Bulldogs have a lot of team speed and should be improved over last season.

Holy Cross

Pat Ryan is the new head coach this year for the Indians, who were 25-12 last year. He replaces Mike Holtz, who joined the Holy Cross administration over the winter. Ryan, an assistant to Holtz, was last a head coach in 1985. While his Indians lost eight seniors from last year including some of their top players from

Senior Blake Schuman is one of Beechwood’s top returners. FILE PHOTO

the past decade, they return two of the top players in the area in seniors Conner Callery and Blake Tiberi. Both are four-year starters and accomplished lefthanded hitters and infielders. Callery will play for Ohio University and Tiberi for Louisville. “The accolades they have received through their careers as players at Holy Cross are much deserved,” Ryan said. “Some players are skilled offensively and some are skilled defensively, but these two young men are highly skilled on both sides of the line.” Other top returners include senior outfielder Vinnie Pangallo and senior outfielder/first baseman Mike Hewitt. Senior Nate Cox returns to the mound after battling injuries last season. Top newcomers include sophomore pitcher/infielder/ outfielder Jared Seibert, junior infielder/pitcher Trevor Niehaus, junior catcher/pitcher Travis Webster, junior outfielder/pitcher Trevor Kincaid, junior outfielder/pitcher Keaton Harvard, junior outfielder Tyler Hoog and junior first baseman/pitcher Jake Ketron. Hewitt and Pangallo will be

key to protecting Callery and Tiberi in the order. The Indians are inexperienced on the mound behind Tiberi and Cox.

Lloyd

The Juggernauts were 16-19 last year, suffering an extra-inning loss to St. Henry in the 34th District Tournament. Aaron Moore returns for his eighth year as head coach. His top returners include Addison Brown, Jimmy Stevens, Tyler Beschman, Corey Day and Austin Smith. “While we will be either young or inexperienced at several spots this year, this group of seniors have big aspirations,” Moore said. “They are a fun group to be around because of their general attitudes and work ethic. I have yet to have an instance where I have had to ask them to work harder. They already have an expectation of that and are passing it on to younger guys. If we can perform offensively, I think we have an excellent shot at getting back to the Ninth Region tournament.” The Juggernauts will start the season at home against See BASEBALL, Page A7


SPORTS & RECREATION

A6 • COMMUNITY RECORDER • MARCH 14, 2013

PRESS PREPS HIGHLIGHTS By James Weber jweber@nky.com

Football

» Boone County has hired Bowling Green High School defensive coordinator Jeff Griffith as their new head coach. Bowling Green has won the past two state titles in Class 5A. » Lloyd head football coach Josh Stratton left last week to take the same position at New Richmond High School in Ohio.

Boys basketball

» Highlands head basketball coach Mike Flynn stepped down on March 11.

Hall of fame

» The Northern Kentucky Sports Hall of Fame will induct new members 1 p.m. Wednesday, March 20 at the Villa Hills Civic Club.

Freedom tickets

» Single game tickets to the Florence Freedom’s 2013 season will go on sale at 11 a.m. Saturday, March 30, at the University of Cincinnati Medical Center Stadium box office. UCMC Stadium will also host the city of Florence’s Easter Egg hunt at the ballpark that day starting at noon. Fans can take advantage of two special ticket offers during the Saturday event: With the purchase of any single game ticket or Kids Club membership, the Freedom will match the purchase with ticket vouchers good to see the

team’s first action of 2013 during the May 8 exhibition game. Tickets to any 2013 Wednesday game will be available at buy two, get two free Kids Club 2 memberships, presented by AAA Travel and supported by Walt Disney World Vacations, are on sale online at FlorenceFreedom.com for $10 until opening day. Memberships include: Tickets to all Sunday and Wednesday home games; Season-long pass to the Airheads Kids Zone inflatables including the new Belle Belly Bounce; a Kids Club 2 T-shirt and membership card; and $1 hot dogs all season. Season and group ticket packages are also available for the 2013 campaign. The team may be reached at 859-594HITS and is located at 7950 Freedom Way in Florence. The 2012 runners-up are members of the independent professional Frontier League and open the regular season on May 16 at UCMC Stadium.

NKU Notes

» The Atlantic Sun Conference has honored Northern Kentucky University women’s basketball players Jaimie Hamlet and Kayla Thacker with spots on the league’s Academic All-Conference team. Hamlet finished her playing career tied for eighth in Norse history with 99 3-point field goals. Hamlet averaged 5.8 points per game this season and started all 27 games. Thacker led the Norse in scoring this sea-

TOURNAMENT CHAMPIONS

son at 11.0 points pergame and tied for the team lead in rebounding at 5.9 rpg. She also topped Northern Kentucky in steals (46), 3-pointers made (43), free throws made (81) and minutes played (36.6 per game). Hamlet and Thacker helped Northern Kentucky post a 15-12 record during its first Division I season. The Norse also extended their streak of consecutive winning seasons to 30 straight. » A pair of Northern Kentucky University women’s basketball players have been honored by the Atlantic Sun Conference for their performance during the 2012-13 season. Northern Kentucky’s Tiara Hopper has been selected All-Atlantic Sun Conference second team, while the Norse’s Rianna Gayheart earned a spot on the league’s All-Freshman squad. Hopper and Gayheart helped the Norse post a 15-12 record in their first Division I campaign and clinch the program’s 30th consecutive winning season. Northern Kentucky also finished 12-6 in the ASun to capture fourth place in the league standings. » Northern Kentucky University’s Eshaunte Jones has been selected to the All-Atlantic Sun Conference first team. Jones, a 6-foot-4 senior guard from Fort Wayne, Ind., averages 15.8 points per game and has made 80 shots from 3-point range this season. He helped the Norse post a 9-9 record in the Atlantic Sun Conference and tie for fourth place in the league standings.

St. Pius X third-grade girls coached by Beth Joyce were champions of the St. Henry Annual Basketball Tournament. Pictured are Rachel Raziano, Sara Schutt, Eleanor Simkonis, Ellie Joyce, Jillian MacKnight, Kylie Aytes and kneeling, Paige Donnelly.

CHEERING ON VILLA

SIDELINES T-ball signup

Meet Ryan Clark

Baseball tryouts

Christ United Methodist Church Leisure Ministry Team will hold youth T-ball and coach-pitch signups online through April 7, at http://bit.ly/Wi4wsK. In-person signups will be noon to 2 p.m. April 6, at the church, 1440 Boone Aire Road, Florence. Deadline is April 7.

University of Kentucky fans will have an opportunity to meet author Ryan Clark at a book signing 7 p.m. Thursday, March 14, at Joseph-Beth Booksellers in Crestview Hills.

Bluegrass Roy Hobbs Men’s Baseball League tryouts for any player 28 and older will be 2-4 p.m. Saturday, March 23, at Moerscher Park, the Newport Central Catholic field. Call Will McCabe at 859-802-0804 or visit bluegrassroyhobbs.com.

Villa Madonna Academy senior Deuce Gibson cheers on the Blue Lightning boys’ basketball team to a victory against Bellevue. THANKS TO NEENA VOLK

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SPORTS & RECREATION

MARCH 14, 2013 • COMMUNITY RECORDER • A7

Baseball

XTREME CHAMPIONS

Continued from Page A5

Bellevue March 18.

Ludlow

Cory Highfield is head coach for the Panthers, who were 12-12 last year. They start the season at Gallatin County March 18 and their first home game is March 22 against Holy Cross.

The Northern Kentucky Midwest Xtreme 16 Navy team played in the IVA Winterfest tournament in Indianapolis. They came back as the champions in the girls 16 division. Pictured are coach Josh Hamer, Morgan Carl, Morgan Berning, Biz Manser, Carson Elliot, Ellie Smith, Maggie McMillian, Rian Boelter, Nikki Lightner, Claire Henning and assistant coach Darlene Hamer.

INDOOR TRACK UPDATES By James Weber jweber@nky.com

» St. Henry won the 1A championship in both the boys and girls competitions at the Mason-Dixon Games indoor high school state meet March 2 in Louisville. The girls 4x800 relay won with Sydney Pitts, Holly Blades, Elizabeth Hoffman and Taylor Connett. The 4x200 won with Laura Felix, Tina Felix, Lauren Cahill and Madison Culbertson. St. Henry was second in the 4x400. Meghan Burke was third in the 60 hurdles. Madison Culbertson was fourth in the 60. Tina Felix was fourth in the 400. Kathy Munzer was third in the long jump. Connett was third in the 1,500 and second in the 800. Holly Blades was fourth in the 3,000. Janelle Tobler was second in high jump. Celia Eltzroth was second in triple jump. In boys, Austin Eibel won the 60 hurdles and the 400. Daniel Wolfer was fourth in the 3,000.

The Crusaders were second in the 4x400. Craig Aldridge was third in the long jump and third in high jump. He won the triple jump. Matt Martin was third in shot put. » Several locals did well in both the boys and girls competitions at the Mason-Dixon Games indoor high school state meet March 2 in Louisville. Notre Dame’s Katy Zembrodt was third in the 60 meter hurdles in 3A. Katherine Koplyay was fourth in the 60 meter dash. Amy Hansen was third in the 3,000. Mandy Arnzen was second in the triple jump. Covington Catholic junior Brian Menke won the 3,000 in 2A. Ross Rohling was third in the shot put. Beechwood was third in the boys 4x200 in 1A with Max Nussbaum, Daniel Middendorf, Mitch Thomas and Devon Everett. Grant Birindelli was second in the 800. Tiger Chad Evans won the shot put. Dixie Heights senior Ella Edgett was fifth in the 3A pole vault.

St. Henry

Doug Peddicord takes over as head coach for the Crusaders, who were 24-13 last season and 34th District champions His top five returners include Rex Rogers, Craig Rose, Alex Conradi, Mitchell Kuebbing and Michael Niemer. Overall, the Crusaders boast 10 seniors and an experienced pitching staff with three solid lefthanders. Peddicord hopes the team can win the conference and several kids on to college ball. St. Henry hosts Scott to start the season March 20.

Scott

Jeff Trame returns for his second year as head coach after directing the Eagles to a 2215 record last season. He returns seven starters from last year. Senior catcher Kyle Kramer hit .312 with two home runs last year. Senior Pete Ohmer led the Eagles in RBI with 31 and hit .316 with two homers. Also a strong pitcher, he was limited to 23 innings in 2012 due to injury. Senior outfielder Jared Best hit .311 and senior outfielder Jordan Pike hit .301. Senior Brenden Wells can play any position in the field and had a 2.85 ERA on the mound. Junior Reed Spata returns at shortstop and junior Josh Castleman returns in the in-

Grant Schreiver is a returning starter for Cov Cath. FILE PHOTO

pitching staff who returns four pitchers. Top newcomers include utility player Tristen Marcum and pitcher/infielder Sean Lawrence. “We return a good core of our team that will hopefully lead our newcomers into the transition to varsity baseball,” Roberts said. “ We have a number of players that can play multiple positions which will allow us to move some guys around, and give us a solid defense to back our pitching staff.” SK hosts Gallatin County March 23 to start the season.

field. He had a .411on-base percentage. Junior Ray Everett was 5-2 with a 1.65 ERA last season. Seniors Seth Robinson and Eric Pouncy return to the mound. The Eagles were regional runner-up in junior varsity last season. Senior Tyler Stoeckel was the leading pitcher on the team and juniors Cameron Kinney and Nick Brinkman were key infielders. Scott starts the season at St. Henry March 20.

Simon Kenton

Troy Roberts returns for his second year as head coach after leading the Pioneers to a 22-17 record last season, including the 32nd District championship. He is 206-177 overall in his 17 years. Returning starters include catcher Michael Mundy, infielder Tyler Smith, pitcher/ second baseman/centerfielder Vic Newberry, second baseman/left fielder Grant Wassom and pitcher/first baseman Brad Franzen. Newberry, with three years varsity experience, leads the

Villa Madonna

Villa was 4-28 last year and will look to improve starting March 18 at Walton-Verona. Villa’s first home game is March 22 against Lloyd. Seniors listed on the roster include Scott Adams, Jordan Drees, Dan Hillenmeyer, Randy Lund, Luke Nybo, Andy Piccirillo, Jack Rees, Glenn Rice, Thomas Steinkoenig, Chandler Taennis and Andrew Wagner.

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VIEWPOINTS A8 • COMMUNITY RECORDER • MARCH 14, 2013

COMMUNITY

RECORDER

Editor: Nancy Daly, ndaly@nky.com, 578-1059

EDITORIALS | LETTERS | COLUMNS | CH@TROOM

CommunityPress.com

Progressivism is the real enemy For the past month Ted Smith and I have been having a conversation about the Republican Party, Tea Party and Lincoln. I’ve raised questions about the future and direction of the Republican Party. He has responded with conservatives can’t win, history lessons about slavery and Lincoln but never answered my questions. It’s been interesting, Mr. Smith, but President Lincoln has not been the standard bearer for the party in 148 years. The real reason I attempted to engage Mr. Smith is a concern that is far greater than any party or individual. The concern that the enemy of our great republic is already within the gates and what can be done to cast the enemy out. Who or what is the enemy? The enemy is progressivism, socialism, Marxism and those who spread

it. They’re at every level from the White House to the school house. It’s all very seductive. Let the state take care of your Jack Shields needs. The COMMUNITY state knows RECORDER GUEST COLUMNIST what’s good for you. Once enough people give in to the false promises we lose our economic and individual liberty, our self reliance, our personal responsibility and our ability to excel. Let’s talk about what is happening in our nation today. What other president has ever told the American people he is not a dictator? President Obama has and more than once. He is avoiding the appearance of

governing, but does he protest too much? Is he an invisible dictator? Here is some food for thought: Control by regulation – Forcing the shutdown of coal-fired power plants by making it too expensive for them to operate and soon too costly for us to afford heating and cooling. 5,391 pages of Obama care regulations including 644 pages on exchange implementation that were dumped on Friday. Mandating unrealistic mileage standards for automobiles. EPA trying to confiscate private property because the owner’s use doesn’t agree with their agenda. Control by intimidation – Suing states for trying to protect their borders when the federal government ignores its legal duty. Loosing 2,000 criminal illegals on the population

with 3,000 more possible under the charade of cost control. Sending out cabinet members to warn of financial doom and create fear if sequestration is implemented. Control by currency destruction – The Federal Reserve is buying up $85 billion of government debt monthly … this is as bad as counterfeiting which only the federal government is authorized to prosecute. Nearly $6 trillion of debt created on Obama’s watch. It’s almost a third of the generational bondage we’ve saddled on our children and grandchildren. Control by manipulation – this administration constantly pits one group against another … whites vs. blacks; people vs. companies; poor vs. rich; state vs. religious groups and institutions; gays vs. straights; conservatives vs. women. All

Teacher wants to spread her love of history My name is Lisa Heiert. I am a history teacher at Notre Dame Academy. This is my 10th year of teaching. I love history. Realistically, history was my first love. As long as I can remember I have loved hearing stories of our past. My mom was a grade school teacher and she was the first person to introduce me to history. I can remember as a child her reading “Little House on the Prairie” books to me. I was so moved by the courage and bravery of those families who moved west for a better life. The second person that sparked my love of history even more was Mr. Jim Schneider, my high school American history teacher. I was mesmerized by his lectures. One story after another about how our great nation came to be. I remember for

the first time watching the movie “Glory” about the Civil War in his class. I will never forget the overwhelming Lisa Heiert feeling of COMMUNITY pride for our RECORDER GUEST COLUMNIST country I got from watching the brave men of the 54th Massachusetts Infantry die for our country. Looking back now it makes perfect sense why I am a history teacher. I want to spread my love of history to others. Every school year I start by asking my students who loves history. Normally one or two hands pop up. I teach not for these students but for the others who didn’t raise their hands. I teach to expose to

students the love I feel for the stories of our past. I teach to show them history isn’t about memorizing a bunch of names, dates and facts. It about learning story of our past and having it come to life. My teaching philosophy is more of an interactive handson approach then a read and memorize. I stand on my desk when I teach about Teddy Roosevelt charging up Kettle Hill during the Spanish American War. I make my students crawl under their desk while I throw paper balls at them to help simulate trench warfare. I like to use a variety of different teaching strategies in my classroom. We watched a video on John Adams and then they had to write an I-am poem on him. We illustrated the Boston Massacre and examine pictures that were used to turn it into to propaganda.

We spent a day learning about the real John Brown. We read his final speech and examined the different photographs of John Brown to determine whether he was a hero or villain. I pride myself in doing things differently. There is no better feeling than seeing your students face light up when they truly get a concept. I love teaching. I truly love American history. I am constantly searching for new lesson plans to use in my classes. I love to use new technology in the classroom. That is why I am a teacher and I am very lucky because I truly love my job. This is the essay that won Lisa Heiert, a teacher at Notre Dame Academy, the American History Teacher of the Year Award from the Simon Kenton chapter of Sons of the American Revolution.

Smith’s RHINOs are bankrupting America Ted Smith’s March 5 article in the Enquirer trashing the Tea Party and conservatives was disgusting. Mr. Smith has not been shy about his vile views on the Tea Party and Sen. Rand Paul. He posted the following comment, “I think the TPs and Senator Screwball are lunatics Hell bent on destruction of the party of Lincoln and Reagan.” Shockingly, the Republican RHINO Association chose to ignore his comments. I guess membership does have its privileges. His attack on small government conservatives and his support for big government Republicans like Sen. Mitch McConnell is part of America’s debt problem. Several weeks ago, Senator McConnell wrote an article proclaiming he saved Kentuckians from the fiscal cliff. Not only did he increase the top marginal income tax rate from 35 percent to 39.6 percent and limited deductions, he increased the Social Security Tax rate from 4.2 percent to 6.2 percent. That tax increase impacts all working Americans. The inheritance tax increased from 35 percent to

40 percent and capital gains and dividends increased from 15 percent to 20 percent. He voted for welfare for Tom Wurtz the banks COMMUNITY (TARP) and RECORDER GUEST COLUMNIST the costly expansion of Medicare prescription coverage. He also voted to expand federal involvement in education with the No Child Left Behind Act. McConnell and Smith clearly believe Americans are not taxed enough. The conservative Heritage Foundation rates McConnell at 76 percent on his conservatism while they rate Sen. Rand Paul at 96 percent. The Freedom Index rated McConnell at 67 percent on his compliance with the U.S. Constitution. Senator Paul scored 93 percent. FreedomWorks score McConnell at 77 percent to Paul’s 100 percent. The facts establish that McConnell is a solid D- conservative. I agree with Mr. Smith that he and Senator McConnell are not conservatives. They’re

COMMUNITY

RECORDER

A publication of

big government Democrats who refuse to take off their donkey masks. During McConnell’s 28 years in Congress, annual federal spending has increased from $946 billion to $3.6 trillion. The national debt has climbed from $1 trillion to almost $17 trillion. During the Bush administration, McConnell voted for five debt ceiling increases and yet during all that exploding debt, he couldn’t swing a measly $2.5 billion for a new Brent Spence Bridge. The increase in America’s national debt could finance 6,000 B.S. Bridges. The only thing Senator McConnell, with the support of Mr. Smith, have been doing for Kentuckians is raising taxes, raising the debt ceiling and expanding the national debt. In 2011, he proposed allowing the president to raise the debt ceiling on his own. McConnell then filibustered his own 2011 bill. Even worse, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi defended his plan by saying it had “merit.” It’s embarrassing when Pelosi and McConnell are on the same page.

Tragically, Democrats and Smith’s RHINOs created this financial mess and constitutional-conservatives are the only ones tough enough to clean it up. Tom Wurtz is president of Tom Wurtz Consulting and a resident of Fort Mitchell.

ABOUT LETTERS AND COLUMNS We welcome your comments on editorials, columns, stories or other topics important to you in the Recorder. Include your name, address and phone number(s) so we may verify your letter. Letters of 200 or fewer words and columns of 500 or fewer words have the best chance of being published. All submissions may be edited for length, accuracy and clarity. Deadline: Noon Monday E-mail: kynews@ communitypress.com Fax: 859-283-7285 U.S. mail: See box below Letters, columns and articles submitted to the Recorder may be published or distributed in print, electronic or other forms.

228 Grandview Drive, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017 654 Highland Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075 phone: 283-0404 email: kynews@communitypress.com web site: www.nky.com

out assault on the Second Amendment right to bear arms. This is classic Alinsky technique – isolate, demonize and destroy. There are many more examples of federal encroachment on our lives and liberty. Space constraints prohibit me from expounding them here. As Kentuckians and Americans it’s our duty to know what the federal government is doing. We need to elect strong state representatives from the governor on down who recognize that the federal government has very limited powers. We need to elect congressman and senators who know and support the Constitution. What do you think? Where do you stand? Jack Shields is an Edgewood resident.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR Revisionist history at its best

In the Feb. 14 edition of the Community Recorder, you published an interesting and well-presented letter by Mr. Ted Smith of Park Hills. In his letter he made one historical error that is being perpetuated by schools and people everywhere. It is, in many cases, unintentional revisionist history at its best. Mr. Smith stated that, “The first Republican president of the United States was Abraham Lincoln. He freed the slaves by executive orders published in the Emancipation Proclamation on Sept. 22, 1862. Its effective dates was Jan. 1, 1863.” This is not completely correct nor accurate. The proclamation freed all slaves in Confederate territories and ordered the Army to treat slaves as free in the 10 states that were still fighting. A hallow point since it could not be enforced in those states, but as the Army took control of Confederate regions, the slaves in those regions were emancipated. The proclamation did not apply to the five slave states that did not secede from the Union nor to most regions already controlled by the Union Army. Lincoln and the Republican Party recognized that the Emancipation Proclamation might not be constitutional once the war was over. The legal framework of slavery would still exist in the former Confederate states as well as in the Union slave states that had been exempted from the proclamation. The Republican Party committed itself to a constitutional amendment to abolish slavery. Not until the December 1865 ratification of the Thirteenth Amendment, which made slavery illegal everywhere in the U.S., were slaves freed. The proclamation did not compensate the owners, did not itself outlaw slavery, and did not make the ex-slaves citizens. Charles K. Duncan Erlanger

Community Recorder Editor Nancy Daly ndaly@nky.com, 578-1059 Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday See page A2 for additional contact information.


THURSDAY, MARCH 14, 2013

LIFE

COMMUNITY RECORDER

PEOPLE | IDEAS | RECIPES

Cinderella’s Closet volunteers Janis Walling and Sarah Tomelin hang up donated dresses. AMY SCALF/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Dress drive fills Cinderella’s Closet for prom princesses By Amy Scalf

FAIRY GODMOTHERS

ascalf@nky.com

Meet the generous women who help high school girls dress up for prom in our video at NKY.com.

LAKESIDE PARK — In the

fairy tale, Cinderella had only one fairy godmother. But in Northern Kentucky, high school girls have dozens of generous ladies who help them dress up for prom and feel like princesses. Cinderella’s Closet of Northern Kentucky hosted its annual dress drive at Immanuel Baptist Church on March 9, a week ahead of the day when girls can visit the church to find the perfect prom dress and all the accessories they could ever dream of. Cinderella’s Closet founder Erin Peterson conjured the event eight years ago in an effort to help girls who otherwise wouldn’t be able to afford prom expenses. She firmly believes that the dress and accessories are only part of what her group provides. “We give them dresses, yes, but we are there to shower them with grace and love and to let them know how special and loved and how beautiful they are,” said Peterson. “Her visit to Cinderella’s Closet should be one of the best days of her life. I want them to have an amazing experience there and feel equal to their peers, but most of all I want them to feel cherished. I want them to know they are loved in this world and how amazing they are.” According to Cinderella’s Closet dress drive coordinator

Angela Cooper inspects a colorful dress during the Cinderella’s Closet dress drive at Immanuel Baptist Church on March 9. AMY SCALF/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Peggy Browning, approximately 430 girls are registered for the event. After the dress drive, she said the organization would have more than 2,500 dresses – which allows each princess five different options for her prom outfit. Sometimes, they have to purchase dresses to make sure there are enough gowns available in each size. Throughout the drive, people pile in with arms loaded, carrying prom dresses of all lengths, sizes and colors, and loaded with bags bulging with jewelry, purses and shoes. They all come to help make some young lady’s prom experience one she’ll remember fondly forever. “I grew up in a rural community and didn’t have a lot,” said

Cinderella’s Closet dress drive coordinator Peggy Browning helps Vickie Mertz of Lakeside Park fill out a tax deduction form for her donation. AMY SCALF/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Vickie Mertz of Lakeside Park. “I had to borrow a prom dress. I had to give it back, but I was a fairy princess for that night, so I know how important that is.” Stacy Bosch of Independence bought shoes and jewelry on sale and brought bags full to the drive. She will also volunteer for the upcoming dress event. Colleen Rogge of Crescent Springs dropped off three large bags of shoes and jewelry. She has volunteered before, but

won’t make it to this year’s event. She said she still wanted to contribute. “Instead of donating my time this year, I decided to donate a few items,” she said. “It’s a wonderful service for these girls. They just sparkle and shine when they get these things.” Rogge said she got an additional discount at DSW shoe store in Crestview Hills when she said she was donating the items to Cinderella’s Closet. She plans to purchase dress-

Cathy Sandlin of Dayton, Ky., brings in an armload of dresses to donate to high school girls in need for Cinderella’s Closet dress drive at Immanuel Baptist Church. AMY SCALF/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

es after prom season this year to prepare for next year. Regina Danaher-Smith, a youth services counselor in Gallatin County, wheeled in a cart loaded with dozens of dresses, some of which were received from Cinderella’s Closet in previous years. Not only does DanaherSmith bring in items, she also makes sure girls in need from her community come to the event to get the prom dresses of their dreams. “It’s such a wonderful thing to see the girls smile and have such a good experience that they’ll never forget. It’s worth every bit of it to make sure these girls have a wonderful prom,” she said. For more information and a list of year-round donation sites, visit www.cinderellas closetusa.org. Want to continue the conversation? Tweet at @AmyScalfNky

Nina Young, age 6 and a half, is Cinderella’s Closet Glass Slipper helper. AMY SCALF/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER


B2 • COMMUNITY RECORDER • MARCH 14, 2013

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD FRIDAY, MARCH 15

Jazzercise Classes, 8:30-9:30 a.m.; 9:30-10:30 a.m.; 4:30-5:30 p.m.; 6-7 p.m., Jazzercise Crescent Springs Center, $34 for unlimited monthly classes. 859-331-7778; jazzercise.com. Crescent Springs.

Art Exhibits The Art of Food, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, 1028 Scott Blvd., Annual exhibition of artistic culinary creations by visual artists and top chefs from the area. Free. 859-491-2030; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington. Contoured Essence, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Artisans Enterprise Center, 27 W. Seventh St., Curated by Paige Wideman. Exploring one’s innate fascination with the figure; artists transform global viewpoints, incorporate or engage audience on an emotional or imaginative level and encourage collaborative discourse between artist and viewer. Through April 19. 859292-2322; www.covingtonarts.com. Covington.

Job Fairs

"Don't Cross the Streams" will be performed March 15-23, at the Falcon in Newport. Pictured are Phillip Webster, Rodger Pille and Randy Lee Bailey. THANKS TO TED WIEL

Museums

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Art Openings The Life and Works of Harlan Hubbard, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, 1600 Montague Road, Collection of artwork created by local artist and author. Collection reflects spirit of simplicity and beauty of nature Hubbard admired during his lifetime. Exhibit continues through May 5. Included with admission. 859-491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

Tot Tuesdays, 10:30-11:30 a.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, 1600 Montague Road, Story, craft and activity. Included with admission. 859-491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

Music - Acoustic Roger Drawdy, 8 p.m., Molly Malone’s Irish Pub and Restaurant, 112 E. Fourth St., Irish music. Free. 859-491-6659; mollymalonesirishpub.com. Covington.

Music - Concerts

Dining Events Trinity United Methodist Church Fish Fry Frenzy, 5-7:30 p.m., Trinity United Methodist Church-Latonia, 101 E. Southern Ave., Gym. Meal includes two sides, dessert and drink. Carryout available. $7.50 dinner, $6 seniors, $3.50 children. 859-2614010. Latonia. St. Joseph Academy Lenten Fish Fry, 4:30-8 p.m., St. Joseph Academy, 48 Needmore St., Dinner includes fried or baked fish, three side items, dessert and drink. Drive-through available. Family friendly. $10 dinner. 859-485-6444; www.saintjosephacademy.net. Walton. Fish Fry, 4:30-8 p.m., St. Barbara Church, 4042 Turkeyfoot Road, Fish, shrimp or baked tilapia with three sides: $7.50. Children’s meals available. Dine in or carry out (no phone orders). 859-444-8040; www.stbarbaraky.org. Erlanger. Mary, Queen of Heaven Fish Fry, 4-8 p.m., Mary, Queen of Heaven Parish, 1150 Donaldson Highway, Full menu and pricing online. Call-ahead/carry-out at 859-371-2622. Drive-thru and fully-accessible dine-in service. Official home of "The Codfather.". 859-525-6909; www.mqhparish.com. Erlanger. Fish Fry Dinner, 4:30-8 p.m., Knights of Columbus 3908, Father Bealer Council, 605 Lytle Ave., Includes fried or baked fish, chicken nuggets, shrimp, hamburgers and hot dogs, sides and drinks. Carry-out available. $1.50-$7.50. 859-342-6643. Elsmere. St. Patrick Catholic Church Fish Fry, 4:30-7:30 p.m., St. Patrick Catholic Church, 3285 Mills Road, Fried fish, shrimp, grilled salmon, pizza, hot buffalo fish bites and cheese sticks. Dine-in, drive thru and carryout available. With entertainment. Family friendly. $3.50 -$9.50. 859-356-5151; www.stpatrickchurch.us. Taylor Mill. Drive Thru Fish Fry, 4-7:30 p.m., Dixie Heights High School, 3010 Dixie Highway, Back of concession stand by football field. Meal 1: fish sandwich, homemade macaroni and cheese, fries and homemade coleslaw. Meal 2: Cheese pizza, fries and homemade coleslaw. Fish sandwiches served on bakery buns or rye bread. Order will be delivered to your vehicle. Benefits Dixie Heights High School’s music programs. $6 meal 1, $5 meal 2. 859-341-7650; http://www.eyeswithpride.net. Edgewood. St. Cecilia Holy Name Society Fish Fry, 5-8 p.m., St. Cecilia Church-Independence, 5313 Madison Pike, Includes fried and baked fish, eight-piece shrimp platter, sides, pizza and desserts. Carryout available. Benefits St. Cecilia Holy Name Society’s projects. $8 dinner, $3 weekly appetizer. 859-393-4964. Independence. Fort Wright Civic Club Lenten Fish Fry, 5-8 p.m. Benefits Fort Wright Girl Scouts., Fort Wright Civic Club, 115 Kennedy Road, Fried fish, baked fish, chicken, shrimp, fries, coleslaw, green beans, and Macaroni and

Hiring Our Heroes Job Fair, 1-5 p.m., Receptions Banquet and Conference Center Erlanger, 1379 Donaldson Road, More than 80 local and national companies participating, honoring veterans and their families. Open 1-2 p.m. to military, veterans and spouses; open to public 2-5. Ages 18 and up. Free. Presented by The Northern Kentucky Career Center. 859372-8413; nkyonestop.org. Erlanger.

The Ready Set and Outasight, 7 p.m. Doors open 6 p.m., Madison Theater, 730 Madison Ave., $15. 859-491-2444; www.madisontheateronline.com. Covington.

The NPC Northern Kentucky Bodybuilding National Qualifier will be held Saturday, March 16, at the Northern Kentucky Convention Center in Covington. Call 859-261-1500. Pictured is last year's overall physique winner Umana, Alberto. THANKS TO SANDY RIEDINGER cheese. Desserts provided by several community organizations. Televisions available for game nights, and special bar pricing. Benefits community organizations. Family friendly. $.75-$7. 859-331-1150. Fort Wright.

Reservations required. 513-3350297; www.sushicinti.com. Covington. Pasta Workshop, 2-4 p.m., Argentine Bistro, 2875 Town Center Blvd., $25. Registration required. 859-426-1042; argentinebistro.com. Crestview Hills.

Exercise Classes

Drink Tastings

Jazzercise Classes, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Jazzercise Crescent Springs Center, 519 Enterprise Drive, $34 for unlimited monthly classes. 859-331-7778; jazzercise.com. Crescent Springs.

Wine Tasting, 2-6 p.m., The Liquor Cabinet, Free. 859-5869270. Hebron. All About Stout Fest, noon-4 p.m., Molly Malone’s Irish Pub and Restaurant, 112 E. Fourth St., Includes 5 five-ounce tastings of any of 24 stouts on tap, one 16-ounce pint, souvenir pint glass and right to purchase additional 5-ounce tastes for $1 and 16-ounce pints for $3. Ages 21 and up. $20. 859-491-6659; www.mollymalonesirishpub.com. Covington.

Music - Jazz Art Gore, 8 p.m. Quartet., The Thompson House, 24 E. Third St., $10. 859-261-7469; www.ticketweb.com. Newport. The John Von Ohlen Trio, 7:30 p.m., Dee Felice Cafe, 529 Main St., 859-261-2365; www.deefelicecafe.com. Covington.

On Stage - Comedy Josh Blue, 8 p.m.; 10:30 p.m., Funny Bone Comedy Club, Newport on the Levee, $20. 859-957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

Shopping St. Charles Care Center Rummage Sale, 8 a.m.-3 p.m., St. Charles Care Center, 500 Farrell Drive, Care Center. Medical assistance items such as walkers, wheel chairs and hospital beds. Household items including tables, chairs, recliners, lift chairs and kitchenware. Office furniture such as desks, chairs and book cases. Cash only. Free admission. 859-331-3224. Covington.

SATURDAY, MARCH 16 Art Events Moon Glow, 6-10 p.m., Glow Gallery Studio, 264 W. Pike St., Galactic themed mixed media works of moon-men, rolling fog, lasers, galactic audio art sounds and contemporary artwork. 859-750-9867. Covington.

Exercise Classes Jazzercise Classes, 8-9 a.m. 9:30 a.m.-10:30 a.m., Jazzercise Crescent Springs Center, $34 for unlimited monthly classes. 859-331-7778; jazzercise.com. Crescent Springs. Jazzercise, 9:30 a.m., Promenade Palace, 3630 Decoursey Pike, Burn up to 600 calories in an effective 60-minute total body workout. Jazzercise is jazz dance, resistance training, yoga and kickboxing. Wear loose, cool stretchy clothing. Aerobic or a cross trainer shoes is recommended. Arrive to first class 15-20 minutes ahead of time. $32 monthly unlimited classes. 859-341-4392. Covington.

Holiday - Easter Pet Photos with the Easter Bunny, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Kenton County Animal Shelter, 1020 Mary Laidley Drive, Pet photos with Easter Bunny. Free gift bag with pet goodies for all. Raffles. Pet treats and baked goods. Benefits Kenton Co. Animal Shelter and Kenton Paw Park. Photos start at $10. 859-3567400. Fort Mitchell.

Art Exhibits

Holiday - St. Patrick’s Day

The Life and Works of Harlan Hubbard, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, 1600 Montague Road, Collection of artwork created by local artist and author. Collection reflects spirit of simplicity and beauty of nature Hubbard admired during his lifetime. Included with admission. Through May 5. 859-491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

The Pub Crestview Hills St. Patrick’s Day Kick-Off Party, 11-1 a.m., The Pub Crestview Hills, 2853 Dixie Highway, Drink specials on Guinness, Smithwicks, Harp, Car Bombs, Jameson Shots, Jello Shots, Bud Light Cans and Green Beer. 859-4267827; www.experiencethepub.com/crestview-hills. Crestview Hills.

Cooking Classes Sushi Rolling and Dining Experience, 7:30 p.m., Sushi Cincinnati, 20 W. Pike St., Includes training, choice of at least three sushi rolls, BYOB and recipe/product information. $25.

Karaoke and Open Mic Super Bowl of Karaoke, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Super Bowl, 510 Commonwealth Ave., Drink specials: $12 buckets, $3 domestics and $2 jello shots. With DJ Matt V and DJ Love MD. Free. 859-727-2000. Erlanger.

Senior Citizens Bingo, 12:30 -3 p.m., Elsmere Senior Center, 179 Dell St., 859-727-2306. Elsmere.

The exhibit, “Harlan Hubbard: The Complexity of Simplicity” will be on display March 15-May 5, at the Behringer-Crawford Museum in Covington. Call 859-491-4003. Pictured is Hubbard's "Summer." FILE PHOTO Music - Classic Rock The New Lime, 8:30 p.m. With Ramona Blaine., Grandview Tavern & Grille, 2220 Grandview Drive, Columbia recording artists perform music from 1960s-1970s. No cover. 859-341-8439. Fort Mitchell. Karl Dappen on Sax, 7-10 p.m., Argentine Bistro, 2875 Town Center Blvd., Variety of music from jazz to soft rock. Free. 859-426-1042; argentinebistro.com. Crestview Hills.

Bluegrass Jam Session, 8 p.m., Molly Malone’s Irish Pub and Restaurant, 112 E. Fourth St., All bluegrass pickers invited to participate. Free. 859-491-6659; mollymalonesirishpub.com. Covington.

On Stage - Theater

Bobaflex, 8 p.m. Doors open 7 p.m., Madison Theater, 730 Madison Ave., $10. 859-4912444; www.madisontheateronline.com. Covington.

Our Beloved Community: Poetry, Story and Song about Over-the-Rhine, noon-1 p.m., Thomas More College, 333 Thomas More Parkway, Written and performed by Appalachian writers Richard Hague, Pauletta Hansel, Michael Henson and Desirae Hosley. Part of TMC Bite-Sized Theater program. Free. 859-344-3309; www.thomasmore.edu. Crestview Hills.

Shopping

TUESDAY, MARCH 19

Everything for Kids Sale, 9-11 a.m., METS Center, 3861 Olympic Blvd., Banquet Room. Children’s clothing, toy and equipment sale. Items for single and multiples. $1 admission. Presented by Northern Kentucky Mothers of Twins Club. 859-384-0641; www.nkmotc.com. Erlanger. St. Charles Care Center Rummage Sale, 8 a.m.-3 p.m., St. Charles Care Center, Free admission. 859-331-3224. Covington.

Art Exhibits

Music - Rock

SUNDAY, MARCH 17 Exercise Classes Jazzercise Classes, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Jazzercise Crescent Springs Center, $34 for unlimited monthly classes. 859-331-7778; jazzercise.com. Crescent Springs.

Holiday - St. Patrick’s Day The Pub Crestview Hills St. Patrick’s Day Celebration, 11 a.m.-11 p.m. Music by 3 Sheets at 1 p.m., The Pub Crestview Hills, 2853 Dixie Highway, Irish food specials available. Drink specials with green beer, car bombs, jello shots and more. 859-426-7827; www.experiencethepub.com/ crestview-hills. Crestview Hills. St. Patty’s Day Weekend, 11 a.m., Cock & Bull English Pub, 859-581-4253. Covington.

MONDAY, MARCH 18 Exercise Classes Jazzercise Classes, 8-9 a.m.; 9:30-10:30 a.m.; 4:30-5:30 p.m.; 6-7 p.m., Jazzercise Crescent Springs Center, $34 for unlimited monthly classes. 859-3317778; jazzercise.com. Crescent Springs.

Music - Bluegrass

The Art of Food, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, Free. 859-491-2030; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington. The Life and Works of Harlan Hubbard, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, Included with admission. 859491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington. Contoured Essence, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Artisans Enterprise Center, 859-292-2322; www.covingtonarts.com. Covington.

Business Meetings Eggs ’N’ Issues: Update on UpTech, 7:30-9 a.m., Marquise Banquet and Conference Center, 1016 Town Drive, Leaders from UpTech return to share their progress to date and give sneak peek at what future holds. Ages 21 and up. $30 future members, $15 members. Registration required. Presented by Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce. 859-426-3652. Wilder.

Community Dance Line Dancing, 7-9 p.m., Lookout Heights Civic Club, 1661 Park Road, Holly and Bernie Ruschman, instructors. Beginners welcome. Smoke-free. $6, $3 for first-timers. Presented by H & B Dance Co.. 859-727-0904. Fort Wright.

Exercise Classes Zumba Class, 7:30-8:30 p.m., Turkey Foot Middle School, 3230 Turkey Foot Road, Exotic rhythms set to high-energy Latin and international beats. All fitness levels welcome. $5. Presented by Zumba with Gabrielle. 513-702-4776. Edgewood.

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 20 Art Exhibits The Art of Food, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, Free. 859-491-2030; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington. The Life and Works of Harlan Hubbard, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, Included with admission. 859491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington. Contoured Essence, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Artisans Enterprise Center, 859-292-2322; www.covingtonarts.com. Covington.

Education Enrollment Information Session, 3-4 p.m., Gateway Community and Technical College Covington Campus, 1025 Amsterdam Road, Room C 202. Learn about admissions, financial aid, academic programs, advising and how to enroll. Ages 18 and up. Free. Presented by Gateway Community and Technical College. 859-441-4500; gateway.kctcs.edu/Admissions. Covington. Community of Creative Writers Workshop, 6:30-8 p.m. Weekly through May 1., Thomas More College, Center for Adult & Professional Education, 365 Thomas More Parkway, Workshop designed to energize and inspire writers in any genre and with any experience level. Ages 18 and up. $75. Registration required. Presented by Thomas More College. 859-344-3304; www.thomasmore.edu. Crestview Hills.

Exercise Classes Jazzercise Classes, 9:30-10:30 a.m.; 5-6 p.m.; 6-7 p.m., Jazzercise Crescent Springs Center, $34 for unlimited monthly classes. 859-331-7778; jazzercise.com. Crescent Springs. Zumba, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Diamond Dance Academy, 5030 Old Taylor Mill Road, No dancing skills required. $5. 859-814-8375; diamonddanceky.com. Taylor Mill. Jazzercise, 6:30 p.m., Promenade Palace, $32 monthly unlimited classes. 859-341-4392. Covington.

THURSDAY, MARCH 21 Exercise Classes Zumba Class, 7:30-8:30 p.m., Turkey Foot Middle School, $5. 513-702-4776. Edgewood. Zumba Fitness, 6:30 p.m., Independence Senior and Community Center, 2001 Jack Woods Drive, $30 six-week session, $7 drop in. Registration required. 859-356-6264. Independence.


LIFE

MARCH 14, 2013 • COMMUNITY RECORDER • B3

Celebrate with champ, soda bread I remember one St. Patrick’s Day in particular. I was a first-grader at St. Margaret of Cortona School in Madison Place. Sister Justina asked me why I wasn’t wearing a green ribbon in my hair. “Because I’m LebaRita nese,” I Heikenfeld replied RITA’S KITCHEN timidly. The real reason, I suspect, is that Mom couldn’t afford to buy green ribbon to make bows for us eight girls. But you know, after all these many years, even I’m a bit Irish on St. Patrick’s Day. The story goes that in the fifth century, St. Patrick went to Ireland, killed all the snakes and converted the people. What were they eating? For starters, cress, leeks and cabbage, all of which are ... green!

Champ

This has a puddle of butter in the middle. Eat from outside to inside, dipping each bite into butter.

2 pounds russet potatoes, peeled, chunked up and cooked 1 ⁄2cup whipping cream or half & half

test paring it down, but here’s a guideline. Start with 1 bag shredded cabbage (12-16 oz.), 1⁄2 cup carrots, 1⁄4 cup red cabbage and enough slaw mix dressing to coat nicely. For the dressing, I’d start with 2 cups mayo, 2 tablespoons vinegar, 1⁄4 cup sugar and a scant teaspoon of celery seeds. I’d go to taste and add more of whatever. I’m thinking I’d like more vinegar, but I haven’t tasted Terry’s slaw at IHM. I would stir in enough dressing to coat the slaw nicely. Here’s Tom’s big batch recipe. Slaw: Mix together and coat with 1 gallon dressing

1 ⁄2stick butter 1 leek, sliced thin or 4 green onions, sliced Salt and pepper to taste

While potatoes are cooking, bring cream and butter to simmer and stir in leeks. Remove from heat, cover and let steep while potatoes cook. Mash potatoes, add enough cream mixture to make potatoes creamy. Make well in center, put dab of butter there to melt and make puddle.

Moist and buttery soda bread

You can’t eat just one slice. For readers who wanted a sweeter tasting soda bread. I use my food processor, but you can use a mixer or do it by hand. Check out my blog for step-by-step photos. 2 cups all-purpose flour ⁄4teaspoon baking soda 1 ⁄2teaspoon salt 3 tablespoons sugar 1 stick butter, softened 1 ⁄2heaping cup dried cherries, raisins or your favorite dried fruit 1 cup regular sour cream Melted butter for brushing on top Turbinado sugar for sprinkling on top (optional, but good)

10 pound bag shredded cabbage 6 cups carrots, shredded 4 cups red cabbage, shredded

3

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Place piece of parchment on cookie sheet and spray parchment. Mix flour, soda, salt, sugar and butter until mixture is crumbly.

Rita’s moist and buttery soda bread is sweeter than most recipes. THANKS TO RITA HEIKENFELD

Add cherries. Toss to combine. This keeps the fruit suspended in the bread. Blend in sour cream. Form into moundshaped circle about six inches wide and two or so inches tall. Place on cookie sheet and make a cross in the middle. (This is to let the devils out, or is it to keep them from coming in?!) Brush with butter and sprinkle with sugar. Bake 40-50 minutes until toothpick in-

serted in center comes out clean. Check after 40 minutes.

Tip from Rita’s kitchen

Turbinado sugar is golden in color and crystals are large.

Terry Pettit’s famous fish fry cole slaw

During Lent, the fish fry at Immaculate Heart of Mary Church serves over 1,000 people and

they come, in part, to enjoy the slaw that’s served alongside the fish. This is for the reader who loves that slaw and wants to make it at home. I talked to Terry Pettit, who shared this family recipe. “The recipe was from a restaurant that my wife and I owned in the early ‘90s and was developed for that purpose,” Terry told me. I haven’t had time to

Dressing: 6 cups sugar 1 cup clear vinegar 11⁄2gallons mayonnaise 1 ⁄3cup celery seed

Dissolve sugar in vinegar. Add mayo and celery seed. Mix thoroughly. Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator and author. Find her blog online at Cincinnati.Com/blogs. Email her at columns@communitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-248-7130, ext. 356.

BUSINESS UPDATE Warren Green of Fort Wright, vice president and manager of process engineering at Hixson, has been selected as an officer of the firm. In this role, Green leads the team which provides process deGreen sign, process safety analysis, waste and energy minimization studies, and due diligence and master planning. Green earned a master of business administration from the University of Cincinnati and a bachelor’s degree in chemical engineering from the University of Kentucky.

Middendorf hired

Furlong Building Enterprises LLC, a commercial and industrial construction firm, announced that David Middendorf of Edgewood has joined the company as a senior project manager. Middendorf Middendorf is responsible for estimating, project management and working with clients. Prior to joining Furlong, Middendorf worked in a senior position at Klenco Construction. Middendorf is a graduate of Eastern Kentucky University’s Construction Technology program.

Santangelo hired

Kathy Santangelo of Crescent Springs joined the Fort Mitchell office of

Sibcy Cline Realtors as a residential real estate specialist. An experienced real estate professional, Santangelo has also been an instructional assistant to a second-grade teacher and lead teacher at the preschool level. Professionally, she is a member of the Northern Kentucky Association of Realtors and the Kentucky and National Associations of Realtors. Santangelo has been a Girl Scout leader, and has chaired many committees and events for St. Joseph’s Church and the school’s Parent-Teacher Organization.

Johnson, Limbach join dunnhumby

dunnhumbyUSA, a global leader in building brand value for consumer goods and retail companies, has hired Patrick Johnson of Erlanger as associate director for client solutions and Keith Limbach of Edgewood as director for project management, in the Cincinnati office. Johnson will be respon-

sible for developing models and analytical solutions that help dunnhumby’s clients deliver relevant pricing and promotions strategies. Prior to joining dunnhumbyUSA, he served as director, business development at Western & Southern Financial Group and spent more than six years at Assurant Health, most recently serving as director. Limbach will be responsible for working with internal teams to manage the delivery of data-driven strategies and tactics to dunnhumby clients. Prior to joining dunnhumbyUSA, he served as client delivery executive at Davis & Henderson and spent 25 years at Convergys Corp., most recently serving as vice president.

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LIFE

B4 • COMMUNITY RECORDER • MARCH 14, 2013

COMMUNITY BRIEFS Library hosts Irish celebration

cinnati will perform. The celebration will conclude with a craft and snacks. The library is located at 401Kenton Lands Road.

ERLANGER — The Erlanger branch of the Kenton County Public Library will host a St. Patrick’s Day celebration 2-3 p.m. Sunday, March 17. Families can enjoy the culture of Ireland including story time and dance. The Erickson Academy of Irish Dance of Cin-

Church hosts spaghetti dinner

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SEND YOUR COMMUNITY NEWS The Community Recorder welcomes news about community events. Please email items for “Community Briefs” to Nancy Daly at ndaly@nky.com, mail to: Community Briefs, c/o Nancy Daly, Community Recorder, 228 Grandview Drive, Fort Mitchell KY 41017, or fax to 859-283-7285.

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school students honored by Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes as an Essay Contest winner. The contest was created in 1988 to inspire students to be active and informed citizens, with particular emphasis on election-related issues. This year, high school students were invited to write essays regarding mandatory voting laws and how they would be affected by the First Amendment’s guarantee of free speech. Entries were judged on research and understanding of voting and the First Amendment, idea development, organization, language and correctness. Each winner received a $2,000 savings bond. They also had the privilege of being recognized at center court of Rupp Arena, thanks to the PNC/ KHSAA Boys’ Sweet Sixteen Basketball Tourna-

Book time with the Easter bunny

ERLANGER — An Easter egg hunt will take place at 1p.m. Saturday, March 23, at Erlanger United Methodist Church, 31 Commonwealth Ave. There will be pictures with the Easter bunny, crafts, games and Inflatables for children 10 years and younger. The event is free but RSVP at 727-2136.

Beef stew dinner set on March 23

ERLANGER — Manna Mission at Erlanger United Methodist Church will host a free beef stew dinner at 5-7:30 p.m. Saturday, March 23. The church is located at 31 Commonwealth Ave. Call 727-2136 for more information.

Gates to talk about health care reform

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EDGEWOOD — The St. Elizabeth Healthcare Respiratory Care Department will offer a free screening to help identify a genetic disorder called Alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency (also known as Alpha-1) 4-8 p.m. Wednesday, March 20, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood in conference rooms F and G. This free screening involves a simple fingerstick blood test. Fasting is not required before the test. The screening is open to anyone. Candidates include: » Adults with emphysema regardless of smoking history » Adults with COPD regardless of smoking history » Adults with uncontrolled asthma Alpha-1 is a type of chronic lung disease that presents as COPD but is not caused by smoking. There is a significantly large population of people who have lung disease but are not showing any symptoms. In addition to the Alpha-1 screening, there will also be basic spirometry and oximetry tests. Info: Call Mark Vargas, 859-301-9036 .

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LIFE

MARCH 14, 2013 • COMMUNITY RECORDER • B5

THE FUTURE OF

SPINE CARE

BEGINS WITH US.

Specialists in Northern Kentucky 71

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Alfred Kahn, III, MD, FACS Orthopaedic Spine Surgeon Fort Wright Outpatient Center 1955 Dixie Highway, Suite F Ft. Wright, KY 41011 After completing his undergraduate degree at Vanderbilt University, Dr. Kahn went on to receive his medical degree from University of Arkansas, then completed his residency at the University of Cincinnati Medical Center and advanced fellowship training in Spine and Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery at University of Toronto Hospital for Sick Children. Dr. Kahn is board certified by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. Michael T. Rohmiller, MD Orthopaedic Spine Surgeon

After completing his undergraduate degree at the University of Kentucky, Dr. Rohmiller went on to receive his medical degree from the University of Kentucky College of Medicine, then completed his residency at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and advanced fellowship training in Spine Surgery at San Diego Center for Spinal Disorders. Dr. Rohmiller is board certified by the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery.

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If you suffer from a serious back or neck condition, you know the pain, numbness or weakness can become debilitating – impacting nearly every aspect of your life. At The Christ Hospital Spine Institute, our specialists use non-surgical care whenever possible, including physical therapy, interventional radiology and pain management. The good news – for most of our patients, non-surgical care will prove effective. However, if surgery does becomes necessary, you can be confident knowing the region’s most experienced spine surgery team is here to offer the latest and least invasive surgical procedures – when you are ready, and where you need it most.

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The spine is an amazing thing – individual parts working as one to allow the body to do incredible things. Just like our superior network of spine experts working to shape the future of comprehensive spine care in the Tristate. As the region’s leader in spine care – supported by orthopaedics that ranks in the nation’s Top 50 Hospitals by U.S.News & World Report – we’re leading the charge in bringing world-class spine care to our patients.

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LIFE

B6 • COMMUNITY RECORDER • MARCH 14, 2013

POLICE REPORTS FORT MITCHELL Arrests/Citations Eric S. Grinnell, age withheld, u-turn, Feb. 19. Douglas Brossart, age withheld, 40 Burdsall, criminal mischief, Feb. 19. Mikael J. Hugenberg, age withheld, 344 Lonemeadow Ln., assault, Feb. 19. Shawna Perkins, age withheld, shoplifting, Feb. 20. Richard Allen Jr., age withheld, shoplifting, two Campbell warrants, Kenton warrant, Feb. 20. Allen K. Sinclair, age withheld, no seat belt, Feb. 20. Juan Lopez, age withheld, no operators license, Feb. 20. Denver Jackson, age withheld, no seat belt, Feb. 20. Mary B. Sinclair, age withheld, no seat belt, Feb. 20. Chris D. Sinclair, age withheld, no seat belt, Feb. 20.

David M. Pompilio, age withheld, speeding, Feb. 20. Thomas M. Sander, age withheld, speeding, Feb. 20. Jeffery S. Thomas, age withheld, speeding, Feb. 20. Logan Bortscheller, age withheld, sexual abuse, first degree, Feb. 21. Charlene M. Noel-Lang, age withheld, speeding, Feb. 21. Jacob S. Kleier, age withheld, no seat belt, Feb. 21. Rachel L. Dunaway, age withheld, 57 Orphanage Rd., No. 12, endangering the welfare of a minor, Feb. 22. Brian T. Wilfong, age withheld, speeding, Feb. 21. Laura Mueller, age withheld, expired registration, Feb. 21. Royce Sanders II, age withheld, resident out of state operators license, Feb. 24. Rebecca C. Frisch, age withheld, failure to notify Department of Transportation, Feb. 24.

ABOUT POLICE REPORTS The Community Recorder publishes the names of all adults charged with offenses. The information is a matter of public record and does not imply guilt or innocence. Dominic J. Mainello, age withheld, 60 Thompson, No. 2, speeding, operating on suspended operators license, Feb. 25. Jena L. Beagle, age withheld, no seat belt, Feb. 19. Duy T. Wguyen, age withheld, no seat belt, Feb. 19. Codey L. Claybem, age withheld, 2572 Lowell Ct., No. 223, warrants, Feb. 25. Latoya Norsworthy, age withheld, u-turn, Feb. 27.

Family and Cosmetic Dentistry Caring for our patients like our own family for two generations

Ian Whitis, age withheld, u-turn, Feb. 27. Brianna Schraer, age withheld, no seat belt, Feb. 28. Sierra M. Dodd, age withheld, no seat belt, Feb. 27. Alyssa C. Richter, age withheld, no seat belt, Feb. 27.

Incident/Investigations Assault Domestic violence at 344 Longmeadow Ln., Feb. 19. Criminal mischief Rock appeared to hit the back window of a car at Royal Dr., Feb. 27. Shoplifting Consumable goods stolen at 2150 Dixie Hwy., Feb. 20.

FORT WRIGHT Arrests/Citations Regina M. Furlow, 27, 753 Welsh Dr., shoplifting at 3450 Valley Plaza Pkwy., Feb. 26. Rahesha D. Blythe, 27, 732 Dutch Colony Dr., shoplifting at 3450 Valley Plaza Pkwy., Feb. 25. Mara C. Seng, 18, 3336 Kleeman Rd, shoplifting at 3450 Valley Plaza Pkwy., Feb. 26. Amanda N. Bradshaw, 27, 803 Greenup St., No. 3, shoplifting at 3450 Valley Plaza Pkwy., March 1.

Incidents/Investigations

Auto theft Silver Buick Century Special stolen at 3442 Madison Pike, Feb. 25. Criminal mischief Car window broken at 1534 Amsterdam Rd., Feb. 28. Pickpocketing Cash and debit card stolen at 3450 Valley Plaza Pkwy., March 1. Shoplifting Merchandise stolen at 3450 Valley Plaza Pkwy., Feb. 26. Electronics and video games stolen at 3450 Valley Plaza Pkwy., Feb. 25. Video games stolen at 3450 Valley Plaza Pkwy., Feb. 26. Merchandise stolen at 3450 Valley Plaza Pkwy., March 1.

LAKESIDE PARK/CRESTVIEW HILLS Arrests/Citations Nicholas Wilmink, 30, 36 Orphanage Rd., No. 4, DUI at Orphanage Rd., Feb. 10. Anthony Noble, 20, homeless, receiving stolen property at 611 Sonoma Valley Ct., No. 10, Feb. 20. Orville Spencer, 45, 435 Summit Dr., DUI at Dixie Hwy. and Buttermilk Pike, Feb. 23. Matthew O'Toole, 28, 13 Edna

Lane, DUI at 2809 Dixie Hwy., Feb. 24. Amy Plewke, 36, 68 Greenbriar Ave., assault at 68 Greenbriar Ave., March 1. Sheila Ackerson, 33, 257 Marble Cliff Dr., assault at 257 Marble Cliff Dr., March 3. Joseph Castaneda, 24, 959 Apple Blossom Dr., disorderly conduct at Centre View Blvd., March 1.

Incidents/Investigations Credit card fraud Reported at 231 College Park Dr., Feb. 22. Shoplifting Reported at 2901 Dixie Hwy., Feb. 21. Reported at 2901 Dixie Hwy., Feb. 22. Terroristic threatening Reported at 340 Thomas More Pkwy., Feb. 13. Theft Reported at 2900 Centerview Blvd., Feb. 5. Reported at 2894 Town Center Blvd., Feb. 15.

PARK HILLS Arrests/Citations Timothy Quillen, 48, 309 E. 13th St., disorderly conduct at 501 Scott St., Feb. 15. George Ison Jr., 21, address unknown, disorderly conduct, assault, resisting arrest, criminal mischief at 501 Scott St., Feb. 15.

Incidents/Investigations Burglary Door taken off hinges at 704 St. Joseph Ln., No. 7, Feb. 4. Doors forced open at Dixie Hwy., Feb. 12.

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LIFE

MARCH 14, 2013 • COMMUNITY RECORDER • B7

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LIFE

B8 • COMMUNITY RECORDER • MARCH 14, 2013

DEATHS Gerald Ballinger Gerald “Todd” Ballinger, 46, died March 1, 2013. He was a self-employed contractor. Todd was a member of Epworth Methodist Church in Covington. Survivors include his parents, Jerry and JoAnn Ballinger of Fort Wright; sister, Linda Acheson of Indianapolis; two nephews; a niece; and significant other, Anna Hutson. Memorials: Epworth Methodist Church, 1229 Highway Ave.,

Covington, KY 41011. Memorials: donor’s choice.

Fern Dressman Fern Ann Roser Dressman, 85, of Erlanger, died Feb. 28, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. She was a homemaker, a former sales clerk for McAlpin’s Department Store in Cincinnati, and avid Cincinnati Reds baseball fan and bingo player. Her husband, Edward B. Dressman Jr., died previously. Survivors include her son, Edward “Skip” Dressman, III, of

Cincinnati; daughters, Deborah Ann Jones of Florence, Kimberly April Deaton of Taylor Mill; five grandchildren; two greatgrandchildren; and sister, Hope Burke of Mount Washington. Memorials: St. Elizabeth Health Care Hospice, 438 South Loop Road, Edgewood, KY 41018.

Sandy Frye Sandy Frye, 66 of Latonia, died March 1, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. She was a retired cafeteria

worker from the 580 building in Cincinnati, a member of Holy Cross Church, the 50 Plus Club at Holy Cross Church, Villa Madonna Guild, and Senior Center at Latonia Christian Church, and an avid University of Kentucky fan. Survivors include her friend and caregiver, Pat Leonard of Villa Hills; friends, Lynne Leonard of Villa Hills, Mary Elise Regan of Covington and Theresa Rein of Milford, Ohio; and many cousins. Memorials: Holy Cross Church, 3612 Church St., Latonia, KY

Official Notice Owen Electric Cooperative, with its principal office at Owenton, Kentucky and with its address at 8205 Highway 127 North, Owenton, Kentucky 40359, has filed with the Kentucky Public Service Commission in Case No. 2012-00448 an application to adjust its retail rates and charges. The need for this adjustment is due to an increase in Owen Electric’s expenses in the areas of wholesale power costs, interest, depreciation, and general operating expenses. Owen Electric is also proposing a $0.001 per kWh increase to its Fuel Adjustment Clause to recover fuel costs it has paid to its wholesale power supplier but not collected through its fuel clause. This increase will last for approximately one year until all of these identified fuel costs are recovered. The rates proposed in this application are the rates proposed by Owen Electric Cooperative. However, the Kentucky Public Service Commission may order rates to be charged that differ from these proposed rates contained in this notice. Such action may result in rates for consumers other than the rates in this application. Any corporation, association, body politic or person may by motion within thirty (30) days after publication or mailing of notice of the proposed rate changes request leave to intervene; intervention may be granted beyond the thirty (30) day period for good cause shown. The motion shall be submitted to the Public Service Commission, 211 Sower Boulevard, P.O. Box 615, Frankfort, Kentucky 40602, and shall set forth the grounds for the request including the status and interest of the party. Any person who has been granted intervention by the Commission may obtain copies of the rate application and any other filings made by the utility by contacting Michael Cobb, Owen Electric Cooperative, 8205 Highway 127 North, Owenton, KY 40359, Phone 502-484-3471. Any person may examine the rate application and any other filings made by the utility at the main office of Owen Electric or at the Commission’s Office. Kentucky Public Service Commission Owen Electric Cooperative 211 Sower Boulevard 8205 Highway 127 North Owenton, KY 40359 Frankfort, KY 40602 502-484-3471 02-564-3940 The amount of the change requested in both dollar amounts and percentage change for customer classification to which the proposed change will apply is presented below: Increase Rate Class Dollar Percent Schedule I $3,463,526 4.9% Farm and Home Schedule IA Off Peak Retail Marketing Rate (ETS) $50 5.7% Schedule 1-B1 Farm and Home - Time of Day (5 days a week) $0% Schedule 1-B2 Farm and Home - Time of Day (7 days a week) $0% Increase Rate Class Dollar Percent Schedule 1-B3 $16 5.3% Farm and Home - Time of Day, with Shoulder Schedule I-D Farm and Home - Inclining Block $65 3.7% Schedule I Small Commercial $ 247,960 4.9% Schedule 1-C Small Commercial - Time of Day $277 5.4% Schedule XI Large Industrial Rate LPB1 $ (24) 0.0% Schedule XIII $ (69) 0.0% Large Industrial Rate LPB2 Schedule XIV Large Industrial Rate LPB $6 0.0% Schedule III Outdoor Lights $ 282,726 34.5% Schedule I OLS Outdoor Lighting Service $ 57,389 9.2% Schedule II SOLS Special Outdoor Lighting Service $ 22,248 23.8% The effect of the proposed rates on the average monthly bill by rate class are listed below: Increase Rate Class Dollar Percent Schedule I Farm and Home $ 5.31 4.9% Schedule IA Off Peak Retail Marketing Rate (ETS) $ 0.52 5.7% Schedule 1-B1 Farm and Home - Time of Day (5 days a week) $0% Schedule 1-B2 Farm and Home - Time of Day (7 days a week) $0% Schedule 1-B3 Farm and Home - Time of Day, with Shoulder $ 7.82 5.3% Schedule I-D Farm and Home - Inclining Block $ 1.23 3.7% Schedule I Small Commercial $ 8.60 4.9% Schedule 1-C Small Commercial - Time of Day$ 15.42 5.4% Schedule XI Large Industrial Rate LPB1 $(0.18) 0.0% Increase Rate Class Dollar Percent Schedule XIII Large Industrial Rate LPB2 $(2.87) 0.0% Schedule XIV Large Industrial Rate LPB $ 0.49 0.0% Schedule III Outdoor Lights $ 3.09 34.9% Schedule I OLS Outdoor Lighting Service $ 1.04 9.2% ScheduleII SOLS Special Outdoor Lighting Service $ 3.33 23.8% The present and proposed rate structure of Owen Electric Cooperative are listed below: Rates Rate Class Present Proposed Schedule 1 and 1-A - Farm and Home Customer charge $ 14.20 $ 14.20 Energy charge $ 0.08545 $ 0.09031 Energy charge per ETS $ 0.05286 $ 0.05419 Schedule 1-B1 - Farm & Home - Time of Day Customer charge $ 20.00 $ 20.00 Energy charge On-Peak $ 0.11859 $ 0.12345 Off-Peak $ 0.05789 $ 0.06275 Schedule 1-B2 - Farm & Home - Time of Day Customer Charge $ 20.00 $ 20.00 Energy charge On-Peak energy $ 0.10101 $ 0.10587 Off-Peak energy $ 0.05789 $ 0.06275 Schedule 1-B3 - Farm & Home - Time of Day, with Shoulder Customer Charge $ 20.00 $ 20.00 Energy charge On-Peak energy $ 0.09980 $ 0.10488 Off-Peak energy $ 0.05789 $ 0.06275 Shoulder $ 0.07539 $ 0.08025 %'*)&&)!#($!"*&)

Schedule 1-D - Farm & Home - Inclining Block Customer Charge $ 15.78 $ 15.78 Energy charge per kWh $ 0.06309 $ 0.06795 0-300 kwh 301-500 kwh $ 0.08559 $ 0.09045 Over 500 kwh $ 0.11559 $ 0.12045 Rates Rate Class Present Proposed Schedule I - Small Commercial Customer charge $ 17.23 $ 17.23 Energy charge $ 0.08598 $ 0.09068 Schedule 1-C Small Commercial - Time of Day $ 24.51 $ 24.51 Customer Charge Energy charge $ 0.09943 $ 0.10413 On-Peak energy $ 0.05556 $ 0.06026 Off-Peak energy Schedule VIII - Large Industrial Rate LPC1 Customer charge $1,521.83 $1,521.83 Demand charge $ 7.08 $ 7.25 Energy charge, first 425 hours per KW $ 0.04993 $ 0.04950 Energy charge, excess of 425 hours per KW $ 0.04569 $ 0.04585 Schedule IX- Large Industrial Rate LPC2 $3,042.58 $3,042.58 Customer charge $ 7.08 $ 7.25 Demand charge Energy charge, first 425 hours per KW $ 0.04499 $ 0.04450 Energy charge, excess of 425 hours per KW $ 0.04335 $ 0.04363 Schedule X - Large Industrial Rate LPC1-A Customer charge $1,521.83 $1,521.83 Demand charge $ 7.08 $ 7.25 Energy charge, first 425 hours per KW $ 0.04747 $ 0.04500 Energy charge, excess of 425 hours per KW $ 0.04462 $ 0.04370 Schedule XI - Large Industrial Rate LPB1 Customer charge $1,521.83 $1,521.83 Demand charge Contract demand $ 7.08 $ 7.25 Excess demand $ 9.84 $ 9.98 Energy charge, first 425 hours per KW $ 0.04993 $ 0.04950 Energy charge, excess of 425 hours per KW $ 0.04569 $ 0.04585 Schedule XII - Large Industrial Rate LPB1-A Customer charge $1,521.83 $1,521.83 Demand charge Contract demand $ 7.08 $ 7.25 Excess demand $ 9.84 $ 9.98 Energy charge, first 425 hours per KW $ 0.04747 $ 0.04500 Energy charge, excess of 425 hours per KW $ 0.04462 $ 0.04370 Schedule XIII - Large Industrial Rate LPB2 Customer charge $3,042.58 $3,042.58 Demand charge Contract demand $ 7.08 $ 7.25 Excess demand $ 9.84 $ 9.98 Energy charge, first 425 hours per KW $ 0.04499 $ 0.04450 Energy charge, excess of 425 hours per KW $ 0.04335 $ 0.04363 Rates Rate Class Present Proposed Schedule XIV - Large Industrial Rate LPB Customer charge $1,521.83 $1,521.83 Demand charge Contract demand $ 7.08 $ 7.25 Excess demand $ 9.84 $ 9.98 Energy charge $ 0.05153 $ 0.05106 Schedule III - Outdoor Lights Existing pole, 120V available $ 8.52 $ 11.09 One pole added $ 10.33 $ 16.09 Two poles added $ 12.14 $ 16.09 Three poles added $ 13.95 $ 16.09 Four poles added $ 15.77 $ 16.09 Transformer required $ 9.22 $ 11.09 One pole, transformer required $ 11.03 $ 16.09 Two poles, transformer required $ 12.84 $ 16.09 Three poles, transformer required $ 14.65 $ 16.09 Four poles, transformer required $ 16.47 $ 16.09 Schedule I OLS - Outdoor Lighting Service 100 Watt, High pressure sodium $ 10.25 $ 11.09 100 Watt, High pressure sodium, 1 pole $ 15.13 $ 16.09 Cobrahead Lighting 100 Watt HPS $ 13.30 $ 16.46 100 Watt HPS, 1 pole added $ 18.18 $ 22.50 250 Watt HPS $ 18.06 $ 22.35 250 Watt HPS, 1 pole added $ 22.94 $ 28.39 400 Watt HPS $ 22.49 $ 27.83 400 Watt HPS, 1 pole added $ 27.37 $ 33.87 Directional Lighting 100 Watt HPS $ 12.45 $ 15.41 100 Watt HPS, 1 pole added $ 17.33 $ 21.45 250 Watt HPS $ 15.30 $ 18.93 250 Watt HPS, 1 pole added $ 20.18 $ 24.97 400 Watt HPS $ 19.48 $ 24.11 400 Watt HPS, 1 pole added $ 24.36 $ 30.15 Schedule II SOLS - Special Outdoor Lighting Service Traditional, w/ fiberglass pole $ 13.14 $ 16.26 Holophane, w/ fiberglass pole $ 15.60 $ 19.31

41015.

Clare Hehman Clare Hehman, 77, of Fort Mitchell, died March 3, 2013. Her husband, Paul L. Hehman, and sons, Paul Hehman and Matthew Hehman, died previously. Survivors include her children, Cathy Nordman, Mark Hehman, Luke Hehman, John Hehman, Peter Hehman and Jude Hehman; siblings, Dr. Paul Haas, Tom Haas and Dr. Martin Haas; 20 grandchildren; and four greatgrandchildren. Memorials: The Hehman Family Endowment Fund, c/o Covington Catholic High School, 1600 Dixie Highway, Park Hills, KY 41011; The Hehman Family Endowment Fund c/o Notre Dame Academy, 1699 Hilton Drive, Park Hills, KY 41011; or Passionist Nuns, 1151 Donaldson Highway, Erlanger, KY 41018.

Gerald Ittig Gerald “Jerry” Ittig, 65, of Villa Hills, died March 4, 2013, at his residence. He was a member of St. Joseph Church in Crescent Springs and Villa Hills Civic Club, and was a retired machinist with General Electric. Survivors include his daughter, Shelly Ittig of Florence, and sister, Lois Glandorf of Monfort Heights, Ohio.

Raymond Orr Sr. Raymond L. “Ray” Orr Sr., 85, of Independence, died March 2, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He was an Army veteran of the Korean Conflict, a retired engraver for the McKay Gravure Systems in Florence, and was formerly employed as a assembler for Sweco Co. in Florence and Buck Equipment in Delhi, Ohio. He enjoyed playing slot machines, and watching Bonanza. His wife, Mary Rita Nicely “Little Mary” Orr, died previously. Survivors include his daughter, Mary Beth Orr of Independence; sons, Steve Shaw, Fort Mitchell and Ray L. Orr Jr. of Naples, Fla.; two grandchildren; six greatgrandchildren; and sister, Helen

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ABOUT OBITUARIES Basic obituary information and a color photograph of your loved one is published without charge by The Community Press. Please call us at 283-0404 for more information. To publish a larger memorial tribute, call 513-242-4000 for pricing details. For the most up-to-date Northern Kentucky obituaries, click on the “Obituaries” link at NKY.com. Orr of Closson, Miss. Memorials: Northern Kentucky Honor Guard, 8385 U.S. 42, Florence, KY 41042.

David Pierce David “Robin” Pierce, 59, of Independence, formerly of Somerset, died March 5, 2013, at his residence. He was a truck driver, a member of the Teamsters, served in the Air Force as a medic and the 82nd Airborne Division of the Army, and had a passion for motorcycles. His father, David Pierce; and grandparents, George and Edna Pierce, Joe and Marian Bond and Seldon Drake, died previously. Survivors include his daughters, Jessica Pierce of Independence and Voni Pierce of Erlanger; sons, Timothy Pierce of San Diego, Calif., Joshua Pierce of Fort Mitchell, James Pierce of Dayton; mother, Voni Pierce of Somerset; sisters, Mary Beth Campbell of Windsor; Susan Hansford of Shopville, Lynnis Honaker of Butler, Kathi Pierce of Somerset and Martha Jo Biddle of Georgetown; brother, Jamie Pierce of Butler; seven grandchildren; and lifelong friend, Randy Zimmerman.

Edwin Scudder Edwin Francis Scudder, 88, of Erlanger, died Feb. 28, 2013. He had retired from Blue Grass Provisions Co., and drove a bus for the Erlanger and Elsmere Schools. His wife, Joyce Ann Scudder; a son, William Gentry; and a grandchild, died previously. Survivors include his children, Theresa Summers, Linda Scudder, David Scudder, Anthony Scudder, Gary Scudder, Regina Mansour, Brian Scudder, Tammy Russell, Edde Scudder, Bonnie Gentry, Nancy Moore and Tom Gentry; 38 grandchildren; and 32 great-grandchildren. Memorials: Alzheimer’s Association, 644 Linn St., Suite 1026, Cincinnati, OH 45203 or the Diocesan Catholic Children’s Home, 75 Orphanage Road, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017.

NOTICE TO KENTON COUNTY RESIDENTS

The Kentucky Agricultural Development Board has approved the following County Agricultural Investment Programs for Kenton County residents: Agricultural Diversification; Animal, Large (beef, dairy, equine); Animal, Small (goat, sheep, bee, rabbit); Farm Infrastructure; Fencing & OnFarm Water; Forage & Grain Improvement; Onfarm Energy; Poultry & Other Fowl; Technology & Leadership Development; Value-Added & Marketing. All funds in these cost-share programs will be distributed using an evaluation method on a reimbursement basis only. The application period to participate in these programs will be Monday, March 28, 2013, through Friday, April 19, 2013. Contact the Kenton County Extension Office, 10990 Marshall Road, Covington, KY 41015, Monday Friday, 8:00 am to 5:00 pm, for further information.

COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE LEXINGTON, KY 40546

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community-recorder-031413