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LOOKING FORWARD TO

2018

From new roads and businesses to stunning new parks and hike-bike trails, these projects have towns, villages and townships talking.

New apartments are part of ongoing development in Union Township and are expected to wrap up in 2018.

Construction of Milford’s new Public Works Facility is underway on Garfield Avenue at Bay Street.

Work on Branch Hill Guinea Pike will stretch past the intersection at Cook and Weber roads next year.

THE ENQUIRER/SHEILA VILVENS

CHUCK GIBSON/FOR THE COMMUNITY PRESS

FILE PHOTO

Union Township expects more growth

Improvements in the works for Milford

Miami Twp. success route is road work

Chuck Gibson

Sheila Vilvens

loveland@communitypress.com

Cincinnati Enquirer USA TODAY NETWORK

UNION TOWNSHIP – In Union Township, Clermont County, growth and development of 2017 is expected to continue into 2018. The opening of a new West Clermont High School, made possible through a township and school district partnership, was a major highlight in 2017, Trustee John McGraw said. New school construction continues into 2018 with work beginning on a new Willowville and a new Summerside Elementary schools. The New Year will begin, however, with the grand opening of the eagerly awaited Crossroads Church next to Jungle Jim's in the Eastgate area, McGraw said. This is scheduled for the weekend of Jan. 6-7. “This should bring new additional life to the shopping area in Eastgate,” he said. In other development news around the Eastgate area, the Meijer parking lot is expected to be the site of a new Waffle House, McGraw said. Aldi is looking to expand its building. “Mt. Carmel Brewing expansion is under construction, and I expect them to open this year," he said. Construction projects McGraw expects to wrap up in 2018 include Clover Senior Apartments, Trilogy Senior Home, Echelon Luxury Apartments, La-Z-Boy, Cubesmart Storage, a new nursing home on Ohio Pike, and Estrella MI Homes. McGraw said Mercy Health could begin work on a new building at Ivy Pointe possibly as early as February. Road improvements continue as well on Bells Lane, Mt. Carmel Tobasco Road, and Summerside. All of this adds up to another busy year in Union Township.

MILFORD – Completing infrastructure improvements and capital projects highlight city of Milford plans for 2018. Slated for completion this summer, the new Public Works Department facility will provide a modern training room and more office space for personnel, and additional parking garage space for public utilities equipment and vehicles. The Milford Corridor Phase I project, the State Route 28/Main Street, and Price Road Storm Projects top the list of roads, walkways and good aesthetics beyond downtown Old Milford and into the business corridor of uptown Milford. Improvements will include curb, sidewalk, storm catch basins, pavement stabilization and resurfacing. Some Ohio Public Works Commission funding will help pay for the projects which provide improved vehicle safety, prevention of erosion damage, and decorative lighting. Expected completion of the Phase I Corridor project is in May. Phase II improvements feature modifications of U.S. 50 and Water Street with east and westbound left turn lanes, traffic signal changes and a new traffic signal to provide safer left turn movement and traffic flow for new development at the bridge in Old Milford.

See MIAMI, Page 2A

New faces lead the way in Loveland Chuck Gibson loveland@communitypress.com

LOVELAND – A new mayor and new faces at City Hall in Loveland promise “hope and change” for the city alongside the scenic Little Miami River in 2018. Restoring public trust, restoring order and assuring the people’s voice is heard is the No. 1 priority cited by Loveland officials for 2018. November elections delivered a clear message

FIND YOUR NEWS To see news submitted for your community, visit http://bit.ly/YourCommunities and select your community or click on the red box.

to stop the turmoil at City Hall. Rebuilding community relationships will come before any brick and mortar development. Loveland officials are already working with business and property owners to guide and ease the process to a late spring/early summer grand reopening of the historic downtown business district devastated by the 2017 Memorial Day weekend fire. Committees for future plans to review and revise the City Charter, Master Plan review, and

MIAMI TOWNSHIP – Improved safety for motorists and pedestrians along with improved traffic flow are the goals of a road project getting underway in Miami Township in 2018. The project will begin on Branch Hill Guinea Pike from the intersection with Jer Les Drive all the way past the intersection of Branch Hill Guinea/Cook/Weber Roads, according to Miami Township Administrator Jeff Wright. Improvements include the addition of left-turn lanes at each leg of the intersection with designated left turn arrows to reduce congestion, the addition of a sidewalk on one side of Branch Hill Guinea Pike, and construction of curbs and gutters to improve the stormwater Wright situation, he said. The lengthy process of relocating overhead utility lines and poles wrapped up in 2017. “We anticipate construction beginning in the spring of 2018,” Wright said. Improvements are coming to Miami Township parks in the new year. “In addition to some park furniture replacements we will make next year at various parks, we are planning on making exterior repairs to and reroofing the Lemming House at Community Park,” Wright said. “This building is rented constantly by residents, nonprofits and businesses for meetings and celebrations. We will also be replacing existing flooring there to improve the user experience and reduce our maintenance costs.” The largest challenge for the township in 2018 will be having sufficient funding for the annual street re-

continued growth for LovelandMadeira corridor, Loveland Commerce Center, and historic zoning review will include residents and other community stakeholders. City Hall will collaborate with schools, businesses, surrounding townships, and the Little Miami River Chamber Alliance. A new website and legislative calendar will keep the public informed of upcoming council actions.

Contact us News ..........................248-8600 Retail advertising ..............768-8404 Classified advertising .........242-4000 Delivery ........................576-8240 See page A2 for additional information

To Our Readers Starting in mid-January, your weekly newspaper is getting a new name! Going forward, this newspaper will be called East Side Community Press and serve a larger geography than your weekly has in the past. Please be assured we remain committed to providing the most compelling news content possible serving your community and those around it. The issues that affect you, your family and your community are important to us. We reaffirm our mission to deliver a balanced mix of news, information, entertainment and more to help you make informed decisions.Please share questions and concerns with Senior News Director Michael Kilian at mkilian@enquirer.com.

Vol. 37 No. 40 © 2018 The Community Press ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


NEWS

2A • COMMUNITY JOURNAL • JANUARY 3, 2018

Big things on track in Glendale

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GLENDALE – The village is inching closer to the sound of silence in 2018. Glendale Village Administrator Walter Cordes says the Glendale Quiet Zone Project, which means trains will no longer blow their horns when passing through the village, should be complete in the fall of 2018. Cordes says the pro-

Glendale will continue its work on a quiet zone to ban train horns from blaring through the village. FILE PHOTO

ject has been successful thanks to volunteer work and financial contributions of supportive Glen-

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Nancy Daly Community Content Strategist 513-768-8530 or 859-578-1059 ndaly@enquirer.com @Nancy_Daly

Jeanne Houck Reporter 513-248-7129 jhouck@enquirer.com @jeannehouck

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dale residents. The village administration has also worked with CSX this fall to move the noisy idling and staged railroad train engines to the northern limits of Glendale; a distance where they will not be heard by residents. CSX’s use of the new idling location has already begun. It is expected to be complete in early 2018. 2018 will also bring a new look to Glendale Police Station. An interior/ exterior remodeling project is scheduled for completion in February. The village will change its notification system for emergencies, road closures and public safety in 2018 as well. The village will go to Hamilton County’s new RAVE phone notification system, which the administrator says has more capabilities and is significantly less expensive.

Miami Continued from Page 1A

Delivery For customer service: 513-576-8240

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paving program, he said. With 156 miles of roads to repair, the township is doing a preliminary study to record road conditions and establish a priority list. “We also eagerly await celebrating the grand openings of some new businesses that are currently in the pipeline of construction or planning,” Wright said.


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JANUARY 3, 2018 • COMMUNITY PRESS/EAST • 3A

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4A • COMMUNITY PRESS/EAST • JANUARY 3, 2018

Freezing temps call for warm, stick-to-ribs meals If the forecast is correct, by the time you read this column, the temperature will have dipped to single digits. But as I write, it’s warm enough outside to qualify for a spring day. I took advantage and hung a full line of clothes up. My office window has a clear view of clothes line with the sheets and towels dancing in the wind. I guess that’s why the old adage rings true for those of us living in this area: “If you Rita don’t like the Heikenfeld weather today, stick around - it RITA’S KITCHEN will change quick.â€? The recipes for today are real tummy warmers, stickto-your-ribs kind of food. I had extra bell peppers in the veggie bin so was glad I could use them in these recipes. One more thing I need to mention is the response from readers about the apron poem. Oh my gosh, did it ever resonate with many of you. Thank you for sharing your memories about your aprons, some of which have been handed down for generations. I’ll be including those on my abouteating.com site, so check it out. (Have tissues ready, too - some are pretty touching‌). Coming soon: 2018 Trends Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator and author. Find her blog online at Abouteating.com. Email her at rita@com munitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchenâ€? in the subject line.

Slow cooked pepper steak with scallion sesame rice Another go to taste recipe. Ingredients 1-1/2 to 2 pounds round or sirloin steak, trimmed and sliced into 1/2� or so thick strips 1/3 cup soy sauce 1-1/2 generous cups chopped onion 1 generous teaspoon minced garlic Salt and pepper to taste 1/4 teaspoon ginger paste (buy this in the Oriental section of the store, or simply use 1/2 teaspoon powdered ginger) 2 bell peppers cut into strips - I like the colored bells 5 plum tomatoes cut into wedges or 1 container grape tomatoes, halved

Slurry 1/4 cup cold water mixed with 1 tablespoon cornstarch

Warm up tummies with a steaming dish of pork and peppers. RITA HEIKENFELD FOR THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Pork Tenderloin with Red and Yellow Peppers

Instructions Spray inside of crockpot. Place steak, soy sauce, onion, garlic, salt, pepper and ginger into crockpot. Stir. Cook on low 4 hours or until meat is tender. Taste and if steak is flavorful enough, make slurry of just the cold water and cornstarch. If it needs more flavor, add 1/4 cup soy sauce to slurry. Stir into steak mixture. Add peppers. Cook on low or high until peppers are crisp/tender. This may take up to half an hour or more, depending on setting. Stir in tomatoes. Serve over scallion sesame rice. Serves 6-8.

Feel free to adjust to your own taste. Don’t overcook the pork or it may be tough/dry. 1 (1-pound) pork tenderloin, trimmed and cut crosswise into 1-inch-thick medallions (slice on the diagonal) Salt and pepper to taste Olive oil Palmful chopped fresh rosemary, divided 4 canned anchovy fillets, drained and mashed or 1 very generous tablespoon anchovy paste 1 generous tablespoon minced garlic 1 red bell pepper, cut into strips 1 yellow bell pepper, cut into strips Balsamic vinegar

Scallion sesame rice 1-1/2 cups rice 3 cups water or half water and half low sodium beef broth 1 teaspoon salt (opt) 1 bunch scallions (green onions), sliced thinly - I like both green and white parts Pure sesame seed oil, regular or toasted

Preparation Heat a large skillet over medium-high heat. Film the pan with olive oil - a few tablespoons. Sprinkle pork with salt and pepper. Add pork to pan; cook 5 minutes. Reduce heat to medium; turn pork over. Add about half the rosemary, anchovies, garlic, and bell peppers; cook until peppers are tender and pork is done. This won’t take long, under 10 minutes. Drizzle with vinegar. Top with remaining rosemary.

Cook rice according to package directions. Stir in scallions and shake in enough sesame oil to taste. Tip: Toasted sesame oil vs regular Regular: used for higher temperature cooking or frying/stir frying. Toasted: a seasoning oil added for flavor, usually not for frying. Once opened, store sesame oil in refrigerator.

       

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6A • COMMUNITY PRESS/EAST • JANUARY 3, 2018

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COMMUNITY PRESS

EDITORIALS | LETTERS | COLUMNS | CH@TROOM

CH@TROOM

Hamilton County is No. 1, and it hurts

Denise Driehaus and Todd Portune COMMUNITY PRESS GUEST COLUMNISTS

Hamilton County is on an exciting path to be more prosperous, safe and healthy. We have invested in critical infrastructure, economic development initiatives, strategies to fight the disease of addiction and continue to reduce infant mortality. Unfortunately, drastic cuts by the State of Ohio are obstructing our efforts and impeding our growth. The 2018 general fund operating budget we approved this week absorbed $24 million in cuts from the state as well as $8 million in unfunded mandates. When you factor in all state cuts and the reductions in the payments the state uses to reimburse counties for implementing state programs, the total loss suffered by Hamilton County and the agencies supported by county property tax levies is $57 Million per year. Balancing the budget was challenging and very frustrating because of these cuts. Out of all 88 counties in Ohio, Hamilton County taxpayers are the number one donors to the state, sending an extra $410 million annually to the State of Ohio in income and sales tax compared to other counties and controlling for population size. If that weren’t bad enough, we also get less back from the State of Ohio. A recent study found Hamilton County residents have suffered the greatest losses per capita from state cuts out of any county in Ohio. Being number one hurts. Hamilton County residents pay the price in the form of: » Unfunded mandates from the state » Less money for basic services » Less money for public safety » More local taxes: public safety levies, school levies, social service levies, to make up state cuts » Increased fees to make up for state cuts Larger cuts are expected from the state in 2019 that will

definitely affect public safety and basic services. And they won’t just hit county government. These cuts also affect smaller local governments. Over the last five years, school districts, cities, villages, and townships in Hamilton County have suffered debilitating cuts, leading many to increase income or property taxes just to fund basic services like public safety. Since the 1930s, a partnership had been in place where the state sent a percentage of the very considerable amount of money it collects from income and sales taxes back to local communities to fund these essential services. Providing fewer dollars as part of that partnership has amounted to a backdoor local tax increase on working families and homeowners. Here in Hamilton County, we don’t have the luxury of passing off our budget problems to someone else. In 2018, we will maintain basic services and hold an adequate reserve. We will make certain that job-creating economic development activities continue, including preserving our ability to use what we have to guarantee a bold and bright future for the county; pledge our commitment to treatment options in response to the heroin crisis; maintain and improve our transportation infrastructure; and guarantee that fewer babies perish before just one year of life has passed. Through an extraordinary bipartisan effort, the County Commission staved off a proposed tax increase to make up for the state’s cuts. But this will not be enough in the long term. State cuts are poised to be worse in 2019. Mad? So are we. We are compelled to have a conversation as a community on how we pay for basic services in light of decreasing partnership from the state government. The Board of County Commissioners will be engaging in a strategic planning process in 2018 to develop a long-term plan for dealing with future budget challenges. We will announce our budget planning sessions in advance and welcome your involvement. Democrats Todd Portune and Denise Driehaus are Hamilton County commissioners.

Cincinnati.com/communities

“I'm going to try to entertain this year for the first time ... we'll see how it goes.” Patrick Kevin George

“At home! I have my family over and we play games and have appetizers!” Paula Kay Warren

“At home.” Michelle Littrell Games, appetizers and binge-watching on TV were in plans for New Year’s Eve . FILE PHOTO

Last week’s question

THIS WEEK’S QUESTION

How do you plan to celebrate New Year’s Eve? At home? Or a larger public celebration? Which is best?

With the increase in the number of flights out of CVG, are you flying more out of Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport or plan to fly more? Why or why not?

“At home sleeping.” John Scales

“Stay warm inside and be asleep by 10 p.m.” Jamie Bothen

Every week we ask readers a question they can reply to via email. Send your answers to ndaly@ communitypress.com with Ch@troom in the subject line.

Duke Energy seeks base fee increase, undercutting thrift You should be able to manage your utility bills by controlling how much energy you use at home. That’s Shannon logical and BakerstraightforBranstetter ward. But COMMUNTIY PRESS Duke Energy GUEST COLUMNIST wants to change that. If Duke’s proposal to significantly raise its “customer fees” is approved, you’d lose control over a big portion of your future utility bills. Worse, lower-income homes and seniors on a fixed income, customers who can least afford a bill hike, would be hit the hardest by this change. Duke Energy’s plan is to nearly quadruple these fixed customer fees — from about $72 a year to over $270 a year — even if energy use decreases. How does a fixed customer fee work? On a typical utility bill, consumers are charged a fixed, or base, fee that applies to every customer, in addition to separate fees that depend on how much energy you use. By conserving energy — turning off lights, adjusting the thermostat or investing in energy-efficient appliances or solar — households can lower their energy use and cut their bills. But if Duke raises the fixed fees, households would see bills rise even before they flip on a light switch. Consumers who invest in efficiency and renewable energy can save a lot of money on energy costs, but with

higher fixed fees, these savings are eroded. Utility companies like Duke seek these fee hikes to lock in high profits regardless of what consumers do to lower their energy usage. Raising fixed fees hurt consumers by unfairly punishing those who need or choose to be thrifty energy users. Take Anthony Johnson, a Duke Energy customer in Cincinnati. The fee hike would undermine his family’s efforts to lower energy bills. “My family isn’t wealthy and we have health issues that require the use of medical equipment that needs to be plugged in all the time,” he says. “It’s really important that we have the ability to control how much energy we use elsewhere in order to keep our energy bills low. But Duke’s plan will take that control away from us by setting a high base fee that we can’t lower no matter how much we try to conserve power.” Low-income households and seniors on fixed incomes, who pay a larger share of their income on energy and generally use less electricity, would feel the most pain. Raising fixed fees would mean low-income households and seniors see a much larger percentage increase on their bills than higher-energy use households. In effect, raising fixed fees would also force lowincome and low-usage customers to subsidize high energy users. That’s unfair, inequitable and just plain wrong.

For Duke customer Geraldine Steel of Cincinnati, a senior on a fixed income, the proposal would force difficult choices: “Between buying groceries and paying for medicine, at the end of the month I have very little to live on. I need to replace my stove, and I’d like to purchase an energy-saving one, but if my utilities continue to increase, this will be impossible.” For households across the state already struggling to make ends meet, Duke Energy’s proposal could force devastating choices like going without a meal or necessary medication. Fortunately, residents are coming together to say “no” to unfair fixed fee hikes. This month, dozens of Cincinnati residents, including several Consumers Union members, pushed back at recent public hearings on Duke’s rate proposal. And this summer, a similar proposal by AEP Ohio in the Columbus area was dropped after the public outcry. Many utility commissions around the country have recognized the problems with higher fixed fees and have rejected most proposals to increase them. The Public Utility Commission of Ohio now has an opportunity to protect Cincinnati residents from this unfair proposal. There’s still a chance to weigh in: visit the PUCO website at puco.ohio.gov and file an online comment against the fee hike. Shannon Baker-Branstetter is a senior policy counsel for Consumers Union, the policy and mobilization division of Consumer Reports.

Stepping out of our comfort zone “There is no innovation and creativity without failure. Period.” - Brené Brown At the Loveland City David School DisKnapp trict, our eduCOMMUNITY PRESS cators hold the GUEST COLUMNIST growth and development of our students higher than anything else. We empathize with the needs of our students, our families and our community to do all that we can to ensure that we reach and grow every single one of our students. This is no small task, and to pull this off on a daily basis, it truly takes a vil-

lage and also requires a little bit of magic. Not magic in the sense of the way of the Jedi or the stuff that happens at Hogwarts, but in the magic of stepping outside of our comfort zone from time to time to take on a new challenge. As we adapt to and embrace the changing needs of our students, innovation is the process that continues to allow us to do this. And true innovation requires failure… and grit. Our students “get it” – and, in my position, I have the amazing opportunity to learn from them daily. One young Innovation Lab student at Loveland High School recently stood out to me – she was exploring and learning the world of digital art creation. Working through intri-

cate software programs, pen and stylus combinations, and a multitude of barriers to her success, I was in awe of the complex challenges that this student had taken on to fuel her creative passions. She told me she had failed – many, many times. But she never gave up. Her diligence led to works of art that she proudly showcased in a digital portfolio during our chat. Her resilience, laser-focus on her passions and her ability to step out of her comfort zone (on a consistent basis, I might add) allowed her to reach new heights. Pretty impressive stuff. So – how do we, as educators,

help students like her? We step outside of our own comfort levels to make some magic. It is with great excitement that we announce the Innovative Classroom Grants for the 2017-18 school year. Continuing with the momentum started last year that awarded 11 grants across the Loveland City School District, and with the purpose of positively impacting student growth and achievement, we couldn’t be more excited to give all of our teachers this unique funding and professional learning opportunity. This year, our teachers will be encouraged to partner with students to create innovative solutions that focus on student-centered learning. We will also be working with our

partners at the Xavier University Center for Innovation to support us in the ideation and refinement of these ideas through the process of design thinking. We cannot wait to see what Loveland teachers come up with this year to promote #TigerInnovation! Keep an eye out this year for a special series of district stories (www.lovelandschools.org) that feature several of our 201617 Innovative Instructional Grant winners, and we look forward to sharing the results of this year’s applicants with you this winter. David Knapp, Loveland City School District director of technology & innovation


JANUARY 3, 2018 • COMMUNITY JOURNAL • 1B

SPORTS

COMMUNITY

JOURNAL

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | RECREATIONAL

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Clermont Signing Day celebrations The following is a pictorial look at athletes in the Clermont County area who have recently signed to continue their careers in college. West Clermont High School had its first Signing Day ceremony Nov. 8 with the following athletes committing to play college sports, from left: Jasmin Hale, Wisconsin basketball; Kaylin Burdick, Ursuline College basketball; Cole Ayers, University of Kentucky baseball; Cal Conley, Miami Hurricanes baseball; Kyle Music, Kentucky baseball and Alexis Starks, Gardner-Webb, basketball. THE ENQUIRER/JOHN SNODGRASS

From left, Jeremiah Davenport (basketball, Wright State University), Raymon Payton (basketball, Indiana Wesleyan University) and Jaxson Hayes of Loveland (basketball, University of Texas) of Moeller High School gather Nov. 8 to celebrate the signing of their commitments to play basketball. SHELBY DERMER/ENQUIRER

Adam Clark celebrates at Loveland High School Nov. 8 after signing his commitment to play lacrosse for Cleveland State University.

Walnut Hills’ Katie Hallinan of Loveland, the Division I state golf champion, signed her national letter of intent to play golf for the University of Illinois Nov. 8. THANKS TO WALNUT HILLS ATHLETICS

From left are Logan Dieball (Syracuse University), Justin Miller (Cleveland State University) and Jack Stahanczyk of Milford (Rutgers University) of Moeller High School pose together on Nov. 8 to celebrate the signing of their commitments to play lacrosse. SHELBY DERMER, CINCINNATI ENQUIRER

Milford High School athletes Dax Creager committed to play lacrosse for High Point University and Lisa Sullivan committed to play volleyball at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point during a ceremony Nov. 8. THANKS TO MARK TROUT, MILFORD ATHLETICS

From left, Michael Lang (baseball, Ohio Dominican University) and Grace Turner (volleyball, University of Virginia) pose at Archbishop McNicholas High School Nov. 8 after signing their commitments to continue their athletics at the collegiate level. THANKS TO SHANNON KAPP

Dylan Whisman of Bethel-Tate signed to play baseball for Urbana University Nov. 10 at Bethel-Tate. With him, from left, are Austin Whisman, assistant coach; Shawn Whisman, assistant coach; Dylan Whisman; Renee Whisman, mom; and Dion Pangallo, Bethel baseball’s head coach. THANKS TO RENEE WHISMAN

THANKS TO LISA CLARK

Paige McElfresh of Miami Valley Christian Academy will play volleyball at Denison University

Pictured from left to right, Brennan Gick (baseball, Northern Kentucky University), Alea Harris (basketball, Wofford College), Harrison Schertzinger (lacrosse, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill) and Henry Schertzinger of Loveland (lacrosse, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill) pose at Summit Country Day School Nov. 8 after signing their commitments to play collegiate-level sports.

THANKS TO MVCA

THANKS TO SUMMIT COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL ATHLETICS

From left, Tyler McDonough (baseball, University of Missouri), Brian Zix (bseball, Urbana University), Taylor Hopkins (baseball, Eastern Michigan University), Cameron Swanger of Loveland (baseball, University of Missouri) and Jack Deeds (baseball, Northwood University) of Moeller High School gather Nov. 8 to celebrate the signing of their commitments to play baseball. SHELBY DERMER, CINCINNATI ENQUIRER


LIFE

2B â&#x20AC;˘ COMMUNITY JOURNAL â&#x20AC;˘ JANUARY 3, 2018

SEASON PREVIEW

High school hockey hits ice for new season Adam Baum Cincinnati Enquirer USA TODAY NETWORK

Ice, maybe the most unforgiving and unrelenting surface for sports competition, always reveals the truth. It leaves nothing to interpretation. For local high school hockey teams, the ice brings with it a winter war where each side is clad in custom sweaters, feet fashioned with freshly-sharpened skates, and sticks spun with tape down to the smallest detail. The season kicked off a few weeks ago and there are seven area teams in action this season. Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a look at the local ice brigade. MIGHTY MOE: Moeller, the only local team to play out of the Capital Hockey Conference in Columbus, is off to a scorching start at 8-3 overall. Longtime coach Mike Reeder told The Enquirer that after going 10-20-3 last season, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s got a much better team this time around with new people in new positions. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re definitely a better team,â&#x20AC;? said Reeder. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So far, we have played pretty hard and we have stayed out of the penalty box. (We) seem to be a faster team with some new players in key positions.â&#x20AC;? Reeder added that his Crusaders have done a good job of spreading the scoring opportunities around, something he hopes they can continue to do. Senior forward Connor Bayer and juniors Jordan Walter, Drew Totin, Kyle Moore and Jarred Gorcyznski will lead the Crusader charge this season. Moellerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s home ice is Northland Ice Center. To see the Crusaders in action, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re at home against Springboro (Dec. 29), Talawanda (Jan. 5), Centerville (Jan. 7), and Dublin Coffman (Jan. 20). SEEING RED: The defending champion in the Southwest Ohio High School Hockey League Red Division, St. Xavier looks like it could be very much in that conversation again this season. Not only does St. Xavier have talent returning from last year â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 10 starters â&#x20AC;&#x201C; but the Bombers have welcomed in quite a bit

of new firepower. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s that fresh blood and senior leadership that coach Kevin Taylor likes most his team. Back as starters are Jack Langenderfer, Noah Reidy, Bailey Hammons, Tyler Dellerman, Nick Kaneps, Neil Keyser, Daniel Luongo, Kyle Archdeacon, Aiden Krueger, and John Driscoll. Langenderfer, a senior forward, is the Bombersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; captain and is doing so after suffering a season-ending knee injury last year. Reidy, a sophomore forward, was second in points last season with 19 goals and seven assists, and Hammons, a sophomore goalie, led the league in shutouts (3) and goals-against average (1.33) last year. Dellerman, a senior defenseman who can score, and Kaneps, a senior who was named assistant captain, will provide leadership and stability throughout all three chunks of the ice. After a big win over Moeller, 4-1, on Dec. 14, St. Xavier has started the season 5-4-1 and the Bombers have a big holiday tournament at Northland Ice Center Dec. 26-28, as well as matches at home against Alter (Jan. 7), Troy (Jan. 21) and Talawanda (Jan. 27). The Bombersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; biggest rival in the red division is Elder, a team coming off the best season in program history. Even with several key losses to graduation, Elder still managed to already do something this season itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s never done before in program history: beat St. Xavier; and the Panthers did so convincingly, 9-2 on Dec. 10. After a 26-9-1 season last year, Elderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s off to a 6-3 start this season. The Panthers return Matt Mahon, Matt Larkin, Austin Gilkey, Josh Nieman, Charlie Garnett and Jacob Henn as starters. Garnett, who became the schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s alltime leading goal scorer on Dec. 1, and Mahon, a four-year starter, are both senior cocaptains this year. Larkin, a junior, whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s older brother Ron just graduated after being named The Enquirer hockey player of the year each of the last two seasons, is an assistant captain, and Henn, a senior, is one of the more-experienced netminders in the area. Junior defenseman Jacob Hofmeyer brings a physical presence for the

Panthers. GOING FOR GOLD: With Elder and St. Xavier in the red division along with Alter, Centerville and Troy, that leaves Beavercreek, Mason, Sycamore, Talawanda and La Salle in the Southwest Ohio High School Hockey League Gold Division. Talawanda hit a rough patch last season but the Braves look back in business after only losing four players from last seasonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s team, said coach Jared Sacre. Talawanda started off strong in league play with a 3-0-1 record, a start that Sacre attributed to that experience. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The skill level and actually knowing how to run the plays that weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve designed year after year ... it really didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t take too long to find the right group to mesh together,â&#x20AC;? he said. Senior Matt Deaton is Talawandaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s captain, and senior Josh Huddleston and junior Josh Shrader, the Bravesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; leading scorer last year, are assistant captains. Junior Trey Hubbard was the second-leading scorer last season and heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also back. Sacre said they added some new names too, so expect Talawanda to have a much better season. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s now the second season that Mason has skated as an official OHSAA team, and the inaugural season landed the Comets in third place in the gold division, a result coach Seth Knudsen is hoping to improve upon this season. The Comets have four captains: junior Brogan Kallymer, who leads the team in goals, assists and points after moving from forward to defense this season; senior Zach Stegman, last seasonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s leading scorer who recently suffered a preseason injury and hopes, Knudsen said, to return in January; junior Seth Spears, who earned the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Câ&#x20AC;? on his sweater in just three years of playing; senior Nick Osterwisch, an experienced scorer who Knudsen said is his teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s top skater. Senior forward Matt Slusser is another crucial part of what the Comets do. Slusser converted from defense to forward last

SHORT HOPS Shelby Dermer sdermer@enquirer.com

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season and heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a big-time penalty killer. Knudsen said itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been exciting to see how quickly the team has developed. Coming off a four-win season, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no doubting the motivation for success at Sycamore, and coach Bob Johnson said his squad is team-focused and anxious to round up a winning season. The Aviators have six starters back in senior Liam Wells, sophomore Marc Filippelli, junior Johnny Ciotola, senior Andrew Turner, junior Nick Kerry and Scott Alisson. Sycamore also added two new freshmen goaltenders in Mary Kahn and Owen Henry. Johnson said theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be battling it out for that starting spot. La Salle took last season off on the ice but the Lancers are back this season as a club team, still competing in the gold division. Murray Holland takes the helm as the Lancersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; coach. Originally from Canada, Hollandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s had coaching experience in high school and college in Canada, and heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also been the head coach of the Cincinnati Swords for six seasons. Holland said he only has two players who were previously a part of La Salleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hockey program before the hiatus, and they are juniors Nathan Scharf and Fin Vieh. The rest of the Lancers are freshmen, said Holland. Keep an eye on freshmen Marshall Merk and Eric Holland, as both enter with quite a bit of playing experience. Because La Salle only had about nine players, Holland said the decision to register as a club team was strictly a numbers decision. So La Salle put out an invitation to other area schools looking for players. This season, the Lancers have players from Badin, Purcell Marian, Fenwick, Cincinnati Christian and St. Henry (Ky.). It will be a rebuilding season for La Salle as many of them try to find their fit on ice for the first time.

Âť Ryan Reidy scored 17 points in McNicholasâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 5346 win over Milford on Dec. 20. Cole Burdick scored 13 points in McNicholasâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 55-48 win over Roger Bacon on Dec. 22.

Âť Nathan Gallimore made four 3-pointers in Milfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 53-46 loss to McNicholas on Dec. 20. Âť Jaxson Hayes scored 21 points in Moellerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 7348 win over Wilmington on Dec. 22. Âť Dallas Padgitt and Jay Tiemeyer scored 17 points each in West Clermontâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 51-48 win over St.

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LIFE

JANUARY 3, 2018 • COMMUNITY PRESS/EAST • 3B

BRIEFLY

the Applause National Talent Competition in Charleston, South Carolina where they won first overall Elite Teen Line with a score of 99.12 (out of 100), and then

RELIGION Bethel Pentecostal Church of God Sunday school is 10 a.m. Sunday worship is 11 a.m. Sunday night service is 6 p.m. Thursday service is 7:30 p.m. The church is at 2738 state Route 125, Bethel.

Calvary Presbyterian Church Worship is 11 a.m. Sundays. The church is at 7416 Elm St., Plainville.

Cranston Memorial Presbyterian Church Sunday service is at 10:45 a.m. A coffee hour is offered the second Sunday of each month. The church is at 200 Union St., New Richmond.

Eastgate Community Church Weekly Sunday celebrations are 9 a.m. and 11 a.m. Child care is available. The church is at 3235 Omni Drive, Eastgate; 843-7778; eastgatecommunitychurch.com.

Emmanuel United Methodist Church Sunday worship services are 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. The church is at Amelia Olive Branch Road and old state Route 32, Batavia; emmanuelumc.com.

Epiphany United Methodist Church Contemporary services are 5 p.m. Saturdays and 9 a.m. Sundays. Traditional service is 10:30 a.m. Sundays. Nursery, children and youth programs are available. The church is at 6635 LovelandMiamiville Road, Loveland; 677-9866; www.epiphanyumc.org.

First Baptist Church of New Richmond Sunday school is 10 a.m. Morning service is 11 a.m. Evening service is 6 p.m. Wednesday morning prayer service is offered. Wednesday evening Kid’s Club is 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Call to request a van service pick up at 553-1956. The church is at 213 Western Ave., New Richmond.

Franklin Chapel Sunday school is 10 a.m. Morning worship is 10:45 a.m. The church is non-denominational. The church is at 2330 FranklinLaurel Road, New Richmond.

Free Will Baptist Church Sunday school is 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. Worship is 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Sunday evening services are 6 p.m. Thursday Bible study is 7 p.m. The church is at 608 Main St., Neville.

Julianne Marks, Dance Etc.

groups at 6 p.m. The church is at 937 Old State Route 74, Eastgate; 753-8223.

offered during Sunday service. The church is at 2297 state Route 131, Goshen.

Hillside Bible Church

New Hope Baptist Church

Sunday school is 9:30 a.m. Worship service is 10:30 a.m. The church meets at Receptions Event Center, 10681 LovelandMadeira Road, Loveland.

House of Restoration of Milford Celebrate Recovery is open to the community at 7 p.m. Wednesday evenings. The church is at 1487 state Route 131, Milford; 290-8358.

Lerado Church of Christ Worship schedule is: 10 a.m. Bible School, 11 a.m. worship service, 6 p.m. evening Bible study. For more information call: 288-8444 or 740-703-5140. The church is at 5852 Marathon Edenton Road, off of state Route 131 in Lerado.

Locust Corner United Methodist Church Sunday worship service is 10 a.m. Bible study is 9 a.m. Thursday evening service is 7 p.m. The church is at 917 Locust Corner Road, Pierce Township.

Loveland Presbyterian Church The Mission Project for January is A Caring Place, a non-profit, privately funded “Pregnancy Help Center” for Clermont County and Eastern Hamilton County. The church will collect donations in baby bottles they provide though out the month of January. Sunday worship is 10:30 a.m. with children’s church and fellowship following. Coffee is served at 9:45 a.m. The church is at 360 Robin, Loveland; 683-2525; lovelandpresbyterian@gmail.com; www.lovelandpresbyterianchurch.org.

Loveland United Methodist Church Sundays 9 a.m. – Traditional worship with music featuring our chancel choir, bell choirs and other musical ensembles. Sundays 10:30 a.m. – Contemporary service with music provided by a praise band. The church is at 10975 S. Lebanon Road, Loveland; 683-1738; www.lovelandumc.org.

Mount Moriah United Methodist Church Sunday worship is 8:15 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. The church is at 681 Mount Moriah Drive, Union Township; 752-1333; www.mtmoriahumc.org.

Glen Este Church of Christ

New Beginnings Church of Belfast

Sunday worship is 8:30 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Sunday school is 9:30 a.m. Evening service and youth

Sunday service is 10 a.m. Adult Sunday school is 9 a.m., Children’s church and nursery are

Services are 10:45 a.m. Sundays, with Bible studies for all ages at 9:45 a.m. Child care is provided both hours. On Wednesday evenings, kids meet throughout the school year at 6:45 p.m., while teens and adults meet for Bible studies and Life Groups at 7 p.m. The church is at 1401 LovelandMadeira Road, Loveland; 677-5377; www.newhopeloveland.com.

Northeast Community Church Worship is 10:45 a.m. Sundays. The church is at 12079 Lebanon Road, Loveland; 683-2707.

Northstar, A Community of Grace Northstar is made up of people who want to experience Jesus on a deeper level. It exists to experience Jesus and to equip others to do the same. It’s mission is to go the missing, love the marginalized and live as God’s kids. Worship times are 9 a.m. and 11 a.m. Sunday mornings. QUEST children’s ministry and the junior high ministry (grades five to eight) are available at both celebrations. The church is at 11020 S. Lebanon Road, Loveland.

Apply online for scholarships Online applications are now available for scholarships for future and current UC Clermont College students. Students need to fill out application to be automatically considered for donorbased UC Clermont scholarships. Scholarship applications are due by 5 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 31, and are being accepted online only.

Donor-based scholarship recipients must have a completed UC Clermont admission application on file with the Enrollment Services Department prior to accepting a scholarship. For detailed information and scholarship application forms, please visit ucclermont.edu/students/ onestop/scholarships2.html Students should review the categories to identify scholarships for which they are eligible to apply. Students are encouraged to apply for scholarships in more than one category. For questions regarding the scholarship process, contact Associate Director of One Stop Dawn Hudley at dawn.hundley@uc.edu or 558-0087. Amanda Chalifoux, UC Clermont College

Light Up Loveland The City Of Loveland kicked off the holidays with the annual Light up Loveland event recently held in downtown Loveland. The Christmas tree in front of City Hall was lit by Vice Mayor Angie Settell with the help of all the kids surrounding the tree. Members of the Beautification Committee: Mike Carpenter, Mark Farrell, Dave Binford, Ann Gunn, and Jessica Lingenfelter announced the winners of the resident/business decorating contest. The judging was in three categories: Clark Griswold, Norman Rockwell, and Inflatable Debateables. Winners received a bag of Loveland prizes and gift cards. Each winner also received a sign that can be displayed in the front of their home or business which proudly proclaimed that they won this year’s ‘event. Angela Settell, City of Loveland

DIRECTORY

EMAIL: servicedirectory@gannett.com or CALL: 877-513-7355, option 7

Forestville Baptist Church 1311 Nagel Rd (Across from Anderson Post Office)

513-474-3884 www.forestvillebaptist.com Sunday Services: Discovery Groups ~ 10am Morning Service ~ 11am Evening Service ~ 6pm Youth Group ~ 6pm

Experience the Light and Sound of God You are invited to the

Spring Grove United Methodist Church Sunday morning services are 9:30 a.m. The church is at 2156 BethelNew Richmond Road, New Richmond.

Stonelick Church of the Brethren The church is at 6426 state Route 727, Pleasant Plain..

Trinity United Methodist Church Trinity’s weekly Sunday services are traditional at 8:15 a.m. and 11 a.m. and contemporary worship (and children’s Sunday school) at 9:30 a.m. The church is at 5767 WolfpenPleasant Hill Road, Milford, 831-0262; trinity@trinitymilford.org; trinitymilford.org.

6710 Goshen Rd., Goshen (Across from Goshen High School)

513-722-2541

Community HU Song

2nd Sunday, 10:00 - 10:30 am

ECK Light & Sound Service

Wednesday Bible Study & Kids Program ~ 7pm Nursery provided for all Services

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BATAVIA BAPTIST TEMPLE

770 South Riverside, Batavia OH 45103 Raymond D. Jones, Pastor

732-2739

Sunday School 10am; Morning Worship 11am; Sunday Evening Service 6pm;

11:00 am - Noon Second Sunday of Each Month Anderson Center Station 7832 Five Mile Road Cincinnati, OH 45230 1-800-891-7713 EckankarOhio.org Worldwide 1-800 LOVE GOD ECKANKAR.org

Wednesday Eve. Prayer Service & Bible Study, 7:00pm

Reaching the Heart of Clermont County

GLEN ESTE CHURCH OF CHRIST 937 Old State Route 74 (Behind Meijer) 513-753-8223 www.gecc.net

Sunday Worship: 8:30 & 10:30am Bible Study: 9:30am & 6:00pm Youth Groups: 6:00pm

2 Traditional Worship Services in our Newly Renovated Sanctuary TRADITIONAL WORSHIP SUNDAY

Sunday8:158:30 & 11 am & 11:00 3 Contemporary Worship Services CONTEMPORARY WORSHIP in our Contemporary Worship Center SATURDAY9:30 & SUNDAY Sunday 11 am 5:30

9:30 & 11:00

Children’s programs and nursery & toddler care available at 9:30 and 11:00 services. Plenty of Parking behind church.

First Church of Christ, Scientist, Anderson Township

Sunday School - 9:30 a.m. Worship Service - 10:30 a.m. GUM Youth - 5:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m. Every Sunday: 6 - 12th grades JR. GUMY - 5:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m. 2nd Sunday of month: 3rd - 5th grades Email: goshenumc@fuse.net Follow us on

Handicapped Accessible Scott Wade, Senior Pastor Amber Blake, Children’s Pastor Kenny McQuitty,Youth Director Lana Wade, Worship Director SUNDAY: Sunday School (all ages) Worship Service Children’s Worship (Age 4 - 5th Grade) Evening Activities for Children, Youth, & Adults

Prince of Peace Lutheran Church A midweek Bible study is offered at 10 a.m. every Wednesday. Worship services are 5 p.m. Saturdays and 8:45 a.m. and 11 a.m. Sundays. Child care is available during the Sunday morning services for children up to 3 years of age. The church is at 101 S. Lebanon Road, Loveland; 683-4244; popluther.org.

GOSHEN UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

7515 Forest Road Cincinnati, OH 45255 513-231-4172 • www.andersonhillsumc.org

7341 Beechmont Avenue (Near Five Mile Road) Email: csandersontownship@gmail.com

9:30 am 10:30 am

6:00 pm

MONDAY: Ladies’ Bible Study/Prayer Group

10:00 am

WEDNESDAY: Choir Youth Group (Grades 6-12) Children (Age 4 - 5th Gr.)

6:30 pm 6:30 pm 6:30 pm

THURSDAY: Celebrate Recovery 6:30pm New Hope Campus, 243 S. Fifth St., Williamsburg S. Charity & E. Water Streets Bethel, Ohio 45106 - 513-734-4204 Office: M-F 10:00 am - 2:00 pm E-mail: bethelnazarenechurch@gmail.com www.facebook.com/BNC4me

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The dancers in Time Keepers from Dance Etc. who auditioned for America’s Got Talent are Andrea Armstrong, Erin Brockman, Savannah Bumgarner, Tara Combs, Chloe Daley, Libby Dixon, Cassidy Fisher, Kara Freeman, Cadence Gulaskey, Sydney Hupp, Kari Krebs, Olivia Kuethe, Vanessa Lima, Tristen Luneack, Dylan Morton, Alexa Mueller, Maddie Petersman, Elena Richey, Bronte, Reinert, Jess Sharpless, Grace Straley, Lydia Thodesen, Karlie Turner, Sarah Wanamaker, Rachel Welty, Tori West, and their teacher and choreographer Anne Kramer. PROVIDED/JULIANNE MARKS

Saint Mary Church, Bethel 3398 Ohio SR 125 Phone 734-4041

231-1020 christiansciencecincinnati.com

Sunday Service & Sunday School 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Testimonial Meeting 7:30 p.m. In Church Reading Rm/Bookstore Open after all services. Downtown Reading Rm/Bookstore 412 Vine Street, Cincinnati Open Monday - Friday 10 a.m. - 3 p.m.

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Thousands of people waited in what seemed like never ending lines to attend the open auditions for the hit TV show America’s Got Talent on Tuesday Nov. 14 at the Duke Energy Convention Center in downtown Cincinnati. Among them were the talented dancers from Dance Etc. in Milford, hoping that their hard work would pay off. Even after 22 years, auditioning for America’s Got Talent (AGT) was a new experience for not only the students, but also the Owner and Artistic Director of Dance Etc. Anne Kramer. Producers from AGT called Kramer to personally invite Dance Etc. to audition after seeing a video of their dance ‘Time Keepers” on YouTube. The dance is a steampunk inspired routine choreographed by Anne Kramer. It features 26 dancers and tumblers ages 13-18. With custom-made costumes created by Anne and her mother Sue Kramer. The dance has been a crowd favorite, and consistently a judges favorite as well over the past two years. This summer, the team competed at

won the Best of the Best Line competition with a score of 99.51 (out of 100). “When Anne told us that AGT was interested in us I didn’t believe her,” said senior student Erin Brockman age 17, “it sounded like one of those things that people say as a joke, but the next day I got our practice schedule and it hit me that this was actually happening.” Brockman has been dancing at Dance Etc. since she was four and was very excited to have this incredible opportunity in her senior year. While the practices were hard, the hardest part of the whole journey was the 7-1/2 hour wait for the audition to take place. ‘Time Keepers’ and most of their parents arrived at the Duke Energy Convention Center around 2 in the afternoon, and they were camped out in the holding room until around 9:30 that night. Even with the long wait the group had fun, laughing, practicing and helping the AGT cameras with some cool behind the scenes footage. While the wait for their audition felt long, the wait to find out if they are going on to the next stage will feel even longer. Dance Etc. and the thousands of others who auditioned in Cincinnati are not supposed to hear anything back on their auditions until February or March of 2018.

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Dance Etc.’s Got Talent

Everyone is welcome! Weekend Worship Saturday: 5 p.m. Sunday: 9 & 10:30 a.m.

Nursery, Children’s & Youth available 6635 Loveland-Miamiville Rd. Loveland, OH 45140 513.677.9866 • www.epiphanyumc.org

Rev. Adam Runtel Saturday Mass – 4:00 PM Sunday Mass – 10:30 AM ccc.city

CLOUGH PIKE BAPTIST CHURCH 1025 CLOUGH PIKE

Sunday School 9:30am Morning Worship 10:45am AWANA Ministry Wednesday 6:45 - 8:15pm Bible Study 7:00 - 8:00pm Youth grades 6-12 7:00 - 8:00pm Nursery provided for all services

www.cloughpike.com

752-3521

Come, connect, grow & serve

2010 Wolfangel Rd., Anderson Twp. 513-231-4301

About religion Religion news is published at no charge on a space-available basis. Email announcements to areeves@communitypress.com.

Sunday Worship: 9:00 & 10:15 AM with

TO PLACE AN AD: 513.768.8400

Childrens Ministry & Nursery PASTOR MARIE SMITH

www.cloughchurch.org

TO PLACE AN AD: 513.768.8400


4B • COMMUNITY PRESS/EAST • JANUARY 3, 2018

SCHOOL NOTES Batavia schools Business and educational leaders from Clermont County and across the tri-state met with Great Oaks/Batavia High School Legal Management students recently for a round of “speed mentoring.” The students spent six minutes discussing their future goals and plans with an individual; every six minutes, they got up started the process again with another person. Sixty-eight students met with thirty-six mentors throughout the morning. “The speed mentoring process gives students a chance to practice meeting potential employers and colleagues,” said Legal Management instructor Angie Kovacs. “They also get instant feedback and advice from a variety of people.” Participants included local CEOs, law enforcement, entrepreneurs, college representatives, the military and superintendents. Survey comments after the event complimented the students’ preparation, communication skills, and confidence. Clermont County Sheriff Steve Leahy said, “This is a great opportunity for business leaders and young people to interact in a structured but relaxed environment. I found each student I spoke with to be open-minded and willing to engage me in dialogue.” Jeff Weir, superintendent of the Clermont County Education Service Center agreed. “Almost all had clearly invested significant time considering their future goals and what is necessary to attain them. Kudos for fostering this degree of deliberation in kids about developing a strong vision for themselves.” Both students and professionals said they would benefit from even more time to talk, and in fact several opportunities arose from the event. One participant, Kelley Snider of Express Employment Professionals, offered to meet with seniors, and J.R. Roush followed up with a Southern State Community College grant for a career readiness course for students. The Legal Management program is a satellite program of Great Oaks Career Campuses offered in partnership with Batavia High School.

Tom Rocklin from Seimens PLM Software mentors junior Zach Lawson and sophomore Macie Mehlman during the Great Oaks Great Oaks/Batavia High School Legal Management “speed mentoring” session. PROVIDED/GREAT OAKS CAREER CAMPUSES

Cincinnati Country Day School

One hundred Cincinnati Country Day Upper School students recently participated in a study that may help transform the ACT test, starting with math. The testing company is conducting the research study to evaluate the feasibility of a new mathematics digital assessment format that makes use of a digital ink application on a tablet. Laurie Davis, senior director for digital assessment research for ACT, said the company wants to leverage digital technology to present a standardized test that more closely reflects students’ day-to-day experiences with technology in the classroom. Davis connected with CCDS Director of Technology Rob Baker through mutual contacts at Microsoft and FluidMath. Davis wanted to do a test run in a school that uses digital ink. The sophomores and juniors who participated in the study answered test questions using three methods: paper and pencil to fill in the bubble; computer keyboard to type the answer and digital ink to show their work and write the answer. Students will not receive their individual scores, but ACT will provide aggregate results. ACT visited a second school that does not have digital ink experience to learn how familiar students must be with this technology to benefit. ACT is testing math first, because it’s an obvious area for digital ink to work. “We’re able to know a lot more about each student because we can look at a complete set of steps in their work. Right now, we just get the final answer, and we don’t know if Great Oaks Career that final answer is the Campuses product of a guess or if it’s

An ACT representative watches as Cincinnati Country Day sophomore Natalie de Beer of Loveland do a math problem for a study using tablets and digital ink for an ACT test. PROVIDED/CINDY KRANZ

the product of really hard work.” The goal is to get more valuable information back to schools, students and parents - the people who can make decisions, based upon that information. ACT plans to widely publish its study results. “We intend to have this research influence not just ACT, but to influence the entire field of assessment,” Davis said. ACT representatives and Baker observed students in the classroom when they took the test. Students provided valuable feedback when they hit glitches, Baker said. “This did not go perfectly. It’s not supposed to. This is the first time they tried it. Students were obviously intrigued by the idea of digital ink, but this is the ACT. It’s got to work. It’s got to be perfect.” Cindy Kranz, Cincinnati Country Day School

Goshen schools This year, more than 150 needy children received Christmas gifts thanks to the Christmas Giving Tree program at Marr/Cook Elementary and Spaulding Elementary schools in Goshen. A tree was set up in each of the elementary schools in November with

ornaments indicating the children’s needs and wishes. People from the community, staff members, parents and students could choose ornaments from the tree, purchase gifts, and bring them back to the school to delivered to needy families in the district. Goshen staff members, especially school counselors Sheli D’Orazio and Kim Lewis, spent countless hours coordinating the Giving Tree program. “The support of our Goshen staff, families, and community is absolutely amazing. We try to make sure students receive clothing items they need as well as other items the students will enjoy,” said Spaulding Elementary’s counselor Sheli D’Orazio. Jen Schlosser, Spaulding Elementary, Goshen Local Schools

Loveland schools » The Loveland City School District is among an elite 433 districts in the United States and Canada named to the College Board’s Annual AP District Honor Roll. The Honor Roll recognizes school districts that have increased access to AP coursework while maintaining or increasing

Outgoing Loveland schools Board Member Tim Taggart and outgoing Board President Dave Blumberg are thanked by Interim Superintendent Dr. Amy Crouse for their service to Loveland students. PROVIDED/HEATHER HIGDON

the percentage of students earning scores of 3 or higher on AP Exams. “It is just so incredibly exciting for our Tigers,” said Loveland Interim Superintendent Dr. Amy Crouse. “Earning recognition such as this is a direct result of strategic work tirelessly executed by our Loveland High School team under the leadership of Principal Peggy Johnson. They made this happen for our students. Job well done, indeed.” Heather Higdon, Loveland City School District

» The Loveland City School District extended its gratitude to outgoing Board of Education President Dave Blumberg and Board Member Tim Taggart, who were officially recognized at the Dec. 12 Board Meeting. Interim Superintendent Dr. Amy Crouse presented each member with a plaque to commemorate their service to the students in Loveland. “It takes time, effort and great deal of energy to be a part of shaping the fu-

ture of the Loveland City School District, and we sincerely appreciate Mr. Blumberg and Mr. Taggart for helping to lead the way in creating a world-class experience for our students,” said Crouse. “Both of these individuals are valued members of the Tiger Family and the Loveland community. Their leadership has helped make Loveland the destination school district it is for families.” Dave Blumberg, the outgoing Board of Education president, has served as a member of the Board of Education since his election in November 2013; Tim Taggart served during 2017 after being voted in by the Board after the retirement of longtime Board Member Linda Pennington. New board members will be officially welcomed at the Organizational Meeting scheduled for 6 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 11. Heather Higdon, Loveland City School District

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LIFE

JANUARY 3, 2018 • COMMUNITY PRESS/EAST • 5B

Start the new year with some good singing Howdy folks, Hope you had a good Christmas with your family and friends. I had a fine Christmas with my family. That is always George wonderful with Rooks all my grandchildren and greatOLE FISHERMAN grandchildren. The little baby girl, Mattox Ann was wonderful and the other baby girl, Elana Kay was great. She is about eight months old and starting to crawl. There were some little items she wanted and would crawl to try to get them, but her dad had other

ideas. I had another Christmas party with Paula and her family — a fine meal and gifts to pass out. Paula’s great-granddaughter was so excited and could not wait to get her presents. Wednesday, I was honored with about 20 or more folks from the Methodist church I attend to have Christmas caroling here for me — that was so wonderful. On Friday Paula invited me to go to the Locust Ridge nursing home for a Christmas party for the folks there. The Nazarene Church was there to sing for the residents. They then had Santa Claus there

to pass out gifts — that was wonderful. I will meet with Randy on Wednesday to take him to Poochie’s for the noon meal. We always celebrate Christmas together. He was never married and he grew up along with my family. He is my adopted brother. On Friday Paula and I will go to meet friends that Ruth Ann and I attended the 20-20 program with. We try to get together one time each month, but Christmas time is always a busy time for me. That is good. I filled the birdfeeders on

Christmas Day and the birds are sure busy eating. Be sure to keep the feeders filled, also the suet blocks-that will help keep them warm. The feeders seem to get low quickly. Mr. Chester doesn’t like to be outside in this cold weather. When he is outside for a few minutes he comes in and lays on the heat register to get warm and then he lays on my lap and sleeps. On Jan. 7, at 6 p.m. there will be a concert by Brian and Yvonne Hutson at the Methodist Church in Bethel. Brian has been at the church before and this will be a very good evening so mark your cal-

DEATHS

POLICE REPORTS Community Press no longer picks up police reports from local departments. We will publish police reports from those departments which can submit them to us by email in a useable format. Reports can be emailed to Bonnie Beasley, bbeasley@communitypress.com. Amelia Incidents/investigations Criminal damaging/endangering Reported at West Main St., Dec. 7. Identity fraud Reported at West Main St., Dec. 6. Menacing Reported at West Main St., Dec. 6. Possession of drugs - marijuana Reported at 100 block of East Main St., Dec. 13. Reported at 200 block of West Main St., Dec. 16. Theft Reported at West Main St., Dec. 8. Reported at West Main St., Dec. 16. Bethel Incidents/investigations Assault Reported at 600 block of West Plane St., Nov. 6. Disorderly conduct Reported at 200 block of East Plane St., Nov. 1. Reported at 100 block of Clare St., Nov. 4. Reported at 100 block of Starling Road, Nov. 4. Gun shot Reported at 100 block of North Main St., Nov. 11. Possessing drug abuse instruments Reported at 500 block of West Plane St., Nov. 13. Possessing drug abuse instruments, disorderly conduct - intoxicated create risk of harm Reported at 200 block of East Osborne St., Nov. 9. Possessing drug abuse instruments, possession of drugs Reported at 100 block of East Main St., Nov. 5. Possession of drugs Reported at 3000 block of Angel Drive, Nov. 8. Theft of coat Reported at 400 block of West Plane St., Nov. 7. Miami Township Incidents/investigations Burglary Reported at 5800 block of Wolfpen Pleasant Hill Road, Dec. 4. Reported at 6600 block of Epworth Road, Dec. 6. Criminal mischief Reported at 6400 block of Airdrie Court, Dec. 10. Disorderly conduct Reported at 5600 block of Wolfpen Pleasant Hill Road, Dec. 10. Domestic violence Reported at 1200 block of Pebble Brooke Trail, Dec. 4. Reported at 1400 block of Ohio 131, Dec. 7.

Reported at 900 block of Ohio 28, Dec. 9. Drug abuse - marijuana, possession of drugs, improperly handling firearms in a motor vehicle - knowingly transport under the influence, trafficking in drugs Reported at Shallow Creek Drive at Woodcreek Drive, Nov. 26. Drug paraphernalia Reported at 800 block of Ohio 28, Dec. 9. Identity fraud Reported at Wildwood Drive, Dec. 9. Marijuana drug paraphernalia Reported at Buckwheat Road, Dec. 10. Offenses involving underage person Reported at 5500 block of Mount Zion Road, Dec. 6. Persistent disorderly conduct Reported at 1400 block of Miami Lakes Drive, Dec. 8. Possession of drugs Reported at 1100 block of Ohio 28, Dec. 10. Possession of drugs, drug paraphernalia Reported at 1200 block of Ohio 28, Dec. 9. Possession of drugs, marijuana drug paraphernalia Reported at I-275, Dec. 6. Reported at 800 block of Ohio 28, Dec. 9. Resisting arrest Reported at 1100 block of South Timbercreek Drive, Dec. 4. Theft Reported at 1100 block of Kash Drive, Dec. 1. Reported at 1000 block of Ohio 28, Dec. 6. Reported at 5800 block of Wolfpen Pleasant Hill Road, Dec. 8. Reported at 1100 block of Ohio 28, Dec. 6. Reported at 5700 block of Lockwood Commons, Dec. 6. Reported at 1100 block of Ohio 131, Dec. 9. Unruly juvenile offense - habitually disobedient Reported at 6100 block of Second St., Dec. 6. Pierce Township Incidents/investigations Assault Reported at Cole Road at Betty Jane, Dec. 3. Criminal damaging/endangering Reported at 1700 block of Ohio 125, Dec. 1. Improperly handling firearms in a motor vehicle - knowingly transport under the influence Reported at 1100 block of Hunters Run, Dec. 6. Possessing drug abuse instruments Reported at 1800 block of Ohio 125, Dec. 6. Theft Reported at 1600 block of East Main St., Nov. 27. Reported at 800 block of Locust Corner Road, Nov. 27. Reported at 1600 block of East Main St., Dec. 5. Symmes Township Incidents/investigations Disorderly conduct while intoxicated

endar. I expect there will be a big crowd. On Sunday, Jan. 14, the Soul’d Out group will be at the church on State Route 222 across from the fire department. These folks are good singers. Paula and I heard them at the Salt Air Church so mark your calendar. Mike said the hunters are still harvesting ducks and deer. Start your week by going to the house of worship of your choice and praising the good Lord. God bless all . . . More later . . . George Rooks is a retired park ranger, Rooks served for 28 years with the last five as manager of East Fork State Park.

Reported at 7300 block of East Kemper Road, Dec. 5. Theft Reported at 11300 block of Montgomery Road, Dec. 5. Reported at 12100 block of Cedarbreaks Lane, Dec. 1. Reported at 10600 block of Loveland Madeira Road, Dec. 11. Reported at 11300 block of Montgomery Road, Dec. 10. Clermont County Sheriff’s Office Incidents/Investigations Assault Reported 100 block of Main St., Felicity, Dec. 5. Reported 300 block of Myrtle Ave., Bethel, Dec. 6. Reported 2100 block of Winemiller Lane, Batavia, Dec. 6. Assault - knowingly harm victim, theft - without consent Reported 2100 block of Winemiller Lane, Batavia, Dec. 9. Breaking and entering Reported 600 block of W. Walnut St., Felicity, Dec. 4. Burglary, criminal trespass, theft Reported 100 block of Broadway St., Moscow, Dec. 3. Criminal damaging/endangering Reported 3500 block of Virginia Drive, Amelia, Dec. 8. Criminal damaging/endangering knowingly any means, breaking and entering - purpose commit theft offense/felony unoccupied structure use of force stealth deception, theft Reported 1700 block of U.S. Route 52, Moscow, Dec. 6. Criminal mischief - move, deface, tamper, etc. property of another Reported 5700 block of Marathon Edenton Road, Williamsburg, Dec. 6. Criminal mischief, theft Reported 2800 block of S. Dunham Road, Amelia, Dec. 7. Criminal trespass Reported 1100 block of Ohio 222, Bethel, Dec. 5. Reported 2200 block of Winemiller Lane, Batavia, Dec. 8. Cruelty to animals Reported 2200 block of Chesterfield Lane, Batavia, Dec. 5. Domestic violence Reported 200 block of Amelia Olive Branch Road, Amelia, Dec. 6. Reported 6300 block of Taylor Pike, Goshen, Dec. 7. Reported 500 block of Stonelick Woods Circle, Batavia, Dec. 9. Reported 2100 block of Hwy. 50, Batavia, Dec. 10. Domestic violence - cause belief of imminent physical harm by threat or force Reported 300 block of Millboro Springs Drive, Batavia, Dec. 9. Domestic violence - knowingly cause physical harm Reported 3100 block of Williamsburg Bantam Road, Bethel, Dec. 10.

Gilbert Lee Gastrich

Elaine Rose McAfee

Gilbert Lee Gastrich, 71, of Batavia died Nov. 13. Survived by wife, Donna Sue Gastrich; children Shawn and Kevin Gastrich and Carrie Arwine; three grandchildren; one great-grandchild; sister, Yolanda Wood; sisters-in-law Shirley Phillips and Linda Freimuth; brother-in-law, Jerry Freimuth; many nieces and nephews, cousins; and friends. Preceded in death by sister, Deborah Thacker; brother-in-law Robert Reimuth; sister-in-law, Ruth Ann Smith. Memorials to: COPD Foundation 3300 Ponce De Leon Blvd, Miami, FL 33134; or the American Cancer Society.

Elaine Rose McAfee, 74, of Amelia died Nov. 27. Survived by husband, Billy D. McAfee; children Cheryl Green,e John M. Barron, Brian and Shannon McAfee; siblings Bertcham Cutillo and Carol Sutryn; and many nieces, nephews, family and friends. Preceded in death by sister, Jonie Cutillo. Memorials to: the American Diabetes Association.

Carolyn J. Hamm Carolyn J. Hamm, 63, of Miami Township died Nov. 28. Survived by son, Mark Miller; two grandchildren; siblings Wanda Baker, Linda Walley, Barbara Blanchard, Marlene McCowan and Charlene Crisp; many nieces and nephews; and many friends. Preceded in death by parents Wilbur and Ruth McCowan; and sisters Gladys Tilley and Shirley McCowan. Memorials to: the American Cancer Society.

Edward L. Hicks Edward L. Hicks, 64, of Bethel died Nov. 22. Survived by wife, Denise; children Amanda Wilson, Jessica Hicks and Katie Niehaus; six grandchildren; and siblings Richard and James Burke and Carol Talbott. Preceded in death by mother, Rebecca Burke; step=father, Melvin Burke; and son, Adam Lee Hicks.

Odis Holland Odis Holland, 75, of Stonelick Township died Nov. 23. Survived by children Ed Holland and Lori Hurdle; four grandchildren; two greatgrandchildren; and siblings Thelma Pierce and Charles Holland. Preceded in death by siblings Erma Kresser and Virgil Holland.

Leslie Marie Kazwell Leslie Marie Kazwell, 71 of Batvaia died Nov. 27. Survived by son, Joel Rivas; three grandchildren; brother, Mark Misevich; and three nieces. Preceded in death by parents Frank and Alice Misevich; and husband, Thomas Kazwell. Memorials to: the American Heart Association.

Charlene Sylvia Omernick Charlene Sylvia Omernick, 67, of New Richmond died Nov. 30. Survived by husband, Allen Omernick; daughter, Shannon Reinert; two grandchildren; sister, Christine Ryburn; many frinds; goddaughter, Amanda Grantaella; and pet cockatoo. Preceded in death by parents Norman and Charlotte Salamone. Memorials to: the Ohio Bird Sanctuary, 3774 Orweiler Rd., Mansfield, OH 44903, or at ohiobirdsanctuary.com.

Jack C. Pfau Jack C. Pfau, 68, of Amelia died Nov. 24. He was a US Army veteran of Vietnam. Survived by siblings Dave Pfau and Jane Mueller; twin sister, Jill Davis; 10 nieces and nephews; and 17 great-nieces and nephews.

Marilyn Alice Poe Marilyn Alice Poe, 91, of Goshen died Oct. 22. Survived by children James Meredith Poe II, William B. Poe and Valerie Zackerman; six grandchildren; 12 great-grandchildren; and sister, Lois Ann Snider. Preceded in death by husband, Meredith James Poe; and sister, June Oligee. Memorials to: Grace Bible Presbyterian Church, 12060 Lebanon Road, Cincinnati, OH 45241; or the Loveland Historical Society, 201 N. Riverside Ave, Loveland, OH 45140.

Carolyn M. Saenz Carolyn M. Saenz, 73, of New Richmond died Nov. 26. Survived by husband, Charles A. Saenz; son, Brad Saenz; two grandchildren; siblings Mollie Huml, Billow Corbyn, Heather Stockdale and Tony Warren; and numerous nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by son, Paul Saenz. Memorials to: St. Timothy Episcopal Church, Cincinnati.

NEW YEAR, NEW YOU.

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Experience independent retirement living in a community where neighbors become friends!

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859-331-3224 www.stcharlescommunity.org

CE-0000695017


LIFE

6B • COMMUNITY PRESS/EAST • JANUARY 3, 2018

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE

ANSWERS ON PAGE 4B

No. 1231 RING OUT THE OLD, RING IN THE NEW BY JOHN LAMPKIN / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ AC R O S S

RELEASE DATE: 1/7/2018

1 Have 4 New Deal org. 7 Motley 13 “Dukes” 18 V.I.P. list 20 Lamborghini rival 21 Arctic people 22 Result of a French powdered drink shortage? 24 1959 Ritchie Valens hit, with “La” 25 Hook’s right hand 26 Hägar the Horrible’s hound 27 Short rows 29 Nincompoop 30 Secures at sea 32 Fig. checked during re-tire-ment? 33 Legends in the automotive world 35 List of things said by Siri? 38 1920s-’30s Yankees nickname 41 Deceive 42 Sights at charging stations 44 Thingamajig 45 Softhead 48 What an infielder might field a ball on 50 “Reckon so” 52 “Savvy?” 54 ____ Conference Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 4,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year).

55 Washington, D.C.? 59 Was beaten by 60 Neighbors of Egyptians 61 Attribute to, in a way 62 Three-foot 1980s sitcom character 65 Grammy winner ____ Elliott 66 Cobbler, at times 68 Cowboy Rogers 69 Giant 71 Not just focused 75 Butting heads 76 Struggling sci-fi writer’s plea for recognition? 78 Blade runner? 81 Hip-hop’s Shakur 82 Attend without a date 83 Country that Menorca is part of 85 If you have it, you might know what this answer is without reading the clue 86 Middle of a simile 88 Quenched 92 “Give me ____” 93 Some 1960s radicals 96 Treat that gives a glowing complexion? 98 Chap 100 Work as a branch manager? 102 Flag 103 Scott of “Happy Days” 104 Nasser’s successor as Egypt’s leader

107 “What’s Opera, Doc?” antagonist 108 Film director ____ C. Kenton 111 Canon competitor 113 Weeklong Irish vacation? 116 Gross 117 Like some turns 118 Chose to take part 119 What if, informally 120 ____ performance 121 Book before Esther: Abbr. 122 Neuron’s ends?

17 Much of a sports recap 19 Good hunting skill 20 Some Guinness Book records 23 Lamp polisher’s surprise? 28 “Quién ____?” 31 Batch of Brownies? 32 Harass incessantly 34 Photog’s bagful? 35 Feature of Devonshire cream 36 Article in Der Spiegel 37 “March comes DOWN in like ____ …” 1 “Wise” sorts 39 Cottonmouth’s 2 “Pow!” warning 3 Result of a haymaker, 40 Targets in “Men in maybe Black,” informally 4 1/20 of a ton: Abbr. 43 Stars 5 Pure 46 Childish retort 6 Couple 47 Indiana’s 7 Torn state flower 8 Dadaist Jean 49 Puts forth 9 Wimbledon surface 51 Historic 10 Archaeological Mesopotamian city treasure trove 53 Wand material 11 “Nessun dorma,” for in the Harry one Potter books 12 Drift 56 Thick and green 13 Statement made while crossing the fingers, 57 Merchandise: Abbr. 58 Artificial silks maybe 59 Grow feathers 14 Like the three men of the 61 Like the French sky “Rub-a-dub-dub” 62 Colorful quartz nursery rhyme 63 ____ position 15 One having trouble 64 Some loose dancing? with basic arithmetic? 65 Godfather after being 16 Neighbor of double-crossed? the talus

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73 Close tightly 74 “King Lear” role 76 “The Last Days of Pompeii” heroine 77 ____ bin Laden

78 Legitimate business practices 79 Last Stuart queen 80 Kind of alphabet 82 Moo goo ____ pan 84 “Sh,” “th” or “ou” 87 1974 C.I.A. spoof 89 Big name in test prep 90 Opposite side 91 Makes a meal of

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72 Action in FanDuel and DraftKings

94 Apple app for viewing reading material 95 Polish, e.g. 97 Green 98 Heeds 99 Eagerly accept 101 County in New Mexico or Colorado 105 Court legend Arthur

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106 Eldest member of an organization 107 Falco of “The Sopranos” 109 The Eagles’ “____ Eyes” 110 Forever and ever 112 December 31: Abbr. 114 D.C.-based media giant 115 1st, 2nd, 3rd … ____

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Classifieds

JANUARY 3, 2018 µ EAST - COMMUNITY µ 1C

cincinnati.com

JOBS

HOMES

RIDES

PETS & STUFF

To place your ad visit: cincinnati.com/classifieds or search: classifieds Great Buys

Homes of Distinction

Garage Sales neighborly deals...

VISIT: cincinnati.com/classifieds TO PLACE YOUR AD

LAST WEEK TO WIN $500!!!!

UNIQUE HOME CONTEST! Help The Deutsch Team find the MOST UNIQUE HOME! If you think your home is the most unique home in the Tri-State and there is a story behind it contact The Deutsch Team Facebook Page for all of the information and send to susan.lenhardt@ cbws.com. Who knows you could be the winner of $500 CASH. Good Luck!!!

Tom Deutsch, Jr.

513-460-5302 Homes for Sale-Ohio

Homes for Sale-Ohio

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968 which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, national origin, handicap or familial status or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newpaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Kentucky Commission on Human Rights 800-292-5566 H.O.M.E. (Housing Opportunities Made Equal) 513-721-4663

Real Estate

Rentals

Garrison Place Senior Apts. 62 and over, Rent Subsidized Free Utilities, Secure Building On-site laundry Pets Allowed 513-876-3590 TTY 800-750-0750

MILFORD- SEM Villa Rent subsidized. Voted Best of the East Senior apts. 62 + older Newly renovated apts. Secure building. Service Coordinator Visiting physicians. 513-831-3262 tty 1-800-750-0750

Milford Village Deluxe, Extra Large 1BR, Updated/New carpet, Extra Clean, Ht/wtr pd., walk to stores, quiet wooded setting, Must See! $695. 513-519-8512 Mount Washington ALL NEWLY DECORATED 1-2BR apts $600-$725, incl coin-ops, pool w/park like setting, off street parking, trash pick up, heat/water, TOWNHOUSE renter pays heat, $800. Call between 9-5. Near restaurants/shopping 444-9029

Direct Support Professional Career Fair

January 9, 2018, 12 Noon - 5 p.m. Eastgate Mall 4601 Eastgate Boulevard, Cincinnati, OH 45245 If you enjoy encouraging and motivating others, building relationships, and enjoy finding creative solutions, this might be an ideal job for YOU!

Cincinnati: 1600 McCabe Ln, SFH, 4bd, 2 full ba, 1 half ba, Great home in a great neighborhood! Functional family floor plan, lg park-like yard, Back porch for nature watching & entertaining, Priced to Sell at $299,900 remodelling allowance, Special financeing avail, 2,730 sq ft, 0.77 acres, Near Sherwood Elementary, Nagel Middle & Anderson High Schools,

Those who attend can register for a free CPR/First Aid Class to be offered on January 13 at Ohio Means Jobs Clermont County. (Offered first come until class is at capacity). For additional Information, visit clermontdd.org.

Contact Rick Barrick Today at 513-229-9661 or Visit

BOECincinnati.com/1600mccabelane

HEAVY TRUCK EQUIPMENT MECHANIC WANTED Immediate full-time position available. Healthcare and other good benefits, including tool allowance. Knowledge of truck and heavy equipment helpful. Must have own tools. CDL licsense required. We will assist with obtaining. Apply at: 1223 W. 8th St. Cincinnati, OH 45030. M-F 8-4 513-723-9587 EOE

Destin, FL, Gulf front, 2BR, Condo Rentals, in Beautiful Destin, Local owner. 513-528-9800 Office., 513-752-1735 H

SGS is hosting an on-site, hiring event/open house.

Elmwood, Madisonville, & Reading. Refrig, cable, laundry, utils, bus, kitchen, warm, $90/wk & up. 513-851-0617

Careers

Jobs new beginnings...

Drivers

New Hebron, KY Team Openings! Sign-On Bonus! Average pay, $77k EACH/yr, excellent benefits & bonuses! New sleeper trucks! Home EVERY weekend! CDL-A, 1yr exp. call Hub Group Dedicated: 866-258-7901

Community

Announce announcements, novena...

DEPENDABLE, Honest & Hardworking w/refs. Home health aide w/ over 30+ yrs exp Available 24/7. Call 513-658-1413, 513-704-5551.

     VISIT CLASSIFIEDS online at cincinnati.com

Special Greeting THANK YOU ST. JUDE YOU DID IT AGAIN. C.L.

Special Notices-Clas Public Auction GMAR Farms, Personal Property and Real Estate Auction Monday January 1st 2018 10:00 am. See full ad at www.auctionzip.co m #6379 Gene Steiner Auctioneer , (513)616-0365

SEASONED FIREWOOD All hardwoods; split/loaded. Best In Cincy. Fall Special! 513-738-9913/ 266-4052

BUYING ALL TYPES OF KENNER TOYS & HISTORICAL MEMORABILIA. Help add to the largest private STAR WARS collection in Ohio! Did you or a family member used to work for Kenner? We are LOCAL paying CASH for prototypes, packaging samples, displays, artwork, paperwork, and toys in all conditions. Heck, we will even buy your KENNER business card! Looking specifically for STAR WARS, M.A.S.K., Jurassic Park, GI Joe, Alien, Stretch Armstrong, The Real Ghostbusters, and most character lines. 1980’s and older only please. Help keep Kenner history here in Cincinnati! Call or text 513.500.4209 - Please leave a voicemail if we don’t answer, or email us at CincyStarWarsCollector@gmail.com . Save this ad- we buy all year !

CASH PAID for unopened unexpired Diabetic Strips. Up to $35 per 100. 513-377-7522 www.cincytestrips.com

*SIGN ON BONUS--$1,000

for full time positions, $500 for part time positions. (*Bonus restrictions apply.)

We are hiring for appointment scheduler roles. Day and Evening shifts available, both PT and FT.

Bethel Area 3BR 2BA Call 513-615-0966 or 513-797-4917

WE SERVICE ALL APPLIANCES Also Selling Washers & Dryers w/ 1 year warranty. 513-429-1091

BUYING-RECORD ALBUMS & CDs, METAL, JAZZ, BLUES, ROCK, RAP, INDIE, R&B & REGGAE. 513-683-6985

SGS HIRING EVENT! West side Insurance Agency has an opening for a full time Customer Service Representative. Personal & Commercial lines insurance experience preferred. Competitive salary & benefits. Please fax resume to: 513-451-8053 Or email: dabbeltins@fuse.net

Stuff all kinds of things...

BUYING-Old guitars & old musical instruments. Any condition. The older, the better. Call or text: 937-767-2326

Dabbelt Insurance

Beechmont NR 275, Lux/Spacious 2/3 bd twnhme, 2.5 ba, w/d hkup, att garage, private patio $950+ 513-943-7800

Assorted

A Direct Support Professional (DSP) provides supervision, teaches skills, assists with personal care, helps with household tasks, and provides social support. DSPs have the opportunity to enhance and enrich the lives and learning of people with disabilities. The possibilities are endless! Available Positions include: Part-time, full-time, afternoons, evenings, early mornings, weekends, live-ins, and more...a variety of hours to fit your lifestyle and needs!

great places to live... FELICITY

NEW YEAR - NEW CAREER

Lockland Estate Sale by CT of Tri Cty 407 Park Ave. Cincinnati OH 45215. Jan. 5th & 6th 9a-2p. Same house, Largely ALL NEW items! Blowout sale! Full size/ twin beds, glassware collectibles, chipper, table saw, love seat, dining room table, dressers, tools, kitchen items, secretary, artwork, prints, lift chair, and much more! 513-680-0276 - William

No weekends. No telemarketing. Newly remodelled offices. Conveniently located off of Fields Ertel Road. Please bring a copy of your resume to this event!

HIRING EVENT/OPEN HOUSE DETAILS: SATURDAY, JANUARY 6TH, 2018 FROM 10:00AM--2:00PM SGS One Waterstone Place 9435 Waterstone Blvd., Suite 300 Cincinnati, OH 45249 If you can’t make it to this hiring event, please send your resume to: sgsresumes@gmail.com www.jobs.sgs.com/

FREON R12 WANTED, Certified buyer will pay CA$H for R12 cylinders and cases of cans., $neg. (312)291-9169 I BUY 1950’S-80’S STEREOs, DRUMS, KEYBOARDS, RECORDS, POOL CUES, JEWELRY, & BIKES (513) 473-5518 I BUY OLD Stereo Equipment. Recording studio gear, musical instruments, etc. (513) 473-5518 WANTED Used Furniture Antiques, Estate & Moving Sale Items, Old Toys, costume jewelry. û 513-821-1604 Wanting to buy cast iron cranking drafting tables , I am looking to purchase antique cast iron drafting tables that crank. Please email or call me with any you may have., $Any. (513)265-4334 Fi lcallc@gmail.com

WAR RELICS US, German, Japanese Uniforms, Helmets, Guns, Swords, Medals Etc, Paying Top Dollar Call 513-309-1347 Yard and Outdoor

CLASSIFIED online at cincinnati.com

CLASSIFIED online at cincinnati.com

Hendel’s Affordable Tree Service Call today for Winter and Discount Pricing 513-738-9913/266-4052


2C µ EAST - COMMUNITY µ JANUARY 3, 2018

Find a home that fits your family in a neighborhood that fits your life.

Your dream home should come with a dream neighborhood. That’s why Cincinnati | Homes provides exclusive details on neighborhoods, lifestyles and area amenities with every listing.

cincinnati.com/Homes


JANUARY 3, 2018 µ EAST - COMMUNITY µ 3C

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION

Adopt Me

Pets find a new friend... ADOPT- Animal Rescue Fund. Open Mon-Sat 11-5; Closed Sun & Holidays 513-753-9252 www.petfinder.com

BERNESE MOUNTAIN DOG PUPS, AKC, big tri colored happy dogs, shots/wormed, 9 weeks, $1,000. Call 765345-5711 or 317-439-6397 Boston Terrier Pups, ready for Christmas, up to date on all shots $600 937-386-0185

Dachshund mini CKC & AKC pups wormed, shots, vet checked, M & F’s. 937-6614185 or 937-661-7611 Irish Setters, 5 month old Female, 5 month old Male, $400. 1 yr old male $300 740-225-0332 Maltipoos,Havanese, Pekinese, Poodles, Yorkies.Shots, wormed & vet checked. Blanchester, OH. û 937-725-9641 û

Manchester terrier puppies (toy) - AKC, 2nd set of puppy shots, vet checked, POP. Call 513-683-1866

Poodle Pups, Standard CKC, hypo coat, vet chkd, Parents on site, great family dogs! $600. 513-868-1746 Shih-Tzu Pups, some imperial, some chocolate, some regular, AKC, $500-$800, 812-637-2494 Yorkie Pups, 1 F 1 M $500 ea; Regular Size, black & gold, utd, Can be CKC Reg, 937-587-3024

Found Cat, Monroe St & Fairview St. Blue Ash, 513-489-3442

Automotive

Rides best deal for you... Buying All Vehicles Not Just Junk up $3000 Fair cash price, quick pickup. 513-662-4955

Toyota 1997 RAV4, 167,000 mi, 4 WD, 4 Cyl, Automatic, Green ext, Gray int, Moonroof, Power Locks/Windows. Single family owned. Bought new from dealership. Car in good working condition. $2,000. Julie Kuhnell (513)237-6944

Public Notice In accordance with the provisions of State law, there being due and unpaid charges for which the undersigned is entitled to satisfy an owner and/or manager’s lien of the goods hereinafter described and stored at 125 Storage, 1958 State Route 125, Amelia, OH 45102. And, due notice having been given, to the owner of said property and all parties known to claim an interest therein, and the time specified in such notice for payment of such having expired, the goods will be sold at public auction at storagetreasures.com to the highest bidder or otherwise disposed of on Thursday, January 10, 2017 Erika Cooper, 3027 State Route 132 #13, Amelia, OH 45102; household goods, boxes, bags, clothes Jennifer Popp, 2190 West Garrison Ln, Amelia, OH 45102; household goods, boxes, shelving, memorabilia, mattress Scott Reynolds, 1124 New Harmony Shiloh Rd, Williamsburg, OH 45176; power tools, mattress, shelving, totes, furniture Sharon Shropshire, 474 Old State Route 74 #401, Cincinnati, OH 45225; household goods, totes, boxes, furniture, electronics Alisa Sizemore, 2992 Norman Ln, Amelia, OH 45102; household goods, boxes, shelving, mattress, clothes, bags Mike Vonderheide, 5809 Islington Dr, Cincinnati, OH 45227 CJC,Dec27,Jan3’18#2620620

FOR SALE (SEALED BID) 1997 Ford F-350 Brush Truck Washington Township, Clermont Co., OH is accepting sealed bids for a 1997 Ford F250 Brush Truck, 19,757.7 original miles, 7.3 L, V8 single rear wheel. Kenco Aluminum Bed, Briggs & Stratton 18 HP V-Twin Pump. In excellent condition. To be sold “AS IS”. Bid form can be picked-up at Washington Twp. Fire & Rescue, 2229 S.R. 756, or call (513) 876-3740. All bids must be received by 12:00 pm (noon) Wed., January 10, 2018 and will be opened at 6:30 pm Wed., January 10, 2018 during the Trustees regularly scheduled meeting. For additional information or to set up a viewing call 513-876-3740 and speak to the officer on duty. The Board of Trustees reserved the right to reject any and all bids. BT,Dec27,Jan3,’17# 2608468 FOR SALE (SEALED BID) Electric Bryant Furnace Washington Township, Clermont Co., OH is accepting sealed bids for a Bryant Electric Furnace, Model # FB4CNP060. New/never used unit. To be sold “AS IS”. Bid form can be picked-up at Washington Twp. Fire & Rescue, 2229 S.R. 756, or call (513) 876-3740. All bids must be received by 12:00 pm (noon) Wed., January 10, 2018 and will be opened at 6:30 pm Wed., January 10, 2018 during the Trustees regularly scheduled meeting. For additional information or to set up a viewing call 513-876-3740 and speak to the officer on duty. The Board of Trustees reserved the right to reject any and all bids. BT,Dec27,Jan3,’17# 2608475

Wanted: Porsche 356 or 911, Jaguar XK or XKE, 1950-70 Mercedes, Austin Healey 3000, Alfa Romeo. Any Condition Call anytime 330-428-5457. $1000 Finders fee paid if we buy the car.

1 BUYER of OLD CARS CLASSIC, ANTIQUE ’30-40-50-60-70s, Running or not. 513-403-7386

Service Directory CALL: 513-421-6300 TO PLACE YOUR AD

Let ME do the Dirty Work!

CALL the PRO! Tricia

513-340-0636 CE-0000694532

HANDYMAN No job too big or small incl. electrical. Call Bob & compare. 513-248-2130

ONLY CARS.COM HELPS YOU GET THE RIGHT CAR, WITHOUT ALL THE DRAMA.

We Buy STAMP Collections! Old Letters U.S. & World 40 years in business 513-624-6800 randyschollstampcompany.com


4C µ EAST - COMMUNITY µ JANUARY 3, 2018

FROM

“NO FOOD ALLOWED.” TO

“HOW OLD ARE THESE FRIES?”

You know us for shopping, and now Cars.com is the site for the entire life of your car. So for every turn, turn to Cars.com.

Community journal clermont 010318  
Community journal clermont 010318