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COMMUNITY JOURNAL CLERMONT 50¢

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 27, 2012

Your Community Press newspaper serving Amelia, Batavia, Batavia Township, New Richmond, Ohio Township, Pierce Township, Union Township, Williamsburg, Williamsburg Township

BECAUSE COMMUNITY MATTERS

CREATING INVENTIONS Duke rewards Students learn creative process Batavia schools Energy savings efforts recognized By Roxanna Blevins clermont@communitypress.com

Morgan Gelter, left, and Noelle Bailey squeeze a banana during a segment at Camp Invention at Batavia Middle School last week. They were learning how inventors mash up their ideas to create new things. For more from the camp, see Schools, page A5. JOHN SENEY/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

WC board reviews seven years of cuts

Levy possible this fall, plus more cuts By John Seney jseney@communitypress.com

UNION TWP. — Members of the West Clermont school board June 11 reviewed some of the cuts the district has made over the past seven years as they prepared to make a decision on a fall levy. Superintendent Dr. Gary Brooks told board members during a work session that since he and Treasurer Alana Cropper were hired in 2004 and 2005, the district has made cuts in all areas. “We have operated the district on thin margins,” he said. The cuts included reductions in personnel, transportation and athletics, he said. Brooks said staff reductions resulted in the loss of 84.6 fulltime equivalent positions. Cropper said the cuts resulted in $7.5 million being taken out of the budget over the past seven years. The personnel cuts were through a combination of attrition, retirements and layoffs, Brooks said. He said one of the results of the cutbacks was that art and music instruction was eliminated in lower grades. “Students now have to wait until sixth grade to take art and

music,” Brooks said. At the high school level, the district eliminated the small schools concept in which high Brooks school students were divided up into a number of smaller schools. “We have returned to a comprehensive high school,” Brooks said. A number of elective classes were eliminated at the high school as a result of the cuts, he said. Custodial and maintenance workers have been eliminated, which resulted in elementary buildings being no longer available for use in the evenings, Brooks said. Board member Denise Smith said the elimination of evening activities in the schools has hurt the district. “Kids feel safe at their own schools,” she said. “It’s sad we can’t provide those activities.” In the area of transportation, Brooks said, the district has gone from 89 full-time bus routes and 37 mid-day routes in the 2004-2005 school year to 37 full-time routes and four midday routes in 2011-2012. Bus transportation now is offered only for kindergarten through eighth-grade students living outside of a two-mile ra-

dius from school, he said. In the area of athletics, Brooks said, the district has reduced coaching positions and instituted higher pay-to-play fees. The result is that participation in sports has dropped, he said. “The cuts have changed the face of West Clermont permanently,” board member Doug Young said. “Everybody still values an education. It’s just coming at a higher cost.” Young said as the district moves forward, “it’s going to be significantly harder than in the past” to make cuts. “It’s all essential services,” Young said. The board will continue to look at district finances at formal meetings followed by work sessions in June and July. Those meetings have been scheduled for 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Monday, June 25; Monday, July 9; Thursday, July 12; Monday, July 16; and Wednesday, July 18. Meetings will be at the Union Township Civic Center, 4350 Aicholtz Road, except for the July 12 meeting, for which the location has not been determined. Young said the board should make a decision on a November property tax levy by the Monday, July 16, meeting. “No matter what levy amount we decide on, we can not restore everything,” he said.

MISS OHIO USA FINISHES THIRD

CHIEF DEPUTY COMBS TO RETIRE

Audrey Bolte is Batavia High School graduate Full story, A2

Sheriff’s Office Chief Deputy Rick Combs will retire. Full story, A2

Contact us

BATAVIA — The Batavia Local School District received $20,618 from Duke Energy for installing energy-efficient equipment in the district’s schools. A rebate check was presented at the board of education meeting June 18 as part of Duke Energy’s Smart Saver Incentive Program. Through the program, businesses receive money for installing energy-efficient equipment, such as highefficiency lighting and HVAC. The district soon will be receiving another check from Duke for $12,000, according to Duke representative Michelle Kolb. “The energy that’s represented in that check is equivalent to powering 150 homes,” Kolb said. Measures were taken district-wide to be more energy efficient, but according to board of education president Michael Enriquez, the school most affected by the changes was Batavia Middle School. “We replaced boilers at the middle school,” Enriquez said. “We also put new windows in the cafeteria.” Enriquez said energy efficient light bulbs have been installed in all of the schools as well. The additional $12,000 from Duke Energy will bring the district closer to meeting its budget for the fiscal year, which ends in July. Currently, the district’s revenues are at 104 percent of what was budgeted, and expenditures are at 106 percent. The board also aimed to save money through renewing its insurance with Ohio Casualty. The district’s current premium is $34,383, which is $24,334 less than the 2007-2008 premiums.

News ..........................248-8600 Retail advertising ..............768-8196 Classified advertising .........242-4000 Delivery ........................576-8240 See page A2 for additional information

According to Treasurer Michael Ashmore, the change has saved the district about $117,000 since 2007. In addition to making sustainability and economic improvements, the board approved a transfer of $80,000 from the district’s general fund to its permanent improvement Enriquez fund. According to Enriquez, the district does not have a permanent improvement levy, so each year funds are transferred for improvements. Enriquez said at least $20,000 of the $80,000 will go to improving Batavia High School’s parking lot. While the district’s finances were the main focus of the resolutions, the board took time to recognize the district’s recent graduates. “I just want to say thank you to anyone who helped participate in graduation,” said Scott Runck, board vice president. Also leaving Batavia is high school language arts teacher Andrea Conner. Conner will be taking on an administrative position with Goshen Local School District, said Enriquez. “I hate to see her go because she is a good teacher,” he said. “But we wish her luck in her new adventure.” Enriquez also briefly mentioned potential levy options are being discussed. However, no action was requested of the board June 18. “More research is being done before resolutions are made,” he said. The district’s Finance Committee will meet in early July to discuss the coming school year, the district’s budget and the levy, he said. The next regular board meeting is scheduled for 7 p.m. July 18 at Batavia High School, 1 Bulldog Place.

COLLECTIONS In the next few days, your Community Press carrier will be stopping by to collect $2.50 for delivery Avery Dietz of this month’s Community Journal. Your carrier retains half of this amount along with any tip you give to reward good service. This month, we are featuring Avery and Tommy Dietz, who collect in Union Township. Avery is 13 years old and will be an eighth-grader at

IHM. She enjoys playing select soccer and volleyball. She loves to draw, paint and do arts and crafts. Tommy Dietz Tommy is 10 years old and will be in the fifthgrade at IHM. He enjoys football, basketball and boys volleyball. He loves to draw and play with his friends. For more information about the carrier program, call Steve Barraco at 2487110.

Vol. 32 No. 14 © 2012 The Community Press ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


NEWS

A2 • COMMUNITY JOURNAL • JUNE 27, 2012

Bolte is third in Miss USA By Lisa J. Mauch clermont@communitypress.com

Batavia Township resident Audrey Bolte being crowned Miss Ohio USA 2012. THANKS TO DEB KNOSKE

BATAVIA TWP. — Batavia High School graduate and Miss Ohio USA 2012 Audrey Bolte was named the second runner-up in the Miss USA pageant June 3 in Las Vegas. “I felt amazing. I went in with a good head on my shoulders. I was prepared mentally and physically. I went in with the game plan: ‘I can win this. I know I can,’” said Audrey. Miss Rhode Island USA Olivia Culpo was crowned Miss USA 2012 and Miss Maryland USA Nana Meriwether was named runnerup. “I think it’s fantastic that a gal from a small town like Batavia can come in third place in a nationwide event, but I’m not too sur-

prised because everybody knows the prettiest girls in Ohio live in Batavia Township,” said Trustee Bill Dowdney. Bolte pointed out another Miss Ohio who came close to winning the crown was Oscar-winning actress Halle Berry, who was the runner-up in 1986. “I was very proud of myself in that moment, that I had worked so hard. I got pretty darn close. Some doors have already been opening for me. This isn’t the end of my career. I think I’ll have just as many opportunities,” said Bolte. “I’m going to continue to pursue modeling even more since I’m in such great shape,” she said. “The modeling came at 16. She had become an attractive young lady. She was spotted at the mall with

her grandmother and cousins,” said Shelley Bolte, Bolte’s mother. Bolte first started modeling with the New View Management Group in Cincinnati. After receiving some stage training for modeling, competing in a pageant was a natural transition, said her mother. Even though the Miss Ohio USA pageant was her first, Bolte had plenty of experience showing horses. Growing up, she was more of a tomboy and began riding at age 7, said her mother. “She always spent most of her time around horses. She was typically outside,” said Shelley. Audrey participated in the Country Riders 4-H Club and also rode on the school team while at St. Andrews Presbyterian Col-

lege, where she earned a degree in business administration with a minor in equine studies in 2011. Back home from Las Vegas, Audrey said she still has all her Miss Ohio duties to keep her busy, which include doing interviews, attending charity events and riding in parades. And while Audrey doesn’t plan on entering any more pageants, she’s glad for the experiences she gained from them. “I have no regrets with Miss USA. I am proud of my competition and everything I did there. I think I’m capable of absolutely anything now. I’m stronger, more prepared, more professional. I think I’ve become a more well-rounded women and I’m confident of every step I take in life,” she said.

Clermont Co. Chief Deputy Combs to retire By Theresa L. Herron

therron@communitypress.com

CLERMONT COUNTY —

Sheriff’s Office Chief Deputy Rick Combs will retire July 31 after almost 37 years in law enforcement. Combs started his career with the Moscow Police Department before moving on to the sheriff’s office, Milford and then Glendale. He came back to the sheriff’s office in 1997 a few months after Sheriff

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A.J. “Tim” Rodenberg took office. “He’s done a great job for us,” Rodenberg said. “He put together a lot of initiatives for us, what I wanted to see happen. He was the moving force for moving those things along.” Combs said he’s taken the job as far as he can right now in this economy and “it’s time to look for something new.” “I’ve always anticipated leaving and doing some-

lmauch@communitypress.com

NEW RICHMOND — Bev Funk and Heidi Nykolayko first met when both were attending a program about how to start a community garden conducted by the Civic Garden Center of Greater Cincinnati. When they both realized the other one was there for New Richmond too, they

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lenges.” “If something comes along that will be interesting and I think I can do it and contribute something, I will consider it,” Combs said.

But another job will come after a “long break.” The chief deputy continued to say he also might find he likes retirement. Combs said he would miss working with Rodenberg, the investigators and the other employees of the sheriff’s office. “We may not always agree,” he said of the sheriff. “But he’s a good guy. We had a pretty special relationship.” “I will miss law enforcement and I love sitting and

talking to investigators about cases,” Combs said. “We have really good teams here. I get letters and people give me (feedback) all the time about the good work done.” Combs also built bridges with many township officials, Rodenberg said. Combs was the one who expanded the contract service into various jurisdictions like Washington and Batavia townships. Combs is in charge of the general criminal divi-

sion at the sheriff’s office, along with the road patrol, uniformed deputies, the investigative and K-9 units, strategic response teams, warrants and resource offices, Rodenberg said. “He has served us well,” the sheriff said. “He’s leaving on a high note with me. I wish him well.” Rodenberg said he is not going to replace Combs right away. “I have three competent lieutenants to run the divisions.”

Women team up on New Richmond garden By Lisa J. Mauch

the

Combs

thing else with my life,” he said. “I like moving and doing different things. I welcome new chal-

decided to join forces. And that’s how the New Richmond community garden was born. Funk said she’s been thinking about starting a community garden for years. “I hope it helps a lot of people have good, fresh produce. Fruits, vegetables, whatever they want to grow,” she said. The area being used for the community garden is a plot of land on Willow Street near the skate park, which was one of the properties the village bought after the 1997 flood, said Dave Kennedy, village administrator. “We pretty just much offered the land … to help

Monroe Township resident Bev Funk, left, and New Richmond resident Heidi Nykolayko worked together to build a community garden in New Richmond on Willow Street near the skate park. LISA J. MAUCH/THE COMMUNITY PRES get it started,” he said. “It will benefit the village because it will make fresh vegetables available and it will be educational for the kids,” said Kenne-

COMMUNITY JOURNAL CLERMONT

Find news and information from your community on the Web Amelia • cincinnati.com/amelia Batavia • cincinnati.com/batavia Batavia Township • cincinnati.com/bataviatownship New Richmond • cincinnati.com/newrichmond Ohio Township • cincinnati.com/ohiotownship Pierce Township • cincinnati.com/piercetownship Union Township • cincinnati.com/uniontownship Williamsburg • cincinnati.com/williamsburg Williamsburg Township • cincinnati.com/williamsburgtownship

dy.

Nykolayko said the people participating in the garden would decide what kind of garden it would be. “It’s not our garden, it’s the community’s garden. What the mission will be, that will be determined by the people who garden. We’re just the ones setting

up the framework,” said Nykolayko. She said the possibilities range from growing produce for food pantries to educating children. Whatever the community gardeners decide to turn it into, Nykolayko has no doubt it will benefit everyone. “What I have seen it do in other communities is it truly brings a sense of ownership to the community, and it brings different age groups together,” she said. Currently all the plots except one are claimed, said Nykolayko. She said they are looking for someone to garden it. Cost for a plot is $25. For more information on New Richmond’s community garden, contact Heidi Nykolayko at 7358159 or northern.heidi@gmail.com.

WELCOME HOME

News

Theresa L. Herron Editor ..................248-7128, therron@communitypress.com Matt Schlagheck Reporter ................248-7681, mschlagheck@communitypress.com John Seney Reporter.......................248-7683, jseney@communitypress.com Lisa Mauch Reporter .......................248-7684, lmauch@communitypress.com Melanie Laughman Sports Editor ........248-7573, mlaughman@communitypress.com Tom Skeen Sports Reporter ...............576-8250, tskeen@communitypress.com Scott Springer Sports Reporter ...........576-8255, sspringer@communitypress.com

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Melissa Martin Territory Sales Manager .................513-768-8357, mmartin@enquirer.com Dawn Zapkowski Account Executive ....687-2971, dzapkowski@cincinna.gannett.com

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For customer service .....................576-8240 Stephen Barraco Circulation Manager...248-7110, sbarraco@communitypress.com Marilyn Schneider District Manager .....248-7578, mschneider@communitypress.com

Classified

To place a Classified ad ..................242-4000, www.communityclassified.com

To place an ad in Community Classified, call 242-4000.

Ron and Tasha Henderson stand outside their new Pierce Township home with their children 2-year-old Bentley, left, 5-year-old Destini and 3-year-old Elizabeth. The house was built for the Hendersons by Habitat for Humanity. LISA J. MAUCH/THE COMMUNITY PRESS


NEWS

JUNE 27, 2012 • COMMUNITY JOURNAL • A3

UC Clermont tuition rises By Matt Schlagheck clermont@communitypress.com

CLERMONT CO. — Ohio undergraduates will pay $176 more next year at UC Clermont College. University of Cincinnati trustees March 27 approved a 3.5-percent increase on all campuses in tuition and fees for the 2012-2013 school year. “It is hard to predict if this will affect our enrollment, but it is my professional goal to remove all obstacles for students who

nually. UC Clermont’s Assistant Dean for Administrative Services John Nelson said the college would stay the “cheapest” school offered by the university next fall, as in-state students at the Blue Ash campus will pay $5,890 and main campus students will pay $10,784 per year. “I would say we are very affordable and are always looking for ways to attract students,” said Nelson. For questions, call UC Clermont at 558-6197.

want a higher education,” said UC Clermont Dean Gregory Sojka. Currently, a full-time instate student at UC Clermont pays $1,678 per quarter, or $5,034 for a whole academic year. Out-of-state students pay $3,926 per quarter, or $11,886 annually, according to the university’s website. As UC transitions to a semester system beginning in August, Sojka said in-state students will pay $5,200 and out of state students will pay $12,302 an-

Weather leads to new HVAC By Lisa J. Mauch

Sheriff to launch new rescue boat in July

lmauch@communitypress.com

sources and personnel to serve our residents to an extent that would be cost prohibitive if funded individually,” Rodenberg said. The Clermont County Sheriff’s Office joined Task Force One when Rodenberg became sheriff in 1997. “The newly acquired boat will be instrumental in keeping the residents and the waterways of Clermont and other nearby counties safe,” Rodenberg said.

The boat was built by Metal Shark Aluminum Boat Co. in Jeanerette, La. Metal Shark is the federal government’s boat contractor for the U.S. Coast Guard and the military, Rodenberg said. The sheriff said the boat will be used as part of Task Force One, a rescue and dive team made up of law enforcement agencies and fire departments from Brown, Clermont, Butler, Warren, Hamilton, Clinton, Highland and Adams counties. “Clermont County’s participation in a multijurisdiction, regional team involves sharing re-

BATAVIA — Clermont County Sheriff A.J. “Tim” Rodenberg has a new boat for his department. The 24-foot all-aluminum Relentless Rescue Boat will be launched into service 10 a.m. Thursday, July 12, in New Richmond. The boat, valued at $123,071, is manufactured to military specifications and will be used on the Ohio River and East Fork Lake, Rodenberg said. “Our office received this equipment through a federal port authority grant and there was no cost to the county government,” he said.

BATAVIA TWP. — The HVAC system for the Clermont County Department of Job & Family Services building was replaced sooner than planned because of the warm spring season. “This was on the capital plan for this year, just not this soon,” said Wade Grabowski, director of Clermont County Facilities Management, on the aged system scheduled for replacement later this fall. Commissioners approved up to $49,500 for labor to replace the HVAC system. Grabowski said the equipment has been purchased for $108,000. He said the job didn’t go out to a formal bid because of the time frame and emergency nature of the job. “One of our biggest is-

Submitted by Kathy Lehr, director of public information for Clermont County.

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sues is in our children services visitation rooms. There’s no air circulation. They don’t have any windows that raise and those rooms get into the upper 80s when we’re trying to do visitations with parents and children,” said Mike Pride, director of the Cler-

mont County Department of Job & Family Services. “That was code back in the early ‘80s not to have windows that opened. It was a good idea at the time, but it makes us very dependent on climate control,” said Grabowski.

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NEWS

A4 • COMMUNITY JOURNAL • JUNE 27, 2012

BRIEFS CLERMONT NORTHEASTERN — The fifth an-

nual Clermont Northeastern Alumni Celebration is Aug. 11 in the Fastiques building on the Clermont County Fairgrounds. The Class of 1962 will be honored and they will have their 50th reunion at the celebration. The entertainment will be a vocal group from CNE High School, Ear Candy. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. and a catered dinner will be served at 6:30 p.m. The cost is $20 per person. Send a check and reservation to Clermont Northeastern Alumni Association, 5327 Hutchinson Road, Batavia, Ohio 45103.

Free concert

UNION TWP. — The trustees will host the Sycamore Community Band at 7 p.m. Saturday, June 30, at the Union Township Amphitheatre, 4350 Aicholtz Road. The Sycamore Community Band is a volunteer musicians who perform everything from the classics and patriotic numbers to musicals and pop. Bring family, friends, lawn chairs and snacks. This concert is free and open to the public. Dave’s Doghouse will be there with gourmet hot dogs.

July 4 fireworks NEW

RICHMOND

New siren

BATAVIA — Clermont

County commissioners June 20 approved the purchase of a new warning siren to replace one destroyed when a tornado struck the village of Moscow. Commissioners declared an emergency to approve the purchase of the siren from Clayt Werden Electric Co. of Cincinnati for an amount not to exceed $17,984. The siren in front of the Zimmer Power Plant was destroyed when the tornado hit Moscow March 2, said Annette Decatur, grant coordinator for the Clermont County Department of Community and Economic Development. A state grant will pay for most of the siren, with a local match of $2,000 from the village of Moscow.

Moscow fireworks

MOSCOW — Village offi-

Fourth of July activities in the village will include a parade and fireworks. Lineup for the parade begins 10 a.m. Wednesday, July 4, at Festival Park. There is no preregistration required.

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The parade begins at 11 a.m. No quad runners or motorcycles are permitted without previous approval. The fireworks display will begin at dark along the Ohio River waterfront. For questions or more information, call 553-4146 or email richmond.gov@fuse.net.

cials will continue to hold the traditional annual Independence Day fireworks display this year despite the devastation caused by the March 2 tornado. “Village council felt it was more important than ever to carry on the fire-

works,” said Bill Gilpin, village fiscal officer. The fireworks will begin about 9:45 p.m. Tuesday, July 3, in the field next to the community center, 30 Wells St.

New leader CLERMONT COUNTY —

Jeffrey Graham is the new East Market Leader and President for Mercy Health. He is responsible for Mercy Health’s network of care of the eastside of Cincinnati. Graham comes to Mercy Health from Adena Health System in South Central Ohio, where he served since 1999, most recently as chief strategy officer. He was responsible for the development and implementation of Adena Health System’s growth strategy and system objectives, overseeing new markets, mergers, physician and hospital acquisitions and strategy execution. “Graham comes to Mercy Health with extensive experience in implementing a successful integrated physician-led model of healthcare delivery. He’s overseen regional growth and service line strategies in cardiology, orthopaedics, oncology, women and children’s health and primary care,” said Lee Ann Liska, chief operations officer for Mercy Health. “His knowledge and experience makes him an ideal candidate to lead the Mercy Health as it continues to grow to best serve Cincinnati’s eastern communities.” Graham holds a Master of Business Administra-

tion, Health Care Management from the University of Findlay in Findlay, Ohio, and a Bachelor of Business Administration from Eastern Kentucky University in Richmond, Kentucky.

Write a resume CLERMONT COUNTY —

The Public Library has acquired Cypress Resume, an online tool that helps patrons create a professional resume in a few minutes. It’s easy-to-use format assures you won’t spend hours trying to perfect your document - all the hard work is done for you. Simply plug in your basic information (as little or as much as you’d like), and Cypress Resume creates a perfectly formatted document to help you land that dream job. With Cypress Resume, there is no need to compose anything, ever. Simply type basic information about yourself and leave the difficult task of writing concise, descriptive statements detailing your abilities to the resume builder. To access Cypress Resume, visit the library website at www.clermontlibrary.org.

Quit smoking

BATAVIA — Adults who smoke, but want to quit, can get free help through a research partnership between The Ohio State University College of Public Health and OSU Extension in Clermont County. This partnership - called the OSU Quit Smoking Project - will provide telephone support and up to eight weeks of nicotine patches.

CE-0000515701

CNE alumni

To participate, smokers must live in Clermont County, be 18 years old or older, have no recent major health issues, be a daily smoker and cannot be pregnant. Space is limited. This study is funded by the National Cancer Institute. If interested in participating, call Debi Parm at 635-8595.

Burg Garden Club

WILLIAMSBURG — The Garden Club will meet at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, July 3, at the home of Barbara and Jerry Mueller. Members will tour the Mueller’s hydrangea garden and they will present a program on growing hydrangeas. The Muellers have been growing hydrangeas for 10 years and have more than 100 plants, all in full bloom. Hostesses for the evening are Kay Reveal, Suzie Steffensen and Ann Pedigo. Members are to respond to roll call by naming their worst garden pest this year or their favorite garden chore. The club welcomes new members. For additional information call 724-3657, visit www.williamsburggarden-club.org or “Friend” the club on Facebook.

Summer concert

NEW RICHMOND — The next summer concert will be at 7:30 p.m. Monday, July 2. The Greenhills American Legion Band will perform. The community is invited to the concerts for the performances and to see the improved bandstand , which now has about twice the seating capacity.

Polo to benefit Senior Services The United States Polo Association’s Mid-States Circuit’s Governor Mark Sedacca has partnered with Clermont Senior Services to present the first annual Congressional Cup Royal In Red Clermont Senior Services Charity Event this fall. This two-day event kicks off Friday, Sept. 7, at the Peterloon Estate in Indian Hill where Clermont Senior Services will host the Touching Hearts Gala & Auction. Saturday, Sept. 8, the USPA Mid-States Circuit will bring the Congressional Polo Cup Finals to Miami Meadows in Miami Township. Enhancing game day, Senior Services will host a VIP hospitality and viewing area. It is a rare occasion to see a sanctioned event among professional and amateur polo players. “It will draw regional attention,” said Cindy Gramke, Executive Director/CEO of Clermont Senior Services.” The 2010 Congressional Cup thrilled more than 1,200 spectators at Miami Meadows. “We are offering a variety of viewing areas, from corporate title sponsorships to individual VIP experiences,” said Frankie Hughart, development and strategic relations manager for Senior Services. For more information, visit www.clermontseniors.com/polo.html or call 724-1255.


SCHOOLS

JUNE 27, 2012 • COMMUNITY JOURNAL • A5

Editor: Theresa Herron, therron@communitypress.com, 248-7128

ACHIEVEMENTS | NEWS | ACTIVITIES | HONORS

COMMUNITY

JOURNAL

CommunityPress.com

Campers play with a beach ball during an action and adventure segment at Camp Invention at Batavia Middle School. JOHN SENEY/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Batavia camp fosters young inventors Story and photos by John Seney jseney@communitypress.com

BATAVIA — Students in grades one through six learned about the process of invention June 18 to June 22 at Camp Invention. The summer camp was of-

Charlie Huhn works on plans for a city at Camp Invention at Batavia Middle School. JOHN SENEY/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

fered by the Batavia school district at Batavia Middle School. Cindy Jacobs, gifted coordinator for Batavia schools, said 65 students signed up for the camp this year. Each day, the campers rotated between different areas to learn about the creative process.

Abby Jayne Huhn, left, and Kaylee Williams work on plans for a city at Camp Invention at Batavia Middle School. JOHN SENEY/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Students at Camp Invention at Batavia Middle School take apart an old VCR to use the parts to create something new. From left are Kyah Lowe, Abby Miller and Clairissa Chandler. JOHN SENEY/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

STUDENTS OF THE MONTH

Dunn named principal at Williamsburg Elementary By John Seney jseney@communitypress.com

The Students of the Month for May at Glen Este High School are from left in front: Samantha Benz; Isabel Baird; Tristan Hamm and Luke Weinstein. Back row: Tanner Korfhagen; Nick Sullivan; Destiny Byrne; Amanda Haag. THANKS TO TESS SMITH

WILLIAMSBURG — The Williamsburg school board June 18 named Kevin Dunn the new principal at Williamsburg Elementary School. For the past three years, Dunn has been principal at Williamsburg Middle School. He replaces Jane Croswell, who retired after serving 35 years as a teacher and principal at the elementary school. “Everybody at the elementary school is pleased and excited about Kevin coming on board,” said Superintendent Jeff Weir. Weir said Croswell spent her entire career at the elementary school, so the position was “a challenging one to replace.” “He (Dunn) has the ability to develop relationships and use

them to produce good things for kids,” Weir said. Before becoming principal, Dunn was a language arts teacher at the middle school for seven years. “He was an exceptional teacher,” Weir said. Dunn said he was “incredibly happy to expand my Williamsburg family.” He said he enjoyed working at the middle school and leaving was a difficult decision. “I am looking forward to working at the elementary school,” he said. Weir said the school board now is looking for a new middle school principal. He said the board members expect to make a decision at the next regular board meeting at 6 p.m. Monday, July 16, at the high/ middle school, 500 South Fifth St.


SPORTS

A6 • COMMUNITY JOURNAL • JUNE 27, 2012

Editor: Melanie Laughman, mlaughman@communitypress.com, 513-248-7573

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | RECREATIONAL

COMMUNITY

JOURNAL

CommunityPress.com

Youth season winds down

Knothole tourney starts July 7 By Tom Skeen tskeen@communitypress.com

Moeller's Zach Shannon speaks with Midland Redskins third base coach Kris Glazier June 12 after flying out deep to right. SCOTT SPRINGER/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Moeller’s Shannon mashing for Midland Program has history of preparing players

By Scott Springer

Midland teammates Andrew Benintendi and Xavier Turner return to the dugout after an inning in the outfield. Benintendi has one more season to play at Madeira, Turner played in Sandusky and is committed to Vanderbilt. SCOTT

sspringer@communitypress.com

AMELIA — The list of legends is growing. The 18 and under Midland Redskins baseball team traditionally features the best of the best from the Tristate and around the country. Most of their players are heading to Division I powerhouses. Some get drafted and signed by the pros before they get there. Last year, Madeira’s Andrew Benintendi made the Midland 18U team at age 16 after his sophomore year. Those sharing the honor of doing that include Ken Griffey Jr., Barry Larkin, Cameron Maybin, David and Ricky Bell. This year, joining Benintendi for at least part of the 18U schedule is Moeller’s Zack Shannon, who slugged five homers for the Crusaders’ DI state title team. Zack Shannon just finished his sophomore year and is 15. He can drive a baseball, but can’t legally drive home alone. “Zack’s a tremendous talent and had a great year for Moeller,” Midland co-manager Dave Evans said. “He’s got unbelievable power.” Shannon played on the 16U team last year as a 14-year-old

SPRINGER/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

and now has made a monumental jump on the baseball food chain. “Nobody in the history of this program has ever done it, maybe Griffey played a little bit at 15, but he’d be the only one,” Evans said. In his inaugural GCL season, Shannon hit .319, made Greater Catholic League second team and over half of his hits were for extra bases. He also gained a championship ring and is looking for more hardware in the years to come. “I didn’t really expect to get one and now I have a chance to get three,” Shannon said. In 2011, he played on Moeller’s freshman team when he could’ve played varsity at many schools. He decided to attend

Moeller as a seventh-grader and has already verbally committed to play at Ohio State, doing so prior to his sophomore season. “I had a bunch of friends commit there and it just felt like the right idea,” Shannon said. After a year playing outfield, first base and pitching some for the Crusaders, Shannon is now swinging the traditional wood bat for the Redskins. As a frequent visitor to the cages, the “old school” lumber is nothing new to the 6-2, 225-pound basher. “I’m more comfortable swinging wood because it makes me swing for base hits instead of swinging for home runs all the time,” Shannon said. “We played with a wood bat most of the year at 16U, but when we

played with aluminum I hit my share (of home runs).” Early plans are for Shannon to be up and back on the 18U and 17U teams as the Midland brass would prefer that he play over sitting. Of course, if his production picks up like Benintendi’s did a year ago, it’ll be hard to move him. The only similarity between the two young stars ends with the name printed across their summer jersey. Andrew Benintendi is 5-10 when standing upright and might weigh 170. He reminds Dave Evans of Lenny Dykstra. Zach Shannon wears size 16 cleats which move fast enough to get him triples. “Completely different players,” Evans said. “Zack’s a hitting phenom with tremendous power. He’s probably going to be a huge draft (pick) when he’s a senior. Andrew will probably get drafted, but I think he’ll probably go to college. He’s gotten stronger and he’s going to be a great one.” Either one is a treat to watch, though you may see No. 30 (Shannon) trotting through the parking lot on occasion in search of a foul ball. He is still 15. “You’ve got to pay your dues,” Evans said.

NEW RICHMOND — With the Clermont County knothole second half of the season coming to a close, here is a look at how the Class A and B teams are fairing through June 20. In the Class A senior league, it’s the Batavia Bulldogs out front with a 5-0 record. The WT Kings are right behind them with a 7-1 record, with their lone loss coming in the first game of the season 6-2 to the Bulldogs. The New Richmond Diamondbacks sit at 5-3, followed by the Tealtown Inferno at 5-4. The Tealtown Red Legs sit at 2-5, while the Swag are 1-5, both out of contention for the top spot in the league with only two games remaining before the tournament. As for the Class A junior league, the Williamsburg Bandits sit at 6-0 with the Milford Cobras just a half game back at 6-1 and the New Richmond Pride a full game back of first. The Tealtown Cobras are 5-3; just two games back of first, while the Amelia Thunder are 3-3. The Class B Division II senior league is jam packed at the top of the standings with just three games remaining for most teams. The WT Titans are alone at the top at 5-1, but the Batavia Bearcats and CNE Sharks sit at 4-2 in second-place. A half game behind them is the Bethel Heat at 3-2. Still alive for the top spot are the Milford Eagles, Milford AllStars, Goshen Crushers and the Tealtown Nighthawks. It’s the Tealtown Strykers at 4-0 leading the Class B Division I senior league. Tied for second are the Batavia Big Dawgs and the Milford Tigers at 5-1. The New Richmond Warthogs sit at 3-2, while the Milford Phillies are 2-3. Six teams are within two-anda-half games of first-place in the Class B junior Division II league. The New Richmond Stingers are 4-0, followed by the CNE Redhawks at 3-0. The Tealtown Diamond Hawks are 2-1, while the Goshen Steamrollers are 3-2. In fifth are the Milford Buckeyes at 4-3, and the WT Screamin’ Deamons at 1-2 are two-and-a-half games back. Rounding out the Class B division, Milford Muckdogs lead the junior Division I league at 4-1. The Batavia Bulldogs are in second at 3-1, followed by the Williamsburg Wildcats and the Batavia Outlaws at 3-2. Sitting at 2-3, two games back, are the Goshen Thunder and the Tealtown Titans. All tournaments begin July 7.

James Nickell of the Williamsburg Bandits in the Class A Junior League takes a cut during the Bandits’ 16-9 victory over the Tealtown Cobras. The Bandits are 6-0 and sit atop the standings. TOM SKEEN/THE COMMUNITY PRESS


SPORTS & RECREATION

JUNE 27, 2012 • COMMUNITY JOURNAL • A7

UNDEFEATED

WHAT ARE YOU WADING FOR? Beechmont Soccer Club '97 Hurricanes, part of the new Beechmont Elite program, recently won the Elite Division of Buckeye Premier League with an undefeated 5-0-2 record. The Division title completes a dream season for the girls, which included their first State Cup Tournament, where they finished the Round of 16 with a solid 1-1-1 record, including a thrilling 1-1 tie with eventual State Cup Champion, Warren County Blue. The team moved up to the statewide Buckeye Premier last fall, after winning the top division of the local Cincinnati United Soccer League (CUSL) last spring. The Hurricanes are coached by Jon Wiley and Jim Calder. In front are Emma Wells and Sara Ventura; in second row are Darcy Aders, Michaela Shepherd, Hayley Racer, Isabella Benintendi, Brandi Brock, Sophie Armor and Shannon Walsh; in third row are Cara Schildmeyer, Taylor Akers, Alyssa Woodward, Emma Heise, Emily Wiley and Pamela West. Beechmont Soccer Club '97 Hurricanes players are from Amelia, Anderson Township, Bethel, Glen Este/Withamsville, Milford, Mt. Orab and West Chester. THANKS TO BECKY VENTURA

Discover the Y - It’s so much more than a swim club! Join any YMCA of Greater Cincinnati location by June 30th and get a summer membership for only $224 for a family or $149 for an adult - and get the month of September FREE. Visit MyY.org or call (513) 362-YMCA.

SIDELINES Football official class

Anyone interested in being an Ohio licensed football official can attend classes starting July 18 at the Miami Township Civic Center. Classes run for seven weeks. Cost is $85. Contact Bob Duncan at 5754542 or e-mail robertreferee@zoomtown.com.

derson Township, Milford, Mariemont, Mt. Adams, Ft. Thomas and Alexandria. With more than 30 shortcourse lanes and 16 long-course lanes, the facilities afford the team comfort, flexibility and stability. The team has 19 coaches on staff covering 10 different

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The Anderson Barracudas are having swim team tryouts July 9 at M.E. Lyons YMCA, 8108 Clough Pike, Anderson Township. Registration is 2:30 p.m. and swimming begins at 3 p.m. The Barracudas train in An-

practice groups. All have been successful at various levels of competitive swimming - in high school, at the collegiate level and at the international level. For more information, contact Tim Hart, director of competitive swimming, at 474-1400, or at thart@cincinnatiymca.org.

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VIEWPOINTS

A8 • COMMUNITY JOURNAL • JUNE 27, 2012

Editor: Theresa Herron, therron@communitypress.com, 248-7128

EDITORIALS | LETTERS | COLUMNS | CH@TROOM

the births of Latin, Oriental, African and/or other non-white persons - a first in the U.S. In addiLen Harding tion, these COMMUNITY PRESS people crowdGUEST COLUMNIST ing into the commonweal don’t necessarily support the “American” way of life, either through disinterest or lack of resources. Of course I am generalizing here, but the lines are discernible. The TPSA is especially sensitive to this issue. Concurrently, we are experiencing global climate change, depletion of natural resources, and an ever-increasing global population. This occurs as we marvel at the astonishing changes capitalism has wrought since WWII - electronics, Internet, smartphones, deodorant and plastic firearms. The Republicans claim to be conservative, but capitalism conserves little - not cars, not buildings, not jobs, not marriages, not religion. Where are all the repair shops we grew up with? Where are the local businesses

we yearn for when we think of “revitalization?” In malls, our current downtown can no longer carry the city - its vitality is important to us as a community, but in no way is it vital to the economy . Labor unions are under siege mostly because much of the work has left the country. Capitalism has eliminated almost one entire economic stratum in our economy, yet we don’t seem to have come to grips with it. Finance capitalism has killed small banks, the savings and loan industry, the local butcher and grain store. Our local butcher thrives due to superior service, great meats, a bottled liquor sales license, and the good fortune of being in an area that can afford upscale products. Madisonville, Oakley and Goshen have not fared as well. Regardless of which candidate succeeds in November, none of these issues will go away. Do we need a middle class? I don’t really know. I do know that without some creative thinking and serious effort, it will disappear. And that, my fellow subscribers, is us.

Leonard Harding lives in Milford.

Unfortunately, it has become increasingly difficult to find volunteers from both parties. Many times, Larry Heller workers are COMMUNITY PRESS from the same GUEST COLUMNIST political party or self-identified independents. Thus, there is an increased opportunity for problems. Although each state administers its own system, most elections have national impact and should be administered uniformly across the country. National voting procedures should be adopted to minimize the potential for future fraud. To ensure voting integrity, we need uniform standards. For example, citizens should be registered 90 days prior to an election. Valid photo identification must be presented. This does not disenfranchise anyone, least of all the poor or minorities, as photo IDs are required for purchasing alcohol, cashing a check and applying for government programs. This is true in many states such as Virginia, Illinois and California. A standardized process deserves consideration such as an all electronic voting system. This would eliminate hanging chad’s and a car trunk full of mysteriously found uncounted votes after an election. Finally, there is a need for a higher level of importance placed on the administration of voting procedures and laws at the county and state levels. If you agree, contact your state and federal representa-

COMMUNITY CLERMONT JOURNAL

Is the caller there?

I appreciated the anonymous voice mail left on my home phone by a Community Press reader a few weeks ago. The caller thanked me for my letter to the editor wherein I ripped our good friend Len Harding a much-needed new one for his pompous, didactic rhetoric and grossly inaccurate conclusions. Yes, caller, you reached the correct John Joseph. If you call back, please leave your number. Maybe we can hook up with Len on a conference call. As I emailed Editor Theresa

Larry Heller lives in Miami Township.

ABOUT LETTERS AND COLUMNS We welcome your comments on editorials, columns, stories or other topics. Include your name, address, cell and home phone numbers so we may verify your letter or guest column. Letters may be no more than 200 words and columns must be 400 to 500 words. Please include a color headshot with guest columns. All submissions will be edited for length, accuracy and clarity. Deadline: Noon Friday E-mail: clermont@community press.com. Fax: 248-1938. U.S. mail: Community Journal Clermont, 394 Wards Corner Road, Suite 170, Loveland, OH 45140. Letters, columns and articles submitted to The Community Journal Clermont may be published or distributed in print, electronic or other forms.

Herron recently, Harding gets way too much ink spewing his elitist and incredibly naive opinions. It’s time to cut the dude off. It’s for his own good. You’ll be sparing him future public humiliation and embarrassment. On a related note, just a reminder - there is hope on the horizon: Jan. 20, 2013 - The End Of An Error! If grass roots America show up at the polls, it will be a landslide defeat for Barack Hussein O-Blame-O (sic). You heard it here first. If I’m wrong, just call me Len. John Joseph Goshen Township

CH@TROOM June 6 question Should the Ohio General Assembly consider a ban on the sale of large sodas and other sugary drinks in an effort to combat obesity? Why or why not?

“No! Ohio should not ban large-size sugary sodas. “Isn’t it amazing that we Americans founded this country based on individual freedom, but now the majority has chosen to create a government that wants to dictate our behavior on the most personal level? “The Libertarian Party respects and trusts individuals to make their own choices. I’m voting Libertarian!” John T.

Would you be willing to pay a toll for using the Brent Spence Bridge? Why or why not?

tives, demand uniformity in administration of our voting laws and that systems be established across the country so we can again enjoy voter integrity Election Day. Find more information at www.OhioVoterIntegrity Project.org or if you want to be a precinct election official in Ohio, you can contact the Secretary of State Elections Division at 180 E. Broad Street, Columbus, Ohio 43215 or contact the Clermont County Board of Elections.

A publication of

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

June 20 questions

Election Day and voter integrity need protection Americans will elect a president Nov. 6. Our system of voting is designed to allow citizens to register before Election Day. In their home county, they are entitled to properly cast their vote - one person - one vote. A fairly straight-forward system designed to afford all citizens an opportunity to participate in our political system. Voting procedures across the country are designed with the assumption that citizens would abide by existing rules. There will be some who wrongly take advantage, such as the Cook County, Illinois, instances in the past. What is really alarming is these are no longer isolated instances, but occur in most states. The integrity of our voting system is under attack. This occurs because the current systems are not designed, nor staffed to properly deter and prevent fraud. The administration of the voting system is the responsibility of each state and results in inconsistencies in procedures. For example, a number of states require a valid photo identification card to be shown to cast a vote. Other states only require an alternative identification such as a copy of a current utility bill. Some states require voter registration 90 days before an election, while others allow registration the day of the election. Another area of concern is the staffing, administration and oversight of polling locations. They are required to have workers from both political parties to ensure a fair and unbiased voting atmosphere.

JOURNAL

CommunityPress.com

This election, historic political shifts loom Elections are coming; we are heading into political shifts of historic proportions. As the nation changes, people try to hang on to their perks. This struggle will be neither pleasant nor easy; things get ugly when people face loss of status. America began as an enterprise by and for rich, white, guys. Because they understood change was inevitable (having just ushered in a dramatic change themselves), they included accommodations for change in our basic ruling document. But they had no idea how much change was coming, had no idea it would morph into something that would turn their world upside down. The changes they had in mind were adjustments to allow others of a similar mindset to join (allowing non-property owners to vote, then exslaves, then women, and finally kids). Our forefathers knew nothing of electronics, atomic energy, peak oil, climate change or jihad. Today’s changes will alter the whiteness of the republic and extend the social compact to folk who are not white, not of European descent, and not English speakers. In 2011, white births were fewer than

COMMUNITY

“A toll is not needed, because the bridge is not needed. “For the Brent Spence Bridge problem, we should think ‘out of the box’ and come up with the following solution: convert the bridge from a roadway into a scenic river overlook with restaurants, bars and hotels. “All traffic can be directed onto (Interstate) 275 east and west. The Brent Spence bridge is not needed - we already have bridges that cross the river with (I 275). “Use the Big Mac and the Clay Way Bailey bridges for crossings for local traffic.” Ted D. Are you concerned that if Greece drops the Euro it will affect the U.S. stock market and the U.S. economy? Why or why not?

“The world will never be like it was before Columbus discovered America, and since the development of transportation and communication tools that make it seem like we are all, in a way, in the same neighborhood. Things that affect some of us will likely affect the rest of us, too. (Well, maybe the sheikhs of Saudi Arabia will be OK.) “A couple of things to keep in mind, however. The population of Greece is about 11 million, which is close to the population of the state of Ohio. It is far less than the total population of the United States, however (313 million) and only a tiny fraction of the total world population (6.7 billion). It also represents only a small percentage of the eurozone economy (estimated to be about 2 percent of the EU GDP.) “Still, the factors that have caused the problems in Greece are not isolated to Greece, and probably will eventually affect the rest of the world. Germany,

394 Wards Corner Road Loveland, Ohio 45140 phone: 248-8600 email: clermont@communitypress.com web site: www.communitypress.com

NEXT QUESTIONS Are you concerned about your privacy now that the FAA has been ordered to give unmanned aircraft, or drones, greater access to civilian airspace by 2015? Why or why not? Every week The Community Press asks readers a question they can reply to via e-mail. Send your answers to clermont@communitypress.com with Chatroom in the subject line.

France, Italy and Spain are already feeling the pain of the Greek crisis, partly because of the money they have given Greece to help bail them out. “It is important to look at the reasons for the economic crisis in Greece, and understand whether these same factors exist in the U.S. and elsewhere. These would include a people living beyond their means, public sector wages skyrocketing, tax evasion and avoidance, and the effort to fix the problem by simply creating more debt. “The United States is NOT EXEMPT from these problems, and if we do not begin to wake up and start taking corrective action eventually we will experience severe crises, perhaps making the crash of 1929 look like child's play. The solution is an economy in which businesses are encouraged to thrive (without being subject to restrictive rules which have been enacted with the best of intentions), so that they can provide employment, which will then allow people to pay their bills. “But equally important is the necessity for all of us to recognize the limits of our financial means. We shouldn't buy a house we can't afford, or a car that is too expensive for us. We should conserve our resources as much as possible in as many ways as possible. “Do we need gigantic TV sets in every room? Do we need vacations to exotic places every year? Do we need to eat out all the time, instead of preparing our own food? Do we all need cell phones and iPads and iPods (especially our kids)? Do we need all kinds of expensive clothing? “The answer briefly is 'responsible budgeting.' It may not be easy, and if you need to change your present habits, it will be harder. But it can be done, and has been done. “One key to making it work is to avoid the temptation to envy our neighbors who might be (or appear to be) better off than we are because of their lifestyles. Finally, I want to stress that these things will only work if they are 'voluntary' and not mandated by the government.” Bill B.

Community Journal Editor Theresa L. Herron therron@communitypress.com, 248-7128 Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday See page A2 for additional contact information.


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 27, 2012

LIFE

COMMUNITY JOURNAL

PEOPLE | IDEAS | RECIPES

Holy Trinity Church in Batavia will be a part of the four-parish pastoral region in Clermont County. JOHN SENEY/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

St Philomena Church in Stonelick Township.

St Ann's Church in Williamsburg.

St Louis Church in Owensville.

Four parishes form pastoral region Congregations will share services, remain independent

By John Seney jseney@communitypress.com

CLERMONT CO. — Four catholic parishes in Clermont County are forming a pastoral region in which the parishes will share services, but remain independent. The Rev. Jerry Hiland, who is based at St. Louis Church in Owensville, will serve as priest for the four churches, which include St. Louis, St. Philomena in Stonelick Township, St. Ann in Williamsburg and Holy Trinity in Batavia. Hiland sees the pastoral region concept as the best alternative to merging or closing small churches. “We don’t want to close small town churches,” he said. “Churches are sacred places. We want to do everything possible to keep them.” A second priest, the Rev. Marty Bachman, will be assigned to the region as associate pastor July 1, the day the new concept goes into effect. Although the pastoral region becomes official July 1, members of the four parishes have been working on the transition for several years, Hiland said. “We spent a lot of time working up to it and talking about it,”

said Steve Scott, a member of the St. Louis parish council. “There’s been a lot of communication and cooperation.” “We’re lucky we’re not that far apart,” Hiland said of the four parishes. “This is workable and doable.” Dan Andriacco, communications director for the Cincinnati Archdiocese, said the pastoral region concept was adopted in 2005 when archdiocese officials realized there would be fewer priests available in the future. “It was a way to provide the same level of service with fewer priests,” he said. All the parishes in the archdiocese were divided up into regions and the parishes were asked to begin working together. The parishes were not required to form pastoral regions immediately, but several already have adopted the concept as older priests retired, he said. “There’s going to be a lot more in the future,” he said. Andriacco said archdiocese officials see the pastoral region idea as not only a way to keep churches open, but to provide better service to the parishioners. The increasing presence of lay

people in the operation of parishes has made the transition easier, he said. “It’s not just about keeping doors open,” Andriacco said. “Even though there are fewer priests, we will still provide service to the people as good or better than it was when we had more priests.” Under the pastoral region concept, the four Clermont County churches remain independent with their own parish councils. The two priests will rotate among the four churches, with service times staggered so parishioners can attend services at any of the churches. Bachman, who previously served at a church on the west side of Cincinnati, will serve as associate pastor of the region for three years. He will conduct services at all four churches, Hiland said. “It will be a good learning experience for a newer priest,” he said. Hiland said on a typical weekend, there will be two Saturday services and six Sunday services scheduled among the four churches. There will be at least one service at each of the four churches

each weekend, he said. “People should feel comfortable going to any of the four churches,” he said. Hiland said there are about 850 households in the four parishes. In addition to sharing priests, the parishes will collaborate on programs such as marriage classes and marriage counseling and classes for adults who want to become Catholics. “It gives us more flexibility in scheduling,” Hiland said. The central offices for the region will be at St. Louis in Owensville. Hiland will live in Owensville and Bachman will live in Batavia. Each parish council will keep its own finances and be responsible for the upkeep of its church. Hiland said the four parishes have been working together in advance of the July 1 official starting date. “It has worked well,” Hiland said. “Cooperation is remarkable.” Marilyn Ross, chairman of the parish council at St. Ann in Williamsburg, said she has been impressed with the cooperation of the four parishes. “The councils of all four par-

ishes have come into it with a good attitude,” she said. “It’s going very well.” She said some people from the other three parishes already have attended services at St. Ann. “It’s nice to see people from other parishes,” she said. Bob Burroughs, a member of the St. Philomena parish council, said he thought the pastoral region concept was the best way to deal with the problem of a decreasing number of priests. “So far it seems to be working well,” he said. Burroughs said the new system required “a little sacrifice on everybody’s part” because there may not be as many services available at each church. John Gauch, a member of the Holy Trinity parish council, said he thought the pastoral region was a good way to keep the small Batavia church open. “We like going to the smaller church in Batavia,” he said. “We think the village has great character.” Gauch credited Hiland with bringing the pastoral region concept to reality. “Father Jerry made us think as a region rather than four individual parishes,” he said.


B2 • COMMUNITY JOURNAL • JUNE 27, 2012

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD THURSDAY, JUNE 28

474-1400. Anderson Township.

Clubs & Organizations

TUESDAY, JULY 3

OutPost, 9:30-11:30 a.m., Miami Valley Christian Academy, 6830 School St., Non-denominational women’s group. Includes messages and music. Complimentary coffee and refreshments are provided. All ages. Free. Presented by OutPost. 528-1952. Newtown.

Art & Craft Classes Practice of Poetry: Summer Series, 4-6 p.m., Grailville Retreat and Program Center, 932 O’Bannonville Road, House of Joy. Bi-weekly workshops and weekly options available, through July 31. For women interested in writing as a spiritual and creative practice. Sessions provide opportunities for writing and sharing with other women as well as guidance in the art and craft of poetry. $60-$90. Reservations required. 683-2340; www.grailville.org. Loveland.

Drink Tastings Entwine: Food Network Partnership Paired Wine Tasting, 6-9 p.m., Winedog Fine Wines & Fine Art, 451A Ohio Pike, Wine specialist: Megan Maloney of Heidelberg Distributing. Music by Max Gise. Hors d’oeuvres by Babee Bites Catering (Debbie Hook). Ages 21 and up. $19.75. Reservations required. 888-2880668; www.winedog.com. Anderson Township.

Exercise Classes Zumba Fitness Class with Robin, 7 p.m., Eastside Sports, $5. 310-5600; www.zumbawithrobin.webs.com. Withamsville.

Exercise Classes Zumba Fitness Class, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Clough United Methodist Church, 2010 Wolfangel Road, $5. 379-4900. Anderson Township. Zumba Fitness Class with Robin, 7 p.m., Eastside Sports, 806 Ohio Pike, Ages 10 and up. All experience levels. Family friendly. $5. 310-5600; www.zumbawithrobin.webs.com. Withamsville.

Health / Wellness Mobile Mammography Unit, 7 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Steamboat Trails Retirement Community, 1221 Bethel-New Richmond Road, Cost varies per insurance plan. Financial assistance available for qualified applicants. Registration required. Presented by Mercy Health Partners. 6863310; www.e-mercy.com. New Richmond.

Home & Garden Vertical Gardening Workshop, 7-8:30 p.m., Loveland Greenhouse, 11924 Lebanon Road, Bring wooden picture frame sized for 8-by-10 photo. $15, plus materials. 683-1581; www.lovelandgreenhouse.com. Symmes Township.

Literary - Crafts Explorer’s Club, 11 a.m.-noon, Batavia Branch Library, 326 Broadway St., Stories, crafts and games while exploring Fractured Fairytales. Ages 7-12. Free. Registration required. 732-2128. Batavia.

Literary - Libraries Creative Writing Group, 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Williamsburg Branch Library, 594 Main St., Teens and adults. Free. 724-1070. Williamsburg. Musical Instruments and Inventions, 3-4 p.m., Symmes Township Branch Library, 11850 Enyart Road, With Steve Featherston, Interactive Music Musician and High Tech Musical Instrument Inventor. Free. Presented by Public Library of Cincinnati & Hamilton County. 369-6001. Symmes Township.

Literary - Story Times Storytime, 10-11 a.m., Batavia Branch Library, 326 Broadway St., Ages 0-6 enjoy stories, songs, rhymes and fingerplays all about this year’s summer reading theme: Dream Big!. Free. Registration required. 732-2128; www.clermontlibrary.org. Batavia. Drop-in ToddlerTime Story Time, 10-10:30 a.m., MilfordMiami Township Branch Library, 1099 Ohio 131, Bring child age 18 months-2 years for books, rhymes and songs each week and early literacy tips. Free. 248-0700. Milford. BabyTime, 10:30-11 a.m., New Richmond Branch Library, 103 River Valley Blvd., Interactive story time with parent and children birth to 18 months. Tickle time, lullaby rhymes, songs and short stories to introduce your child to literature. Free. Registration required. 553-0570. New Richmond. All Ages Story Time, 10:3011:30 a.m., Amelia Branch Library, 58 Maple St., Stories, songs, rhymes and finger plays about this year’s summer reading theme: Dream Big. Each session promotes six early literacy skills that children must know before they can learn to read. Ages 0-6. Free. Registration required. 752-5580. Amelia.

Music - Blues Sonny’s Solo Blues, 7-11 p.m., Mama Vita’s, 6405 Branch Hill

Farmers Market

“Flex-rock” band Waiting on Ben will perform at MJ’s on Main, 18 Main St. in Milford, beginning at 9 p.m. Friday, June 19. For more information, call 831-9888 or visit www.mjsonmain.net. Band members are, from front left, Jon Lattier, Ben Alexander, Carlos Vargas and Dave Swift; second row, Jude Hayden, Mark Rudy, Daniel Martens, Paul Alexander and Josh Parker. THANKS TO TERRENCE HUGHES. Guinea Pike, 697-9705; www.mamavitas.com. Loveland.

Music - World Community Drum Circle, 7-9 p.m., Riverside Coffee Mill, 177 S. Riverside Drive, With Bob Laake. Plenty of extra Djembe drums to participate. Free. 732-2326; www.riversidecoffeemill.com. Batavia.

starting at 7 p.m. Family friendly. $13, $5 ages 7-15, free ages 6 and under. 937-444-6215. Williamsburg.

SATURDAY, JUNE 30 Benefits

Family Night: Free Dog Park, 6-9:30 p.m., KennelResorts, 5825 Meadowview Drive, Cedar Grove Dog Park. All dogs welcome. Dog owners required to bring proof of dog’s vaccinations. Family friendly. Free. 831-7297; www.kennelresorts.com. Milford.

Nick Erdy Foundation Memorial Golf Outing, Noon, Deer Track Golf Course, 6160 Oh. 727, Check in 11 a.m. Shotgun start. Includes green fees, driving range, golf cart, door prize, drink tickets, dinner, awards and prizes. Benefits Nick Erdy Foundation. $80 per person. Registration required, available online. Presented by Nick Erdy Foundation. 312-2363; www.nickerdyfoundation.org. Goshen.

Shopping

Exercise Classes

Flower Hour, 4-6 p.m., Loveland Greenhouse, 11924 Lebanon Road, Manager specials. 6831581. Symmes Township.

Zumba Fitness Class, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Clough United Methodist Church, $5. 379-4900. Anderson Township. Zumba with KC, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Bethel Community Center, 135 N. Union St., Zumba fitness and Zumba Gold classes. $5. Presented by Kimberley “KC” Coniglio. 240-5180; www.zumbawithkc.com. Bethel.

Pets

FRIDAY, JUNE 29 Business Seminars Job Search Learning Labs, 1-2:45 p.m., Anderson Senior Center, 7970 Beechmont Ave., Technically-oriented learning opportunities for those in job transition. Free. Presented by Job Search Learning Labs. 4743100; www.jobsearchlearninglabs.wikidot.com. Anderson Township.

Dining Events Friday Night Family Grillouts, 5-8 p.m., Lake Isabella, 10174 Loveland-Madeira Road, Music by Brad Martin. Freshly grilled meals and music on dock. Meals: $7.75-$9.25. Parking permit required. Presented by Hamilton County Park District. 791-1663; www.greatparks.org. Symmes Township. Fish Fry, 6-7:30 p.m., Dennis Johnson VFW Post 6562, 1596 Ohio 131, Fish sandwiches, chicken fingers or six-piece shrimp dinner. Includes cole slaw and French fries. Carryout available. $5.50 and up. Presented by Ladies Auxiliary Dennis Johnson VFW Post 6562. 5752102. Milford.

Karaoke and Open Mic Karaoke Contest, 9 p.m.midnight, Batavia Station, 600 E. Main St., Qualifying rounds May 11-June 15. Semi-finals June 22. Finals June 29. First place: $500. Second place: $300. Third place: $200. Family friendly. Free. Registration required. 732-9800. Batavia.

Music - Acoustic Waiting on Ben, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., MJ’s on Main, 18 Main St., 831-9888; www.mjsonmain.net. Milford.

Recreation Friday Night Racing, 7-11:30 p.m., Moler Raceway Park, 2059 Harker Waits Road, Now running Mount Orab Ford Late Models, Holman Motors Chevettes Modifieds and Crazy Compacts on Fridays, Hot Laps

Home & Garden Vertical Gardening Workshop, 10-11:30 a.m. and 2-3:30 p.m., Loveland Greenhouse, $15, plus materials. 683-1581; www.lovelandgreenhouse.com. Symmes Township.

Music - R&B Fathead Davis Trio, 9:30 p.m.-1 a.m., Padrino, 111 Main St., 965-0100; www.padrinoitalian.com. Milford.

Pets Puppy Play: Free Dog Park, 1-3 p.m., KennelResorts, 5825 Meadowview Drive, Cedar Grove Dog Park. For puppies up to age one. All puppies must have completed, at minimum, their second round of puppy shots. Family friendly. Free. 831-7297; www.kennelresorts.com. Milford.

SUNDAY, JULY 1 Auditions Old West Festival Auditions, Noon-3 p.m., Old West Festival, 1449 Greenbush Cobb Road, Long Branch Saloon. Unpaid volunteer positions available. Opportunity to practice and improve improvisational skills. Characters needed include: saloon girls, melodrama cast, outlaws, emcee, gamblers and people with special talents. Ages 18 and up. Free. register with. 866-937-8337; www.oldwestfestival.com. Williamsburg.

Exercise Classes Cardio Kick Boxing, 6-7 p.m., ATA Taekwondo Black Belt Academy, 8510 Beechmont Ave., Led by George Sizemore, fourthdegree black belt and co-owner of ATA Black Belt Academy. Family friendly. $5. 652-0286; www.atacincinnati.com. Anderson Township.

ABOUT CALENDAR To submit calendar items, go to www.cincinnati.com and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to life@communitypress.com along with event information. Items are printed on a spaceavailable basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to www.cincinnati.com and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page.

Historic Sites Miller-Leuser Log House, 1-4 p.m., Miller-Leuser Log House, 6550 Clough Pike, Tour of 1796 historic log house furnished with 18th and 19th century antiques, the barn, outhouse and corn crib. The oldest log cabin in Hamilton County remaining on its original site. Members of the Historical Society will be on hand to show you around and answer any questions. Appointments available. Closed November-May. Family friendly. Free. Presented by Anderson Township Historical Society. 231-2114; andersontownshiphistoricalsociety.org. Anderson Township.

Nature Free Firsts Appreciation Days, 7 a.m.-8 p.m., Lake Isabella, 10174 Loveland-Madeira Road, Residents can enjoy any park without the need for a motor vehicle permit, while enjoying a host of other free and discounted activities. Dress for weather. Family friendly. Free, no vehicle permit required. Presented by Hamilton County Park District. 521-7275; www.greatparks.org/freefirsts. Symmes Township.

Pets Singles Night: Free Dog Park, 6-9:30 p.m., KennelResorts, 5825 Meadowview Drive, Cedar Grove Dog Park. Single adults ages 21 and up welcome to share love of dogs with other single adults. Dog owners required to bring proof of dog’s vaccinations. Free. 831-7297; www.kennelresorts.com. Milford.

Summer Camp Religious/VBS Woodland Lakes Christian Camps, 8 a.m.-4 p.m., Woodland Lakes Christian Camp, 3054 Lindale-Mount Holly Road, Intermediate. Daily through July 4. Grades 3-4. Activities include: arts and crafts, climbing, giant swing, swimming in pool or lake, archery, BB gun range, volleyball and canteen. Ages 4-18. $25-$250 for preschool day camp to week-long camps. Registration required. 797-5268; www.woodlandlakes.com. Monroe Township.

MONDAY, JULY 2 Dance Classes Square Dance Lessons, 7-9 p.m., Mount Moriah United Methodist Church, 681 Mount Moriah Drive, Ages 8 and up. Instructor: Sharon Murphy, licensed square dance caller. $5.

Presented by Beechmont Squares Dance Club. 871-6010. Withamsville.

Exercise Classes Zumba Fitness Class, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Clough United Methodist Church, $5. 379-4900. Anderson Township. Zumba Fitness Class with Robin, 7 p.m., Eastside Sports, $5. 310-5600; www.zumbawithrobin.webs.com. Withamsville. Zumba with KC, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Bethel Community Center, $5. 240-5180; www.zumbawithkc.com. Bethel.

Literary - Crafts Crochet Group, 6-7:30 p.m., Williamsburg Branch Library, 594 Main St., Evening of crochet. Learn basic crochet stitches and how to read and follow crochet patterns. For 12 and up. Free. 724-1070; www.clermontlibrary.org. Williamsburg.

Literary - Libraries River City Writer’s Group, 6-7:30 p.m., New Richmond Branch Library, 103 River Valley Blvd., Participants freely share their writing endeavors, generate ideas, hone their craft and network with fellow writers in area. Free. 553-0570. New Richmond.

Music - Cabaret Sinatra Night, 5:30-8:30 p.m., Tong’s Thai Restaurant, 1055 Main St., With Matt Snow, “The Cincinnati Sinatra.” Dinner available starting at 4:30 p.m. Family friendly. Free. 248-2999. Milford.

Summer Camp Religious/VBS Woodland Lakes Christian Camp, 8 a.m.-4 p.m., Woodland Lakes Christian Camp, 3054 Lindale-Mount Holly Road, Happy Birthday U.S.A. Daily through July 6. Swimming, hot lunch, games, canteen and arts and crafts. With weekly themes. Dress for weather. Ages 1-6. $140 per week; $50 per week pre- and post camp. Registration required. 797-5268; www.woodlandlakes.com. Monroe Township.

Loveland Farmers Market, 3-7 p.m., Loveland Station, W. Loveland Avenue, E. Broadway and Second Streets, Located at Loveland Station parking area: Route 48 and W. Loveland Ave. Presented by Loveland Farmers’ Market. 683-0491; www.lovelandfm.com. Loveland.

Health / Wellness HIV and Hepatitis C Testing, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Clermont Medical Social Services, 2400 Clermont Center Drive, Suite 200. Confidential testing and education. Free. Appointment required. Presented by Clermont County General Health District. 735-8400. Batavia.

Literary - Crafts Explorer’s Club, 2-3 p.m. and 3:30-4:30 p.m., Amelia Branch Library, 58 Maple St., Explore this years summer reading theme: Dream Big. Stories, crafts, games and snacks. Ages 0-5. Free. 752-5580. Amelia. Craft Time, Noon-1 p.m., Bethel Branch Library, 611 W. Plane St., Attendees in grades kindergarten through elementary invited to join for games and crafts during story time for siblings. Free. 734-2619. Bethel.

Literary - Libraries Writing Group, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Milford-Miami Township Branch Library, 1099 Ohio 131, Group meets first Tuesday of every month. Writers of all levels and genres welcome. Ages 18 and up. Free. Registration required. 248-0700. Milford.

Literary - Story Times Preschool Story Time, Noon-1 p.m., Bethel Branch Library, 611 W. Plane St., Ages 3-6. Stories, craft and games. Family friendly. Free. Registration required. Presented by Clermont County Public Library. 734-2619. Bethel.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 4

Family Fun Carnival, 4-7 p.m., First Baptist Church of Glen Este, 1034 Old State Route 74, Giant inflatable slide, carnival games, obstacle course, dunk tank, cornhole, face painting and putt-putt. Concessions available. No alcohol served or permitted. Free. 752-0936, ext. 118; www.fbcge.org. Batavia.

THURSDAY, JULY 5 Exercise Classes Zumba Fitness Class, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Clough United Methodist Church, $5. 379-4900. Anderson Township. Zumba Fitness Class with Robin, 7 p.m., Eastside Sports, $5. 310-5600; www.zumbawithrobin.webs.com. Withamsville.

Literary - Libraries Volunteers of the Library, 11 a.m., Milford-Miami Township Branch Library, 1099 Ohio 131, Free. Presented by Clermont County Public Library. 248-0700. Milford. Creative Writing Group, 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Williamsburg Branch Library, Free. 724-1070. Williamsburg.

Summer Camp - YMCA

Literary - Story Times

Traditional Day Camps, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., M.E. Lyons YMCA, 8108 Clough Pike, Ages 6-11. Monday-Friday. $120 per week for YMCA member, $175 per week for non-member. 4741400. Anderson Township. Campers in Leadership Training, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., M.E. Lyons YMCA, 8108 Clough Pike, Ages 14-15. Monday-Friday. $60 members, $120 non-members.

Drop-in ToddlerTime Story Time, 10-10:30 a.m., MilfordMiami Township Branch Library, Free. 248-0700. Milford. All Ages Story Time, 10:3011:30 a.m., Amelia Branch Library, Free. Registration required. 752-5580. Amelia.


LIFE

JUNE 27, 2012 • COMMUNITY JOURNAL • B3

Herbs, spices are links to biblical times and soul!

“Bible” bean salad

I adapted this from a chick pea salad daughterin-law Jessie shared. Perfect for that July 4 gathering. Note all the Bible foods and herbs included: vinegar, olive oil, cumin, garlic (which was eaten as a vegetable during Bible times), oregano, beans, onions and, of course, salt. Remember Lot’s wife turned to salt. Healthy, too. Dressing: Go to taste on this, adding more vinegar, etc. if you like.

Rita grows basil in a cast iron kettle she inherited from her mother. THANKS TO RITA HEIKENFELD

MORE ABOUT BIBLE HERBS AND SPICES!

This bean salad is chock full of ingredients mentioned in the Bible. THANKS TO RITA HEIKENFELD. joram, which mint was to be picked for kibbee, and how many sprigs of thyme it took for a kettle full of dolmathas. (Thyme grew wild in the Jerusalem hills). Some of the herbs doubled as medicines, as well. Mom gave us anise tea for cramps, and babies recovering from illness were given barley water sweetened with honey and anise.

Barley was a popular grain during Bible days and honey was the main sweetener. She came upon this naturally, learning from her mother holistic ways to heal. To this day, my Aunt Margaret still cooks with Bible herbs and spices. She is in her 90s and going strong! One of my most prized possessions is the huge ancient cast iron “spider”

Program manages falls CLERMONT COUNTY —

Have you turned down a chance to go out with family or friends because you were concerned about falling? Have you cut down on a favorite activity because you might fall? If so, “A Matter of Balance: Managing Concerns About Falls” is a program for you. Fear of falling can be just as dangerous as falling itself. People who develop this fear often limit their activities, which can result in severe physical weakness, making the risk of falling even greater.

Many older adults also experience increased isolation and depression when they limit their interactions with family and friends. A “Matter of Balance” can help people improve their quality of life and remain independent. A “Matter of Balance” is designed to reduce the fear of falling and increase activity levels among older adults. Participants learn to set realistic goals to increase activity, change their environment to reduce fall risk factors and learn simple exercises to increase

strength and balance. The Clermont County General Health District Senior Safety Program is offering “A Matter of Balance: Managing Concerns About Falls” on Thursdays, July 12 through Aug. 30, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at Eastgate Village, 776 Old Ohio 74. The program is free. A workbook is provided and refreshments will be served. Call Denise Franer RN at 513-735-8421 to register or for more information.

STM JulyFest is July 13, 14, 15 Bring family and friends to the St. Thomas More JulyFest, one of the largest festivals on the eastside of Cincinnati. The St. Thomas More JulyFest is held the second full weekend in July, and is the major fundraiser for the parish. St. Thomas More’s JulyFest was voted best festival in Clermont County for 2005. The 2012 event will be July 13, July 14, and July 15. JulyFest offers food and entertainment for the entire family. This year’s festival offers games and midway rides for children, as well as an interactive gaming video trailer, face painting and balloon animals. Bid ‘n Buy, grand raffle and games are available for adults, including the JulyFest casino. iPADs and

Cooking with Rita on Cincinnati.com Hear Rita live each week Thursday at 7:20 a.m. on the Sonrise Morning Show/Sacred Heart Radio on 740AM (check site out for more stations).

46-inch flat screen TVs can be won at the Pull Tabs Booth. This year’s JulyFest will include a variety of refreshments and food, including steak hoagies, roasted corn on the cob, brats, metts, hotdogs, hamburgers, baked potatoes, funnel cakes, homemade desserts, and more. This year’s Sunday dinner features a choice of half of an Amish roasted chicken or pulled pork, with choices of Saratoga chips, baked beans, green beans, cole slaw, fresh fruit, corn bread and iced tea. There is also a children’s menu featuring chicken nuggets. The Sunday dinner is from 1 p.m. to 8 p.m. or until the food runs out! Beverages at this year’s JulyFest include soft

drinks, beer from the large Beer Garden, wine coolers, and new this year, a LimeA-Rite booth. The entertainment lineup has music to please all types of fans. Acts include the bands Gypsy Stone Friday at 6:15 p.m.; Leroy Ellington & the E-Funk Band Friday at 9 p.m.; Blue Sacrifice Saturday at 6:15 p.m.; The Dan Varner Band Saturday at 9 p.m.; Rattlesnakin’ Daddies Sunday at 3 p.m.; Anna and Milovan Sunday at 5:30 p.m.; and a recital by OMEB and the School of Rock Sunday at 8:30 p.m. JulyFest is open Friday and Saturday 6 p.m. to midnight, and Sunday at 1 p.m. for the Sunday dinner, and at 3 p.m. for the rest of the festival.

kettle that I inherited from my mother. She grew enough herbs for our family of 11 in that kettle. It now sits in a place of honor in my garden, and my “hobbit”/basil grows happily there. (The legend is that basil sprang up in the ground near Christ’s tomb after the resurrection). I ask the Lord to bless her as I scatter seeds on the surface, patting

RELIGION Greater Cincinnati Russian Church

Services are each Sunday at Milford Assembly of God, 1301 Ohio 131, beginning at 1 p.m. There are also Bible study classes each Thursday at 7:30 p.m.

Laurel United Methodist Church

Vacation Bible School for children in kindergarten through sixth grades will be from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. all five Sundays in July at the church. Registration is at 5:45 p.m. For more information, call Amy at 553-2547. The church is at 1888 LaurelLindale Road.

them into the soil with bare hands. There is a burgeoning interest in holistic health and aromatherapy, and many herbs and spices mentioned in the Bible are included in natural remedies. There is dill, another tithing herb, for “gripe water” to soothe colicky babies; mint tea for digestion and in spritzers to refresh and cleanse the air; cilantro/coriander (analogous to Biblical manna) for removing heavy metals from the body. Flax, out of which linen was made, helps lower cholesterol and cinnamon helps stabilize blood sugar. Bay (athletes were crowned with bay) shows promise in research for diabetes and heart health and is used in steam facials. You could say they’re good for body

¼ cup red wine vinegar ½ cup olive oil 1 teaspoon cumin or more to taste ½ teaspoon chili powder or more to taste 2 teaspoons garlic 1 teaspoon dried oregano Salt to taste Red pepper flakes to taste (optional go easy on these)

Salad: 3 cans beans: your choice, drained and rinsed 1 bunch green onions, chopped 3 tomatoes, chopped Handful chopped parsley 2-4 ribs celery or more to taste, diced 1 large bell pepper, diced

Whisk together dressing ingredients. Set aside while mixing salad ingredients. Pour dressing over salad. Toss gently to blend.

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Did you know many common herbs and spices we use have Biblical roots? I have always been fascinated with the historical significance of Biblical Rita herbs and Heikenfeld spices so often menRITA’S KITCHEN tioned throughout the Old and New Testaments. They’re living links to our past, and many of the trendy herbs and spices common to cuisines all around the world trace their roots to Biblical and pre-Biblical times. Even before people could write, they used herbs and spices to season and preserve foods. The people of Bible days were herbalists out of necessity. Herbs and spices also were in cosmetics, dyes and medicines. All households, whether rich or poor, cultivated an herb garden and the plants were highly valued. My own Lebanese cooking and healing heritage is rich with facts and folklore regarding herbs of Bible days. I remember my parents telling stories of their families who immigrated from “the old country,” Lebanon. Mint, one of the tithing herbs, was carefully nurtured during the long voyage to America. We used Bible herbs and spices in everyday cooking in our traditional Lebanese household. All nine of us children learned at an early age how to distinguish oregano (the hyssop of the Bible) from mar-

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LIFE

B4 • COMMUNITY JOURNAL • JUNE 27, 2012

How to Live a ‘Balanced Life’ If you’ve ever lost your footing or found yourself reaching for a chair or wall to steady yourself, you’ve come face-to-face with a fact of life. As we age, our ability to balance ourselves decreases. For many, that loss of balance is negligible and does not interfere with daily activities. For others, it can limit mobility and personal confidence. While good balance is important at any age, it is especially critical for seniors. According to the National Institutes of Health, balance-related falls are the second leading cause of accidental death for seniors, and the number one cause of emergency room visits. Statistics show that one in three adults over the age of 65 falls each year with as many as 30 percent resulting in severe injuries. There’s an emotional cost as well. Balance is the intangible force that allows us to perform the daily activities we take for granted.

If you are experiencing balance issues, there are a Linda Eppler number CARING & SHARING of balancing and stretching exercises that may improve your stability. Before beginning these, however, it’s important to eliminate any physical issues that might be contributing to the problem. Here are three good steps to begin with. First, have your eyes checked. Studies indicate that our brain uses visual signals from our surroundings to help balance our bodies. It could be that a vision correction will help your balance. Next, have your ears checked. Last, check your medications.

Linda Eppler is director of Community Services for Clermont Senior Services.

Second Chance program benefits community, those on probation Submitted by Kathy Lehr clermont@communitypress.com

As 44-year-old Mark, with a lot of experience in landscaping work, offered his co-workers advice on the best way to split hosta plants, other participants in the Clermont County Main Street Project cleared debris from flower beds around the Clermont County Common Pleas Courthouse in Batavia. “It’s a project designed to teach individuals about the importance of giving back to the community,” said Ann Kruse, an employment specialist with the Success through Employment Program of Clermont County Adult Probation. “The individuals involved with this program aren’t bad people. By doing projects like this, they learn the importance of volunteerism and working together; it provides them with positive feedback and a feeling of accomplishment.” Chris, convicted of a

Clermont County Adult Probation employment specialists Ann Kruse, center, and Elizabeth Moran, right, help a participant in the Main Street Program beautify a flower bed in front of the Clermont Common Pleas Courthouse in Batavia. THANKS TO KATHY LEHR felony, said the Main Street Program definitely has given him a sense of accomplishment and boosted his confidence. “I am hoping that people won’t be prejudiced against me and will give

me another chance,” said Chris, 23-years-old, while easing plants into the soil in a bed in front of the courthouse. “This is a great experience and I thank the probation officers for giving me this op-

portunity.” “I feel really good about giving back to the community,” said Mark, on probation for non-payment of child support. “The probation officers care about us and don’t give up on us. This has been a rewarding experience for me.” Adult Probation employment specialist Elizabeth Moran said, “We don’t ask them to do anything we won’t do ourselves.” She and Kruse worked alongside the six people on probation involved with the project recently one morning in May. This is the second Main Street Project that has been implemented locally. “We hope local employers will notice that people involved with this program are hard working, team players that deserve a second chance,” said Kruse. For more information about the Main Street Project, contact Kruse at Workforce One of Clermont County at 943-3744.

Krista Ramsey, Columnist kramsey@enquirer.com

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LIFE

JUNE 27, 2012 • COMMUNITY JOURNAL • B5

Birds interesting to watch from porch Howdy folks, Last week we set out on the back porch one evening. The birds were feeding and a deer was blowing at something. There was a cardinal and a cow bird setting on the feeder fussing at each other. This didn’t seem to have any effect on either of them. After each fussing, they both picked up some seed and ate it then kept up their fussing. This was interesting. The black raspberries are ripening, so we are making several more beds for berries next year. We like the black raspberries better than the red ones. The lady that was a hairdresser a few years ago on South Bantam Road, Margie Caldwell, is in the Sunrise Nursing home. Ruth Ann and I went down to visit her last week. She is a very lovely person and she and her late husband were good friends of ours so if any of you remember her and read this, you might send

her a card of cheer. She would enjoy the card. While we were working in the garden George last week, I Rooks thought I OLE FISHERMAN saw something around the bee hives. I saw a couple small skunks, one was solid black. The other one was about 60 percent white, its tail was all white. They didn’t seem to be bothering the bees, but getting grubs or something out of the ground. I didn’t go to see what they were eating. We were gone to Grange on Friday night and the neighbor was setting outside watching the dogs. When she saw the skunks by our carpenter shop, she called the dogs back in the house. The dogs didn’t see the little skunks. If they had, the outcome would have been a different story.

When we got home, the air would have been pretty thick with the skunk “perfume.” Last week, I mowed the pasture for Ruth Ann’s second cousins. Where the horses pasture, the ground was plenty rough. There were wild turkeys and deer in the field. This country sure has plenty of wildlife. The other night, Ruth Ann heard the coyotes howling and could hear the small ones. We seem to have a good population of these animals. The coyotes have taken the population of groundhogs down. The groundhogs can destroy a garden overnight. We see lots of animals killed on the highway, so when you are driving be careful. They can cause a wreck and hurt people. Friday evening, the Grange at Nicholsville held their meeting and put on the third and fourth degree for their new members. They also join the Whiteoak Valley Grange in

the spring to do this once a year. Saturday evening, we went to Grants Farm and Greenhouse to get some potting soil and a couple yellow tomato plants and cucumber plants. It seems the deer like the ones we have planted. After we left there, we went up to Mowyrstown to the White Oak Valley Grange card party playing euchre. We could see a bad cloud ahead of us. We were about three miles west of Sardinia when it started to rain on us. Then it got extremely hard along with hail and wind. There were several cars parked along the road. I was getting to the rest area along Ohio 32. This is where we parked with other cars, even a big tractor trailer. I have never driven in rain like that. The wind would rock the truck some and the hail was really pounding the truck. This was scary. After about 20 minutes the rain let up and down here

at home there was no rain. Monday evening, the Bethel Lions Club met for a picnic at the Burke Park in Bethel, and had the VanScyok’s from the Kenwood Lions Club to install the Bethel Lions Club officers for the year 20122013. There was a good group of 16 members, spouses, guests and the young lady, Brianna Hamilton, that got a certificate from the district convention for her peace poster and her mom and dad. The Bethel Lions Club say congratulations. While we were leaving, we saw a squirrel setting on a picnic table holding a potato chip bag in it’s paws like it was reading the label. We stopped and watched it for a couple minutes. A young couple with their baby in a stroller saw the squirrel, too. Ruth Ann said we don’t have a camera. The lady said they didn’t have one either. I haven’t written anything about Chessy. She

doesn’t like to stay in the house. She only comes in to eat. We got her some salmon dinner cat food and now by golly she has sure got a liking for that. She loves to be outside and wherever we are outside she comes along with us. The Good Lord has taken another wonderful Mother home. Her family will miss her and talk about the good times they had with her. We have known this lady for several years and did she ever like to play cards. Her name is Julia Jackson. God bless the family. Also the family of June Frame who passed away last week. They used to have the Frame’s Department Store here in Bethel. Start your week by going to the house of worship of your choice and praise the Good Lord. God bless all. More later.

ASSEMBLIES OF GOD

BAPTIST

CHURCH OF CHRIST

EVANGELICAL FREE

UNITED METHODIST

NON-DENOMINATIONAL

LINDALE BAPTIST CHURCH

GLEN ESTE CHURCH OF CHRIST

3052 ST. RT. 132 AMELIA, OH 45102 797-4189

Sunday School..............................9:30am Sunday Morning Worship............10:30am Sunday Evening Worship...............6:30pm Wednesday Prayer Service ...........7:00pm

509 Roney Lane Cincinnati Ohio 45244 T: 513.528.3200 E: admin@clconline.us

Services: Sunday Worship 10:30 AM - Children’s Church Wednesday Worship 7:00 PM - Rangers and Girl’s Ministry Friday 24 hour prayer 6:00 PM

RIVER OF LIFE Assembly of God 1793 U.S. 52, Moscow, Ohio 45153 Pastor: Ralph Ollendick Sun. Contemporary Service SS -9:45am, Worship 11:00am Wed.- Informal Biblestudy 7-8pm Come Experience The Presence of the Lord In Our Services

SOUTHERN BAPTIST

CLOUGH PIKE BAPTIST CHURCH 1025 CLOUGH PIKE

Sunday School 9:30am Morning Worship 10:45am Wednesday Night Worship & Prayer Service 7:00pm Nursery provided for all services/ Youth & Children’s Programs

752-3521

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF MT REPOSE 6088 Branch Hill-Guinea Pike Ken Slaughter, Pastor

Sunday School 9:45am - Worship 11am (nursery provided) Sunday Evening Service 6pm-Youth 6pm 513-575-1121 www.mtrepose.org

Northside Baptist Church 320 Brown St. Bethel, Ohio 45106 Pastor: Ben Hurst Ph: (513) 734-6040 Sunday School 10:00-10:45 Children’s Church Provided Worship 11:00 Wednesday Prayer Service 7PM Come grow with a church on a "mission"

Sunday Worship: 8:30 & 10:30am Bible Study: 9:30am & 6:00pm Youth Groups: 6:00pm

OWENSVILLE CHURCH OF CHRIST

A fellowship where God changes people for life. Come visit us! 2545 Highway 50 Owensville, OH 45160 513-732-2324 Sunday School 9:00am Childrens Church 10:00am Worship 10:00am Contemporary and traditional with live music and multi-media.

CHURCH OF GOD GOSHEN CHURCH OF GOD

ROMAN CATHOLIC Saint Mary Church,Bethel 3398 Ohio SR 125 Phone 734-4041 Rev. Michael Leshney, Pastor Saturday Mass – 5:00 PM Sunday Mass – 10:30 AM www.stmaryparishfamily.org

Real People...In a Real Church... Worshipping a Real God! 1675 Hillstation Road, Goshen, Ohio 45122 722-1699 www.goshenchurchofgod.org Pastor Tim McGlone Service Schedule Sunday School 10:00am Sunday Worship 10:45am Sunday Evening Worship 6:00pm Wednesday Youth Service 7:00pm Saturday Service 7:00pm

Contemporary and Traditional live Worship Music and Multimedia

BAPTIST

2010 Wolfangel Rd., Anderson Twp. 513-231-4301

LUTHERAN

www.cloughchurch.org

Take I-275 to exit 57 toward Milford, Right on McClelland, Right on Price, church soon on Right

Sunday School 10am; Morning Worship 11am; Sunday Evening Service 6pm; Wednesday Eve. Prayer Service & Bible Study, 7:00pm

Reaching the Heart of Clermont County

BATAVIA BAPTIST TEMPLE

Services Saturday at 5 p.m. Sunday at 8 a.m. and 10:30 a.m.

Pastor James Dinkel 513-528-9142

PRINCE OF PEACE LUTHERAN CHURCH (ELCA)

101 South Lebanon Rd. Loveland, OH 45140 683-4244 Lead Pastor Jonathan Eilert Pastor Grant Eckhart Saturday Service 5:00pm Sunday Services 8:00, 9:30am & 11:00am Sunday School 9:30am http://www.princeofpeaceelca.org

UNITED METHODIST )2$5!. #1!+$& 0$+"/&!,+ %"*-("

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Saint Peter Church

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1192 Bethel-New Richmond Rd New Richmond, Ohio 45157 Phone 553-3267 Rev. Michael Leshney, Pastor

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Saturday Mass - 5:00 PM Sunday Masses – 8:30 & 11:00 www.stpeternewrichmond.org

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CHRISTIAN AND MISSIONARY

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF FELICITY

CALVARY ALLIANCE CHURCH

212 Prather Rd. Felicity, OH Pastor: Chad Blevins 876-2565

9:45am 10:45am 6:00pm 6:00pm 7:00pm 7:00pm

EPISCOPAL ST. THOMAS EPISCOPAL CHURCH & ST. THOMAS NURSERY SCHOOL 100 Miami Ave, Terrace Park,OH 831-2052

www.stthomasepiscopal.org

Sunday 8am Holy Eucharist, Rite I 9:15am Christian Formation & Discovery Hour for all ages* 10:30am Choral Eucharist, Rite II*

*Child care for children up to 4 in a staffed nursery from 9-noon

Wednesday Eve. Prayer Service & Bible Study, 7:00pm

Reaching the Heart of Clermont County

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Worship Services

Senior Pastor, Rev. Dave Robinette 986 Nordyke Road - 45255 (Cherry Grove turn off Beechmont at Beechmont Toyota) Worship Service, Sunday 10:45 am Classes For All Ages, Sunday 9:15 am Prayer Service Wednesday, 6:45 pm

THE CHURCH OF THE GOOD SAMARITAN

673> '$ +.2-.* 9.*& ? +.5.0!.( 4= 63:;7 1.#5)%( <%), 1$ '%0!*

Contemporary Sat 5pm & Sun 9am Traditional Sunday at 10:30 a.m. Full childcare & church school at all services. 513-677-9866 Dr. Doug Damron, Sr. Pastor (across from the Oasis Golf Club) Rev. Lisa Kerwin, Assoc. Pastor www.epiphanyumc.org

6635 Loveland Miamiville Rd Loveland, OH 45140

57%"2& 5$9##4 ; +)1( 2'

770 South Riverside, Batavia OH 45103 Raymond D. Jones, Pastor 732-2739

Sunday School 10am; Morning Worship 11am; Sunday Evening Service 6pm;

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All Saints Lutheran Church 445 Craig Road Mt. Carmel, Ohio 45244 513-528-0412

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770 South Riverside, Batavia OH 45103 Raymond D. Jones, Pastor 732-2739

Sunday Worship: 9:00 & 10:30 AM with Childrens Church & Nursery PASTOR MARIE SMITH

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GOSHEN UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 6710 Goshen Rd, Goshen Across from Goshen High School 513-722-2541 www.goshenmethodist.org Sunday School 9:30am Worship 10:30am Blended Worship Traditional and Contemporary Youth Fellowship 6:00pm Nursery Available

6/* )-$ 31'!+$&4

BATAVIA BAPTIST TEMPLE

Sunday School Sunday Worship Sunday Eve. Childrens Mission Sunday Eve. Adult Discipleship Sunday Eve. Worship Wed. Eve. Adult Bible Study

www.faithchurch.net

Services 8:00 am, 9:15 am & 11:00am Steve Lovellette, Senior Pastor Nursery proivided at all services

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MONUMENTS BAPTIST CHURCH

2831 State Route 222 Mark Pence, Pastor 513-313-2401 Sunday School....9:30AM Sunday Worship....10:45AM Childrens Church & Nursery Avail Wednesday Prayer Service & Youth Meeting....7:00PM Nursery & Children’s Activities www.monumentsbaptist.org

5910 Price Road, Milford 831-3770

Trinity United Methodist “Encircling People with God’s Love”

A New Life - A New Prospective A New Song Pastor: Michael Fite info: 753-3159 3868 McMan Rd., Withamsville, OH 45245 (behind the Water Works car wash) Sunday Worship. 10:00am www.newsongohio.com

FIRST CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST

A Loving Church in Jesus’ Name Sunday School..............................10:00AM Sunday Morning Worship..............10:45AM Thurs Prayer & Bible Study..............7:00PM Nursery Provided for Sunday Morning Worship www.FirstChurchofJesusChrist.org 6208 Guinea Pike, Milford, Ohio 45150 Pastor: Melvin Moore Church: 513-575-5450

PRESBYTERIAN (USA) LOVELAND PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

A Loving, Praying, Caring Church Join us for Sunday Services

Traditional Worship.......8:15am & 11:00am Contemporary Worship..................9:30am Sunday School...............................9:30am

Worship Service ...................... 10:00am Church School ......................... 11:15am Fellowship/Coffee Hour after Worship Nursery Provided/Youth Group Activities

Nursery Available 5767 Pleasant Hill Rd (next to Milford Jr. High)

360 Robin Av (off Oak St) Loveland OH

513-831-0262 www.trinitymilford.org

683-2525

www.LPCUSA.org • LPCUSA@fuse.net

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NON-DENOMINATIONAL %(+*''*#")*,!+'*

www.cloughpike.com

www.lindalebaptist.com

937 Old State Route 74 (Behind Meijer) 513-753-8223 www.gecc.net

George Rooks is a retired park ranger. Rooks served for 28 years with the last five as manager of East Fork State Park.

BETHEL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 402 W. Plane St. Bethel, Ohio 513-734-7201 www.bumcinfo.org

25 Amelia Olive Branch Rd.

Blended Worship 8:00 & 10:45 am Contemporary Worship 9:30 am Sunday School 9:30 & 10:45 am

Sunday 10:30am ... Holy Eucharist 10:30am...Sunday School (Lil’ Samaritans)

Nursery Care for Age 3 & under Full Program for Children, Youth, Music, Small Groups & more Handicapped Accessible

Handicap Accessible 513-753-4115 www.GoodSamaritanEpiscopal.org

Bill Bowdle -Sr. Pastor Steve Fultz - Assoc. Pastor; J. D. Young - Youth Director Janet Bowdle - Children’s Director

Sunday Morning 10:00AM Contemporary Worship Practical Message Classes for Children & Teens Nursery Care Sunday 6:00PM Avalanche Youth Service Wednesday 7:00PM Bible Study (adults) / Avalanche Youth We have many other groups that meet on a regular basis 4050 Tollgate Rd, Williamsburg, OH 513-724-3341 www.cmcchurch.com Mark Otten, Pastor

PRESBYTERIAN FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 199 Gay Street Williamsburg, Ohio 45176 Phone: 513-724-7985 Sunday School: 9:30A.M.

Worship:10:30A.M.(SupervisedNursery) PRESCHOOL: Tues, Weds, Thurs

WESLYAN MULBERRY WESLEYAN CHURCH 949 SR Bus. 28, Milford 831-3218 Eric George, Pastor Kent Underwood, Minister of Worship & Music

Sunday School 9:30am Worship/Children’s Church 10:30am Tuesday Adult Bible Study/Prayer Mtg 7:00pm Wednesday Youth Mtg. 7:00pm Friday Young Adult Mtg. 7:30pm “A friendly Church for the Whole Family”


LIFE

B6 • COMMUNITY JOURNAL • JUNE 27, 2012

POLICE REPORTS AMELIA Arrests/citations Derk Alexander, 50, 1080 Kimberly Drive, domestic violence, May 23. Leslie D. Lauriault, 34, 40 Eastridge Drive, theft, June 6. Ernest T. Rodriguez, 29, 65 E. Main No. 2, menacing, June 7.

Incidents/investigations Criminal damage Door frame, etc. damaged at 109 Hunters Court, May 31. Domestic violence At Lori Lane, May 23. Menacing Female stated she was threatened at Cecelia Ave., June 7. Theft Fraudulent deposits made and then withdrawals made on account at Key Bank ; $931.30 loss at 18 W. Main St., June 6.

BATAVIA Arrests/citations Deeana Bowles, 29, 2191 Ohio 125 No. 187, drug possession, June 7. James M. Scott, 19, 160 S. Riverside, warrant, June 9. Crystal G. Saunier, 28, 343 Clark St., warrant, June 10.

Incidents/investigations Burglary Cash and a ring taken; $3,350 at 200 Meadowbrook, June 6. Theft Cash taken; $50,000 at 120 N. Riverside, June 2. Diamond ring taken; $100 at 215 N. 5th St., June 3. Gasoline not paid for at United Dairy Farmers; $50 at East Main Street, June 8.

NEW RICHMOND Arrests/citations Mark L. Abercrombie, 26, 318 Center St., warrant, May 16. Kimberly Waits, 24, 508 Market St., drug abuse instruments, May 28. Shana A. Blair, 34, 108 Main St. No. B, warrant, June 1. Roger E. Boehm, 29, 2755 Ohio 132 No. 4, warrant, June 1. Elvis L. Haass, 46, Homeless, warrant, June 3.

Incidents/investigations Theft Money taken from vehicle $70 at 315 Center St., May 31.

PIERCE TOWNSHIP Arrests/citations Justin Moore, 27, 1751 Ohio 125 No. 103, criminal trespass, June 1. Juvenile, 17, theft, June 3. William T. Spence, 18, 4132 Forsythia, obstructing official business, June 4. Garrett Messer, 22, 824 Clough, warrant, May 31. Nicole Cooper, 32, 843 Bradbury, warrant, May 31. Felicia R. Hardin, 21, 6454 Elbrook, domestic violence, June 5. Gregory Nelson, 19, 1340 Twelve Mile Road, drug possession, obstructing official business, June 4. Danny W. Dickerson, 30, 3357 Ohio 132 No. 8, criminal damage, disorderly conduct, June 5. Kurtis J. Childs, 24, 3449 Jenny Lind, drug possession, paraphernalia, June 6. Emma J. Lawson, 20, 56 Bethel Park, theft, June 8. Juvenile, 17, theft, June 8. Regina L. Raines, 29, 3798 Merwin 10 Mile, warrant, June 6. Brandon C. Fields, 21, 332 St. Andrews No. A, warrant, June 9.

Incidents/investigations Breaking and entering Mower, pressure washer, etc. taken; $8,900 at 3534 Behymer, June 8. Burglary Playstation games, etc. taken; $1,000 at 3480 Lewis Road, June 5. Shotgun taken at 1751 Ohio 125 No. 187, June 7. Bunk beds/mattresses, etc. taken; $200 at 1751 Ohio Pike No. 124, June 7. Unlisted items taken at 3480 Lewis Road, June 7. Gun and diamond ring taken; $2,700 at 1365 Locust Lake, June 10. Criminal damage Stove and cabinets damaged at 3357 Ohio 132 No. 8, June 5. Domestic violence At Ohio 125, June 5. Failure to provide for functionally impaired At 648 Old Ohio 52, June 8.

Misuse of credit card Male stated ID used with no authorization at 1159 Greens Farm, June 7. Theft Hat taken from Walmart; $10 at Ohio 125, June 3. Cellphone, left on counter at Walmart, was taken at Ohio 125, June 4. Cash taken; $70 at 302 St. Andrews No. A, May 31. Gasoline, etc. taken from vehicle at 999 Cedar Ridge No. 7, June 4. Gasoline taken from vehicle; $35 at 1751 E. Ohio Pike No. 171, June 5. Medications taken at 3666 Oakwood, June 7. Pad locks taken from storage units at Circle Storage at Ohio Pike, June 7. Home entertainment system taken from Walmart at Ohio 125, June 7. Merchandise taken from Walmart; $290 at Ohio 125, June 8. DVDs taken from Walmart at Ohio 125, June 8. Merchandise taken from Walmart; $162 at Ohio 125, June 8. GPS unit taken from vehicle at 3570 Turnberry, June 10. Trafficking in drugs At 1000 block of Ohio 125, June 6. Violation of protection order Female reported this offense at 307 Mott Road, June 8.

UNION TOWNSHIP Arrests/citations Brian Anderson, 32, lka 2780 Lindale Mount Holly, disorderly conduct while intoxicated, June 15. Gail L. Adington, 44, 3960 Nine Mile Tobasco No. 212, driving under suspension, June 14. James M. Pedigo, no age given, 810 Clough, warrant service, June 15. Courtney Hasse, 21, 2594 Hazel Crest, wrongful entrustment, June 15. Nathan J. Kuebbe, no age given, 6259 Springdale, driving under suspension, June 15. Laura R. Srofe, 28, 4818 Beechwood, theft, June 12. Shawnta Brock, 25, 3052 Old State Road, drug abuse, June 14. Theresa Waters, 29, 4468 Schoolhouse Road, driving under suspension, June 14. Kahylie Pyles, 20, 4706 Beechwood, domestic violence, June 13. Daniel R. Lawrence, 39, lka 2 Mayflower, aggravated menacing, June 13. Rachel L. Delisle, 34, 745 Rue Center Court, leaving scene, obstructing official business, June 11. Tony McMurray, 48, 927 Ohio 52, warrant, June 13. Tory M. Luken, 48, 526 Old Ohio 74; No. 15, obstructing official business, June 12. Lindsay R. Watters, 33, 5233 Hageena, theft, June 13. Perry Graybill, 61, 4392 Eastwood, open container, June 13. Brenda Griffin, 52, 4392 Eastwood, driving under influence, June 13. Jason L. McKenzie, 38, 4471 Ripley Road, theft, June 13. Joshua J. Jones, 33, 815 Oak Fairway, complicity to theft, June 13. Maria Cook, 38, 4005 Deer Park Ave., child endangering, June 12. Sergey Marusich, 36, 4005 Deer Park Ave., child endangering, June 12. Nicholas M. Linde, 19, 27 Lori Lane, obstructing official business, driving under suspension, June 12. Jessica Souder, 18, 27 Lori Lane, wrongful entrustment, June 12. Juvenile, 15, domestic violence, June 13. Juvenile, 17, leaving scene, June 5. Eddie Davis, 41, 240 E. Glen, warrant service, June 13. Dylan W. Mullen, 20, 1751 Ohio Pike, warrant, June 13. Joseph L. Hensley, 27, 230 Union, warrant, June 12. Charles L. Cosby, 21, 3307 Church St., warrant service, June 6. Joel Davis, 24, 4704 Beechwood, warrant service, June 6. Edward Philpot, 49, 4298 Brisco, warrant, June 6.

Incidents/investigations Criminal damage Vehicle damaged at Red Roof Inn lot at Mount Carmel Tobasco Road, June 8. Criminal mischief Female reported this offense at 4515 Eastwood No. 13102, June 14.

Tires damaged on vehicle at 4145 Fox Run, June 6. Criminal trespass Trespassing on property of Kroger at Old Ohio 74, June 5. Fraud Female stated ID used with no authorization at 4542 English Creek, June 6. Misuse of credit card Female stated card used with no authorization at 4257 Pinetree, June 13. Runaway Suspect reported missing at 4500 block of Laurel Ridge, June 14. Sex offense Offense involved female juvenile at Carnoustie, June 13. Suicide Offense involved adult woman at Roland Creek, June 9. Theft Unlisted items taken at 4386 Eastwood, June 14. Fishing gear taken from truck; $230 at 486 Piccadilly, June 14. Merchandise taken from Kroger; $108 at Old Ohio 74, June 14. Personal papers taken at 4767 Rumpke, June 14. AC unit taken at 4168 Aubrey Lane, June 13. Cellphone charger etc. taken from vehicle at 1133 Forest Run, June 12. Leaf blower taken from truck at 3957 Hopper Hill, June 13. Cash taken from Apparel Outlet; $315 at Eastgate Blvd., June 6. Gasoline not paid for at United Dairy Farmers; $36 at Ohio Pike, June 6. A 1999 Chevrolet taken at 3978 Piccadilly, June 7. Jewelry taken from Claire's; $6.50 at Eastgate Blvd., June 7. Clothing taken from Kohl's; $60 at Eastgate Blvd., June 7. Purse, etc. taken from vehicle at Kroger at Old Ohio 74, June 4. Credit card taken at 3935 Wilma Court No. 101, June 5. Male stated ID used with no authorization at 946 Staghorn, June 8. Purse taken from vehicle at Kroger at Old Ohio 74, June 8. Camera taken from Sam's Club; $250 at Clepper Lane, June 9. Make-up items taken from Walmart; $826 at Eastgate Blvd., June 9. Unauthorized use A 2005 Chevrolet has not been returned at 4418 Eastwood, June 6. Vandalism Window and door damaged at 457 Ohio Pike, June 6.

WILLIAMSBURG Arrests/citations Jeffrey D. Hinkle, 47, 3490 Clover Road, assault, June 2.

Incidents/investigations Assault Female was assaulted, June 2. Burglary Debit card taken at 176 N. 8th St., June 1. Theft Debit card taken and change taken from vehicle at 108 S. 4th St. No. B, June 1.

CLERMONT COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE Arrests/citations Nicholas Knox Pinger, 25, 3452 Bolender Drive, Bethel, drug paraphernalia, possessing drug abuse instruments, possession of drugs, possession of drugs marijuana at 162 Sulphur Springs Drive, Batavia, June 14. Edward Roger Graham, 33, 231 E. Osborne St., Bethel, driving while under the influence of alcohol and/or drugs, driving while under the influence of alcohol/drugs concentration of controlled substance, drug paraphernalia, possession of drugs at 2019 Hospital Drive, Batavia, June 14. Cassandra Fields, 24, 2179 Ohio Pike, Amelia, receiving stolen property at 4530 Eastgate Blvd. No. 620, Cincinnati, June 16. Daedre Elizabeth Bronson, 25, 342 C St. Andrews, Cincinnati, theft at 531 W. Plane, Bethel, June 11. Sheena Elizabeth Fisse, 26, 2755 Ohio 132, New Richmond, forgery, theft at 2755 Ohio 132, New Richmond, June 15. Stephen Scott Rouff, 45, 4560 Water Dance Drive, Batavia, using weapons while intoxicated at 4560 Water Dance Drive, Batavia, June 11. Barbara D. Windsor, 32, 2191 Ohio Pike, Amelia, unauthorized use of property at 2989 Fair Oak Road, Amelia, June 11. Brendan Cory Cox, 20, 2191 Ohio Pike, Amelia, unauthorized use of property at 2989 Fair Oak

ABOUT POLICE REPORTS The Community Journal Clermont publishes the names of all adults charged with offenses. The information is a matter of public record and does not imply guilt or innocence. To contact your local police department, call: » Amelia, Chief David Friend, 753-4747 » Batavia village, Chief Mike Gardner, 732-5692 » New Richmond, Chief Randy Harvey, 553-3121 » Pierce Township, Officer in charge Lt. Jeff Bachman, 752-3830 » Union Township, Chief Terry Zinser, 752-1230 » Williamsburg, Chief Mike Gregory, 724-2261 » Clermont County Sheriff's Office, Sheriff A.J. “Tim” Rodenberg, 732-7500. Road, Amelia, June 11. Richard E. Morrow, 36, 2606 Airport Road, Bethel, unauthorized use of property at 2989 Fair Oak Road, Amelia, June 11. Zachary D. Johns, 22, 2191 Ohio 125, Amelia, unauthorized use of property at 2989 Fair Oak Road, Amelia, June 11. Joshua Aaron Owens, 30, 2061 Ohio Pike, Amelia, domestic violence at 2061 Ohio Pike, Amelia, June 11. George J. Dotzauer, 38, 8349 Louderback Road, Sardinia, disorderly conduct - fighting or threatening at 2191 Ohio Pike, Amelia, June 11. William Andrew Dotzauer, 36, 2191 Ohio Pike, Amelia, disorderly conduct - fighting or threatening at 2191 Ohio Pike, Amelia, June 11. Justin Whisenant, 25, 2191 Ohio Pike, Amelia, disorderly conduct - fighting or threatening at 2191 Ohio Pike, Amelia, June 11. Michael Joseph Brewer, 31, 1290 Woodville Pike, Milford, theft at 2780 Lindale Mount Holly Road, Amelia, June 12. Darryl Lee Hignite, 31, 3381 Ohio 132, Amelia, theft at 2780 Lindale Mount Holly Road, Amelia, June 12. Holly Kendle, 21, 358 St Andrews Drive, Apt. C, Cincinnati, theft at 1260 Ohio 125, Amelia, June 13. Charles C. Livingston, 25, 100 University Lane, Batavia, fugitive from justice at 4470 Ohio 222, Batavia, June 13. Nicholas Story, 21, 1815 Williams, Cincinnati, possessing drug abuse instruments at Old 74 and Armstrong, Batavia, June 14. Adam Wilbert Colston, 29, 355 Felicity Cedron Rural Road, Georgetown, domestic violence at 355 Felicity Cedron Rural Road, Georgetown, June 14. Marvin James Renner, 36, 7501 School Road, Cincinnati, drug paraphernalia, possessing drug abuse instruments, possession of drugs, receiving stolen property at 6218 Ohio 727, Goshen, June 14. Bert Dewayne Smith, 44, 2041-12 East Ahil Road, New Richmond, violate protection order or consent agreement at 2041 E. Hall Road, New Richmond, June 14. Cody Wayne Gibson, 19, 37 Wooded Ridge Road, Amelia, drug paraphernalia, possession of drugs at 1764 Ohio 125, Amelia, June 15. Juvenile, 17, possession of drugs, Amelia, June 15. Juvenile, 17, possession of drugs, Amelia, June 15. Nicholas Story, 21, 1815 Williams, Cincinnati, robbery, theft at 500 University Lane, Batavia, June 18. Roger Joseph Baldrick, 20, 1815 Williams Ave, Cincinnati, robbery, theft at 500 University Lane, Batavia, June 18. Nicholas Matthew Pegg, 28, 6255 Newtonsville Road, Newtonsville, criminal trespass, menacing at 5687 Ohio 133, Batavia, June 16. Quentin Raymond Robert Brown, 18, 171 Sulpher Springs Drive, Batavia, aggravated menacing at 17 Sulphur Springs Drive, Batavia, June 16. Catherine Marie Brown, 40, 171 Sulpher Springs Drive, Batavia, assault at 17 Sulphur Springs Drive, Batavia, June 16. Mardrees Luvall Valentine, 19, 1281 Pebble Brook Trail, Milford, criminal trespass at 500 University Lane, Batavia, June 16. Chastity Ann Neal, 40, 1185 Twelve Mile, New Richmond, drug paraphernalia at U.S. Route 52/Frank Willis Memorial, New Richmond, June 16. Brandon Dewar, 20, 2390 Laycock Cutoff, New Richmond, offenses involving underage

persons - underage consume beer intoxicating liquor at 500 University Lane, Batavia, June 17. Megan D. Stewart, 19, 200 University Lane, Batavia, offenses involving underage persons - underage consume beer intoxicating liquor at 500 University Lane, Batavia, June 17. Brandon Ray Hughes, 20, 2780 Lindale Mount Holly Road, Amelia, offenses involving underage persons - underage consume beer intoxicating liquor at 500 University Lane, Batavia, June 17. Britteney Highfield, 19, 500 University Lane, Batavia, offenses involving underage persons - underage consume beer intoxicating liquor at 500 University Lane, Batavia, June 17. Robert Hughes, 19, 133 Maple Ave, Sardinia, offenses involving underage persons underage consume beer intoxicating liquor at 500 University Lane, Batavia, June 17. Catherine Ann Kucharski, 21, 863 Meadow Ridge Drive, Cincinnati, criminal trespass, disorderly conduct - intoxicated annoy or alarm at 304 W. Walnut St., Felicity, June 17. Juvenile, 14, domestic violence knowingly cause physical harm, Williamsburg, June 17. Alice Rae Johnson, 36, 74 Lucy Creek No. 1, Amelia, driving while under the influence of alcohol/drugs, drug paraphernalia, endangering children, possession of drugs - marijuana at Amelia Olive Branch & Wood Mill, Batavia, May 30. Juvenile, 17, domestic violence cause belief of imminent physical harm by threat or force, Williamsburg, May 30. Juvenile, 17, offenses involving underage persons - underage consume beer intoxicating liquor, Williamsburg, May 30. Candis Yvonne Heggood, 23, 120 Forest Meadow, Batavia, domestic violence - knowingly cause physical harm at 120 Forest Meadow Drive, Batavia, May 31. Mardrees Luvall Valentine, 19, 1281 Pebblebrook Trail No. 2, Milford, criminal trespass at 500 University Lane, Batavia, June 1. Mallory Canfield, 20, 1193 Teakwood Drive, Milford, criminal trespass at 700 University Lane, Batavia, June 1. Stevi Breann Huff, 23, 371 W Main St., Owensville, drug paraphernalia, selling, purchasing, distributing, or delivering dangerous drugs at Stable Trail/Ohio 132, Amelia, June 1. Christopher Michael Decamp, 39, 203 Savannah Circle, Batavia, using weapons while intoxicated at 203 Savannah Circle, Batavia, June 2. Mason Edward Boling, 31, 151 Hunters Court, Amelia, domestic violence - knowingly cause physical harm at 18 Amelia Olive Branch Road, Amelia, June 2. Alshem Nmn Sebastian, 24, 445 Yarbee Trace, Cincinnati, assault, theft at 1106 Stonelick Woods Circle, Batavia, June 2. Steven Brandon Herndon, 29, 5707 Melody Lane, Milford, possessing drug abuse instruments at 4700 Filager Road, Batavia, June 2. Jeffery Cabot Partin, 24, 2845 Hwy. 50 Lot 16-B, Batavia, drug paraphernalia at 2845 Hwy. 50 Lot 16-B, Batavia, June 2. Sarah Schlake, 28, 1851 Rolling Hills Drive, New Richmond, domestic violence - knowingly cause physical harm at 1851 Rolling Hills Drive, New Richmond, June 3. Melissa Lee Matlock, 36, 4666 Galaxy Lane, Cincinnati, domestic violence - knowingly cause physical harm at 1851 Rolling Hills Drive, New Richmond,

June 3. Tanner Preston Malloy, 18, 482 S Broadway St., Williamsburg, offenses involving underage persons - underage consume beer intoxicating liquor at Ohio 32 and Ohio 133, Williamsburg, June 3. Brennan Anthony Belcher, 38, 2096 Elklick Road, Batavia, domestic violence at 2096 Elklick Road, Batavia, June 3. Juvenile, 17, domestic violence, Batavia, June 3. Nichole Marie Keller, 31, 76 Scenic Drive, No. 76, New Richmond, domestic violence at 2755 Ohio 132, New Richmond, June 3. Donald Gerald Horne, 32, 2755 Ohio 132 Lot 76, New Richmond, Oh, domestic violence, violate protection order or consent agreement at 2755 Ohio 132, New Richmond, June 3. Britney Nichole Conn, 20, 1112 Millstone No. 44, Aberdeen, offenses involving underage persons - underage consume beer intoxicating liquor at 400 University Lane, Batavia, June 3. Corey Wesley Kirby, 20, 114 Forest Meadow Drive, Batavia, offenses involving underage persons - underage consume beer intoxicating liquor at 424 Sweetbriar Drive, Batavia, June 3.

Incidents/investigations Aggravated burglary At 4560 Water Dance Drive, Batavia, June 11. Aggravated menacing At Sulphur Springs Drive, Batavia, June 16. Assault At Twelve Mile Road, New Richmond, June 13. At Sulphur Springs Drive, Batavia, June 16. At University Lane, Batavia, June 17. At Northlook Court, Batavia, June 17. At Ohio 132 Lot 257, New Richmond, June 13. At Stonelick Woods Circle, Batavia, June 2. At Gumbert Drive, Amelia, June 9. At Stonelick Woods Circle, Batavia, June 4. At Ohio Pike, Amelia, June 10. At Seneca Drive, Batavia, June 7. At Sierra Court, Batavia, June 9. Assault - knowingly harm victim At Clough Pike, Batavia, June 10. Breaking and entering At 2291 Bethel New Richmond Road, New Richmond, May 31. At 4685 Ohio 133, Batavia, June 2. At 4170 Dela Palma Road, Williamsburg, May 30. At 5242 Stonelick Williams Corner Road, Batavia, May 29. At 3973 Ohio 132, Batavia, June 4. At 1600 Frank Willis Memorial Road, New Richmond, June 12. At 2101 Laurel Lindale Road, New Richmond, June 12. At 4160 Half Acre Road, Batavia, June 11. At 5025 Ohio 276, Batavia, June 15. Burglary At 2780 Lindale Mount Holly Road, Amelia, May 30. At 312 Amelia Olive Branch Road, Amelia, June 3. At 361 Seneca Drive, Batavia, May 31. At 400 University Lane, Batavia, May 29. At 17 Sulphur Springs Drive, Batavia, June 9. At 1554 Bethel New Richmond Road, New Richmond, June 8. At 2328 Hillcrest Drive, Amelia, June 5. At 11 Montgomery Way, Amelia, April 23. At 2117 Picketside Drive, Batavia, June 7. At 3303 Yelton Lane, Amelia, June 9. At 1436 Twelve Mile Road, New Richmond, June 12. At 2843 Dixie Lane, Batavia, June 11. At 4333 Sharps Cutoff Road, Batavia, June 15. At 500 University Lane, Batavia, June 16. At 700 University Lane, Batavia, June 16. Contributing to the unruliness/delinquency of a child At 2191 Ohio Pike, Amelia, June 11. Criminal damaging/endangering At 100 University Lane, Batavia, May 20. At 1310 Twin Spires Drive, Batavia, May 20.

See POLICE, Page B7


LIFE

JUNE 27, 2012 • COMMUNITY JOURNAL • B7

POLICE REPORTS At Taylor Road, No. B1, Batavia, Oct. 27. Pandering sexually oriented matter involving a minor create/produce material At Taylor Road, No. B1, Batavia, Oct. 27. Pandering obscenity At 801 Stonelick Woods Circle, Batavia, June 15. Passing bad checks At 1967 Lindale Nicholsville Road, Amelia, June 6. Possessing drug abuse instruments At 500 University, Batavia, May 12. At U.S. 50/Elizabeth, Batavia, May 11. At 2023 Ohio 131, Batavia, May 15. At 4700 Filager Road, Batavia, June 2. At 162 Sulphur Springs Drive, Batavia, Feb. 17. At Old 74 and Armstrong, Batavia, June 13. Possession of drugs - heroin At Ohio 125/ Bach Buxton, Amelia, June 4. Possession of drugs marijuana At 1351 Clough Pike, Batavia, May 4. At 1351 Clough Pike, Batavia, May 16. At 28 Lucy Run Road, Amelia, May 27. At Amelia Olive Branch & Wood Mill, Batavia, May 30. At Avian Way at Laurel Oak, Amelia, June 8. At Slade Road/Ohio 222, Batavia, June 7. At 162 Sulphur Springs Drive, Batavia, Feb. 17. Possession of drugs At 4145 Half Acre Road, Batavia, May 15. At 500 University, Batavia, May 14. At Ohio 32 eb exit Half Acre Road, Batavia, May 20. At 2894 Mount Pisgah Road, New Richmond, May 27. At 2571 Laurel Lindale Road, New Richmond, May 26. At 2894 Mount Pisgah Road, New Richmond, May 27. At 3759 Old Ohio 32, Williamsburg, May 23. At 46 Madagascar Drive, Amelia, May 25. At 975 West Main St., Williamsburg, May 28. At Ohio 32 eb exit Half Acre Road, Batavia, May 20. At 1857 Ohio Pike, Amelia, May 30. At 975 West Main St., Williamsburg, May 28. At 2 Montgomery Way Apt. 10, Amelia, June 5. At 500 University Lane, Batavia, June 5.

At East Main at Ohio 133, Williamsburg, June 10. At 162 Sulphur Springs Drive, Batavia, Feb. 17. At 2019 Hospital Drive, Batavia, Feb. 18. At 162 Sulphur Springs Drive, Batavia, Feb. 17. At 1764 Ohio 125, Amelia, June 15. At Bach Buxton at Ohio 125, Amelia, June 15. Rape At Millboro Springs Drive, Batavia, May 30. At University Lane, Batavia, June 5. Rape - victim < 13 nonforcible At Hwy. 50, Batavia, May 16. At Wolf Creek, Amelia, May 21. Receiving stolen property At 2160 Berry Road, Amelia, March 22. At 2191 Ohio Pike, Amelia, April 13. At 4530 Eastgate Blvd. No. 620, Cincinnati, May 17. At Ohio 32 Batavia Road, Batavia, May 21. At 1693 Clough Pike, Batavia, May 2. At 4530 Eastgate Blvd. No. 620, Cincinnati, June 6. At 4530 Eastgate Blvd. No. 620, Cincinnati, June 6. At 4530 Eastgate Blvd. No. 620, Cincinnati, June 6. Resisting arrest At 2755 Ohio 132, New Richmond, May 20. At 2755 Ohio 132, New Richmond, May 20. At 3759 Old Ohio 32, Williamsburg, May 23. Robbery At Leeds Road, Amelia, June 7. At 500 University Lane, Batavia, June 16. Runaway At 700 University Lane, Batavia, May 13. At 2755 Ohio 132, New Richmond, May 22. Selling, purchasing, distributing, or delivering dangerous drugs At Stable Trail/Ohio 132, Amelia, June 1. Theft At 2191 Ohio Pike, Amelia, June 12. At 2989 Fair Oak, Amelia, June 11. At 1260 Ohio 125, Amelia, June 13. At 1310 Ohio 125, Amelia, June 13. At 1433 Woodburry Glen Drive, Batavia, June 14. At 1600 Frank Willis Memorial Road, New Richmond, June 12.

At 2227 Siesta Drive, Batavia, June 15. At 2414 Koehler Estates, New Richmond, June 15. At 2730 Old Ohio 32, Batavia, June 13. At 2755 Ohio 132, New Richmond, June 8. At 2780 Lindale Mount Holly Road, Amelia, June 12. At 2971 N. Dunham Road, Amelia, June 16. At 3214 Marshall Drive, Amelia, June 11. At 3914 Rocky Hill Terrace, Amelia, June 15. At 400 University Lane, Batavia, June 12. At 500 University Lane, Batavia, June 16. At 600 University Lane, Batavia, June 12. At 705 Stonelick Woods Circle, Batavia, June 11. At 101 Shady Court, Amelia, May 8. At 2315 Laurel Lindale Road, New Richmond, May 9. At 2580 Ohio 132, New Richmond, May 7. At 2780 Lindale Mt Holly Road, Amelia, May 13. At 49 Huntington Ave., Amelia, May 7. At 5496 Anstaett, Batavia, May 8. At 700 University Lane, Batavia, May 12. At 1000 Diamond Hill Road, New Richmond, May 10. At 119 Forest Meadow Drive, Batavia, May 13. At 1227 Ohio 125, Amelia, May 11. At 2075 James E. Sauls Sr. Drive, Batavia, May 9. At 2159 Ohio Pike, Amelia, May 10. At 2191 Ohio Pike, Amelia, April 13. At 2745 Ohio 132, New Richmond, May 7. At 2755 Ohio 132, New Richmond, May 8. At 300 University Lane, Batavia, May 11. At 3471 Ohio 132, Amelia, May 7. At 5025 Ohio 222, Batavia, May 10. At 5272 Aber Road, Williamsburg, May 8. At 5569 Stonelick Williams Corner Road, Batavia, May 13. At 1103 U.S. 52, New Richmond, May 2. At 1337 Covedale Lane, Amelia, May 4. At 1406 Breckenridge Drive, Amelia, May 3.

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10. At 4430 Ohio 222, Batavia, May 7. At 4317 Marbe Lane, Batavia, May 14. At 4430 Ohio 222, Batavia, May 21. At 4430 Ohio 222, Batavia, May 23. At Ohio 222, Batavia, May 22. At 4470 Ohio 222, Batavia, May 29. At 1560 Bethel New Richmond Road, New Richmond, June 5. At 4470 Ohio 222, Batavia, June 4. At 4470 Ohio 222, Batavia, June 13. Gross sexual imposition victim < 13, statutory At Millstream Drive, Batavia, May 15. At Judd Road, Batavia, June 14. Having weapons while under disability - under indictment, convicted of felony At 2580 Ohio 132, New Richmond, May 7. Identity fraud At 2220 Berry Road, Amelia, May 10. At 2220 Berry Road, Amelia, May 11. At 3000 Hospital Drive, Batavia, June 13. Identity fraud - obtain, possess, or use to hold out as other person At 2308 Wilshire Circle, Batavia, May 22. Illegal conveyance of drugs of abuse - detention mental health facility At 4700 Filager Road, Batavia, May 26. Illegal manufacture of drugs or cultivation of marijuana At 5407 Ohio 286, Williamsburg, May 21. Illegal use of a minor in nudity oriented material At 4200 Taylor Road, No. B1, Batavia, Oct. 27. Inducing panic At 4120 West Fork Ridge Drive, Batavia, May 8. Intimidation At 2580 Ohio 132, New Richmond, May 7. At 300 University Lane, Batavia, May 28. Kidnapping - restrain liberty At 2580 Ohio 132, New Richmond, May 7. Menacing At Lindale Mount Holly Road, Amelia, May 18. At College Drive, Batavia, May 24. At Ohio 32/ Main Street Batavia, Batavia, May 22. At Maryan Ave, Amelia, June 4. At Frontwheel Drive, Batavia, June 9. At Winemiller Lane, Batavia, June 8. At Clermont Center Drive, Batavia, June 15. At Ohio 133, Batavia, June 16. Misuse of credit card At 3873 Greenbrook Drive, Amelia, May 9. At 2175 Ohio Pike, Amelia, May 29. At 1590 Creekside Road, Amelia, June 6. At 2715 Cedar Trace, Batavia, June 5. At 2939 West Holly Lane, Amelia, June 5. Notice of change of address At 4839 Monterey Maple Grove Road, Batavia, April 19. At 515 Piccadilly Square, Cincinnati, May 18. Obstructing official business At 3084 Ohio 132, Amelia, May 9. At 47 Madagascar Drive, Amelia, May 25. Offenses involving underage persons - underage consume beer intoxicating liquor At University Lane, Batavia, May 10. At University Lane, Batavia, June 3. At Sweetbriar Drive, Batavia, June 4. At Sharps Cutoff Road, Williamsburg, May 30. At Ohio 32 and Ohio 133, Williamsburg, June 3. At Old Ohio 32, Batavia, June 10. At Sweetbriar Drive, Batavia, June 4. At 500 University Lane, Batavia, June 17. At 500 University Lane, Batavia, June 17. Open liquor container operator or passenger of motor vehicle At 2023 Ohio 131, Batavia, May 15. Pandering obscenity involving a minor - buy, procure, possess, obscene material At Taylor Road, No. B1, Batavia, Oct. 27. Pandering obscenity involving a minor

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At 2076 Ohio 125, Amelia, May 21. At 2421 Jackson Pike, Batavia, May 20. At 1641 Ohio 749, Amelia, May 29. At 300 University Lane, Batavia, May 28. At 123 Santa Maria Drive, Amelia, June 7. At 1415 Gumbert Drive, Amelia, June 9. At 2061 Ohio Pike, Amelia, June 7. At 207 Amelia Olive Branch Road, Amelia, June 9. At 2175 Ohio Pike, Amelia, June 9. At 2309 Chesterfield Lane, Batavia, June 8. At 2535 Hwy. 50, Batavia, June 8. At 2780 Lindale Mount Holly Road, Amelia, June 8. At 448 Shannon Circle, Batavia, June 9. At 6044 Belfast Road, Batavia, June 4. At 1433 Woodburry Glen Drive, Batavia, June 14. At 2346 Ginn Road, New Richmond, June 14. Criminal mischief At 42 Lucy Run Road, Amelia, May 15. At 1560 Bethel New Richmond Road, New Richmond, May 25. At 4181 Otter Creek Drive, Amelia, May 26. At 3831 Bach Grove Court, Amelia, June 3. At 4346 Armstrong Blvd., Batavia, June 8. At 452 Shannon Circle, Batavia, June 4. At 1208 Saddletop Ridge, Batavia, June 12. At 120 Sulphur Springs Drive, Batavia, June 11. Criminal trespass At 2366 Vista Lake Drive, Batavia, May 26. At 600 University Lane, Batavia, May 22. At 500 University Lane, Batavia, June 1. At 700 University Lane, Batavia, June 1. At 1928 Clermontville Laurel Road, New Richmond, June 9. At 2989 Fair Oak, Amelia, June 11. At 500 University Lane, Batavia, June 16. At 5687 Ohio 133, Batavia, June 16. Cruelty to animals At 399 Millboro Springs Drive, Batavia, June 17. Defrauding a livery or hostelry - used deception At 1264 Ohio 125, Amelia, May 18. Discharge of firearm on or near prohibited premises At 3443 Twin Bridges Road, Williamsburg, May 27. Disorderly conduct offensive gesture or noise At 2177 Ohio Pike, Amelia, May 26. Disorderly conduct At 38 Rose Lane, Batavia, May 13. At 2755 Ohio 132, New Richmond, May 9. At 400 University Lane, Batavia, May 10. Disorderly conduct - fighting or threatening At 1 Bulldog Place, Batavia, May 16. At 2191 Ohio Pike, Amelia, June 11. Disseminate matter harmful to juveniles At Deer Meadow Drive, Batavia, May 17. Domestic violence - cause belief of imminent physical harm by threat or force At Montgomery Way, Amelia, May 29. At Sharps Cutoff Road, Williamsburg, May 30. At Amelia Olive Branch Road, Amelia, June 9. Domestic violence knowingly cause physical harm At Ohio 286, Williamsburg, May 21. At Wildwood Lane, New Richmond, May 11. At Terrace View Drive, Cincinnati, May 12. At Stonelick Williams Corner Road, Batavia, May 14. At Forest Meadow Drive, Batavia, May 31. At Amelia Olive Branch Road, Amelia, June 2. At Rolling Hills Drive, New Richmond, June 3. At Covedale Lane, Amelia, June 4. At Whitmer Road, Batavia, June 4. At Ohio 132, Amelia, June 9. At Bootjack Corner Road, Williamsburg, June 17.

Domestic violence At Front St., New Richmond, May 9. At Sherwood Court, Batavia, May 11. At Gavey Way, Batavia, May 9. At University Lane, Batavia, May 7. At Ohio Pike, Amelia, May 17. At Ohio 132 No. 10, Amelia, May 15. At Lucy Creek, Amelia, May 19. At Elklick Road, Batavia, June 3. At Ohio 132, New Richmond, June 3. At Lindale Mount Holly Road, Amelia, May 30. At Wilsons Landing, Batavia, June 5. At Newtonsville Hutchinson Road, Batavia, June 9. At Ohio Pike, Amelia, June 11. At Ohio 132 Lot 257, New Richmond, June 13. At Felicity Cedron Rural Road, Georgetown, June 14. Driving while under the influence of alcohol and/or drugs At Amelia Olive Branch & Wood Mill, Batavia, May 30. At 2019 Hospital Drive, Batavia, Feb. 18. Driving while under the influence of alcohol/drugs concentration of controlled substance At 2019 Hospital Drive, Batavia, Feb. 18. Drug paraphernalia At 1351 Clough Pike, Batavia, May 16. At 500 University, Batavia, May 14. At 1351 Clough Pike, Batavia, May 21. At 28 Lucy Run Road, Amelia, May 27. At 46 Madagascar Drive, Amelia, May 25. At 975 West Main St., Williamsburg, May 28. At 2845 Hwy. 50 Lot 16-B, Batavia, June 2. At 975 West Main St., Williamsburg, May 28. At Amelia Olive Branch & Wood Mill, Batavia, May 30. At Stable Trail/Ohio 132, Amelia, June 1. At 2 Montgomery Way Apt. 10, Amelia, June 5. At 500 University Lane, Batavia, June 5. At East Main at Ohio 133, Williamsburg, June 10. At Slade Road/Ohio 222, Batavia, June 7. At 162 Sulphur Springs Drive, Batavia, Feb. 17. At 1764 Ohio 125, Amelia, June 15. At 2019 Hospital Drive, Batavia, Feb. 18. At 6218 Ohio 727, Goshen, June 14. At U.S. Route 52/Frank Willis Memorial, New Richmond, June 16. Endangering children At Wolf Creek, Amelia, May 12. At Stonelick Woods Circle, Batavia, June 2. At Amelia Olive Branch & Wood Mill, Batavia, May 30. At Wolfer Drive, Amelia, June 14. Endangering children - create substantial risk of harm At Maryan Ave., Amelia, May 23. At Ohio Pike, Amelia, May 26. At Parkside Drive, Batavia, May 22. Extortion At 2580 Ohio 132, New Richmond, May 7. Failure to confine a canine At 5286 Belfast Owensville Road, Batavia, May 11. At 3851 Baxendale Drive, Batavia, May 16. At 5286 Belfast Owensville Road, Batavia, May 22. Falsification - purpose to incriminate another At 4470 Ohio 222, Batavia, May 15. Felonious assault At Ohio 132 No. 10, Amelia, May 15. Felonious assault - victim seriously harmed At Ohio 132, New Richmond, May 7. Felonious assault - weapon or ordnance At Ohio 132, New Richmond, May 7. Forgery At 5569 Stonelick Williams Corner Road, Batavia, May 13. At 4182 Ohio 276, Williamsburg, May 25. At 1693 Clough Pike, Batavia, May 2. At 2755 Ohio 132, New Richmond, June 8. At 2755 Ohio 132, New Richmond, June 8. At 2971 N. Dunham Road, Amelia, June 16. Fugitive from justice At 4430 Ohio 222, Batavia, May

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LIFE

B8 • COMMUNITY JOURNAL • JUNE 27, 2012

DEATHS Curtis Adkins

Heather Batchler

Curtis Marion Adkins, 85, died June 19. He worked for the Celetox Corporation. Survived by wife Mary Ruth Terry Adkins; sons Curtis, Terry Adkins; grandchildren Stephanie Barton, Terry, Curt Adkins, Amber DeLong; great-grandchildren Amanda, Abby, Emma, Anna, Liam; great-great-granddaughter Madeline; sister Bonnie Hangan. Preceded in death by siblings Christine, Clarice, Clifford, Max, Charles, Hobart Adkins. Services were June 21 at Graceland Memorial Gardens. Arrangements by Evans Funeral Home.

Heather Lee Batchler, 21, Amelia, died June 16. Survived by parents Tamara, Richard Batchler; sibling Jamie Batchler; grandmother Wilma Batchler; many aunts, uncles and cousins. Services were June 21 at E.C. Nurre Funeral Home. Memorials to: Heather Batchler Memorial Account, c/o Fifth Third Bank, 1196 Ohio Pike, Amelia, OH 45102.

Mary Braun Mary Efkeman Braun, 90, Amelia, died June 13. Survived by children Carol (Dennis) Lewis, Ted (Linda), Tom

(Kerri), Dave (Bev), Jerry (Linda) Braun; seven grandchildren; five great-grandchildren; many nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by husband John “Bill” Braun, parents Walter, Helen Mummert Efkeman, sister Helen Efkeman Hammond. Services were June 18 at St. Thomas More Church. Arrangements by E.c. Nurre Funeral Home. Memorials to the Hospice of Cincinnati.

Joe Elliott Joe Elliott, 68, Union Township, died June 20. Survived by children Nick, Joe (Heather), Colleen (Bill), Lori Elliott; grandchildren Haily, Christopher Young, Emmie, Joey

REAL ESTATE Clermont County real estate transfer information is provided as a public service by the office of Clermont County Auditor Linda L. Fraley.

AMELIA VILLAGE

7 Pintail, Virginia Love, et al. to Homesales Inc. of Delaware, $75,525.

BATAVIA TOWNSHIP

4770 Horseshoe Bend, The Drees Co. to Donald & L. Brooke Berning, 0.3400 acre, $298,785. 4707 Keeneland Run, Troy & Brandy Donohoo to Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp., $166,666.67. Lexington Run Subdivision, Lexington Run Land Holding LLC to Fischer Development Co., 25.7410 acre, $793,264.36. 3907 Little Creek Drive, Jennifer Perry to Katie Speigel, 0.4100 acre, $119,900. 2022 Mistletoe Court, George & Judith Kenney to Dennis & Kelli Lamb, 0.6260 acre, $180,000. 3521 Ohio 132, Federal National Mortgage Assoc. to Lisa Traurig, $38,500.

PIERCE TOWNSHIP

3544 Hopper Hill Road, Bank of America NA to Bruce & Stephanie Laybourne, 1.6100 acre, $200,000. 862 Locust Corner Road, Ralph Hartmann III, et al. to JPMorgan Chase Bank NA, 0.4000 acre, $33,334. 3039 Parkers Run Road, Douglas & Mary Shiley to James Shiley, et al., $275,000. 901 Pine Valley Lane, Gary & Deborah Tragesser to Daivd & Denise Vance, 0.2170 acre, $315,000. 897 Pine Valley Lane, J. Robert Parker, successor trustee to Gary & Isabelle Sullivan, 0.2000 acre, $340,000.

UNION TOWNSHIP

4582 Balmoral Drive, Jon & Judith Hammond to Terry & Caddie Pontius, 0.7990 acre, $212,000. 1204 Beechwood Place, Estate of Carole Westerkamp to Frank Espohl, $150,000. 4611 Bethany Glen Drive, Alejandro Estrada & Anelena Carazo Barrantes to Shannon Hogan, $144,500. 4638 Blackberry Lane, Arthur & Dawn Brinson to Janice Coleman, $73,000. 4348 Cider Mill Drive, William Tabscott, et al. to PNC Bank NA, $103,334. 3900 Columbard Lane, Judith Wohlgethan to Mary Shiley, $160,000. 841 Danny Drive, Brandon & Sarah Norton to Cassandra

Mueller, $141,000. 1089 Flick Lane, Charles Felts to William & Veronica Giglio, 0.2460 acre, $154,900. 3971 Hamblen Drive, Eric Gibson to Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp., $60,000. 584 Lang Road, Old Mill Enterprises LLC to Joseph Lyons Jr., $98,000. 491 Mapleport Way, Scott Wolf, trustee to Benjamin Baxter, $81,000. 4445 McIntosh Drive, Bruce Ruppert to Mary Jo & David Ormes, $86,000. 4656 Melody Lane, Sherion Mullarkey to Brandon & Sarah Norton, $185,000. 682 Mockingbird Lane, Sandra Lane, et al. to Wells Fargo Bank NA, $60,000. 4370 Mount Carmel Road, Janet Bickel to B.E.E. Holdings Limited Partnership, 11.9800 acre, $216,000. 4243 N. Yorkshire Square, Peggy C. White, et al. to Dennis W. Spurgeon, et al., 0.1010 acre, $135,500. 2174 Ohio 125, Federal National Mortgage Assoc. to Robert Anter, 2.6200 acre, $51,000. 2 Queens Creek, Michael Warren to JPMorgan Chase Bank NA, $53,333.34. 551 Sonny Lane, Chris Katsanis to Federal National Mortgage Assoc., $60,000. 870 Sycamore Blvd., Donald E. Blackman III to Wayne & Gloria Imhoff, $112,000. 4022 Wilma Court, Mark Waller, et al. to Federal National Mortgage Assoc., $73,334. 1179 Wingwood Trail, Dharmesh Parekh & Rita Thakkar to Nhung Do & Tan Truong, 0.2480 acre, $187,500.

WILLIAMSBURG TOWNSHIP

4029 Alexander Lane, Danny Stamper, et al. to JPMorgan Chase Bank NA, 0.6360 acre, $40,000. 4272 North Ellis Road, Susan Soard to Federal National Mortgage Assoc., 0.7100 acre, $60,000.

WILLIAMSBURG VILLAGE

235 Nevels Drive, Bank of America NA to Rick Wuebold, 0.5400 acre, $23,000. 229 North Second St., William McManus to Victor Jetter, 0.6880 acre, $25,000. 174 South Sixth St., John & Laura Maklem, et al. to Thomas & Richard Hoffman,et al., 0.4590 acre, $13,000. 870 Southwynd Trail, Federal National Mortgage Assoc. to John Maggard, $81,000.

BUILDING PERMITS Residential The Drees Co., Ft. Mitchell, Ky., alter, 143 Woodside Park, Amelia Village. Reeves Heating, Hebron, Ky., HVAC, 1402 Whitaker Lane, Batavia Township. Thomas Marck, New Richmond, new, 2041 E. Hall Road, Monroe Township, $345,000. Dean Miller, New Richmond, addition, 3361 Merwin Ten Mile, Pierce Township, $18,000. Deerfield Apartments, Cincinnati, deck, 4689 Buckskin, Union Township. True Energy Smart Air, Cincinnati, HVAC, 3878 Mark Court, Union Township. A-1 Pools, Williamsburg, pool, 1322 Old Ohio 74, Union Township. Ryan Homes, West Chester, new, 5303 Terrace Ridge, Union

Township, $171,000; new, 959 Shephard Woods, $116,000.

Commercial CR Architecture & Design, Cincinnati, alter-Kroger Little Clinic, 210 Sterling Run, Mt. Orab Village, $45,000. Atlantic Sign Co., Cincinnati, sign, 210 Sterling Run, Mt. Orab. Ivan Mansell, Bethel, newHamer Road Auto Salvage, Hamer Road, Scott Township, $74,000. David Eads, Amelia, alterHoppy’s Bar & Grill, Ohio 132, Batavia Township. Chris Mohring, Owensville, alter-Engine Parts Outlet, Old Ohio 32, Batavia Township. Roland Crawford, New Richmond, alter, lot No. 20 Parkside, 2755 Ohio 132, Ohio Township.

Elliott, Ally, Billy Reed. Preceded in death by wife Judy Elliott. Services were June 25 at St. Veronica. Arrangements by E.C. Nurre Funeral Home.

Evelyn Orick Evelyn Irene Orick, 63, Union Township, died June 12. Survived by husband Ty Rorick; children Richard, Ty Jr., Tris Rorick; siblings Harold Rogg, Carol Persanyi, Lois Key, Bill, John Baird, Chilton, Jeff Sellars; 11 grandchildren; many nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by brother Charles Rogg. Services were June 16 at E.C. Nurre Funeral Home. Memorials to the American Cancer Society.

James Wulf

Thelma Ziegler

James A. Wulf, 50, died June 15. Survived by wife Danielle Wulf; father Raymond Wulf; brother Thomas (Janice) Wulf; parents-in-law Doris, Daniel E. Childress; brother-in-law Daniel S. (Donna) Childress; nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by mother Lee Corbin Wulf, sister Nancy (Larry Hawley) Wulf. Services were June 23 at Craver-Riggs Funeral Home. Memorials to: Cincinnati Nature Center, 4949 Tealtown Road, Milford, OH 45150 or Peppermint Pig Animal Rescue, 8255 Beechmont Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45255.

Thelma Knepfle Ziegler, 94, Union Township, died June 10. Survived by children Nancy (Jerry) Runnels, Mary Kay Prall, Kathy (Clint) Bard, John (Robyn) Ziegler; nine grandchildren; 11 great-grandchildren; two stepgrandchildren. Preceded in death by husband Charles Ziegler, parents Henry, Bertha Knepfle, brothers Robert (Rita), John (Sara) Knepfle. Services were June 15 at Immaculate Heart of Mary Church. Arrangements by E.C. Nurre Funeral Home. Memorials to: Mercy Angel Care Fund, 7010 Rowan Hill Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45227.

IN THE COURTS The following cases have been filed with Clermont County clerk of courts.

Filings Jean Marilyn Snook vs. Carespring Health Care Management LLC, et al., professional tort. Wilma L. Mason vs. Estate of Jason D. Vdovick, et al., other tort. Zachary Scheuer vs. Mary Tensing, other tort. Phillip W Swafford vs. Monroe Muffler Brake Inc./Stephen Buehrer Administrator, worker’s compensation. Brian E. Findley vs. Stephen Buehrer Administrator/Merchants Security Systems Inc., worker’s compensation. U.S. Bank NA vs. Edwin M. Sinclair III, et al., foreclosure. Bank of America NA vs. John S. McCahan, et al., foreclosure. Bank of America NA vs. Joseph E. Shaw, et al., foreclosure. Cenlar FSB vs. Ernest E. Carter, et al., foreclosure. Wells Fargo Bank NA vs. Rebecca K. Reaves, et al., foreclosure. Green Tree Servicing LLC fka Conseco Finance vs. Mark A. Smith, et al., foreclosure. Bank of New York Mellon vs. Anna M. Shaw, et al., foreclosure. Wells Fargo Bank NA vs. Daniel C. Lind, et al., foreclosure. Bank of New York Mellon vs. Ronnie M. Holland, et al., foreclosure. Bank of America NA vs. Dean A. Gaskins, et al., foreclosure. Wells Fargo Bank NA vs. George Masadeh, et al., foreclosure. Wells Fargo Bank NA vs. Susan A. Caruso, et al., foreclosure. HSBC Bank USA NA vs. Donald L. Gamble, et al., foreclosure. Branch Banking and Trust Co. vs. Michael E. Wheeldon, et al., foreclosure. CitiMortgage Inc. vs. Robert W. Gollaway, et al., foreclosure. Bank of America NA vs. Patricia P. Richards, et al., foreclosure. Bank of New York Mellon Trust Co. vs. Frank E. Espohl, et al., foreclosure. PHH Mortgage Corp. vs. Unknown Heirs Devisees Legatees Exec Administrator, et al., foreclosure. JPMorgan Chase Bank NA vs. Dmitry Galandi, et al., foreclosure. JPMorgan Chase Bank NA vs. Paul D. Cooper, et al., foreclosure. Deutsche Bank Trust Co. vs. Francis C. Maus, et al., foreclosure. Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. vs. Eugene L. Leever, et al., foreclosure. Wells Fargo Bank NA vs. Danny Ray Wright, et al., foreclosure. U.S. Bank NA vs. Travis J. Pope, et al., foreclosure. Wells Fargo Bank NA vs. Andrew N. McGregor, et al., foreclosure. Deutsche Bank National Trust Co. vs. Pat Cardwell, et al., foreclosure. Bank of America NA vs. Geda Seng, et al., foreclosure. Green Tree Servicing vs. Sheila J. Mattie, et al., foreclosure. Bank of America NA vs. Philip Smith, et al., foreclosure. J. Robert True Treasurer of Clermont County vs. John G. Carsten, et al., foreclosure. J. Robert True Treasurer of Clermont County vs. Allen R.

Morris, et al., foreclosure. Bank of America NA successor by merger to BAC Home vs. Joni K. Tharpe, et al., foreclosure. CitiMortgage Inc. vs. Daniel K. Smalley, et al., foreclosure. Citimortgage Inc. vs. Charles Jordan, et al., foreclosure. Bank of America NA vs. Terry E. Eshman, et al., foreclosure. JPMorgan Chase Bank NA vs. Maurita Strimple, et al., foreclosure. Bank of America NA vs. Erik W. Hajek, et al., foreclosure. Bank of America NA vs. Jamie A. Caruso Sr., et al., foreclosure. JPMorgan Chase Bank NA vs. Brian Callahan, et al., foreclosure. Wells Fargo Bank NA vs. Kelly A. O'Keefe, et al., foreclosure. J. Robert True Treasurer of Clermont County vs. James Robert Chalmers, et al., foreclosure. Wells Fargo Bank NA vs. Stephanie Swingle, et al., foreclosure. Wells Fargo Bank NA vs. Brian M. Schank, et al., foreclosure. CitiMortgage Inc. successor by merger CitiFinancial vs. Mark S. Murray, et al., foreclosure. CitiMortgage Inc. successor by merger CitiFinancial vs. Pamela J. Norton, et al., foreclosure. Wells Fargo Bank NA vs. David L. Henderson, et al., foreclosure. Bank of New York Mellon vs. Elsie E. Brunemann/Robert B. Brunemann, foreclosure. JPMorgan Chase Bank NA vs. Richard Brusman Jr., et al., foreclosure. Bank of America NA vs. Gary Dalton, et al., foreclosure. Bank of America NA vs. Nancy M. Conner, et al., foreclosure. M.E. Abrams vs. A1 Fabricators and Finishers LLC, et al., other civil. Eastgate Professional Office Park V LTD vs. Ideopia Inc., et al., other civil. CACH LLC vs. Allen D. Ernst, other civil. Village of New Richmond Ohio vs. Cost Plus Builders LLC, et al., other civil. American Express Bank FSB vs. Ralph Vilardo, other civil. Motorists Mutual Insurance Co. vs. John W. Christ, other civil. Cincinnati Insurance Co., et al., vs. Jerry Dunlap, other civil. Clermont County Transportation Improvement Dist. vs. Douglas A. Smolinski, et al., other civil. Clermont County Transportation Improvement Dist. vs. Shrewd Investment LLC, et al., other civil. Clermont County Transportation Improvement Dist. vs. Ronald E. Smolinski, et al., other civil. CACH LLC vs. Brenda Hendricks, other civil. Financial Freedom Acquistion Corp. vs. Mary Christine Callahan, et al., other civil. Total Quality Logistics vs. Golden West Foods Inc., other civil. Total Quality Logistics vs. Danette Adamson, other civil. Der Development Co. LLC vs. ABC Precision Masonry and Concrete Inc., et al., other civil. Jerry Wray Director Ohio Department vs. SSC Eastgate Square GR LLC, et al., other civil. Willard Bruce Griffis, et al., vs. Donna Hollis, et al., other civil. Firstmerit Bank NA vs. Jeffrey A. Eversman, other civil.

Misty Vanhoose vs. Adam G. Auxier, et al., other civil. Carolyn Neal vs. Adam Henderlight, et al., other civil. LCNB National Bank vs. Smith Custom Service Inc., other civil. State of Ohio Ex Rel Joanne Rosbac vs. Miami Township Board of Trustees, et al., other civil.

Divorce Heather S. Verzwyvelt vs. Joseph D. Verzwyvelt Justin N. Weber vs. Tosha M. Weber Carolyn Jansen vs. Theodore C. Henline Joseph Reynolds vs. Stephanie Reynolds Michelle Lindsey vs. Timothy C. Lindsey David Haley vs. Elizabeth Haley Andrew J. LaCombe vs. Christine LaCombe Penny E. Hess vs. Thomas A. Hess Jack Kasee vs. Tammy Kasee

Dissolution Michele Purcell vs. Dean M. Purcell Stephanie R. Lawson vs. Jason M. Lawson Homer A. Matheny vs. Gail M. Matheny Heather Packard vs. Curtis Packard Ronnie J. Lawson vs. Stacey M. Lawson Beth Carter vs. Dustin Carter Kyle T. McRoberts vs. Danielle E. McRoberts Jennifer Stranko vs. John Stranko Kellie J. McElfresh vs. Jonathon C. McElfresh Zachery L. Burson vs. Sarah S. Tidball Nicole Sinclair vs. Jonathan Sinclair Melissa A. Smith vs. Jason M. Smith Kimberly A. Spatz vs. Roger D. Spatz Stephanie A. Siegel vs. Jeffrey A. Siegel Andrew M. Schuler vs. Sondra Schuler Victor Carter vs. Autumn Carter Doyle A. Douglas vs. Donna K. Douglas Angela H. Kunkel vs. Jonathan D. Kunkel Tara Campbell vs. Terry Campbell Heidi Ruiz vs. Miguel Ruiz Kelly C. Fisher vs. Gary S. Fisher Joanna R. Brunner vs. William R. Brunner William J. Allen vs. Wendy S. Allen Tracey L. Humphreys vs. Donald W. Ober Sr. James A. Shouse Jr. vs. Kelley C. Hoffman Shouse Jason T. Provins vs. Bethany S. Provins David B. Smith vs. Margretta Smith Clint D. Fox vs. Eva J. Fox

Indictments The following people have been indicted by the Clermont County grand jury to the Court of Common Pleas. This means members of the grand jury decided enough evidence has been collected to warrant filing charges. James Marshall Harr, 26, 6572 Ohio 727, Pleasant Plain, non support of dependents, Clermont Department of Support Enforcement. Joshua Steven Fisher, 27, 947 Ohio 28, Lot 15, Milford, non support of dependents, Clermont Department of Support Enforcement. Rhonda Kaye Hindenlang,

40, 1214 N.W. 55th Terrace, Gainsville, FL non support of dependents, Clermont Department of Support Enforcement. Shawn Paul Drew, 32, Clermont County Jail, notice of change of address, Clermont County Sheriff’s Office. Warren Keith Gallagher, 46, 233 Mulberry St., Lot 8, Felicity, possession of cocaine, Clermont County Sheriff’s Office. Jeffery William Fisher Jr., 31, 3900 Lake Grant Access Road, Mount Orab, theft, Milford Police. Jeffery William Fisher Sr., 56, 3900 Lake Grant Access Road, Mount Orab, theft, Milford Police. Travis Wayne Haag, 19, 342 S. East St., Bethel, tampering with evidence, receiving stolen property, Union Township Police. Duke Wayne Haag, 37, 342 S. East St., Bethel, burglary, receiving stolen property, Union Township Police. Antoine S. Lee, 34, 2650 Melrose Ave., Cincinnati, forgery, Union Township Police. Adam F. Bauer, 26, 1501 Beacon St. No. 3, Cincinnati, burglary, Union Township Police. Jennifer Ann Shoop, 33, 4792 Stoney Brook Road, Cincinnati, illegal conveyance of weapons or prohibited items onto grounds of detention facility or institution, possession of drugs, possessing drug abuse instruments, Union Township Police. Eddie Dewayne Davis, 41, 178 Amelia Olive Branch Road, Amelia, trafficking in cocaine, Narcotics Unit. Richard Allen Johanson, 74, 779 Wards Corner Road, Loveland, aggravated trafficking in drugs, trafficking in drugs, Narcotics Unit. James Ernest Reeves, 28, 5901 Marathon Edenton Road, Williamsburg, violating a protection order, domestic violence, kidnapping, Miami Township Police. Gregory M. Abbott, 40, Clermont County Jail, receiving stolen property, forgery, Williamsburg Police. Derek Zackary Donell, 21, Clermont County Jail, trafficking in heroin, tampering with evidence, trafficking in cocaine, Narcotics Unit. Sonya Kay Vaughn, 25, Clermont County Jail, misuse of credit cards, receiving stolen property, forgery, Clermont County Sheriff’s Office. Diana Crisie Skidmore, 23, 2730 Ohio 222, Lot 17, Bethel, misuse of credit cards, receiving stolen property, forgery, Clermont County Sheriff’s Office. Caleb Bunton, 31, 10 Montgomery Way, Apt. 5, Amelia, domestic violence, Clermont County Sheriff’s Office. Joshua Steve Kearns, 36, Clermont County Jail, burglary, Clermont County Sheriff’s Office. Tony Jay Ball, 28, 969 Ohio 28, No. 84, Milford, theft, Clermont County Sheriff’s Office. Brandon Lee Ruhstaller, 19, 84 Deer Meadow Drive, Batavia, disseminating matter harmful to juveniles, Clermont County Sheriff’s Office. David Nathan Burns Jr., 46, Clermont County Jail, burglary, theft, vandalism, Pierce Township Police. Rebecca Ann Donell, 41, 2755 Ohio 132, No. 197, New Richmond, possession of heroin, possession of cocaine, aggravated possession of drugs, New Richmond Police.


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YOUR AFFORDABLE MONTHLY RENT INCLUDES: Live-in managers available to you day and night Three nutritious chef-prepared meals served daily Full calendar of social activities, outings and special events Pets are welcome Weekly housekeeping and linen service Local transportation to shopping and appointments All utilities (except telephone & cable) No buy-in fees, hidden costs, or long-term leases

New England Club

New England Club

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I n d e p e n d e n t Re t i re m e n t L iv i n g

YOUR INDEPENDENCE! ELEBRATE

At New England Club, we celebrate our freedom and independence everyday! It’s our job to take the stresses of everyday living off our resident’s shoulders so that you, or your loved one, can enjoy life to its fullest. Don’t wait, call us today to help yourself, or your loved one, regain the freedom and independence that is deserved.

8135 Beechmont Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45255

513-474-2582

www.newenglandclub.com Community Journal Clermont


New England Club Independent Retirement Living

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Simply Complete Care Independent Living with Assistance Available

Over 15 year on-site partnership with New England Club. All inclusive lifestyle living. Unique 24/7 “Share-an-Aide” program designed to meet your individual needs. Superior Home Care staff available on site to provide complimentary consultation and care coordination. Individually customized health care options. Skilled and non-skilled care, provided in the privacy of your own apartment.

Model for a true “Age in Place” Concept. No need to change apartments to increase health services - Superior Home Care will come to your apartment. Extensive experience in creating affordable senior living with the help of Council On Aging, Medicare, long term care, and private insurance. On-Site Wellness Center sponsored by Superior Home Care In home nursing, therapy, and aide programs.

Letter of recognition from the Ohio Department of Health for deficiency free survey for 9 years

(513) 231-1060 www.superiorcareplus.com


New England Club

New England Club

EVENT CALENDAR

Independent Retirement Living

JUNE: Friday June 29th – Call for appt. – Hearing Solutions Mobile Unit Saturday June 30th – 5:00pm – Patrick Calvert (Music) (Free Supper)

JULY: Wednesday July 4th – 11:30am – Stars & Stripes Buffet (Free) Friday July13th – 10:00am – Animal Rescue Charity Bake Sale Friday July 27th – 10:00am-2:00pm – Parade of Homes Open House Sunday July 29th – 12:00pm – Dinner & Dance

AUG: Sunday August 5th – 1:30pm – Friendship Day (Bluegrass Songs) Tuesday August 14th – 2:00pm – Animals on display from Cincinnati Zoo

I

have been in 3 communities, and New England Club is by far the nicest place I’ve been. Everyone is so friendly here and enjoyable to be around. Since I arrived here, I have made numerous friends and the New England Club staff went out of their way to make me feel at home. ~ Charlie Herrington Retired Entrepreneur and fighter pilot in World War II

Saturday August 25th – Call for details – NEC ANNUAL LUAU and reservations

SEPT: Monday Sept. 10th – 3:00pm – Carol Burnett Presentation (by Cinti. Public Library) Friday Sept. 14th – call for time – Jim McBride “One Man Band” Friday Sept. 28th – 3:00pm – Singing by Judi & Wayne

LUAU 2011

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he first thing that comes to mind about living at the New England Club is the friendly atmosphere throughout the building. I also love having the choice of attending all the different events and activities or going out on the outings with my friends. Myself and my friends have had so much fun since I moved to New England Club. ~ Wanda Lewis “Captain Wendy” from the “Uncle Al Show”.

New England Club Independent Retirement Living

8135 Beechmont Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45255

513-474-2582

www.newenglandclub.com

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New England Club

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Independent Retirement Living

Simply Complete Care www.superiorcareplus.com

PROVIDER FOR THE ASHBY MEMORY METHOD PROGRAM(AMM) AMM is a 1:1 program conducted in the privacy of your home in 1 hour sessions. The “BREAKTHROUGH” program helps people with early stages of ALZHEIMERS and DEMENTIA to enhance quality of life for clients and their families. AMM program integrates the participants interests so the sessions are relevant and enjoyable.

Contact us now to find out how we can help your loved one.

(513) 231-1060

Laugh more. Live better.


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