Page 1

VOLUNTEER RECOGNITION

B1

CLERMONT

Leann Townes, left, and Billie Kuntz were recognized for their youth services efforts with the Clermont County Community Services Center at the United Way Eastern Area.

Your Community Press newspaper serving Amelia, Batavia, Batavia Township, New Richmond. Ohio Township, Pierce Township, Union Township, Williamsburg, Williamsburg Township Website: communitypress.com Email: clermont@communitypress.com We d n e s d a y, A p r i l 2 7 , 2 0 1 1

B E C A U S E C O M M U N I T Y M AT T E R S

Voters to decide WC’s future

Vol. 31 No. 15 © 2011 The Community Press ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Prom photos

Amelia’s annual prom is Friday, April 29. Watch Cincinnati/com/amelia May 8 for photos of the kids dressed up for “the” dance of the year.

By Kellie Geist-May

Grant’s birthday

This month marks the 150th anniversary of the start of the Civil War. On this occasion, Clermont County will honor Ulysses S. Grant at his birthplace along the Ohio River. FULL STORY, A2

Batavia seeks 6.9-mill levy

Facing declining revenue and increased expenses, Batavia school officials this year instituted $1.5 million in cuts and are asking voters to approve an operating levy that will generate an additional $1.5 million a year. FULL STORY, A2

Habitat house under construction

After exactly 17 years from their first date, Tim and Amy Wahl turned another new page in their lives. The Wahl family started building their new home through Habitat For Humanity Saturday, April 16 – the anniversary of the day Tim and Amy started dating. FULL STORY, A5

rently,” Brooks said. Board President Dan Krueger said all the proposed cuts will be UNION TWP. – Voters in the painful. West Clermont Local School Dis“These are not threats or things trict are being asked to approve a the board has made up to scare 7.9-mill levy May 3. people, this is what we’ll have to The emergency property tax do to make ends meet,” he said. would cost $241.94 per year per “Hopefully, people can understand $100,000 of home value and how important this is to our kids would generate $10.9 million a and to our community.” year based on 2010 valuations, Also, if the levy doesn’t pass in according to Clermont County 2011, the district will go into fiscal Chief Deputy Auditor Chuck emergency, which will mean more Tilbury. issues on the ballot, Brooks said. West Clermont Local School “If the levy doesn’t pass, we’ll District officials can promise two be calling the state because we things if the levy fails: Deep cuts don’t have the funds to make payand future levies. roll. The plan would be to put The district administration has another issue on the ballot in cut a cumulative $45 million in 2011 and, if that fails, we’ll go spending since 2005 - including into fiscal emergency,” Brooks $2.4 million for next year - that said. “In the simple sense, that will not be reinstated if the levy removes the ability for the local passes. board of education to make many However, if the levy fails, more decisions involving expenditures than $5 million in additional cuts for the district.” will go into effect In fiscal emergency, before school a state committee The emergency starts this fall. would come in, review property tax would Those cuts mean West Clermont’s opera80 fewer class- cost $241.94 per year tions and loan the room teachers, money necessary to per $100,000 of larger class sizes, run the district. That shorter school home value and would debt would then be days and the elimgenerate $10.9 added to the millage on ination of elemenmillion a year based the ballot, which would tary school art and decided by the state on 2010 valuations, be music, all orchescommittee and not the tra classes and according to Clermont local school board, gifted and talented County Chief Deputy Brooks said. programs. District Treasurer Auditor Chuck Tilbury. Alana In addition, all Cropper said votsports and extraers should consider curricular activities will become how the cuts will impact the compay to play with fees of about munity before casting their bal$500 per activity per student, all lots. buildings will be closed 30 min“This levy is absolutely critical. utes after school lets out and all Given that we’ve already made weekend and evening activities $45 million in cuts, we are down will be eliminated. to the bone. There’s no where else The entire district also will go to cut,” she said. “To make a to state minimum busing. That strong community, you have to means no bus service at the high have strong schools … West Clerschool and no busing for students mont is such a gem, especially within a two-mile radius of the when you look at our cost per school they attend. pupil, which is $1,736 under state Superintendent Gary Brooks average.” said the district currently buses Krueger asked people to talk to about 8,700 students. About their state representatives and 6,730 of those students will be request a fix to the unconstitutionineligible for bus service at the al state funding set-up. state minimum. “Columbus isn’t fixing the “Due to the changes in the problem,” he said. “No one wants state and federal funding and the to pay more taxes, but we need to rising cost of goods, materials and pass the levy.” services, we are at the point where For more information about the we no longer have the capacity to district’s finances or the proposed offer the programs we have cur- cuts, visit www.westcler.org. kmay@communitypress.com

Collection time

In the next few days your Community Press carrier will be stopping by to collect $2.50 for delivery of this month’s The Community Journal. Your carrier retains half of this amount along with any tip you Scanlon give to reward good service. This month we’re featuring Cooper Scanlon, who is a fourth grader at Miami Valley Christian Academy. He is also a Boy Scout and loves the outdoors. Cooper also really enjoys his paper route and his customers are pleased with his service. For information about our carrier program, call Steve Barraco, 248-7110.

50¢

KELLIE GEIST-MAY/STAFF

Amelia High School seniors Paige Spencer, left, and Abbie Pizzo are aides in Alicia Battelle’s special needs class. The two have been working to raise money – by selling Tupperware and magnets and asking for donations – to buy a classroom iPad and to fund other activities.

Amelia students make a difference By Kellie Geist-May kmay@communitypress.com

When Amelia High School seniors Paige Spencer and Abbie Pizzo started as student aides in Alicia Battelle’s Multiple Handicaps and Multiple Disabilities Unit twice a day, they didn’t know what to expect. “At first we would just stand in the corner. We were nervous,” Spencer said. “And some of our friends gave us a hard time,” Pizzo said. But now the two give high fives to the special needs students in the hallway and spend their free time raising money for classroom needs. Spencer and Pizzo are hoping a bulk of the money they’ve raised can help pay for a classroom iPad and two special communication applications for non-audible students. Spencer, who incorporated the effort into her Senior Exit Action Project, sold Tupperware to raise money and both students make and sell magnets at school and at their teacher’s family store, Battelle’s Grocery and Catering in Mt. Carmel. “We have almost $700, but we want there to be money left over. There are things this class does – trips to the grocery (for cooking skills) and projects – and the money comes out of Ms. Battelle’s pocket. We want to help with that,” Pizzo said.

Battelle said the two seniors are making an impact beyond their fundraising efforts. “They are working with the (special needs) students one-onone every day. That makes a huge difference,” she said. Their involvement also has changed the face of the special needs program. “Abbie and Paige are wellknown in the school and they’ve made it OK for other students to be friends with the special needs students. It’s awesome,” Battelle said. “I really can’t sing their praises enough. I don’t want them to leave.” Being part of the class also has made a difference for Pizzo and Spencer. Pizzo, who was thinking about being a teacher, will be attending the University of Cincinnati this fall to study special education. Spencer will be attending Tennessee Tech University on a soccer scholarship to study nursing. “This all started as being an aide and doing an (exit) project, but it’s become a part of us,” Spencer said. “These students have different needs, but you just need to get to know them. We’re their friends now.” “It’s been a life-changing experience,” Pizzo said. Anyone interested in making a donation to the MHMD Unit should contact Battelle at battelle_a@westcler.org.

High winds Mike Wisby, who lives at Lot 171 of the Holly Towne Mobile Home Park in Monroe Township, said strong winds blew his trailer off its pad early Wednesday, April 20. He thought it was a tornado, but fire department officials said it was straight line winds. No one was injured, but the trailer is a total loss, Wisby said. For the full story, see page A3. JOHN SENEY/STAFF

To place an ad, call 242-4000.


VOLUNTEER RECOGNITION

B1

CLERMONT

Leann Townes, left, and Billie Kuntz were recognized for their youth services efforts with the Clermont County Community Services Center at the United Way Eastern Area.

Your Community Press newspaper serving Amelia, Batavia, Batavia Township, New Richmond. Ohio Township, Pierce Township, Union Township, Williamsburg, Williamsburg Township Website: communitypress.com Email: clermont@communitypress.com We d n e s d a y, A p r i l 2 7 , 2 0 1 1

B E C A U S E C O M M U N I T Y M AT T E R S

Voters to decide WC’s future

Vol. 31 No. 15 © 2011 The Community Press ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Prom photos

Amelia’s annual prom is Friday, April 29. Watch Cincinnati/com/amelia May 8 for photos of the kids dressed up for “the” dance of the year.

By Kellie Geist-May

Grant’s birthday

This month marks the 150th anniversary of the start of the Civil War. On this occasion, Clermont County will honor Ulysses S. Grant at his birthplace along the Ohio River. FULL STORY, A2

Batavia seeks 6.9-mill levy

Facing declining revenue and increased expenses, Batavia school officials this year instituted $1.5 million in cuts and are asking voters to approve an operating levy that will generate an additional $1.5 million a year. FULL STORY, A2

Habitat house under construction

After exactly 17 years from their first date, Tim and Amy Wahl turned another new page in their lives. The Wahl family started building their new home through Habitat For Humanity Saturday, April 16 – the anniversary of the day Tim and Amy started dating. FULL STORY, A5

rently,” Brooks said. Board President Dan Krueger said all the proposed cuts will be UNION TWP. – Voters in the painful. West Clermont Local School Dis“These are not threats or things trict are being asked to approve a the board has made up to scare 7.9-mill levy May 3. people, this is what we’ll have to The emergency property tax do to make ends meet,” he said. would cost $241.94 per year per “Hopefully, people can understand $100,000 of home value and how important this is to our kids would generate $10.9 million a and to our community.” year based on 2010 valuations, Also, if the levy doesn’t pass in according to Clermont County 2011, the district will go into fiscal Chief Deputy Auditor Chuck emergency, which will mean more Tilbury. issues on the ballot, Brooks said. West Clermont Local School “If the levy doesn’t pass, we’ll District officials can promise two be calling the state because we things if the levy fails: Deep cuts don’t have the funds to make payand future levies. roll. The plan would be to put The district administration has another issue on the ballot in cut a cumulative $45 million in 2011 and, if that fails, we’ll go spending since 2005 - including into fiscal emergency,” Brooks $2.4 million for next year - that said. “In the simple sense, that will not be reinstated if the levy removes the ability for the local passes. board of education to make many However, if the levy fails, more decisions involving expenditures than $5 million in additional cuts for the district.” will go into effect In fiscal emergency, before school a state committee The emergency starts this fall. would come in, review property tax would Those cuts mean West Clermont’s opera80 fewer class- cost $241.94 per year tions and loan the room teachers, money necessary to per $100,000 of larger class sizes, run the district. That shorter school home value and would debt would then be days and the elimgenerate $10.9 added to the millage on ination of elemenmillion a year based the ballot, which would tary school art and decided by the state on 2010 valuations, be music, all orchescommittee and not the tra classes and according to Clermont local school board, gifted and talented County Chief Deputy Brooks said. programs. District Treasurer Auditor Chuck Tilbury. Alana In addition, all Cropper said votsports and extraers should consider curricular activities will become how the cuts will impact the compay to play with fees of about munity before casting their bal$500 per activity per student, all lots. buildings will be closed 30 min“This levy is absolutely critical. utes after school lets out and all Given that we’ve already made weekend and evening activities $45 million in cuts, we are down will be eliminated. to the bone. There’s no where else The entire district also will go to cut,” she said. “To make a to state minimum busing. That strong community, you have to means no bus service at the high have strong schools … West Clerschool and no busing for students mont is such a gem, especially within a two-mile radius of the when you look at our cost per school they attend. pupil, which is $1,736 under state Superintendent Gary Brooks average.” said the district currently buses Krueger asked people to talk to about 8,700 students. About their state representatives and 6,730 of those students will be request a fix to the unconstitutionineligible for bus service at the al state funding set-up. state minimum. “Columbus isn’t fixing the “Due to the changes in the problem,” he said. “No one wants state and federal funding and the to pay more taxes, but we need to rising cost of goods, materials and pass the levy.” services, we are at the point where For more information about the we no longer have the capacity to district’s finances or the proposed offer the programs we have cur- cuts, visit www.westcler.org. kmay@communitypress.com

Collection time

In the next few days your Community Press carrier will be stopping by to collect $2.50 for delivery of this month’s The Community Journal. Your carrier retains half of this amount along with any tip you Scanlon give to reward good service. This month we’re featuring Cooper Scanlon, who is a fourth grader at Miami Valley Christian Academy. He is also a Boy Scout and loves the outdoors. Cooper also really enjoys his paper route and his customers are pleased with his service. For information about our carrier program, call Steve Barraco, 248-7110.

50¢

KELLIE GEIST-MAY/STAFF

Amelia High School seniors Paige Spencer, left, and Abbie Pizzo are aides in Alicia Battelle’s special needs class. The two have been working to raise money – by selling Tupperware and magnets and asking for donations – to buy a classroom iPad and to fund other activities.

Amelia students make a difference By Kellie Geist-May kmay@communitypress.com

When Amelia High School seniors Paige Spencer and Abbie Pizzo started as student aides in Alicia Battelle’s Multiple Handicaps and Multiple Disabilities Unit twice a day, they didn’t know what to expect. “At first we would just stand in the corner. We were nervous,” Spencer said. “And some of our friends gave us a hard time,” Pizzo said. But now the two give high fives to the special needs students in the hallway and spend their free time raising money for classroom needs. Spencer and Pizzo are hoping a bulk of the money they’ve raised can help pay for a classroom iPad and two special communication applications for non-audible students. Spencer, who incorporated the effort into her Senior Exit Action Project, sold Tupperware to raise money and both students make and sell magnets at school and at their teacher’s family store, Battelle’s Grocery and Catering in Mt. Carmel. “We have almost $700, but we want there to be money left over. There are things this class does – trips to the grocery (for cooking skills) and projects – and the money comes out of Ms. Battelle’s pocket. We want to help with that,” Pizzo said.

Battelle said the two seniors are making an impact beyond their fundraising efforts. “They are working with the (special needs) students one-onone every day. That makes a huge difference,” she said. Their involvement also has changed the face of the special needs program. “Abbie and Paige are wellknown in the school and they’ve made it OK for other students to be friends with the special needs students. It’s awesome,” Battelle said. “I really can’t sing their praises enough. I don’t want them to leave.” Being part of the class also has made a difference for Pizzo and Spencer. Pizzo, who was thinking about being a teacher, will be attending the University of Cincinnati this fall to study special education. Spencer will be attending Tennessee Tech University on a soccer scholarship to study nursing. “This all started as being an aide and doing an (exit) project, but it’s become a part of us,” Spencer said. “These students have different needs, but you just need to get to know them. We’re their friends now.” “It’s been a life-changing experience,” Pizzo said. Anyone interested in making a donation to the MHMD Unit should contact Battelle at battelle_a@westcler.org.

High winds Mike Wisby, who lives at Lot 171 of the Holly Towne Mobile Home Park in Monroe Township, said strong winds blew his trailer off its pad early Wednesday, April 20. He thought it was a tornado, but fire department officials said it was straight line winds. No one was injured, but the trailer is a total loss, Wisby said. For the full story, see page A3. JOHN SENEY/STAFF

To place an ad, call 242-4000.


A2

Community Journal

News

April 27, 2011

New Richmond voters asked to renew levy By John Seney jseney@communitypress.com

New Richmond village residents May 3 will vote on whether to renew a 3-mill,

five-year general operating levy. “Since the levy is a renewal it will not increase your property taxes,” said village Administrator David

Index Classified.......................................C Calendar ......................................B3 Police ..........................................B8

Schools .......................................A6 Sports .........................................A8 Viewpoints ..................................A9

CLERMONT Find news and information from your community on the Web Amelia – cincinnati.com/amelia Batavia – cincinnati.com/batavia Batavia Township – cincinnati.com/bataviatownship New Richmond – cincinnati.com/newrichmond Ohio Township – cincinnati.com/ohiotownship Pierce Township – cincinnati.com/piercetownship Union Township – cincinnati.com/uniontownship Williamsburg – cincinnati.com/williamsburg Williamsburg Township – cincinnati.com/williamsburgtownship News Theresa L. Herron | Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . 248-7128 | therron@communitypress.com Mary Dannemiller | Reporter . . . . . . . . . 248-7684 | mdannemiller@communitypress.com Kelie Geist | Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248-7681 | kgeist@communitypress.com John Seney | Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248-7683 | jseney@communitypress.com Melanie Laughman | Sports Editor. . . . . . 248-7573 | mlaughman@communitypress.com Nick Dudukovich | Sports Reporter . . . . . . 248-7570 | ndudukovich@communitypress.com Advertising Alison Hauck Account Relationship Specialist . . . . . . . . . . 768-8634 | ahauck@communitypress.com Kristin Manning Account Relationship Specialist . . . . . . . . . 768-8197 | kjmanning@communitypress.com Delivery For customer service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 576-8240 Stephen Barraco | Circulation Manager . . 248-7110 | sbarraco@communitypress.com Marilyn Schneider | District manager . . . 248-7578 | mschneider@communitypress.com Classified To place a Classified ad . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242-4000 | www.communityclassified.com To place an ad in Community Classified, call 242-4000.

Kennedy. The levy originally was passed five years ago and must be renewed by the end of 2011 to stay in effect. Voters rejected a request to renew the levy last November. Kennedy said the renewal levy is needed despite a 1-percent income tax that went into effect in 2010. “The income tax did not replace the need for the general operating levy; it simply covers the losses we are experiencing from (utility) deregulation,” Kennedy said. The general operating levy, which generates $172,888 annually, accounts for about 22 per-

cent of general fund income. “The renewal levy is an important part of the village operations,” Mayor Ramona Carr said. “It funds operations of the village such as snow removal, brush pickup, road repairs, park maintenance, Front Street improvements and sidewalk installation. These funds would also be used to purchase the equipment which we need to keep our services going such as mowers, salt trucks and a new backhoe.” “The general operating monies are used for matching funds for many village grants, such as the Ohio 132 culvert project, the Augusta Street Boat Ramp

and many other projects,” Carr said. “The levy will not increase the property owner’s taxes and will help us to continue the many improvements we have completed in the village,” she said. “We are very proud of the services we supply to our residents and we hope to keep these going.” Kennedy said the failure of the renewal levy would require the reduction of village services. “These would likely include reduction of staff, decreased annual street resurfacing, elimination of brush collection, minimal park upgrades and reduc-

tion of snow removal to primary streets only,” Carr he said. The operating levy costs the owner of a $100,000 home $89.29 in taxes annually, said Chuck Tilbury, Clermont County chief deputy auditor. This will not increase if the levy is approved by voters. To answer questions about the levy, Kennedy and Fiscal Officer Lynn Baird will be available for an informal session 11 a.m. to noon, Saturday, April 30, at Village Hall, 102 Willow St. For more information, call 553-4146.

Batavia schools seek passage of 6.9-mill levy

By John Seney

jseney@communitypress.com

Facing declining revenue and increased expenses, Batavia school officials this year instituted $1.5 million in cuts and are asking voters to approve an operating levy that will generate an additional $1.5 million a year. Even if the 6.9-mill levy is approved May 3, the cuts will remain in place for the 2011-2012 school year. The district has operated

at a deficit for the past three years, and the district’s reserve fund has been deleted. Both the Grubb cuts and passage of the levy are needed to build up the reserve fund, Superintendent Jill Grubb said. District officials have held several informational community meetings on the levy. A committee has been formed to promote passage of the levy. Wayne Gates, chair of the steering committee backing the levy, said even

voters who don’t have students in the schools should support the levy for economic reasons. “Voting ‘yes’ for the levy is an economic development decision and property value decision for every person living in the Batavia school district,” he said. Gates said the pro-levy campaign is going well. A push was made to find parents of students who were not registered to vote and get them registered. “If every parent votes ‘yes,’ it should pass easily,” he said. Grubb said levy backers have mailed information to every registered voter in the

district. In the final days of the campaign, levy backers are gearing up for a door-todoor campaign that will target 18 neighborhoods in the district. “We hope that people understand the importance of education,” Grubb said. “We’re remaining positive.” The levy would cost the owner of a $100,000 home an additional $211.31 a year in property taxes, said Chuck Tilbury, Clermont County chief deputy auditor. If approved, the levy will generate an additional $1,527,152 a year for the school district, based on tax year 2010 valuations, Tilbury said.

Knepp to speak at Grant celebration Community Press Staff Report

POINT PLEASANT - This month marks the 150th anniversary of the start of the Civil War. On this occasion, Clermont County will honor Ulysses S. Grant at his birthplace along the Ohio River. Saturday, April 30, the annual U.S. Grant Birthday Celebration will be held in Point Pleasant. Festivities begin at 10:30 a.m. at Grant Memorial Park with a

flag ceremony featuring New Richmond Veterans Color Guard and local Scout troops. All local Boy and Girl Scouts are invited to participate in the Pledge of Allegiance. Patriotic music will be performed by the awardwinning men’s choir from New Richmond High School. At 1 p.m., a commemorative program will be held in the sanctuary of Grant Memorial Methodist Church

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adjacent to Grant’s Birthplace. The keynote speaker will be local historian and author Gary Knepp. Music will be provided by the renowned Cincinnati Freedom Choir that has performed at Great American Ballpark prior to the Civil Rights game in past years. To commemorate the sesquicentennial of the Civil War, one individual and one group will be honored for their support in promoting the history of the conflict and the role of Clermont County’s most famous son in achieving victory for the Union cause. An entertainment program with an Irish flair will cap off the event at 3 p.m. in the sanctuary of the Grant Memorial Church. For more information visit ohiohistory.org/grantbirthplace or historicnr.org.

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News

April 27, 2011

Community Journal

A3

Batavia schools raise sports fees By John Seney jseney@communitypress.com

JOHN SENEY/STAFF

Strong winds early Wednesday, April 20, knocked this trailer in Monroe Township off its pad. The trailer moved about two to three feet to the right, owner Mike Wisby said. The trailer was at the Holly Towne Mobile Home Park, 2061 Ohio Pike.

Winds push trailer off pad in Monroe Township By John Seney jseney@communitypress.com

High winds early Wednesday, April 20, pushed a trailer in Monroe Township off its pad. Mike Wisby, who lives at Lot 171 of the Holly Towne Mobile Home Park, 2061 Ohio Pike, said he and his roommate, Donna Brummett, were in the trailer about 1:45 a.m. when the winds hit. “I lifted up and slammed back down,” he said. Wisby said he thought it was a tornado, but Monroe Township Fire Chief Tom Marck said it was most like-

ly straight line winds from a thunderstorm. Wisby said the wind moved his trailer about 2 to 3 feet. “It’s demolished, a total loss,” he said. Brummett said she was praying when the trailer lifted up. “I was in shock, screaming. I thought it was a tornado,” she said. She said neither she or Wisby were hurt. “We were just shaken up,” she said. Brummett said they did not have insurance on the trailer. The investigation into the incident was continuing, Marck said.

Batavia schools raised the fees for students to participate in athletics. The school board April 18 voted to raise the fee to $125 per sport for each student. The old fee was $50 per student. A family pass will be offered for $350 that covers participation in sports for all students in a family plus admission to all school athletic events for all family members. If the family pass is paid for in two equal installments, it will cost $400. Board member Michael Enriquez said the higher fee for sports was part of the school district’s budget reduction plan. The fee increase “was a whole lot smaller than it could be,” said board member Chris Huser. West Clermont school officials have proposed raising sports participation fees to $495 per student per sport.

JOHN SENEY/STAFF

Grant celebration

Clermont County Commissioner Ed Humphrey reads a proclamation April 20 designating April 30 as “Ulysses S. Grant Commemoration Day” in the county. From left are Edna Burns, president of Historic New Richmond; and Loretta Fuhrman, curator of the U.S. Grant Birthplace in Point Pleasant. A celebration to commemorate the 189th anniversary of Grant’s birth will be April 30 in Point Pleasant.

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Batavia hires football coach By John Seney jseney@communitypress.com

Don Sizer has been hired as new varsity head football coach for Batavia High School. The school board April 18 voted to hire Sizer for the supplemental position at a salary of $5,148. He will not teach at the school.

Sizer has been head coach at ClintonMassie, Bethel-Tate and Western Brown high schools. Most recently, he was defensive line coach at Wilmington College, his alma mater. “Thank you for the opportunity. I look forward to the challenge,” Sizer told the school board. He replaces Ron Ogden as head coach.

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A4

Community Journal

News

April 27, 2011

BRIEFLY Trustees to meet

BATAVIA TWP. – The Batavia Township trustees have scheduled a special meeting for 8 a.m. Thursday, April 28. The meeting will be at the township community center, 1535 Clough Pike. The trustees will discuss text amendments to the zoning code. Following the meeting (about 10 a.m.) the trustees will travel in a passenger van throughout the township looking at zoning, road and general issues.

Plant sale

Clough closed

UNION TWP. – The Clermont County Engineer’s Office has closed a portion of Clough Pike, near Terrace Drive in Union Township, for emergency culvert repairs. The culvert was damaged by high water. The roadway will be closed until further notice. The Engineer’s Office will post detour signs to reroute traffic. For more information, call the Clermont County Engineer’s Office at 732-8857.

Tea Party meeting

LOOK

CLERMONT COUNTY – The Clermont County Tea Party will be showing the documentary, “Waiting for Superman,” at 7 p.m. Thursday, April 28, at the Holiday Inn Eastgate. This is a critically-acclaimed, award-winning presentation on the troubled state of the American public school system, kids who are trapped in it, and those who are finding creative ways to make changes for the better to save a failing system. Admission is free. For more information, www.clermontteaparty.org.

Buying Gold, Silver & Coins

Run for a cure

UNION TWP. – The Day Heights Garden Club members will sponsor a “Perennial Plant Sale” from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday, April 29, and 9 a.m. to “sell out” Saturday, April 30, at 1149 Deblin Drive, Milford. All plants are homegrown by garden club members and selected to grow well in this area.

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PIERCE TWP. – It is not too late to sign up for Becca’s Legendary Run for a Cure. The race is Saturday, May 7, at Legendary Run Golf Clubhouse, 915 E. Leg-

endary Run. Registration begins at 7:30 a.m. with the race at 9 a.m. The Pierce Township Police Department staff is hosting this run/walk in honor of Becca Bennett, the daughter of one of the officers. This run/walk is to raise money for Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Oncology Research to help children who have been or will be diagnosed with a childhood cancer. Registering at www.piercetownship.org or www.getmeregistered.com. The cost prior to May 3 is $25, which includes a T-shirt. Register after May 3 and the day of the race for $25 without a T-shirt. There will be items raffled off and food after the race.

Emergency fair

CLERMONT COUNTY – Join the Clermont County Board of Developmental Disabilities for an Emergency Preparedness Interactive Fair April 28 and April 29. This event includes tours of the Miami Township Smokehouse, as well as informational flyers from local safety organizations in Clermont County and the Greater Cincinnati Area. Flyers on safety precautions for tornadoes, electrical outages, snowstorms and fires will be available. Visitors also will learn what materials are necessary to put together a

household disaster kit. The Emergency Preparedness Event takes place April 28 at the Wildey Center, 2040 U.S. 50 (one mile west of Owensville), and April 29 at the Donald A. Collins Habilitation Center, 4275 Armstrong Boulevard, Batavia. For details or to schedule a tour, contact Lisa Davis at 513-732-4921 or email ldavis@clermontdd.org.

Spring benefit

OWENSVILLE – The Friends of the Fair will host the annual spring benefit with proceeds dedicated to major improvements to the Clermont County fairgrounds. The benefit is 6:30 p.m. to midnight Saturday, May 7, in the Multi-Purpose Building on the fairgrounds in Owensville. Cost is $25 per couple, $15 per person or $5 for children age 8 to 18. Those under age 8 are free. Food, drinks, beer and entertainment will be provided. The dance floor will be open. Door prizes will be awarded. The evening features special raffles, cake and pie auctions as well as many silent auction items. With the money from this benefit and other fundraising activities, the group was able to build a new horse barn on the fairgrounds in time for the 2010 fair. While the next project has not been determined, a similar improvement to the fairgrounds is planned.

Special election set for May 3

If you live in the Batavia on the website, www.clerLocal School District, West montelections.org and mailClermont Local School Dis- ing it to the board, 76 S. trict or in the village of New Riverside Drive, Batavia, Richmond, you have a tax Ohio 45103. The deadline for the issue to decide in the Clermont County Special Elec- board to receive an application for a ballot by mail is tion Tuesday, May 3. “There are almost noon Saturday, April 30. “Citizens 63,000 eligible can also stop voters in those Polls will be open from by the Clerareas that 6:30 a.m. until 7:30 mont County should make Board of their votes p.m. Election Day. Elections count,” said Clermont County Board of office to vote,” said Miller. She said on the day of a Elections Director Judy special election or general Miller. Miller reminds citizens election, if citizens have not voted early, they must cast that they can vote early. “Any registered voter in ballots at their assigned the state of Ohio can vote polling location. early (absentee) by mail or The board office is open by casting a ballot at the 8 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. board of elections, starting Monday through Friday. 35 days before the day of The office also will be open the election,” she said. 8 a.m. to noon Saturday, “Early voting is currently April 30. underway.” Polls will be open from She said the board of 6:30 a.m. until 7:30 p.m. elections has received 423 Election Day. requests for ballots by mail For additional informaand three citizens have tion about voting, contact voted at board offices. the Clermont County Board Citizens who want to of Elections at 732-7275 or vote early by mail must visit www.ClermontElecsubmit an application to tions.org. receive a ballot by calling Submitted by Kathy Lehr, the Clermont County Board director of the Clermont of Elections at 732-7275 or County Office of Public by printing an application Information

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Pierce zoning admin dismissed By John Seney jseney@communitypress.com

PIERCE TWP. – Donna Cann, Pierce Township’s zoning administrator, has been dismissed. The action was taken at a special meeting of the trustees Tuesday, April 19. “The board of trustees voted to dismiss Donna Cann as an at-will employee effec-

tive immediately,” administrator David Elmer said. No reason was given for the dismissal. Because she was an at-will employee, she served at the pleasure of the board. Cann was receiving an annual salary of about $52,000, Elmer said. Cann had no comment on the reason for her dismissal. Trustees Bonnie Batchler

and Christopher Knoop had no comment on the action. Elmer said the day-today zoning duties of the zoning department will be handled by Harold “Tub” Maxson, the zoning violations officer. “The board has yet to make a decision about the future of the zoning administrator position,” Elmer said.

National Day of Prayer is May 5 Community Press Staff Report

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If you’re out and about Thursday, May 5, you may see people stopping to pray. That’s because May 5 is the National Day of Prayer in the United States. According to the National Day of Prayer Task Force’s website, www.nationaldayofprayer.o rg, the day is recognized as a time to encourage personal and corporate prayer regardless of issues and positions, to preserve America’s Christian heritage and defend the religious freedoms granted by the Constitution, and to emphasize prayer for America and its leadership. National Day of Prayer was first recognized in 1775, according to the site. Events are scheduled throughout the day in Clermont County. Union Township In Union Township, the National Day of Prayer celebration will be at 7 p.m. near the helicopter at the Union Township Veterans Memorial Park. Attendees will form a single file line and walk once around the track before assembling for group prayer and patriotic singing. Organizers also will recognize participating churches, military personnel, elected officials, veterans’ groups, fire and police departments. The event will end with

closing remarks, a prayer and “Taps.” Should the weather not permit the walk around the track, prayer and singing will be held under the large pavilion in the center of the park. New Richmond New Richmond will have a God and Country Concert and Prayer Service 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. May 5 at the village bandstand at Susanna Way and Front Street. Bennett said the event will begin with area soloists, groups and the community choir singing patriotic songs. Area pastors will pray for America, the hometown heroes such as police, firefighters and EMTs, and veterans, who will be recognized and introduced by veteran Ralph Shepherd. Clermont County A county-wide celebration will be at noon on the steps of the Clermont County Courthouse in Batavia. Some of the county’s elected officials will read Bible verses while pastors will pray for the country, the county, the military both active and veterans, and the hometown heroes such as police, firefighters and EMTs. The annual prayer service includes patriotic songs and hymns sung by John Hale of New Richmond and other soloists. “Before each prayer we ask the different groups to

come forward, be recognized so we can show our appreciation for their contributions to the blessing of living in Clermont County,” said county Commissioner Bob Proud, co-chair of the county’s National Day of Prayer Task Force. The Bible theme for 2011 is found in Psalm 91, verse 2: “A mighty fortress is our God.” “This verse is such a comfort in these times when evil seems to triumph. We need this reminder as America’s Godly foundations are being shaken,” said Libbie Bennett, county coordinator for the event. The National Day of Prayer Annual Pastors Brunch will be 11 a.m. May 5 on the third floor of the county administration building in Batavia. The brunch for area pastors will be hosted by Pastor Dale Campfield and the Eastgate Community Church. Clermont County’s elected officials are invited to be special guests, said Tim Rudd, honorary chair. “This is a great opportunity for our officials to meet area pastors and to share any prayer requests they may have,” Rudd said. “All county pastors are invited and after the brunch join us as we walk down to the courthouse for the noon prayer service,” said Dee Deaton, co-chair of the pastors brunch committee. For more information, call Deaton at 943-7026.


News

Community Journal

April 27, 2011

A5

Habitat For Humanity helps Union Twp. family build home By Kellie Geist-May kmay@communitypress.com

KELLIE GEIST-MAY/STAFF

Tim Wahl and his son, Andy, work on their new house, which is being built in Union Township through Habitat For Humanity.

After exactly 17 years from their first date, Tim and Amy Wahl turned another new page in their lives. The Wahl family started building their new home through Habitat For Humanity Saturday, April 16 – the anniversary of the day Tim and Amy started dating. “It’s a special day for us,” Tim said. The family of eight – Amelia High School sweethearts Tim and Amy and their six boys – currently lives in a three bedroom rental in Mt. Carmel. The new house, which they will own, is being built on Kitty Lane in Union Township. Tim said the family has made ends meet by pinching pennies and holding odd jobs. “God has always provided for us, but it’s not easy,” he said. “This will make a

KELLIE GEIST-MAY/STAFF

Habitat For Humanity volunteers take a lunch break while working on a new home for the Wahl family in Union Township. Tim and Amy Wahl, who have been married for 15 years, have six children and currently live in a three-bedroom home in Mt. Carmel. big difference.” Cincinnati Habitat For Humanity in a non-profit organization that helps Tristate, low-income families living in substandard condi-

tions build new homes or renovate existing spaces. Those families then work 500 volunteer, or “sweat” hours, for Habitat and pay back the interest-free mort-

gage over 20 years, said volunteer services coordinator Tara Price. “The Wahl family is really a model family for us,” she said. “They are outgoing, they want to engage people and they want to make sure they are doing everything they can to get the house complete.” “They are doing this because of the love for their family … We are excited they get this opportunity to be homeowners. They really deserve it,” Price said. For more information about getting involved, call 942-9211.

Yard sale to raise money for Batavia BPA Conference in Washington in May. Stephen Engle and Sam Weaver will receive the Ambassador Torch Award at the national conference. The award is given at the national level based on dedication to leadership, community service, cooperation, knowledge, friendship, love-hope-faith and patriotism. Batavia BPA students have worked hard to give back to the community this year. Together with the Batavia Middle School team, they donated more

than $5,565 to Special Olympics through participation in the 2011 Polar Plunge. In addition, they are organizing a book drive which will benefit Batavia middle and elementary schools. BPA will accept community donations for the yard sale 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Friday, April 29, at the high school. Donation receipts for tax purposes will be mailed. For more information, contact BPA advisor Angie Kovacs at kovacs_a@bataviaschools.org.

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SCHOOLS A6

Community Journal

April 27, 2011

| NEWS | Editor Theresa Herron | therron@communitypress.com | 248-7128 ACHIEVEMENTS

ACTIVITIES

JOURNAL

| HONORS communitypress.com Your Community Press newspaper serving Bethel, Chilo, Felicity, Franklin Township, Moscow, Neville, Tate Township, Washington Township E m a i l : c l e r m o n t @ c o m m u n i t y p r e s s . c o mm

West Clermont school student news Outstanding achievement

At the April 5 meeting of the West Clermont Board of Education the following students were recognized for outstanding achievement: Erin Fite, a second-grader at Brantner Elementary, and Madison Brown, a fourth-grader from Summerside Elementary, were chosen as exhibitors for this year’s Youth Art Month Exhibition sponsored by the Ohio Art Education Association. The exhibition was held in Columbus last month. Only 160 pieces of art work were selected from schools all over Ohio.

It is a distinct honor for a student to have art work in this exhibition. Also recognized were Anna Altherr, a fourth-grader at Brantner Elementary, and Hannah Reno, a fifth-grader from Summerside Elementary, who were chosen as exhibitors for the 31st Young Peoples Art Exhibition also sponsored by the Ohio Art Education Association. This year’s show highlighted the artistic talent of only 158 students from across the state.

Amelia newspaper staff wins awards

The Ohio Scholastic Media Association Contest has just ended – the Baron Beat newspaper staff made an impressive showing for their first time in this competition. There were more than 2,000 entries from across the state. The following students won awards: Alex Robb, Junior – Honorable Mention in News Writing and General Features; Hadiza Itapson, Junior – Honorable Mention in Personality Profile; Kymmy Simon, Junior – Honorable Mention in Sport Opinion Writing Staff

– Honorable Mention in Editorial Writing; Thamara Lynch, Junior, Honorable Mention in Newswriting; Sarah Blankenship, Excellent (the second highest rating) in News Feature. Shalee Rogney won an award in the “Day-of” Interview Contest – Honorable Mention (out of 30 students) – Students for this contest had to hear an interview and write a story in a twohour period. Overall, the Baron Beat won third place in the state for outstanding school publication.

Exchange Club student of the Year

Wynton Overcast, senior in American Studies at Glen Este High School, has been named Youth of the Year by the Eastern Hills Exchange Club. Overcast earned this honor after being named Youth of the Month in January and competing against other area high school students who were also named Youth of the Month throughout the year. Exchange Club representative Gary Lent said Overcast’s essay about volunteerism was “well presented, meaningful and gripping.”

Principal to rappel down hotel for charity Jamie Corrill, Batavia assistant superintendent and high school principal, has agreed to team up with the high school chapter of Business Professionals of America (BPA) to support Ohio Special Olympics. Once a minimum of $1,000 has been donated on Corrill’s behalf, he plans to rappel down the 23-story Hyatt Regency Cincinnati hotel Tuesday, May 17. To help with the push, visit the Ohio Special Olympics website at http://sooh.kintera.org/otecincin-

PROVIDED

Ten students from Batavia Middle School attended the regional Invention Convention April 9 at Cincinnati State Technical and Community College. In back row, from left, are teacher Jacqueline Chambers; Dr. Claire, a character at the convention; Trystan Norman; Sessaley Weitlauf; Maggie Harris; Isabella Burton; Stevie Tenbrink; and Captain Gadget, also a character at the convention. In front row, from left, are Darion Foley, Jake Walker, Jefferson Northrup, Conner Gadbury and Kenny Losekamp.

Batavia Middle students show off inventiveness at convention

By John Seney jseney@communitypress.com

Ten students from Batavia Middle School got to show off their inventiveness April 9 at the regional Invention Convention at Cincinnati State Technical and Community College. Jacqueline Chambers, a sixthgrade science teacher, said students were required to solve a problem and create a prototype of an invention as part of class. They kept inventor journals and designed display boards. All sixth-graders at the middle school created inventions and participated in the school’s own Invention Convention. Ten of the students were chosen to show their inventions at the regional competition. Batavia’s Isabella Burton was the overall sixth-grade winner at the regional convention. Chambers said Isabella invented the wheelchair huggie, a specially

Belting it out Glen Este High School freshman Jordan Large, left, and junior Peter Brandt sing “No Air” with all three Glen Este choirs during rehearsal for the spring concerts. KELLIE GEISTMAY/STAFF

designed Snuggie blanket for someone in a wheelchair. Her invention earned her a $500 scholarship. Time Warner Cable, a major sponsor of the event, chose 10 of the inventions as “Coolest Creations” and interviewed each of the inventors. Those 10 interviews will air on Time Warner’s 411 channel during May. The public can vote to determine the favorite and that student will win $500. Batavia students were selected for three of those 10 spots, Chambers said. They were Darion Foley for his first aid bike seat, Kenny Losekamp for his student storage seat and Stevie Tenbrink for an invention called see salt. In addition, Time Warner awarded the Chairman’s Choice Trophy to Batavia student Conner Gadbury for his green fire starter. Chambers said Just Think Inc., which organizes the convention, did their own judging. “Our students did extremely

well according to the official judges,” she said. The following students each received a Superior Innovator Award and a $50 savings bond: Darion Foley, Conner Gadbury, Kenny Losekamp, Maggie Harris, Trystan Norman, Jefferson Northrup, Stevie Tenbrink, Jacob Walker and Sessaley Weitlauf. Pictures of the students with their display boards and prototypes are on display by the middle school office, Chambers said. “Several of these students have or are planning to pursue a patent on their inventions,” Chambers said. “I could not be more proud of the entire group. They had innovative inventions, attractive and informative display boards and were good public speakers.” The students were recognized at the April 18 school board meeting. “It’s pretty impressive for kids at that age,” said board member Mark Ewing.

nati2011. Search for the Batavia High School BPA team page or for Corrill individually. Donations can be made by credit card Corrill online. To donate by cash or check, contact BPA adviser Angie Kovacs at kovacs_a@bataviaschools.org.

Students use art to learn body systems Community Press Staff Report

Third graders at St. Thomas More School have been studying the systems of the human body. As part of the class, the stu-

dents traced each other with chalk and filled in the outline with the different body systems to create life-sized illustrations of the circulatory and skeletal systems.

JOHN SENEY/STAFF

BPA achievers

The students in the Batavia High School Business Professionals of American (BPA) was recognized for achievement at the Batavia school board meeting April 18. From left are Jordan Boswell, Taylor Swartz, Hunter Meadors, Charles Weinberg, Sam Weaver, Tate Sester, Chris Trusty and adviser Angie Kovacs. The students were recognized for qualifying for state competition. Also, the BPA chapter members, along with six teachers from Batavia Middle School, were recognized for raising $5,665 for the Special Olympics of Ohio.

NOTES Kroeger earns scholarship

An Amelia High School student was awarded Honors Experience Scholarships to Cincinnati State Technical and Community College: Katherine D. Kroeger of Amelia, pastry arts technologies. The Honors Experience scholarships covers tuition, fees and books at Cincinnati State. Minimum requirements for admission to the Honors Experience include an ACT score of 26 or an SAT score of 1,140, a high school grade point average of 3.25 and a class rank in the top 20 percent. Cincinnati State will welcome the students at the 2011 Scholars and Scholarships Ceremony at 3:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 25, in the auditorium of the Advanced Technology & Learning Center on the main campus. For more information, visit www.cincinnatistate.edu/honors or contact Marcha Hunley, honors experience chair, at 513-569-1732 or HonorsExperience@cincinnatistate.edu.


Schools

Community Journal

April 27, 2011

A7

New Richmond science team qualifies for state Community Press Staff Report New Richmond’s Science Olympiad team is headed to the state finals Saturday, April 30 at the Ohio State University after recording a third-place finish in the Cincinnati regional competition held at UC Raymond Walters College. “We were the highest placing public school,” said New Richmond coach Josh Grischow, whose sixth- through ninth-grade students received medals in 15 of the 23 events tested. New Richmond finished behind teams from Summit Country Day and St. Aloysius Gonzaga. New Richmond finished ahead of teams from public schools Kings, Wyoming, Lakota, Ross, National

Trail and Twin Valley. “We improved a great deal from last year, moving up from sixth in the regional tournament to third,” said Grischow, who was assisted by New Richmond Middle School science teachers Tina Grippa, Pam Hughes and Doug Smiddy. “Last year, we medaled in 10 events and this year, we medaled in 15.” Science Olympiad teams competed individually or in groups in a series of 23 events which tested their knowledge of science skills, processes and applications in a wide range of science disciplines including biology, chemistry, physics, technology, earth science and mathematics. The New Richmond team was comprised of Paige Anderson, Marie Bezold, Audrey Feiler, Matt

Graham, Alex Grooms, Abby Jewell, McKenzie Lauver, Griffin Mulvaney, Jessica Nazareth, Michaela Nordyke, Jenny Roberts, Lindsay Slone, Ian Wahoff, Eric Williams and Leah Wolfer. “I was really pleased with our team’s performance and am excited about the opportunity to represent New Richmond at the state competition,” said Grischow. The Ohio Science Olympiad is an academic, interscholastic competition designed to increase student interest in science and to improve the quality of science education. With the middle school competition being expanded in include freshmen, Grischow was able to bring back four members of last year’s team: Abby Jewell, Jessica

Nazareth, Paige Anderson and Michaela Nordyke. “Their experience came in handy, with a haul of two firstplace medals, a second-place medal and a fifth-place medal,” said Grischow, whose team won three first-place medals, five second-place medals and two thirdplace and fourth-place medals. Five of the eighth graders were with last year’s team: Audrey Feiler, Jenny Roberts, Matt Graham, Lindsay Slone and Ian Wahoff. “They contributed to 10 more medals,” said Grischow. “I was especially impressed with Audrey Feiler, who paid her dues as an alternate last year. She stepped up this year, medaling in every event she entered, earning team MVP honors.”

Six newcomers to this year’s team were Griffin Mulvaney, McKenzie Lauver, Marie Bezold, Leah Wolfer, Alex Grooms and Eric Williams. All won medals. “We know that we will be at a disadvantage at the state competition considering the size and demographics of our school and the relative lack of experience of our team,” said Grischow. “This is only our third year competing at the regional level and it will be our first at state. “We will do our best to prepare in the eight weeks we have until the tournament on April 30. Luckily, we have the full resources of our outstanding science department, with Doug Smiddy joining veteran coaches Tina Grippa and Pam Hughes this year.”

SCHOOL NOTES ROTC cadets receive awards

JOHN SENEY/STAFF

Choir qualifies for state

Members of the Batavia High School choir were recognized for achievement at the April 18 school board meeting. From left are teacher Karen Allen and students Aaron Wood, Jenna Justice, Lauren Williamson, Danielle Kinman, Courtney Huser, Mike Almond and Jessica Bauer. The chamber choir went to the OMEA District 14 contest and received an excellent rating, which qualifies for a trip to the state contest.

Amelia/Great Oaks students excel in contest

PROVIDED

Students of Month

Six Williamsburg Middle School students were chosen as Students of the Month for February. They are, front row, from left, Austin Whisman, Hanna Simpson and Nathan Webb and back row, from left, Calie Brown, Cassidy Bowling and Talia Wainscott.

PROVIDED

Hoops for hearts

Brantner Elementary students collected $1,575.48 for the American Heart Association during the recent Hoops for Hearts event. The top collectors were Matthew Roark ($1,14.50) and Tess Jones ($100). The money will help develop medicine and treatments for children with heart disease. From left, Jones and Roark, along with physical education teacher Jeanne D’Argis, show off their Hoops for Hearts T-shirts.

Amelia/Great Oaks business students were successful April 9 and April 10 competing in the state Business Professionals of America (BPA) competition in Columbus. Seven students qualified for national competition: • Sara Dunn: First place, Economic Research ProjectIndividual • Katie Morgan and MaKenzie Mullins: First place, Global Marketing Team • Connor Morrow and Justin Smedley: Second place, Financial Analyst Team • Brian Keefe: Third place, Entrepreneurship • Corinna Baker: Third place, Administrative Support-Individual The national competition is held as part of the 2011 National Leadership Conference in Washington, DC. Four other students also placed in the top 10 in the state. These students were called to the stage and recognized in front of thousands of other students and faculty. Other students placing in the top 10 were: • Shelby Engle: Sixth place, Prepared Speech • Katie Whitaker, Ashley Houston and Courtney Shank: Ninth place, Administrative Support Team The Amelia BPA Chapter also was recognized as a Chapter of Excellence for its activities completed throughout the year. Chapter President Katie Morgan, who is also the BPA State Historian, helped organize the state conference. To assist the students in paying for the trip to the National Leadership Conference, Amelia BPA hosted a pancake breakfast April 16. The Amelia High School Business Management program is a program of the Great Oaks Career Campuses, led by instructor Rebecca Landen.

Awards were recently presented to cadets of the All For One Army ROTC Battalion at Xavier University. • Elizabeth Glaser of Union Township was inducted into Alpha Sigma Nu. Alpha Sigma Nu is the Jesuit honor society. Candidates must be outstanding in scholarship, loyalty and

service. • Elizabeth Heitker of Union Township received the Gold X-Key. The award recognizes junior and senior students’ co-curricular involvement and contributions to the Xavier community. Eligibility is based upon the breadth of their campus involvement and academic achievement.

Amelia senior wins National Merit scholarship

National Merit Scholarship Corporation officials April 18 released the names of the first group of winners in the 56th annual National Merit Scholarship Program. • John D. Hart of Amelia High School has received the National Merit Siemens Scholarship. He plans to study industrical engineering.

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And REGISTER NOW for the Sidewalk Chalk Art Contest! Deadline to register is April 28.

Prizes valued up to $500!

For more information about Arts Fest and the Sidewalk Chalk Art Contest,

visit www.newportonthelevee.com CE-0000456977

or call 859-261-5770


SPORTS

A8

Community Journal

BRIEFLY

Track meet

The Batavia High School Athletic Department will host a health fair and elementary school track meet April 30, according to a school press release. Interested participants can attend Batavia High School from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. to gain information on blood pressure, health insurance, obesity, stress and exercise. Admission is $10 and $5 for those attending the elementary track and field meet. All kindergartners to sixthgraders who live in Brown or Clermont counties are invited to participate in the meet, which runs 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Participants must pay an entry fee of $5 to compete in three events. For spectators, admission is $5 for adults and $1 per child. Questions should be directed to Jason Strine at the Batavia High School Athletic Department. He may be contacted at Strine.Jason@gmail.com or 513-236-0523.

April 27, 2011

| YOUTH | Editor Melanie Laughman | mlaughman@communitypress.com | 248-7573 HIGH

SCHOOL

RECREATIONAL

By Scott Springer

sspringer@communitypress.com

Through most of April, the Glen Este High School softball team has been on a tear. With a mix of five seniors, five freshmen, a sophomore and junior, Tim Gregory's Trojans have been among the Fort Ancient Valley Conference leaders in nearly every category. Senior Kaylin Steinmetz leads the league in home runs and runs batted in and will take her talents to Northern Kentucky University next season. Fellow senior Kierstin Gregory is hitting well over .400, as is her freshman sister Kaylin Gregory and freshman teammate Bailey Miller. (Kierstin and Kaylin Gregory are coach Tim Gregory's daughters.) “This team has great chemistry,” Gregory said. “They all get along pretty good. These girls have really stepped up.”

The week at Glen Este

• In boys tennis, Glen Este beat Norwood 4-1, April 18. Mauricio Tostado beat Bradow 6-1, 6-3; Colin Couch beat Cole 6-0, 6-1; Kurt Cutshall and Ryan Stroup beat Garlock and Traw 6-0, 6-0; Thomas Moore and Josh Owens won by forfeit.

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The one that really stands out, due to the nature of the position, is the pitcher. Kelley Benhase is nails. On April 18, she threw her sixth career no-hitter, shutting down Milford with 13 strikeouts. “Out of all the pitchers I’ve had, she probably rates No. 1,” Gregory said. “She’s got a great rise ball, a great screwball and she throws the ball really hard. She’s got great natural movement on her ball.” The Milford win put Benhase at 10-0 with 124 strikeouts in 66 innings and an ERA of 0.42. Benhase recently answered the following questions during a break in practice. What steered you toward NKU to room with teammate Kaylin Stein metz? “They’ve won a few national championships, they’re pretty good. They have a good program. I used

to pitch for Chip Gregg (NKU assistant coach). We have a real good relationship, so it worked out.” How long have you been pitching? “Eight years. I used to be a catcher and then my Dad said, ‘You should try pitching.’ I just worked in the back yard with him all the time and it worked out really well.” You dominate girls. Do the guys think they can hit you? “This summer, me, my boyfriend and his best friend went over here on the field and I threw probably about 20 pitches. He claims that he hit it, but I say it was a change-up. I struck him out and I struck his friend out. He (boyfriend) hit again and he hit it up the middle. It was a change-up, but he’ll swear it was a fastball.” How hard do you throw? “I think my fastest has been 63 (miles per hour—throwing from 43 feet). One of the people I used to go

to for lessons said, ‘Work on the speed now, the accuracy will come later. Work on building up your arm speed before worrying about location.’” Are you good at other sports? “I’ve played basketball since fifth grade.” Can the Trojans make a run? “I think all of us would love winning a title. We have five freshmen that just came in and they’re ready to play. We have a sophomore and a junior that have been really helpful. And, we have five seniors and we want to go out with a bang.” Benhase is also one of five Trojans hitting above .400. She's been a Fort Ancient Valley Conference first-team selection her entire career and was the league athlete of the year her sophomore year. Benhase and Kaylin Steinmetz signed with the NKU Norse over the winter.

By Scott Springer sspringer@communitypress.com SCOTT SPRINGER/STAFF

Amelia sophomore pitcher Sammy Baynori walks off the field at Midland with Barons assistant coach Stu Conrad prior to Amelia’s game with Madeira April 14. Baynori is one of Amelia’s best pitchers and played varsity as a freshman a year ago. He also joined teammate Michael Seebohm on the Baron bowling team for coach Craig Mazzaro over the winter.

Trojans hang on

Peter Winegardner, pitcher for the Glen Este Trojans, hurls the ball plateward against Milford April 18. The Trojans went to 12-1 (10-0 FAVC) with the 7-6 win. Cory Goedde got the win in relief, with Ryan Fuller getting the save. Fuller also scored two runs and drove in one.

The week at Amelia

• In boys tennis, New Richmond beat McNicholas 5-0, April 18. New Richmond’s Martin beat Poole 6-3, 7-6; Raver beat Shaw 6-3, 6-2; Anderson beat Dill 6-2, 6-1; Manning and Lytle beat Tiettmeyer and Lancester 6-0, 6-4; Flood and Rydzewski beat Groh and Gula 6-2, 6-2. On April 19, New Richmond beat Amelia 3-2. New Richmond’s Anderson beat Nick Cardarelli 6-4, 4-6, 6-4. Doubles: Lytle-Manning beat Brennan Horine and Chris Lau 6-2, 6-0; Flood-Rydzewski beat Trent Wirth and Claire Schweinhart 6-3, 6-1. Amelia’s Azizbeck Ruziboev beat Martin 6-0, 6-0; Cameron Nelson beat Raver 6-2, 6-3. On April 21, New Richmond beat Bethel-Tate 4-1. New Richmond’s Martin beat Iding 6-1, 7-6; Anderson beat Adams 6-4, 1-6, 6-4; Manning and Lytle beat J. Houchin and Lang 6-1, 6-4; Flood and Rydzewski beat H. Houchin and Dickhus 6-4, 6-1.

E m a i l : c l e r m o n t @ c o m m u n i t y p r e s s . c o mm

Barons banging in a new conference

• The Mariemont boys tennis team beat Batavia 5-0, April 16. On April 18, Batavia beat Bethel-Tate 4-1. On April 20, Batavia beat East Clinton 4-1. • The Clermont Northeastern baseball team beat Batavia 6-2, April 18. Austin Lenhardt was 2-3 and scored a homerun for Batavia. On April 21, Batavia beat Georgetown 23-0 in five innings. Batavia’s Ryan Gormley was 2-3, hit two doubles and had three RBI. • In softball, CNE beat Batavia 5-2, April 18. Batavia’s Andi Otten had two RBI.

The week at New Richmond

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Glen Este’s Benhase has been dealing

The week at Batavia

• In softball, Amelia beat Georgetown 15-1 in five innings, April 18. Amelia’s Shelby Engle pitched 11 strikeouts, and was 4-4, scored two homeruns and had three RBI. On April 21, Amelia beat Norwood 11-0 in five innings. Amelia’s Faith Kaiser was 1-2, had an RBI and scored a run.

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Strange season for Lion baseball so far By Adam Turer eastsports@communitypress.com

NEW RICHMOND – It has been a strange season so far for the New Richmond High School baseball team. Through 10 games, the Lions are 4-6. The season started with optimism, including the opening of the program’s new baseball facility. Since then, it has been a season of highs and lows for the Lions. New Richmond has dropped three of its first four Southern Buckeye Academic Athletic Conference games, falling to last place in the SBAAC American Division. The three league losses were tough to stomach. The Lions lost one-run games to Clermont Northeastern and Western Brown and lost 12-9 to BethelTate, despite racking up 17 hits and outhitting the Tigers. “We’ve been right there,” head coach Brian Benzinger said. “A break here or there, a play here or there, and we win those games. It’s been kind of frustrating for everyone involved." Those breaks have largely gone the other team’s way, often with help from the Lions. Walks and errors have allowed opponents to defeat New Richmond despite being outhit by the Lions. The pitchers have

struggled to throw timely strikes. When they do, the support behind them has been less than perfect. “We are giving away too many free passes, either by walk or error,” Benzinger said. “We need to make plays on defense and limit our errors.” The Lions’ new home field features the area’s first turf infield. Playing on a different surface at home than on the road could be partly to blame for the Lions’ defensive lapses, but that does not excuse the breakdowns. “That was a concern going into the season. I think we get spoiled with our turf,” said Benzinger of the difference in infields. “But we’ve been walking batters and making throwing errors, and that has nothing to do with the playing surface." Four sophomores and a freshman start for New Richmond. Their youth is also not an excuse for the defensive miscues. Even the experienced upperclassmen have committed crucial errors this season. “It has been total team ineffectiveness on defense,” Benzinger said. “It has been very frustrating.” The pitching and defense are not responsible for every loss. There have been games in which the pitching kept the Lions within a run or two into the sixth inning,

and the offense failed to come through with timely hits. The Lions have yet to put together consecutive wins this season. The recent weather postponements have not helped New Richmond put any momentum together. April 22’s game against CNE was postponed with the teams tied at two in the bottom of the second inning. A doubleheader against Ripley scheduled for April 23 was canceled. “It’s been a really tough year weather-wise,” Benzinger said. “You play a game, you might have three days off. You have a good game and think you can really build on it, then you don’t get to play another game that week.” Despite their early-season struggles, the Lions are not throwing in the towel on the 2011 season. They are only 2.5 games behind American Division leader Western Brown. There are experienced leaders with conference championship experience who can lead the younger Lions through the stretch run of conference play. “It is weird to be sitting 1-3 in conference play with six games left and still feel like if we can get on a hot streak we can still at last tie for first,” Benzinger said. “If we start playing well, I think we can beat anybody in our league.”

AMELIA – Brad Koewler’s Amelia baseball Barons have the best of both worlds. They have an on-site field like most other schools. And, just down the road, they have access to one of the better facilities around. Being neighbors with American Modern Insurance Group, home of the Midland baseball fields has its upside. The Barons recently played on the finely kept field in the A.J. Cohen Memorial baseball tournament. “This is a remarkable tiein that we have here,” coach Koewler said. “Midland’s been very generous. They actually allow us to use their indoor facilities in the winter also.” Koewler hopes the access and experience pays off with Amelia as they play their first season in the Southern Buckeye Conference-American division. Early returns indicate it has. At press time, the Barons were already closing in on last year’s win total (five) and Koewler credits the league switch. “Competition-wise, yes,” Koewler said. “This year we’re edging out teams where last year we were falling short (in the FAVC). Switching to the SBAAC has definitely been beneficial to the baseball program and to all of our sports.” In Amelia’s case, they do have 10 seniors, but many key players are younger. Especially, in the pitching department. “Sophomore Sammy Baynori is my ace,” Koewler said. “Michael Seebohm is another sophomore (6-4, 230). We’re pretty blessed to have a lot of depth. Both were on varsity last year.” Baynori recently threw a five-inning perfect game, striking out 12 in an April 18 win over Georgetown 14-0. Both Baynori and Seebohm also participated on coach Craig Mazzaro’s winter bowling team and did rather well. Either way, it’s all about throwing strikes. What excites Koewler is thinking he still has a couple years after this season with Baynori and Seebohm. “To work with the same

SCOTT SPRINGER/STAFF

Amelia senior pitcher Cody Chase warms up in the bullpen April 14 before a game with Madeira. The 6-1, 210 pound Chase also plays first for coach Brad Koewler’s Barons. guys for that amount of time is only going to allow me to hone in on their skills and make them a better baseball player,” Koewler said. “We’re surprisingly deep in pitching.” In addition to the two sophomores, Trevor Simon is playing and pitching as a freshman and has been among Amelia’s leaders at the plate and mound. However, the Barons aren’t in a total youth movement. Koewler’s junior third baseman and senior second baseman have been productive with the “minus threes.” “Anthony Hunt is my cleanup hitter and was last year as well,” Koewler said. “My lead-off man Jordan Ellerhorst is swinging it very well. We’re all clicking which is very nice.” Koewler has tried to keep Amelia on their toes with a competitive non-conference schedule. The problem is, Mother Nature has caused a few “swings and misses” in scheduled games with Anderson and Turpin. The Barons did get a contest in with Cincinnati Hills League power Madeira during the Cohen tournament at Midland (losing 9-6). “It gave us a chance to see some people we wouldn’t normally see,” Koewler said. “It also gave me a chance to play some people that haven’t gotten league playing time. It’s just an overall good experience for the guys.” It’s experience he’d like to turn into wins as Amelia battles the likes of Western Brown, Clermont Northeastern and Goshen in the new league. The Barons have rematches with CNE (April 27) and Western Brown (May 2) ahead having already prevailed in the first games.


VIEWPOINTS

April 27, 2011

EDITORIALS

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LETTERS

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COLUMNS

Editor Theresa Herron | therron@communitypress.com | 248-7128

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CH@TROOM

Community Journal

Your Community Press newspaper serving Bethel, Chilo, Felicity, Franklin Township, Moscow, Neville, Tate Township, Washington Township E m a i l : c l e r m o n t @ c o m m u n i t y p r e s s . c o mm

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A9

JOURNAL

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Vote ‘no’ Batavia school levy

You probably received a flyer from the school district. The district says this levy will cost only 57 cents a day. But the aggregate of 57 cents is $1,656,000 annually. Since this is a continuous levy, you’ll pay forever. The district advises one reason they are requesting a levy is “delinquent taxes of $682,193 haven’t been paid by property owners … ” Perhaps one reason some property owners cannot pay is that taxes are too high. If this levy is passed, more property owners could be delinquent. The district touts zero increases in base salaries for teachers. They did not tell you about the bonuses paid in lump sum. Convenient omission? The district says “without this levy, they will struggle to balance the operating budget.” Struggle does not mean they can’t do it. We all struggle to balance the budget, but they get a $1,656,000 windfall to ease their struggle. The district says the last levy was intended for five years, has stretched to seven, but now they ask for a levy that will last a lifetime. Why? Vote “no” May 3. Tell this district that you want a sensible levy for a defined time period. Bob Baillie Batavia Township

‘Yes’ on Issue 4

The preschool program in the West Clermont school district is designed to provide support for young children with special needs in order to prepare them for kindergarten. When the children turn 5, we transition them into kindergarten, which can be a difficult time for them. Communication between the preschool team and kindergarten teachers is critical. Our preschool children need structure and routine. They need to know what is coming in advance. In the spring the preschool team, kindergarten teachers, administration and parents come together to create a plan for a smooth transition. Each child is matched with a kindergarten teacher who is a perfect fit to meet their individual needs. In years past, our children have made visits to their new classrooms to meet the teacher and to learn the classroom routines. This year there is so much uncertainty. Our preschoolers do not know who will be their teacher next year, what the classroom will look like, how many students will be in the room or if they will be riding the bus. Please, help our preschool children have a smooth transition into kindergarten and make their world a stable one by voting “yes” on Issue 4. Cathy Berchtold Batavia

A retiree’s point of view

I’m writing in reference to a couple of articles in the paper. “‘No’ vote could cost more.” Perhaps this is true, but the school board has many residents upset, especially the retired and unemployed. As a result of a “loophole,” my taxes increased $224 this year. District Treasurer Alana Cropper said: A 7.9-mill levy would cost the owner of a $150,000 home $363. On top of the loophole tax, $587 is a huge increase. I’ve had no increase since retiring in 1994. I’ve had a decrease since losing my full paid insur-

ance, which now costs $180. School board president Dan Krueger said: “We’re not trying to scare people, but we have to operate with the money we have.” I have to do the same with no chance of asking for an increase. Mr. Krueger and the school board, why don’t you apply your own words. I wonder how many on the school board are retirees and have learned to live on what they have? I don’t want to see any cuts, but the retired and unemployed have learned to do just that. Let us all, including the district, learn to live on what we have. B. Edward Boyd Amelia

Our children are our future

As a parent of four children who attend a West Clermont school, I am proud of the education they have received thus far. My children are being prepared to meet the challenges of college life and “real life.” The teachers and staff at the schools have been a positive influence on my children not just academically, but personally as well. I have always felt that the teachers and staff know who my children are and are looking out for my children’s best interests. West Clermont teachers and staff reinforce the positive character traits that I try to instill at home. Our children are our future. I am hopeful for a positive, strong and intelligent future. This can only happen if we vote “yes” for West Clermont. Melissa Cass Batavia

WC is a great place

As the mother of four children it is easy to understand why I will be voting in favor of the West Clermont school district (WCSD) levy on May 3. I am here to ask for the support from those of you in the community who do not have children enrolled in the WCSD. I understand in these extremely difficult economic times, many seem to be wanting to vote against a levy that would (slightly) increase your taxes. Just as most of us are feeling the pressure of the current economic crisis, so are our schools. Not only have their costs significantly increased, but so has the enrollment in these schools. Please understand, we will all feel the effect of a levy failure in some way; this will come through decreased quality of education, lower property values and an overall negative effect on our economy. We risk a generation of children who will no longer have the opportunities and experiences that will allow them to grow into the kind of adults that have helped to make our community great. Please vote “yes” on Issue 4 to keep West Clermont a great place to live. Heather Copenhaver Amelia

Only option is ‘yes’

When our family’s primary source of income was in jeopardy recently, we cut back our spending. Not the necessities, because we were lucky. Just the “extras.” The West Clermont school district administration has done the same thing: Cut back on the “extras.” Just like anyone else in that same position. Many of us are still there. I don’t envy the district administration for all the tough decisions they’ve had to make in the past

few years. But this levy marks a turning point. Now the district is faced with cutting programs and services that aren’t “extra.” If the levy fails and the proposed cuts are implemented, there will be immediate, obvious, negative repercussions that others have explained eloquently in these pages before me. Until the Ohio state government develops a method of funding schools that is constitutional, we are left with our current, admittedly flawed system. Please contact your state lawmakers and plead for changes in school funding so debating property tax increases becomes obsolete. But in the meantime, until changes are made at the state level, our only option is to vote “yes” on 4. Janet Cotner Pierce Township

Education for kids

Given all the events that have taken place recently at Clough Pike, I want to urge all the voters to support the upcoming levy. This levy isn’t about being upset with the administration, board of education or superintendents. It is about children. That is what I am about, your children, and that is what everyone needs to be about. You see if voters do not support the levy it will only impact the education of our kids. I say “yes” to our kids and I encourage everyone to do the same. Please vote for the levy on May 3. Pat Crahan Principal Clough Pike Elementary Union Township

Save excellence

As a parent of two students in the West Clermont school district, I urge you to vote Yes 4 West Clermont. Is it fair to penalize our students and teachers for the indiscretions of the decision-making adults on the school board? Our students are not the ones making the decisions about how our schools are being funded. If you are not happy with these decisions and people, then cast your no vote in November when it is time to elect new board of education members and state officials. The students and teachers in the West Clermont school district are working very hard to be successful as demonstrated by the Excellent with Distinction rating. Failure of this levy will create extensive obstacles for our students and teachers to overcome in order to continue the hard work and level of success that our community strives for. Excellent with Distinction is a rating bestowed to only a handful of district within the state of Ohio. In order to maintain this rating, we cannot afford to eliminate any additional teachers that are providing the knowledge base for our students. Failure of this levy will eliminate those teaching positions. Please vote “yes.” Michele Delaney Union Township

‘Yes’ for the levy

As a senior at Amelia High School, you would expect that I would not care about the levy considering that I’m graduating. The truth is, however, I do care about the opportunities that the underclassmen will have. If the levy fails, it will cut many things such as staff, high school busing, art and music in the elementary

schools, the gifted and talented program, sports and marching band. Extracurricular activities will become “pay-to-play.” These are some of the great programs at Amelia. They have taught me a lot about prioritizing my time, being a leader and building character. Without all the programs offered at Amelia, I think that school won’t be as enjoyable. I do not believe that making huge cuts is going to be beneficial. What will happen? Would you really want 40 or more kids in a classroom? Students will not learn in an environment that is out of hand and distracting. I will be voting “yes” for the levy. Even though there will be an increase in taxes, I would rather everyone else have the chance to experience the great opportunities and to be taught by some of the great educators in our high school. Mary Dusing Union Township

Save our schools

I am a senior at Amelia High School who has recently turned 18. I am excited to exercise my right to vote on May 3. I am voting “yes” for the West Clermont levy for many reasons. First, the K-12 students deserve busing, sports, music, art, gym, gifted/talented programs, drama, orchestra and classrooms with less than 40 students. Although I will be graduating next month, I have younger family members who will be affected by these potential cuts. I cannot imagine a high school without extracurricular activities. What will students do with their time after school? They will be unfocused, bored and possibly get into trouble. Not to mention, many scholarship opportunities would be lost if these things were cut. Property taxes might go up, but it’s less than a dollar a day. A passing levy will give our community a brighter future. It will offer the students of West Clermont the education they deserve. Please go and vote “yes” on May 3 to save our schools. I know my high school experience wouldn’t have been the same without the great opportunities I was given. Morgan Eberhard Amelia

Support West Clermont

Economically speaking, would a $200 tax increase per $100,000 home be excessive if a middle or high school student … A. Who lived within a two-mile radius of the school where the only option to get to school would be carpooling or walking on dark early morning streets. Think: Safety and gas prices. B. Who wanted to play a sport, be part of the band, choir, drama club or any other extracurricular activity which would require a fee around $500 each. Think: Social benefits lost for a well-rounded student. These would be benefits lost without your support for West Clermont schools on May 3. Mary Flood Pierce Township

Specials are special

When someone wants to speak to me about our current levy it just makes me sick. I currently have two children who attend Clough Pike Elementary. As it stands, next fall, my children will not have any gym or library teachers. Their home room teacher will be teaching them, if the levy fails this May. In August, my children

A publication of

CLERMONT

Community Journal Editor . .Theresa L. Herron therron@communitypress.com . . . . . . . .248-7128

will walk into school with no specials which includes art, music, library and gym. No after school actives. Really? I ask myself this question: Why would they want to go to school then? Then I asked my children this question “What do you think about losing your specials next year?” Their answers were... “We would be bored and I need art, it is part of my life”. The other child said “I like my specials.” Even though I do not agree with the changes, I know they are going to happen like it or not. But I choose to live in Union Township and to send my children to West Clermont schools. I love my home and my children’s school. So I ask you to make a list of pros and cons for the school levy. Annie Galloway Batavia

Vote for levy

Consider our investment in this community. Why have we chosen to live here? We have outstanding services provided by the county and township. There was no question our home had to be in this school district. West Clermont schools, along with Clermont County Educational Services, has been blessed with individuals who create an amazing team. My daughter is a student at Glen Este High School. Because of their commitment to all children and collaboration of county and school services, she is thriving. Our district is unique in areas many residents never see. The balance of teachers, interpreters, therapists, teaching assistants, coaches and administrators that exist in our district provide the tools and support needed to prepare students for the future. We live in a district rated “Excellent with Distinction.” We all should understand the significance of this rating. If we do not continue to provide this level of education, including music, arts, sports and positive social experiences, we will reap what we have sown. Our district administrators have made significant budget cuts to reduce expenses. They have done their due diligence. As financially painful as this is, we must pass Issue 4. Our district and our community deserve nothing less. Barbara L. Greco Union Township

Support their ballot issue

I have been privileged to serve as an educator in West Clermont schools for almost 30 years and have worked through a few budget crises and levy campaigns. As a homeowner and educator I can understand the concerns of good people on both sides of the current issue. Although I do not live in the district, I know that a tax levy will also be needed in my home district next year. I will vote for that levy and encourage West Clermont voters to support their ballot issue because the tangible inconvenience – higher property tax – is trumped by much greater intangible benefits – property values, excellent schools that graduate productive citizens, and a positive sense of community. Mike Hall Counselor Glen Este High School Anderson Township

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A10

Community Journal

April 27, 2011

Viewpoints LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

From A9

Strong school districts

Not only am I proud to be a teacher in the West Clermont school district, I am also happy to be a community member and a parent of two Amelia High School students. It saddens me to think of what our schools will look like, due to the state cuts, if this very necessary levy does not pass. As a teacher, I will see my past and present students and their families suffering from the cuts to the academic choices that are offered, athletic programs, fine arts and busing. As a parent, I will feel the bite of the “pay to play” that will be imposed on sports, as well as the fine arts cuts. As a community member, I will feel the financial loss as my home loses value. Families choose communities that offer strong school districts, not communities that fail to support their schools. I will be voting “yes” on May 3. Vikki Henshey Pierce Township

Supporting the levy

To concerned West Clermont residents, I am writing in support of West Clermont schools. Why is it important to vote yes? To maintain the instructional programs that have made our schools excellent. Keep sports programs available for all students. Maintain transportation for all students, including parochial and private schools. Voting “yes” will keep local control of our educational process. It is about maintaining property values in our community. That is why I am supporting the levy for West Clermont schools. Patty Howes Union Township

An excellent education

My name is Julie Jeffcott, I am a seventh-grade science teacher at Glen Este Middle School. My triplet sons are receiving an excellent education from Clough Pike Elementary. I have worked in West Clermont for a total of eight years. In this time I have watched and been a part of the growth and transformation of our West Clermont community. The steady rise in wealth and knowledge of this district is due to the phenomenal assets we have in our schools, its teachers. If you are looking for a crown jewel in the future of our community it has to be in the growth and education of the next generation. I understand the economic sacrifice and demands that are put on me and the rest of the residents of Clermont County, however, to invest now is to secure the prosperity of our community for the future. So I am willing to sacrifice a little now for the greater benefit of every child and resident in the future. I am asking you to join me in the same sacrifice and keep our community strong for years to come. Julie Jeffcott Union Township

Balanced education

As Amelia Elementary School’s art teacher, this

past art show evoked mixed emotions. Pride is always present when showcasing my student’s artwork, but melancholy seeped through as thoughts of the impending loss of our art program surfaced throughout the weekend. Creativity has become a minor standard in our society. I fear for a generation of robots who can regurgitate facts. Children will not be encouraged to think creatively or problem solve. Gifted programs also encourage creative and critical thinking will also be eliminated if the levy fails. The arts have been proven to enhance academic excellence and integrate different subject matter such as mathematics, social studies and science. The arts also teach processes and techniques. Our children live in an urgent society where fast food, instant messaging, texting, interactive Internet are expected. Our children will never develop patience. Art processes encourage several steps where one step progresses to build upon another and another to create a product. Our children deserve a well rounded, balanced education so please keep the cultural arts in our schools. Cheryl Koehler Amelia

hear news of Matt. That sense of community is evident every time one attends any concert, sporting event or awards assembly where student success is on display and celebrated. I encourage your support of this school levy. The district has cut costs consistently. Since the district currently operates significantly below state average in per pupil costs, there is simply little left to cut. I am relying on the strong sense of community that helped influence us to move here, to rally together in this time of need and support our kids. Nate Lynch Union Township

Students support levy, too

Reform yes, levies no

I am a proud graduating senior from Glen Este High School this year. The excellent education and athletic programs provided by the West Clermont school district enabled me to receive an academic/athletic scholarship to college. I am certain the awesome teachers and overall high school experience played a vital role in my achievements. We (students) are often overlooked when it comes to an opinion about our own future. Since being a student has been my primary job for the last 12 years, I feel qualified to fight for my school and the community. If it were not for certain teachers and administration being there on a daily basis, pushing us to be our best, we would not amount to much of anything. Of course, school as well as life is what you make it, but we need a chance to make it. An excellent school system is necessary to keep the community prosperous. Education is how we are able to advance in life and ultimately give back. I know I am only a “child” in some peoples eyes, but my vote does count. Please vote “yes” May 3. Give every student the same excellent opportunities for years to come. Lakin Louiso Union Township

Support our kids

I initially came to West Clermont due to employment as a teacher and coach at Glen Este High School, and my wife and I believed in this school system enough to establish residence here. This decision was made due to a unique sense of community that the students and parents share. This sense of community was evident recently in the response to the passing of a former GEHS student this fall. That sense of community was evident 8 years ago, in supporting the Maupins as they waited to

‘No’ vote will be

Many ideas and opinions have been voiced concerning whether to vote for or against the West Clermont levy. When all is said and done, it seems to come down to the following: A “no” vote will affect everyone somehow in a negative way. A “yes” vote at least gives the children better opportunities for a quality education. Please show your support. Dave and Lynn Mack Batavia

“It’s for the children.” No. It’s for the teachers and staff. Let’s be truthful. The truth is: Academic performance is more closely linked with a child’s household economic well-being, not a school’s. The truth is: Property taxes are rising faster than household incomes, threatening the economic survival of homeowners, their families and the businesses that employ them. The truth is: Funding schools through property taxes is economically unsustainable. For school funding reform to succeed, levies must fail. Support school funding reform; vote “no” on all school levies. Jeff Mancini Union Township

Situation is challenging

As a parent of former West Clermont graduates, I can speak first-hand about the education they received while attending the West Clermont schools. My children were exposed to the arts and music programs and the many extracurricular activities. They received all the things needed to help them become successful individuals. I care about the West Clermont students. I want them to receive the same high quality education that my children received. As a substitute teacher I can also speak first-hand about the outstanding teachers, administrators and support staff. I care about the teachers. Cuts have already been made, and if the levy doesn’t pass, more cuts will be necessary. The remaining teachers will have the very difficult task of teaching larger classes of students. The situation is challenging now and it will only get worse. On May 3 the West Clermont school district will be on the ballot. I have watched as the district has continually cut people and programs. Now, anymore cuts will completely devas-

tate the district that has received the highest state rating – “Excellent with Distinction.” I encourage everyone to join me on May 3 and vote for the levy! Sandi Martin Union Township

Will it ever end

Although I do not pay school taxes to the West Clermont school district, I live in Pierce Township and stay current on the happenings in our community. I am so exhausted hearing the school district and its employees cry poor mouth. I would hope the parents of attending students would also be debilitated of being taxed to death. Don’t get me wrong. I am all for good education and students having the opportunity to participate in sports and extracurricular activities, but not again at the expense of your homeowners and small businesses. As for the recommended “pay-to-play,” all taxpayers so eager to vote “yes” should just sponsor an athlete instead of dipping again into everyone else’s pocket … it is considered a donation which is tax deductible. I believe student athletes also participate in “Select” sports and pay fees much larger than recommended by WCSD. Take a minute to look around your community, abandoned houses, vacant buildings, unemployment, trash, crime, heroin use, the number of children in foster care, all due to the poor economy. Bottom line is the more money we have in our wallets, the more money we will spend which will help boost the economy. Vickie Mazzaro Pierce Township

Entitlement programs

There’s a major problem with your analogy, Ms. Kober: The Taliban doesn’t allow for slow deaths. If the Republicans are the only people who want to cut entitlement programs, then the Democrats have a big problem; they can’t do math. Fifty years ago, there were 16 workers for every retiree; now it is 3 to 1. Entitlement programs account for more than 50 percent of all federal spending. Almost half of all U.S. households pay no income taxes. Both parties ran up the national debt to 14 trillion; which breaks down to $47,000 for each man, woman and child. What does this mean? We are in crisis mode. We have no money. We have no jobs. Our country is aging. I don’t care if you are Republican, Democrat, Independent or Tea Party, you will not like the cuts that are coming. Judy Merz Union Township

Levy is not needed

Do not let the West Clermont school board continue to dupe you. Last February they provided themselves with $3.9 million a year to spend, without taxpayer say so. Now they are looking for more. In 2013, they will do the same thing. Do not allow this board to pick your pocket. They have made some cost cuts over the past few years, but these cuts were mainly through attrition,

meaning they didn’t replace people who retired or quit, meaning they didn’t need the positions in the first place, blatantly wasting your tax dollars. It’s time for this school board to make expenses fit income. Taxpayers do this in their households, and businesses and governments do it all the time. Why let the school board off the hook? They have yet to cut sufficient non-teaching high level administrative positions, many of which are redundant across the school. Force this school board to cut the fat out of the district and make ends meet. They do not have to cut busing nor incorporate pay-for-play, nor do they need more tax dollars. A “no” vote will force cost cutting in those “sacred arenas” that they have let untouched. Garry R. McGee Amelia

Music is important

The weekend of April 15-16, the students involved in the West Clermont Vocal Music program entertained packed houses. They sang and danced and poured out their souls. As producer of the vocal music program, I have had appreciative individuals email me or stop me after By Request has delighted them with a song. The response is always the same, “how inspiring these young, talented people are and how they feel hopeful for the future just listening to them sing.” Music is a vital part of everyday life. It comforts, excites, soothes and is there when words leave off. I cannot imagine a school without music. Where did you learn the National Anthem? I bet it was at school in music class. If you have ever stood on a riser with a chorus and sang, or marched in the band at half-time, or held any instrument in the school concert, you know the impact of music on your education. Vote for the West Clermont levy. Vickie McKee Union Township

Support WC levy

There is an urgent need to rally support for the upcoming West Clermont school levy. A local property owner for 11 years, I have been a strong supporter of all public services (police/fire/elder care), including local school levies. On a dollar spent per child basis, our district has long been rated by outside agencies as an excellent value when compared to other school districts both within the state of Ohio. That achievement reflects the value-focus of our school board members while spending our hardearned dollars. Recognize that we are at a critical juncture with the health of our school system – a decision to not invest in education this election day will result in a drop in the quality of education today and the local standard of living tomorrow. Therefore, I urgently advocate investment in the children who are destined to be our future guardians, whether we support their education or not, ensuring that the next generation will be brighter, live longer, and have more opportunities than we ourselves face

today. As their elders, we are responsible to vote for the school levy and the promise of a secure future. Kathleen O’Halloran Batavia

Have a positive impact

Please consider having a positive impact on kids and vote for Issue 4. It is so disheartening to think that one of the most important things to the present as well as our future, our children, would not be supported. The support in the past has made a difference. The district has been excellent and excellent with distinction. That is not an easy achievement. This has been accomplished through many good decisions, hard working teachers and capable students. Your support in the past has moved the district in a positive direction from where it was. Please don’t let it turn back. We can’t allow our schools to go backwards. Glen Este teachers, coaches, administrators and students do a lot with fugal funds as it is. We can’t expect to continue to get the same standard of results with fewer funds. When schools are not strong, it impacts the community. Don’t we want a community that we are proud to live in? Don’t we want to say we have a positive impact? Be part of that positive impact and vote “yes” for our children and our community. Joni Overcast Union Township

National Day of Prayer

Thursday, May 5, at noon Clermont County will observe National Day of Prayer at the steps of our courthouse in Batavia. Throughout history, from our founding fathers to the present day, prayer has played a vital role in shaping our nation and people. President Abraham Lincoln’s March 30,1863, proclamation sums up our need to return to reliance on God and prayer. “We have been the recipients of the choicest bounties of Heaven. We have been preserved, these many years, in peace and prosperity. We have grown in numbers, wealth and power, as no other nation has ever grown. But we have forgotten God ... Intoxicated with unbroken success, we have become too self-sufficient to feel the necessity of redeeming and preserving grace, too proud to pray to the God that made us.” Please join us on the steps of the courthouse as we celebrate all of God’s blessings and honor our country, military, county, communities’ hometown heroes (police, fire, EMS) and our children. At 7 p.m. that evening there will be a prayer walk at the Veteran’s Park in Union Township. An important question to ask yourself, “Is prayer your steering wheel or your spare tire?” by Corrie Ten Boom. God bless. Bob Proud Honorary chair Clermont County National Day of Prayer Batavia Township

‘Yes’ for Issue 4

No matter your opinion on the facts surrounding Issue 4, I think most people

Letters | Continued A11


Viewpoints

9,250 children need your help If we saw that headline on the evening news or as the lead story on the front page of our newspaper, we would demand to know, what is going on, what could we do to help? Here is what you can do to help the children. Who are the children? The children are the 9,250 children of the West Clermont Local School District. Why do they need your help? Due to real cuts in revenue from the state of Ohio over the past five years, West Clermont is in a very serious financial crisis. The projected cuts, if the May 3 levy should fail, will drastically impact the education of our children, lead to fiscal emergency and the loss of local control of our schools. The successful passage of the May 3 levy will allow West Clermont to continue this quality pub-

lic education for our children, keep local control and restore our fiscal strength. I invite you to come and spend a day in one of our Daniel schools. What you Krueger would see and hear Community would amaze you: The high quality of Press guest our children and columnist our amazing staff. So who would you meet as you visit West Clermont? You might meet our night custodial staff who clean 12 buildings. Our head custodians and food service people, who arrive hours before the children to make sure the buildings are ready and to start food preparation. Did you know that in addition to lunch, we

serve breakfast to many students? Our bus drivers and other support people make sure our children arrive and return safely home every day, and also get the extra help they need. Every school has the school secretary, who we all know is the glue that holds each building together. Our building principals are the educational leaders, challenged with: Student progress, Ohio testing and a host of other state mandates. We could not operate our schools without the many parent and community volunteers who everyday give of their time to help. A big “thank you” to each community volunteer. Finally, you would meet our professional teaching staff. The West Clermont schools has a dedicated and caring group of teachers, who every day gives to your children the joy of learning. I challenge anyone to

Community Journal

April 27, 2011

A11

About letters & columns We welcome your comments on editorials, columns, stories or other topics. Include your name, address, cell and home phone numbers so we may verify your letter or guest column. Letters may be no more than 200 words and columns must be 400 to 500 words. Please include a color headshot with guest columns. All submissions will be edited for length, accuracy and clarity. spend a day with one of our outstanding teachers and not be amazed at what they do. Look into the eyes of our children, as their professional teacher guides them through the many challenges of the lesson, and helps them develop their life-long desire for learning. This life-long desire for learning is a critical part of today’s 21st Century Learning Skills that all children need and must develop. How can we not challenge and

Deadline is noon Friday. E-mail: clermont@community press.com. Fax: 248-1938. U.S. mail: The Community Journal, 394 Wards Corner Road, Suite 170, Loveland, OH 45140. Letters, columns and articles submitted to The Community Journal may be published or distributed in print, electronic or other forms. support the dreams of this generation? How can we hold hostage the education of a generation of children because our legislature in Columbus will not fix the funding problem? Vote “yes” for our children. Vote “yes” for their future, as well as for our future. Together we can. Daniel W. Krueger is the president of the West Clermont Local School District Board of Education. He lives in Batavia Township.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR From A10 would agree we all desire a strong community that builds into kids and teaches them how to make a difference in the world in their own way. I’m surprised to hear the reasons people are giving for not voting “yes” on Issue 4 for West Clermont schools. Yes, you could choose to just be discouraged and accept that we are in an economic crisis and the state minimum is simply the best we can do for our kids. Complacency is a dangerous thing to teach a child. Yes, you could choose to vote “no” simply because you don’t trust how our district’s finances are being handled. Make sure you have all the facts. Get involved and be informed before you make a decision that will impact our kids. I want my children to remember when the people around them came together to invest in their futures. I want them to realize that people believe in them. I want them to grow up knowing that when a community comes together in mission and spirit, a difference can be made. Join me and vote “yes” for Issue 4. Paula Rakestraw Amelia

Seniors for voting ‘no’

They say, “Only $20 a month per $100,000.” How many homes are valued at $100,000 or less in Union Township? Seniors do not have the privilege of negotiating an increase in their monthly income. The state is broke, the government is broke and so are seniors. It’s a big deal for those who have to budget for additional costs. On a fixed income, seniors must budget $20-plus for auto and house insurance, telephone, gas/electric, water, lawn service, garbage pickup, cable/dish, Internet, medicine, Depends, batteries for hearing aids, postage stamps, four gallons of gas at $5 a gallon, food, haircuts, setting thermostat at 60 instead of 65 in winter, not running the air conditioner in summer, and it can go on and on. How can you sleep at night knowing that your neighbors are hanging by a spider thread trying to hold onto their homes and $20plus can break that web and throw them into foreclosure? It is up to you “seniors.” Vote “no” or don’t complain. Can’t get to the precinct? Car pool and go to Batavia early and vote at

the board of elections on an absentee ballot. MJ Reynolds Union Township

‘Yes’ for the levy

As a parent in West Clermont, I urge you to vote yes for the levy on May 3. In many of the negative letters to the editor, people talk about not having schoolaged children, and some talk about having children not involved in extra-curricular activities. If you are in that situation, the impact of this levy not passing will still affect you. This isn’t just about schools; it’s about our community as a whole. What will children do after school with nothing to do? Not having extra-curricular activities potentially puts young people at risk for trouble. My two daughters play soccer and volleyball for Amelia High School, and I’ve seen what a positive impact this has made for both of them. They are disciplined, conscious of their actions and set high goals for themselves. It gives me comfort to know that there are opportunities for them to get involved with school activities. Having a school district with the title “Excellent with Distinction” is an honor that speaks volumes about our school and community. Vote “yes” on May 3 to maintain this honor. Wendy Robb Amelia

Support Issue 4

Ten years ago I took a job in West Clermont because the principal told me that this was a district that believes in doing what is best for kids. Six years ago I bought a house in the district because I wanted to raise a family in a community that believes in doing what is best for kids. One year from now I will be enrolling my child in West Clermont schools because the teachers in this district truly believe in doing what is best for kids. No matter what side of the fence you are on the bottom line is we have a responsibility to give our children every educational advantage possible. The teachers in this district are amazing. I am proud to say that I work with a group of people that are willing to go above and beyond each and every day to do what is best for kids. So on May 3, I urge you to go out and do what is best for the kids in our community and vote in support of Issue 4.

Kelly Taylor Union Township

Classes students love

West Clermont has placed a 7.9-mill emergency levy on the May 3 ballot. The levy failing could cut everything students love about school: Gym, art, music, journalism, Spanish, yearbook and even health. What will motivate students to attend school every day if what they love about school no longer exists? I have taken many art classes along with my two years in journalism. Without those classes my high school career would have been boring. I met some really great friends along the way, friends that I probably would not have without those classes. It saddens me to know that some of my friends and future students of Amelia High School might not have all the class opportunities I was given. School is very important to people in every community. With the state cutting funds and the economy, districts must find ways to provide an outstanding education. They must depend on the community. If the levy in May does not pass, this could jeopardize the future for West Clermont. Checking “yes” on the ballot could be the start of a change not only for the community, but for the state of Ohio. Megan Vinson Amelia

Only two options

The last several years delivered difficult economic times for our community (and our nation) and many questionable financial policies by our state and national governments. Our legislature has left each community to fend for itself. This puts the property owners in West Clermont in a tough spot. We have two unpleasant options: Vote to raise our taxes by a significant amount and maintain something of a status quo for our “Excellent with Distinction” school district. Or vote not to raise taxes and see unavoidable cuts that will drastically change our district and housing values for years. As parents of two children just getting started in school and parent of a 2009 graduate of WeCIPA, we believe the best of the two choices (remember there are only two options, no matter how much we would like a third) is to vote “yes.” We want our youngest daughters to have the tremendous opportunities that our 2009

graduate had that enable her to now be excelling at the top-rated engineering university in America. As teachers, we want students to be able to get to school safely, participate in activities that provide lifelong lessons, and encounter the best of academic variety and challenges. Brian and Courtney Wallace Union Township

Despite economy

I know that the economy is bad. I know that making ends meet can be hard. I haven’t been able to work since August due to health reasons. I receive no benefits. I also know that even through all the trials and difficulties in life, we can’t afford to say no to the children of West Clermont. We can’t say no to their education. They deserve good educational resources and good teachers to encourage them and help them learn. They deserve a good education so they can be great leaders of our community and the world in the future. The children of West Clermont are counting on us to give them that education. I can’t say no to the children of West Clermont. I must vote “yes.” It is too important. I encourage you to please vote “yes” for West Clermont schools. Vicki Watkins Union Township

Fiscal emergency?

I take pride in being a Clermont County citizen despite the stigma we tend to receive. I was born here, I work here. I am raising my family here. I am concerned for our future as both county and district and I waiver with this current levy. Trust me, I don’t want my taxes raised again. The state needs to come up with other alternatives, but for right now this is all we have. The state pushed the decision to the districts, which leads us to feud within our Clermont County bubble. However, it’s not only our district struggling; it appears to be statewide, which should tell our representatives something. We can’t afford to be in fiscal emergency like Little Miami. The long-term effects will have businesses and community members leaving and creating a larger financial crisis, especially with property values. We have to give our kids an edge in the struggling economy. If we don’t sup-

port them in the school environment today, we will be supporting them with government assistance in the future. Please vote for the levy and please contact your representative about restructuring the funding for our schools so it works out for all of us. Trent Davis Pierce Township

Dear Clermont voters

I’m writing this letter to beg you to consider the children when you vote for the levy before us. There are plenty of issues that we can debate but really it just comes down to the children. Let’s keep building on the foundation that we started for our children that they are able to achieve their maximum potential. Our kids are very proud of “Excellent with Distinction.” I agree that there is an issue with school funding across the state of Ohio and we need to address that quickly but let’s not confuse the issues: (1) Our children’s foundation for their education (2) state government funding for schools. We can send a message to our leaders that we expect them to fix the school funding with votes but let’s not use our children’s future as a bargaining chip. Della Douglas Withamsville

To fellow tax haters

Even though I work in the school district, I was against this levy, that is until I discovered the facts. I thought, “I cannot afford any more taxes, fine, let the state take over and try to run our district on the money they are willing to give us, then they’ll see it is impossible and change their funding system. That will force the state to do what they have been ordered to do by the courts.” Then I was informed of reality. The state will force new taxes on us whether we vote for them or not, and until this happens, they will pay for the expenses of our school district by loaning us money that we will have to pay back with interest. Districts that have already been taken over by the state have had taxes forced on them by the state that are larger than the levy they originally proposed. We will be paying higher taxes either way. Unfortunately, there’s no way to force the state to obey a court order. Sherrie Sorterup Batavia

Please support Issue 4

I have watched as the state of Ohio has continued to cut funding to our school district. I have also watched West Clermont spend $1,736 less per child than the state average, all the while receiving the highest rating on the state report card – Excellent with Distinction – and watch our graduation rate increase. Issue 4 is all about our kids. It is about providing an educational experience that will help secure their futures and ours. Without the additional revenue that Issue 4 will provide our school district will suffer, but also property owners will also feel the lose. Who will want to buy a home in a district where there is limited busing, no art or music, no extra-curricular activities, and no gifted and talented programs and have to pay approximately $500 per sport per child? Do the right thing on May 3. Join me and support our kids. Vote for Issue 4. George Sturgeon Union Township

Times are tough

I have been a lifelong resident of the West Clermont school district. I have seen many changes take place over the years. I became a teacher to instill the love of learning in my students that my teachers had instilled in me. Our district is rated “Excellent with Distinction.” With that said, our schools have a lot to offer to the community. Our schools and students offer hope to endless possibilities. Our nation was founded on the principles of education. Many founding fathers believed that education was essential for the people to govern themselves. Thomas Jefferson once said, “to penetrate and dissipate these clouds of darkness, the general mind must be strengthened by education.” Education continues to be an integral, essential part of our future. I know times are tough on everyone. In a time when many people are questioning everything that is going on around them, people wonder about the importance and value of Issue 4. When you vote “yes” on Issue 4, you vote “yes” to our children’s future. There is an old Chinese proverb, “learning is like rowing upstream: Not to advance is to drop back.” Let’s not drop back, vote “yes” on Issue 4. Cheryl Stevens Amelia


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Community Journal

April 27, 2011

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Your Community Press newspaper serving Bethel, Chilo, Felicity, Franklin Township, Moscow, Neville, Tate Township, Washington Township E m a i l : c l e r m o n t @ c o m m u n i t y p r e s s . c o mm

JOURNAL

We d n e s d a y, A p r i l 2 7 , 2 0 1 1

KELLIE GEIST-MAY/STAFF

The United Way Eastern Area handed out four awards and five honorable mention certificates during the annual volunteer recognition breakfast Thursday, April 14. Front row, from left are: FINE representatives Pam Johnson and Vicki Griffith; 4C for Children representative Patty Stefanik; Clermont County Community Service Center’s Billie Kuntz; and Brown County Educational Service Center Recreation Program representative Kathy Bright. Back row, from left are: United Way Eastern Area Director Deb Gordon; Clermont Senior Services Chair Tom Rocklin; FINE’s Sue McKinley; 4C for Children’s Kim Ginn; Clermont County Community Service Center’s Leann Townes and Dayne Michael; Darci Newman and Brenda Reed of the Brown County Educational Service Center Recreation Program.

KELLIE GEIST-MAY/STAFF

TQL representative and incoming United Way Action Committee Chair George Rewick chats with United Way Eastern Area Director Debra Gordon and Clermont County Chamber of Commerce President and CEO Matt Van Sant at the United Way Eastern Area Volunteer Recognition Breakfast Thursday, April 14.

United Way Eastern Area recognizes volunteer efforts Community Press Staff Report

The United Way Eastern Area held its annual Volunteer Recognition Breakfast April 14. During the event, four groups were given awards and five groups were given honorable mentions. The awards are as follows: • Resources Award: Lisa Harris, L-3 Fuzing & Ordnance Systems • Exemplary Service Award: Brown County Educational Service Center Recreation Program • Vision Award: 4C for Children • Marty MacVeigh Leadership Award: Felicity Initiative for Neighborhood Excellence The honorable mentions went to the Hobart Corp., Total Quality Logistics, Matt Wagner of William Bick Primary School, Child Focus and the Clermont Community Services Youth Services.

KELLIE GEIST-MAY/STAFF

KELLIE GEIST-MAY/STAFF

Milford-Miami Township Chamber of Commerce Chair and National Bank and Trust representative Darrell Baumann enjoys breakfast with coworkers Sandy Wesley and Jim Wolary, right. The United Way Eastern Area held its annual volunteer recognition breakfast Thursday, April 14.

United Way of Greater Cincinnati Board of Directors Chair Michael Graham gave the introductions at the United Way Eastern Area Volunteer Recognition Breakfast Thursday, April 14.

KELLIE GEIST-MAY/STAFF

Lisa Harris, who could not be at the United Way Eastern Area Volunteer Recognition Breakfast Thursday, April 14, was given the Resources Award for her efforts in making significant contributions to the Eastern Area.

KELLIE GEIST-MAY/STAFF

Leann Townes, left, and Billie Kuntz were recognized for their youth services efforts with the Clermont County Community Services Center at the United Way Eastern Area Volunteer Recognition Breakfast Thursday, April 14.

KELLIE GEIST-MAY/STAFF

Lori York of American Modern Insurance checks in at the United Way Eastern Area Volunteer Recognition Breakfast Thursday, April 14, at Receptions East.

KELLIE GEIST-MAY/STAFF

United Way Eastern Area Action Council Chair Mark Heitkamp presents the Marty MacVeigh Award to members of the Felicity Initiative for Neighborhood Excellence. From left are: Sara Dreier of U.S. Rep. Jean Schmidt’s office, Heitkamp, Clermont County Commissioner Ed Humphrey and FINE representatives Vicki Griffith, Pam Johnson and Sue McKinley.

KELLIE GEIST-MAY/STAFF

The United Way Eastern Area Vision Award was presented to 4C for Children for demonstrating vision and leadership in the development, implementation and process improvement of a systematic change plan that aligns with United Way’s Agenda for Community Impact. From left are: Sara Dreier of U.S. Rep. Jean Schmidt’s office, Clermont County Commissioner Ed Humphrey, and 4C for Children representatives Kim Ginn and Patty Stefanik.


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Community Journal

April 27, 2011

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD T H U R S D A Y, A P R I L 2 8

ART EXHIBITS

Charley Harper Art Show, 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m., River Hills Christian Church, 6300 Price Road, Art exhibit and sale featuring works by the late artist. Free. Presented by Row House Gallery. 831-7230; www.rowhouse.com. Loveland. Open Spaces, 7:30 a.m.-7 p.m., UC Clermont Campus, 4200 Clermont College Drive, Park National Bank Art Gallery. Works by Katie Vota. Weaved and dyed pieces are custom hung and draped from the ceiling, walls and floor of each individual site and can change in form and impact on the viewer. Free. Presented by UC Clermont College. Through April 29. 732-5332. Batavia.

BUSINESS MEETINGS

Economic Forecast Breakfast, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Holiday Inn Eastgate, 4501 Eastgate Blvd., Brian Beaulieu, economist and CEO of the Institute for Trend Research, returns to Clermont County to examine what the trend probabilities are through 2012 for the nation and the local area. $75, $40 chamber members. Reservations required. Presented by Clermont Chamber of Commerce. 5765000; www.clermontchamber.com. Union Township.

EDUCATION

Waiting for Superman, 7 p.m., Holiday Inn Eastgate, 4501 Eastgate Blvd., Showing of documentary film on the troubled state of the American public school system, kids who are trapped in it and those who are finding creative ways to make changes for the better to save a failing system. Free. Presented by Clermont County Tea Party. 752-4400; www.clermontteaparty.org. Union Township.

HEALTH / WELLNESS

Mobile Mammography Unit, 7 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Kroger Mulberry, 1093 Ohio 28, Fifteen-minute screenings. Cost varies per insurance plan. Financial assistance available for qualified applicants. Appointment required. Presented by Jewish Hospital. 6863300. Mulberry. Health Screenings, 10 a.m.-noon, Homan Chiropractic Eastgate, 4380 Glen Este-Withamsville Road, Brief health questionnaire, blood pressure, height, weight, pulse and spinal/postural evaluation. Free. 753-6325. Union Township.

LITERARY - LIBRARIES

Creative Writing Group, 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Williamsburg Branch Library, 594 Main St., Inspire and offer suggestions. Ages 13 and up. 724-1070. Williamsburg.

FESTIVALS

Grassy Run Heritage Rendezvous, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., Williamsburg Community Park, 150 E. Main St., Outdoor living history event. Celebrating years of 1750-1840. Tours of outdoor living history encampment and interacting with historically dressed participants. Children’s hands-on area, historians, period music and traders. $5, $3 seniors, $2 ages 6-14, free ages 5 and under. Presented by Grassy Run Historical Arts Committee. 7341119; www.grassyrun.org. Williamsburg.

FOOD & DRINK

Fish Fry, 6-7:30 p.m., Dennis Johnson VFW Post 6562, 1596 Ohio 131, Fish sandwiches, chicken fingers or six-piece shrimp dinner. Includes cole slaw and French fries. Carryout available. $6 and up. Presented by Ladies Auxiliary Dennis Johnson VFW Post 6562. Through Dec. 30. 575-2102. Milford.

GARDEN CLUBS

Ohio Association Garden Clubs Region 4 Spring Meeting, 9:30 a.m., Receptions Banquet and Conference Center Loveland, 10681 Loveland Madeira Road, Registration and sales tables, 8:30 a.m. Morning program: “Ikebana” by Brenda Baird, includes the history and culture of Japanese fresh floral design. Afternoon program: “English Gardens” by Faye McHaffey. Includes lunch. $20. Registration required by Oct. 13. Presented by Ohio Association of Garden Clubs Region 4. 488-4969; www.oagc.org. Loveland.

LITERARY - LIBRARIES

Board Game Day, 2-4 p.m., Bethel Branch Library, 611 W. Plane St., Scrabble and variety of board games. All ages welcome. Free. Presented by Clermont County Public Library. 734-2619; www.clermontlibrary.org. Bethel.

MUSEUMS

Vintage Purses and Ladies’ Accessories Exhibit, 1:30-4:30 p.m., Promont House Museum, 906 Main St., Exhibit from 18901940 includes 30 purses made of shells, beads, lace, rhinestones, mesh and leather. Shoes include dainty lace boots to ornate evening slippers. Miscellaneous accessories include fans, compacts, gloves, hankies and scarves. Benefits Greater Milford Area Historical Society and Promont House. $5, $1 ages 12 and under. Presented by Greater Milford Area Historical Society. 248-0324; www.milfordhistory.net. Milford. S A T U R D A Y, A P R I L 3 0

FESTIVALS

Grassy Run Heritage Rendezvous, 10 a.m.5 p.m., Williamsburg Community Park, $5, $3 seniors, $2 ages 6-14, free ages 5 and under. 734-1119; www.grassyrun.org. Williamsburg.

GARDEN SHOWS

African Violet Show, Noon-9 p.m., Eastgate Mall, 4601 Eastgate Blvd., Violets for sale, demonstrations and displays. Free. Presented by Cincinnati African Violet Society. Through May 1. 831-3692; www.cincyavs.com. Union Township.

NATURE

Wildflower Walk, 6:30 p.m., Sycamore Park, 4082 Ohio 132, Free. Presented by Clermont County Park District. 876-9013. Batavia. F R I D A Y, A P R I L 2 9

ART EXHIBITS

Charley Harper Art Show, 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m., River Hills Christian Church, Free. 831-7230; www.rowhouse.com. Loveland. Open Spaces, 7:30 a.m.-5 p.m., UC Clermont Campus, Free. 732-5332. Batavia.

BUSINESS SEMINARS

Job Search Learning Labs, 1-3:30 p.m., Anderson Senior Center, 7970 Beechmont Ave., Technically-oriented learning opportunities for those in job transition. Free. 4743100; www.jobsearchlearninglabs.wikidot.com. Anderson Township.

HEALTH / WELLNESS

Refresh and Renew: A Day of Loving Kindness, 7:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Jesuit Spiritual Center, 5361 S. Milford Road, Schott Pavilion. Information from local experts in stress management, alternative health and healing and new and powerful ways to release stress, create peace and experience bliss in your life. Ages 18 and up. $110. Reservations required. Presented by Take Charge Seminars. 560-5753; www.takechargeseminars.net. Milford.

HISTORIC SITES

Ulysses S. Grant Birthday Celebration, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Birthplace of Ulysses S. Grant, U.S. Route 52, Music by Freedom Center Choir, Kentucky Dulcimers, local men’s choral group the Troubadours and soloist John Hale. Generals Grant and Lee make appearance on horseback. Crafters, demonstrators, historic lectures, tours and more. 543-9149; www.historicnr.org. Point Pleasant.

For more about Greater Cincinnati’s dining, music, events, movies and more, go to Metromix.com. Ulysses S. Grant Birthday Celebration, 1 p.m., Grant Memorial United Methodist Church, 1600 Back St., Special Ohio Civil War 150 years recognition, 1 p.m. Speakers are Ohio Sen. Tom Niehaus and County Commissioner Bob Proud. Music by John Hale. Entertainment Program, 3 p.m. Civil War Letters to Home with Maureen Kennedy; Civil War Period Music with Prof. William Williams; and U.S. Grant’s Irish roots with Leslie Huggard. Coincides with celebration at Grant Birthplace in front of church. Free. Presented by Historic New Richmond. -5532624; www.historicnr.org. New Richmond.

MUSEUMS

Bells of the World, 1-4:30 p.m., Greater Loveland Historical Society Museum, 201 Riverside Drive, Collection of bells from around the world by Marilyn Grismere, bell collector since 2004. Free. 683-5692; www.lovelandmuseum.org. Loveland. Vintage Purses and Ladies’ Accessories Exhibit, 1:30-4:30 p.m., Promont House Museum, $5, $1 ages 12 and under. 2480324; www.milfordhistory.net. Milford.

MUSIC - CABARET

Sinatra Night, 7-11 p.m., Mama Vita’s, 6405 Branch Hill Guinea Pike, With Matt Snow, “The Cincinnati Sinatra.” Family friendly. Free. 697-9705; www.mamavitas.com. Loveland.

THANKS ENOS PENNINGTON

The Ulysses S. Grant Birthday Celebration is 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday, April 30, at the birthplace of Ulysses S. Grant, pictured, U.S. Route 52. There will be music by Freedom Center Choir, Kentucky Dulcimers, local men’s choral group the Troubadours and soloist John Hale. Generals Grant and Lee make appearances on horseback. There will also be crafters, demonstrators, historic lectures, tours and more. The birthday celebration coincides with activities at the Grant Memorial Church behind the Birthplace. Presented by Historic New Richmond. For information, call 543-9149 or visit www.historicnr.org. Tom Marck (right) of VFW Post 6770 salutes as Ralph Shepherd of New Richmond American Legion Post 550 raises the American and Ohio flags at the U.S. Grant birthplace during a prior celebration. The flag-raising begins the annual observance of Grant’s birthday and season opening of the historic site.

FESTIVALS

Grassy Run Heritage Rendezvous, 11 a.m.4 p.m., Williamsburg Community Park, $5, $3 seniors, $2 ages 6-14, free ages 5 and under. 734-1119; www.grassyrun.org. Williamsburg.

FOOD & DRINK PETS

Noah’s Wish Disaster Response Training, 7:30 a.m.-4 p.m., Grailville Education and Retreat Center, 932 O’Bannonville Road, Concludes May 1. Information on animal first aid and CPR, animal intake and sheltering, zoonotic and blood-borne pathogens, mass casualty animal triage techniques and hands-on exercises and more. Ages 18 and up. $75-$125; $85 students and seniors. Registration required. Presented by Noah’s Wish. 916-939-9474; www.noahswish.info. Loveland.

SHOPPING

Greater Cincinnati Dahlia Association Tuber Sale, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Burger Farm and Garden Center, 7849 Main St., Opportunity to replace, acquire and expand dahlia collection. Free. Presented by Greater Cincinnati Dahlia Association. 553-6311. Newtown. S U N D A Y, M A Y 1

ART EXHIBITS

Charley Harper Art Show, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., River Hills Christian Church, Free. 831-7230; www.rowhouse.com. Loveland.

COMMUNITY DANCE

Celebration of the Community of Life, 34:30 p.m., Grailville Education and Retreat Center, 932 O’Bannonville Road, 4 p.m. Art Opening of “Sharing the Dream of Our Regeneration.” Mixed media show with imagery and words by Cincinnati artist Cherri Ann Forest, an engaged environment advocate and mystic with global focus. In the Dining Room. Learn simple folk dances with Jay Williams, local Grail member. Family friendly. $20 family of five or more; $5. 683-2340. Loveland.

Sunday Supper, 5:30 p.m., Grailville Education and Retreat Center, 932 O’Bannonville Road, $15, $10 children ages 10 and under. Reservations required. 683-2340; www.grailville.org. Loveland.

GARDEN SHOWS

African Violet Show, Noon-6 p.m., Eastgate Mall, Free. 831-3692; www.cincyavs.com. Union Township.

About calendar

To submit calendar items, go to “www.cincinnati.com” and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to “life@communitypress.com” along with event information. Items are printed on a space-available basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to “www.cincinnati.com” and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page. T U E S D A Y, M A Y 3

ART EXHIBITS

Charley Harper Art Show, 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m., River Hills Christian Church, Free. 831-7230; www.rowhouse.com. Loveland.

HOME & GARDEN

Container Gardening, 1-3:30 p.m., Greenfield Plant Farm - Anderson Township, 6840 Clough Pike, Barn. Learn about creative combinations of plants, colors and textures for fall and beyond. Learn about soil, drainage, fertilizer and compatible plants. Bring your own container or purchase one. Forest Hills School District Community Education class. Ages 18 and up. $15. Registration required. 231-3600, ext. 5949; www.foresthills.edu. Anderson Township.

MUSEUMS

Vintage Purses and Ladies’ Accessories Exhibit, 1:30-4:30 p.m., Promont House Museum, $5, $1 ages 12 and under. 2480324; www.milfordhistory.net. Milford. M O N D A Y, M A Y 2

CIVIC Project In Theater High School Challenge, 8 a.m.-5 p.m., Yellow Ribbon Support Center, 700 S. Eastgate Blvd., Drive to collect new and gently used DVDs in an effort to create DVD libraries on bases and camps of U.S. military troops in Iraq and Afghanistan. Ages 9-12. Free. 752-4310. Eastgate. CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS

W E D N E S D A Y, M A Y 4

FOOD & DRINK

WAVE Free Community Dinner, 6 p.m., Milford First United Methodist Church, 541 Main St., Wednesdays Are Very Extraordinary. No church service attached, no reservations needed.Free; donations accepted. 831-5500; www.milfordfirstumc.org. Milford.

HOME & GARDEN

“Cardinal,” a work by Charley Harper.

Hypertufa Trough Workshop, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Loveland Greenhouse, 11924 Lebanon Road, Learn to make your own hypertufa containers. $45. 683-1581. Symmes Township.

EDUCATION

RECREATION

Poetry Workshop for Women, 7-9 p.m., Grailville Education and Retreat Center, 932 O’Bannonville Road, For women interested in writing as a spiritual and creative practice. Includes instruction in the art and craft of poetry, writing time and opportunities for participants to share what they have written. $175 weekly with craft session. Registration required. 683-2340; www.grailville.org. Loveland.

SHOPPING

Plant Auction, 7 p.m., Williamsburg United Methodist Church, 330 Gay St., Wide selection of plants, including perennials, ornamental grass, young trees, containers and hanging baskets. Benefits Williamsburg civic beautification. Presented by Williamsburg Garden Club. 625-2602. Williamsburg.

Bingo at St. Veronica, 5 p.m., St. Veronica Parish, 4473 Mount Carmel-Tobasco Road, Parish Center. Birthday specials, raffle, Lucky Loser, giveaways and door prizes. Ages 18 and up. $10, free ages 84 and up. 5281622; www.stveronica.org. Mount Carmel. Little Nature Nuts, 10-10:45 a.m., Johnson Hills Park, 7950 Bridle Road, Each class has different outdoor/nature theme. Ages 18 months-4 years. $10; $5 residents. Registration required. 388-4515. Anderson Township.

SUPPORT GROUPS

Job Loss Support Group, 7:30-9 p.m., Immaculate Heart of Mary Church, 7820 Beechmont Ave., Unload burdens, get support, ask questions and understand grief. Family friendly. Free. Registration required. 241-7745. Anderson Township.

Take Off Pounds Sensibly, 6:30-7:15 p.m., Anderson Hills United Methodist Church, 7515 Forest Road, Take Off Pounds Sensibly weekly support meeting. Presented by TOPS. 528-5959. Anderson Township.

EXERCISE CLASSES

Zumba Fitness Class, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Clough United Methodist Church, $5. 3794900. Anderson Township. Friendly Zumba Fitness Class, 7 p.m., Rplace, $5. 310-5600; www.zumbawithrobin.webs.com. Amelia. Zumba Fitness Class, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Anderson Dance Academy, $50 for 10 classes; $7. 474-7800. Anderson Township. Pilates, 7:15-8:15 p.m., Fitness For Function, 8298 Clough Pike, Suite 8, Improve core control, coordination, standing alignment and balance with Pilates mat exercises. With Katie Cline. $10. 233-3484; www.fitnessforfunctioncincy.com. Anderson Township.

LITERARY - CRAFTS

Crochet Group, 6-7:30 p.m., Williamsburg Branch Library, 594 Main St., Learn simple stitches each week. Participants need size H or larger crochet hook. Ages 13 and up. Free. Presented by Clermont County Public Library. 724-1070. Williamsburg. STAFF/MEG VOGEL

The 2011 Krohn Conservatory Butterfly Show will be featuring the butterflies of Brazil through June 26. Pictured is a Peleides Blue Morpho from South America. Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. Tickets are $6 for adults, $5 for seniors and $4 for children under 17. Ages 4 and under are free. Family packs are $20 (includes admission for two adults and up to six children). Krohn Conservatory is located at 1501 Eden Park Drive. For details, call 513-421-4086 or visit www.ButterflyShow.com.

MUSIC - JAZZ

Sinatra Night, 5:30-8:30 p.m., Tong’s Thai Restaurant, 1055 Main St., With Matt Snow, “The Cincinnati Sinatra.” Dinner available starting at 4:30 p.m. Family friendly. Free. 248-2999. Milford.

PROVIDED

See what all the “fuzz” is about this May at the Cincinnati Zoo during Zoo Babies. Some of the babies you will see include: bonobos (pictured), a white-handed gibbon, a little penguin and Zuri, a female baby Maasai giraffe who was born April 2. The event is free with regular zoo admission. Admission prices are $14 for adults, $10 for children (2-12), children under 2 are free and parking is additional. The zoo opens daily at 9 a.m. For more information, call 513-281-4700 or visit www.cincinnatizoo.org.


Life

Community Journal

April 27, 2011

B3

The virtue we may have until we know we have it The creation story in Genesis says that God created us humans by mixing dust and spirit. Humility is to know this about ourselves and be willing to live with this mixture that we are. Humility is a virtue misunderstood by most of us. We associate it with people who are pushovers for bullies, wimpy unassertive people, spineless employees, cringing wives, or sweet-talking pious people. Most people would prefer to be called powerful than humble. Our confusion about humility is caused by two misunderstandings. One way thinks it means the diminishment of one’s selfhood and identity, blandness, the dread of being noticed or of speaking before a group, or a passion for anonymity. Such erroneous images of humility are more expressive of certain tendencies than humility.

The other misunderstanding of humility is when we think it means running oneself down, denying qualities or skills we actually have, or Father Lou feigning a worthGuntzelman lessness (somePerspectives times in order to have another praise us). It’s been suggested, the next time a good singer says, “Oh, I really can’t sing very well,” agree with him or her and say, “Well, you tried your best!” Then notice their reaction. Humility is truth. One of the reasons humility is so difficult for a human to possess is because our egos like to be seen as special and to stand out from everyone else. We enjoy being seen as the

Therapist Wayne Muller says, “Each of us was given a particular combination of wounds, gifts, talents, and imperfections that merely give texture to the quality of our experience.” As a result, he says, “We are all human beings who are born, trying to survive, learning to love, and preparing to live and die with some dignity and peace.” “best” or the “worst,” rather than just an ordinary imperfect human being who sometimes makes mistakes. Many of us harbor the supposition that either we’ve experienced a worse childhood and bag of circumstances than most people, or, that we are highly gifted and a cut above the rest of people. We’re enthralled by grandiosity or victimhood. Each of us is a spark of divinity encased in compost. Someone has described humans as “the juxtaposition of incongruities.” The Latin word “humus” (soil,

dust, earth, etc.) is the root word of both the words “human” and “humility.” And at the same we are made in God’s precious image and likeness. Therapist Wayne Muller says, “Each of us was given a particular combination of wounds, gifts, talents, and imperfections that merely give texture to the quality of our experience.” As a result, he says, “We are all human beings who are born, trying to survive, learning to love, and preparing to live and die with some dignity and peace.

No more, no less. To learn humility is to honor that your hurt and mine are one, that my life and yours are cut from the same cloth, and that we share the gentle communication of being human.” Humility is so important that it is impossible for anyone to have any authentic type of spiritual life without the virtue of humility. Humility tames the ego and rids us of superficiality and arrogance. It compels us to be true to ourselves and respect others. Because of the nature of our egos, humility is an extremely slippery virtue. In the act of thinking we possess it, we prove to ourselves we don’t. A Sufi adage says, “A saint is a saint unless he knows he is one.” Father Lou Guntzelman is a Catholic priest of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati. Contact him at columns@community press.com or P.O. Box 428541, Cincinnati, OH 45242.

Before getting work done, check roofer’s references This is the time of year when our area is hit with severe windstorms that can damage the roof of your home. A lot can be learned from the windstorm of September 2008, when roofers were kept busy for months. Like thousands of others, Marc and Julie Silverman needed a new roof on their Symmes Township home. Marc heard about a roofer from a friend and hired him. It’s what’s happened since then that can be a lesson for us all. Earlier this year Julie noticed a leak in the house.

“ O u r bathroom ceiling is coming down. We had the r o o f e r come over a couple of Howard Ain weeks ago he Hey Howard! and said he couldn’t find the source of the leak,” she said. Soon there were more leaks in the ceiling. That prompted the Silvermans to call in several other roofers hoping to find the source of

the problem. “There were numerous things that they found are wrong – pages and pages of things. We’ve gotten estimates from $3,000 just to repair it, up to $11,000,” said Julie. The Silvermans decided the best thing to do was tear off the bad roof because it was so done so poorly. Julie said she’s learned, “When there’s a storm all of a sudden everybody’s a roofer. We trusted him, and allowed him to do our roof – and now you see what’s happened.

“The insurance company was paying a little bit for the damage in our house – not very much. Then they tried to go after the roofer because they did pay for the roof and felt his work was not acceptable.” Unfortunately, that roofer didn’t have liability insurance, which would have paid for the damage to their house. “People don’t know until something happens that there’s something wrong with their roof. So, other than appearance, we wouldn’t have known it

either. It never looked great, but what do we know about roofing?” Julie said. The Silvermans say they have not been able to get that bad roofer to return their calls or answer their letter. He hung up on me when I called. But, it’s believed this roofer is still out there working, so you need to protect yourself. Always check out a company with the Better Business Bureau. If the BBB has no record of the company, get another company. You want to hire a firm

that’s been in business for several years and has a good record. In addition, check out the company’s references. Don’t forget to get a copy of the company’s liability insurance and Worker’s Compensation policy – both of which are designed to protect you. If you can’t get a copy of each, find another company. Howard Ain answers consumer complaints weekdays on WKRC-TV Local 12. Write to him at 12 WKRC-TV, 1906 Highland Ave., Cincinnati 45219.

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B4

Community Journal

Life

April 27, 2011

Cool spring days call for warm, lighter soups As I write this column, it is 50 degrees outside with cloudy skies. We’ve had lots of rain, too. My husband, Frank, was supposed to clean out the wood stove for the season but got behind on his chores. He said today he’s happy about that, too, since we had to build a fire in it to keep the baby chicks warm. They’re nestled quite snugly in front of the stove in a little box with sawdust. I’m anxious, though, for the weather to cooperate so we can put them outside. They chirp constantly! It’s been a great year so far for foraging for wild edibles. We’ve already gotten a small bounty of morel mushrooms, and the wild violets are like a purple carpet in the yard.

Healthy spring garden vegetable soup

This is a lighter soup for spring. 2 cups sliced carrots 1 cup diced onion or more to taste 1 tablespoon garlic, minced or more to taste

Rita Heikenfeld Rita’s kitchen

6 cups broth – y o u r choice b e e f , chicken or vegetable, low-sodium and fat-free 3 cups diced cabbage 1 cup

green beans 2 tablespoons tomato paste or more to taste 1 generous teaspoon dried basil or to taste 3 ⁄4 teaspoon dried oregano or to taste Salt and pepper to taste 1 zucchini, diced Parmesan cheese for garnish Put carrots, onion and garlic in nonstick soup pot. Spray with olive oil cooking spray. Cook over low heat until soft, about five minutes. Add everything but zucchini and bring to a boil. Lower to a simmer, covered, and cook about 20 minutes or until beans are tender. Stir in zucchini and heat a few more minutes. Sprinkle each serving generously with Parmesan.

Violet jam

COURTESY RITA HEIKENFELD

Besides wild violets, morel mushrooms are also growing in Rita Heikenfeld’s backyard.

The Caudill kids have been bringing me violets by the bagful. We had fun making jam and jelly. I told them we could sell these as gourmet items! 2 cups packed violet

COURTESY RITA HEIKENFELD

Rita pours her infusion of petals into a pan in order to make wild violet jelly.

COURTESY RITA HEIKENFELD

Violet blossoms can be turned into a tasty – and gourmet – jam or jelly. blossoms, without stems 3-4 tablespoons fresh lemon juice 3 ⁄4 cup water 21⁄2 cups sugar 3 ⁄4 cup water (a second time) 1 pkg. dry pectin 3

Put ⁄4 cup water and the violet blossoms in a blender and blend well. Add the lemon juice and notice how the violet paste turns a richer purple as soon as the lemon juice hits the dull purple paste. Add the sugar and blend again to dissolve. Next, stir the package of pectin into the second 3⁄4 cup water in a saucepan and bring it to a boil, continuing to boil hard for one minute. Pour the hot pectin into the blender with the violet paste. Blend again and pour

COURTESY RITA HEIKENFELD

Jessie and Kim Caudill help Rita Heikenfeld by skimming the foam from the jars of violet jam and jelly. into jars or small storage containers. Let cool, then cover with lids and store in fridge or freezer.

Violet jelly

21⁄2 cups boiling water 3 cups tightly packed violet blossoms without stems 1 ⁄4 cup lemon juice 1 pkg. dry pectin 4 cups sugar Pour 21⁄2 cups boiling water over violets. Let sit overnight or for 12 hours to infuse. Strain and measure. You should have 2 cups liquid; if not, add water. Add 1⁄4 cup lemon juice and one package of powdered pectin. Bring to a boil, stirring constantly. Add 4 cups sugar all at once.

When mixture comes to a hard boil, cook one minute. Pour into sterilized jars and seal. Store in cool, dry place. Elegant on scones and biscuits.

Crockpot potato soup with sausage

If you’re looking for an easy and tasty soup, this may be for you. From Darlo Tanner, who said she received this recipe from her sister, and Darlo has shared it “with people from Texas and Florida.” I’ve had it in my file for awhile, and am glad I found it again. Darlo said she has used reduced-fat sausage and fat-free soups and it was very good. She’s also used Italian sausage. “Even better the next day,” she said.

2 pounds sausage 1 large onion 2 bags diced frozen hash browns, no need to thaw 2 cans each: cream of mushroom soup and cream of celery soup 2 cups milk 1 cup water, or more if needed Brown sausage and onion and crumble sausage. Drain and stir in rest of ingredients. Pour into sprayed crockpot on high for four hours. Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator and author. E-mail columns@community press.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-2487130, ext. 356.

I f s k i n c a n c e r i s t h e l a s t t h i n g yo u w a n t to t h i n k a b o u t t h i s s u m m e r, h e re’s t h e fi r s t t h i n g yo u s h o u l d d o. 1 in 5 Americans, or over 3,500,000 cases, will develop some form of skin cancer, making it the most common cancer in the U.S. Yet if found and treated early, it’s 95% curable. So if you haven’t had a skin cancer screening, or if it’s been awhile, now is the time to get one. FREE. Just call any of the participating dermatologists listed below during Skin Cancer-Melanoma Detection and Prevention week (May 2–7, 2011) for your free screening. It’s quick. It’s painless. And it just might save your life.

Free

Skin Cancer Screenings May 2 – 7, 2011

Call one of these dermatologists for an appointment during their office hours. Monday through Friday, April 27 – May 6

Participating Dermatologists by Area. OHIO

Anderson Dr. Debra Breneman Dr. Nancy Pelc Dr. Tiffany Pickup Dr. Denise Smith

246-7003 231-1575 231-1575 231-1575

Clifton Dr. Toby Mathias Dr. Pranav Sheth UC Health Dermatology

246-7003 246-7003 475-7630

Downtown Dr. Mitchell Ede Dr. Lana Long Mason Dr. Jan Fu Dr. James Nordlund

459-1988 246-7003

Milford Dr. Robert Fixler Dr. Z. Charles Fixler Dr. Linn Jones

831-3003 831-3003 831-8087

Montgomery Dr. Mona Foad Dr. K. William Kitzmiller

984-4800 396-7546

621-5188 421-3376

Mt. Auburn Dr. Brett Coldiron Dr. Robert Fixler Dr. Z. Charles Fixler

221-2828 281-6044 281-6044

West Chester UC Health Dermatology

475-7630

Western Hills Dr. Marcella Bouchard Dr. Toby Mathias UC Health Dermatology

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Community

Community Journal

April 27, 2011

B5

It was a busy weekend in the county

PROVIDED.

Feeding the needy

Lynn Stranz of the Batavia YWCA, center, receives a check for $10,000 from Mount Washington Presbyterian members Connie Rodriguez, right, and Joan Sigmund. Mount Washington Presbyterian Church has made a $10,000 donation to the Batavia YWCA recognizing that the demand for food support in Clermont County continues to rise and in recognition of the outstanding work that the Batavia YWCA does. “It’s a godsend,” Lynn Stranz, director of the Batavia YWCA’s emergency services, said of MWPC’s donation. In the month of January the Y’s Food Pantry had provided emergency food assistance to more than 2,300 individuals and funds were dwindling. MWPC has supported the Batavia YWCA food pantry for more than 20 years through both its hunger ministry and its Christmas Giving Tree programs. MWPC has recently announced a goal of making hunger ministry its signature outreach ministry and plans to commit $100,000 to this cause over the next year in celebration of its upcoming Centennial Anniversary.

MARRIAGE LICENSES Adam Donaldson, 29, 5965 Marathon-Edenton Road, Williamsburg, pipefitter, and Megan Carter, 27, 5965 Marathon-Edenton Road, Williamsburg, stay at home mom. Joshua Brose, 28,147 S. 3rd St., Williamsburg, supervisor, and Sarah

E. Maynard, 24, 127 S. 3rd St., Williamsburg. Jeffrey Goldberg, 33, 62 Carpenters Ridge, Cincinnati, information technology, and Jennifer Longhauser, 31, 3421 Ohio 125, Bethel, substitute teacher.

Howdy folks, Last week was a busy one here at our house. The Monroe Grange meeting was last Friday evening. We were getting everything in order for the Grassy Run Rendezvous event. The Monroe Grange will be there serving the food, soft drinks, coffee, hot chocolate and water, as we have done for several years. This event lets folks, especially the children, learn about the early days and the struggles the folks had. The times for this event are April 29, April 30 and May 1. Friday is school day, from 9 a.m. till 3 p.m. This event is held at the Williamsburg Park, in Williamsburg. On Saturday it starts at 10 a.m. and goes till 6 p.m., on Sunday from 11 a.m. till 5 p.m.. These two days it is open to the public. There will be things for everyone to enjoy. Last Saturday morning the Bethel Lions Club held their last pancake breakfast for this school year. The next season will begin in October so watch the paper for the date. The members of the Bethel Lions Club thank the community for their support they have given the club so they can keep furnishing eye glasses for folks. The club is sponsoring the circus, which will be held at the Bethel-Tate Middle

S c h o o l grounds May 15 so watch for this event. There will be two performGeorge ances SunafterRooks day noon. The Ole Bethel Lions will Fisherman Club have a table at the Bethel Arts and Music Fest May 7 and will have circus tickets for sale then. The Grant’s Farm and Greenhouses, on Bucktown Road held their open house at all three locations last Saturday and Sunday. The folks in the community look forward to this event. Ruth Ann and I started out at the Lions Club Breakfast, then went to Grants farm. That evening we came back to the U.S. Grant Vocational School for their community appreciation dinner. This is to thank the folks for their support they have given all these years. I called the school to get the number of folks that came to eat. The report I got was 998 folks not counting the staff and volunteers. Wow! The students started cooking at noon Saturday getting that big meal ready. The staff did the serving and furnished the deserts. The two Forcee Brothers that do the chef’s training classes do a super job. We

that have miniature donkeys and live out of Owensville. They had a little one born last Saturday evening. It’s only about 12 or 14 inches tall. This would be great to see. We are looking forward to going over and seeing it. For breakfast this morning Ruth Ann made a coffee cake, so she will put the recipe in for it. So enjoy.

have talked to some of the students over the years and they are sure happy with the training they get. I always enjoy their fried chicken. It is the best, of course. The rest of the meal was great. As Ruth Ann and I were walking in from the parking lot, I could smell the fried chicken. Their greenhouse is open, too, with lots of good plants to purchase. On Sunday we went back to the Grant’s farm. The weather was better that day. Then that evening we went to the Bethel United Methodist Church and sang with the community choir the Musical “Come Touch the Robe.” There were 40 people in the community choir. This is always an exciting time. This was the first of the Holy Week services here in Bethel. There was a good crowd of about 350 people. At this service Lois told me about a lady who wanted to meet Ruth Ann and me at the dinner at the vocational school the night before. They were looking for us, but we had just left. This lady enjoys our articles. We would have liked to have talked to her. This lovely lady in Maude Hensley. We say “hi” and hope we will get to see you sometime and thanks for reading our article along with all the other folks. We were talking to folks

Ruth Ann’s coffeecake

Ingredients: 1⁄4 cup salad oil, 1 beaten egg, 1⁄2 cup milk, 1⁄2 teaspoon salt, 1-1⁄2 cups sifted flour, 3⁄4 cup sugar, 2 teaspoons baking powder. Combine salad oil, egg, and milk, sift together dry ingredients; add to milk mixture, mix well. Pour into greased 9-by-9-by-2-inch baking dish. Topping combine 1⁄4 cup brown sugar, 1 tablespoon flour, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, 1 tablespoon melted butter and 1⁄2 cup broken nuts; sprinkle over batter. Bake in moderate oven (375) about 25 minutes or till done. Serve warm. Start your week by going to the church of your choice and praise the Good Lord. God bless all. More later. George Rooks is a retired park ranger. Rooks served for 28 years with the last five as manager of East Fork State Park.

Pierce Point

Cinema 10

For Today's Showtimes, Call Our Movie Hotline 947-3333 Or Visit www.ourshowtimes.com

ALL DLP DIGITAL SOUND

1255 W. Ohio Pike - Amelia, Ohio $2.50 Surcharge On 3D Tickets

Sponsored by:

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831-4552

Leagues Now Forming for Adult/Youth Teams Seven Professional Sand Courts with Lights – New Seating Areas

JOHN SENEY/STAFF

Child care recognition

Available for Private Parties & Events

Batavia Heights Christian Child Care was recognized as the Business of the Month at the April 5 Batavia Township trustee meeting. The child care center, at 2555 Old Ohio 32, has been in operation for 25 years. From left are, Trustee Bill Dowdney, Trustee Lee Cornett, child care owner Barb Bruner and Trustee James Sauls.

Visit our website at: www.cincinnatisand.com for more information and registration

CE-000045701 CE-000 CE-0000457010 0457010 045701 0

YOU ARE CORDIALLY INVITED TO A VIEWING OF

The Hiding Place is the autobiographical story of Corrie Ten Boom which chronicles her family’s nightmarish experiences in the Nazi concentration camp system. Ms Ms. George, who plays the role of Corrie Ten Boom in the movie will be present for a question and answer session after the movie and an opportunity to meet the star in person. Presented by:

FRIDAY EVENING, MAY 13 Beginning at 6:30 pm

Friday

Mainyning1at3 Beg . 6:30 p.m

MADISON AVENUE CHRISTIAN CHURCH

1530 Madison Ave., Covington, KY This event is free to the public reservations required - Call 859-441-6332 Free parking adjacent building / elevator service available

AN EVENING WITH ITS GOLDEN GLOBE NOMINEE

JEANETTE CLIFT GEORGE

Saturday, May 14, 2011 1:00 - 4:00 pm Especially for those who no longer have the physical presence of their Moms. An afternoon tea followed by a presentation featuring Golden Globe nominee, actor, director, author and noted speaker - Jeanette Clift George. Wear or bring something that belonged to your mother and celebrate the legacy of those special women who live in our memories.

This event is free to the public - Reservations required. RSVP to (859) 441-6332 (Free parking adjacent to building / Elevator Service available) Sponsorships Available y Presented by Saturda

May 1.m4. 1-4p

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CE-0000456656

EARLY SPONSORS EVENT SPONSORS The Family of Lois Quayle Miller The Family of Helen Wichmann

PROGRAM SPONSORS Robin Weiss Goldberg in memory of Sandra Weiss Linnemann Family Funeral Homes TEA SPONSORS Spring Grove Cemetery and Arboretum


B6

Community Journal

April 27, 2011

Community

Meals-on-Wheels now offers choices Think back to a time when families gathered at the dinner table and shared their day. Meals were slowcooked and hearty in portions. Great memories, great food. One thing about family meals – you could choose just what you wanted to eat. My mother loved liver and onions – but not me. I didn’t have to eat it though; she gave me other options. Our meals-on-wheels customers have never had the option to choose what they want to eat. All customers get the same meal on the same day everyday. Until now. Now we are pleased to announce a new program for customers called Savory Selects. Savory Selects lets seniors select the foods they would like to receive each week.

LOOK

MARKUS JEWELERS

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Buying Gold, Silver & Coins 2022 EIGHT MILE ROAD 513-474-4950 Tues. & Thurs. 10 - 6 Wed. & Fri. 10 - 7 Sat. 10 - 5 Closed Sun. & Mon.

M e a l selections are delivered frozen one day per week. The customer Linda d e c i d e s meal Eppler which to eat and Community when. We make Press guest sure all cuscolumnist tomers have microwaves. The Savory Selects meal plan offers 31 delicious, quality entrees, such as rosemary chicken, roasted turkey and country fried steak served with sugar snap peas, Nantucket vegetables and many, many other choices. For a sweet tooth, how about cherry muffin cake, sliced peaches or apple dessert? Items can be repeated as

often as the senior likes, just as long as it’s listed as an option. Now if someone wants a crispy rice treat every day, they can have it. Sounds like a great idea to me. About 85 percent of our customers are approved for this service. If a customer needs a daily safety check, we will continue to deliver a chilled meal every day. However, menu choices are not available in the that plan. For a long time we have wanted to offer choices to our MOW customers. It’s finally a reality. There’s an added benefit, too. Delivering meals once a week is much more fuel and time efficient. Plus, volunteers help us deliver meals, making the process even more efficient. If you have an interest in helping, we need more vol-

unteers in Amelia, Bethel, Milford and Eastgate. We think the Savory Select program is an exciting addition to our service. The Meals-on-Wheels program provides nutritious meals for older adults throughout Clermont County. Eligibility guidelines must be met and include being 60 years of age or older and a resident of Clermont County. Other guidelines apply as well. Meals are provided to all eligible participants for a suggested donation of $2 per meal. A case manager will verify your eligibility for the program. For information on receiving or delivering meals, call 724-1255. Bon appétit. Linda Eppler is the director of Communications and Lifelong Learning for Clermont Senior Services.

To the skies

Rick Rohrig of Mount Carmel earned his recreational pilot certificate in March. To earn his certificate, Rohrig passed an oral exam and a flight exam with a Federal Aviation Administration designated flight examiner. Rohrig is enrolled in the Professional Pilot Program at the University of Cincinnati, the laboratory portion of which is taught at the Clermont County Airport. When Rohrig completes the two-year pilot program, he will have earned an Associate of Applied Science degree and a commercial pilot certificate. Flight instructor Colin O’Rourke, left, congratulates Rohrig after his recreational checkride. PROVIDED

PROVIDED

UC Clermont College Dean Greg Sojka, left, and Warren Walker, district manager of community and government relations with Duke Energy, check out the progress of plants in a community garden greenhouse as part of Earth Day activities at the college. Duke Energy provided a $4,000 grant for the garden.

UC Clermont activities revolve around Earth Day Community Press Staff Report

BATAVIA - Green shirts, green thumbs and green attitudes were everywhere on campus as UC Clermont College celebrated Earth Day. The college hosted 168 Batavia Elementary secondgrade students on campus and organized activities that showed them first-hand how the environment can be nurtured by everyone. Each child left with a book on recycling and a tree seedling to plant at home. “We were excited to host an event for students that not only teaches them about their environment, but also empowers them to take that information home and make changes in their daily lives that can make a real difference, “ said Krista L. Clark, assistant professor of biology and chair of the Earth Day committee. For the second year, a community garden was planted on Earth Day to benefit local food banks. Last year’s garden produced a total of 381 pounds of vegetables and fruits. The 2010 harvest included squash, zucchini, tomatoes, eggplant, corn, peppers, basil, cucumbers, pumpkins and watermelons. This year the plan for the garden has grown. Thanks to a $4,000 Duke Energy grant, the community garden size is being quadrupled in size. UC Clermont College biology students were key in planning the garden, building and raising the beds and germinating seeds in the greenhouse for planting in the garden. “Being able to incorporate the Earth Day events into my biology classes here at Clermont College has also been an excellent teaching tool. My students are learn-

ing about garden planting strategies, low-impact gardening, and alternative watering systems to be used in our community garden. The idea that their research can impact the yield of the garden, and thus how much food will be donated has brought a new service element into my curriculum that has engaged the students in the classroom, and made them excited to work outside of class to enhance their own learning,” Clark said. The Earth Day events for elementary children were made possible by a grant from the American Association of Community Colleges. The grant director is Barbara Wallace. Earth Day celebrations included: Earth Day Fair with student booths, demonstrations and fun activities; a Cincinnati Zoo Reptile Show; a tree seedling give-away; and the planting of the 2011 community garden. The college also donated about 900 tomato plants and about 650 pepper plants to many community food banks and agencies to grow their own gardens. Some of the groups receiving plants include: James Sauls Shelter, YWCA, Anderson Senior Support Commission, Thomaston Woods, YMCA, Felicity Food Pantry, Goshen Township and OSU Extension. Student clubs who organized events and volunteered are: Student Tribunal, Discovery Club, Education Club, Psychology Club, Biology Club, Foreign Language Club, SHOCK (service), UCCAN (social work) and UCCAPS (Paralegal). Community organizations that participated include: Clermont CAN and the Clermont Office of Environmental Quality.

Rep. Schmit honors young artists

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CLERMONT COUNTY U.S Rep. Jean Schmidt honored this year’s Congressional Art Competition participants and winners. The competition is open to high school students and the winner from each district will have their art work displayed in the U.S. Capitol for one year. “The care and detail these young artists display in there art is inspiring,” Schmidt said. “Just as it has been in past years there were so many great pieces of art it made the job of our expert judges very difficult.” This year’s competition was judged by local artists Lonna Kingsbury, Deborah Ridgley and Jennifer Carin Hebenstreit. Schmidt acknowledged the difficult task the judges had with nearly 100 entries in the competition. The artwork submitted included paintings, draw-

ings, collage, prints, mixed media, computer-generated art and photography. Schmidt will display the second- through fourth-place winners’ work in her district and Washington D.C. offices. Schmidt announced the following winners: • Fourth Place: Indian Hill’s Molly Seitz - “Steffi 2” • Third place: Batavia’s Ashley Young - “Grasshopper” • Second Place: Batavia’s Adam Lyons - “Rock Bottom” • First Place: Lebanon’s Tyler McQuinn - “Self Portrait” “I would like to thank the judges for their time and expertise, as well as the teachers and students who participated in the competition,” said Schmidt. “I also congratulate this year’s winners and I look forward to sharing their artwork with the people of the 2nd District and the United States.”


Community

April 27, 2011

Community Journal

B7

RELIGION

Christ Presbyterian Church

Christ Presbyterian Church members invite the community to participate in a silent auction to benefit Teen Challenge. Teen Challenge is a local non-profit group that offers a safe place for young adult men to recover from addictions. This group has been successfully serving this community for many years. The silent auction will take place from 6:30 p.m. to 7:15 p.m. Friday, May 6, at the church. Church members also will offer a meal during this time. The Classical Guitar Ensemble of the University of Cincinnati’s CollegeConservatory of Music will present a program of solos, duos, trios and quartets at 7:30 p.m.

The church is at 5657 Pleasant View Drive in Miami Township; 831-9100.

Mount Moriah United Methodist Church

The Mount Moriah United Methodist Women will sponsor a three-day rummage sale from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday, May 5; 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday, May 6; and 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, May 7, in the education building at the church. A $5 bag sale will take place Saturday. The sale will be a month later than usual because of a conflict with the people who pick up the leftover rummage. Dishes, linens, adult and children’s clothing, toys, books, knick-knacks, furniture, tools, appliances and more will be available for bargain hunters. All money received from this sale will be used for on-going projects that need to be done to the church facilities. Mount Moriah has developed a reputation of offering satisfied customers special rummage sales. The merchandise is clean and in good condition, and there is always a large selection from which to choose. The church is at 681 Mount Moriah Drive, Withamsville; 752-1333.

Williamsburg United Methodist Church

The Williamsburg United Methodist Women will be serving their famous chicken sandwiches during the Williamsburg village-wide yard sale beginning at 10 a.m. Saturday, April 30. Also on the menu will be sloppy Joes, hot dogs, desserts and beverages. In case of rain, food will be served inside the church. The church is at 330 Gay St.

CNC warns hikers about false morels Every spring, mushroom hunters head outdoors to look for their favorite “sponge-head” mushrooms. Known in the trade as morels, these gourmet delights are a special find in the spring woods, and they already are appearing. But beware. At the same time of year, the potentially deadly false morels also appear. Scientifically known as Geomitra carolinana, their common name of Big Red refers to the large dimension of their brain-like wavy heads. To the untrained eye, novice mushroom hunters might think they found the motherload of morels, but false morels are potentially fatal. Never eat wild mushrooms unless you are 100 percent certain of their identity and edibility. Enjoy a hike in the spring woods

RIVER OF LIFE Assembly of God 1793 U.S. 52, Moscow, Ohio 45153 Pastor: Ralph Ollendick Sun. Contemporary Service SS -9:45am,Worship 11:00am Wed.- Informal Biblestudy 7-8pm Come Experience The Presence of the Lord In Our Services

SOUTHERN BAPTIST CLOUGH PIKE BAPTIST CHURCH 1025 CLOUGH PIKE

Sunday School 9:30am Morning Worship 10:45am Wednesday Night Worship & Prayer Service 7:00pm Nursery provided for all services/ Youth & Children’s Programs

www.cloughpike.com

752-3521

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF MT REPOSE 6088 Branch Hill-Guinea Pike Ken Slaughter, Pastor

Sunday School 9:45am - Worship 11am (nursery provided) Sunday Evening Service 6pm-Youth 6pm 513-575-1121 www.mtrepose.org MONUMENTS BAPTIST CHURCH

2831 State Route 222 Mark Pence, Pastor 513-313-2401 Sunday School....9:30AM Sunday Worship....10:45AM Childrens Church & Nursery Avail Wednesday Prayer Service & Youth Meeting....7:00PM Nursery & Children’s Activities www.monumentsbaptist.org

BAPTIST

CHURCH OF CHRIST

UNITED METHODIST

937 Old State Route 74 (Behind Meijer) 513-753-8223 www.gecc.net

Sunday Worship: 8:30 & 10:30am Bible Study: 9:30am & 6:00pm Youth Groups: 6:00pm

OWENSVILLE CHURCH OF CHRIST

A fellowship where God changes people for life. Come visit us! 2545 Highway 50 Owensville, OH 45160 513-732-2324 Sunday School 9:00am Childrens Church 10:00am Worship 10:00am

Sunday School 10am; Morning Worship 11am; Sunday Evening Service 6pm;

Sunday Worship 8:00 & 10:45am Contemporary Worship 9:30amSunday School For All Ages: 9:30 & 10:45am Nursery Care for Age 3 & under Full Program for Children, Youth, Music, Small Groups & more Handicapped Accessible PASTORS: Bill Bowdle -Sr. Pastor Steve Fultz - Assoc. Pastor; J. D. Young - Youth Pastor Janet Bowdle - Children’s Pastor

Sunday Worship: 10:30am with Childrens Church & Nursery PASTOR JONATHAN KOLLMANN

GOSHEN CHURCH OF GOD

www.cloughchurch.org

Real People...In a Real Church... Worshipping a Real God! 1675 Hillstation Road, Goshen, Ohio 45122 722-1699 www.goshenchurchofgod.org Pastor Tim McGlone Service Schedule Sunday School 10:00am Sunday Worship 10:45am Sunday Evening Worship 6:00pm Wednesday Youth Service 7:00pm Saturday Service 7:00pm

732-1400

Sunday School 9:00 am Worship 10:30 am Children’s Worship and Childcare 10:30 am http://www.emmanuel-umc.com

Contemporary and Traditional live Worship Music and Multimedia

EPISCOPAL ST. THOMAS EPISCOPAL CHURCH & ST. THOMAS NURSERY SCHOOL

Sunday 8am Holy Eucharist, Rite I 9:15am Christian Formation & Discovery Hour for all ages* 10:30am Choral Eucharist, Rite II*

Worship Services Contemporary Sat 5pm & Sun 9am Traditional Sunday at 10:30 a.m. Full childcare & church school at all services. 513-677-9866 Dr. Doug Damron, Sr. Pastor (across from the Oasis Golf Club) Rev. Lisa Kerwin, Assoc. Pastor www.epiphanyumc.org

6635 Loveland Miamiville Rd Loveland, OH 45140

CE-1001614369-01

*Child care for children up to 4 in a staffed nursery from 9-noon

Reaching the Heart of Clermont County

212 Prather Rd. Felicity, OH Pastor: Chad Blevins 876-2565

Sunday School Sunday Worship Sunday Eve. Childrens Mission Sunday Eve. Adult Discipleship Sunday Eve. Worship Wed. Eve. Adult Bible Study

PROVIDED

False morels can be found this time of year. They are commonly called Big Reds and are potentially fatal. along the 15-miles of trails at Cincinnati Nature Center, but refrain from collecting except with your memories and camera lens.

Museum Center relies on volunteers,” said Schleibaum. “I’ve really seen the importance of giving back to the community. I like the idea of ‘paying it forward,’ and when you volunteer, that’s what you do.” Schleibaum, a former channel marketer at an educational publishing company, is currently in-between careers and was looking for a way to use her design background while deepening her skill set when she came across volunteer opportunities at Museum Center. A self proclaimed “history fanatic,” Schleibaum was drawn to the “style and class” of Union Terminal. Now, as a volunteer, she loves exploring the building and interacting with visitors. In celebration of National Volunteer Week, Museum Center extends its gratitude to volunteers like Schleibaum whose dedication and passion account for more than 112,320 hours of service and an estimated value of $2,400,906.

9:45am 10:45am 6:00pm 6:00pm 7:00pm 7:00pm

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF GOSHEN 1828 Woodville Pike • 625-5512 Pastor Junior V. Pitman Sunday School – 10:00am Morning Worship – 11:00am Prayer Time – 5:30pm Sunday Evening – 6:00pm WED. Prayer & Bible Study – 7:00pm Nursery provided for all services

LINDALE BAPTIST CHURCH

3052 ST. RT. 132 AMELIA, OH 45102 Pastor John Davis 797-4189 Sunday School..............................9:30am Sunday Morning Worship............10:30am Sunday Evening Worship...............6:30pm Wednesday Prayer Service ...........7:00pm Wednesday Youth Group...............7:00pm www.lindalebaptist.com

Northside Baptist Church 320 Brown St. Bethel, Ohio 45106 Pastor: Ben Hurst Ph: (513) 734-6040 Sunday School 10:00-10:45 Children’s Church Provided Worship 11:00 Wednesday Prayer Service 7PM Come grow with a church on a "mission"

ROMAN CATHOLIC Saint Mary Church,Bethel 3398 Ohio SR 125 Phone 734-4041 Rev. Michael Leshney, Pastor Saturday Mass – 5:00 PM Sunday Mass – 10:30 AM www.stmaryparishfamily.org

Saint Peter Church

1192 Bethel-New Richmond Rd New Richmond, Ohio 45157 Phone 553-3267 Rev. Michael Leshney, Pastor

Saturday Mass - 5:00 PM Sunday Masses – 8:30 & 11:00 www.stpeternewrichmond.org

Rev. Scott Wade, Senior Pastor Rev. Cynthia Church, Discipleship Pastor Rev. Dale Noel, Congregational Care Pastor Rev. Kent Davenport, Youth Pastor SUNDAY: Sunday School (All Ages) Worship Service Children’s Worship. (1st-5th Grades)

9:30am 10:30am

Discipleship Hour Nursery Care Provided Handicapped Accessible

6:00pm

10:30am

7:00pm 7:00pm

S.Charity & E. Water Sts. Bethel, Ohio 45106 513-734-4204 Office: M-F 8:00am - 2:00pm E-mail: bethelnaz@fuse.net www.bethelnazarenechurch.org

NON-DENOMINATIONAL

EMMANUEL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Amelia-Olive Branch Road

THE CHURCH OF THE GOOD SAMARITAN 25 Amelia Olive Branch Rd.

Sunday 10:30am ... Holy Eucharist 10:30am...Sunday School (Lil’ Samaritans) Handicap Accessible 513-753-4115 www.GoodSamaritanEpiscopal.org

GOSHEN UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 6710 Goshen Rd, Goshen Across from Goshen High School 513-722-2541 www.goshenmethodist.org Sunday School 9:30am Worship 10:30am Blended Worship Traditional and Contemporary Youth Fellowship 6:00pm Nursery Available

Sunday Worship: 9 & 10:30 a.m. Sunday School: 9 a.m. Active Youth • Outreach • Fellowship Music Ministries • Bible Studies

Ark of Learning Preschool and Child Care Ages 3 through 12

681 Mt. Moriah Drive • 513.752.1333

mtmoriahumc.org

Come visit us at the

Owensville United Methodist Church

Located at 2580 US Hwy 50 (next to the library) or (1mile east of Owensville on 50)

Contemporary Service.......................9:00am Traditional Service.......................10:30am Something for children at each service

UNITED METHODIST

Prayer and Fasting Wednesday at 6:00pm

Pastor Mike Smith

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Amelia United Methodist Church

SUNDAY SERVICE TIMES

www.kingswayfellowship.com

Take I-275 to exit 57 toward Milford, Right on McClelland, Right on Price, church soon on Right

101 South Lebanon Rd. Loveland, OH 45140 683-4244 Lead Pastor Jonathan Eilert Pastor Grant Eckhart Saturday Service 5:00pm Sunday Services 8:00, 9:30 & 11:00am Sunday School 9:30am http://www.princeofpeaceelca.org

A Loving Church in Jesus’ Name Sunday School..............................10:00AM Sunday Morning Worship..............10:45AM Thurs Prayer & Bible Study..............7:00PM Nursery Provided for Sunday Morning Worship www.FirstChurchofJesusChrist.org 6208 Guinea Pike, Milford, Ohio 45150 Pastor: Melvin Moore Church: 513-575-5450

4359 E. Bauman Lane | Batavia, OH 45103 Pastor, Troy P. Ervin

www.faithchurch.net

PRINCE OF PEACE LUTHERAN CHURCH (ELCA)

4050 Tollgate Rd, Williamsburg, OH 513-724-3341 www.cmcchurch.com Mark Otten, Pastor

513-735-2555

5910 Price Road, Milford 831-3770

LUTHERAN

Contemporary Worship Practical Message Classes for Children & Teens Nursery Care Sunday 6:00PM Avalanche Youth Service Wednesday 7:00PM Bible Study (adults) / Avalanche Youth We have many other groups that meet on a regular basis

Morning Worship 9 a.m. & 11 a.m. Evening Worship 6 p.m. High Voltage Youth 6 p.m.

EVANGELICAL FREE Services 8:00 am, 9:15 am & 11:00am Steve Lovellette, Senior Pastor Nursery proivided at all services

Sunday Morning 10:00AM

FIRST CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST

Wednesday Eve. Prayer Service & Bible Study, 7:00pm

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF FELICITY

Bethel Nazarene Church

WEDNESDAY: ‘Bethel Chapel’ Prayer Service Youth Group - Grades 6-12

2010 Wolfangel Rd., Anderson Twp. 513-231-4301

CHURCH OF GOD

NAZARENE

MONDAY: Ladies’ Bible Study/Prayer Group

Contemporary and traditional with live music and multi-media.

www.stthomasepiscopal.org

BATAVIA BAPTIST TEMPLE

BETHEL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 402 W. Plane St. Bethel, Ohio 513-734-7201 www.bumcinfo.org

GLEN ESTE CHURCH OF CHRIST

100 Miami Ave, Terrace Park,OH 831-2052

770 South Riverside, Batavia OH 45103 Raymond D. Jones, Pastor 732-2739

Volunteer pays it forward J i l l Schleibaum of Eastgate may be one of Cincinnati Museum Center’s newest vol- Schleibaum unteers, but she’s already found her niche giving back to the community. Schleibaum began volunteering in January in the Museum Center’s design department. As an in-house photographer, she’s spent her time updating the image database, helping design promotional materials, and creating a digital image library. Schleibaum also served on the Banquet Task Force, a team of eight volunteers responsible for planning the Volunteer Appreciation Banquet, which was held April 6 at Museum Center. Schleibaum used her design expertise to create the event invitation and a digital slideshow highlighting the 750 museum volunteers. So, what has she learned from this experience? “It’s amazing how much

ASSEMBLIES OF GOD

CE-1001626059-01

The Athenaeum Chorale, in its 31st season, will present Eastertide Vespers at 7:30 p.m. Sunday, May 1. The chorale is under the direction of Athenaeum Music Director Anthony DiCello. The Rev. Anthony Brausch, vice rector designate of the Athenaeum, will preside. The vespers will be in the Chapel of St. Gregory the Great at The Athenaeum of Ohio/Mount St. Mary’s Seminary, 6616 Beechmont Ave. The vespers will include Festival Easter Music. The chorale will be accompanied by Cincinnati Brassworks Quintet & Timpani. The chorale continues to inspire and delight listeners and worshippers in performances of great choral masterworks and sacred liturgical repertoire. The performance is free and open to the public. For more information or to schedule an interview, call 513-231-1200.

513-732-2211

A New Life - A New Prospective A New Song Pastor: Michael Fite info: 753-3159 c 3868 M Man Rd., Withamsville, OH 45245 (behind the Water Works car wash) Sunday Worship. 10:00am www.newsongohio.com

PRESBYTERIAN (USA) LOVELAND PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

A Loving, Praying, Caring Church Join us for Sunday Services

Worship Service ...................... 10:00am Church School......................... 11:15am Fellowship/Coffee Hour after Worship Nursery Provided/Youth Group Activities 360 Robin Av (off Oak St) Loveland OH

683-2525

www.LPCUSA.org • LPCUSA@fuse.net

PRESBYTERIAN Trinity United Methodist

19 E. Main St., Amelia OH 45102 ‘To become and make disciples of Christ”

You Are Invited! Sunday School ~ 9:30 am Classes for every age group

Worship Service 10:45 a.m.

A Blend of contemporary and traditional styles, with a relevant message for today! Nursery / Children’s Church during 10:45 Worship Service

“Encircling People with God’s Love” Traditional Worship.......8:15am & 11:00am Contemporary Worship..................9:30am Sunday School...............................9:30am Nursery Available 5767 Pleasant Hill Rd (next to Milford Jr. High)

513-831-0262 www.trinitymilford.org

Williamsburg United Methodist Church

Welcomes You

Sunday Morning Schedule: 9AM - Worship: Traditional 10AM - Classes & Groups 11AM - Worship: Contemporary Nursery care provided

www.ameliaumc.org

513.753.6770

330 Gay Street, Williamsburg, OH 45176

CE-1001604952-01

The Athenaeum

One block north of Main Street at 3rd 513-724-6305 WburgUMC@aol.com

www.williamsburgumc.com

Pastor: Rev. Duane A. Kemerley

CALVIN PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH Amelia/Withamsville - 3mi. East of I-275

1177 West Ohio Pike (SR125)-Phone 752-2525 Sunday School 9:30am Worship 10:30am

Rev. Kathleen B. Haines, Pastor Nursery care provided www.calvin-pc.org

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 199 Gay Street Williamsburg, Ohio 45176 Phone: 513-724-7985 Sunday School: 9:30A.M.

Worship:10:30A.M.(SupervisedNursery) PRESCHOOL: Tues, Weds, Thurs

WESLYAN MULBERRY WESLEYAN CHURCH 949 SR Bus. 28, Milford 831-3218 Eric George, Pastor Kent Underwood, Minister of Worship & Music

9:30am Sunday School Worship/Children’s Church 10:30am Tuesday Adult Bible Study/Prayer Mtg 7:00pm Wednesday Youth Mtg. 7:00pm Friday Young Adult Mtg. 7:30pm “A friendly Church for the Whole Family”


B8

ON

RECORD

Community Journal

THE AMELIA

Arrests/citations

Richard J. Springer, 31, 1465 Quail Ridge Road, drug abuse, driving under suspension, April 6. Christopher D. Colliver, 40, 3974 Piccadilly, open container, April 6. Mark Wanninger, 32, 11 Cecelia Drive No. E30, drug abuse, April 7.

Incidents/investigations Assault

Female was assaulted at 69 E. Main St. No. 3, April 7.

Theft

Female stated ID used with no authorization at 19 Partridge Drive, April 11.

BATAVIA

Arrests/citations

Juvenile, 14, assault, April 3. Juvenile, 15, domestic violence, April 6. Carmen S. Holland, 52, 254 E. Glen, endangering children, April 9.

April 27, 2011

BIRTHS | DEATHS | Editor Theresa Herron | therron@communitypress.com | 248-7128

Incidents/investigations Assault

Male juvenile was assaulted at 215 Broadway, April 3.

Criminal damage

Vehicles were damaged at Batavia Station at West Main St., April 5.

Domestic violence

At Forest Avenue, April 6.

Endangering children At 254 E. Glen, April 9.

NEW RICHMOND

Incidents/investigations Assault

Male juvenile was assaulted at 231 Augusta No. 6A, April 9.

PIERCE TOWNSHIP Arrests/citations

Scott Cooper, 21, 46 Timber Trail, warrant, April 5. Dale Cooper, 43, 46 Timber Trail, warrant, April 5. Clinton Zepf, 30, 1689 E. Main St. No. 1, public indecency, April 7.

|

POLICE

REAL

Mark Carlotta, 21, 3361 Canterberry, drug paraphernalia, April 8. Justin L. Hess, 23, 1748 Culver Court, drug instrument, drug possession, domestic violence, April 10. Martin J. Johnson, 35, 404 Stonelick Woods, theft, April 10. Nicholas Cramer, 24, 368 St. Andrews, recited, April 6. Nicholas G. Royes, 20, 362 St. Andrews, warrant, April 6. Jacob Gill, 24, 1421 Old Ohio 74, warrant, April 11. Marc D. Brookenthal, 28, 5133 Monterey Maple Grove, warrant, April 8.

Incidents/investigations Assault

Male was assaulted at 3357 Ohio 132, April 8.

Burglary

Entry made into residence at 1298 Betty Jane Lane, April 11.

Domestic violence

At Culver Court, April 10.

Drug paraphernalia

Found in vehicle during traffic stop at 1097 Muirfield, April 10.

Misuse of credit card

Female stated credit card used with no authorization at 3731 Nine Mile Road, April 8.

Bad check issued to Sunil Carry-out; $843 at Ohio Pike, April 7.

Public indecency

Man seen running without clothing in area at 1689 Ohio Pike, April 7.

Theft

Various tools taken from storage bin;

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$2,900 at 3660 Appomattox No. 33, April 5. Lawn chair taken; $100 at 887 Castlebay, April 5. Trading cards taken from Walmart; $39 at Ohio Pike, April 5. Wallet taken from vehicle at 951 Locust Corner, April 6. Aluminum battery cover taken from truck; $450 at Ohio Pike, April 9. Cash taken from vehicle; $20 at 358 St. Andrews, April 10.

UNION TOWNSHIP Arrests/citations

James R. Burson, 40, 4534 Tealtown, persistent disorderly conduct, April 6. Gregory P. Michael, 65, 1556 Maryann Ave., driving under influence, April 5. Carol E. Shafer, 54, 4035 Mt. Carmel Tobasco, warrant service, April 6. Johnnie Z. Morgan, 32, 7098 Ohio 221, bench warrant, April 7. Kirsten L. Heinrich, 20, Clovernook St., bench warrant, April 6. Corey D. Hicks, 21, 1785 Ohio 28, driving under suspension, April 6. Lisa M. Heming, 46, 4056 Mt. Carmel Tobasco, warrant service, April 6. Ervin Tackett, 58, 410 Virginia Lane, passing bad checks, April 7. Michelle Dolch, 41, 4430 Mt. Carmel Tobasco, warrant service, April 7. Rhonda L. Elliott, 45, 1005 Clepper Lane, warrant service, April 7. Nathan A. Picolo, 20, 1125 Oho Pike, warrant service, April 7. Arica Eichelbrenner, 18, 450 Craig, drug possession, April 6. Amy J. Wells, 34, 4714 Beechwood, warrant service, April 7. Alexander Duval, 21, 121 Southern Trace, driving under suspension, April 7. Joseph Hawkins, 26, 240 Laurel Ave., warrant service, April 6. Juvenile, 16, marijuana possession, April 8. Jeremy Dean, 40, 2542 Woodville Pike, warrant service, April 7. Kimberly A. Neace, no age given, 821 Wisby Road, open container, April 7. Brittney M. Salyers, 22, 3904 Southern Ave., warrant service, April 8. Zachary R. Williamson, 22, 152 Southern Trace, warrant service, April 8.

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Kyle R. Shaw, 20, 4267 McKeever, theft, April 8. Ryan T. Wood, 18, 3809 Todds Run, theft, April 8. Joshua R. Hartzel, 27, 632 Ft. Thomas Ave., theft, April 9. Thomas Morgan, 33, 3960 Nine Mile Tobasco (Motel 6), persistent disorderly conduct, obstructing official business, April 9. Darrell Crooms, 49, 3960 Nine Mile Tobasco (Motel 6), disorderly conduct, April 9. Leah M. Chadwick, 20, 2502 Beechmont, warrant service, April 10. Jeramiah Johnson, 23, 3357 Jenny Lind, marijuana possession, April 7. Alex M. Hanson, 23, 49 Wolfer, drug possession, April 7. Brandon Grant, 28, 70 Hummingbird, driving under influence, April 10. Justin Sons, 19, 123 N. West St., disorderly conduct, April 10. Jordon S. Grooms, 21, 501 McKinney, disorderly conduct, April 10. Dennis R. Wilson, no age given, 385 Seneca, drug abuse, April 10. Christopher D. Patton, 26, 8623 Glenrose, warrant service, April 10. Anthony L. Guenther, 39, 4582 Roxbury Circle, driving under suspension, April 11. Steven Garren, 43, 467 Breezy Lane, warrant service, April 11. Garrett J. Gerard, 32, 404 Main St., wrongful entrustment, April 10. Christina M. Hairfield, 35, 484 Old Ohio 74, driving under suspension, April 10. Cheryl L. Hittle, 28, 1288 Old Ohio 74, receiving stolen property, misuse of credit card, April 10. Aubrey Roberts, 32, 260 Judd, open container, April 8. Joseph T. Drusell, 43, 177 Pine Oak, obstructing official business, April 9. Sandra Titcomb, 47, 3970 Piccadilly, drug paraphernalia, April 8. Heather Urban, 28, 4035 Mt. Carmel Tobasco No. 225, drug paraphernalia, April 8. Kevin M. McNeal, 26, 1521 Spruce, open container, April 8. Jason A Samaan, 32, Tonapah Drive, warrant service, April 8. Dennis D. Bauer, 30, 3464 Jenny Lind, driving under influence, April 9. Donald Lawrence, 20, 3585 Brook Haven, driving under suspension, April 9. Samuel R. Wise, 22, 14789 Bodman, drug possession, April 10. John R. Magevney, 21, 503 Piccadilly, warrant service, April 10. Zachary D. Blume, 21, 4476 Grandview, drug possession, paraphernalia, April 10. Chris E. Broerman-Foster, 27, 7100 Olentangy, drug possession, April 9. Darlene K. Houston, 55, 4181 Otter Creek, driving under influence, April 11. Robert T. Setty, 43, 2810 Ohio 132, driving under influence, April 12. Kyle Anderson, 22, 498 Piccadilly No. A, domestic violence, April 11. Nicholas J. Hall, 18, 4702 Beechwood, warrant service, April 11. Sarah E. Winchel, 20, 202 Cardinal, warrant service, April 11. Daniel J. Brooks, 29, 1396 Blue Orchard, falsification, April 12. Angela M. Brooks, 27, 1396 Blue Orchard, falsification, April 12. Bobby D. Temple, 42, 163 Sardinia Mowrystown, illegal assembly, conspiracy to manufacture, driving under suspension, April 11. Kenneth M. Lewis, 40, 163 Sardinia Mowrystown, illegal assembly, conspiracy to manufacture, April 11. James M. Golden, 39, 5907 Stephen Road, illegal assembly, conspiracy

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to manufacture, April 11. Patrick R. Rose, 28, 991 Kennedy’s Landing, domestic violence, April 8. Juvenile, 15, domestic violence, April 11. Juvenile, 13, arson, April 9. John Curtis IV, 38, 655 Arlington, warrant service, April 12. Gregory Howell, 19, 4505 Eastwood, drug abuse, April 12. Tracy Fields, 45, 1712 Petri, open container, criminal trespass, April 12. Terrance Hughes, 66, 3129 Spring Grove Ave., theft, criminal trespass, April 13. Daryl Lilly, 41, 507 Piccadilly, domestic violence, April 12. Robert A. Mention, 20, 2175 E. Ohio Pike No. 5, criminal damage, domestic violence, April 14. Rachel Bare, 35, 645 Bellatre Court, driving under suspension, April 13. Laura A. Morgan, 26, 500 Ely St., warrant, April 13. Cassonor A. Davidson, 24, 1220 Glenwood, driving under influence, April 13.

Incidents/investigations Assault

Female was assaulted at 450 Old Ohio 74, April 10.

Breaking and entering

Two printers taken from construction trailer; $257 at Ryans Way, April 11. Two bikes taken at 1209 Forest Run, April 8. Female reported offense at 1209 Forest Run, April 9.

Burglary

Attempt made to enter residence at 3995 Williams Drive, April 6. Front door damaged at 980 Old Ohio 74, April 6. Laptop computer and X-Box taken ; $1,700 at 118 Southern Trace No. F, April 10. Jewelry taken; $3,950 at 4110 Hunting Horn, April 9.

Criminal damage

Vehicles damaged at Holman Motors at Elick Lane, April 11. Window broken in vehicle at 4704 Beechwood, April 9.

Criminal mischief

Deck disassembled at 469 Old Ohio 74, April 10.

Domestic violence

At Clepper Lane, April 7.

Fraud

Female stated ID used with no authorization at 4615 Bells Lake, April 8.

Passing bad checks

Bad check issued to Grammas at Ohio Pike, April 6. Female received bad check; $3,297.93 at Olive Branch Stonelick, April 5.

Theft

Cellphone taken from Red Roof Inn at Mt. Carmel Tobasco Road, April 6. Male reported this offense at 4006 Williams Drive, April 6. Electric scooter taken; $200 at 544 Alvina Lane, April 13. Merchandise taken from Meijer; $99 at Eastgate Blvd., April 11. Merchandise taken from Kohl’s; $100 at Eastgate Blvd., April 13. iPod taken from locker at Gleneste High at Gleneste Withamsville, April 13. 2004 Chevrolet taken at 4473 Spruce Creek, April 13. Clothing and jewelry taken from JC Penney; $161 at Eastgate Blvd., April 12. Clothing taken from Dillard’s; $110 at Eastgate Blvd., April 12. I-Pod taken from Gleneste High; $400 at Gleneste Withamsville, April 12. Trailer/contents taken at Solid Rock Church; $6,550 at Hopper Hill, April 11. GPS unit and video game system taken from vehicle at Motel 6 at Nine Mile Tobasco, April 11. Merchandise taken from Walmart; $140 at Eastgate Blvd., April 11. Vacuum cleaner taken at Hampton Inn at Eastgate Blvd., April 9. A ring taken; $2,500 at 1225 Ben Avon St., April 8. Toolbox taken; $225 at 4339 Aicholtz, April 8. Clothing taken from Walmart; $336 at Eastgate Blvd., April 9. CDs, medication, etc. taken from vehicle at 486 Piccadilly, April 9. AC unit taken at 451 Ohio Pike, April 8. Clothes taken from Walmart; $75 at Eastgate Blvd., April 8. Medication, etc. taken from vehicle at 479 Piccadilly, April 6. Generator not returned to Home Depot; $3,000 at Ohio Pike, April 6.

Unauthorized use

Subject refuses to return vehicle to owner at 474 Old Ohio 74, April 5.

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Arrests/citations

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Michelle Horton, 22, 177 N. Front St., recited, April 2. Sam Massengale, 44, 282 W. Charles St., driving under influence, vandalism, drug possession, April 9.

Incidents/investigations Theft

Subject refuses to return cellphone and keys to owner at 173 Concord Sq., April 1.

Vandalism

Window broken out of patrol car at 100 block of W. Main Street, April 9.

Police | Continued B9


On the record POLICE REPORTS From B8

Identity fraud

CLERMONT COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE

Illegal conveyance of drugs of abuse - detention mental health facility

Cristopher Crowell, 28, 113 Southern Trace, Cincinnati, receiving stolen property at 400 Technecenter Drive, Milford, April 17. Crowell Christopher, 28, 113 Southern Trace, Cincinnati, forgery at 100 Southern Trace, Cincinnati, April 17. Kenneth R. Vinson, 42, 1173 Bennings Road, Milford, vandalism property used for business, $500 or more in value at 4700 Filager Road, Batavia, April 11. Brittany Combs, 18, 221 South 4th St., Williamsburg, criminal damaging/endangering at 4070 Greenbriar Road, Batavia, April 12. Cheyanne Baker, 18, 2910 Fair Oak Road, Amelia, assault at 2910 Fairoak Road, Amelia, April 12. William Maurice Tansey, 19, 2061 Ohio Pike No. 71, Amelia, burglary, theft at 2061 Ohio Pike, Amelia, April 13. Rachel Underwood, 37, 171 Spring Street, No. 16, Batavia, fugitive from justice at 4430 Ohio 222, Batavia, April 14. Kyle Lee Werner, 24, 2713 Cedar Trace, Batavia, driving under OVI suspension, theft at 2713 Cedar Trace, Batavia, April 15. Juvenile, 14, menacing, Batavia, April 12. Juvenile, 14, menacing, Batavia, April 12. Jason D. Marshall, 28, 3033 U.S. 50, Batavia, breaking and entering, theft at 2020 Countryside Drive, Batavia, April 15. Stacey Naegel, 26, 83 Sierra Court, Batavia, assault at 82 Sierra Court, Batavia, April 15. Joni Fawley, 33, 15690 Lucky Lane, Williamburg, possession of drugs at Ohio 123 at Libby Lane, New Richmond, April 15. Juvenile, 15, aggravated menacing, Batavia, April 15. Juvenile, 15, inducing panic, Batavia, April 15. Mark L. Wanninger, 32, 11 Cecelia, Amelia, forgery, theft at 188 Chapel, Amelia, April 16. James R. Smith, 20, 5823 Baas Road, Batavia, domestic violence at 5823 Baas Road, Batavia, April 16. N. Ellen Lipscomb, 35, 517 W. Plane St., Bethel, drug paraphernalia, possession of drugs - marijuana at 2232 Ohio Pike, Amelia, April 16. Bobby E. Turner, 28, 2191 E Ohio Pike E63, Amelia, assault at 2755 Ohio 132 Lot 98, New Richmond, April 17. Brenda Ward, 36, 2111 Ginn Road, New Richmond, domestic violence at 2111 Ginn Road, New Richmond, April 17. Clayton R. Mofford, 27, 2111 Ginn Road, New Richmond, domestic violence at 2111 Ginn Road, New Richmond, April 17. Jonathan Baldwin, 24, 104 Mastin Drive, Cumberland, Ky 40823, fugitive from justice at 844 Wright St., Batavia, April 17.

At 5347 Newtonsville Hutchinson Road, Batavia, April 16.

Arrests/citations

Incidents/investigations Aggravated menacing

At 3156 Parkside Drive, Batavia, April 16. At 4700 Filager Road, Batavia, April 15.

Inducing panic Menacing

At 10 Montgomery Way, Amelia, April 13. At 1381 Gumbert Drive, Amelia, April 17. At 2191 Ohio Pike, Amelia, April 14. At 904 Stonelick Woods, Batavia, April 12.

Passing bad checks

At 100 Southern Trace, Cincinnati, Jan. 31.

Possession of drugs

At 2232 Ohio Pike, Amelia, April 16. At 4700 Filager Road, Batavia, April 15. At Ohio 123 At Libby Lane, New Richmond, April 15.

Runaway

At 2519 Ohio 222, New Richmond, April 11.

Telecommunications fraud

At 1760 Culver Court, Amelia, April 13.

Theft

At 300 University Lane, Batavia, April 14. At 1500 Thomaston Drive, A, Amelia, April 12. At 1780 Mackenzie Trace, Batavia, April 14. At 188 Chapel, Amelia, April 16. At 2270 Laurel Nicholsville Road, New Richmond, April 15. At 8 Pineview Drive, Amelia, April 14. At 109 Judd Road, Batavia, April 12. At 1260 Ohio Pike, Batavia, April 11. At 1800 Ohio Pike, Batavia, April 17. At 2 Mayflower Drive, Amelia, April 17. At 2020 Countryside Drive, Batavia, April 15. At 2061 Ohio Pike, Amelia, April 13. At 2118 U.S. 50, Batavia, April 14. At 2191 Ohio Pike, Amelia, April 17. At 2200 Winemiller Lane, Batavia, April 14. At 2713 Cedar Trace, Batavia, April 15. At 3644 Black Jack Trail, Batavia, April 11. At 3698 Ohio 131, Williamsburg, April 11. At 3813 Sodom Road, Hamersville, April 17. At 4248 Pleasant Acres, Batavia, April 16. At 4533 Ohio 276, Batavia, April 14.

Unauthorized use of motor vehicle

At 1003 Stonelick Woods Circle, Batavia, April 14. At 12 Pine View Drive, Amelia, April 12.

Unruly juvenile offenses

At University Lane, Batavia, April 15. At 2755 Ohio 132, New Richmond, April 7.

Vandalism

At 4700 Filager Road, Batavia, April 6.

Violate protection order or consent agreement

At 1520 Ja Mar Lane, New Richmond, April 15. At 3554 Bootjack Corner Road, Williamsburg, April 13. At 2202 Stonelick Woods Court, Batavia, April 4. At 2258 Siesta Drive, Batavia, April 4. At 2258 Siesta Drive, Batavia, April 9. At 679 Ely St., Batavia, April 6.

The following cases have been filed with Clermont County clerk of courts.

Filings

Vickie Schmitt, et al. vs. Angela Tumser, et al., other tort. Joe D. Thomason vs. Cheryl L. Wetz, et al., other tort. Darrell Sizemore vs. Extendicare Health Services Inc., et al., worker’s compensation. Jeremy Hoop vs. Stephen Beuhrer, et al., worker’s compensation. U.S. Bank NA ND vs. Fred M. Trent, et al., foreclosure. Wells Fargo Bank NA vs. Rhonda Meador, et al., foreclosure. Deutsche Bank National Trust Co. vs. Steven S. Distler, et al., foreclosure. Third Federal Savings and Loan Association vs. James William Piper, et al., foreclosure. J. Robert True Treasurer of Clermont County vs. Shawn M. Girty, et al., foreclosure. Wells Fargo Bank NA vs. Joey M. Johnson Jr., et al., foreclosure. U.S. Bank NA vs. Jamey L. Heffler, et al., foreclosure. J. Robert True Treasurer of Clermont County vs. William H. Howard, et al., foreclosure. PNC Bank NA vs. Diana L. Tucker, et al., foreclosure. BAC Home Loans Servicing LP vs. Viginia Painter, et al., foreclosure. Nationstar Mortgage LLC vs. Esteban M. Berry, et al., foreclosure. Commons of Crosspointe Condominium Association Inc. vs. Chonmarie S. Neise, et al., foreclosure. Vanderbilt Mortgage and Finance Inc. vs. Kenneth Baldwin, et al., foreclosure. J. Robert True Treasurer of Clermont County vs. David M. Sadeik, et al., foreclosure. Kelly L. Stahl vs. Midwest Practice Solutions LLC, et al., administrative appeal. Althea Davis trustee of the Nanette M. Davis vs. Midland National Life Insurance Co., other civil. Westfield National Insurance Co. vs. Joseph N. Correll, other civil. Marlene Schmidt vs. Mercy Health Partners of Southwest Ohio, other civil. Larry Lewis vs. Brian P. Macke, other civil. Cintel Financial Credit Union vs. Bobby Staggs, et al., other civil. Thomas Baker vs. Fay Gardens Ltd., other civil. Arthur S. Kohn, et al. vs. Carla F. Syme, et al., other civil. First National Bank of Germantown vs. James I. Watson, et al., other civil.

Divorce

Denise A. Wood vs. Keith B. Wood Kymberly B. Back vs. Scott A. Back Hobert Roark vs. Susan M. Roark Stephanie D. Matthews vs. James D. Matthews Kimberly Turnbull vs. Thomas O. Turnbull Timothy Rader vs. Kelly Rader Sheila I. Henize vs. Frank D. Henize

Donna Kaylor vs. Jason R. Kaylor Barbara Mefford vs. William K. Striblen Starlet S. Toles vs. Russell J. Toles Joseph A. Ogletree vs. Pamela Ogletree

Dissolution

Jennifer L. Sharpe vs. Bryan C. Sharpe Kristine R. Poppell vs. Paul B. Poppell Stephanie Kozakiewicz vs. Jeffrey A. Kozakiewicz William Gregory vs. Lavonne Gregory Christina Elam vs. Scott Elam Judy G. Quinlan vs. Richard T. Quinlan Robbin C. Farmer vs. David G. Farmer Sr. Angie Jetter vs. Richard Jetter II Ronald W. Ballard vs. Maria R. Ballard Sujitabahen Sharma vs. Sidharth Sharma

Indictments

The following people have been indicted by the Clermont County grand jury to the Court of Common Pleas. This means members of the grand jury decided enough evidence has been collected to warrant filing charges. Timothy L. Whitmer, 36, 1786 Ohio 28, Lot 320 F, Goshen, domestic violence, Goshen Police. Sabrina Whitmer, 31, 1786 Ohio 28, Lot 320 F, Goshen, having weapon while under disability, Goshen Police. Ronald Phillip Embry, 41, 1529 S. Parker Drive Evansville, Indiana, tampering with evidence, forgery, Union Township Police Department. Brendon A.J. Kirker, 21, 140 Rich Street, Bethel, vandalism, Union Township Police Department. Phillip A. Brady, 27, 4121 W. Fork Ridge Drive, Batavia, burglary, theft, breaking and entering, safecracking, grand theft of a motor vehicle, grand theft, criminal damaging, Clermont County Sheriff’s Office. Christopher J. Johnson, 21, 1004 Commons Drive, Milford, burglary, theft, breaking and entering, safecracking, grand theft of a motor vehicle, grand theft, criminal damaging, Clermont County Sheriff’s Office. Sean Thomas Berold, 25, 3977 Youngman Drive, Cincinnati, burglary, Union Township Police Department. Herman Drewe Delk, 24, 173 Vine Street, Seaman, Ohio, receiving stolen property, arson, Union Township Police Department. Michael Allan Roberts Jr., 32, 232 Mairabeau Street Lower Apt., Greenfield, Ohio, non-support of dependents, Clermont Department of Support Enforcement.

Assault

Breaking and entering

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$1,000 Coverall Snack Bar • Pull Tab Games King of the Mountain Win on Diamonds Joe's • Flash Seals

ping, Union Township Police Department. Margaret Mary Ehemann, 22, 464 Picadilly Square E., Cincinnati, aggravated robbery, aggravated burglary, felonious assault, theft, kidnapping, Union Township Police Department.

Appeals

The following decisions were rendered through the Twelfth District Court of Appeals. Interested persons are urged to obtain copies of actual decisions by visiting the court’s Web site, www.twelfth.courts.state.oh.us\ne wdecisions.asp so that the full text of the court’s opinions can be carefully read. Brian Clark vs. Nichole Malicote, et al., presiding judge Stephen W. Powell, judges Robert P. Ringland and Robert A. Hendrickson. The appeals court affirmed the juvenile court’s decision dismissing Brandon Shaw’s motion to intervene in Brian Clark’s custody action. Kenneth Rathert aka Kenneth Rathert, P.C. vs. Lois Kristine Kempker, presiding judge Stephen W. Powell, judges William W. Young and Robert A. Hendrickson. The appeals court affirmed the trial court’s decision in a lawsuit involving the collection of unpaid attorney fees. State of Ohio vs. Allen G. Bregen aka Alan G. Bregen, presiding judge Robert A. Hendrickson, judges H.J. Bressler and Robert P. Ringland. The appeals court affirmed the trial court’s decision denying Bregen’s request to withdraw his guilty pleas, but remanded the case to the trial court with instructions that the court properly inform Bregen about his postrelease control obligations.

PUBLIC NOTICE Tate Monroe Water Assn., Inc. Box 90 Bethel, Ohio 45106 The Annual Consumer Confidence Report for the year 2010 wherein information concerning water quality, including results of testing and any violations of Ohio EPA Standards, is available at the Association’s business office located at 2599 S.R. 232, New Richmond, Ohio 45157 or online at tatemonroe.com. A copy can be mailed to you by calling 734-2236 between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. on any business day. Kevin Newberry Plant Operations Manager Tate Monroe Water Assn., Inc. 1634383

DESTIN. Local owner, 1 or 2 luxury condos. 2 BR, 2 BA overlooking gulf, sugar white beaches. Heated pool, hot tubs & more. 937-767-8449,or visit www.majesticsunindestin.com

N. Broadway, Owensville, Ohio-732-2218 or 732-2580

Burglary

B9

SOUTH CAROLINA

HILTON HEAD ISLAND, SC

ST. LOUIS PARISH FRIDAY NIGHT BINGO

At 2233 Harvey Road, New Richmond, April 16. At 2020 Countryside Drive, Batavia, April 15. At 2118 U.S. 50, Batavia, April 14. At 3238 Jackson Pike, Batavia, April 17. At 3325 Ohio 222, Batavia, April 16. At 4362 Armstrong Blvd., Batavia, April 14.

Criminal mischief

William Joseph Schrage, 45, 7680 Cheviot Road, No. 2, non-support of dependents, Clermont Department of Support Enforcement. Gary Bruce Schmurr Jr., 32, 6779 Shiloh Road, Goshen, non-support of dependents, Clermont Department of Support Enforcement. Mickey Lee Turner, 40, 1400 William Way No. 4, Mount Vernon, WA, non-support of dependents, Clermont Department of Support Enforcement. James Ryan Williamson, 28, 1734 Sanborn Drive, Cincinnati, nonsupport of dependents, Clermont Department of Support Enforcement. Ann L. Seal, 64, 263 W. Main Street, Apt. 209, Owensville, domestic violence, Owensville Police Department. Karl A. Kursim, 41, 308 Buddy Lane Lot 22, Loveland, aggravated possession of drugs, Goshen Police. Dionne L. Kursim, 36, 308 Buddy Lane Lot 22, Loveland, aggravated possession of drugs, Goshen Police. Spencer O. Bowles, 30, 7042 Noble Court, Cincinnati, theft, breaking and entering, Goshen Police. Larry D. Cloud, 30, 464 Picadilly Square E., Cincinnati, aggravated robbery, aggravated burglary, felonious assault, theft, kidnapping, Union Township Police Department. Joshua J. Curtis, 32, 484 Old Ohio 74, A206, Cincinnati, aggravated robbery, aggravated burglary, felonious assault, theft, kidnapping, Union Township Police Department. Donald W. Thompson, 25, 464 Picadilly Square A, Cincinnati, aggravated robbery, aggravated burglary, felonious assault, theft, kidnap-

FLORIDA

At 2755 Ohio 132 Lot 98, New Richmond, April 17. At 2910 Fairoak Road, Amelia, April 12. At 3424 Ohio 132, Amelia, April 13. At 5751 Bucktown Road, Williamsburg, April 16. At 82 Sierra Court, Batavia, April 15.

Community Journal

IN THE COURTS

At 5347 Newtonsville Hutchinson Road, Batavia, April 16.

At 11 Cecelia Drive, Amelia, April 16. At 13 Montgomery Way, Amelia, April 13. At 1969 Ohio 232, New Richmond, April 17. At 2233 Harvey Road, New Richmond, April 16. At 2911 Old Ohio 32, Batavia, April 14. At 4070 Greenbriar Road, Batavia, April 12. At 4700 Filager Road, Batavia, April 6. At 70 Wolfer Drive, Amelia, April 13.

April 27, 2011

CLEARWATER - Indian Rocks Beach 2 BR , 2 BA Gulf Front con do. Heated pool, balcony. Many upgrades. 513-771-1373, 448-7171 www.go-qca.com/condo

DESTIN. Luxury 2 BR, 2 BA oceanfront condos. Heated pool, spas, kids’ pool & tennis. Sleeps 6. Local owner. www.us-foam.com/destin . D- 513-528-9800, E- 513-752-1735

PANAMA CITY BEACH The Summerhouse - 2B/2B Family Accommodations . Beach side pools, tennis, WiFi & More. 800/354-1122 THE BEST BEACH VACATION VALUE! www.SummerhousePC.com

SANIBEL ISLAND Quality, beachfront condos. Excellent service! Great rates! www.SanibelIslandVacations.com 1-888-451-7277

NEW YORK MANHATTAN--NYC HOTEL $129/2 persons. Singles $124. Suites $139-$159. Lincoln Ctr area, Hudson River views, 18 flrs, kitchenette, 5 mins to midtown, safe, quiet, luxury area. RIVERSIDE TOWER, Riverside & 80th St. Call 1-800-724-3136 or visit: www.riversidetowerhotel.com

NORTH CAROLINA CLEARWATER TO ST. PETE BEACHES Gulf front & bay side condos. All prices & sizes! Florida Lifestyle VAC. 1-800-487-8953. Jan. 2012, Monthly Discounts • www.ourcondo.com

EMERALD ISLE. Ocean Front luxury vacation homes with community pool. Call for free brochure. 1-252-354-5555 Spinnaker’s Reach Realty www.SpinnakersReach.com

Plan a stay with Seashore Vacations. Oceanfront condos. Walk to dine and shop. Golf discounts. Free tennis. Call 1-800-845-0077 or book online at www.seashorehhi.com.

SEABROOK EXCLUSIVES Villas & Private Homes. Ocean, golf, tennis, equestrian. Pet friendly rentals. Free brochure. Book online! 888-718-7949. www.seabrook-vacations.info

TENNESSEE

1-7 Affordable, Deluxe Chalets & Cabin Rentals. Pigeon Forge in the Smokies. Vacation/Dollywood Specials. Free brochure. Call 1-800-833-9987. www.firesidechalets.com

A Beautiful Cabin Getaway Gatlinburg/Pigeon Forge. Hot tub, jacuzzi, fireplace, gas grill. $85/nt, 5 nt special $375. 800-793-8699. smokymtncrossrdrentals.com

GATLINBURG. April & May Limited Special! 4 nights $333.33, 5 nights $444.44/cpl. Luxurious cabins with hot tubs; on trout streams in parklike setting. Near Dollywood & National park. 800-404-3370 www.countryelegancecabins.com


B10

Community Journal

On the record

April 27, 2011

DEATHS Deborah Bertram

Deborah LeFever Bertram, 51, Pierce Township, died April 16. She was a homemaker. Survived by children Michael, Amanda Bertram, Robin Bishop; mother Phyllis LeFever; brothers Paul, Mark LeFever; six grandchildren. Preceded in death by father Robert LeFever. Services were April 21. Arrangements by E.C. Nurre Funeral Home. Memorials may be directed to the family in care of E.C. Nurre Funeral Home, 177 W. Main Street, Amelia, OH 45102.

Betty Brown

Elizabeth Jane “Betty” Brown, 74, Union Township, died April 16. Survived by sister Alice Motz; 25 nieces and nephews, 32 greatnieces and nephews; 20 greatgreat-nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by siblings Virginia,

Charlie, Ralph. Services were April 20 at E.C. Nurre Funeral Home.

Jacqueline Hackney

Jackie Beach Hackney, 73, died April 16. She was a life-long resident of Clermont County, living in Amelia for the last 20 years. Survived by children Anthony (Grace) Hackney, Justina (Joseph) Gray, Roxanne (Darron) Peacock; grandchildren Adam, Autumn, Joel Strickland, Sarah, Zac Hackney, Tyler Vestring, Anna Reeves, Amanda Peacock; great-grandchildren Trinity, Ivan Reeves; brothers Carl (Linda) Beach, Gary (Kathy) Beach; many nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by husband Frank Hackney and parents, Joel and Margaret Beach. Services are 3 p.m. Saturday, May 7, at Bethel United Methodist Church. Memorials to: Heartland

Hospice Services, 3800 Red Bank Road, Cincinnati, OH 45227.

Russell Miller

Russell J. “Rusty” Miller, 63, Pierce Township, died April 15. He was an insurance agent for over 25 years with the Brower Insurance Agency. He was an Army veteran of Vietnam. Survived by children Brian (Melissa), Kelly Miller; siblings Cathy (Bill) VanAntwerp, Lynn (Greg Meade), Mick (Tammy), Jim (Joan) Miller. Preceded in death by brother Bill Miller. Services were April 19 at Immaculate Heart of Mary Church. Arrangements by T.P. White & Sons Funeral Home. Memorials to Immaculate Heart of Mary Church.

Harry Motz Jr.

Harry L. Motz Jr., 73, With-

amsville, died April 15. Survived by wife Betty Motz; children Rick Motz, Debra (William) Taylor; siblings Ray Motz, Marian Beckman; grandchildren Chrystal (Rob) Willmoth, Brandy (Bobby) Wilmoth; great-grandchildren Shelby Willmoth, Faith, Bobby Wilmoth. Preceded in death by parents Elizabeth, Harry Motz Sr., siblings Janet Ellard, Donald Motz. Services were April 18 at E.C. Nurre Funeral Home. Memorials to a charity of the donor’s choice.

Ronald Mullins

Ronald Leo Mullins, 77, New Richmond, died April 20. He was a supervisor at Milacron. Survived by wife Sarah Mullins; children Ronald S., David, Christopher, Patrick, Matthew (Ashley) Mullins, Sharon (Bob) Keegan, Ellen (Marty) Edwards; sisters Virginia, Audrey; 16 grandchildren; 10 great-

BUILDING PERMITS

LEGAL NOTICE 125 Storage 1958 Ohio Pike Amelia, OH 45102 RICK BRADSHAW K397/413 821 Maple Creek Rd. Moscow 45153; Ohio N ATASHA CARMIE133 CHAEL 210 Division Street, Erlanger KY 41018; KRISTEN GRIFFITH M447 212 Bethel Concord Road Bethel Ohio 45106 STEVE HACKER D114 42 S. Kline Street Amelia, Ohio 45102 CHERRI MCCALL I306 305 S. Union OH Bethel Street 45106 PEGGY MEADORS G222/ 241 & Q627/ South 134 601, Street Bethel Ohio 45106 AMANDA OOTEN R672 1060 SR 222 Bethel, Ohio 45106 TARYN SCARBOUGH R550 2191 E. Ohio Pike, Amelia, Ohio 45102 TIMOTHY TOMAK 19 Flamingo H299 Court Amelia, Ohio 45102 Legal Notice In accordance with the provisions of State law, there being due and unpaid charges for which the undersigned is entitled to satisfy an owners lien of the goods hereafter described and stored at Self Bob’s Uncle Storage, located at 1105 Old St. Rt. 74, Batavia, OH 45103 and (513)752-8110 due notice having been given to the owner of said property and all parties known to claim an interest therein, and the time, and the time specified in such notice for payment of such having expired, the goods will be sold at public auction at the above stated address to the highest bidder or otherwise disposed of on Wednesday, May 18, 2011 at 10 AM. Nita Lytle 4622 Sheaphard Rd. Batavia Ohio 45103 (Tools); Tom Clark 5929 Kellog Ave Cincinnati Oh 45244 (house goods, furn, boxes, tools, appl, TV’s or stereo equip); Sheli Fischer 3518 Jackson Pike Oh Williamsburg 45176 (Housegoods, furn, appl, office furn); Ronda Glener 2820 Eight Mile Cincinnati Oh 45244 (tools); Emma K, Whitford 500 University Ln Apt 113 Batavia Oh 45103 (housegoods, furn). 1001634767

Crestview Hills, Ky., alter, 4575 Citation Court, Batavia Township, $10,400; new, 1243 Autumnview, $99,470; new, 1263 Secretariat, $100,079. Ryan Homes, West Chester, new, 4563 Vista Meadows Drive, Batavia Township, $85,000. Robert Foy, Amelia, alter, 2862 Lindale Mt. Holly, Monroe Township. Terrell Luck, New Richmond, trailer, 2390 Laurel Lindale, Monroe Township. Thomas Willhoff, New Richmond, deck, 119 Lights Pointe, New Richmond Village, $7,700. Timothy Friedhof, Amelia, deck, 1244 White Oak, Pierce Township, $4,000. Norman Hensley, New Richmond, aler, 1204 Wilson Dunham Hill, Pierce Township. Robert Lucke Remodeling, Cincinnati, alter, 3632 Hopper Ridge, Pierce Township, $20,000. Eddie Cunningham, Amelia, garage, 1130 Orchard, Pierce Township, $21,000. Kenneth Forbes, Cincinnati, deck, 550 Hamblin, Union Township, $5,000. Premier Construction & Rehab, Columbus, deck, 4342 Mt. Carmel Tobasco, Union Township, $6,340. Ragland Investments, Milford, alter, 1167 McCane Court, Union Township. Combs Builders, Cincinnati, hot tub,

Paula Posival

Paula Graham Posival, 63, died April 19. Survived by children Maggie (David) Brown, Katrina (Tom) Gross, Mindy, John (Nikki), Lee (Melissa Donaldson) Motz; grandchildren Rob, Jenna, Evan Brown, Tyler, Kyle Gross, Dalton, Carley, Logan Stichtenoth, MacKenzie, Gavin Motz, Ava Donaldson; siblings Pam Anderson, Ginger Brezinski, Jan (Jack Hastings) Graham, Jill (Rich) Godfroy, Gaea (Terry) Morris, Sara , Hank (Violet) Graham. Preceded in death by son Anthony Motz, siblings Rick, Pat Graham.

Arrangements by Craver-Riggs Funeral Home. Memorials to: Cincinnati Nature Center, 4949 Tealtown Road, Milford, OH 45150.

James Skeens

James David Skeens, 63, died April 17. He was an Army veteran. Survived by daughter Rachel (Frank) Miller; grandchildren Jessica, Jake, Alex, Alyssa, Abbi, Greyson, Katie, Noah; stepchildren Anthony (Jodie) Noble, Kristina Atkins; mother Ruth Skeens; fiancée Eva Spain; siblings Deedee Shiver, Judy Diane Carroll, Sherry Overbeck, Beverly Stricker, Lynn Perry; great-grandchildren Blake, Haven. Preceded in death by father Jimmy Skeens, daughter Rhonda Skeens. Services were April 21 at E.C. Nurre Funeral Home. Memorials to the American Cancer Society.

REAL ESTATE

5059 Eagles View, Union Township. Jason Hess, Cincinnati, HVAC 4266 Cider Mill, Union Township. Robert Kling, Cincinnati, remodel basement, 5012 Hurlingham Way, Union Township. Chris Clark, Williamsburg, addition, 3528 Bootjack Corner, Williamsburg Township $14,000. Archie Poe, Batavia, HVAC, 2865 Old Ohio 32, Williamsburg Township.

Commercial

Cintas, Cincinnati, fire suppression, 560 N. High St., Mt. Orab Village. North Point Development, Georgetown, alter-Snap Fitness, 127 North Point, Mt. Orab Village, $5,700. Electro-Mech Services, Russellville, alter, 409 N. High St., Mt. Orab Village. Ketan Patel, Amelia, alter, 208 Amelia Olive Branch, Batavia Township, $10,000. Robert Knight Architect, Cincinnati, four family residence, 507 Old Ohio 74, Union Township. Preferred Fire Protection, Fairfield, fire suppression, 4450 Eastgate Blvd., Union Township. H & H Structural Contracting, Fairfield, alter-Fashion Nails, 4450 Eastgate Blvd., Union Township, $22,000. Latosha Hodsed, Amelia, alter, 482 Ohio 125, Union Township.

Clermont County real estate transfer information is provided as a public service by the office of Clermont County Auditor Linda L. Fraley.

AMELIA VILLAGE

17 Belwood Court, Maple Street Homes LLC to Albert Osborn & Kathleen Grieco, 0.1520 acre, $140,000. 2 E. Main St., Bernard Fox Jr. & Sandra Fox to William Rapp, 0.2500 acre, $105,000. 32 Hummingbird Way, Aurora Loan Services LLC to John Gosney, 0.2300 acre, $97,000. 66 Tall Trees Drive, The Drees Co. to Steven Kress, $62,000.

BATAVIA TOWNSHIP

3665 Bristol Lake Drive, Larry & Jane Long to Richard & Janet Bishop, $233,200. 2 Hammann Drive, Raymond Ayers to Jamie Madden, 0.7900 acre, $45,000. 56 Ledgerwoods Drive, Federal National Mortgage Assoc. to Lisa George, $57,000. 117 Madison Park, RE RECYCLE IT LLC to Burnet Capital LLC, $50,000. 1265 Secretariat & Stablehand, Fischer Development Co. II Inc. to Fischer Single Family Homes II

Gary is 40 years old, but running marathons makes him feel like he’s still 20.

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CE-0000454145

Residential

The Drees Co., Ft. Mitchell, Ky., new, 5 Cedarwood, Amelia Village, $124,000; new, 4241 Bobwhite, Union Township, $127,260. Decks by Design Inc., Burlington, Ky., deck, 1211 Sprinters Crossing, Batavia Township, $5,000. Fischer Single Family Homes,

grandchildren. Preceded in death by brother Larry Shannon. Services were April 23 at the Glen Este Church of Christ. Arrangements by E.C. Nurre Funeral Home. Memorials to the Glen Este Church of Christ Building Fund.

To learn more about behavioral targeting, use your smartphone to scan the QR code. Or, for a link to our mobile site text YAHOO to 513859.

LLC, 0.1377 acre, $75,214. 4624 Steeplechase Drive, Federal National Mortgage Assoc. to Ronald & Patricia French, 0.2993 acre, $213,000.

BATAVIA VILLAGE

388 North Street, Michael & Sherri Beerman to Donald & Victoria Clevenger, 0.1100 acre, $167,900. 680 Old Ohio 32, W. Douglas & Patricia Auxier to Gerald & Ruth Owens, 0.2310 acre, $21,500.

MONROE TOWNSHIP

3049 Lindale Mt. Holly Road, Daniel & Connie Jump to Everett Glen Black, 1.1500 acre, $66,000.

NEW RICHMOND VILLAGE

Old U.S. Rt. 52, Tonya Strunk & Linda Deaton to Dale & Angela Wiesner, 0.0560 acre, $9,000. Union Station Way, Grand Communities, Ltd to Fischer Single Family Homes II LLC, 0.2540 acre, $27,550.

OHIO TOWNSHIP

Lindale Nicholsville Road, CASP Properties LLC to Willis & Alissa Gardner, 0.6440 acre, $4,000.

LEGAL NOTICE Jonathan May D11 592 Mercury Drive Cincinnati, OH 45244 John Wesley A3 33 Lori Lane #6 Amelia, OH 45102 You are hereby notified that your personal belongings stored at Eastside Storage, 4400 St. Rt. 222, Ste A, Batavia, OH 45103, 715 Cincinnati Batavia Pike Cincinnati, OH 45245 1170 Ohio Pike Amelia, OH 45102 will be sold for payment due. Legal Notice The following Storage unit(s) from Stronghold of Eastgate will be sold at public auction by Don Bates Auctioneers, at 758 Old State Route 74, Cincinnati Ohio 45245 on Saturday, April 23rd, 2011 at 10:00 a.m. and will continue until all units are sold. The unit numbers, names and last known addresses are as follows: Unit #222 - Anthony A. Williams, 4051 McClean Dr. Cincinnati, Ohio 45255; Unit #368 - Shane Carter, 3430 Drake St. Cincinnati, Ohio 45244; Units #036 & 262 - Christy L. Byrd, 1154 Beechridge Ct. Batavia, Ohio 45103. Please send me an affidavit to verify this ad to Stronghold of Eastgate, 758 Old State Rt. 74, Cincinnati, Ohio 45245

PIERCE TOWNSHIP

1422 Edgewood Drive, Citimortgage Inc. to Charles Sims, $14,000. 3648 Highland Green, Fischer Single Family Homes II LLC to Susan Croutwater, 0.3840 acre, $270,000. 1012 Legendwood Lane, Jeffrey & Jeanne Feldkamp, trustees to Cameron & Carey Parker, 1.4500 acre, $470,000. 537 Locust Run Road, Barbara Summers to Jennifer & Jay Chamberlain, 6.8030 acre, $425,000. 1156 Thornhill, Ronald Rishforth to Warren Anderson, 510.0000 acre, $180,000. 3545 Whitehills Drive, Robert & Lindsey Ringhand to Benjamin Ghearing, $225,000.

UNION TOWNSHIP

4031 Ashwood Court, MorEquity Inc. to Christopher Rowland, 0.2480 acre, $144,000. 445 Ashworth Court, Nicholas & Theresa Ciampone to Joy Harbert, $190,000. 3983 Benjamin St., Burchell & Dixie Hoskins to Cathy Vaske, $122,500. 625 Brandy Way, Joseph & Rachel Murdock to Scott Jackson, $190,000. 4509 Clermont Lane, Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. to Rebecca Murrison, 1.6960 acre, $27,000. 794 Clough Pike, Wayne & Eloise Smith to Wells Fargo Financial Ohio 1 Inc., 0.5000 acre, $63,334. 3845 Dieckman Lane, Thressa Smith to Kristina Lay, 0.4600 acre, $112,400. 991 Glendale Road, Mary Ann Chadwell, Executor to Melissa Little, $106,500. 4590 Greensbury Court, Jonathan & Jamie Vanvolkinburg to Dane & Jennifer Schaeffer, 0.2710 acre, $168,000. 855 Hawthorne Drive, Dolores McKay to Jonathan Fraley, $76,000. 4115 Mt. Carmel Tobasco Road, Mark & Catherine Pence to William Gregory, 1.2800 acre, $15,000. 3960 Nine Mile Road, M-Six Penvest II Business Trust to Motel 6 Operating LP, 3.5700 acre, $1,638,692.10. 956 Round Bottom Road, Federal National Mortgage Assoc. to Stewart Lovdal, 1.0900 acre, $20,313. 1174 Wingwood Trail, Jitendraprasad Patel & Snehlata Patel to Kamal Patel, 0.4440 acre, $130,000. 597 Woodland View Drive, Adam & Kelly Spacht to Darwin Carmichael, $133,000.

WILLIAMSBURG TOWNSHIP

4063 Maple Drive, Federal National Mortgage Assoc. to Ivan Miller, 0.4870 acre, $29,900. 3293 Musgrove Road, Deborah & Floyd Hensley Sr. to Christopher & Kimberly Gabbard, 2.4040 acre, $185,000. 4274 N. Ellis Road, Robert Baker to Christopher & Brittany Sharp, 0.9000 acre, $86,500. 3345 Ashton Road, Federal National Mortgage Assoc. to Tina Strubbe, 6.0000 acre, $55,000.

WILLIAMSBURG VILLAGE

146 & 148 Santa Barbara Drive, Angelo Santoro to Michael & Andrea Vance, 2.8500 acre, $51,500. 237 S. Broadway St., Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. to Michael Poehner, 0.4590 acre, $16,000. 488 West Main St., James Vaughn to Kellie Wright, 0.0950 acre, $29,000.


April 27, 2011

Community Journal

Is IBS with CONSTIPATION keeping you from your favorite seat?

If you’re not finding overall symptom relief,† ask your doctor if AMITIZA can help. Millions of people suffer from Irritable Bowel Syndrome with Constipation (IBS-C). †Symptoms are defined as abdominal discomfort, abdominal pain, bowel habits, and other IBS symptoms.

AMITIZA (8 mcg) twice daily is approved to treat Irritable Bowel Syndrome with Constipation (IBS-C) in women 18 years of age and older.

AMITIZA may help

• AMITIZA is not for everyone. If you know or suspect you have a bowel blockage, do not take AMITIZA. If you are unsure, your healthcare provider should evaluate your condition before starting AMITIZA.You should not take AMITIZA if you have severe diarrhea.

• AMITIZA is not a laxative or fiber • AMITIZA is the only prescription medicine that is FDA-approved to relieve the overall symptoms of IBS-C in women. Individual results may vary

Get started with the AMITIZA Healthy Savings Program* Just visit AMITIZAsavings5.com or call 1-866-746-9888 [option 5] to learn more about AMITIZA and sign up for the AMITIZA Healthy Savings Program. As a member, you’ll save up to $35 a month on your AMITIZA prescription.* *Must meet Eligibility Requirements. Offer good for up to 12 refills. Offer expires 12/31/11.

Important Safety Information

• AMITIZA has not been studied in pregnant women and should only be used during a pregnancy if the potential benefits justify the potential risk to the fetus. Women should have a negative pregnancy test before beginning treatment with AMITIZA and need to practice effective birth control measures. If you are pregnant or become pregnant while being treated with AMITIZA, talk to your healthcare provider to evaluate the risks to the fetus. • Some patients taking AMITIZA may experience nausea or diarrhea. If nausea occurs, take AMITIZA with food. If your nausea or diarrhea becomes severe, tell your healthcare provider. • Within an hour of taking AMITIZA, a sensation of chest tightness and shortness of breath may occur. These symptoms usually go away within three hours, but may recur with repeated use. Tell your healthcare provider if you experience these symptoms. • The most common side effects of taking AMITIZA (8 mcg) twice daily, pink capsules for IBS-C are nausea, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. These are not all the side effects associated with AMITIZA.

Talk to your doctor. Ask about AMITIZA.

Please see Brief Summary on adjacent page. You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

CE-0000456794

MARKETED BY: Sucampo Pharma Americas, Inc., Bethesda, MD 20814 and Takeda Pharmaceuticals America, Inc., Deerfield, IL 60015. AMITIZA is a trademark of Sucampo Pharmaceuticals, Inc., registered with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and used under license by Takeda Pharmaceuticals America, Inc. ©2011 Takeda Pharmaceuticals North America, Inc. LUB-03096 Printed in U.S.A. 03/11

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B12

Community Journal

April 27, 2011

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Initial U.S. Approval: 2006 BRIEF SUMMARY OF PRESCRIBING INFORMATION – Please see package insert for full prescribing information. INDICATIONS AND USAGE Chronic Idiopathic Constipation Amitiza ® is indicated for the treatment of chronic idiopathic constipation in adults. Irritable Bowel Syndrome with Constipation Amitiza is indicated for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome with constipation (IBS-C) in women ≥ 18 years old. DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION Amitiza should be taken twice daily orally with food and water. Physicians and patients should periodically assess the need for continued therapy. Chronic Idiopathic Constipation 24 mcg twice daily orally with food and water. Irritable Bowel Syndrome with Constipation 8 mcg twice daily orally with food and water. DOSAGE FORMS AND STRENGTHS Amitiza is available as an oval, gelatin capsule containing 8 mcg or 24 mcg of lubiprostone. • 8-mcg capsules are pink and are printed with “SPI” on one side • 24-mcg capsules are orange and are printed with “SPI” on one side CONTRAINDICATIONS Amitiza is contraindicated in patients with known or suspected mechanical gastrointestinal obstruction. WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS Pregnancy The safety of Amitiza in pregnancy has not been evaluated in humans. In guinea pigs, lubiprostone has been shown to have the potential to cause fetal loss. Amitiza should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus. Women who could become pregnant should have a negative pregnancy test prior to beginning therapy with Amitiza and should be capable of complying with effective contraceptive measures. See Use in Specific Populations (8.1). Nausea Patients taking Amitiza may experience nausea. If this occurs, concomitant administration of food with Amitiza may reduce symptoms of nausea. See Adverse Reactions (6.1). Diarrhea Amitiza should not be prescribed to patients that have severe diarrhea. Patients should be aware of the possible occurrence of diarrhea during treatment. Patients should be instructed to inform their physician if severe diarrhea occurs. See Adverse Reactions (6.1). Dyspnea In clinical trials conducted to study Amitiza in treatment of chronic idiopathic constipation and IBS-C there were reports of dyspnea. This was reported at 2.5% of the treated chronic idiopathic constipation population and at 0.4% in the treated IBS-C population. Although not classified as serious adverse events, some patients discontinued treatment on study because of this event. There have been postmarketing reports of dyspnea when using Amitiza 24 mcg. Most have not been characterized as serious adverse events, but some patients have discontinued therapy because of dyspnea. These events have usually been described as a sensation of chest tightness and difficulty taking in a breath, and generally have an acute onset within 30–60 minutes after taking the first dose. They generally resolve within a few hours after taking the dose, but recurrence has been frequently reported with subsequent doses. Bowel Obstruction In patients with symptoms suggestive of mechanical gastrointestinal obstruction, the treating physician should perform a thorough evaluation to confirm the absence of such an obstruction prior to initiating therapy with Amitiza. ADVERSE REACTIONS Clinical Studies Experience Because clinical studies are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical studies of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical studies of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice. Chronic Idiopathic Constipation Adverse reactions in dose-finding, efficacy, and long-term clinical studies: The data described below reflect exposure to Amitiza in 1175 patients with chronic idiopathic constipation (29 at 24 mcg once daily, 1113 at 24 mcg twice daily, and 33 at 24 mcg three times daily) over 3- or 4-week, 6-month, and 12-month treatment periods; and from 316 patients receiving placebo over short-term exposure (≤ 4 weeks). The total population (N = 1491) had a mean age of 49.7 (range 19–86) years; was 87.1% female; 84.8% Caucasian, 8.5% African American, 5.0% Hispanic, 0.9% Asian; and 15.5% elderly (≥ 65 years of age). Table 1 presents data for the adverse reactions that occurred in at least 1% of patients who received Amitiza 24 mcg twice daily and that occurred more frequently with study drug than placebo. In addition, corresponding adverse reaction incidence rates in patients receiving Amitiza 24 mcg once daily is shown. Table 1: Percent of Patients with Adverse Reactions (Chronic Idiopathic Constipation) Placebo System/Adverse Reaction1

Gastrointestinal disorders Nausea Diarrhea Abdominal pain Abdominal distension Flatulence Vomiting Loose stools Abdominal discomfort2 Dyspepsia Dry mouth Stomach discomfort Nervous system disorders Headache Dizziness General disorders and site administration conditions Edema Fatigue Chest discomfort/pain Respiratory, thoracic, and mediastinal disorders Dyspnea

N = 316 %

Amitiza 24 mcg Once Daily N = 29 %

Amitiza 24 mcg Twice Daily N = 1113 %

3 <1 3 2 2 <1 <1 <1 <1

17 7 3 3 3 -

29 12 8 6 6 3 3 2 2 1 1

5 <1

3 3

11 3

<1 <1 -

3

3 2 2

-

3

2

Includes only those events associated with treatment (possibly, probably, or definitely related, as assessed by the investigator). 2 This term combines “abdominal tenderness,” “abdominal rigidity,” “gastrointestinal discomfort,” and “abdominal discomfort.”

1

Nausea: Approximately 29% of patients who received Amitiza 24 mcg twice daily experienced an adverse reaction of nausea; 4% of patients had severe nausea while 9% of patients discontinued treatment due to nausea. The rate of nausea associated with Amitiza (any dosage) was substantially lower among male (7%) and elderly patients (18%). Further analysis of the safety data revealed that long-term exposure to Amitiza does not appear to place patients at an elevated risk for experiencing nausea. The incidence of nausea increased in a dose-dependent manner with the lowest overall incidence for nausea reported at the 24 mcg once daily dosage (17%). In open-labeled, long-term studies, patients were allowed to adjust the dosage of Amitiza down to 24 mcg once daily from 24 mcg twice daily if experiencing nausea. Nausea decreased when Amitiza was administered with food. No patients in the clinical studies were hospitalized due to nausea. CE-0000456796

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Diarrhea: Approximately 12% of patients who received Amitiza 24 mcg twice daily experienced an adverse reaction of diarrhea; 2% of patients had severe diarrhea while 2% of patients discontinued treatment due to diarrhea. Electrolytes: No serious adverse reactions of electrolyte imbalance were reported in clinical studies, and no clinically significant changes were seen in serum electrolyte levels in patients receiving Amitiza. Less common adverse reactions: The following adverse reactions (assessed by investigator as probably or definitely related to treatment) occurred in less than 1% of patients receiving Amitiza 24 mcg twice daily in clinical studies, occurred in at least two patients, and occurred more frequently in patients receiving study drug than those receiving placebo: fecal incontinence, muscle cramp, defecation urgency, frequent bowel movements, hyperhidrosis, pharyngolaryngeal pain, intestinal functional disorder, anxiety, cold sweat, constipation, cough, dysgeusia, eructation, influenza, joint swelling, myalgia, pain, syncope, tremor, decreased appetite. Irritable Bowel Syndrome with Constipation Adverse reactions in dose-finding, efficacy, and long-term clinical studies: The data described below reflect exposure to Amitiza 8 mcg twice daily in 1011 patients with IBS-C for up to 12 months and from 435 patients receiving placebo twice daily for up to 16 weeks. The total population (N = 1267) had a mean age of 46.5 (range 18–85) years; was 91.6% female; 77.5% Caucasian, 12.9% African American, 8.6% Hispanic, 0.4% Asian; and 8.0% elderly (≥ 65 years of age). Table 2 presents data for the adverse reactions that occurred in at least 1% of patients who received Amitiza 8 mcg twice daily and that occurred more frequently with study drug than placebo. Table 2: Percent of Patients with Adverse Reactions (IBS-C Studies)

N = 435 %

Amitiza 8 mcg Twice Daily N = 1011 %

4 4 5 2

8 7 5 3

Placebo System/Adverse Reaction

1

Gastrointestinal disorders Nausea Diarrhea Abdominal pain Abdominal distension

Includes only those events associated with treatment (possibly or probably related, as assessed by the investigator). Less common adverse reactions: The following adverse reactions (assessed by investigator as probably related to treatment) occurred in less than 1% of patients receiving Amitiza 8 mcg twice daily in clinical studies, occurred in at least two patients, and occurred more frequently in patients receiving study drug than those receiving placebo: dyspepsia, loose stools, vomiting, fatigue, dry mouth, edema, increased alanine aminotransferase, increased aspartate aminotransferase, constipation, eructation, gastroesophageal reflux disease, dyspnea, erythema, gastritis, increased weight, palpitations, urinary tract infection, anorexia, anxiety, depression, fecal incontinence, fibromyalgia, hard feces, lethargy, rectal hemorrhage, pollakiuria. One open-labeled, long-term clinical study was conducted in patients with IBS-C receiving Amitiza 8 mcg twice daily. This study comprised 476 intent-to-treat patients (mean age 47.5 [range 21– 82] years; 93.5% female; 79.2% Caucasian, 11.6% African American, 8.6% Hispanic, 0.2% Asian; 7.8% ≥ 65 years of age) who were treated for an additional 36 weeks following an initial 12–16-week, double-blinded treatment period. The adverse reactions that were reported during this study were similar to those observed in the two double-blinded, controlled studies. Postmarketing Experience The following adverse reactions have been identified during postapproval use of Amitiza 24 mcg for the treatment of chronic idiopathic constipation. Because these reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to drug exposure. Voluntary reports of adverse reactions occurring with the use of Amitiza include the following: syncope, allergic-type reactions (including rash, swelling, and throat tightness), malaise, increased heart rate, muscle cramps or muscle spasms, rash, and asthenia. DRUG INTERACTIONS Based upon the results of in vitro human microsome studies, there is low likelihood of drug–drug interactions. In vitro studies using human liver microsomes indicate that cytochrome P450 isoenzymes are not involved in the metabolism of lubiprostone. Further in vitro studies indicate microsomal carbonyl reductase may be involved in the extensive biotransformation of lubiprostone to the metabolite M3 (See Pharmacokinetics [12.3].). Additionally, in vitro studies in human liver microsomes demonstrate that lubiprostone does not inhibit cytochrome P450 isoforms 3A4, 2D6, 1A2, 2A6, 2B6, 2C9, 2C19, or 2E1, and in vitro studies of primary cultures of human hepatocytes show no induction of cytochrome P450 isoforms 1A2, 2B6, 2C9, and 3A4 by lubiprostone. No drug–drug interaction studies have been performed. Based on the available information, no protein binding–mediated drug interactions of clinical significance are anticipated. USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS Pregnancy Teratogenic effects: Pregnancy Category C. [See Warnings and Precautions (5.1).] Teratology studies with lubiprostone have been conducted in rats at oral doses up to 2000 mcg/kg/day (approximately 332 times the recommended human dose, based on body surface area), and in rabbits at oral doses of up to 100 mcg/kg/day (approximately 33 times the recommended human dose, based on body surface area). Lubiprostone was not teratogenic in rats or rabbits. In guinea pigs, lubiprostone caused fetal loss at repeated doses of 10 and 25 mcg/kg/day (approximately 2 and 6 times the highest recommended human dose, respectively, based on body surface area) administered on days 40 to 53 of gestation. There are no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women. However, during clinical testing of Amitiza, six women became pregnant. Per protocol, Amitiza was discontinued upon pregnancy detection. Four of the six women delivered healthy babies. The fifth woman was monitored for 1 month following discontinuation of study drug, at which time the pregnancy was progressing as expected; the patient was subsequently lost to follow-up. The sixth pregnancy was electively terminated. Amitiza should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus. If a woman is or becomes pregnant while taking the drug, the patient should be apprised of the potential hazard to the fetus. Nursing Mothers It is not known whether lubiprostone is excreted in human milk. Because many drugs are excreted in human milk and because of the potential for serious adverse reactions in nursing infants from lubiprostone, a decision should be made whether to discontinue nursing or to discontinue the drug, taking into account the importance of the drug to the mother. Pediatric Use Safety and effectiveness in pediatric patients have not been studied. Geriatric Use Chronic Idiopathic Constipation The efficacy of Amitiza in the elderly (≥ 65 years of age) subpopulation was consistent with the efficacy in the overall study population. Of the total number of constipated patients treated in the dose-finding, efficacy, and long-term studies of Amitiza, 15.5% were ≥ 65 years of age, and 4.2% were ≥ 75 years of age. Elderly patients taking Amitiza (any dosage) experienced a lower incidence rate of associated nausea compared to the overall study population taking Amitiza (18% vs. 29%, respectively). Irritable Bowel Syndrome with Constipation The safety profile of Amitiza in the elderly (≥ 65 years of age) subpopulation (8.0% were ≥ 65 years of age and 1.8% were ≥ 75 years of age) was consistent with the safety profile in the overall study population. Clinical studies of Amitiza did not include sufficient numbers of patients aged 65 years and over to determine whether they respond differently from younger patients. Renal Impairment Amitiza has not been studied in patients who have renal impairment. 1

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Hepatic Impairment Amitiza has not been studied in patients who have hepatic impairment. OVERDOSAGE There have been two confirmed reports of overdosage with Amitiza. The first report involved a 3-year-old child who accidentally ingested 7 or 8 capsules of 24 mcg of Amitiza and fully recovered. The second report was a study patient who self-administered a total of 96 mcg of Amitiza per day for 8 days. The patient experienced no adverse reactions during this time. Additionally, in a Phase 1 cardiac repolarization study, 38 of 51 patients given a single oral dose of 144 mcg of Amitiza (6 times the highest recommended dose) experienced an adverse event that was at least possibly related to the study drug. Adverse reactions that occurred in at least 1% of these patients included the following: nausea (45%), diarrhea (35%), vomiting (27%), dizziness (14%), headache (12%), abdominal pain (8%), flushing/hot flash (8%), retching (8%), dyspnea (4%), pallor (4%), stomach discomfort (4%), anorexia (2%), asthenia (2%), chest discomfort (2%), dry mouth (2%), hyperhidrosis (2%), and syncope (2%). PATIENT COUNSELING INFORMATION Dosing Instructions Amitiza should be taken twice daily with food and water to reduce potential symptoms of nausea. The capsule should be taken once in the morning and once in the evening daily as prescribed. The capsule should be swallowed whole and should not be broken apart or chewed. Physicians and patients should periodically assess the need for continued therapy. Patients on treatment who experience severe nausea, diarrhea, or dyspnea should inform their physician. Patients taking Amitiza may experience dyspnea within an hour of the first dose. This symptom generally resolves within 3 hours, but may recur with repeat dosing. Chronic Idiopathic Constipation Patients should take a single 24 mcg capsule of Amitiza twice daily with food and water. Irritable Bowel Syndrome with Constipation Patients should take a single 8 mcg capsule of Amitiza twice daily with food and water. Marketed by: Sucampo Pharma Americas, Inc., Bethesda, MD 20814 and Takeda Pharmaceuticals America, Inc., Deerfield, IL 60015 Amitiza® is a registered trademark of Sucampo Pharmaceuticals, Inc. AMT0509-R1/brf L-LUB-0509-8

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