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CAMPBELL COUNTY RECORDER

RESIDENTS THINK PINK A5

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving all of Campbell County 75¢

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2012

BECAUSE COMMUNITY MATTERS

County-run senior housing closing

By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

HIGHLAND HEIGHTS — Campbell County Fiscal Court has made a final decision to close Lakeside Terrace senior apartments in Highland Heights Feb.1, 2013. Fiscal court unanimously approved a resolution declaring their intent to close the senior apartments during the Sept. 20 meeting in Newport. Judge-executive Steve Pendery warned residents in May that the county was intent on closing the apartments and selling the building.

Since Pendery’s announcement, more than half of the residents have moved to new homes. Of the 43 residents living in the apartments in May, 14 people remained as of Sept. 20. Fiscal court unanimously approved a resolution to close Lakeside Terrace at the Sept. 20 meeting in Newport. “I think we’re down to 14, and I think two of the 14 have places to go,” Pendery said. Pendery said the fiscal court’s Sept. 20 announcement was following through on a promise to close the senior apartments in May. “I let everybody know so there was no confusion where every-

thing was going and people had at least eight months to find a new place to live,” he said. The county receives regular reports on the circumstances of each resident remaining, and the likelihood they will succeed in finding a new place, he said. “Everybody should comfortably have time enough to make a move,” Pendery said. The leases of Lakeside Terrace residents can be legally terminated on 30-days notice, but the county made a commitment to provide them with at least 120 days notice, said Campbell County Administrator Robert Horine. “This notice will be in advance

of the 120 days notice,” Horine said. Wilder resident Kevin Gordon said during the Sept. 20 meeting that he wanted the county to make public a report detailing the $5 million cost estimate to renovate Lakeside Terrace. Campbell County has refused to release the report to Gordon. Pendery said the approval of the intent to close resolution Sept. 20 doesn’t change his mind on withholding public release of the report. Pendery cited the $5 million cost estimate to renovate as too expensive during the June 20 fiscal court meeting. There is asbe-

stos in the building and other expensive repairs are needed in any renovation, he said. Campbell County’s decision to close and sell the building takes the county out of the business of maintaining a senior citizens housing building. Gordon said he thinks closing Lakeside Terrace and not having anything to replace it is worth the investment, compared to something like a proposed tax by the independent library district increase to build a new South Branch. There are more agencies and See LAKESIDE, Page A2

Court clerk candidates on license office By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

From left: Michelle Roll, Nell Griffin and Mindy Laber, co-chairs of the Free to Breathe Cincinnati 5K Run/Walk, pose for a picture at last year's event. PROVIDED

Resident honors friend, raises money with 5K run By Amanda Joering ajoering@nky.com

For nearly two years, Southgate resident Mindy Laber watched her friend and coworker, Morgan Alloway, battle lung cancer. Alloway, a non-smoking mother of two young girls, was diagnosed with Stage 4 lung cancer at age 29. Less than two years later, Alloway lost her battle with lung cancer and passed away Oct. 1, 2010. “She really fought so hard, it was heartbreaking, but encouraging,” Laber said. “It was an inspiration to watch her fight.” The death of Alloway, who Laber worked with at Acosta Sales and Marketing, really hit home for Laber, who is also a mother of two young girls. “Lung cancer just takes so many lives,” said Laber, who pointed out that lung cancer is

the leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. Laber said, after her diagnoses Alloway participated in Free to Breathe, a series of National Lung Cancer Partnership events held throughout the nation to create awareness and raise money for lung cancer research and education. While events are held in various places around the country, Cincinnati didn’t have its own event, Laber said. “So many people in this area have been affected by lung cancer, we just thought that Cincinnati should have its own event,” Laber said. Laber, along with some of Alloway’s other friends, set out to plan the Free to Breathe Cincinnati 5K Run/Walk to support the cause and honor their friend. The first event was held on Oct. 1, 2011, exactly one year after Alloway’s death.

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“This is our way of honoring her,” Laber said. “This event helps bring hope and a feeling that we’re fighting the good fight.” Last year’s event had 350 participants and raised about $30,000 for the National Lung Cancer Partnership, and Laber said this year’s event will be bigger and better. The second annual event, being held at 8:30 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 6 at Acosta Sales and Marketing, 3 Crowne Point Ct., in Cincinnati, will include a 5K Run/Walk, one-mile memorial walk, kid’s dash, a performance by the Northern Kentucky University cheerleaders and a rally featuring speeches from lung cancer survivors. For more information or to donate or sign up to participate, visit www.freetobreathe.org/ cincinnati. Participants can also sign up the day of the event.

NEWPORT — The location of the driver’s license office is the primary issues Circuit Court Clerk candidates Mary Ann Mader Jones and Taunya Nolan Jack have different views upon. Republican Nolan Jack, of California, is seeking reelection to a second four-year term, and Democrat Mader Jones, of Alexandria, is a first time candidate for the office. The Circuit Court Clerk office handles filings for district and cirMader Jones cuit court cases in Campbell County and is also responsible for issuing state driver licenses. Mader Jones said she has extensive management experience Nolan Jack including opening up a mortgage company branch in Campbell County. A current employee of Union Savings Bank, Mader Jones said she has worked for 17 years as an insurance agent and another 17 years in mortgage finance. “Both occupations involve some knowledge of the court systems,” she said. Mader Jones said when the new county administration building was constructed at 1098 Monmouth St. in Newport the plan was to move the Circuit Court Clerk driver’s license office there along with the county clerk’s office. The county clerk’s office, a separate entity, handles vehicle tag renewals. Having the offices together was going to make it more convenient for everyone with lots of free parking and easy access, Mader Jones said. People now have to go to the courthouse on York Street to renew their driv-

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er’s license and to the county clerk’s office at 1098 Monmouth to renew their auto tags, she said. And to get to the drivers license office people have to go through security, and go through the old building to get to the office on the far end of the new addition. “It’s very inconvenient especially for seniors and handicapped people,” Mader Jones said. Not having the driver’s license office also costs the county money because the sheriff’s office has to maintain a security checkpoint for the office to be open on Saturday in the courthouse. Nolan Jack, first appointed to the circuit court clerk’s office Jan. 13, 2009, said her work experience in the courts and as a legal secretary gives her the best experience for the duties the office primarily handles. The convenience issue surrounding the driver’s license office is a misnomer, Nolan Jack said. The offices being together frees up employees working on court paperwork to also work in the driver’s license office, she said. People only have to get their driver’s license renewed once every four years, and they need their vehicle tags renewed annually, she said. “And they don’t expire at the same time, so I don’t know how it’s a big inconvenience every four years,” Nolan Jack said. There’s also three full lots on Court Street of parking and street meter parking. And people have to go up to the second floor at the county administration building, so the distance from the front door is similar, Nolan Jack said. Nolan Jack said she introduced credit card payments during her time in office. Nolan Jack said she thinks voters will be best served keeping her on the job because she’s been in the legal field since 1986 and she is available “24-7” to attor-

The Campbell County Recorder 654 Highland Suite 27 Fort Thomas, KY 41075

Published weekly every Thursday. Periodicals postage paid at Newport, KY 41071 USPS 450130 Postmaster: Send address change to The Campbell County Recorder 654 Highland Suite 27, Fort Thomas, KY 41075 Annual subscription: Weekly Recorder In-County $18.02; All other in-state $23.32; Out-of-state $27.56; Kentucky sales tax included

Vol. 34 No. 34 © 2012 The Community Recorder ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


NEWS

A2 • CAMPBELL COUNTY RECORDER • SEPTEMBER 27, 2012

Fort Thomas boy fights rare disease, Histiocytosis By Amanda Joering ajoering@nky.com

FORT THOMAS — When Fort Thomas resident Gina Holt’s son, Joey Holt, 10, started complaining about pain in his hip earlier this year, she never imagined

Index Calendar .................B2 Classifieds ................C Food ......................B3 Life ........................B1 Police .................... B8 Schools ..................A7 Sports ....................A8 Viewpoints ............A10

the tough times that were ahead of them. “I thought he just pulled a muscle,” Gina said. “A few days later it was getting worse and spreading, so then I thought maybe it was growing pains.” After days went by and

the pain continued, Gina decided it was time to take her son to the doctor. When nothing abnormal showed up in the blood work and X-rays, the doctor agreed that it must be growing pains. But, the pain continued

CAMPBELL

COUNTY RECORDER Find news and information from your community on the Web Campbell County • nky.com/campbellcounty

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Michelle Shaw Editor ..........................578-1053, mshaw@nky.com Chris Mayhew Reporter .......................578-1051,cmayhew@nky.com Amanda Joering Reporter ....................578-1052, ajoering@nky.com Melanie Laughman Sports Editor ............513-248-7573, mlaughman@nky.com James Weber Sports Reporter ................578-1054, jweber@nky.com

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getting worse, leading Gina to take Joey to an orthopedic doctor, who still couldn’t find an explanation. “At this point he was having days where he couldn’t even get out of bed, or would get up and fall right back down because the pain was so bad,” Gina said. Joey said the pain was unbearable. After several more calls to the doctor, Joey received a referral to see an orthopedic doctor at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, where an MRI showed something none of the other doctors had thought about, since many of them had never seen it before. Joey had Histiocytosis, a rare, cancer-like, autoimmune disease that causes white blood cells to attack certain parts of the body. While the cells attack different parts of different people’s bodies, in Joey’s case, they attacked his hipbone, almost completely eating it away. The disease, which occurs in five of every million children, wasn’t diagnosed earlier because it is so rare. Joey’s doctors had never encountered it, Gina said. They were lucky that the disease only attacked his hipbone, instead of organs, as it does in more severe cases that can lead to death. A few days after the diagnosis, Joey had surgery, including a bone graph and bone biopsy. After the surgery, Joey had to spend three months in a wheelchair, spent several months going to physical therapy and missed months of school. Gina had to move Joey’s room to the first floor of their house and install a chair lift to get him there from the entrance of their house in the basement. While Joey is doing much better today, his fight with the disease, which can come back, will never end. He will always have to be checked to detect any future attacks, Gina said. Through the experience, Gina said she has met networked and met with other families who have

been affected by this disease, all of whom had similar stories about it not being diagnosed at first. Many families have to travel to this area to take their children to Children’s Hospital. “Now that our life is starting to get back to our new normal, I really want to help those families,” Gina said. Gina is also hoping to spread the word about the disease, especially this month since its Histiocytosis Awareness Month. For more information , visit www.histio.org.

Lakeside

but the county should continue to step up to continue operation of Lakeside Terrace, he said. “I still think it is an asset, and it is has been something the county should be proud of in terms of having

Continued from Page A1

facilities available now than when Lakeside Terrace was opened in 1969,

Campaign information: Nolan Jack: Website: http://keeptaunya.com/ taunya_about Nolan Jack said she has been endorsed by Northern Kentucky Right To Life, and by retired Campbell Circuit judges William Wehr and Leonard Kopowski, and also by retired Campbell Commonwealth Attorney Jack Porter. Nolan Jack said she has been previously been involved n Mentoring Plus, a program for at risk youths in Newport as a both a board member and mentor. Prior to working as Circuit Court Clerk, Nolan Jack worked for Campbell Circuit Court Judge Fred A. Stine as a judicial secretary from 2005 to 2009 and as a legal secretary for Jolly & Blau from 2002 to 2004. She also has a bachelors degree in psychology from Northern Kentucky University and has completed continuing education through the Kentucky Administrative Office of the Courts for circuit clerks in 2009 and 2012.

Clerk Continued from Page A1

neys and judges through her cell phone. “It’s a perfect fit for me,” she said. “I like work-

Fort Thomas resident Joey Holt, 10. THANKS TO GINA HOLT

Mader Jones: Website: http://www.maderjones.com/ Mader Jones said she is married to Ron Jones, a Vietnam War veteran who is involved in the Veterans of Foreign Wars. She is a member of the V.F.W. auxiliary in Alexandria, has spent 18 years volunteering as an EMT, EMT instructor, paramedic and CPR instructor. She has volunteered for 16 years at St. Mary Parish teaching religious education and as the administrator of the program. In addition to her 34 years of experience as an insurance agent and mortgage finance, Mader Jones said she also chartered several professional trade organizations and was once named Kentucky Professional Agent of the Year. She has also served as president of the Northern Kentucky Insurance Agents Association and as president-elect of the Professional Insurance Agents of Kentucky. Mader Jones said she also once received a letter of commendation from President Ronald Reagan for a safe driving program she developed for young people.

ing with the public, working with records, and I make sure everything is done effectively and efficiently,” she said.

Visit nky.com/campbellcounty for more community news

a facility like that which puts us heads and shoulders above most counties,” Gordon said.

Visit nky.com/campbellcounty for more community news

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NEWS

SEPTEMBER 27, 2012 • CCF RECORDER • A3

Picnic a friendship treasure trove By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

Wilder resident Mary Whitacre practices her cornhole bag tossing skills in full pirate dress in keeping with the pirate theme of the 45th annual Campbell County Senior Picnic. CHRIS MAYHEW/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

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Fort Thomas resident Karen Richey, left, wraps her arm around her new found friend Virginia Delaney, 91, of Bellevue Wednesday, Sept. 19. CHRIS MAYHEW/THE COMMUNITY

Highland Heights resident Joyce Barth and Chuck Deuser, 82, of Indian Hill, attend the pirate-themed Campbell County Senior Picnic in Melbourne together Wednesday, Sept. 19. CHRIS MAYHEW/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

RECORDER

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Roth attended the first senior picnic 45 years ago. Roth said he likes to talk with people and play bingo, horse shoes and cornhole. “I like the atmosphere here,” he said. “There are a lot of people here that are friendly and nice.”

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MELBOURNE — The treasures people found at the pirate-themed Campbell County Senior Picnic Wednesday, Sept. 19, were friendships longstanding and new. Fort Thomas resident Karen Richey said she struck up a fast friendship with 91-year-old Virginia Delaney of Bellevue after they met at this year’s picnic in Pendery Park. Delaney’s costume was an attention-getter, Richey said. “We’re friends now,” Richey said. Delaney wore a red scarf, sunglasses, a white dress intentionally frayed at the ends of the arms, and swashbuckling black kneehigh boots. It was Delaney’s first time attending the senior picnic. Delaney said she wanted to get into the spirit of the party. “I just like to have fun,” she said. “I think it’s great, seeing all the people my age.” Seeing friends from years past is why Ruth Campbell, 92, of Newport, said she comes to the picnic every year. “You meet people you haven’t seen in a while who are old friends,” Campbell said. Campbell and 85-yearold Highland Heights resident Joe Rakosi were named the “King and Queen” of the 2012 senior picnic. Wearing her pirate hat crown, Campbell said with a laugh, “Now they have to respect me.” Campbell said she always thought she’d have a chance to be the picnic queen someday and figured she’d win because she plans to live to be 120 years old. The king and queen of the picnic are the oldest people who chose to register for the title by placing their name and age in a hat. The picnic is an event 83-year-old Bob Roth of Cold Spring said he looks forward to every year. “We get here early in the morning to get a table


NEWS

A4 • CCF RECORDER • SEPTEMBER 27, 2012

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FORT WRIGHT — The James A. Ramage Civil War Museum will host its fifth annual Antiques Appraisal Fair from 1 to 4 p.m. Saturday Oct. 6. The event will be held in the parking lot of Community of Faith Presbyterian Church, located next to Battery Hooper Park on Highland Avenue. Participants are invited to bring two small items to be verbally appraised at a cost of $5 each by a qualified appraiser or auctioneer. All proceeds will benefit the Ramage Museum. For more information, visit www.fortwright.com. “The event helps the museum and it’s a good way to bring the community together. It’s a fun afternoon,” said Kathleen Romero, museum board member. She said several interesting objects have been brought in to previous appraisal events. Romero said a young lady brought in two paintings that were worth several thousand dollars each. She’s also seen beautiful estate jewelry, a Civil War cavalry saber, and a rare piece of Rookwoodpottery, of which only four were ever made. Appraiser Randy Burnett said the most amazing thing he saw at the antiques fair was a copy of “Mein Kampf” signed by Adolf Hitler. She said the appraisers specialize in different areas so they can critique items with an expert opinion, and they donate their time to the event. Visit nky.com/fortwright for more community news

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Ramage Museum volunteer Kittie Duppswas happy with the appraisal on her American cut glass at a previous event. THANKS TO KATHLEEN ROMERO

Fort Wright resident San Juan Romero also went to the James A. Ramage Civil War Museum antique appraisal to learn the value of an item: a New Mexico land grant document signed by Theodore Roosevelt in 1906. THANKS TO KATHLEEN ROMERO


NEWS

SEPTEMBER 27, 2012 • CCF RECORDER • A5

Calendar set for General Assembly Community Recorder

By Chris Mayhew

The 2013 regular session of the Kentucky General Assembly is scheduled to begin on Jan. 8 and will last 30 legislative days. As usual during an oddnumbered year, in which sessions are half as long as in even-numbered years, the session will have two parts. The first four days of the session, Jan. 8-11, will focus on organizational work, such as electing legislative leaders, adopting rules of procedure and organizing committees. The

cmayhew@nky.com

COLD SPRING — Seeking to give their wives a tractor of their own, three friends who collect and restore antique tractors ditched their favorite John Deere green and yellow for pink. The idea for painting the tractor pink was also because they wanted to support the Northern Kentucky breast cancer survivors support group Chicks & Chucks, said Mark Schroder of Cold Spring. Schroder, and friends, Joe Bremke of Alexandria and Alan Goetz, of Cold Spring work together at least once a week to restore a new antique John Deere “2 cylinder” tractor. For eight years they have displayed their restored tractors at an annual show for friends, family and neighbors in Cold Spring. The three friends knew each other through their work volunteering at Central Campbell Fire District. Schroder said he and Bremke and Goetz work as a team to restore their tractors, and their wives Candy Schroder, Pat Bremke and Linda Goetz made a special request of them. “The girls, they’ve always wanted a tractor of their own,” he said.

introduction and consideration of legislation can also begin during this time. The second part of the session begins on Feb. 5, with final adjournment scheduled for March 26. Legislators will not meet in session on Feb.18 in observance of Presidents Day. The veto recess, the period of time when lawmakers commonly return to their home districts to see which bills, if any, the governor vetoes, begins on March 12. Lawmakers will return to the Capitol on

From left, Joe and Pat Bremke of Alexandria, and their friends Candy and Mark Schroder of Cold Spring and Linda and Alan Goetz of Cold Spring gather round the pink John Deere model "1944 LA" tractor they restored during their annual tractor show for friends and family Saturday, Sept. 22. CHRIS MAYHEW/THE

March 25 and 26 for the final two days of the session. The 2013 session calendar can be viewed online at http://www.lrc.ky.gov/ sch_vist/13RS_calendar. pdf.

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Candy Schroder said they decided to paint their John Deere model “1944 LA” pink and use it as a way to raise money for Chicks & Chucks. “We plan to take it around to some Chicks & Chucks events,” she said. Representatives of Chicks & Chucks were at Schroder’s property in Cold Spring for the annual tractor show Saturday, Sept. 22, to take donations people left in a jar next to the tractor for the charity. Claire Bazler, of Edgewood, a member of the Chicks & Chucks board, said money donated to the group pays for resource bags given to every breast cancer pa-

tient through St. Elizabeth Healthcare. Bags contain comfort items and information about support groups. Started in 2006 in Campbell County, the nonprofit Chicks & Chucks also pays for medical expenses and deductibles, wigs, prosthetics, she said. Chicks & Chucks board member Lisa Webster, of Alexandria, said they were thrilled when they were approached about the idea of promoting their organization with a unique pink tractor. Visit nky.com/coldspring for more community news

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A6 • CCF RECORDER • SEPTEMBER 27, 2012

Board members fund new scoreboard lion project to build a new Area Technology Center (ATC) and athletic stadium at the high school, said Superintendent Glen Miller. Miller said the new scoreboard will feature advertisements to repay the district. “It is our expectation that we will generate more than $100,000 in advertising revenue, and those revenues will be returned to the general fund,” he said. “So it is a win-win situation.” Miller said scoreboards last about 25 years, and the district is still considering how many advertising spots to have on the score-

By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

ALEXANDRIA — By a 4-1 vote Sept. 10, Campbell County Schools Board of Education approved a $98,000 digital scoreboard add-on for the new field being built at Campbell County High School. The scoreboard, which will display digital messages, is being funded with money freed up by the NFL and Cincinnati Bengals donation of $200,000 to help pay for a new synthetic turf field. The district will save $200,000 because of the NFL grant on a $16.375 mil-

board. A row of four advertising spots will generate $4,000 a year, he said. Board chairperson Janis Winbigler said it bothers her the discussion has centered on a “scoreboard addition” when it is a digital information board on top of the scoreboard for the district. “We have a captive audience that we can promote things like our ACT scores being 12th in the state,” Winbigler said. Board member Patrick Walch said he voted against the digital message board because he was looking for some other funding sources, and

didn’t think the advertising idea was solidified enough yet with a set payback plan. “I just think it’s a good time to show the public that we’re also watching our Ps and Qs, and something like that might be construed as being maybe extravagant or extra or something that’s not needed,” Walch said. Prior to the meeting, two county residents spoke in support of the digital message board spending, and one resident spoke against it.

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CAMP SPRINGS — The sixth annual Neltner’s Farm Fall Festival will begin on the Saturday, Oct. 7. The festival features home-grown and handmade foods, regionallyproduced wines, folk art, artisan demonstrations, old-fashioned games, Bluegrass music and pumpkins, according to a news release from Neltner’s Farm and Greenhouse. Children will have the opportunity to pet goats, sheep or a miniature donkey or run through a corn

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SCHOOLS

SEPTEMBER 27, 2012 • CCF RECORDER • A7

COMMUNITY

RECORDER

Editor: Michelle Shaw, mshaw@nky.com, 578-1053

ACHIEVEMENTS | NEWS | ACTIVITIES | HONORS

CommunityPress.com

Grandview earns Energy Star certification By Amanda Joering ajoering@nky.com

Artrose Pinner, left, talks to Robert Wilke, a first-grader at Campbell Ridge Elementary School in Alexandria, about eating healthy and exercise during lunch in the cafeteria Wednesday, Sept. 19. CHRIS MAYHEW/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

School backs healthy eating with football star

By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

ALEXANDRIA — Former star University of Kentucky running back Artose Pinner carried a message to Campbell Ridge Elementary School students to eat healthy and stay active Wednesday, Sept. 19. Pinner spoke to students gathered inside the gym on behalf of the NFL’s Fuel Up to Play 60 program and The Southeast United Dairy Industry Association. Students each signed a Fuel Up to Play 60 Pledge card and dropped it in a box as they entered the gym. Students promised to “energize my body and mind by eating healthy” and to be active 60 minutes each day. Pinner said part of being ready for each day is eating whole grains, fruits and vegetables and non-fat dairy each day to fuel up for the day correctly, Pinner said to the students. “Whether it’s time to ace a test or score big in a game you’ll be ready,” he said. Pinner said obesity is a national problem that is spreading, and asked the students to go outside and jog, jump rope or ride a bicycle in their free time instead of playing video games or watching television. “When you are watching TV, instead of grabbing some chips grab some fruit,” he said. “They taste great, and they’re good for you.” Pinner, a native of Hopkinsville, Ky., was the 2002 SEC Offensive Player of the Year. He was drafted by the Detroit

Third-grader Cassie Johnson drops her signed "Fuel Up to Play 60 Pledge" into a basket.CHRIS MAYHEW/COMMUNITY RECORDER Lions in 2003. Pinner played for Detroit, Minnesota and Atlanta during his six years in the league. Speaking with students is a fun way to give back, he said. Pinner said he created a jacket with positive words to reinforce his message to students. Words on the jacket included confident, commitment and the phrase “Never give up.” Melinda Turner, a school program account manager for the Southeast United Dairy Association, also spoke to the students about eating healthy and presented a $2,000 check to Campbell Ridge Elementary for promoting healthy eating. The school has received a total of $6,000 in 2011and 2012 to improve its cafeteria into more of a cafe experience to get students excited about eating and trying foods they might not otherwise, Turner said. Campbell Ridge bought a blender in 2011 to allow students to have fruit smoothies from the cafeteria, she said.

Having Pinner come to the school, who was a star at UK, helps reinforce the healthy eating and exercise message, Turner said. Children often heed a message especially well when a professional athlete delivers it, she said. “Kids have gone home and said to their parents, ‘We need to eat healthy,’” Turner said. Linda Hardy, Campbell Ridge’s school nurse, said some of the $6,000 in grant money through dairy association and NFL Fuel Up to Play 60 program has been used to bring fresh fruit to every meal served in the cafeteria. Students especially love eating the bananas, and they are getting to try different kinds of beans, Hardy said. Improving the cafeteria to give it a restaurant feel gets students excited about eating healthy, she said. Wrap up a healthy sandwich the way a restaurant does, and the students get more excited about eating it, Hardy said. All of Campbell County Schools’ menus have changed in the past year, she said. “Everything is low fat with whole grains, and lots more fruits and vegetables,” she said. First-grader Robert Wilke was eating a bowl of peaches as Pinner made the rounds to speak with students at their tables during lunch after the assembly. Wilke said he always tries to eat healthy at home or school, and oranges are his favorite fruit. Wilke said Pinner’s speech made him think more about eating healthy. “It made me hungry though,” Wilke said.

BELLEVUE — After spending the past few years working towards being more energy efficient, Grandview Elementary School has earned the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Energy Star certification. To earn the Energy Star certification, a building must perform in the top 25 percent of similar facilities nationwide for energy efficiency and must meet energy efficiency performance levels set by the EPA. Superintendent Wayne Starnes said the district is happy to accept the certification in recognition of their efforts. “Through this achievement, we have demonstrated our commitment to environmental stewardship while also lowering our energy costs,” Starnes said. Dave Feldmann, the district’s director of facilities, said that district started doing little things to be more energy efficient several years ago, but then stepped up their efforts. Feldmann said the work included replacing fluorescent light bulbs with low energy consuming bulbs and cutting back on heating and air conditioning temperature settings. The district also joined with other local districts to take part in a state grant program that hired an energy manager to help the districts reduce energy costs. Feldmann said in today’s economy, any way a district can save money helps. “Every dollar we save goes into instruction and other areas,” Feldmann said. “Hopefully by next year we’ll be saving an even higher percent.” Energy manager Nathan Wright said in fiscal year 2012, Grandview reduced its energy usage by10.51percent compared to fiscal year 2009. The school’s energy 2012 expenditures were reduced by 16.62 percent when compared to 2009, equaling $10,949. Since the efforts began in fiscal year 2010, Grandview has saved a combined total of $21,533 on energy costs, Wright said. To attain these savings and earn the Energy Star, the district also implemented a comprehensive energy management plan, created an energy efficiency committee and worked to promote the importance of energy efficiency to students and staff. Dan Ridder, the district’s director of curriculum who also serves on the energy efficiency committee, said at their most recent meeting, they decided to move forward with creating and implementing a plan to improve the energy efficiency more at Bellevue High School. Ridder said the committee is looking into outside agencies who may be able to help the district find more ways to save energy at the school and hopefully lead to the high school receiving the Energy Star in the future. For more information, visit www.energystar.gov.

Tyler Bader serves internship in Alaska Community Recorder

Urbana University student Tyler Bader, a senior in the athletic training education program, began his first day of the academic year and his internship at the University of Alaska Fairbanks in the training room for the Nanook’s athletic department. This past April, Bader was named the recipient of the inaugural Cary S. Keller Athletic Training Internship. The internship was established after Keller visited Urbana. Keller is an orthopedic surgeon and team physician at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. The goal of the internship program is to give a senior level stu-

dent within the athletic training education program the opportunity to travel to Fairbanks, Alaska for eight months and work side by side with the the staff: Mike Curtin, the head athletic trainer and Amber Barlow, the assistant athletic trainer. The student also works with Keller in his office at Sports Medicine Fairbanks. Bader is the son of Taria Bader and grandson of Harry and Antoinette Bader of Southgate. He attended St. Therese School and graduated from Newport Central Catholic High School. To follow his eight-month internship journey visit his blog at www.uuatep.wordpress.com.

A welcome dinner party was held for Tyler Bader, an Urbana University student, who is interning at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. Pictured are Assistant Athletic Trainer Amber Barlow, Vice Chancellor of Students Dr. Mike Sfraga, Tyler Bader, Athletic Trainer for Lathrop High School Chris Dean and President/Medical Director Sports Medicine Fairbanks Dr. Cary Keller. THANKS TO CHRISTINA BRUUN-HORRIGAN


SPORTS

A8 • CCF RECORDER • SEPTEMBER 27, 2012

COMMUNITY

RECORDER

Editor: Melanie Laughman, mlaughman@communitypress.com, 513-248-7573

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | RECREATIONAL

CommunityPress.com

Bellevue digs into volleyball scene

By Adam Turer

presspreps@gmail.com

BELLEVUE — Led by an experienced lineup and an intense offseason training program, Bellevue High School’s volleyball team is having one of its best seasons in years. The Tigers started the season 14-8 thanks in large part to the fact that there were no seniors on the 2011 roster. With so much experience back in 2012, the team set high goals for itself this year. “The girls are 100 percent focused on winning, rather than

getting used to playing with each other,” head coach Brittany Finch said. “They know we have a good team. They’ve played together for two years now.” The Tigers are led by a trio of seniors. Outside hitter Kendall Schmits has played on the varsity since she was in seventh grade. Setter Jennifer Sexton and outside hitter Makenzie Phelps are starting on varsity for the third straight year. “We have three really strong seniors,” said Finch. Schmits and Phelps gained valuable experience this past offseason when they joined a

club volleyball team. Traveling around the nation playing with and against some of the top volleyball players in the country was an eye-opening experience for them. “I think it helped with their awareness more than anything,” said Finch. A pair of eighth-graders have stepped into big roles this season. Setter Linzie Murphy and middle hitter Courtney Schmits have emerged as key starters for the Tigers. With Sexton graduating after this season, she has groomed Murphy to be the team’s setter of the future.

Norse volleyball makes waves in A-Sun By James Weber jweber@nky.com

HIGHLAND HEIGHTS — Sept. 18 was both a gut-check and a confidence booster for the Northern Kentucky University volleyball team. The Norse lost a heartbreaking five-set match to Lipscomb, dropping the fifth and deciding set16-14. That match was the first home contest in Regents Hall for NKU as an NCAA Division I member, and its first match in the Atlantic Sun Conference. At the same time, it was a narrow loss to a Lipscomb team that drove up from Nashville having won the last three conference titles in the A-Sun and wearing the mantle of preseason favorite this year. So, as far as moral victories go, it was a lopsided score. “That was one of the best feelgood games of my life,” NKU freshman hitter Jayden Julian said. “The fans were crazy. Lipscomb was picked to win the conference again, so it helped give us a gauge of how good the teams are in the A-Sun.” More importantly, the Norse took points and pointers from that moral win and used them to win their first two conference matches Sept. 21-22, beating North Florida and Jacksonville in Regents Hall. The Norse left their home gym with a 2-1 conference record and 14-2 overall. “It’s been an awesome feeling,” senior setter Jenna Schreiver said. “We’ve been playing well with the transition. We’ve been unfamiliar with these teams but we’ve handled the situation pretty well and I’m really proud of my team.” Bouncing back from the Lipscomb loss was crucial, said head coach Liz Hart, a former NKU standout. “We knew Lipscomb was going to be tough and the key was being able to come back and respond,” she said. “We talked about not letting it get us down. It comes down to experience and playing a lot of games. There have been a couple of times this year that we’ve been down and been able to pull it together.” Against Jacksonville Sept. 22, the Norse won the first two sets but lost a late lead to fall in Set 3. The Norse then had to rally from behind in set four, and after the teams were tied at 23, the Norse won the final two points to end the match. The two wins should help the Norse as they prepare to head to central Georgia this week to face Kennesaw State and Mercer in ASun matches. As new members of Division I, the Norse cannot play in the postseason but are eligible to win the regular season conference title.

“Linzie has been a great complement to Jennifer,” said Finch. “Jennifer has really helped mentor Linzie.” Bellevue lacks height across the frontline, but the younger Schmits makes up for it with her athleticism. “We don’t have a lot of height,” said Finch, “but Courtney can jump through the roof.” With the entire roster returning and a change in the rules extending games to best of five matches, Finch and her staff made changes to the team’s preseason plan. The team focused more on weightlifting and run-

ning and held its open gyms earlier in the summer than it had in past years. “We changed our preseason routine to help build more endurance,” said Finch. “It has really helped us with the five-match games we’ve played.” While 14-8 is a good mark for the program, the Tigers are not satisfied yet. They hope to finish the season strong and make a run in the postseason. “We had some losses that we could have turned around,” said Finch. “Now, it’s all about finishing strong when the going gets tough.”

PRESS PREPS HIGHLIGHTS By James Weber jweber@nky.com

This Week’s MVP

» Brossart senior Emily Greis for 16 aces and 24 digs against Scott in a volleyball win. » NewCath senior Maria Froendhoff for a big game in a win over Highlands in volleyball.

Volleyball

» Brossart defeated new district rival Scott 22-25, 25-23, 25-21, 25-20 Sept. 18 to improve to 15-6. Emily Greis had a phenomenal 16 aces with 24 digs. Tori Hackworth posted nine kills. » NewCath beat Highlands 17-25, 25-8, 25-19, 25-15 Sept. 18. Maria Froendhoff had 39 digs. Whitney Fields posted 13 kills.

Boys soccer

» Brossart beat Highlands 1-0 Sept. 18. Jordan Frommeyer had the goal and David Paulin the shutout. Brossart is 14-1 through Sept. 22. » Highlands beat NewCath 2-0 Sept. 22. Cole Davis-Roberts and Ethan Schmits had the goals and Nick Breslin the shutout. NKU freshman Jayden Julian (Independence, Ky./Holy Cross) gets a kill. NKU beat Jacksonville 3-1 to improve to 2-1 in Atlantic Sun Conference volleyball Sept. 22. JAMES WEBER/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Girls soccer

» Campbell County beat Beechwood 1-0 Sept. 19. Taylor Robinson scored the goal and Bryanna Schroers had the shutout.

Boys golf

» Newport Central Catholic won the Division II championship in the Northern Kentucky Athletic Conference tournament Sept. 17. Drew McDonald was individual medalist with a 73. NCC shot 306 overall.

Girls golf

» Brossart’s Lauren Seiter was fifth in the NKAC tourney with a 90.

Cross country

NKU senior setter Jenna Schreiver (Edgewood/Notre Dame) tries to save the ball. NKU beat Jacksonville 3-1 to improve to 2-1 in Atlantic Sun Conference volleyball Sept. 22. JAMES WEBER/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER “Our main goal is to win the conference title,” Schreiver said. “We definitely can do it. We have a good feeling about the conference. The game on Tuesday (Lipscomb) showed us we’re a good team and we can compete in this conference.” The Norse weren’t sure what to expect this season as they stepped up to all-new foes. NKU was picked to finish eighth in the preseason A-Sun coaches poll, but it’s likely that most voters had no idea what to expect from the newcomers, either.

“We knew we would be pretty good after our great spring season and knowing we have a lot of returners coming back, so the experience has been a big part of our success,” Hart said. “We spend a lot of time watching film and that helps us keep working harder and know we have to play our game to be successful. If we keep playing our system we can put ourselves in a good position at the end of the season.” Schreiver, a former Notre See NKU, Page A9

» Highlands won the girls title in the Campbell County championships Sept. 18 at A.J. Jolly Park. Lauren Ossege won the meet, followed by teammates Molly Mearns and Sydney Ossege as Highlands claimed five of the first six spots. Brossart finished second, led by Olivia Johnston in seventh. Campbell County‘s Jennah Flairty finished fourth. » In the boys meet at the Campbell County championships, NewCath edged Brossart 41-49. Brossart’s Michael Caldwell won the individual title. Chris Loos was fourth. NCC’s Patrick Allen finished third and Connor Bartels fifth. Highlands’ John Michael Griffith finished second overall.

Newport Central Catholic’s Loren Zimmerman (14) battles for control of the ball against Notre Dame Academy Jamie Bramlage (12). JOSEPH FUQUA II/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Campbell‘s top finisher was Mark Chaplin in sixth. Dayton’s Chris Johnson was 11th.

NKU Notes

» A season-opening trip to the west coast, a game against powerful Ohio State and a road encounter with two-time national champion San Francisco highlight Northern Kentucky University’s 2012-13 men’s basketball schedule as it tips off its inaugural year of NCAA Division I play. In addition, NKU visits Lubbock, Texas, Dec. 4 to take on Texas Tech of the Big12 Conference. That will mark the Norse’s first-ever trip to the state of Texas. The Norse begin the season by traveling to California to participate in the four-game National Urea Cycle Disorders Foundation Challenge at the University of San Diego. NKU meets host San Diego (13-18 last season) on Nov. 14, followed by games against Tulsa (Nov. 15), Siena (Nov. 17) and CalState Northridge (Nov. 18). “The tournament in San Diego will be a big-time test because we have to play four games in five days, and the teams involved are going to be very good,” NKU head coach Dave Bezold said. “It’s a challenging way to begin our first season as a Division I program, but we should learn a great deal about our team during that tournament.” On Dec. 1, NKU travels to Columbus, Ohio, to battle Big Ten powerhouse Ohio State in Value City Arena. It will mark the first regular-season meeting between the two programs. The Norse and Buckeyes played in an exhibition game in 2004, with Ohio State pulling out a 77-67 victory in Columbus. A year ago, Ohio State posted a 31-8 record and advanced to the NCAA Final See HIGHLIGHT, Page A9


SPORTS & RECREATION

SEPTEMBER 27, 2012 • CCF RECORDER • A9

NCC wins district opener Campbell County

By James Weber jweber@nky.com

Here is a rundown of district football action for schools of interest to Fort Thomas Sept. 21.

Bellevue

Bellevue beat Owen County 22-14 to improve to 3-3. Dylan Huff had another great game with 193 rushing yards and three touchdowns. He has 852 and 10 for the year, plus two touchdown receptions and one return score. The Bellevue defense limited Owen to 214 yards offense. Huff and Cameron Pangallo and Blake Stephenson were the leading tacklers. Alec Hazeres and Zack Poinsett had interceptions. Bellevue is off this week and starts 1A district play at Beechwood 7 p.m. Oct. 5.

Bishop Brossart

The Mustangs lost 58-0 to Newport Central Catholic to drop to 1-4 overall in their 2A district opener. Senior Jacob Elbert left the game with a knee injury and his prognosis was uncertain at press time. He had an 80-yard punt in the game, a school record Brossart plays at Lloyd 7 p.m. Friday.

NKU Continued from Page A8

Dame Academy standout, recently notched her 4,000th career assist in an NKU uniform. “Jenna’s been directing offense for us since her freshman year,” Hart said. “She’s very competitive, a very smart setter. She makes things look very easy, and they’re not. She’s one of the best setters out there.” Schreiver said the transition to a higher level has been challenging. “We were really concerned with the bigger block,” Schreiver said. “The players are a lot taller and their arm-span is longer than ours, so we’ve been focusing on hitting around the block and tipping higher over the block. We run a fasterpaced offense which tries to confuse their block, too.

The Camels were off last week and will start 6A district play at Simon Kenton 7 p.m. Friday. After five games, Campbell senior quarterback Tyler Durham had 734 rushing yards and eight touchdowns, averaging 7.4 yards a carry. He threw for 485 yards and three TDs. Jake Zabonick had 302 yards on 14 catches with three scores.

Dayton

Dayton beat Bracken County 32-27 to improve to 2-4 this season. D.J. Walker had 212 yards on the ground and two touchdowns. Logan Brewer, Dylan Adams and Justin Turner also had TD runs. Dayton is off this week and plays at Ludlow Oct. 5 to start 1A district play.

Newport

The Wildcats beat Ludlow 47-8 for their secondstraight win after four losses to open the season. Daylin Garland rushed for 170 yards and three touchdowns, and also threw a 45-yard touchdown pass. Jayshawn Stanley threw for 112 yards and two touchdowns. Robert Sharp had two

We have five very strong hitters so it’s very nice to have five hitters out there that I can rely on. I’m able to read the block and set it to the hitter I know can put the ball away.” Leading the plethora of hitters is Shelby Buschur, who recently became the 16th Norse player to reach 1,000 kills. The St. Henry, Ohio, native had 21 kills against Jacksonville. “Shelby has been a key player for us all four years,” Hart said. “She’s been able to get a lot of kills per set and at a high efficiency, and that is huge for someone we go to all the time.” Haley Lippert (Lakota East), Kelly Morrissey (Loveland/Mt. Notre Dame), Jenna Ruble and Jayden Julian (Independence/Holy Cross) all have more than 100 kills this year. Julian, Northern Kentucky’s 2011 prep player of the year at Holy Cross, is enjoying the transition.

touchdown receptions and 108 receiving yards, and JaQuan Short had 47 receiving yards and a score. Short also returned an interception for a touchdown. Sharp and David Lynam also had picks as Newport forced three turnovers. Newport hosts Holy Cross to start 2A district play 7 p.m. Friday.

Newport Central Catholic

NewCath beat Brossart 58-0 to improve to 2-3 in the 2A district opener for both teams. Josh Cain threw for 205 yards and afour touchdowns. Dylan Hayes rushed for 90 yards and one score as NewCath outgained Brossart 453-63. Cain’s TD passes were to Franzen (two), Tyler Lyon and Dan Ruwe. Franzen had three catches for 99 yards. Freshman Jacob Smith had a 64-yard TD run late in the game. Ruwe and Mason Myers also had touchdown runs. Brandon Gray had an interception. NCC plays at Holmes in a non-district game 7 p.m. Friday.

Four. “Ohio State played in the Final Four last season, and they should be a terrific team once again,” Bezold said. “Ohio State is loaded with talent, and Thad Matta is an outstanding coach.” Schedule: Nov. 14-18 San

Diego tourney, Dec. 1 at Ohio State, Dec. 4 at Texas Tech, Dec. 20 at Hampton, Dec. 22 at Navy, Dec. 31 at Jacksonville, Jan. 2 at North Florida, Jan. 5 USC Upstate, Jan. 7 East Tenn. State, Jan. 11 Lipscomb, Jan. 17 at Stetson, Jan. 19 at Fla. Gulf Coast, Jan. 24 Mercer, Jan. 26 Kennesaw St.,

“I love it so much because we get to travel everywhere and it’s so much different than high school,” she said. “We practice all the time. It’s a dream come true. I didn’t know what to expect as a freshman. I came in during preseason, worked really hard, and it paid off.” Kylee Tarantino (Loveland/Mt. Notre Dame) and Anna Prickel (Ursuline Academy) lead the defense. Tarantino has been a three-year starter at libero. Lefty Megan Wanstrath (Cleves, Ohio/Mother of Mercy High School) stepped in with five kills against Jacksonville when Ruble missed the match, and freshman Jamie Kohls (Newport Central Catholic) got her first action of the season in last weekend’s matches. Follow James on Twitter @RecorderWeber.

Jan. 31 at E. Tenn. St., Feb. 2 at USC Upstate, Feb. 8 at Lipscomb, Feb. 14 Fla. Gulf Coast, Feb. 16 Stetson, Feb. 21 at Kennesaw St., Feb. 23 at Mercer, Feb. 28 North Florida, March 2 Jacksonville, March 14 at San Francisco.

SIDELINES Baseball tryouts Select baseball tryouts for 2013 SWOL 12U team Northern Kentucky Sharks is being scheduled in September and October. For information, contact Ken Shumate at k.shumate@zoomtown.com or 859-512-8541 or call Randy Suttles at 513-312-8550.

Softball tryouts Shooting Stars 14U girls fast pitch softball traveling team tryouts are going on now. For more information, call coach Mark at 859-485-6230 email mcvalvano@yahoo.com.

Winstel hoops clinic Eight instructional basketball clinics for girls in grades five

through eight led by former Northern Kentucky University women’s basketball coach Nancy Winstel and her staff will be at Town & Country sports and Health Club in Wilder. Each session will deal with the fundamentals of the game as well as advanced skills needed to play the game. Each session will be taught in a teaching/drill format using the part/whole/ part and the whole/part/whole method. » Grades five and six will be 5:30-7:30 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays, Oct. 1-24. » Grades seven and eight will be 5:30-7:30 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays, Oct. 2-25. Participants should wear basketball clothes: shorts, t-shirt,

The Scott Classic cross country meet was Sept. 22 at Scott High School. The Newport Central Catholic boys team won the meet. Patrick Allen was seventh, Connor Bartels, 10th; Collin Walker, 12th; Griffin Jordan, 13rd; and Bannon Seiter, 39th. Junior Caitlyn Drohan finished 16th to lead the NCC girls team.

Newport Central Catholic senior Patrick Allen finished seventh, helping NewCath to the team title at The Scott Classic Sept. 22. JAMES WEBER/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Follow James on Twitter @RecorderWeber and check out all local news at NKY.com/CampbellCounty.

PRESS PREPS HIGHLIGHTS Continued from Page A8

’Breds win Scott meet

Newport Central Catholic senior Connor Bartels finished 10th, helping NewCath to the team title Sept. 22 at Scott High School. JAMES WEBER/THE

Newport Central Catholic junior Caitlyn Drohan finished 16th in the Scott Classic Sept. 22. JAMES WEBER/THE

COMMUNITY RECORDER

COMMUNITY RECORDER

Have you had fun following the Reds this year? We here at The Enquirer and Cincinnati.com hope you’ve had as much fun watching the Reds this season as we have.

Submit your favorite Season to Remember photo and you could

WIN a paIr of 2013 reds seasoN TIckeTs! Photos must include you and/or your family celebrating your love of the best home team around – the Cincinnati Reds!

basketball shoes, and bring a water bottle. Cost is $150 for all eight sessions or $25 per session. To register, visit www.kingssa.com. For more information contact Bobby at 859-653-9261.

Officials needed The Northern Kentucky Volleyball Officials Association is seeking individuals who might be interested in officiating high school volleyball matches for the 2012 season. Training is provided. Contact Sharan Bornhorn at sbornhorn@fuse.net or 859-7604373. Additional information can be found at www.nkvoa.com.

1. Go to Facebook.com/cincinnatienquirer, like the page 2. Follow the directions to submit your photo 3. Or mail your entry to The Enquirer All photos will be judged by us – the Enquirer Media sports staff! We’ll send the top 10 photos over to our friends at the Reds where Marty Brennaman; Phil Castellini, Reds’ COO; and Michael Anderson, Reds’ PR manager, will choose the Grand Prize winner!

No purchase necessary to enter or win. The Enquirer Reds Season to Remember Contest is open to legal residents of the United States (except Puerto Rico) who are 18 years or older at the time of entry. Entry Period is 9/23/12 – 10/20/12. Only 1 entry per person. For complete rules, visit http://www.facebook. com/cincinnatienquirer or email ehendricks@enquirer.com. This Contest is not sponsored, produced or executed by any MLB Entity. Major League Baseball trademarks and copyrights used with permission of MLB Advanced Media, L.P. All rights reserved.


VIEWPOINTS A10 • CAMBELL COUNTY RECORDER • SEPTEMBER 27, 2012

COMMUNITY

RECORDER

Editor: Michelle Shaw, mshaw@nky.com, 578-1053

EDITORIALS | LETTERS | COLUMNS | CH@TROOM

CommunityPress.com

Celebrate the freedom – Read a banned book

The 1933 burning of more than 25,000 “un-German” books eventually elicited widespread condemnation. Yet, the sheer number of books in the Unites States that are still challenged or banned is staggering. Since 1990, the American Library Association has recorded more than 10,000 book challenges! A challenge is a formal complaint requesting a book be removed from libraries or schools. As in pre-WWII, books that are challenged or banned have one thing in common: something in a book’s content runs counter to what a person – or group of people – believe should be available.

About three out of four of all challenges involve books in schools. Materials most challenged are books for children. The popKeyth Sokol ular picture COMMUNITY book “Brown RECORDER GUEST COLUMNIST Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See?” was banned for a short time in Texas in 2010 because the author had the same name as a Marxist theorist. Thankfully, most challenges are unsuccessful, and books such as The Hunger Games, Twilight

and the Harry Potter series remain available. Those who seek the banning of materials from a library are not simply expressing a point of view. They are attempting to suppress someone else’s point of view. Censorship denies us our freedom as individuals to choose and think for ourselves. For children, decisions about what books to read should be made by the people who know them best — their parents. In the end, we must defend our freedom to make our own decisions about what we read and view, but that freedom also extends to respect for the same freedom for everyone else.

Libraries across the country are celebrating Banned Books Week Sept. 30-Oct. 6 in support of the freedom to access library materials without censorship. The Campbell County Public Library, along with many others nationwide, upholds the freedom to read, listen, and view freely. The celebration of Banned Books Week is to encourage communities not to take this freedom for granted. While everything in the library might not be appropriate for you, each of us has the right to decide for ourselves what to read, to listen to, or to view. During Banned Books Week, the Campbell County Public

How should the winners govern? As November’s elections get closer, two very different approaches to wielding power are on offer. The first has characterized most of our nation’s history: a willingness to engage in robust debate over competing ideas, work across ideological divides, and above all find a way to strike a deal and move forward. Its emphasis is on problem-solving and finding workable solutions to the great problems that confront us. It is what has made possible most of the great pieces of legislation that have shaped this nation – everything from rural electrification to federal highways. The other approach has been on view more often than not in the House, and was prominent in the Indiana Republican primary that recently ended in the defeat of Sen. Richard Lugar. It holds that in order to achieve policy goals it’s crucial to purify the party, purge it of moderates, and work hard to reach overwhelming, possibly even permanent, political victory. It rests on a belief that the political philoso-

Lee Hamilton COMMUNITY RECORDER GUEST COLUMNIST

phies at large in the country right now are irreconcilable, and that reaching a compromise in the interest of moving legislation is impossible without betraying core principles. In this view, Washington does not need more collegiality,

it needs less. This is not an irrational or illegitimate approach to governing. There are plenty of politicians of both major parties who have, at one time or another, advocated this approach. But there’s a practical problem with it: It is very hard to make work. The kinds of majorities that make ideologically pure legislating possible don’t come along very often – and when they do, they don’t tend to last very long. Moreover, legislation that has bipartisan support tends not just to be more durable and of a higher quality than if it

does not, it is also easier to implement. As a governing tactic, ideological purity has enormous practical difficulties. Nonetheless, in the upcoming election these two approaches – negotiation and flexibility vs. unyielding dedication to an ideology – will both be part of the package of issues that voters must weigh. Which makes it crucial that candidates talk not only about policy, but also about process – not only about where they want the country to go, but also about how they expect it to get there. Which approach do they favor? If they get into office, how will they govern? Their answers will make a difference in how we as a nation tackle the challenges that confront us. So as campaign season truly gets under way and the candidates who would represent you start showing up to ask for your vote, don’t let them off the hook: Ask them not just what they want to accomplish, but how they’ll go about it. Lee Hamilton is director of the Center on Congress at Indiana University.

Clean water essential to good health

Have you ever thought about how many times you interact with water on a daily basis? Go ahead, count the number of times. I bet the number you came up with is higher than you expected. And that’s true for most people. Water is such an intricate part of our daily lives and we don’t realize how valuable and important it is to our health and our community. For me, water is life. I drink it, cook with it, bathe in it, use it to wash my clothes and my dishes, I wash my hands with it, not to mention outside uses like washing my car and watering my lawn. At Greater Cincinnati Water Works, our mission is to provide customers within our regional communities a plentiful supply of the highest quality water and excellent services. Our engineers, water quality experts and water distribution and supply specialists constantly assess the needs of our customers,

identifying areas of demand, monitoring and upgrading our infrastructure and developing a plan to keep high-quality water flowing. In 2013, our Biji George state-of-the-art COMMUNITY ultraviolet disinRECORDER GUEST COLUMNIST fection (UV) treatment facility will be brought online to protect against potential micro-organisms like cryptosporidium. When the facility is operational, GCWW will be the largest water utility in North America to use UV following sand filtration and granular-activated carbon. All the while members of our information technology, business and billing teams research and implement the latest technologies to help keep us on the cutting edge of customer service.

Because we think water’s worth it. And we hope you do too. Without water, our firefighters can’t fight fires. Many of our local businesses can’t manufacture their products, our hospitals can’t treat patients and our schools can’t teach tomorrow’s leaders. On behalf of every GCWW employee, I am proud to report that our water met or exceeded all state and federal health standards in 2011, as it always has. So the next time you turn on the tap, take comfort in knowing that more than 600 people at Greater Cincinnati Water Works take care each and every day to bring you life’s necessity – water. To view our 2011 Water Quality Report, which highlights our extensive water quality monitoring, visit www.cincinnati-oh.gov/gcww. Biju George is interim director of Greater Cincinnati Water Works.

CAMPBELL COUNTY REPRESENTATIVES AND CONTACT INFO Senator Katie Kratz Stine – District 24 Local address: 21 Fairway Drive, Southgate KY 41071 Frankfort address: 702 Capitol Ave. Annex Room 236, Frankfort, KY 40601 Local phone: 859-781-5311 Frankfort phone: 502-5643120Email: katie.stine@lrc.ky.gov

Website: http://www.lrc.ky.gov/ legislator/S024.htm

Representative Dennis Keene – District 67

Local address: 1040 Johns Hill Road, Wilder, KY 41076 Frankfort address: 702 Capitol Ave. Annex Room 358, Frankfort, KY 40601 Local phone: 859-441-5894

CAMPBELL

COUNTY RECORDER

A publication of

Frankfort phone: 502-564-8100 ext. 626Email: dennis.keene@lrc.ky.gov Website: http://www.lrc.ky.gov/ legislator/H067.htm

Congressman Geoff Davis – District 4

Local phone: 859-426-0080 Email: (link on website)Website: http://geoffdavis.house.gov/

Library will have dozens of books that have been challenged or banned on display. Check one out to read and enter random drawings throughout Banned Book Week for prizes. Be caught with a banned book and we’ll take your picture at any branch. Celebrate the freedom to read at your library, and check out a banned book Sept. 30-Oct. 6. Keyth Sokol is the Collection Services Coordinator for the Campbell County Public Library. He selects books for the Library’s collection, purchases materials on patron requests, and oversees the Library’s interlibrary loan program.

CAMPBELL COUNTY MEETINGS Campbell County Fiscal Court Address: 1098 Monmouth St., Newport, KY 41071 Phone: 859-292-3838 Website: www.campbelcountyky.org Meets: 7 p.m. the first Wednesday of the month at the Alexandria Courthouse, 8352 E. Main St. And meets at 5:30 p.m. the third Wednesday of the month at the county administration building, 1098 Monmouth St., Newport. Judge-executive: Steve Pendery 859-547-1803 Commissioners: Pete Garrett Brian Painter Ken Rechtin: 859-2502263

Alexandria

8236 W. Main St. 859-635-4125 7 p.m. the first and third Thursday www.alexandriaky.org

Bellevue

616 Poplar St. 859-431-8888 7 p.m. the second Wednesday www.bellevueky.org

Cold Spring

5694 East Alexandria Pike 859-441-9604 7:30 p.m. the second and fourth Monday www.coldspringky.com

Crestview

14 Circle Drive 859-441-4620 7:30 p.m. the first Tuesday www.crestviewky.com

Dayton

514 Sixth Ave. 859-491-1600 7:30 p.m. the first and third Tuesdays www.daytonky.com

Fort Thomas

130 North Fort Thomas Ave. 859-441-1055 7 p.m. the first and third Mondays www.ftthomas.org

Highland Heights

176 Johns Hill Road 859-441-8575 7:30 p.m. the first and third Tuesdays www.hhky.com

Melbourne

502 Garfield Ave. 859-781-6664

228 Grandview Drive, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017 654 Highland Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075 phone: 283-0404 email: kynews@communitypress.com web site: www.nky.com

7:30 p.m. the second Tuesday Website: NA

Newport

998 Monmouth St. 859-292-3687 7 p.m. the second and fourth Mondays www.newportky.gov Silver Grove 308 Oak St. 859-441-6390 7 p.m. the first Tuesday Website: NA

Southgate

122 Electric Ave. 859-441-0075 7:30 p.m. the first and third Wednesdays www.southgateky.org

Wilder

520 Licking Pike 859-581-8884 7 p.m. the first and third Mondays www.cityofwilder.com

Campbell County School Board

51 Orchard Lane, Alexandria 859-635-2173 7 p.m. the second Monday www.campbellcountyschools.org

Dayton School Board

200 Clay St. 859-491-6565 6:30 p.m. – day changes month-to-month www.dayton.kyschools.us

Fort Thomas School Board

28 North Fort Thomas Ave. 859-781-3333 7 p.m. the second Monday www.fortthomas.kyschools.us

Newport School Board

301 East Eighth St. 859-292-3001 Changes month-to-month www.newportwildcats.org

Silver Grove School Board

101 W. Third St. 859-441-3873 7 p.m. the third Monday www.s-g.k12.ky.us

Southgate School Board

6 William F. Blatt St. 859-441-0743 7 p.m. the second Thursday www.southgate.k12.ky.us

Campbell County Editor Michelle Shaw mshaw@nky.com, 578-1053 Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday See page A2 for additional contact information.


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2012

LIFE

COMMUNITY RECORDER

PEOPLE | IDEAS | RECIPES

The Highlands High School String Symphony performs at the event. AMANDA JOERING/COMMUNITY RECORDER

Hundreds gather at Merchants & Music festival FORT THOMAS —

Hundreds of people gath-

ered in Tower Park Saturday, Sept. 22 for the ninth annual Merchants & Music festival. The event, which was the biggest one so far, featured local vendor and organization booths and live music by Tupelo Honey, The Danny Frazier Band and Jo Dee Messina.

Mike Dill with the Midway Cafe pours beer at the festival. AMANDA JOERING/COMMUNITY RECORDER

Members of Northern Kentucky University's cross country team pose for a picture during the event. AMANDA JOERING/COMMUNITY RECORDER

Grammy nominated country star Jo Dee Messina performs during the festival. AMANDA JOERING/COMMUNITY RECORDER

BEST FRIENDS FOREVER

Family a good fit for siblings By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

When the siblings in the Pence family reunite they make sure everyone knows they’re together by wearing matching shirts. They are family and close friends, said David Pence, 72, of Newport. “We stay pretty close together,” he said. They pronounce their unity with matching shirts when they go out in public together with their names on them, Pence said. The siblings wore yellow shirts

with red letters to the Wednesday, Sept. 19, Campbell County Senior Picnic in Melbourne. They also have matching shirts in red and white, he said. They wear the shirts whenever they’re together, Pence said. Betty Turner, 74, of Alexandria, said she and her three brothers Tom, David and Allen, all of Newport, are especially close and get together regularly. They were raised in Newport where their parents had 11 children. Of the 11 siblings, seven are still surviving, Turner said. When the surviving members of the family get together they

like to play cards and sit around and talk, she said. David and Tom, 70, of Newport, also both worked at the same company, NuTone Inc., for 39 years in Norwood, Ohio. Some of the brothers are also in the same Masonic lodge in Newport. They like to do almost everything together, said Tom of himself and his siblings. They care for one another and are each others’ number one priority, he said. “That’s all we got is family,” Tom said. Visit nky.com/newport for more community news

Newport resident Allen Pence, front left, grabs his brother David's shoulder, front right, as their siblings Tom Pence and Betty Turner, of Alexandria, gather at the 45th annual Campbell County Senior Picnic in Melbourne Wednesday, Sept. 19. CHRIS MAYHEW/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER


B2 • CCF RECORDER • SEPTEMBER 27, 2012

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD FRIDAY, SEPT. 28

County Fiscal Court, 1098 Monmouth St., Become a confident, more effective speaker. Family friendly. Free. Presented by Triangle Toastmasters. 859-6523348; triangle.toastmastersclubs.org. Newport.

Art Exhibits Portraits from Botswana by Andrew Eckerle, 6:30 a.m.-4 p.m., Fort Thomas Coffee, 118 N. Fort Thomas Ave., Collection of photographs taken by Eckerle while he lived in Botswana with his family. Free. 859-814-8282. Fort Thomas.

Education One Book One Community: Keeneland - A Rich Heritage and History, 7 p.m., Fort Thomas-Carrico Branch Library, 1000 Highland Ave., Becky Ryder, director of Keeneland Library, shares significant highlights from the rich history of this beloved Kentucky treasure. Ages 18 and up. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 859-572-5033. Fort Thomas.

Attractions Sweetpea’s Birthday Celebration, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Newport Aquarium, Newport on the Levee, Sing Happy Birthday to Sweetpea during special dive shows. $23, $15 children, free under age 2. Through Sept. 30. 800-406-3474. Newport.

Dance Classes

Exercise Classes

Belly Dance A-Z with Maali Shaker, 8:30-9:30 p.m., Locomotion on the Levee, 1 Levee Way, Beginner dancers follow Maali’s class progression to develop beautiful and fluid exotic belly dance moves. Intermediate and advanced dancers shown layering, spins, turns and arm techniques to improve their dance. $12. 859-261-5770; www.cincinnatibellydance.com/ maalishaker. Newport.

Drink Tastings Wine Tasting, 5-9 p.m., StoneBrook Winery, 6570 Vineyard Lane, Stonebrook is on the Northern Kentucky Back Roads Wine Trail. Pick up passport at one of five wineries and get it validated at each winery for a gift. Five for $5 on Saturday and Sundays. $2.50 Friday: two free wineglasses with case purchase. Family friendly. 859-635-0111; www.stonebrookwinery.com. Camp Springs.

Festivals Newport Oktoberfest, 5-11 p.m., Festival Park Newport, Riverboat Row, Large festival tents. Munich Oktoberfest style of German food, beer and music. Free. Presented by City of Newport. 513-477-3320; bit.ly/ LyDrt3. Newport.

Holiday - Halloween USS Nightmare, 7 p.m.-1 a.m., BB Riverboats Newport Landing, 101 Riverboat Row, Haunted tour built on real steamboat. Experience 30-minute tour with over 40 areas and two levels of fright. $16. Presented by USS Nightmare. Through Nov. 3. 859-740-2293; www.ussnightmare.com. Newport.

Music - Rock The Turkeys, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., JerZee’s Pub and Grub, 708 Monmouth St., Free. 859-4913500; www.jerzeespub.com. Newport.

On Stage - Comedy Jay Phillips, 8 p.m., 10:30 p.m., Funny Bone Comedy Club, Newport on the Levee, AfricanAmerican comedian. $15-$17. 859-957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

On Stage - Theater The Producers, 8 p.m., Stained Glass Theatre, 802 York St., Book by Mel Brooks and Thomas Meehan. Music and lyrics by Mel Brooks. $20. Presented by Footlighters Inc.. Through Oct. 6. 859-652-3849; www.footlighters.org. Newport. The Curious Savage, 8 p.m., Village Players, 8 N. Fort Thomas Ave., After inheriting $10 million, Mrs. Savage decides to establish a fund to help others realize their dreams. But her grown step-children have their own designs on the money and commit her to a sanatorium, hoping to "bring her to her senses.". $15. Through Sept. 29. 859-392-0500. Fort Thomas.

Runs / Walks The Great American Beer Run, 7 p.m. All runners required to check at least 1-hour prior to running., Festival Park Newport, Riverboat Row, Runners depart from Oktoberfest and cross Purple People Bridge to touch both sides of the Ohio River. Four beer stops later, participants cross finish line and head to Oktoberfest tent for music and a complimentary pour of craft beer. $49, $44 advance by Aug. 31. Registration required. Presented by The Great American Beer Run. --; www.americanbeerrun.com/cincinnati. Newport.

Cardio Dance Party!, 7:30-8:30 p.m., Locomotion on the Levee, 1 Levee Way, $10 drop-in. Presented by Cardio Dance Party. 513-617-9498; www.cardiodanceparty.com. Newport.

Holiday - Halloween

Taste of the Levee will be held noon to 9 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 29, at Newport on the Levee. For more information visit, www.newportonthelevee.com. THANKS TO CHRISTY GLOYD

Campbell County Rotary Meeting, noon-1 p.m., Highland Country Club, 931 Alexandria Pike, Weekly meetings include presentations for local organizations and discussions on how to provide service to those in Campbell County and beyond. Family friendly. Free. Presented by Campbell County Rotary Club. 859-635-5088. Fort Thomas.

To submit calendar items, go to www.NKY.com and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to life@communitypress.com along with event information. Items are printed on a space-available basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to www.NKY.com and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page.

Attractions Sweetpea’s Birthday Celebration, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Newport Aquarium, $23, $15 children, free under age 2. 800-4063474. Newport.

Benefits Scheper Family Benefit, 6:30-11 p.m., Marquise Banquet and Conference Center, 1016 Town Drive, Food, beer, wine, music and dancing. Includes live and silent auctions. Benefits local boy injured last November and now a quadriplegic. $50. Presented by Trinity Episcopal Church. 859-586-0279; scheperfamilybenefit@gmail.com. Wilder.

An Evening With Blame Bertsch, 8 p.m.-midnight, Raniero’s, 28 Martha Layne Collins Blvd., Acoustic indie rock. Free. 859-442-7437; www.blamebertsch.com. Cold Spring.

Music - Concerts Swine Fest, 7 p.m. With Kill Box, Specyphi and Reason 420. Doors open 6 p.m., The Thompson House, 24 E. Third St., Tommy Gun Theater. Featuring the Might Swine. Ages 18 and up. $10. 859-261-7469; www.thompsonhousenewport.com. Newport.

Music - Rock Danny Frazier Band, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., JerZee’s Pub and Grub, 708 Monmouth St., Free. 859-4913500; www.jerzeespub.com. Newport.

Holiday - Halloween USS Nightmare, 7 p.m.-1 a.m., BB Riverboats Newport Landing, $16. 859-740-2293; www.ussnightmare.com. Newport.

Literary - Signings

Saturday, Sept. 29

Will Hillenbrand, 1:30-3 p.m., Blue Marble Books, 1356 S. Fort Thomas Ave., Great Green Room. Illustrator discusses and signs "Bear in Love," written by Daniel Pinkwater. Free. 859-7810602. Fort Thomas.

Art Exhibits

Music - Acoustic

One Book One Community Destination: Dublin, Ireland, 7 p.m., Cold Spring Branch Library, 3920 Alexandria Pike, Maureen Kennedy, founding member of Irish Heritage Center of Greater Cincinnati and artistic director for the Irish American Theater Company, presents about capital and most populous city of Ireland. Ages 18 and up. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 859-7816166. Cold Spring.

Cole Porter Night, 6 p.m., Vito’s Cafe, 654 Highland Ave., Suite 29, Piano Pete and servers present Cole Porter tunes. Reservations required. 859-4429444. Fort Thomas.

Wine Tasting, 1-6 p.m., StoneBrook Winery, 859-635-0111; www.stonebrookwinery.com. Camp Springs. Newport Oktoberfest, noon-11 p.m., Festival Park Newport, Free. 513-477-3320; bit.ly/LyDrt3. Newport. Taste of the Levee, noon-9 p.m., Newport on the Levee, 1 Levee Way, Each food item $3 of less. Beer, music and street performer entertainment. Participating Levee venues: Bar Louie, Brothers Bar & Grill, Claddagh Irish Pub, Cold Stone Creamery, Dewey’s Pizza, Jax Grill at GameWorks, Jefferson Hall, Mitchell’s Fish Market, Saxbys Coffee, Star Lanes on the Levee, StoneBrook Winery and Tom+Chee. Free. 859-815-1389; www.newportonthelevee.com. Newport. Reiley Elementary PTA Fall Festival, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Reiley Elementary School, 10631 Alexandria Pike, Outdoors, behind school. Games, inflatables, food, entertainment, basket raffles, silent auction, $500 raffle, bovine bingo, crafters and vendors, hayrides and more. Rain or shine. Benefits Reiley Elementary PTA. Free. 859-6352118. Alexandria.

Education

Music - Cabaret

Drink Tastings

Festivals

Wednesday, Oct. 3 Business Meetings

ABOUT CALENDAR

Portraits from Botswana by Andrew Eckerle, 6:30 a.m.-4 p.m., Fort Thomas Coffee, Free. 859-814-8282. Fort Thomas.

Pumpkin Patch Tour, 10 a.m.noon, 4-6 p.m., Sunrock Farm, $10 two-hour tour, $8 one-hour tour. Registration required. 859-781-5502; www.sunrockfarm.org. Wilder.

On Stage - Comedy Jay Phillips, 7:30 p.m., 10 p.m., Funny Bone Comedy Club, $15-$17. 859-957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

On Stage - Theater The Producers, 8 p.m., Stained Glass Theatre, $20. 859-6523849; www.footlighters.org. Newport. The Curious Savage, 8 p.m., Village Players, $15. 859-3920500. Fort Thomas.

Tours Newport Gangster Tour, 4:306:30 p.m., Gangsters Dueling Piano Bar, 18 E. Fifth St., Twohour tour begins with two gangster guides leading highenergy presentation inside old casino followed by walking tour of historic sites. $20. 859-4918000. Newport.

Sunday, Sept. 30 Attractions

Holiday - Halloween

Newport Oktoberfest will be 5-11 p.m. Friday, noon to 11 p.m. Saturday and noon to 9 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 28-30, at Newport Festival Park. For more information, visit www.oktoberfestnewport.com. PROVIDED USS Nightmare, 7-11 p.m., BB Riverboats Newport Landing, $16. 859-740-2293; www.ussnightmare.com. Newport.

On Stage - Comedy Jay Phillips, 7:30 p.m., Funny Bone Comedy Club, $15-$17. 859-957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

On Stage - Theater The Producers, 2 p.m., Stained Glass Theatre, $20. 859-6523849; www.footlighters.org. Newport.

Youth Sports Volleyball Clinic, noon-2 p.m. 13s age group., 2-4 p.m. 14s age group., 4-5:30 p.m. 9-12 age group., Campbell County Middle School, 8000 Alexandria Pike, Preseason clinic to prepare for tryouts. Opportunity to work and learn from coaches of Northern Kentucky Junior Volleyball. Lead by Director Jen Woolf. $30. Registration recommended. Presented by Northern Kentucky Junior Volleyball. 859-620-6520; www.nkjv.net. Alexandria.

Sweetpea’s Birthday Celebration, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Newport Aquarium, $23, $15 children, free under age 2. 800-4063474. Newport.

MONDAY, OCT. 1

Drink Tastings

Auditions

Wine Tasting, 1-6 p.m., StoneBrook Winery, 859-635-0111; www.stonebrookwinery.com. Camp Springs.

Swiss Cheese, Sweethearts, and Shenanigans, 7-9:30 p.m., Village Players, 8 N. Fort Thomas Ave., Six new short comedies by two up-and-coming Fort Thomas playwrights. Cold readings from the scripts. No appointment necessary. Resumes and headshots are welcome, but not required.Bring schedule conflicts Dec. 10-Feb.23, 2013. Free. 859-392-0500; www.village-

Festivals Newport Oktoberfest, noon-9 p.m., Festival Park Newport, Free. 513-477-3320; bit.ly/LyDrt3. Newport.

Holiday - Halloween

players.biz. Fort Thomas.

Civic Campbell County Conservation District Meeting, 8:3010:30 a.m., Campbell County Conservation District, 8351 E. Main St., Suite 104, Suite 104. Public encouraged to attend. Family friendly. 859-635-9587; http://home.fuse.net/campbellcd. Alexandria.

USS Nightmare, 7-11 p.m., BB Riverboats Newport Landing, $16. 859-740-2293; www.ussnightmare.com. Newport. Pumpkin Patch Tour, 4-6 p.m., Sunrock Farm, $10 two-hour tour, $8 one-hour tour. Registration required. 859-781-5502; www.sunrockfarm.org. Wilder.

On Stage - Theater The Producers, 8 p.m., Stained Glass Theatre, $20. 859-6523849; www.footlighters.org. Newport.

Thursday, Oct. 4 Exercise Classes Cardio Dance Party!, 7:30-8:30 p.m., Locomotion on the Levee, $10 drop-in. 513-617-9498; www.cardiodanceparty.com. Newport.

Holiday - Halloween

Holiday - Halloween

Pumpkin Patch Tour, 10 a.m.noon, 4-6 p.m., Sunrock Farm, 103 Gibson Lane, Hands-on animal fun: milk a goat, hold chicks, brush a horse, feed the sheep and pet many different farm animals. Hayride to pumpkin patch to purchase pumpkins. Free apple cider and cookies on weekends at farm store. Family friendly. $10 two-hour tour, $8 one-hour tour. Registration required. 859-781-5502; www.sunrockfarm.org. Wilder.

USS Nightmare, 7-11 p.m., BB Riverboats Newport Landing, $16. 859-740-2293; www.ussnightmare.com. Newport. Pumpkin Patch Tour, 4-6 p.m., Sunrock Farm, $10 two-hour tour, $8 one-hour tour. Registration required. 859-781-5502; www.sunrockfarm.org. Wilder.

Literary - Libraries Lego Lessons, 6 p.m., Cold Spring Branch Library, 3920 Alexandria Pike, Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 859-781-6166. Cold Spring.

Tuesday, Oct. 2 Auditions Swiss Cheese, Sweethearts, and Shenanigans, 7-9:30 p.m., Village Players, Free. 859-3920500; www.villageplayers.biz. Fort Thomas.

Clubs & Organizations Triangle Toastmasters Meeting, 7-8:30 p.m., Campbell

Karaoke and Open Mic Karaoke, 9 p.m., Olde Fort Thomas Pub, 1041 S. Fort Thomas Ave., Free. 859-441-1927. Fort Thomas.

Music - World Alpen Echos, 7:30-11:30 p.m., Hofbrauhaus, 200 E. Third St., 859-491-7200; www.hofbrauhausnewport.com. Newport.

On Stage - Comedy Brian Posehn, 8 p.m., Funny Bone Comedy Club, Newport on the Levee, $15-$17. Reservations required. 859-957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

On Stage - Theater The Producers, 8 p.m., Stained Glass Theatre, $20. 859-6523849; www.footlighters.org. Newport.


LIFE

SEPTEMBER 27, 2012 • CCF RECORDER • B3

Fall is time to turn on your oven

Sometimes I’ll use just breasts and thighs. the high heat gives the chicken an incredibly crisp skin. This is one of those “hurry home” meals. Freshly ground pepper makes this a standout dish. If you don’t have a peppermill, put it on your wish list. Makes all the difference in the world, and pepper has lots of antioxidants. Ditto for the oregano, one of the most healing herbs on the planet.

1 chicken, cut up, about 3 pounds

Heat 1 inch of oil in frying pan over medium high heat. Slice onions across into 1-inch rings and separate, discarding outer layer of skin. Pour milk in bowl. Mix flour with seasonings in shallow dish. Dip rings in milk, then coat with flour. Fry in single layer (oil should be about 360) until golden. Place on paper towels to drain. Salt while still hot.

Sauce for dipping

Mix together 1 cup sour cream, cayenne pepper and cumin to taste (start with about 1/2 teaspoon each) and stir in chili sauce to taste, starting with 1/4 cup. Ingredients

Roasted Greek chicken is a good dish to hurry home for. THANKS TO RITA HEIKENFELD 6 Italian tomatoes, cut into quarters 1 very large yellow onion 4 Yukon gold or large red potatoes, cut into quarters or big chunks Salt and pepper to taste ¼ cup fresh oregano, or a generous 2 teaspoons dry 1 ⁄3 cup olive oil or bit more as needed 1 ⁄3 cup fresh lemon juice 1 tablespoon fresh garlic, minced

Preheat oven to 450. Toss chicken, tomatoes, onion and potatoes with salt and pepper. Put chicken and vegetables in large bowl. Mix oregano,

More Oktoberfest recipes on Rita’s blog, Cooking with Rita.

oil, lemon juice and garlic together. Pour over chicken and vegetables. Put into shallow roasting pan, placing chicken pieces skin side up on top of vegetables. Roast 1 hour or until chicken is golden and cooked through.

Big & bold onion rings

OK I can’t figure out where the recipe originated, but it has been in my files for a while with a

Thomas More presents ‘The Little Prince’ Ghent at alana.ghent@thomasmore.edu or 859-344-3664. Tickets can be purchased online at www.thomasmore.edu/theatre.

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Oil for frying 2 large sweet Vidalia onions 2 cans, 5 oz ea., evaporated milk 1 cup flour ½ teaspoon dry mustard Cayenne pepper – start with 1/4 teaspoon or to taste 1 teaspoon paprika

Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator and author. Email her at columns@communitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-248-7130, ext. 356.

Frosty Orange Julius Gosh, this brings back memories from when my kids were young. What goes around, comes around. 6 oz frozen orange juice concentrate, thawed 1 cup milk 1 cup water ¼ cup sugar or substitute 1-½ teaspoons vanilla extract 10 to 12 ice cubes

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Thomas More College’s theater department will present “The Little Prince” Friday through Sunday, Sep. 28-30 and Oct. 5-7, at Thomas More College theater, 333 Thomas More Parkway, Crestview Hills. Evening performances will be 7 p.m. and Sunday matinees will be 2 p.m. Based on Antoine de Saint Exupery’s classic novella, Thomas More College’s production of “The Little Prince,” interprets the story of a world-weary aviator stranded in the Sahara desert who comes across a mysterious boy who speaks of the magic of the world around him. Captivating the pilot’s imagination through his adventures, the Little Prince coaxes the aviator to see “what is essential is invisi-

ble to the eye.” General admission tickets are $10. For more information, contact Jim Nelson at james.nelson@thomasmore.edu or 859-344-3421 or Alana

CE-0000524228

Community Recorder

shorthand note that I can’t read. (Funny, I can still write in shorthand so easily, but the translation is another matter …). Anyway, the note from the sender said “This has spoiled me. No restaurant rings are as good.” For Megan, an Anderson Township reader.

In a blender, combine the orange juice, milk, water, sugar and vanilla. Cover and blend until smooth. With blender running, add ice cubes, one at a time, through the opening in lid. Blend until smooth. Serve immediately. Yield: 4-5 servings.

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Roasted chicken with Greek herbs

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It’s starting to feel, and look like, autumn. The tops of the maple trees have splashes of red, orange and yellow. And this morning when I went out for a bike ride, I got no farther than the bend in the road when I had to turn around and Rita change Heikenfeld from a RITA’S KITCHEN T-shirt to a sweatshirt. Are you ready for fall? I’m not sure I am, but it’s coming nonetheless. Our farmer neighbor, Ed Kluba, predicts frost in the next couple of weeks. That’s according to the Old Farmer’s Almanac, Ed told me. Fall is a perfect time to start roasting dinner in the oven instead of turning on the grill.

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LIFE

B4 • CCF RECORDER • SEPTEMBER 27, 2012

Check your energy usage via Smart Meter

Power companies around the country are hearing from consumers concerned about new Smart Meters being put on homes. They transmit your home’s electric usage, and some fear the meters emit potentially harmful radiation. Studies show that’s not the case, but now the some people are questioning the studies. Mike Mannarino, of Anderson Township, isn’t concerned about that, he’s troubled about possible spying. “It’s a surveillance device essentially because

they can tell what actually takes place inside the home,” he said. The Smart Howard Meters do Ain record the HEY HOWARD! electricity usage in your home every few seconds and transmit the information to a terminal. Mannarino said that information can be used to determine whether you’re using enough energyefficient devices in your

home. “It’s gradually intrusive: A little bit today. I think there’ll be more tomorrow and, frankly, I don’t feel they need that information,” Mannarino said. But Duke Energy spokeswoman Sally Thelen refutes this. “This is completely not true. I can tell you, Howard, the only thing we’re getting from these meters is how much electricity you’re using. We don’t know what appliances are being used. We don’t know anything specific at all,” Thelen said.

Nevertheless, Mannarino said, “If they determine you’re not doing the things they think you should, I see in the future where they could charge you a higher rate.” “There is no way that somebody’s monitoring the usage all the time. There’s a lot of fallacy out there on the Internet,” Thelen said. She said there is no large room where someone is monitoring the usage in each house. Instead, she said, the daily readings just go into big computer servers. Thelen said Duke is 75

percent complete in modernizing its grid with these digital meters. Since these meters transmit the usage, she said the company figures there will be far fewer estimated bills. When the upgrade is complete at the end of next year Duke can re-route electricity if there’s a power outage in an area. In addition, there could be “time of use pricing.” This allows customers to save money by, for instance, doing their wash at night when electric rates are reduced. In the meantime, those

with these Smart Meters can go online to Duke’s website and check their usage. The meters capture energy usage daily and that’s available to customers the next day. Duke said this can help customers make wiser energy decisions and avoid billing surprises at the end of the month. Howard Ain answers consumer complaints weekdays on WKRC-TV Local 12. Write to him at 12 WKRC-TV, 1906 Highland Ave., Cincinnati 45219.

Talkin’ ‘bout my generation: So what about this open enrollment period? Turning 65 and eligible for Medicare? Or are you on Medicare now? Then this column is for you! It’s open enrollment time! I’ll bet you are being

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besieged with numerous solicitations! Confused by parts A, B, C, and D (and whatever other famous letters of the alphabet there may be). My brother Nick is turning 65 next month. He reports receiving more than 40 mailings in one month. This exceeds offers he has received for credit cards! So what is this all about? Every year, people with Medicare get to explore new choices and pick the health and drug plans that work best for them. This

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is a good thing: it is called consumer choice! This year, the open enrollment period is Oct. 15-Dec. 7. This gives people with Medicare a full seven weeks to compare and make decisions. There are a wide range of health and drug plan options available across the country, including Original Medicare. Most people with Medicare can choose a Part D plan to help them pay for prescription drugs. And people who have chosen to enroll in a Part C Medicare Advantage plan for their basic health care services have the option of staying in that plan, choosing a different plan, or going back to the Original Medicare program. Plans can change from year to year, so these are important choices that should be made with care. People can turn to www.medicare.gov, call 1-800MEDICARE, or consult with a local State Health Insurance Assistance Program (SHIP) for help. During open enroll-

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ment, what changes can I make? You can switch from Ken Rechtin Original COMMUNITY Medicare RECORDER GUEST COLUMNIST (Medicare Parts A and B) to a Medicare Advantage (Medicare Part C) plan, switch from a Medicare Advantage plan back to Original Medicare, switch from one Medicare Advantage plan to another which might involve switching from a plan without Medicare Part D prescription drug coverage to one that has it, or vice-versa. You can make changes to your Medicare Part D prescription drug plan. You can join a Part D plan; switch from one Part D plan to another one or drop your Part D plan altogether. Once the Medicare open enrollment period closes on Dec. 7, for the most part, you can’t make

any changes to your Medicare plan until the following year. Must I make a change? Absolutely not! If the Medicare coverage you have now is working and your plan(s) is offered for 2013, then you can keep your coverage as it is. However, because this time comes but once a year, it’s a good idea to evaluate your coverage during the open enrollment period every year. That way, you’ll know if you already have the best coverage options for you, or if you need to make some changes. How do I compare plans? Knowledge is power! It is your health and your health care coverage! You can and should make these decisions for yourself! And there are resources to help! Don’t be intimidated by this! You don’t need to be confused! This site: http://

www.medicare.gov/publications/pubs/pdf/10050.pdf is the official US Government Medicare handbook. It is an excellent publication explaining all the details. Can’t access this on your computer? Or need help in finding the site? Then, stop in one of the Senior Services of Northern Kentucky Senior Activity Centers or county libraries and use their computer! Still feel that you need additional help? Many of the Senior Activity Centers and libraries in Northern Kentucky are offering free help. Please call any one of our centers for information on a program, class or a clinic near you. Ken Rechtin is the Interim Executive Director of Senior Services of Northern Kentucky.

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Officer Lisa Hampton of the Bellevue Police Department, pictured with her fiance Sgt. Patrick Noll of the Covington Police Department, was recently promoted to sergeant. PROVIDED

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OUT OF THE COUNTY OR PHYSICALLY UNABLE TO GET TO THE POLLS ON ELECTION DAY NOVEMBER 6TH 2012? CALL YOUR COUNTY CLERK’S OFFICE TO SEE IF YOU QUALIFY FOR AN ABSENTEE BALLOT BEFORE OCTOBER 19TH 2012

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LIFE

SEPTEMBER 27, 2012 • CCF RECORDER • B5

Planting garlic in a fall garden Question: Is it true that garlic can be planted in the fall? If so, when is it ready to harvest? Can it survive the winter outside? Answer: Yes, it’s true. Garlic is a crop you plant in your garden in the fall. Planting and culture of garlic differ little from onions, but many gardeners believe garlic is more exacting in its requirements. No one cultiMike var or culKlahr tural pracHORTICULTURE tice is best CONCERNS suited for every situation. An open, sunny location, with a fertile well drained soil that is high in organic matter is desirable. Fertilizer is usually applied beginning in the spring as side-dressings every two weeks until bulbs begin to form. Garlic is day-length sensitive and begins to bulb around the summer solstice. In Kentucky, it is best to plant garlic in October and early November. Plant individual cloves root end down and cover with two to three inches of well-drained soil. Allow six inches between sets. Mulch helps provide winter protection and conserves moisture during the summer. Although there are many different varieties,

some red, purple or silver in bulb color, there is only one species of true garlic... Allium sativum, an herbaceous biennial which belongs to the lily family. It is usually divided into two subspecies ophioscordon (hard-neck or top set garlic) and sativum (softneck garlic). Hard-neck garlic produces flower stalks called scapes and bulbils at the top of the stalk. Soft-neck garlic usually does not produce bulbils but produces larger bulbs with more cloves per bulb. The cloves which make up the mature garlic bulb are used for propagation. Propagation from bulbils is more difficult and requires two years to produce mature bulbs. Hard-neck garlic cultivars usually do better in colder climates and produce larger cloves that are easier to peel. On hardneck garlic remove any flowering stalk that forms to increase bulb size. During the growing season garlic needs one inch of water/week. Stop watering about 2 weeks before harvest. Many gardeners enjoy eating the green shoots and leaves of garlic plants. However, cutting them continuously inhibits bulb formation. By early June, flower stalks may appear and should be cut back and discarded so the plant’s energies can be directed toward root and bulb formation. Some people eat the flower

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stalk. Bulbs begin to mature or ripen in mid-July and early August, and the leaves become yellow and the leaf tips turn brown. When the leaves have yellowed, lift the plants and dry the bulbs in a dry, partly shaded storage area for about 2 weeks. After drying, the tops may be removed, braided or tied and then hung in a cool, dry, well-ventilated spot. Dampness invites rotting. Properly dried garlic should last for 6-7 months at 32F and 70% relative humidity.

Angie Whittamore (left) and Tiffany Roland (right) from Cash Express in Newport pose for a picture with Newport police officer William Johnson after dropping off a cake and thank you posters to the department on Tuesday, Sept. 11. PROVIDED

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Mike Klahr is the Boone County extension agent for horticulture.

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LIFE

B6 • CCF RECORDER • SEPTEMBER 27, 2012

Campbell County libraries offer October events Community Recorder The Campbell County Public Library will offer the following events at the Cold Spring, Newport and Fort Thomas branches in October:

Cold Spring

3920 Alexandria Pike; 859-781-6166 Lego Lessons Part 1: 6 p.m. Monday, Oct. 1. This is the first of four architectural Lego lessons designed to inspire the making of one’s own unique designs. Ages 11 to 18. Registration required; space is limited. One Book One Community - Destination: Dublin, Ireland: 7 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 3. Maureen Kennedy, a founding member of the Irish Heritage Center of Greater Cincinnati and the Artistic Director for the Irish American Theater Company, will present about the capital and most populous city of Ireland, and backdrop in this year’s One Book selection. Adults. Registration required. Ghost Hunting 101: 2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 6. Lori and Ron Coffey, local paranormal investigators, will

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share tips and tricks about ghost hunting. All ages. Registration required. Puppy Tales - Read to a Dog: 11 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 6. Spend some time reading to Baxter, a specially trained dog. Sign up for a 15-minute slot from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Ages 4 to 11. Registration required. Lego Lessons Part 2: 6 p.m. Monday, Oct. 8. The second of four architectural Lego lessons designed to inspire the making of one’s own unique designs. Ages 11 to 18. Registration required; space is limited. Cold Spring Book Club: 11 a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 9. Discuss this month’s selection, “Writ of Mandamus,” by Rick Robinson. New members welcome. Adults. Let’s Talk About It: Unaccustomed Earth by Jhumpa Lahiri: 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 9. The third presentation in the 2012 Danny Miller Memorial Let’s Talk About It fall lecture and discussion series is Unaccustomed Earth, a collection of short stories that follow individuals navigating through culturally confusing, and sometimes conflicting, terrain. Adults. Registration required. Cold Spring Book Club: 2 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 10. Discuss this month’s selection, “Writ of Mandamus,” by Rick Robinson. New members welcome. Adults. Lego Club: 1 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 13. Join the Library’s monthly LEGO club and create a masterpiece from thousands of

pieces. Ages 5 to 11. Registration required; space is limited. Knight and Princess Party: 11 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 13. Dress up as a knight, and enjoy a snack, hear stories and make royal crafts. Ages 4 to 7. Registration required. Snacks provided. Lego Lessons Part 3: 6 p.m. Monday, Oct. 15. The third of four architectural Lego lessons designed to inspire the making of one’s own unique designs. Ages 11 to 18. Registration required; space is limited. Eatable Slime: 6 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 17. Learn how to make gross looking slime that can be dessert, just in time for Halloween. Ages 11 to 18. Registration required. Snacks provided. Lego Lessons Part 4: 6 p.m. Monday, Oct. 22. The final architectural Lego lessons designed to inspire the making of one’s own unique designs. Registration required; space is limited. Let’s Talk About It: “11.22.63,” by Stephen King: 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 23. The final presentation in the 2012 Danny Miller Memorial Let’s Talk About It fall lecture and discussion series is “11.22.63,” Stephen King’s novel that follows Jake Epping, a high school English teacher persuaded to travel down a hidden passageway to 1958 and attempt to prevent the Kennedy assassination. The novel, which includes elements of science fiction, history, and

ELECTION ALERT LAST DAY TO REGISTER TO VOTE IN THE NOVEMBER 6, 2012 ELECTION IS OCTOBER 9TH.

romance, varies from the “horror” genre often associated with King. The Friends of the Campbell County Public Library will provide a light supper. Adults. Registration required. Adventure Club: Spooky Science Experiments with Northern Kentucky University Chemistry Club: 4 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 25. The always fun Northern Kentucky University Chemistry Club is back to celebrate National Chemistry Week. Ages 6 to 11. Registration required. Medicare Education with Bankers Life: 6 p.m. Monday, Oct. 29. Amanda Hunt, of Bankers Life and Casualty, will discuss Medicare options and answer questions. Adults. Registration required.

Carrico /Fort Thomas

1000 Highland Ave.; 859572-5033 Brown Bag Book Club: noon Monday, Oct. 1. Join this month’s discussion on “Moonwalking with Einstein: The Art and Science of Remembering Everything,” by Joshua Foer. Adults. Snacks provided. Adventure Club: Football Party with special Guest Who Dey!: 4 p.m. Monday, Oct. 1. Tailgate with the library and meet Cincinnati Bengals mascot, Who Dey. Ages 6 to 11. Registration required. Snacks provided. One Book One Community: Keeneland - A Rich Heritage & History: 7 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 2. A National Historic Landmark, Keeneland attracts racing enthusiasts from around the world. Join Becky Ryder, Director of Keeneland Library, as she shares signifi-

IF YOU HAVE MOVED: 1. INTO KENTUCKY FROM ANOTHER STATE 2. FROM ONE COUNTY TO ANOTHER IN KENTUCKY 3. WITHIN YOUR OWN COUNTY YOU MUST REGISTER WITH YOUR COUNTY CLERK BY OCTOBER 9TH 2012 IN ORDER TO VOTE IN THE NOVEMBER 6TH 2012 GENERAL ELECTION. CONTACT YOUR COUNTY CLERK AT: BOONE CO. 334-2130 CAMPBELL CO. 292-3885, KENTON CO. 392-1620 CE-0000526524

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cant highlights from the rich history of this beloved Kentucky treasure. Adults. Registration required. Family Game Day: 11 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 13. You never know what you might learn about mom and dad at Family Game Day! Families. Registration required. Snacks provided. Campbell County Public Library Board Meeting: 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 16. The board meets at 4:30 p.m. on the third Tuesday of every month. Meetings take place on a rotating basis among the library branches. Halloween Makeup Workshop: 4 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 17. Learn cool makeup tips tol scare friends and ensure the best costume on the block this year. Ages 12 to 18. Registration required. My Little Pumpkin: 10 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 20.. Read books, sing songs, and take a trip to the library “pumpkin patch” and pick out a pumpkin. Ages infant to 2. Registration required. Adventure Club: Science Fun with Northern Kentucky University Chemistry Club: 4 p.m. Monday, Oct. 22. Celebrate National Chemistry Week and join the Northern Kentucky University Chemistry Club for some fun experiments. Ages 6 to 11. Registration required. Creepy Cookie Creations: 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 24. Decorate cookies for Halloween with Donna Ziv. No tricks, just treats! Ages 8 to 18. Registration required. Snacks provided. One Book One Community Author Visit: After Hours with Rick Robinson: 7 p.m. Friday, Oct. 26. Attend the final 2012 One Book program of the year with author Rick Robinson. Learn how the Fort Mitchell attorney launched a writing career that has resulted in several awardwinning novels, including this year’s One Book selection, “Writ of Mandamus.” Following the presentation, mingle with Rick and others from the community as you enjoy Guinness Pork Sliders and a selection of cheese and crudités prepared by Chez Nora. Adults. Snacks provided. Halloween Movie Day:

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50th Anniversary Bill and Marty Yung are celebrating their 50th anniversary. The couple married on September 29, 1962 at St. Margaret of Cortona in Cincinnati. They will be celebrating with their 7 chldren, Bill (Pam), Joe (Erin), Julie (Derek), Judy (Marcus), Jenny, Michelle (Keoni), Scott (Meghan) and 14 grandchildrenn. A reception will be held at The Doubletree Hotel Cincinnati Airport.

10 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 27. Enjoy a double feature as the library gets into the Halloween spirit. Families. Registration required. Snacks provided. Moving Rating: G/PG.

Newport

901 E. Sixth St.; 859-5725035 Newport Book Club: 7 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 2. Join this month’s discussion on the 2012 One Book One Community selection “Writ of Mandamus,” by Rick Robinson. Adults. Snacks provided. Hoxworth Blood Drive: 4:30 - 6 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 10. Participate in the blood drive and make a difference in the lives of patients in local hospitals. Visit http://www.hoxworth.org/groups/newport for more information and to register. Adults. Registration required. Choga Fitness - Yoga and Fitness practice in a chair: 9:30 a.m. Thursday, Oct. 11. Choga integrates breathing with movement. Enjoy the benefits of traditional yoga and range of motion exercises without being on the floor. The library will host this introductory program through November. Suggested attire: Loose-fitting clothing and rubber-soled shoes that tie or Velcro closed. Please no leather soles or open toes. Adults. Registration required. Super Saturday: Harry Potter Halloween Party: 2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 13. Dress up for some Halloween fun at Hogworts! Ages 6 to 11. Registration required. Snacks provided. Choga Fitness - Yoga and fitness practice in a chair: 9:30 a.m. Thursday, Oct. 18. Choga integrates breathing with movement. Enjoy the benefits of traditional yoga and range of motion exercises without being on the floor. The Library will host this introductory program through November. Suggested attire: Loose-fitting clothing and rubber-soled shoes that tie or Velcro closed. Please no leather soles or open toes. Adults. Registration required. It Came From the Library Movie-fest: 6 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 20. It is time to bring back the horror. Come for the popcorn, stay for the movies. Ages 13 to 18. Snacks provided. Movie rating: PG-13. One Book One Community: The Legal Aftermath of the Beverly Hills Supper Club Fire: 6:30 p.m. Monday, Oct. 22. The Beverly Hills Supper Club tragedy changed the zoning laws for all public venues. Additionally, the tragedy and the legal aftermath became the genesis of class action lawsuits. This program will discuss some of the primary legal issues and attempt to honor those who fell that day. Adults. Choga Fitness - Yoga and Fitness practice in a chair: 9:30 a.m. Thursday, Oct. 25. Choga integrates breathing with movement. Enjoy the benefits of traditional yoga and range of motion exercises without being on the floor. The Library will host this introductory program through November. Suggested attire: Loose-fitting clothing and rubber-soled shoes that tie or Velcro closed. Please no leather soles or open toes. Adults. Registration required.


LIFE

SEPTEMBER 27, 2012 • CCF RECORDER • B7

We always hear about the great heroes of the Bible. Little David, who because of his great faith in God was able to slay his giant, Goliath. Noah, who heard God so clearly he built an ark to save his family from utter devastation. And Moses, the only person in the Old Testament to get a real glimpse of God himself walking by. We are often reminded of their great faith in God in Sunday school classes, urging us to develop their character traits and strengths. Recently I’ve taken a liking to another biblical hero from the Old Testament, Joshua. Outside of Joshua 24:15, the classic scripture visible upon entering many homes (yours truly included) that reads, “As for me and my house, we will serve the Lord,” we don’t often

hear about this man, whose character traits and faith I sure would Julie House like to COMMUNITY emulate. RECORDER GUEST COLUMNIST Why, out of all the great men and women of the bible would I choose Joshua? First of all, he was the leader to finally experience the fullness of God’s promises and enter the Promised Land. I don’t know about you, but I’m ready to exit the “desert life” and experience a little “milk and honey.” Secondly, God speaks to Joshua, the words I need to hear on a daily basis as I journey through this life of uncertainty. “I will not fail or abandon

and emotional rest. Wow! We need that. We need a rest from all the worries, concerns, frustrations, bills, etc. As the book of Joshua closes, he reminds the people he has led into the Promised Land, “Cling tightly to the Lord your God….The Lord your God fights for you.” Joshua 23:8, 10. The next time you feel uncertain about your situation, cling to the Lord like your 4-year old clings to you before she enters her class on Friday morning Co-op (oops, that would be my 4-year old.) But don’t let go, “be strong and courageous.”

you.” Joshua 1:5. In this world where abandonment commonplace, we all need to realize that there is one who will never leave. And, I think Joshua and I may share a personality trait or two. Well ahh, well, let’s just say, sometimes I need to hear instructions a few times before they sink in. I think Joshua was like that too. Not once, not twice, but three times in the first chapter God had to remind him to “Be strong and courageous.” Joshua 1:6, 7, 9. And God knew Joshua (and you and I) need rest. “The Lord your God is giving you a place of rest. He has given you this land.” Joshua 1:13 I don’t believe the rest spoken of in the above verse referred only to physical rest. This is a spiritual, physical, mental

Julie House is a member of East Dayton Baptist Church and former resident of Campbell County. She graduated from NKU with her Bachelors Degree and is the Founder of Equipped Ministries.

Fort Thomas residents accepted into youth orchestra

Dunne honored for contributions to public transit

Community Recorder

Community Recorder

Sam Steiden, Ryan Millard, Jacob An, Brett Marzano, and Brian Johncox, all of Fort Thomas, from Highlands High School Sinfonia Orchestra have been accepted into the Northern Kentucky Youth Symphony Orchestra. The audition process is extensive, and selected students are among the most exceptional young

musicians of string, wind, brass, and percussion instruments in the Northern Kentucky and Cincinnati region. The first concert of the season will be 2 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 28, in Greaves Concert Hall at Northern Kentucky University. Admission is free. For more information, visit http://music prep.nku.edu or call 859-572PREP.

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Spin for the Cure Cincinnati partnered with Five Seasons Sports Club to add two locations and 52 bikes to the seventh annual event. The ride, which will be 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 6, will feature a live broadcast from the Cintas Center at the Crestview Hills and Snider Road Five Seasons locations to unite spin enthusiasts on their four-hour journey. In its seven years, Spin for the Cure has helped raise thousands of dollars to support the fight against breast cancer by raising funds for Susan G. Komen Cincinnati. Founded by local spinning instructor Vickie Magliano, Spin for the Cure has grown significantly since its inception in 2006. This year’s partnership with Five Seasons nearly doubles bike availability and triples location facilities, now including Five Seasons’ Cincinnati and Covington locations in addition to Xavier University’s Cintas Cen-

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Dunne is responsible for managing and implementing media, public and community relations to increase awareness and drive ridership for Cincinnati Metro. She led the effort to redesign Metro’s website and manages Metro’s social media efforts. She joined Metro in 2010. Before joining Metro, she was Senior Account Executive for O’Keeffe Communications.

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Learning to become like Joshua


LIFE

B8 • CCF RECORDER • SEPTEMBER 27, 2012

POLICE REPORTS ALEXANDRIA Arrests/citations Danny W. Eaton, 41, 1 Bittersweet Drive, DUI - third offense, possession of marijuana, possession of open alcoholic beverage container in motor vehicle, failure to produce insurance card at Tollgate Road and U.S. 27, Aug. 30. Rachael E. Craddock, 39, 3920 Windbrook, warrant at Alexandria Pike and East Main Street, Sept. 7. Shelby J. Holland, 21, 3918 Huntington Ave., theft by unlawful taking at 7740 Alexandria Pike, Sept. 5. Chastity Gibson, 33, 8833 Harpers Point Drive, alcohol intoxication in a public place - first and second offense at West Second Street at Columbia, Sept. 2.

Incidents/investigations Fourth degree assault Report of female juvenile struck another female juvenile at fairgrounds barn at 100 Fair-

ABOUT POLICE REPORTS The Community Recorder publishes the names of all adults charged with offenses. The information is a matter of public record and does not imply guilt or innocence.

grounds Road, Aug. 29. Fraudulent use of a credit card Report of bank card taken and used at store at 1 Viewpoint Drive, Aug. 29. Second degree burglary Report of purse and medications taken and apartment ransacked at 8255 Tollgate Road unit 16, Aug. 29. Second degree burglary, third degree criminal mischief Report of home damaged and items taken at 6 Ivy Court, Sept. 7. Theft by unlawful taking Report of woman in car droveoff without paying after receiving food at 7105 Alexandria Pike, Aug. 29. Report of wallet taken from vehicle and bank card used at 3663 Meadowview, Sept. 5. Report of keys for vehicle taken off bar and van taken from parking lot at 7634 Alexandria Pike, Sept. 7. Third degree burglary Report of money taken at 8255 Constable Drive, Aug. 31. Third degree criminal mischief Report of political poster for Taunya Nolan Jack damaged at 100 Fairgrounds Road, Sept. 1. Report of vehicle scratched at 103 Greenup St., Sept. 6. Third degree criminal mischief, harassing communications Report of vehicle spray painted at 509 Brookwood Drive, Sept. 1.

Third degree terroristic threatening Report of man threatened to harm woman and her husband during custody exchange outside restaurant at 7105 Alexandria Pike, Sept. 1.

BELLEVUE Arrests/citations Erica Scanlan, 30, 184 Circle Drive, alcohol intoxication in a public place at 100 Fairfield Ave., Sept. 2. Timothy Kuechler, 34, 103 Sunset, warrant at 500 block of Berry Ave., Sept. 4. Rod Bieslin, 57, 200 Water Works Road No. 328, DUI at 15 Donnermeyer Drive, Sept. 5. James Lambert Jr., 24, 709 East Seventh St., DUI, careless driving at 30 Donnermeyer Drive, Sept. 6. Brandon Gross, 28, 102 Glenway Ave., reckless driving, second degree fleeing or evading, DUI at 1 Levee Way, Sept. 7. Sharon Lucas, 42, 308 Center St. Apt. 2, DUI, careless driving at Route 8 at I-471, Sept. 7. Donald Mitchell III, 21, 2 Frelinghayen St., alcohol intoxication in a public place at 15 Donnermeyer Drive, Sept. 8. Brandon Morris, 31, 209 Division St., public intoxication, second degree fleeing or evading, resisting arrest at 209 Division St., Sept. 8. Kendra Jansen, 24, 323 Washington, warrant at 616 Poplar st., Sept. 10. Robert Brumer, 65, 114 Memorial

Parkway No. 1, criminal trespassing, alcohol intoxication in a public place at 114 Memorial Parkway, Sept. 11. Ryan Feheley, 38, 3900 Hillside Drive, DUI at Landmark Drive, Sept. 13. James Sullivan, 20, 411 Washington Ave., warrant at Fairfield Avenue, Sept. 14. Rodney Kennedy Jr., 26, 734 Eubanks Road, second degree disorderly conduct, resisting arrest, fourth degree assault at 240 Prospect, Sept. 14. Christina Marie Deroshia, 31, 1901 East 54Th St., alcohol intoxication in a public place, disorderly conduct at 11 Landmark Drive, Sept. 16. Timothy Lake, 22, 2200 Westfort Ave., warrant at Landmark Drive, Sept. 16. Ernest Mofford, 19, 730 Fifth Ave., warrant at 214 Foote Ave., Sept. 14. Marlyn Miller, 19, 6587 Tolle Road, DUI, possession of open alcoholic beverage in a motor vehicle at Fairfield Avenue, Sept. 16. Sue Ann Davidson, 52, 1829 Russell, public intoxication at I-471 north to Fairfield Ave., Sept. 15.

COLD SPRING Arrests/citations Elisha R. Hudepohl, 21, 784 Flint Ridge, warrant at Boulderview at Matinee, Aug. 27. Todd D. Michael, 31, 114 Water Works Road, warrant at 5010 Alexandria Pike, Aug. 29.

Michael L. Carson Jr., 33, 7 Stonegate Drive, warrant at U.S. 27 and DavJo Drive, Aug. 29. Chad M. Gullett, 24, 1207 Downing, warrant at 5633 Dodsworth Lane, Aug. 29. Regina M. Alcorn, 24, 4115 Snakelick Road, warrant at U.S. 27 and Crossroads Boulevard, Aug. 30. Amanda J. Fogt, 27, 715 Janet Drive, warrant, theft by unlawful taking at 395 Crossroads Blvd., Aug. 30. Kimberly A. Rouse, 28, 1001 Buckingham Court, warrant at 1001 Buckingham Court, Aug. 30. Rebecca M. Faulkner, 20, 40 Vista Point Drive, theft by unlawful taking or shoplifting at 5400 Alexandria Pike, Sept. 11. Tonya L. Fugate, 44, 1116 W. 33Rd St., theft by unlawful taking or shoplifting at 395 Crossroads Blvd., Sept. 4. Michael W. Barnes, 23, 11847 Burns Road, warrant at U.S. 27 and Blossom Lane, Sept. 6. Aaron J. Serraino, 24, 433 Jefferson Ave., operating on suspended or revoked operators license at U.S. 27 south at AA Highway, Sept. 7. Heather J. Creech, 36, 156 Breckenridge Drive, possession of drug paraphernalia, first degree possession of controlled substance - drug unspecified, possession of marijuana at 5400 Alexandria Pike, Sept. 10. Amanda L. Cline, 31, 310 Castlwood Ave., possession of drug

paraphernalia, first degree possession of controlled substance - drug unspecified, possession of marijuana, theft by unlawful taking or shoplifting at 5400 Alexandria Pike, Sept. 10. Joseph P. Adams, 25, 217 W. 12Th St., warrant at 375 Crossroads Blvd., Sept. 10. Patricia Butt, 56, 813 Thornton St., second degree robbery at 395 Crossroads Blvd., Sept. 4. Taylor W. Buren, 22, 12507 Hutton Drive, warrant at 100 Crossroads Blvd., Sept. 11. Jennifer L. Barro, 27, 6108 Sebree Drive, Apartment 1, warrant at 495 Pooles Creek Road, Sept. 12. Sierra N. Nickell, 22, 101 Osage Drive, Unit 1, theft by unlawful taking or shoplifting at 395 Crossroads Blvd., Sept. 14. Sarah B. Parker, 29, 657 Valley Terrace, Apartment A, warrant at 657 Valley Terrace, apartment A, Sept. 16. Scott A. Rigg, 48, 24 Highland Meadows Drive, warrant at 5589 East Alexandria Pike, Sept. 15.

Incidents/investigations Fourth degree assault domestic Reported at Springside Drive, Aug. 24. Second degree burglary, first degree criminal mischief Report of items taken from apartment units at 1200 Downing St., apartment 6, Aug. 29.

See POLICE REPORTS, Page B9

Krista Ramsey, Columnist kramsey@enquirer.com

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LIFE

SEPTEMBER 27, 2012 • CCF RECORDER • B9

DEATHS Joe Ashcraft Joe Ashcraft, 84, of Williamstown, died Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He was a retired lathe operator, a Navy veteran of World War II, and a member of the Williamstown Christian Church and Grant Lodge No. 85 F&AM. His wife, Mary Ann Sinkovich Ashcraft, died previously. Survivors include his son, Donald Joe Ashcraft of Richmond, Ind.; daughter, Linda Jones of Dayton; half-brother, Gene Ashcraft of Williamstown; three grandchildren; and six great-grandchildren. Burial was in Williamstown Cemetery. Memorials: Williamstown Christian Church, 318 North Main St., Williamstown, KY 41097.

William Asher Jr. William “Billy” Carl Asher Jr., 42, of Dayton, died Sept. 17, 2012, at his residence. He was a security guard with Securitas in Cincinnati. Survivors include his parents, William Sr. and Linda Davis Asher of Cincinnati; wife, Natasha Tittle Asher of Dayton; brother, Shane Asher of Mount Washington, Ohio; and sister, Lorie Rowland of Cincinnati. Burial was in the New Bethel Cemetery in Verona.

Carl Butcher

Carl Lee Butcher, 87, of Falmouth, died Sept. 17, 2012, at his residence. He was a graduate of Falmouth High School, he was a well-known Pendleton County farmer, an Army veteran of World War II, a member of the Antioch Mills Christian Church, Harrison County, a member of the Hardin-Browning Post No.109, a former Pendleton County Magistrate, a former member of the Pendleton County Farm Bureau Board, and a former member of the East Pendleton County Water District Board. He enjoyed spending time with his family, friends, cows, and square dancing. A grandchild died previously. Survivors include his wife, Martha Butcher; son, David Butcher of Butler, Wanda Hensley of Harrison, Ohio and Jennie Butcher of Wilder; four grandchildren; six great-grandchildren; brother, James Kenneth Butcher of Cynthiana, Ky.; and sister, Geneva King of Butler, Ky. Interment was in Riverside Cemetery in Falmouth. Memorials: Jennifer Lynn Butcher Scholarship Fund, c/o Pendleton High School, 2359 Highway 27 North Falmouth, KY 41040.

Edward Cheslock Edward Thomas Cheslock, 83, of Burlington died Sept. 14, 2012, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He was in the engineering

field for 50 years, served in the Navy, was a Kentucky Colonel, a member of Immaculate Heart of Mary Church and of the Northern Kentucky Sports Hall of Fame, and was an instrumental figure of the Boone County Knothole League. Survivors include his wife Rose Mary Cheslock of Burlington; sons, Thomas Cheslock and Michael Cheslock, both of Burlington, and Mark Cheslock of Greendale, Ind.; daughter, Susan Meyers of Alexandria; sister, Ann Richardson of Chicago; brother, Robert Pulia of Chicago; four grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren. Interment was at Kentucky Veterans Cemetery North. Memorials: Alzheimer’s Association, P.O. Box 96011, Washington, DC 20090-6011 or St. Elizabeth Hospice, 483 South Loop Road, Edgewood.

Mitchell Combs Mitchell Combs, 82, of Alexandria, died Sept. 15, 2012. He was a member of the Fairlane Baptist Church. A brother, Manuel Combs, died previously. Survivors include his wife, Eileen Turner Combs; son, Curt Combs, brother, Roscoe “Shack” Combs; and three grandchildren. Memorials: Fairlane Baptist Church, 12898 Herringer Road, Alexandria, KY 41001.

Catherine Downing

Catherine “Kitty” Downing, 84, of Latonia, died Sept. 14, 2012, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. She was retired from the former Booth Hospital in Florence as a clerk in the business office, a member of Holy Cross Church, the 50 plus club and Young at Heart Group at Latonia Baptist Church, a school volunteer and a former Girl Scout leader. Her husband, Vernon L. Downing and a grandchild died previously. Survivors include her daughters, Debbie Young of Covington, Linda Vollmar of Villa Hills, Karen Horton of Covington and Laurie Herald of Latonia; sons, Mike Downing of Covington, Steve Downing of Fort Mitchell and Tom Downing of Chicago; sisters, Dorothy Newman of Fort Thomas and Mary Hayes of Newport; 22 grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Interment was in St. Joseph Cemetery in Wilder. Memorials: Downing Family Scholarship Fund Holy Cross High School, 3617 Church St., Latonia, KY 41015.

Victoria Gesenhues Victoria Gesenhues, 89, of Fort Thomas, died Sept. 11, 2012, at Carmel Manor Nursing Home in Fort Thomas. She was a registered nurse and served during World War II and at St. Luke Hospital in Ft.

Thomas for more than 20 years. She was a member of the Siena Seniors at St. Catherine of Siena Church and Club 55 at St. Thomas Church, and volunteered at Carmel Manor Nursing Home in Fort Thomas, KY. Her husband, Ernest Gesenhues and a son, James Gesenhues, died previously. Survivors include her son, Dennis Gesenhues of Fort Thomas; daughter, Anne Klei of Fort Thomas; five grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren. Burial was in St. Stephen Cemetery in Fort Thomas. Memorials: Carmel Manor, 100 Carmel Manor Road, Fort Thomas, KY 41075.

Gary Goldsberry Gary S. Goldsberry, 63, of Newport, died Friday, Sept. 14, 2012. He was a counselor at the Joseph House and Commonwealth Substance Abuse Specialists, a graduate of Bellevue High School and Thomas More College, a former teacher and tennis coach at Simon Kenton High School, and enjoyed camping. His parents, Wilber and Alice Goldsberry and brother, Jerry Goldsberry, died previously. Survivors include his sister, Judith Moore Marshall; nephew, Jeff Marshall and many friends. Burial was in Confidence Cemetery in Georgetown, Ohio. Memorials: Holy Spirit Out-

reach Ministry, 825 Washington Ave., Newport, KY 41071.

Virgil Lemons Virgil Lemons, 68, of Cold Spring, died Sept. 16, 2012, at his residence. He was a computer programmer for Interlake Steel, retired from the Campbell County Sheriff’s department, a member of the Campbell County Men’s Democratic Club, a Kentucky Colonel, an avid golfer and was part of the Northern Kentucky Sports Hall of Fame. Survivors include his wife, Karin Lemons; son, Gary Lemons; daughter, Sharon Criss; sisters, Teresa Davis, Wanda Hoeter, Linda Conley, Mary Bruck, Bonnie Chisolm and Ruby Hensley; and six grandchildren. Interment was at Highland Cemetery. Memorials: Big Stef Inc., P.O. Box 721844, Newport, KY 41072.

Virginia Meyer Virginia “Ginny” Meyer, 87, of Highland Heights, died Sunday, Sept. 16, 2012, at the Baptist Convalescent Center in Newport. She was a retired bookkeeper with Eckert Welding Company. Her husband, Walter Meyer; a son, Walter Meyer; two brothers, Richard and Perry Eckert; and sister, Bonnie Theiss, died previously. Survivors include her son, Kirk

See DEATHS, Page B10

POLICE REPORTS Continued from Page B8 Theft by unlawful taking Report of vehicle taken from driveway at 263 Ridgepoint Drive, Sept. 7. Report of 'Welcome to Cold Spring' road sign taken at near 5400 Alexandria Pike, Sept. 11. Report of golf clubs taken from vehicle in driveway at 5818 Granite Springs Drive, Sept. 13. Theft by unlawful taking or shoplifting Report of cosmetics taken from store at 395 Crossroads Blvd., Aug. 30. Report of clothing and baby items taken without paying at 5400 Alexandria Pike, Sept. 7. Report of cigarettes taken without paying at 70 Martha Layne Collins Blvd., Sept. 11.

FORT THOMAS Arrests/citations Todd Negich, 30, 1142 Davejo Drive Apt. 1, receiving stolen property at Sherman Avenue, Sept. 18. Colleen Duesing, 56, 124 Ridgewood Place, leaving the scene of an accident, DUI at 124 Ridgewood Place, Sept. 12. Stephen Hopper, 24, 608 Queensway Court, failure to maintain insurance, DUI at I-471, Sept. 12.

Incidents/investigations Second degree criminal mischief At 401 Rossford Ave., Sept. 13. Theft by deception At 640 Alexandria Pike, Sept. 17.

HIGHLAND HEIGHTS Arrests/citations Mohammad Alhar Bi, 22, 219 Meadow Trail Drive, second degree disorderly conduct at 219 Meadow Trail Drive, Sept. 16. Saud Zafers Alboogmy, 24, 219 Meadow Trail Drive, second degree disorderly conduct at 219 Meadow Trail Drive, Sept. 16. David Franklin Flatt, 26, 2163 Colerain Ave., warrant at 2015 Alexandria Pike, Sept. 13. Alexis Ellick, 27, 639 12Th St., warrant at Alexandria Pike and Marshall, Sept. 12. Gregory Martin, 57, 467 Purcell Ave., possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia at Alexandria Pike and Sunset, Sept. 9. Mary Henson, 20, 412 Chapel St., possession of drug paraphernalia at I-471 south, Sept. 6. Gregory Carson, 36, 102 Carriage Park Drive, possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia at Alexandria Pike and Martha Layne Collins, Sept. 6. Paul Dickman, 23, 1188 Far Hills Drive No. 27, possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia at 3906 Alexandria Pike, Sept. 6. Travis True, 22, 752 Highland

Ave., possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia at 3906 Alexandria Pike, Sept. 6. Timothy Neulist, 47, 910 Shayler Road, warrant at I-275 at Alexandria Pike, Sept. 5. Clayton Woodruff, 25, 1439 Maple St., warrant at I-275 at I-471, Sept. 5.

East Fifth at Patterson, Sept. 12. Derrick Partee, 21, 1938 Young St., first degree possession of a controlled substance at 401 Central Ave., Sept. 11. Reva Cain, 29, 15 Midway Court, unlawful transaction of a minor, possession of marijuana at 800 block of Patterson St., Sept. 11.

Anthony Johnson Jr., 19, 1727 Garden Lane, possession of a defaced firearm, first degree trafficking a controlled substance, trafficking a controlled substance within 1000 feet of a school, first degree fleeing or evading at West Ninth St., Sept. 10.

Incidents/investigations Fraudulent use of a credit card At 21 Terrace Ave., Sept. 6. Second degree burglary At 29 Bramble Ave., Sept. 14. Theft by unlawful taking At 2369 Alexandria Pike, Sept. 17. At 80 Hidden Valley Drive Apt. 84, Sept. 4. At 66 Maple Ave., Sept. 3. Third degree burglary At I-471 at Alexandria Pike, Sept. 4. Third degree criminal mischief At 2810 Alexandria Pike, Sept. 7.

NEWPORT Arrests/citations Dennis Haithcoat, 41, 968 Hatch, theft by unlawful taking at 130 Pavilion Parkway, Sept. 18. Henry Thomas, 33, 915 Isabella St., fourth degree assault at 915 Isabella St., Sept. 19. Elizabeth Perkins, 28, 7 Dorothy Drive, public intoxication, possession of drug paraphernalia, first degree possession of a controlled substance at 101 East 10th St., Sept. 17. Candice Turner, 23, 510 Fifth Ave., first degree criminal possession of a forged instrument at 732 Monmouth St., Sept. 17. George Ard, 51, 312 West 10Th St., first degree wanton endangerment, first degree unlawful imprisonment at 312 10th St., Sept. 17. Gary Evans, 34, 213 West 13Th St., first degree wanton endangerment, first degree possession of a controlled substance, trafficking marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of a handgun by a convicted felon at 213 13th St., Sept. 14. Ashley Kemp, 23, 740 Liberty St., fourth degree assault, first degree fleeing or evading, third degree criminal trespassing at 740 Liberty St., Sept. 15. Mark Saunders, 46, 439 West 11Th St., first degree possession of a controlled substance, resisting arrest, tampering with physical evidence at 432 West 11th St., Sept. 13. Kendrick Hambrick, 27, 801 Saratoga St. No. 1, second degree disorderly conduct, first degree possession of a controlled substance at East Fifth at Patterson, Sept. 12. Christian Dixie, 90, 944 Klondike Road, second degree disorderly conduct, first degree possession of a controlled substance at

CITY OF SOUTHGATE CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY ORDINANCE NO 12-11 AN ORDINANCE ESTABLISHING AND LEVYING A TAX ON MOTOR VEHICLES AND BOATS SUBJECT TO TAXATION FOR THE PURPOSE OF PROVIDING REVENUE FOR THE CITY OF SOUTHGATE, KENTUCKY, FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 2012/13 NOW THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED by the City of Southgate, Kentucky, as follows: Section 1 For the purpose of providing revenue to pay the general operating expenses of the City of Southgate, Kentucky, for the fiscal year 2012/13 an ad valorem tax is hereby levied on all motor vehicles and boats subject to taxation located within the City at the rate of $.270 on each $100.00 of the assessed value of said personal property. Section 2 The tax levied and imposed on motor vehicles and boats by this ordinance shall be paid in the manner prescribed in the Kentucky Revised Statutes. Section 3 This ordinance shall take effect and be in force from and after its passage and publication according to law, enacted on the 19th day September of 2012. James G. Hamberg, Mayor Attest: Jody Anderson, City Clerk 1st Reading: 9/5/2012 9/19/2012 2nd Reading: 9/27/2012 Published:

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NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING COUNTY OF CAMPBELL, KENTUCKY INDUSTRIAL BUILDING REVENUE REFUNDING AND IMPROVEMENT BONDS, SERIES 2012 (BRIGHTON PROPERTIES, INC. PROJECT) Notice is hereby given that a public hearing will be held by the County of Campbell, Kentucky on Wednesday, October 17, 2012, at 5:30 p.m. at the Fiscal Chambers, 1098 Monmouth Street, Newport, Kentucky 41072. This hearing is for the purpose of considering the approval of the issuance of Industrial Building Revenue Refunding and Improvement Bonds, Series 2012 (Brighton Properties, Inc. Project) (the "Series 2012 Bonds") of the County of Campbell, Kentucky (the "Issuer") in an aggregate principal amount not to exceed $2,260,000, pursuant to Chapter 103 of the Kentucky Revised Statutes (the "Act"). If the Series 2012 Bonds are approved, the proceeds will be loaned to Brighton Properties, Inc., a Kentucky nonprofit corporation (the "Borrower"), for the purpose of: (i) refinancing the outstanding County of Campbell, Kentucky Industrial Building Revenue Refunding and Improvement Bonds, Series 2009 (Brighton Properties, Inc. Project) (the "Series 2009 Bonds"); and (ii) financing the acquisition of certain real property located at 11 Shelby St, Florence, KY 41042. Projects financed with the proceeds of the Series 2009 Bonds and the Series 2012 Bonds will be owned and operated by the Borrower and Brighton Center, Inc. as health care and related facilities or as facilities in furtherance of the educational purposes of the Borrower and Brighton Center, Inc. THE SERIES 2012 BONDS SHALL NOT REPRESENT OR CONSTITUTE A DEBT OR PLEDGE OF THE FAITH AND CREDIT OR THE TAXING POWER OF THE ISSUER (COUNTY OF CAMPBELL, KENTUCKY), THE COMMONWEALTH OF KENTUCKY, OR ANY POLITICAL SUBDIVISION OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF KENTUCKY. Interested persons are invited to attend this public hearing and will be given an opportunity to express their views concerning the proposed project. Anyone desiring to make written comments may give them to the Fiscal Court Clerk of the County of Campbell, Kentucky, at 1098 Monmouth Street, Newport, Kentucky 41072. This notice is given pursuant to § 147(f) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended. /s/ Paula Spicer _ Fiscal Court Clerk County of Campbell, Kentucky 1001728153

NOTICE OF ADOPTION, TITLE AND SUMMARY OF ALEXANDRIA ORDINANCE 2012-07 I hereby certify that the following is the Title and Summary of Ordinance 2012-07 of the City of Alexandria, in Campbell County, Kentucky, which was adopted by City Council on September 20, 2012: ORDINANCE NO. 2012-07: AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF ALEXANDRIA, IN CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY, ADOPTING A TEXT AMENDMENT TO SECTION 9.7 G.2 OF THE ALEXANDRIA ZONING ORDINANCE IN ORDER TO ALLOW FOR A TEMPORARY SIGN FOR NEW START-UP BUSINESS ES IN THE CITY . This Ordinance, approves and adopts the recommendation of the Alexandria Planning Commission which amends the text of the City’s Zoning Ordinance to allow a new initial start up business a one time ninety (90) day temporary sign, in addition to any other permitted permanent or temporary sign(s). *************************************************************************** I, Michael A. Duncan, an attorney licensed to practice law in the Commonwealth of Kentucky, for Ziegler & Schneider, P.S.C., City Attorneys for the City of Alexandria, in Campbell County, Kentucky, do hereby certify that this Notice of Adoption, Title and Summary of Ordinance 2012-07 was prepared by me, and that it represents an accurate description of the summary of the contents of the Ordinance. The full text of the Ordinance, and other information relative to the Ordinance, is on file at the office of the City Clerk/Treasurer, 8236 West Main Street, Alexandria, Kentucky 41001. /s/ Michael A. Duncan Michael A. Duncan, attorney For Ziegler & Schneider, P.S.C., City Attorneys CITY OF SOUTHGATE CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY ORDINANCE 12-09 AN ORDINANCE ESTABLISHING AND LEVYING A TAX ON REAL AND PERSONAL PROPERTY SUBJECT TO TAXATION FOR PROVIDING REVENUE FOR THE CITY OF SOUTHGATE, KENTUCKY, FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 2012/13; PROVIDING FOR A LIEN WITH REGARD TO SAID TAX; AND PROVIDING FOR A PENALTY AND INTEREST UPON A TAX BILL BECOMING DELINQUENT. NOW THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED, by the City of Southgate, Kentucky, as follows: Section 1 For the purpose of providing revenue to pay the general operating expenses of the City of Southgate, Kentucky, for the fiscal year 2012/13 there is hereby levied an ad valorem tax on all real estate property subject to taxation located within the City at the rate of $.487 on each $100.00 of assessed value of said real property. Section 2 For the purpose of providing revenue to pay the general operating expenses of the City for the fiscal year 2012/13, an ad valorem tax is hereby levied on all personal/tangible property, except motor vehicles and boats, subject to taxation located within the City at the rate of $.750 on each $100.00 of assessed value of said personal property. Section 3 The taxes levied as herein provided, are on all real and personal/tangible property as of January 1, 2012. All franchises shall be subject to said assessment and taxation for the purposes of the City unless exempted, by the Constitution or statutes of the Commonwealth of Kentucky, and said real and personal/tangible property assessed at its fair cash value based on the price it would bring upon a voluntary sale. Section 4 The tax levied and imposed by this ordinance shall be due and payable immediately upon the passage and publication of this ordinance. Any tax incurred because of this ordinance, which remains unpaid as of November 30, 2012, is considered delinquent and shall thereafter carry a penalty of 10 percent of the amount of the tax bill plus interest thereon at the rate of 12 percent per annum from the time it becomes delinquent until paid. Section 5 The City shall have a lien for all delinquent taxes on all property subject to the taxation of the City, together with all penalties and interest that may have accrued thereon, which lien shall be superior to all other liens and encumbrances. Section 6 This ordinance shall take effect and be in force from and after its passage and publication according to law. Enacted on the 19th day of September 2012. James G. Hamberg, Mayor Attest: Jody Anderson, City Clerk 1st Reading: 09/05/2012 2nd Reading: 09/19/2012 Published: 09/27/2012

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LIFE

B10 • CCF RECORDER • SEPTEMBER 27, 2012

DEATHS Continued from Page B9

former member of the Northern Kentucky Community Chorus. Survivors include his wife, Sharon Ewing Pavey; sons, Robert David Pavey of Marion, Ky.; and Joseph William Pavey of Highland Heights, Ky.; sister, Roberta Watsky of Goose Creek, S.C.; and two grandsons. Burial was in Evergreen Cemetery in Southgate. Memorials: St. John's United Church of Christ Music Fund, 415 Park Ave., Newport, KY 41071; Alzheimer's Association, 644 Linn St. Suite, 1026 Cincinnati, OH 45203; or American Heart Association, 5211 Madison Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45227.

Meyer; two grandchildren; and brother, Daniel Eckert. Burial was in Evergreen Cemetery in Southgate.

Walter Pavey Walter William Pavey, 69, of Highland Heights, died Sept. 18, 2012, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. He was a retired Machinist with Metzger Machine Co. in Cincinnati, attended Asbury United Methodist Church in Highland Heights, where he sang in the choir, and was a member of the Joker's Club and St. John's United Church of Christ in Newport, where he also sang in the choir. He was also a

Mary Ratliff Mary Margaret Barrett Ratliff,

Frank Schreiber Frank E. Schreiber Jr., 80, of Bellevue, died Sept. 15, 2012, at his residence. He was an offset pressman with Standard Publishing in Mount Healthy, Ohio, served in the Navy, was a member of member of Sacred Heart Church,

the men of Sacred Heart, the Holy Name Society, Campbell County Game and Fish, and Bellevue Vets, and coached peewee football in Bellevue. He was a graduate of Sacred Heart grade school and Newport Catholic High School. His brothers, Allan and Paul Schreiber and a grandchild died previously. Survivors include his wife, Joyce Wagner Schreiber; sons, Randy and Andy Schreiber of Bellevue; Dan and Phil Schreiber of Florence; daughters, Jeany Merman, Lynn Grainger and Lu Ann Fechenda of Bellevue; brothers, Jack Schreiber of Crestview Hills and Joseph Schreiber of Lakeside Park; sisters, Rosemary Fischer of Cold Spring and Joan Pompilio of Crestview Hills; 17 grandchildren; and 14 great-grandchil-

ABOUT OBITUARIES

ORDINANCE NO. O-11-2012 AN ORDINANCE PROVIDING FOR THE IMPOSITION, LEVY, COLLECTION, AND APPORTIONMENT OF THE TAXES OF THE CITY OF FORT THOMAS, CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY, FOR THE YEAR 2012; AND FIXING THE TAX RATE BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY OF FORT THOMAS, CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY: SECTION I That for the year 2012 there is hereby imposed, levied and ordered to be collected as taxes of the City of Fort Thomas, Campbell County, Kentucky, the sum of $0.360 upon each one hundred dollars ($100.00) valuation of the real property and $0.360 upon each one hundred dollars ($100.00) valuation of personal property and mixed property and $0.3971 upon each one hundred dollars ($100.00) valuation of motor vehicles subject to taxation within the corporate limits of said City, as assessed, corrected, and returned, according to law, for said year, and $0.360 upon each one hundred dollars ($100.00) valuation of all franchise valuations as assessed and returned according to law for said year, to be used for defraying the current and incidental expenses of city government. SECTION II The tax bills shall be made out, on behalf of the City Clerk, in accordance with the assessed valuation for the year 2012 as finally completed and reported to the Board of Council, and in accordance with the valuation as certified by the State Tax Commission of the Commonwealth of Kentucky as provided by law. The tax bills shall be printed in proper form to show clearly and fully the year in which the taxes are collected, the names of the owner(s) of the property, a brief description of the property, the rate of taxation for the various funds, the total amount due, and such other information as may be necessary in order to give a clear and complete statement to the taxpayer. The tax bills shall be substantially bound in book form with proper stubs, and the City Clerk shall sign and deliver the bills to the City Treasurer and shall take a receipt from the City Treasurer showing the total number of bills turned over to the City Treasurer and the aggregate amount thereof. SECTION III The taxes herein fixed and levied shall be due and payable at the Office of the City Treasurer, at the City Building, 130 North Fort Thomas Avenue, Fort Thomas, Kentucky 41075 or Post Office Box 75402, on the date in which the Ordinance is published and becomes effective. SECTION IV All bills not paid or postmarked by October 31, 2012, shall be delinquent and shall be stamped by the City Treasurer with the word “Delinquent” and shall be turned over to the City Clerk, together with a complete statement to the Board of Council of the total amount of the bills not collected. Upon each unpaid tax bill, a penalty of five percent (5%) of the amount of the total bill shall be added. The City Treasurer shall collect said unpaid bills with said five percent (5%) penalty added, and interest at the rate of eight percent (8%) per annum until paid, on the amount of the tax and waste fee. The City Treasurer shall make a full and complete settlement with the Board of Council and the Board of Education of the City of Fort Thomas at the meetings of said respective Boards in January, 2013, of all tax bills placed in his hands for collection for the year 2012, and shall furnish said Boards a list of Delinquents and insolvents. He shall, at the first Regular meeting of the Board of Council in January, 2013, deliver to the City Clerk all unpaid bills in his hands and the City Clerk shall add to and enter upon each of said bills an additional penalty of ten percent (10%) of the amount of the total bill, and shall redeliver said unpaid bills to the City Treasurer and take a receipt therefore. The City Treasurer shall then proceed to collect the said bills, with a total penalty of fifteen percent (15%) of said tax and waste fees added hereto as herein before provided, and interest from the first day of November, 2012, until paid, until further directed by the Board of Council, and as said amounts are collected, shall deposit them in the General Fund of the City of Fort Thomas to be apportioned and paid into the respective funds for which levied. SECTION V There is hereby imposed, levied and ordered to be collected a penalty of five percent (5%) upon all 2012 tax and waste fees not paid or postmarked by October 31, 2012, and an additional penalty of ten percent (10%) making a total of fifteen percent (15%) upon all 2012 tax and waste fees not paid or postmarked by January 1, 2013, which shall bear interest at the rate of eight percent (8%) per annum from November 1, 2012, until paid. In the event that a delinquent tax bill is referred to the City Attorney for collection, legal action will be initiated to collect the delinquent tax, interest, and penalty levied thereof, and the costs associated with collection, including but not limited to court costs, filing fees, and attorney fees. SECTION VI The City of Fort Thomas has a lien upon the property assessed for the tax and waste fees levied thereon and special assessments pursuant to the terms hereof, and all penalties, interest, fees, commission, charges, and other expenses, including court costs and attorneys fees incurred by reason of delinquency in payment of the tax bill or in the process of collecting such bill and such a lien has a priority over all other obligations or liabilities for which the property is liable. SECTION VII This Ordinance shall be in full force and effect from and after its passage, approval, and publication as required by law. APPROVED___________ Mary H. Brown, Mayor First Reading: September 4, 2012 ADOPTED: September 17, 2012 Published: September 27, 2012 ATTEST: _______________________________ Melissa K. Kelly, City Clerk

95, of Alexandria, died Sept. 13, 2012, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. She was a homemaker. Survivors include her son, Tom Ratliff; daughters, Pegg Neekamp and Sue Swobland; sisters, Patty Miller, Linda Kerr and Connie Carty; 11 grandchildren; 19 great-grandchildren; and two great-great-grandchildren. Burial was at Highland Cemetery. Memorials: St. Elizabeth Hospice Foundation, 1 Medical Village Dr., Edgewood, KY 41017.

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Basic obituary information and a color photograph of your loved one is published without charge by The Community Press. Please call us at 283-0404 for more information. To publish a larger memorial tribute, call 513-2424000 for pricing details. For the most up-to-date Northern Kentucky obituaries, click on the “Obituaries” link at NKY.com.

dren. Burial was at St. Stephen Cemetery. Memorials: Divine Mercy Parish, Sacred Heart Church, 318 Division St., Bellevue, KY 41073.

Charles Wolpert Charles Wolpert, 83, of Newport, died Sept. 18, 2012, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. He was a Navel Reservist and in the Air Force during the Korean War, a life member of the American Legion Post 11 in Newport, he retired from Durkee Foods and was an avid walker. His brothers, Gene and Edward Wolpert and a sister Helen Purvis, died previously. Survivors include his wife Betty Wolpert of Newport; daughters, Linda Staley of Fort Thomas, Deborah Frasher of Forest Park, Ohio and Patricia Wolpert of Newport; son, Charlie Wolpert of Anderson Township, Ohio; five grandchildren; five great-grandchildren; sisters, Dorothy Wolpert of Newport and Mary Louise Sexton of Hillsboro, Ohio. Burial was at Floral Hills Memorial Gardens. Memorials: American Cancer Society.

Gale F. Watson Sr., 65, of Alexandria, died Sept. 12, 2012, at his residence. He was an avid musician his entire life, being taught by his father, and passing that passion down to his two oldest sons. His band was Gale Watson and Kentucky Morning, he served in the Navy, spending most of his naval career in Hawaii, and worked Procter and Gamble, Henkle and with ADP. Survivors include his wife, Sharyne; sister, Diane; sons, Gale Franklin Jr., Matthew Gale and Jeffrey; and daughters, Jessica Gayle and Virginia.

Marjorie Woodworth Marjorie S. Woodworth, 80, of Huber Heights, Ohio, died Sept. 13, 2012, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. She was an administrator with Bank One in Dayton, Ohio and past president of Welcome Wagon in Huber Heights. Survivors include her sons, David Wiggins of Dayton, Ky., and Bradley Wiggins; daughter, Judi Lynn Tallman; sister, Frankie; six grandchildren; and a great-grandchild. Memorials: Hospice of the Northern Kentucky, 7388 Turfway Road, Florence, KY 41042.

Gale Watson Sr.

MARRIAGE LICENSES Lorianne Teegarden, 22, of Fort Thomas and Jordan Franzen, 23, of Edgewood, issued Aug. 8. Jamie Prichard, 25, and Ian Kerfoot, 32, both of Cincinnati, issued Sept. 7. Ashley Stottman, 23, and Ryan Reeves, 23, both of Edgewood,

issued Sept. 7. Lindsay Milligan, 31, of Columbus and Daniel Bibb Jr., 39, of Fort Thomas, issued Sept. 7. Heidi Smith, 22, of Florence and Charles Rider, 29, of Fort Thomas, issued Sept. 7. Kristina Collins, 24, of Spartenburg and Eric Brown, 23, of

LEGAL NOTICE The Campbell County Fiscal Court, at a regular meeting to be held on Wednesday, October 3, 2012, at 7:00 p.m. at the Campbell County Courthouse, 8352 E. Main Street, Alexandria, Kentucky, will call for second reading and consideration of passage the following ordinance, said ordinance having been read by title and a summary given for the first time at the September 20, 2012, special meeting of the Court. CAMPBELL COUNTY FISCAL COURT CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY ORDINANCE O-11-12 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CAMPBELL COUNTY FISCAL COURT ENACTING AND ADOPTING THE 2012 S-25 SUPPLE MENT TO THE CODE OF ORDINANCES OF THE COUNTY OF CAMPBELL, KENTUCKY (JANUARY 1, 2012 THROUGH JUNE 30, 2012) The full text of Ordinance O-11-12 will be on file in the Office of the County Clerk, Newport, Kentucky, and is on file in the Office of the Fiscal Court Clerk, Newport, Kentucky, and same is available for inspection and use by the public during regular business hours. I, Paula K. Spicer, Clerk of the Campbell County Fiscal Court, hereby certify that this summary was prepared by me at the direction of the Campbell County Fiscal Court and that said summary is a true and accurate summary of the contents of Ordinance O-11-12. Paula K. Spicer Fiscal Court Clerk

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LEGAL NOTICE The Campbell County Fiscal Court, at a special meeting of the court on Thursday, September 20, 2012 at 5:30 p.m., at the Campbell County Administration Building, Fiscal Court Chambers, 1098 Monmouth Street, Newport, Kentucky, adopted the following ordinance upon the second reading, said ordinance having been read by title and summary given for the first time at the September 5, 2012 regular meeting of the Court. CAMPBELL COUNTY FISCAL COURT CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY ORDINANCE O-10-12 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CAMPBELL COUNTY FISCAL COURT AMENDING CAMPBELL COUNTY ORDINANCE O-1987 AMENDED AND LAST AMENDED BY ORDINANCE O-18-11, RELATING TO THE CAMPBELL COUNTY DETENTION CENTER POLICY AND PROCEDURE ON PRISONER SECTIONS MANUAL RIGHTS AND ON ADMISSION; SEARCH ES AND RELEASE The full text of Ordinance O-10-12 will be on file in the Office of the County Clerk, Newport, Kentucky and is on file in the Office of the Fiscal Court Clerk, Newport, Kentucky, and same is available for inspection and use by the public during regular business hours. I, Paula K. Spicer, Clerk of the Campbell County Fiscal Court, hereby certify that this summary was prepared by me at the direction of the Campbell County Fiscal Court and that said summary is a true and accurate summary of the contents of Ordinance O-10-12. Paula K. Spicer Fiscal Court Clerk

1728364

St. Marys, issued Sept. 10. Andrea Minshall, 23, of Covington and Zachary Smith, 24, of Edgewood, issued Sept. 10. Jennifer Karhrs, 32, of Covington and Matthew Scheper, 32, of Cincinnati, issued Sept. 10. Janine Vance, 46, of Miami and Douglas Gumbert, 48, of Cincinnati, issued Sept. 10. Sheila Haas, 29, of Kansas City and Scott Redding, 30, of Covington, issued Sept. 10. Carrie Thompson, 26, and Jack Turner, 30, both of Dayton, issued Sept. 11. Emily Allen, 22, of Fort Thomas and Joshua Berry, 25, of Edgewood, issued Sept. 11. Stephanie Orleck, 23, of Cincinnati and mark Merlia Jr., 29, of Newport, issued Sept. 12. Amanda Hunt, 21, of Edgewood and David Fassler, 23, of Fort Thomas, issued Sept. 12.

Casey Wilson, 23, of Sandusky and Kasey Todd, 25, of Cincinnati, issued Sept. 12. Erin Tischner, 31, of Cincinnati and James Buchina, 31, of Louisville, issued Sept. 12. Rebecca Walz, 31, of Covington and Kenneth Buddle II, 32, of Fort Thomas, issued Sept. 12. Kristin Butsch, 26, and Andrew Gallo, 29, both of Cincinnati, issued Sept. 13. Margarete Allen, 27, and James Lipscomb, 29, both of Fort Thomas, issued Sept. 12. Stephanie Roderick, 23, and Jonathan Milleck, 24, both of Fort Thomas, issued Sept. 13. Mary Black, 40, of Troy and David Sanders, 46, of Dayton, issued Sept. 13. Nakeishia Crawford, 25, of Cleveland and Bajan Simic, 25, of Bosnia, issued Sept. 14.

CITY OF SOUTHGATE CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY ORDINANCE NO 12-10 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF SOUTHGATE, KENTUCKY, ESTABLISHING AND LEVYING THE SPECIAL AD VALOREM TAX RATE FOR THE YEAR 2010/2011 SO AS TO SUPPORT THE ACQUISITION, CONSTRUCTION, EQUIPPING AND MAINTAINING OF A FIREHOUSE AND RELATED FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT AND PROVIDING FOR A PENALTY AND INTEREST UPON A TAX BILL BECOMING DELINQUENT. WHEREAS, the City of Southgate, Kentucky ("City") enacted Ordinance No. 08-14, to establish the funding mechanism for the acquisition, construction, equipping, and maintaining of a firehouse and related facilities and equipment; and WHEREAS, the adoption of the Special Ad Valorem tax was approved by a majority of voters of the City of Southgate at the general election held on November 4, 2008, pursuant to KRS 65.125; and WHEREAS, the City, consistent with the authority conferred by the voters to enact the Special Ad Valorem tax, is now charged with determining the tax rate for the year 2012/13, in a manner that is consistent with the provisions of Ordinance No. 08-14; NOW THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY OF SOUTHGATE, KENTUCKY: SECTION 1 That for the year 2012/13, there shall be imposed, levied and collected by the City of Southgate, Campbell County, Kentucky, the sum of $.0468 on each One Hundred Dollars valuation of real and personal property, as assessed by the Campbell County Tax Assessor, and returned to the City of Southgate, Kentucky, unless exempt from municipal taxation, under the laws of the Commonwealth and the Constitution. The funds so realized as herein provided, shall only be used for the purposes set forth in Ordinance No. 08-14. SECTION 2 The City Clerk shall forthwith make out the necessary tax bills, for the year 2012/13 and said tax bill shall show among each item of taxation the Special Ad Valorem Tax for the Firehouse, the value thereof and the tax imposed. SECTION 3 The tax levied and imposed by this ordinance shall be due and payable immediately upon the passage and publication of this ordinance. Any tax incurred because of this ordinance, which remains unpaid as of November 30, 2012, are deemed delinquent and shall thereafter carry a penalty of 10 percent of the amount of the tax bill, plus interest thereon at the rate of 12 percent per annum from the time it becomes delinquent until paid. SECTION 4 All Ordinances or parts of Ordinances, in conflict herewith are to that extent only hereby repealed. SECTION 5 This Ordinance shall take effect and be in full force from and after its passage, approval and publication according to law. Enacted on the 19th day of September 2012. James G. Hamberg, Mayor Attest: Jody Anderson, City Clerk 1st Reading: 9/5/2012, 2nd Reading: 9/19/2012, Published: 9/27/2012

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Delivery and installation not included. BEST BUY®, the BEST BUY® logo, the tag design are trademarks of BBY Solutions, Inc. One per household. Not valid on prior sales. Cannot be combined with any other promotional offer.

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includes right arm facing recliner,armlesschair, corner wedge, armless recliner, console table and left side facing recliner This item can be ordered in reverse configuration.

with purchase of this set you will receive a

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$

1999

6pc sectional

4

6

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with purchase of this set you will receive a

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This sectional consists of a left side facing sofa, armless sofa, right side facing chaise and matching cocktail ottoman.

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2197

sectional

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with purchase of this set you will receive a

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Comfort Scapes 6pc Sectional features a left arm facing power recliner and right arm facing press back chaise

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32” HDTV!

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on purchases of $2000 or more made on your Furniture Fair Gold Card through September 30, 2012. 20% deposit required. (not eligible for credit promotion) ;$R-< 97FH (&'TA<5 payments required. Account fees apply. Additional 9'-'JF &%T@&'! -Q-@<-*<F @' !T&#F0 See store for details

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with purchase of this set you will receive a

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includes double pedestal table, four side chairs, two arm chairs and the matching buffet cabinet

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$

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1999

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At t ic Ret re a t 5 p c B e d ro o m

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complete 8pc set

1887

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Includes leg table, four side chairs, two arm chairs and matching 2pc china cabinet Features a warm vintage cherry finish on mahogany

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OUR DELIVERY GUARANTEE

We will e-mail you with a two hour window for delivery. If we are late for your delivery, you will receive a Gift Card for the amount of your delivery charge. You can also go to our website and click on the blue truck in the top right hand corner. You will need the 11 digit sales order number from your original sales receipt.

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OUR O UR DELIVERY GUARANTEE

We will e-mail you with a two hour window for delivery. If we are late for your delivery, you will receive a Gift Card for the amount of your delivery charge. You can also go to our website and click on the blue truck in the top right hand corner. You will need the 11 digit sales order number from your original sales receipt.

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Queen 2pc set

Twin 2pc set ............. ....... $ 15 9 Full 2pc set ............... ....... $ 17 9 King 3pc set ............... ..... $ 59 9

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$

479

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Queen 2pc set

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$

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Twin 2pc set ............. ....... $ 18 6 Full 2pc set ............... .......$ 26 6 King 3pc set ............... ...... $ 57 9

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Queen 2pc set

Twin 2pc set ........ .... Full 2pc set .......... ....... $ 8 9 9 .... King 3pc set .......... ...... $ 10 9 9 ......... $ 16 9 9

NO INTEREST if paid in full in

24

MONTHS!*

on purchases of $2000 or more made on your Furniture Fair Gold Card through September 30, 2012. 20% deposit required. (not eligible for credit promotion) ;$R-< 97FH (&'TA<5 payments required. Account fees apply. Additional 9'-'JF &%T@&'! -Q-@<-*<F @' !T&#F0 See store for details

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campbell-county-recorder-092712