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COMMUNITY JOURNAL

NORTH CLERMONT

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 1, 2014

Your Community Press newspaper serving Goshen Township, Jackson Township, Newtonsville, Owensville, Stonelick Township, Wayne Township 75¢

BECAUSE COMMUNITY MATTERS

Milford adopts no-smoking policy Officials pledge to re-examine policy’s effectiveness in one year By Keith BieryGolick kbierygolick@communitypress.com

MILFORD — The Milford Exempted Village School District Board of Education unanimously approved an updated policy eliminating designated smoking areas on school property – including athletic fields. The policy was met with resistance from board members Rob Hewlett and George Lucas when it was first discussed in November. Lucas called it a “feelgood” policy officials would have trouble enforcing. Hewlett agreed, saying it was easy to kick someone out of a football game for drinking alcohol, but kicking someone out for Hewlett chewing tobacco would be another thing entirely. Assistant Superintendent Tim Ackermann said the policy, which eliminates all tobacco use on district property, is something officials have been discussing “for a couple years.” Lucas Ackermann said under the old policy teachers and staff were able to smoke at front doors, back doors and other designated areas where students could see them. “It felt like we weren’t setting a good precedent and example for the students,” he said. The assistant superintendent also mentioned the extensive cleanup of cigarette butts outside facilities that designated smoking areas made necessary. Board member Debbie Marques said the district already has a zero-tolerance policy for alcohol and drugs. “The point is our goal is to make this a smoke-free, drug-free, alcohol-free campus. That means our staff too. And I’m sorry that means our visitors too,” Marques said. “To tell kids they can’t do this and then have teachers outside doing this is contradictory.” Hewlett said he agrees with the policy’s intent, but struggles “with continuously adding rules and regulations on the population.” Hewlett pointed to Michelle Obama’s National School Lunch Program, which Milford schools participate in, as an example. That program was done for the students’ benefit, giving them healthier lunch options, but kids are now eating less and many schools are opting out of it, Hewlett said. “Comparing cigarette smoking to a food program is kind of difficult because it’s illegal for students to smoke,”

See POLICY, Page A2

FOOD Rita’s red beans and rice is her take on the traditional New Year’s Hoppin’ John. Full story, B3

Clermont County commissioners approved the creation of a committee that will form the response plan in the event of any dangerous wild animal escapes.LEAH FIGHTMASTER/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

CLERMONT PLANS FOR

WILD ANIMAL

ESCAPES

By Leah Fightmaster

lfightmaster@communitypress.com

After the escape of more than 50 exotic animals from a farm in Zanesville, the state and all Ohio counties are creating a response plan in the case of a similar event. Clermont County commissioners created a committee to craft an emergency response plan in case any dangerous wild animals escape or are intentionally released, said Pam Broughton, director of the Clermont County Emergency Management Agency. The state is requiring all counties to create a team, as part of the Ohio Revised Code, according to the resolution. The committee will draft the response plan, as well as take applications to be part of the Clermont County Dangerous Wild Animal Emergency Response Team. Broughton said the plan is mainly for first responders who would be on the scene to guide them in dealing with the situation. Creating the plan is part of the

CAMPUS HEROES Catch up with local athletes now in college See Sports, A4

state’s response to the Zanesville escape in 2011, when Terry Thompson released more than 50 lions, tigers, bears, wolves and monkeys from his Zanesville farm. Broughton Thompson then committed suicide. Police shot and killed most of the animals. Six animals were captured and taken to the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium and placed under quarantine. The Clermont County committee is made up of nine people from various organizations, including fire departments, the American Red Cross and the Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Gardens. Broughton said the committee has to create a plan by Feb. 28, and then will need to be approved by the county commissioners. Want to know what’s going on with the Clermont County commissioners? Follow Leah Fightmaster on Twitter: @LCFightmaster.

Contact us

News ..........................248-8600 Retail advertising ..............768-8404 Classified advertising .........242-4000 Delivery ........................576-8240 See page A2 for additional information

COMMITTEE MEMBERS

Here’s who is on the planning committee for the Clermont County Dangerous Wild Animal Emergency Response Team: » Tony Adams — Vice President, The Clermont Sun Publishing Co. » Pam Broughton — Director, Clermont County Emergency Management Agency » Edwin Humphrey — President, Clermont County commissioners » Dan Mack — Assistant chief, Miami Township Fire and EMS » Jason Oyer — Disaster Operations Coordinator, American Red Cross » Rob Perry — Director, Environmental Health, Clermont County General Health District » Karl Schultz — Miami Township trustee, Clermont County Township Association » Tom Tenhunfeld — Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Gardens » James Young — Sergeant, Miami Township Police Department

Vol. 33 No. 39 © 2014 The Community Press ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


A2 • COMMUNITY JOURNAL NORTH CLERMONT • JANUARY 1, 2014

K1

Miami Twp. facility upgrades planned

Fire, police departments consider sharing building By Keith BieryGolick kbierygolick@communitypress.com

MIAMI TWP. — A simple discussion between department heads about sharing an old building could have been the sign of something more significant. Trustees were certainly impressed. “I have waited 13 years to hear the level of cooperation we’ve heard in this discussion right here,” said Trustee Mary Makley Wolff. “I can’t tell you how long we’ve fought for that.” Longtime Police Chief R. Steven Bailey and Fire Chief Jim Whitworth both retired this year. On the cover of Miami Township’s recent newsletter stand their replacements, Police Chief Sue Madsen and Fire Chief Steve Kelly. The headline reads “A new era in safety services leadership is underway.” In their first budget meeting together, the duo used the phrase “domino effect” multiple times to explain their plans for the new year. “What we saw is a lot of unused space,” Madsen said, referring specifically to the former service building next to the police department. The goal is to refrain from building something new, and, instead, use what departments al-

ready have, she said. “We found everything had a domino effect. We can’t do that until we do this,” Madsen said. There are problems: The fire department wants better shower space, Kelly said. Right now there is one men’s and women’s bathroom in the central station. Firefighters and paramedics trying to shower must share the bathroom with the public, who often take CPR and other training classes there. “If you could get (new) showers, from a morale standpoint, little things can really make a big difference,” said Trustee Ken Tracy. The police department wants locker rooms and a restroom they don’t have to share with criminals and suspects they bring in. “That means urine tests, that means people puking everywhere and then we have to use that same facility,” Madsen said. “We don’t know who that person is, or if they might have some type of communicable disease.” There are other problems. Investigations are conducted in a “closet” and the department wants a witness facility that gives off a “better look and feel for the township,” Madsen said.

ed. She also said the civic center could be used for civilian training. “When we purchased this building ... we wanted you guys to utilize this building for training,” Wolff said. “There’s room to put resuscitation equipment here. You could do public ... classrooms (here) — all of this stuff works together. If we can’t figure that out as an organization then shame on us.”

South station ‘shed’ dismissed

This is the old service building next to the police station in Miami Township. Officials want to clean it out and reconfigure the space inside to make a combined training room with workout equipment, showers and other facilities. KEITH BIERYGOLICK/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Trustee Karl Schultz said the configuration of the station isn’t ideal. “(With) the traffic coming from one end of the building to the other, you’re going through places you shouldn’t be going through,” Schultz said. Discussing their vision for the future, the new chiefs gave trustees a long list of improvements to digest. Kelly said he walked around with Madsen and the township’s service director for three hours recently to examine existing facilities. It all starts with the service building, the first domino in their master plan. The police use the building for evidence, to

store community outreach material and for a gun-cleaning room. The fire department uses one room for training, but the majority of the space is an overflow storage area. “The goal would be to move (the workout equipment) back into that building and create a larger training room,” Kelly said. The training room would be shared by both departments and would free up office space in the police station. Kelly said he plans to begin selling and disposing of overflow materials in the building after Jan.1. The police department wants to build a mezzanine in another section of the building to store D.A.R.E material and other excess equipment. With the service building cleared out, the interior can be altered to ac-

commodate a locker room and shower facility. There is currently one shower in the men’s restroom. The police department budgeted $20,800 for the mezzanine and its restroom at the station. It also budgeted $59,000 to move the evidence room, another domino knocked over by reconfiguring the service building. Kelly said he hopes to “get everything squared away and have that facility come to life (sometime) in 2014.” Administrator Larry Fronk said there are “still a lot more discussions to come” before those projects are realized. Wolff reiterated just because a capital improvement is OK’d in the budget doesn’t mean it automatically happens, but said she looked forward to hearing more about what was discuss-

Policy Continued from Page A1

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Marques said. Hewlitt countered that it isn’t illegal for adults to smoke, which the policy impacts. Nevertheless, he agreed to support the nosmoking policy, as long as the board revisits it in one year to make sure it is working. “With the board’s direction, we would be happy to relook (sic) at it in a year,” Ackermann said. Lucas said tobacco use negatively impacts lives,

Brady

Ackermann

which is something he knows personally, but his issue with the policy was enforcement. “I don’t want any citizen banned from the grounds,” he said. “That was my issue with the enforcement side of that. Most people of common reason are going

COMMUNITY JOURNAL NORTH CLERMONT

Find news and information from your community on the Web Goshen Township • cincinnati.com/goshentownship Jackson Township • cincinnati.com/jacksontownship Newtonsville • cincinnati.com/newtonsville Owensville • cincinnati.com/owensville Stonelick Township • cincinnati.com/stonelicktownship Wayne Township • cincinnati.com/waynetownship Clermont County • cincinnati.com/clermontcounty

News

Eric Spangler Editor .......................576-8251, espangler@communitypress.com Keith BieryGolick Reporter ...............248-7683, kbierygolick@communitypress.com Lisa Wakeland Reporter ...................248-7139, lwakeland@communitypress.com Forest Sellers Reporter ....................248-7680, fsellers@communitypress.com Jeanne Houck Reporter....................248-7129, jhouck@communitypress.com Melanie Laughman Sports Editor ........248-7573, mlaughman@communitypress.com Tom Skeen Sports Reporter ...............576-8250, tskeen@communitypress.com

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Classified

To place a Classified ad ..................242-4000, www.communityclassified.com

To place an ad in Community Classified, call 242-4000. CE-0000576409

When Kelly suggested adding a $100,000 storage garage to the south station, on 1154 U.S. Route 50 in Perintown, trustees groaned. The garage has been proposed before. “Until we know what we are doing with the stations we are wary of expanding what we already have,” Wolff said, referring to the new station that will most likely be built on state Route 131. Tracy said he wanted to know what the south station would be used for “before we get to a $100,000 shed.” “I’m not a fire person — and I never claimed to be — but looking at the numbers the south station can be used for a lot more resources than it is (currently) being used for,” he said. “Right now, the number of runs coming out of the south station is slim to none and slim is leaving town.” Kelly said he hoped to have a more strategic plan for trustees to consider concerning the department’s stations in the first half of 2014.

to recognize that what we are trying to do is for the benefit of students.” The policy, as it is written now, is solid, Lucas said. Citizens caught smoking will be verbally notified of the board’s policy and after multiple offenses can be removed from school property. If someone refuses to put out their cigarette or tobacco product they “may be fined by the Ohio Department of Health,” according to the policy. Board member Andrea Brady said discussion of the policy makes it sound like the school district is not currently smoke-free. “Our buildings are tobacco free. That policy has been in effect since 1995,” she said. “We’re not going from adults can smoke in buildings and now they are not (allowed). I think that is getting lost in some of the discussion.” Announcements will be made about the policy before home athletic games and during halftime. “No tobacco” signs also will be posted throughout the district, according to the policy.

Index Calendar .................B2 Classifieds ................C Food ......................B3 Life ........................B1 Police .................... B6 Schools ..................A5 Sports ....................A6 Viewpoints .............A8


SCHOOLS

JANUARY 1, 2014 • CJN-MMA • A3

COMMUNITY

PRESS

Editor: Eric Spangler, espangler@communitypress.com, 576-8251

ACHIEVEMENTS | NEWS | ACTIVITIES | HONORS

CommunityPress.com

“It’s fun to watch them. As the day goes on, they start getting the hang of what this means." MARIA SENTELIK, Ohio Valley Voices executive director

The green flag waves as karts race at the start of the Ohio Valley Voices 500 Friday, Oct. 4. CHUCK GIBSON/FOR THE COMMUNITY PRESS

October motor race raised $10K for OVV By Chuck Gibson

clermont@communitypress.com

The roar of racing engines was heard during the third annual Ohio Valley Voices OVV-500 in October at Motorsports Country Club of Cincinnati. Eight teams of four drivers competed in European style karts on the professionally designed track in Batavia, Ohio. The Kart Enduro invitational race is a benefit event for Ohio Valley Voices. Maria Sentelik is the executive director of the Miami Township program that provides early intervention to teach profoundly hearing impaired infants and children to listen and talk. “The OVV 500 is such a unique event,” Sentelik said. “It’s an opportunity for a bunch of people to get in cars and race around. It’s an exciting opportunity for people who are connected in some way to Ohio Valley Voices to really let some steam out.” Even people who know nothing about racing get in the cars. Sentelik sat it out this year, but has put on the helmet and gloves, slid behind the wheel, and took the turns around the track in previous years. She admitted it was a little scary for her. It is an all-day event. A professional driver is on hand to help, and the participants all took some “warm-up” laps. “It’s fun to watch them,” Sentelik said. “As the day goes on, they start getting the hang of what this means. Eventually you see them getting better and really competitive. By the end of the day,

Karts line up for the third annual OVV 500 race to benefit the Ohio Valley Voices.CHUCK GIBSON/FOR THE COMMUNITY PRESS

they’re stoked. ‘I’m a race car driver.’ It’s a fun event.” More than just a fun event, the OVV 500 netted over $10,000 for the program this year. The daylong event included an auction which raised about $500 of that sum. “Team Trista,” named after OVV student Trista DeBruler, was the winning team. Her father, Scott DeBruler, and the father of another student, both took the wheel as part of the winning team of four drivers. Ashley Schmitz was also a driver for one of the teams in the race. Her twoyear old son attends OVV. Tate Schmitz was born with moderate to severe hearing loss in both ears “He’s been there since he was 18months-old,” Schmitz said. “When he started, he wasn’t talking at all. Now he’d talking up a storm. He’s really feisty; he’s saying all kinds of stuff they teach him. He’s doing really, really well.” Ohio Valley Voices has been instrumental in supporting legislation for hospitals to test the hearing of newborn babies at birth. Schmitz says they knew there was a problem the day Tate was born because of this testing. As a result, they had his full diagnosis by the time he was three weeks old. He had his first set of hearing aids by the time he was 10weeks-old. They call him “Tater Bear” and drive 45 minutes from their home in Springboro, Ohio to bring him to OVV and back. “It’s quite a drive,” Schmitz said. “When we did the tour, we were really amazed with what the kids were doing. We wondered how it would affect Tate. Looking at where he was versus where he is now, we always tell people the program is amazing.” Fred Zacharias is already connected as a member of the OVV board of directors, chairman for the race event, and a driver on one of the teams. He hoped the event would help raise money for the school, but he has even higher hopes beyond that. “One of the other things is to get new people to come out and bring them along to get involved with OVV,” he said. “That’s how we got involved. Somebody brought us to an event and we sort of jumped into it.”

B.J. Zacharias in the drivers seat with wife, Stephanie, with teammates Fred Zacharias and Dennis Okin pose before the race.CHUCK GIBSON/FOR THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Laurence Jones, Ashley Schmitz, Kevin Weckesser and Steve Petrosky made up one of the race teams.CHUCK GIBSON/FOR THE COMMUNITY PRESS

2014

New Year’s Resolution

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LIFE TO THE FULLEST…

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SPORTS

A4 • CJN-MMA • JANUARY 1, 2014

COMMUNITY

PRESS

Editor: Melanie Laughman, mlaughman@communitypress.com, 513-248-7573

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | RECREATIONAL

CommunityPress.com

Milford’s Grothaus surges through juco to Bowling Green By Mark D. Motz mmotz@communitypress.com

Milford High School graduate Kyle Grothaus (8) was the leading scorer for the Cincinnati State soccer team as a sophomore. He recently committed to continue his career at Bowling Green State University. PHOTO COURTESY OF CINCINNATI STATE

CINCINNATI — It might not have been his first choice, but in retrospect, it was the right choice. So said Milford High School graduate Kyle Grothaus of his decision to attend and play soccer for Cincinnati State. He recently completed his sophomore season by playing in his second consecutive national junior college tournament. “When (Surge head soccer coach) Mike Combs came to me with a good offer to play, I had to think about it,” he said. “Everybody wants to play Division I, but I wasn’t ready.” He is now. The Community Press caught up with Grothaus a few days before he officially signed his letter of intent to continue his education and soccer career at Bowling Green State University. He plans to major in biology and sports management and will begin classes in January. Grothaus said academics were the most difficult part of his transition to college. Attending Cincinnati State proved beneficial. “At first I wasn’t too sure about school and it was hard,” he said. “It was a lot more work than high school. But I knew I had to buckle down and get through it, so I did. The soccer part has been great, but I think doing that has been the most valuable thing I've done.” Grothaus has big plans for his NCAA Division I career. “On the field I hope to keep my success up,” he said. “I think I can be all-(Mid-American Conference), maybe all-American. I want to play soccer professionally. I’m going to work my hardest to get whatever may come next.” Combs said hard work is part of Grothaus’ DNA. “He was our leading scorer as an outside midfielder and he’s

Grothaus

been an everyday starter for us the last two years,” Combs said. “He has such good speed, he really causes problems around the box for other teams. He lived up to our expectations 100 percent. “Getting the local guys like Kyle to stay home is crucial for us. We don’t have a facility, a home field. I’m not full time at the school. We’re recruiting against some very good local teams at UC, XU and NKU, so for us to get that kind of talent, to help nurture it and help them get to a four-year school, that’s very important. “Kyle is part of a sophomore class with nine of 10 guys going on to four-year schools on scholarship. We’re very proud of that.” Grothaus said his favorite high school soccer memory was a sectional final match against Moeller. “It goes to overtime and I scored a goal with about eight minutes,” he said. “I jumped into this huge crowd. It was amazing.” Combs said Grothaus had a similar signature moment early in his Surge career. “He’s actually had quite a few, but one that really stands out was from the national tournament his freshman year,” Combs said. “He had a goal from the outside that was perfect, really perfect. “Kyle is one who is a huge competitor. He saw the opportunity in front of him and didn’t shy away from the spotlight. At the national tournament, about 90 percent of the people attending are coaches from four-year schools. They took notice. It grew his confidence and got him some of the exposure he needed to move on from here.”

CATCHING UP WITH COLLEGE ATHLETES The Milford-Miami Advertiser/Community Journal North Clermont asked college athletes’ family and friends to submit information so our readers can get caught up on their activities. Their offerings:

Amanda Darling

Milford’s Kayla Byrnside just finished as a freshman on Marshall University’s women’s soccer team.THANKS TO ALLEN BYRNSIDE

Kayla Byrnside

» Kayla Byrnside is No. 3 on Marshall University’s women’s soccer team and is the daughter of Allen and Susan Byrnside. She attended Milford High School. Kayla played significant minutes in 18 games as a freshman for the Thundering Herd this fall helping her team to a historic 10-7-3 record overall and firstever win in the Conference USA Tournament, played in Houston. Kayla scored her first collegiate goal in her first game in a 3-0 victory against Campbell University and her first assist in her second game against Kent State. She plays midfield for Marshall and finished the season with eight shots total and five on goal. She is majoring in elementary education.

» Amanda Darling, a Milford High School graduate, just completed her freshmen season with the Union College Bulldogs women’s soccer team where she appeared in 14 games, starting five. She only scored one goal on the season, but it was a memorable one. With the scored tied at one, Darling found the back of the net in the 82nd minute to lift her team to a 2-1 victory over Appalachian Athletic Conference foe Point (Ga.) University. Her team is hoping to train in Brazil this summer with head coach Camila Mendes. The nursing major graduated Milford with a 4.022 grade point average earning her both athletic and academic scholarships to Union. Darling is the daughter of Judy and Jerry Darling, and the sister of Rachel Darling.

With the scored tied at one, Darling found the back of the net in the 82nd minute to lift her team to a 2-1 victory over Appalachian Athletic Conference foe Point (Ga.) University. THANKS TO JUDY DARLING

Amy Van Syoc

Jennifer Trame holds the record for the lowest 18-hole round in the HCAC Championship in the history of the College of Mount St. Joseph women’s golf program with an 82. THANKS TO BILL TRAME

Jennifer Trame

» Jennifer Trame, a Milford High School graduate, finished in a tie for fifth place in the Heartland Collegiate Athletic Conference golf tournament, earning her all conference honors as a senior. Trame broke three school records for the College of Mount St. Joseph at the tournament in Seymour, Ind. Her opening day 82 was the lowest round for a Mount player in HCAC tournament history. Her fifth-place finish was also a record for HCAC Championship play. The former Eagle owns the second lowest scoring average in Mount history (90.05) and holds three of the four lowest single-season scoring averages in school history. Her 86.36 average this past season ranks second all time. She is the daughter of Gary and Billie Trame of Milford.

» Amy Van Syoc, a 2008 Milford High School graduate, is in the midst of her senior season with the University of Louisville rowing team. Van Syoc has captained the Cards rowers for three seasons now and is coming off a junior season where she was named Collegiate Rowing Coaches Association National Scholar-Athlete and chosen as the team’s Cardinal Pride Award winner by her teammates. She earned first-place finishes against Duke, Dayton, Alabama, Kansas and Georgetown in the varsity eight boat, to go with a third-place finish at the BIG EAST Championships. In the only meet during the fall season, her varsity eight boat finished second in the Rivanna Romp hosted by the University of Virginia. She is the daughter of Gary and Cindy Van Syoc.

Amy Van Syoc, a 2008 Milford High School graduate, is in the midst of her senior season with the University of Louisville rowing team.THANKS TO MICHELLE HUTCHINS, LOUISVILLE ATHLETICS


SPORTS & RECREATION

JANUARY 1, 2014 • CJN-MMA • A5

PRESS PREPS HIGHLIGHTS Girls basketball

By Mark D. Motz mmotz@communitypress.com

Early holiday deadlines prevented the inclusion of all scores. Please visit cincinnati.com/preps for the complete list.

Boys basketball

» CNE lost 88-52 on the road at Georgetown Dec. 20, falling to 3-4 on the season. The Rockets played in the Hillsboro Shootout Dec. 27 and 28. » Goshen lost 65-45 at new Richmond Dec. 21, slipping to 5-2 on the season as Austin Smith scored 14 in the losing effort. The Warriors were on the road at Madeira Dec. 28. » Milford lost a 45-41 decision at home against Kings Dec. 20. Junior Austin Taylor led Milford with a season-high 10 points off the bench. Brad Hall tacked on six points, while grabbing a careerbest nine rebounds and adding five steals. Milford fell to 4-2 overall (2-2 ECC). The Eagles competed Dec. 27 and 28 in the Eaton High School Holiday Tournament. » McNicholas High School dropped to 3-1 on the season with a 50-49 loss on the road at Purcell Marian Dec. 20. Danny Byrne had 15 points to lead the Rockets, who competed in the Ripley Invitational Dec. 27 and 28. » Moeller defeated Western Hills 86-49 on Dec. 20. Junior Nate Fowler led the Crusaders with 18 points. On Dec. 21, the Crusaders beat Mount Healthy 66-36 as senior Grant Benzinger hit for 25 points.

» CNE struggled through a 64-17 loss at Georgetown Dec. 19, dropping its record to 2-5. The Rockets played in the Bethel-Tate holiday tournament Dec. 27 and 28. » Goshen lost 56-45 at Norwood Dec. 19 to slip to 4-5 on the season. » Milford improved to 5-4 on the season with a 63-45 road win at Hughes Dec. 21. Kelly Noll led the Eagles with 14 points, seven rebounds and five assists. Milford played at Batavia Dec. 28. » McNicholas beat Purcell Marian 48-30 Dec. 21 behind Hannah Taylor’s 21 points and 12 rebounds. The Rockets improved to 6-3 with the win. They played Mason Dec. 28.

Hall of fame

» The Milford High School athletic department and the Milford Athletic Boosters Club announced its 2013 hall of fame induction class of 2013: John Washko (1977), football, basketball, baseball; Justin Wallace (‘96), soccer; Michael Bode (’02), track and field, football, basketball; and Evan Smith (’03), baseball, basketball. Hall of Fame night is scheduled for Friday, Jan. 31. Festivities will include a pre-induction reception and dinner for the new inductees, their families, friends and the current hall of fame members. Induction ceremonies will be in the Fley Center Gymnasium prior to the Milford boys varsity basketball game against Loveland. For more information, please contact the Milford Athletic Department at 5762208.

Bowling

» » The Milford girls beat Anderson Dec.17 and 19, winning 2,082-1,870 and 2,089-1,825, respectively. Anderson beat the Milford boys 2,929-2,625 Dec. 17 and knocked off the Eagles Dec. 19 by a 2,422-2,314 score. » McNicholas lost 2,353-2,154 against Middletown Fenwick Dec. 18 to even its record at 2-2. The Rockets roll again Dec. 7 against Kettering Alter.

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VIEWPOINTS

A6 • CJN-MMA • JANUARY 1, 2014

Editor: Eric Spangler, espangler@communitypress.com, 576-8251

EDITORIALS | LETTERS | COLUMNS | CH@TROOM

COMMUNITY

PRESS

CommunityPress.com

Walking in winter for weight loss

Winter isn’t just a time to bundle up and head indoors. Clermont CAN (Coalition for Activity and Nutrition) believes that just because the flurries start to fall doesn’t mean you shouldn’t continue to do activities outside. One of the best ways to increase physical activity is to simply walk. The longer and farther you go the better for you, but you can start out with just 10 minutes. Recommendations for adults are 150 minutes of moderate activity a week. That seems like a lot all at once but it is only 30 minutes a day. Some days you may walk longer to make up for skipping a day and that is fine; find

what works for you. There are a couple of tips to remember when walking outside in winter. First, start out slow; Julianne allow your Nesbit COMMUNITY PRESS muscles to warm up gradGUEST COLUMNIST ually. Watch out for icy roadways and trails, you can try wearing studded outdoor walking shoes for extra grip or try using traction devices that slip over your shoes. You may not think about it in the winter, but you need to hydrate just as much, take some water along with

CHATROOM Last week’s question Should the U.S. adopt an advisory panel’s recommendations to end the government’s systematic collection of logs of all Americans’ cellular phone calls and require those to be kept in private hands “for queries and data mining” only by court order? Why or why not?

“We are definitely in an 1984 epic realty show. Unfortunately, it is not a 'show' but the central government intrusion into our lives. “The recent U.S. District Court opinion was on the money. Eroding our private lives is unacceptable. This started when 9/11 caught most of us by surprise. Many documents have shown that the present wholesale spying on citizens would not have prevented that tragedy. “Secret courts whiteout public information is a danger to the Constitution. One should read that document to understand the many ways that government agencies are twisting it.”

W.B.

“Yes, the US should probably adopt the recommendation, but the president has said there will be a decision made about much of this in January. In the post-911 world many parts of our freedom of speech have been curtailed. “The real question is how much freedom are we willing to sacrifice in order to feel safer from terrorism occurring on our soil? And if you have a problem with that sacrifice of freedom, don't use a cell phone.”

TRog

“I believe Time Magazine's choice of Pope Francis is an excellent one! What strikes me about the pope is his simplicity and his urging all of us to feed the poor throughout the world and to strive for world peace. Another noticable trait is his always smiling face and never being afraid to spread the Gospel of Jesus Christ. “What a great example he is of a disciple of our Lord. If we all followed his lead, there would be far less problems in the world and in our own country!”

J.S.

NEXT QUESTION Should Ohio allow online voter registration, which would allow for an immediate cross check of license records and help prevent illegal voting? Why or why not? Every week we ask readers a question they can reply to via e-mail. Send your answers to espangler@communitypress.com with Chatroom in the subject line.

from you skin. Avoid wearing cotton, once you start sweating, you may get cold if you cannot get the moisture away from your body. Be sure to wear gloves and a hat, most of your heat escapes through your head. Again, you can always take it off if you need to cool down but you are better off to keep it on. Socks should be made of wool for warmth but not too bulky to prevent blisters. Keep in mind you will be moving which should keep you warm. Don’t forget your sunglasses, if there is snow on the ground the glare can reduce your visibility. If it gets extremely cold out, move in-

Rep. William Howard sympathized with the South Jan. 30, 1861: U.S. Rep. William Howard of Batavia rose to address his colleagues about the impending crisis. Howard was a 43-year-old conservative Democrat who served two terms as Clermont County’s prosecuting attorney and one term in the Ohio Senate before being elected to Congress. The situation was dire. South Carolina, claimed “the increasing hostility on the part of the non-slave holding states to the institution of slavery” - especially their failure to enforce the Fugitive Slave Act - was responsible for the Constitutional crisis. The secessionists, believing that the North wouldn’t stop until it abolished slavery throughout the country, said it was left with no other choice. South Carolina left the Union on Dec. 24, 1860. Within a month five other states - Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, and Louisiana - followed South Carolina out of the Union. Howard sympathized with the South. He agreed that the North failed to enforce the Fugitive Slave Act. The North agitated the South by sending “forth their emissaries to stir up the unsuspecting slave to insurrection to

murder, rape, arson.” In short, he blamed the North for the situation: “the Northern states were the aggressors; and if they really…desire the preservation of the Union, let them first correct the Gary Knepp COMMUNITY PRESS errors at home.” Though provoked, GUEST COLUMNIST the South couldn’t leave the Union because “This Union, under our Constitution, was intended to be perpetual.” Representative Howard praised the efforts of President James Buchanan to save the Union. “What American citizen,” Howard asked, “does not feel a glow of pride thrill his very soul to see the present Executive…enforcing the national laws, elevating our flag, and showing a determination at all hazards to preserve and perpetuate our national honor?” What of the future? Would it be war or peace? That, he said, was entirely “within the hands of the Republican Party.” If the president-elect insisted on

doors, many malls allow walking and have designated hours. Clermont CAN encourages everyone to “Be Active, Eat Smart” and you can do it as a family. Clermont CAN and the Clermont County Health District encourage families to start incorporating physical activity into their normal routine and walking is one of the best ways to do it. More information on Clermont CAN and places for no cost or low cost physical activity can be found at www.clermonthealthdistrict.org. Julianne Nesbit, Health Commissioner-Clermont County General Health District

restraining slavery’s expansion, then it was likely that the nation would hear the “tramp and tread of hostile armies.” Howard urged compromise by supporting the so called Crittenden proposals which would have preserved both slavery and the Union. Howard’s Southern sympathies may sound strange to modern ears, but they were well within the mainstream of Democrat party thoughts about slavery. The party’s platform reaffirmed its support for slavery. The Democrats upheld the rights of the states to regulate slavery, urged support for the Fugitive Slave Act, and blamed the abolitionists for agitating against slavery, predicting those efforts will “endanger the stability and permancy of the Union.” They pledged to do what they could to preserve the institution. Events overtook the compromisers. Howard, like many Democrats, went to war to preserve the Union, not to free the slaves. Howard joined up with the 59th Ohio Volunteer Infantry at Camp Ammen in Ripley. The 59th was a hard-fighting unit, seeing heavy action at Shiloh, Perryville and Stone River. Howard left the service with a medical discharge with a rank of Lieutenant Colonel. He returned to Batavia to continue his law practice. Gary Knepp is a resident of Milford.

Better serving veterans in the digital age Nearly 24 years ago, American leadership helped bring down the Berlin Wall without firing a shot. Now, our service members and veterans are up against a new wall – bureaucracy. This wall complicates nearly every facet of life as they transition from active duty service to veteran status. This Veterans Day, we must renew our commitment to those who have served us. Our task begins by ensuring that their medical records, which document years or decades of service, seamlessly follow them from uniformed to veteran status. The House of Representatives is taking action to push both the Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs to realize this goal. Our troops face numerous challenges after they serve: transitioning to civilian life, finding a career or continuing their education, to name just a few. Our veterans should not have to serve as couriers between the DoD and VA too. It’s an additional and unnecessary burden. Our two biggest departments are still not fully capable of digitally communicating in the 21st century. Early in his presidency, President Obama charged these two departments to “build a seamless system of integration

COMMUNITY JOURNAL

NORTH CLERMONT

you, you will lose water through the dry winter air and sweating. Watch the roadways; motorist may not be expecting walkers in the winter months. Always wear reflective clothing and be sure to walk where it is safe. Clermont County has a wonderful system of county, township and village parks that you can use at no cost. Wear multiple layers that you can move in. You can always take a layer off, but you will be miserable if you don’t have enough on. Consider making your outside layer wind resistant to help cut down on the cold. Layers should be of a material that keeps moisture away

A publication of

with a single goal: when a member of the Armed Forced separates from the military, he or she will no longer have to walk paperwork from a DoD duty station to a local VA health center; their Brad electronic records will Wenstrup COMMUNITY PRESS transition along with them and remain with GUEST COLUMNIST them forever.” This vision has devolved into a series of missed milestones, shifting priorities and ballooning budgets. The House Veterans’ Affairs Committee learned earlier this year that these failures have led President Obama and both departments to abandon the original goal of one system, and instead plan continued reliance on separate systems integrated together to connect electronic health records. I served as an Army combat surgeon in Iraq and still serve as a Reservist. I know that my fellow military members, when they retire, should not have to continue to wage war at home against bureaucracies and paperwork. And yet, a doctor treating veterans cannot seamlessly access the medical

394 Wards Corner Road Loveland, Ohio 45140 phone: 248-8600 email: clermont@communitypress.com web site: www.communitypress.com

history of their patient because that history is housed in a separate Defense Department system. VA doctors report that initial steps are improving this digital sharing, while still on separate systems. The House of Representatives is working to tackle these issues through the bipartisan H.R. 1960. Important sections call for basic interoperability capabilities within a year, meaning that doctors on both sides will be able to readily view medical history files. By 2016, we are demanding full system integration between the two departments. These are essential steps towards realizing a system that seamlessly communicates medical history files between the departments, without forcing the burden on to the shoulders of our transitioning veterans It’s discouraging for our troops, our veterans, and our doctors to face a wall of bureaucracy that hinders care. They deserve a lasting solution that honors their legacy and service. Brad Wenstrup represents Ohio’s 2nd Congressional District and serves on both the House Armed Services and Veterans’ Affairs Committees. Contact him at www.wenstrup.house.gov.

Community Journal Editor Eric Spangler espangler@communitypress.com, 576-8251 Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday See page A2 for additional contact information.


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 1, 2014

LIFE

COMMUNITY PRESS

PEOPLE | IDEAS | RECIPES

Retro Fittings draws record crowd

Cincy Style Edit's Brock Maitland and Marsha Ashley of Hyde Park hang out at RetroFittings. THANKS TO ELYSA HAMLIN

St. Vincent de Paul District Council President Andrew Curran and Liz Curran of Anderson get ready for the festivities at RetroFittings THANKS TO ELYSA HAMLIN

Jen Dalton and Artrell Hawkins emcee at RetroFittings. THANKS TO ELYSA HAMLIN

David Hammerstrom of Fort Thomas, Advisory Board Member and RetroFittings Committee Member Tamie Sullivan of Loveland and Charitable Pharmacy Board Member Bob Saelinger of Mariemont enjoy the evening at RetroFittings. THANKS TO ELYSA HAMLIN

RetroFittings emcee Artrell Hawkins models during the fashion show. THANKS TO ELYSA HAMLIN

Aaron Kinebrew of Avondale, Committee Member Meg Tarvin and Paul Tarvin of Anderson mingle at RetroFittings. THANKS TO ELYSA HAMLIN

The RetroFittings Committee for this year's event are, in back, from left, Kathleen Stenger of Newport, Carmen Sanders of Springdale, Hengameh Nassef of Indian Hill, Meg Tarvin of Anderson, Peggy Mossbarger of Hyde Park and Jeanne Howe of Hyde Park; in second row, Lori Stenger of Cleves, Dianne Brown of Hyde Park, Tina Hawking of Mt. Lookout, Jayne Watkins of Fairfield, Tammy Snyder of Franklin Township; and in front, Taren Kinebrew of Avondale, the committee chairwoman. THANKS TO ELYSA HAMLIN

S

Creative Director Joe Rigotti of Over the Rhine and St. Vincent de Paul Director of Development Karen Williams of Springdale chat at RetroFittings. THANKS TO ELYSA HAMLIN

t. Vincent de Paul’s recent 11th annual RetroFittings event was attended by a record-breaking 800 guests. The event was moved to Music Hall this year because of repeat sell-out crowds. The new Creative Director, Joe Rigotti, used the new venue, Music Hall, as inspiration for this year’s theme, “A Night at the Opera.” The event showcased the fashion designs of more than 55 students from the University of Cincinnati's College of Design, Architecture, Art and Planning.

RetroFittings committee members Mary Casella and Peggy Mossbarger attend the event. THANKS TO ELYSA HAMLIN

Each student was given a $10 voucher to shop at one of St. Vincent de Paul’s seven Thrift Stores to redesign and create an ensemble inspired by one of eight famous operas. Each design was modeled in a New York style fashion show by UC students and other special guests including event emcee Artrell Hawkins, Cincinnati Bengal Adam Jones and owners of Cincy Style Edit, Marsha Ashley and Brock Maitland. The event also featured a boutique filled with vintage and

trendy items donated to St. Vincent de Paul’s thrift stores, cocktails and h'ors d'oeuvres, raffle prizes, and a live auction with items such as a one-of-akind jewelry piece designed by Krombholz jewelers. Proceeds from the event will benefit St. Vincent de Paul's efforts to bring hope to the front line of poverty, with more than 900 parish volunteers visiting the homes of neighbors in need to provide innovative, practical emergency assistance throughout Greater Cincinnati.


B2 • CJN-MMA • JANUARY 1, 2014

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD THURSDAY, JAN. 2

Childcare provided with registration. Ages 18 and up. 8313770. Milford.

Exercise Classes SilverSneakers, 9-9:45 a.m., Union Township Civic Center, 4350 Aicholtz Road, Variety of exercises designed to increase muscular strength, range of movement and activity for daily living skills. Call for pricing. 947-7344. Union Township. SilverSneakers Flex, 12:30-1:15 p.m., Summerside Woods, 5484 Summerside Road, Move to music through variety of exercises designed to increase muscular strength, range of movement and activities for daily living. Call for pricing. Presented by SilverSneakers Flex. 478-6783. Summerside. SilverSneakers, 1:30-2:15 p.m., O’Bannon Terrace, 6716 Ohio 132, Move to music through variety of exercises designed to increase muscular strength, range of movement and activities for daily living. Call for pricing. Presented by SilverSneakers Flex. 478-6783. Goshen. Zumba Fitness with Sue, 6-7 p.m., Clough United Methodist Church, 2010 Wolfangel Road, Burn calories, sculpt your body and have a blast. $5. 379-4900; www.zumbasue.net. Anderson Township.

Health / Wellness Mercy Health Mobile Mammography Unit, 7 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Kroger Mulberry, 1093 Ohio 28, Fifteen-minute screenings. Cost varies per insurance plan. Financial assistance available for qualified applicants. Appointment required. 6863300; www.e-mercy.com. Mulberry.

Nature Project Feeder Watch, 9-11 a.m., Cincinnati Nature Center at Rowe Woods, 4949 Tealtown Road, Share cup of coffee or tea while counting birds. Free. 831-1711. Union Township.

FRIDAY, JAN. 3 Dining Events Fish Fry, 6-7:30 p.m., Dennis Johnson VFW Post 6562, 1596 Ohio 131, Fish sandwiches, chicken fingers or six-piece shrimp dinner. Includes coleslaw and French fries. Carryout available. $6-$6.50. Presented by Ladies Auxiliary Dennis Johnson VFW Post 6562. 575-2102. Milford.

Exercise Classes SilverSneakers Yoga Stretch, 9-9:45 a.m., Union Township Civic Center, 4350 Aicholtz Road, Complete series of seated and standing yoga poses. Restorative breathing exercises and final relaxation promote stress reduction and mental clarity. Call for pricing. Presented by SilverSneakers Flex. 478-6783. Union Township. Chair/Mat Yoga, 9-10:10 a.m., Yoga with Sharon Studio 1, 267 Mount Holly Road, Gentle yoga begins in chair and ends on mat. Focus on strength, flexibility, pain management and relaxation. $6 drop-in or $50 for 10 classes. Presented by Sharon Strickland. 237-4574. Amelia. Zumba Fitness with Sue, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Clough United Methodist Church, $5. 379-4900; www.zumbasue.net. Anderson Township.

Nature Project Feeder Watch, 9-11 a.m., Cincinnati Nature Center at Rowe Woods, Free. 831-1711. Union Township.

SATURDAY, JAN. 4 Drink Tastings A Tasting With Chip Emmerich of Burnet Ridge Winery, 1-3 p.m., Jungle Jim’s International Market Eastgate, 4450 Eastgate South Drive, Cooking School. Chip show new releases, plus lots of surprises from his barrel samples. Ages 21 and up. $20. Registration required. Presented by Jungle Jim’s International Market. 674-6000. Union Township.

Exercise Classes Zumba Fitness with Sue, 9-10 a.m., Clough United Methodist Church, $5. 379-4900; www.zumbasue.net. Anderson Township.

Nature Make and Take Bird Houses, 9:30-11 a.m., Cincinnati Nature Center at Rowe Woods, 4949 Tealtown Road, Outdoor Learning Center. Wood stove keeps

Build and decorate your own bird house in the Outdoor Learning Center at Cincinnati Nature Center at Rowe Woods, 4949 Tealtown Road, from 9:30-11 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 4. The cost is $14, $9 for children, or $6 for Cincinnati Nature Center members. Registration is required. Call 831-1711.FILE PHOTO you warm as you make and decorate your own bird house. $14, $9 children; $6 all members. Registration required. 831-1711. Union Township.

Pets Puppy Social, Noon-1 p.m., All Creatures Animal Hospital, 1894 Ohio Pike, Puppies socialize with other pups under supervision of professional trainers at indoor facility. Free. 797-7397; www.allcreatures.com. Amelia. Clermont Pets Alive Pet Adoptions, 1-5 p.m., Petco, 1087 Ohio 28, Cats and dogs available for adoption. Presented by Clermont Pets Alive. 279-2276; www.clermontpetsalive.org. Milford.

SUNDAY, JAN. 5 Exercise Classes

7 p.m. $7 or $12 for both classes. 675-0954. Mount Carmel. Zumba Fitness with Sue, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Clough United Methodist Church, $5. 379-4900; www.zumbasue.net. Anderson Township.

Music - Cabaret Sinatra Night, 5:30 p.m.-8:30 p.m., Tong’s Thai Restaurant, 1117 Main St., With Matt Snow, “The Cincinnati Sinatra.” Doors open 4:30 p.m. Free. 248-2999. Milford.

TUESDAY, JAN. 7 Dance Classes Frontier Squares Square Dance Classes, 7:30-9:30 p.m., American Legion Post 450, 450 Victor Stier Drive, No prior dance experience necessary. Wear casual dress and smooth-soled shoes. Class registration closes after third week. $5, first class is free. 929-2427; frontiersquares.tripod.com/. Milford.

Cardio Kick Boxing, 7-8 p.m., ATA Taekwondo of Cincinnati, 4240 Mount Carmel Tabasco Road, Non-contact workout including cardio and strength training in energizing environment, using kicks, jabs, hooks and uppercuts to improve overall agility and power. $5. 652-0286. Union Township.

SilverSneakers, 11-11:45 a.m., O’Bannon Terrace, Call for pricing. 478-6783. Goshen.

Nature

Farmers Market

Winter Walk, 3 p.m., Woodland Mound, 8250 Old Kellogg Road, Seasongood Nature Center. Walk along the trail to enjoy the sights and sounds of winter. Free, vehicle permit required. 5217275; www.greatparks.org. Anderson Township. Hot Cocoa Social, 1-3 p.m., Cincinnati Nature Center at Rowe Woods, 4949 Tealtown Road, Free hot cocoa, conversation and play. Bring your own mug. For ages 12 and under with adult. Members free; nonmembers pay daily admission. 831-1711. Union Township. Thru-Hiking the Buckeye Trail, 2-3 p.m., Cincinnati Nature Center at Rowe Woods, 4949 Tealtown Road, Learn about globe-trotting experiences of fellow nature lovers. Ages 18 and up. Members free; non-members pay daily admission. Registration required. 831-1711. Union Township.

Loveland Farmers Market, 4-6 p.m., Grailville Retreat and Program Center, 932 O’Bannonville Road, Presented by Loveland Farmers’ Market. 683-0491; www.lovelandfm.com. Loveland.

MONDAY, JAN. 6 Exercise Classes Zumba with KC, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Bethel Community Center, 135 N. Union St., Zumba fitness and Zumba Gold classes. $5. Presented by Kimberley “KC” Coniglio. 240-5180; www.zumbawithkc.com. Bethel. SilverSneakers, 9:15 a.m.-10 a.m., Union Township Civic Center, Call for pricing. 947-7344. Union Township. SilverSneakers, 10:30 a.m.-11:15 a.m., Crossings of Amelia, 58 Amelia Olive Branch Road, Move to music through variety of exercises designed to increase muscular strength, range of movement and activities for daily living. For seniors. Call for pricing. Presented by SilverSneakers Flex. 478-6783. Amelia. SilverSneakers Flex, 2:15-3 p.m., Bethel Woods Elderly Complex, 610 Easter Road, Move your whole body through complete series of seated and standing yoga poses. Chair support offered to safely perform variety of seated and standing postures designed to increase flexibility, balance and range of movement. Call for pricing. Presented by SilverSneakers Flex. 478-783. Bethel. Beginner Yoga Classes, 6-8 p.m., Mount Carmel Christian Church, 4183 Mount Carmel Tobasco Road, Choose from Beginners Power Yoga Class at 6 p.m. or Candlelight Relaxation and restorative slow flow class at

Exercise Classes

Nature Herpetology Program, 7-8:30 p.m., Cincinnati Nature Center at Rowe Woods, 4949 Tealtown Road, PowerPoint programs on reptiles and amphibians. Ages 18 and up. Free. Presented by Greater Cincinnati Herpetological Society. 831-1711. Union Township.

Dance Classes

Astronomy Club, 7-9 p.m., Cincinnati Nature Center at Rowe Woods, 4949 Tealtown Road, With naturalist Sheila Riley. For ages 12 and up. Members free; non-members pay daily admission. 831-1711. Union Township. Camera Club, 7-8:30 p.m., Cincinnati Nature Center at Rowe Woods, 4949 Tealtown Road, Amateur and professional photographers learn and share knowledge. Ages 18 and up. Members free; non-members pay daily admission. 831-1711. Union Township.

Frontier Squares Square Dance Classes, 7:30-9:30 p.m., American Legion Post 450, $5, first class is free. 929-2427; http:// frontiersquares.tripod.com/. Milford.

THURSDAY, JAN. 9 Exercise Classes SilverSneakers, 9-9:45 a.m., Union Township Civic Center, Call for pricing. 947-7344. Union Township. SilverSneakers Flex, 12:30-1:15 p.m., Summerside Woods, Call for pricing. 478-6783. Summerside. SilverSneakers, 1:30-2:15 p.m., O’Bannon Terrace, Call for pricing. 478-6783. Goshen. Zumba Fitness with Sue, 6-7 p.m., Clough United Methodist Church, $5. 379-4900; www.zumbasue.net. Anderson Township.

Nature Project Feeder Watch, 9-11 a.m., Cincinnati Nature Center at Rowe Woods, Free. 831-1711. Union Township.

FRIDAY, JAN. 10 Dining Events Fish Fry, 6-7:30 p.m., Dennis Johnson VFW Post 6562, $6$6.50. 575-2102. Milford.

Exercise Classes SilverSneakers Yoga Stretch, 9-9:45 a.m., Union Township Civic Center, Call for pricing. 478-6783. Union Township. Zumba Fitness with Sue, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Clough United Methodist Church, $5. 379-4900; www.zumbasue.net. Anderson Township.

Nature Project Feeder Watch, 9-11 a.m., Cincinnati Nature Center at Rowe Woods, Free. 831-1711. Union Township.

SATURDAY, JAN. 11 Exercise Classes Zumba Fitness with Sue, 9-10 a.m., Clough United Methodist Church, $5. 379-4900; www.zumbasue.net. Anderson Township.

Nature

Caregiver Support Group, 7-8:30 p.m., St. Andrew Church, 552 Main St., Undercroft. To support caregivers of elderly or disabled parents (relatives). Ages 18 and up. Free. Registration required. 929-4483. Milford.

Ohio Young Birder’s Club, 9 a.m.-noon, Cincinnati Nature Center at Rowe Woods, 4949 Tealtown Road, Youth-led group interested in hiking and watching birds. Hosted by CNC volunteer Brian Herriott. $10 online pre-registration required to join club. 831-1711, ext. 125; www.cincynature.org. Union Township. Bird Walk, 8 a.m.-10 a.m., Cincinnati Nature Center at Rowe Woods, 4949 Tealtown Road, Spend morning looking for birds. Ages 18 and up. Members free; non-members pay daily admission. 831-1711. Union Township.

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 8 Knitting, Crochet and Needlecraft Class, 7-8 p.m., Milford Heights Church of Christ, 1646 Ohio 28, Basic handwork techniques and fresh ideas in knitting, crochet and other handicrafts along with short devotional time. Free. 575-1874. Milford.

SUNDAY, JAN. 12

Dining Events

Exercise Classes

WAVE Free Community Dinner, 6 p.m., Milford First United Methodist Church, 541 Main St., Part of Wednesdays Are Very Extraordinary event. No church service attached, no reservations needed. All welcome. Familyfriendly meals. Free; donations accepted. 831-5500; www.milfordfirstumc.org. Milford.

Cardio Kick Boxing, 7-8 p.m., ATA Taekwondo of Cincinnati, $5. 652-0286. Union Township.

Exercise Classes Zumba with KC, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Bethel Community Center, $5. 240-5180; www.zumbawithkc.com. Bethel. Cardio Kick Boxing, 6:30-7:30 p.m., ATA Taekwondo of Cincinnati, $5. 652-0286. Union Township. Zumba Fitness with Sue, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Clough United Methodist Church, $5. 379-4900; www.zumbasue.net. Anderson Township.

Mom’s Clubs Mothers of Preschoolers, 9:30-11:30 a.m., Faith Church, 5910 Price Road, Share homemade food while listening to speaker or learning new craft.

TUESDAY, JAN. 14

Nature

Support Groups

Art & Craft Classes

Township.

Nature Arches, Canyons and Ruins of Utah and Northern Arizona, 2-3 p.m., Cincinnati Nature Center at Rowe Woods, 4949 Tealtown Road, Learn about globe-trotting experiences of fellow nature lovers such as yourself. Ages 18 and up. Members free; non-members pay daily admission. Registration required. 831-1711. Union Township.

MONDAY, JAN. 13 Exercise Classes Zumba with KC, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Bethel Community Center, $5. 240-5180; www.zumbawithkc.com. Bethel. Beginner Yoga Classes, 6-8 p.m., Mount Carmel Christian Church, $7 or $12 for both classes. 675-0954. Mount Carmel. Zumba Fitness with Sue, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Clough United Methodist Church, $5. 379-4900; www.zumbasue.net. Anderson

Farmers Market Loveland Farmers Market, 4-6 p.m., Grailville Retreat and Program Center, 683-0491; www.lovelandfm.com. Loveland.

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 15 Art & Craft Classes Knitting, Crochet and Needlecraft Class, 7-8 p.m., Milford Heights Church of Christ, Free. 575-1874. Milford.

a.m., Clough United Methodist Church, $5. 379-4900; www.zumbasue.net. Anderson Township.

SUNDAY, JAN. 19

Cardio Kick Boxing, 7-8 p.m., ATA Taekwondo of Cincinnati, $5. 652-0286. Union Township.

MONDAY, JAN. 20

Zumba with KC, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Bethel Community Center, $5. 240-5180; www.zumbawithkc.com. Bethel. Beginner Yoga Classes, 6-8 p.m., Mount Carmel Christian Church, $7 or $12 for both classes. 675-0954. Mount Carmel. Zumba Fitness with Sue, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Clough United Methodist Church, $5. 379-4900; www.zumbasue.net. Anderson Township.

TUESDAY, JAN. 21

Dining Events

Dance Classes

WAVE Free Community Dinner, 6 p.m., Milford First United Methodist Church, Free; donations accepted. 831-5500; www.milfordfirstumc.org. Milford.

Frontier Squares Square Dance Classes, 7:30-9:30 p.m., American Legion Post 450, $5, first class is free. 929-2427; frontiersquares.tripod.com/. Milford.

Exercise Classes Zumba with KC, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Bethel Community Center, $5. 240-5180; www.zumbawithkc.com. Bethel. Cardio Kick Boxing, 6:30-7:30 p.m., ATA Taekwondo of Cincinnati, $5. 652-0286. Union Township. Zumba Fitness with Sue, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Clough United Methodist Church, $5. 379-4900; www.zumbasue.net. Anderson Township.

Health / Wellness Pre-Diabetes Class, 4-6 p.m., Mercy HealthPlex Anderson, 7495 State Road, Information on making healthy food choices, exercise and blood sugar control and monitoring blood sugar levels. $20. 956-3729; www.emercy.com. Anderson Township.

Nature Full Moon Walk, 7:30-9 p.m., Cincinnati Nature Center at Rowe Woods, 4949 Tealtown Road, Meet at Kiosk. Hit trails at night and enjoy full moon and natural history readings. For ages 8 and up. $8, free for members. Registration required. 831-1711. Union Township. A Jungle Jim’s Tasty Expedition, 10-11 a.m., Jungle Jim’s International Market Eastgate, 4450 Eastgate South Drive, Food Safari tour market to experience delectable bounty of nature. Explore miles of aisles with one of Jungle Jim’s knowledgeable tour guides and sample food from around the world. Free. Registration required. Presented by Cincinnati Nature Center at Rowe Woods. 831-1711; www.cincynature.org. Union Township.

THURSDAY, JAN. 16 Exercise Classes Zumba Fitness with Sue, 6-7 p.m., Clough United Methodist Church, $5. 379-4900; www.zumbasue.net. Anderson Township.

Nature Project Feeder Watch, 9-11 a.m., Cincinnati Nature Center at Rowe Woods, Free. 831-1711. Union Township.

Farmers Market Loveland Farmers Market, 4-6 p.m., Grailville Retreat and Program Center, 683-0491; www.lovelandfm.com. Loveland.

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 22 Art & Craft Classes Knitting, Crochet and Needlecraft Class, 7-8 p.m., Milford Heights Church of Christ, Free. 575-1874. Milford.

Dining Events WAVE Free Community Dinner, 6 p.m., Milford First United Methodist Church, Free; donations accepted. 831-5500; www.milfordfirstumc.org. Milford.

Exercise Classes Zumba with KC, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Bethel Community Center, $5. 240-5180; www.zumbawithkc.com. Bethel. Cardio Kick Boxing, 6:30-7:30 p.m., ATA Taekwondo of Cincinnati, $5. 652-0286. Union Township. Zumba Fitness with Sue, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Clough United Methodist Church, $5. 379-4900; www.zumbasue.net. Anderson Township.

THURSDAY, JAN. 23 Art & Craft Classes Teen Craft, 4 p.m., Loveland Branch Library, 649 LovelandMadeira Road, Make a fleece pillow. Ages 12-18. Free. 3694476. Loveland.

Exercise Classes Zumba Fitness with Sue, 6-7 p.m., Clough United Methodist Church, $5. 379-4900; www.zumbasue.net. Anderson Township.

Nature Project Feeder Watch, 9-11 a.m., Cincinnati Nature Center at Rowe Woods, Free. 831-1711. Union Township.

FRIDAY, JAN. 24 Dining Events Fish Fry, 6-7:30 p.m., Dennis Johnson VFW Post 6562, $6$6.50. 575-2102. Milford.

Support Groups

Exercise Classes

Caregiver Support Group, 4-5:30 p.m., Immaculate Heart of Mary Church, 7820 Beechmont Ave., Guadelupe Room. To support caregivers of elderly or disabled parents (relatives). Ages 18 and up. Free. Reservations required. 929-4483; www.ccswoh.org/caregivers. Anderson Township.

Zumba Fitness with Sue, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Clough United Methodist Church, $5. 379-4900; www.zumbasue.net. Anderson Township.

FRIDAY, JAN. 17 Dining Events Fish Fry, 6-7:30 p.m., Dennis Johnson VFW Post 6562, $6$6.50. 575-2102. Milford.

Exercise Classes Zumba Fitness with Sue, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Clough United Methodist Church, $5. 379-4900; www.zumbasue.net. Anderson Township.

Nature Project Feeder Watch, 9-11 a.m., Cincinnati Nature Center at Rowe Woods, Free. 831-1711. Union Township.

SATURDAY, JAN. 18 Exercise Classes Zumba Fitness with Sue, 9-10

Nature Project Feeder Watch, 9-11 a.m., Cincinnati Nature Center at Rowe Woods, Free. 831-1711. Union Township.

SATURDAY, JAN. 25 Exercise Classes Zumba Fitness with Sue, 9-10 a.m., Clough United Methodist Church, $5. 379-4900; www.zumbasue.net. Anderson Township.

Nature Bird Walk, 8 a.m.-10 a.m., Cincinnati Nature Center at Rowe Woods, Members free; nonmembers pay daily admission. 831-1711. Union Township.


LIFE

JANUARY 1, 2014 • CJN-MMA • B3

Rita predicts food trends for 2014

At the start of each new year with you, I like to talk about food trends. Locally sourced continues to be a big factor, along with homemade biscuits instead of buns and bread for sandwiches. Another trend is healthier kids meals: yogurt, applesauce and baked fries for fried. Rita GlutenHeikenfeld free (no RITA’S KITCHEN surprise) items will be abundant in restaurants and at the grocery. Chefs will use nuts as coating for poultry and fish instead of flour. Veggies galore, especially cauliflower, will be cooked simply or with flavorful herbs and spices as mains and sides. Heirloom beans and peanuts are “in” and are easily grown. Peanuts hide under the ground and kids love to harvest these. Rice is big this year. You’ll see a dizzying variety, from instant to brown to the new darling of the food world: Carolina Gold. This is the grandfather of long-grain rice here and, depending upon the way it’s cooked, can be made into fluffy rice or creamy risotto. Tea is here to stay. Get out mom’s tea set and enjoy a relaxing and healthy cup of tea. Tea contains polyphenols, antioxidants that are good for our heart, teeth, eyes and general good health. As far as wild edibles, I’m right on top of it. I’ve made pine needle tea (high in vitamins A and C) for years and now it’s hit the big time. It has a minty, piney flavor. Look for ground pine needle tea at health food stores. Ditto for sumac lemonade. We have sumac trees (not the poison sumac!) growing along our old country road and in late August they bear a beautiful, cone-shaped red fruit perfect for tart, healthy lemonade. A caution here: Always make a positive identification when picking wild edibles. There are many non-edible look-a-likes out there.

Rita’s vegetarian red beans and rice My twist on Hoppin’ John, the traditional New Year’s dish. Rice and beans together make a protein-filled dish. Add sautéed shrimp or chicken for a non-vegetarian meal. Use your favorite beans.

1 very generous cup chopped onion 2-3 teaspoons garlic, minced 2 teaspoons cumin or to taste 2 bay leaves 1 teaspoon chili powder blend or to taste 2 cups rice 2 cans red beans, drained 4 cups vegetable or chicken broth, or bit more if needed Salt and pepper to taste

To stir in after cooking: Favorite greens (If using kale, add when you put rice in as it takes

Rita’s red beans and rice is her take on the traditional New Year’s Hoppin’ John.THANKS TO RITA HEIKENFELD

longer to cook). Garnish: Thinly sliced green onions, chopped tomatoes Film pan with olive oil. Add onion, garlic, cumin, bay and chili powder. Sauté until onion looks almost clear. Add rice, beans and broth. Bring to boil. Cover and lower to a simmer and cook until rice is tender. Remove bay leaves. Health aspects Beans: Lower cholesterol, stabilize blood sugar and reduce risk of cancer and heart disease. Onions and garlic: Great for your heart. Tomatoes: Contains antioxidants and is good for the prostate. Brown rice vs. white: Nutritionally superior, your body absorbs nutrients from brown rice more slowly. Bay: Helps blood sugar levels.

Well wishes from our family to yours.

Easy Southern “light” biscuits

Try a Southern flour like White Lily, which has a lower gluten/protein content than Northern flours and produces a lighter textured biscuit. 2 cups self-rising flour ⁄4 cup shortening 2 ⁄3 to 3⁄4 cup buttermilk Melted butter

1

Preheat oven to 475 degrees. Spray baking sheet. Spoon flour into measuring cup and level off. Cut in shortening until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. With a fork, blend in enough milk until dough leaves sides of bowl. Knead a couple times on lightly floured surface and roll 1 ⁄2 inch thick, cutting with biscuit cutter or glass. Place on baking sheet, one inch apart. Bake 8-10 minutes or until golden. Brush with melted butter.

Mercy Health—Anderson Hospital

Mercy Health—Fairfield HealthPlex

Mercy Health—Clermont Hospital

Mercy Health—Western Hills HealthPlex

Mercy Health—Fairfield Hospital

Mercy Health—St. Raphael Social Service Agency

The Jewish Hospital—Mercy Health Mercy Health—West Hospital

On the blog

Homemade self-rising flour, more Hoppin’ John recipes and quick cheddar bay biscuits.

Mercy Health—Eastgate Medical Center Mercy Health—Harrison Medical Center Mercy Health—Liberty Falls Medical Center

Rita’s current herb book

Mercy Health—Mt. Orab Medical Center

“Culinary Herbs that Heal Body and Soul” is available at Sacred Heart Radio (www.sacredheartradio.com or 513731-7748).

Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator, Jungle Jim’s culinary professional and author. Find her blog online at Cincinnati.Com/ blogs. Email her at columns@communitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-248-7130, ext. 356.

Mercy Health—St. John Social Service Agency Mercy Health—West Park Senior Living & Rehabilitation Mercy Health—StoneBridge at Winton Woods Mercy Community at Winton Woods

Mercy Health—Rookwood Medical Center

Mercy Health Physicians—360+ Primary Care Physicians & Specialists

Mercy Health—Western Hills Medical Center

Mercy Health—Eastgate Occupational Health & Urgent Care

Mercy Health—Anderson HealthPlex

Mercy Health—Springdale Occupational Health & Urgent Care

Mercy Health—Downtown HealthPlex

Mercy Health—Mobile Mammography

CE-0000579784


LIFE

B4 • CJN-MMA • JANUARY 1, 2014

Watch out for online lending scams Thieves have figured out a new way to steal your money and it doesn’t involve sending you bad checks. Once again they prey on people who can least afford to lose money: those seeking a loan. Krystal, I’ll just use her first name, wrote about her mother’s need for a loan while out of work following surgery. She turned to the Internet and found lots of websites offering loans. After applying at one of

them, she received a call saying she was approved for the $2,000 she was requesting. But first, she was told, she had to prove she could cover her first loan payment. She told the lender she wouldn’t send him money before getting the funds. “He answered, ‘No, of course not. We just need to verify you’ll be able to make the payment,’” Krystal wrote. Krystal says she was instructed to go a local

drug store, get a Vanilla Card and load it with $150 so they could verify the funds. “He then had my mother give him the information off the card so he could verify the funds. He told her everything was great and that he needed to place her on hold so he could go ahead and finalize the transaction. He came back on the line and said that, due to her credit, would she be able to verify a second month’s payment for another $150 on the Vanilla Card? She told him, ‘No,’” Krystal wrote. At this point Krystal says she and her mother were suspicious, began

researching the card and discovered the socalled lender was buying time so he Howard could pull Ain the funds HEY HOWARD! off the Vanilla Reload Card. By the time they began trying to download the funds from the card themselves, the “lender” had already taken all the money. They called the local police who had them contact the Vanilla Network to see if they could learn where the money

“We treat your pet like family”

Cincinnati’s Largest Selection of Pet Foods. Featuring: Celebrating 10 Years at Current Location & Serving Animals Since 1971!

• Orijen • Fromm Four Star and Gold • Blue Buffalo/Wilderness/Basics • Dog Lover’s Gold • Natural Balance LID • California Natural/Innova • Taste of the Wild • Natural Choice

www.FamilyPetCenter.com 6666 Clough Pike | (513) 231-7387(PETS) Mon.-Fri. 7-7 • Sat. 9-5• Sun. 12-5

CE-0000572125

ASSEMBLIES OF GOD

BAPTIST FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF FELICITY 212 Prather Rd. Felicity, OH Pastor: Chad Blevins 876-2565

509 Roney Lane Cincinnati Ohio 45244 T: 513.528.3200 E: admin@clconline.us

Services: Sunday Worship 10:30 AM - Children’s Church Wednesday Worship 7:00 PM - Rangers and Girl’s Ministry Friday 24 hour prayer 6:00 PM

RIVER OF LIFE Assembly of God 1793 U.S. 52, Moscow, Ohio 45153 Pastor: Ralph Ollendick Sun. Contemporary Service SS -9:45am, Worship 11:00am Wed.- Informal Biblestudy 7-8pm

Sunday School Sunday Worship Sunday Eve. Childrens Mission Sunday Eve. Adult Discipleship Sunday Eve. Worship Wed. Eve. Adult Bible Study

9:45am 10:45am 6:00pm 6:00pm 7:00pm 7:00pm

Sunday School..............................9:30am Sunday Morning Worship............10:30am Sunday Evening Worship...............6:30pm Wednesday Prayer Service ...........7:00pm

www.lindalebaptist.com

Come Experience The Presence of the Lord In Our Services

SOUTHERN BAPTIST

ROMAN CATHOLIC

CLOUGH PIKE BAPTIST CHURCH

Saint Mary Church,Bethel

1025 CLOUGH PIKE

Sunday School 9:30am Morning Worship 10:45am AWANA Ministry Wednesday 6:45 - 8:15pm Bible Study 7:00 - 8:00pm Youth grades 6-12 7:00 - 8:00pm Nursery provided for all services

www.cloughpike.com

752-3521

BAPTIST BATAVIA BAPTIST TEMPLE

770 South Riverside, Batavia OH 45103 Raymond D. Jones, Pastor 732-2739

Sunday School 10am; Morning Worship 11am; Sunday Evening Service 6pm; Wednesday Eve. Prayer Service & Bible Study, 7:00pm

Reaching the Heart of Clermont County

Evans Funeral Home.

David Wessling

Margaret Rechtin

Charles Steigerwald

Margaret Turner Rechtin, 96, Milford, died Dec. 18. Survived by husband Ralph Rechtin; children Don (Barb), Dave (Mary Lee) Rechtin, Jean (Greg) Bodde, Mary (Ref) Fritsch, Sheri (Larry) Mersch; 18 grandchildren; 16 great-grandchildren. Preceded in death by daughter Judy (Jim) Holtzleiter. Services were Dec. 21 at St. Andrew Catholic Church. Arrangements by Craver-Riggs Funeral Home. Memorials to: Hospice of Southwest Ohio, 7625 Camargo Road, Cincinnati, OH 45243.

Charles H. Steigerwald, 77, Milford, died Dec. 22. He was a radio personality. Survived by children Lou Daniel, Kim Reser, Bob Steigerwald, Cheryl Campolongo; sister Rosemarie Bloch; 13 grandchildren; six great-grandchildren. Preceded in death by wife Shirley Nixon Steigerwald, sister Tina Marple. Arrangements by Evans Funeral Home.

David Richard Wessling, 55, died Dec. 9. Survived by mother Noreen Wessling; sister Diana Miller; aunt and uncle Mary and Don Sager; family member Jim FitzPatrick. Preceded in death by father Richard Wessling. Arrangements by Craver-Riggs Funeral Home. Memorials to: Ohio Tourette’s Syndrome Association, P.O. Box 40163, Cincinnati, OH 45240-0163.

Clotha Money Clotha Lee Money, 90, Milford, died Dec. 21. She was a homemaker. Survived by children Shirley Allen, Betty Caudill, Jim Money, Sandra Shircliff, Jean LaFata, Vickie Parker; grandchildren Michael, David Allen, Rebecca Hoffman, Ted Caudill, Rob Shircliff, Jason, Justin, Steven Money, Brian LaFata, Kari McEntush, Jeffrey Parker; siblings Bob, Ben Sizemore, Geraldine Davis, Jeanette Browning; 21 greatgrandchildren; two great-greatgrandchildren. Preceded in death by husband Luther Money, brothers Ralph, Clayton Sizemore. Services were Dec. 27 at Evans

Saint Peter Church

1192 Bethel-New Richmond Rd New Richmond, Ohio 45157 Phone 553-3267 Rev. Michael Leshney, Pastor

Saturday Mass - 5:00 PM Sunday Masses – 8:30 & 11:00 www.stpeternewrichmond.org

CHRISTIAN AND MISSIONARY CALVARY ALLIANCE CHURCH

Senior Pastor, Rev. Dave Robinette 986 Nordyke Road - 45255 (Cherry Grove turn off Beechmont at Beechmont Toyota) Worship Service, Sunday 10:45 am Classes For All Ages, Sunday 9:15 am Prayer Service Wednesday, 6:45 pm

Jeffrey Teaney

Lonzie Smith, 73, died Dec. 15. She was a homemaker. Survived by children Gary, Larry Smith, Theresa Goodman; siblings Sarah Parks, Narmus Burns; many grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Preceded in death by husband Harold Smith. Services were Dec. 21 at the Church of God of the Union Assembly. Arrangements by

Jeffrey Allen Teaney, 49, Owensville, died Dec. 17. He owned the Jeff Teaney Construction Company. Survived by sons Gage, Seth Teaney; parents Tom, Jane Hogue Teaney; siblings Dale (Kelli) Teaney, Terra (Steve) Bales; nieces and nephews Alex, Jay Teaney, Sarah, Kristen Bales. Services were Dec. 21 at Evans Funeral Home. Memorials to the Hospice of Cincinnati, Stonelick Church of the Brethren or Newtonsville Methodist Church.

CHURCH OF CHRIST

LUTHERAN

UNITED METHODIST

GLEN ESTE CHURCH OF CHRIST

All Saints Lutheran Church 445 Craig Road Mt. Carmel, Ohio 45244 513-528-0412

GOSHEN UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 6710 Goshen Rd, Goshen Across from Goshen High School 513-722-2541 www.goshenmethodist.org Sunday School 9:30am Worship 10:30am Blended Worship Traditional and Contemporary Youth Fellowship 6:00pm Nursery Available

937 Old State Route 74 (Behind Meijer) 513-753-8223 www.gecc.net

Sunday Worship: 8:30 & 10:30am Bible Study: 9:30am & 6:00pm Youth Groups: 6:00pm (except summer)

Lonzie Smith

Services Saturday at 5 p.m. Sunday at 8 a.m. and 10:30 a.m.

Pastor James Dinkel 513-528-9142

UNITED METHODIST CHURCH OF GOD GOSHEN CHURCH OF GOD

Real People...In a Real Church... Worshipping a Real God! 1675 Hillstation Road, Goshen, Ohio 45122 722-1699 www.goshenchurchofgod.org Pastor Tim McGlone Service Schedule Sunday School 10:00am Sunday Worship 10:45am Sunday Evening Worship 6:00pm Wednesday Youth Service 7:00pm Saturday Service 7:00pm

Contemporary and Traditional live Worship Music and Multimedia

Phone 734-4041

MONUMENTS BAPTIST CHURCH

2831 State Route 222 Mark Pence, Pastor 513-313-2401 SS 9:30AM, Sun Worship 10:45AM Wed. Prayer Service 7:00PM Childcare Provided for All Services www.monumentsbaptist.org Growing in Faith Early Learning Center NOW ENROLLING 513-427-4271 www.monumentsbaptist.org/ growinginfaith

Funeral Home.

Glenn M. Evans, 73, Milford, died Dec. 18. He was a member of the Miami Township Police Department. Survived by wife Laurie Evans; children Ian, Kindy Evans; sister Jeanette (Bud) Brown. Services were Dec. 23 at Evans Funeral Home.

3398 Ohio SR 125

Rev. Michael Leshney, Pastor Saturday Mass – 5:00 PM Sunday Mass – 10:30 AM www.stmaryparishfamily.org

Howard Ain’s column appears bi-weekly in the Community Press newspapers. He appears regularly as the Troubleshooter on WKRC-TV Local 12 News. Email him at heyhoward@local12.com.

Glenn Evans

LINDALE BAPTIST CHURCH 3052 ST. RT. 132 AMELIA, OH 45102 797-4189

Commission says legitimate lenders never “guarantee” or say you’re likely to get a loan or a credit card even before you apply – especially if you have bad credit, no credit or a bankruptcy. Bottom line, beware of these new methods used to steal your money. Remember, online lending offers are often just scams and a quick way to lose your money.

DEATHS

Anderson Township

FAMILY PET CENTER

from the card was released. She was told it had been placed into the account of a pre-paid debit card so the money could now be taken and used anywhere without a trace. “All said and done this scam has me out of pocket over $170,” Krystal wrote. She’s not alone, I received a letter from a Harrison area man who also applied for an online loan and was sent to the store to buy a Green Dot Money Pack. He loaded $375 on the card and didn’t realize it was a scam until they got another $282 from him. The Federal Trade

TRADITIONAL WORSHIP Sunday 8:30 & 11 am CONTEMPORARY WORSHIP Sunday 9:30 & 11 am & 1st Saturday of the Month 6 pm

Locust Corner Community United Methodist Church 917 Locust Corner Rd. (at Wagner) 513-752-8459 Traditional Worship : Sunday,10 am Bible Study : Sunday, 9 am Thursday, 7 pm Pastor: Allen R. Mitchell Join us in worshipping our risen Lord and sharing Christ’s love with our community.

Children’s programs and nursery & toddler care available at 9:30 and 11:00 services. Plenty of Parking behind church.

Lowell Wolfe William Lowell Wolfe, 78, Milford, died Dec. 21. He worked for the Ford Motor Company for 35 years. He was a Navy veteran of Korea. Survived by wife Betty Wolfe; sons Gregory (Karen), Randy Wolfe; grandchildren Staci (Jacob) Potts, Travis “TJ” Wolfe; great-grandson Wyatt Potts. Services were Dec. 21 at Evans Funeral Home. Memorials to: SEM Haven Health and Residential Care Center, 225 Cleveland Ave., Milford, OH 45150.

NON-DENOMINATIONAL

Sunday Morning 10:00AM Contemporary Worship Practical Message Classes for Children & Teens Nursery Care Sunday Night Live 6:00PM Exciting classes for all ages! We have many other groups that meet on a regular basis 4050 Tollgate Rd, Williamsburg, OH 513-724-3341 www.cmcchurch.com Mark Otten, Pastor

Sunday Morning Service Times are: 8:45am, 10:15am & 11:45am Sunday Night Service Time at 6pm Youth Service at 6pm (in Youth Center) Watch LIVE online Sunday's at 10:15am, 11:45am & 6pm www.LCchurch.tv Life Change TV Program Every Sunday Cincinnati Fox19 @ 11am

EPISCOPAL THE CHURCH OF THE GOOD SAMARITAN 25 Amelia Olive Branch Rd.

7515 Forest Road Cincinnati, OH 45255 513-231-4172 • www.andersonhillsumc.org

BETHEL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 402 W. Plane St. Bethel, Ohio 513-734-7201 www.bumcinfo.org

Sunday 10:30am ... Holy Eucharist 10:30am...Sunday School (Lil’ Samaritans)

Blended Worship 8:00 & 10:45 am Contemporary Worship 9:30 am Sunday School 9:30 & 10:45 am

Handicap Accessible 513-753-4115 www.GoodSamaritanEpiscopal.org

Nursery Care for Age 3 & under Full Program for Children, Youth, Music, Small Groups & more Handicapped Accessible Bill Bowdle -Sr. Pastor Steve Fultz - Assoc. Pastor; J. D. Young - Youth Director Janet Bowdle - Children’s Director

EVANGELICAL FREE 5910 Price Road, Milford 831-3770 www.faithchurch.net

Services 9:15 am & 10:45 am Nursery provided at all services

Take I-275 to exit 57 toward Milford, Right on McClelland, Right on Price, church soon on Right

Troy P. Ervin, Pastor 4359 E. Bauman Lane | Batavia, OH 45103 513-735-2555 www.LCchurch.tv

Sunday Worship: 8:30 & 11 a.m. Sunday School: 9:45 a.m. Active Youth • Outreach • Fellowship Music Ministries • Bible Studies

Ark of Learning Preschool and Child Care Ages 3 through 12

681 Mt. Moriah Drive • 513.752.1333

mtmoriahumc.org

Childrens Church & Nursery PASTOR MARIE SMITH

www.cloughchurch.org

A Loving, Praying, Caring Church Join us for Sunday Services Sunday School .........9:15 - 10:00am Fellowship ...............10:00 - 10:30am Worship Service .....10:30 - 11:30am 360 Robin Av (off Oak St) Loveland OH

683-2525

Trinity United Methodist “Encircling People with God’s Love”

Sunday Worship: 9:00 & 10:15 AM with

LOVELAND PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

www.LPCUSA.org • LPCUSA@fuse.net

Traditional Worship 8:15am & 11:00am

2010 Wolfangel Rd., Anderson Twp. 513-231-4301

PRESBYTERIAN (USA)

Contemporary Worship.........9:30am Sunday School......................9:30am

Nursery Available 5767 Pleasant Hill Rd (next to Milford Jr. High)

513-831-0262 www.trinitymilford.org

PRESBYTERIAN FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 199 Gay Street Williamsburg, Ohio 45176 Phone: 513-724-7985 Sunday School: 9:30A.M.

Worship:10:30A.M.(SupervisedNursery) PRESCHOOL: Tues, Weds, Thurs


LIFE

JANUARY 1, 2014 • CJN-MMA • B5

Watching the new kitten play is entertaining Howdy Folks, Wednesday Ruth Ann and I went down to my brothers for the noon meal. His wife, Inez cooked a great meal. Ruth Ann fried frozen crappie. Herb sure likes fish especially, bluegills and crappie. Their son and daughter-in-law were there to eat with us, also Randy our foster brother. Herb is doing pretty good. He has trouble walking. He has a good appetite and that is good, he is my only brother living. The Bethel Lions club held a pancake breakfast last Saturday morning with a good crowd. The school had a wrestling tournament and that always help with the kids eating pancakes after weigh in. Ruth Ann and I delivered the calendars to folks that ordered them. We took a couple to Bethel Marine/Tire Service. The folks that have the facility are doing a super job. They did have the auto mechanics and tire shop in Bethel. Now they have that along with the Bethel marine shop. So they can work on boats or vehicles and put on new tires. If you are down that way stop and say hello to the folks and see how they are ready to take care of your boat or vehicle. They are very qualified and their telephone number is 734-2628. They also have storage for boats or vehicles and they are doing a lot of remodeling to make their busi-

ness better for service. I was told a feller saw a coyote and her pup and they were both George white. The Rooks coyotes are OLE FISHERMAN getting to be a bigger number in their pack. They have taken a number of the groundhogs down. The new kitten we have, Chester sure likes to play. A friend of ours gave us a plastic thing with several hole in it. It has several small mice made of fabric that he can reach in and try to get out. He sure does play with this and when he gets them out he bats them around then runs and gets each one and rolls around. He can do a somersault real quick. Ruth Ann had a big plastic bag the one that has loops for hand holes. Chester was playing with it the other morning. He got his head in the handle part and was running with the bag. Ruth Ann caught the bag and pulled it off of him. It was so funny how he was running and was scared of the noise it was making. He as a kitten does a lot of playing. Then stops and has a snack then jumps on the couch and sleeps. We sure enjoy Chester. If he is playing and Ruth Ann gets up from her chair and goes to the kitchen he will run

after her. He sometimes sleeps with us at night. Then in the morning before we get up he likes to play and jumps if we move the covers any. We went down to Milford to the Garden Center to help Santa last Saturday evening. It was special. We had the pleasure of having two sets of twins on my lap. One set were 4 1/2 months old both were girls, their young brother was about 2 1/2 years old. The other twins were older. This was so special. I talked to Mike at the Boars Head Bait Shop in Afton. He said there were a few fisherman out and they were catching fish and the duck hunters were getting their limit of ducks. We have received some seed catalogs and now I want to start planting. I know it is too early but that doesn’t stop me from dreaming and planning for spring. We hope everyone had a good Christmas and a Happy New Year. Keep check on your neighbor and the shut-ins to see if they have food and heat. Start your week by going to the House of Worship of your choice and praise the Good Lord. God Bless All. More Later.

Seasons Greetings from Adams County Cancer Center Prakash B. Patel, MD THE LEADER IN CANCER CARE Introducing the Elektra Hexapod Evo RT System

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Pat Donaldson, resident since 2009

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LIFE

B6 • CJN-MMA • JANUARY 1, 2014

POLICE REPORTS GOSHEN TOWNSHIP Arrests/citations Heather Gilbert, 36, 193 Lakeshore Court, domestic violence. Kurt Lahm, 40, 8109 Sterling Springs, domestic violence. James Harbison, 42, 6691 Manila Road, disorderly conduct. Julie Harbison, 42, 6691 Manila Road, disorderly conduct. Katie Kiraly, 23, 6533 Covey Court, criminal trespass. Chandler Manchester, 18, 2219 Pampano Ave., unauthorized use of motor vehicle. Melissa Powell, 36, 15 W. 9th St., drug instruments.

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Incidents/investigations Assault Reported at area of Holly Park and Parkwood, Dec. 9. Breaking and entering Reported at 2180 Ohio 28, Dec. 10. Reported at 7220 Goshen Road, Dec. 11. Burglary Reported at 6351 Manila Road, Dec. 9. Criminal mischief Reported at 6725 Dick Flynn Blvd., Dec. 11. Disorder Reported at 1569 Ohio 28, Dec. 11. Reported at 6691 Manila Road, Dec. 12. Reported at 2340 Cedarville, Dec. 8. Dispute Reported at 404 Country Lake Circle, Dec. 9. Domestic violence Reported at Lakeshore Court,

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Dec. 7. Reported at Sterling Spring Drive, Dec. 9. Receiving stolen property Reported at 6725 Dick Flynn Blvd., Dec. 10. Theft Reported at 6542 Ohio 132, Dec. 9.

MIAMI TOWNSHIP Arrests/citations Juvenile, 17, criminal damage, Dec. 10. Othar L. Sloan III, 26, 928 Cambridge, felonious assault, driving under influence, open container, Dec. 10. Joseph Bryant, 26, 4346 Ohio 48, open container, Dec. 10. Kevin E. Williams, 25, 319 Buddy Lane, obstructing official business, Dec. 12. Shaun A. Davis, 27, 6535 Hastings, traffic citations, Dec. 12. Brandon W. Alexander, 21, 1822 Louis Lane, theft, Dec. 13. Shelby L. Lewis, 21, 968 Long Lane, marijuana possession, Dec. 13. Michele L. Hering-Buhl, 42, 5602 Mount Zion, drug possession, open container, Dec. 14. Michael Hornsby, 38, 1179 Brightwater No. 8, drug possession, paraphernalia, domestic violence, Dec. 14. Kimberly A. Sharp, 43, 1179 Brightwater No. 8, drug possession, paraphernalia, Dec. 14. Kevin A. Schneider, 43, 2475 Jackson Pike, disorderly conduct, Dec. 14.

Incidents/investigations

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Aggravated menacing Female was threatened at 468 Boots Lane, Dec. 14. Breaking and entering Car batteries, etc. taken from Monro Brakes and Tires at Ohio 28, Dec. 14. Burglary Wallet taken at 5585 Betty Lane, Dec. 10. Medication taken at 17 Maple Crest, Dec. 10. Criminal damage Vehicle driven through soccer fields at VFW Post 5354 at Epworth Road, Dec. 7. Furniture, walls, etc. damaged at 1887 Pebble Ridge No. 3, Dec. 10. AC unit damaged at 5763 Hanley Close, Dec. 11. Disorderly conduct Reported at Milford Auto Sales at Ohio 28, Dec. 14. Domestic violence Reported at Floyd Place, Dec. 14. Rape Female juvenile reported offense at 5600 block of Betty Lane, Dec. 8. Theft Cell phone and keys taken at 1365 Ohio 28 No. 10, Dec. 7. Money obtained through quick change scam at Circle K; $100 at Ohio 28, Dec. 7. Gasoline not paid for at United Dairy Farmers; $19.30 at Branch Hill Guinea Pike, Dec. 7. Merchandise taken from Meijer; $162 at Ohio 28, Dec. 8. Phone card taken from Circle K; $47 at Ohio 28, Dec. 9. Gasoline not paid for at United Dairy Farmers; $28 at Wolfpen Pleasant Hill Road, Dec. 9. Gasoline not paid for at Kroger; $32 at Branch Hill Guinea Pike, Dec. 10. Septic system motor taken; $600 at 855 Wards Corner, Dec. 11. Merchandise taken from Meijer; $19 at Ohio 28, Dec. 11. Money taken from purse at Kohl’s; $360 at Ohio 28, Dec. 11. Merchandise taken from Kroger; $26 at Ohio 28, Dec. 12. Merchandise taken from Meijer; $149 at Ohio 28, Dec. 13.

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