Page 1

News

CCF Recorder

August 26, 2010

A3

Democrats to open headquarters in Newport ajoering@nky.com

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

The Campbell County Democratic Party will soon open their headquarters at 644 Monmouth St.

Those interested in learning more about the Democratic candidates in this year’s election will soon have a place to turn. The Campbell County Democratic Party is opening a headquarters at 644 Monmouth Street in Newport. The building, donated to the party, will open in the next couple weeks and stay open through the November elections. “We thought having this physical presence was really important,” said Sue Orth,

the party chair. “This is an important election season, and we want people to have a place they can come to get literature and ask questions.” Orth said she also hopes to hold some candidate nights, where constituents can come meet those people running for office. Donna Hoffman, a candidate for magistrate in District 2, is one of many people who are helping get the headquarters up and running, because she said she sees the importance. “Having this visual presence is extremely important

IN THE SERVICE

SD1 recognized as one of the ‘healthiest’ Sanitation District No. 1 of Northern Kentucky has been named one of the Healthiest Companies in America for 2010. The recognition came from Interactive Health Solutions (IHS), an Illinoisbased provider of health management programs. SD1 is one of just 36 winners nationwide that were recognized for “significantly reduced healthcare costs through employee participation in a prevention-based health program in the workplace,” according to Interactive Health Solutions. The award is based on a series of clinical evaluations of employee participants across an index of key health indicators designed by Interactive Health Solutions. Tom Wiechman, SD1’s Deputy Executive Director, Administration, said the award “serves as recogni-

tion that the SD1 culture is indeed strong in the area of employee health and wellness.” SD 1 implemented an internal health and wellness program 11 years ago that included the option of receiving key health indicators from its previous provider. Five years ago this program was moved to Interactive Health Solutions due to their nationally recognized health management programs. The program allows SD1 employees the opportunity to become more actively engaged in managing and controlling their primary health indicators. Through employee participation in this program, SD1 is able to see benefit through reduced costs for medical care. SD1 has actively encouraged its employees to become better and more informed consumers of health care since

first partnering with IHS. “Being recognized as one of 36 companies nationally of the over 1,200 served by IHS is a tribute to all SD1 employees who work throughout the year to improve their health and overall wellness,” Wiechman said. “SD1 employees are active participants in working to control and minimize the organization’s health plan costs.” According to a study by The American Journal of Health Prevention, employers who invested in worksite health promotion saw a 28 percent reduction in sick leave absenteeism, 26 percent reduction in use of health care benefits and a 30 percent reduction in worker’s comp claims and disability management. More information about the award can be found at www.healthiestcompanies. com

when it will be open, visit www.thecampbelldems.com or search for The Campbell County Democratic Party on Facebook.com.

for our party and the candidates,” Hoffman said. “I always have people ask me where they can get candidate signs, and now they can come here to do that.” Orth said the headquarters has been on her agenda for years, and she sees it as another way to help get candidates elected. “Campbell County is really one of the strongest Democratic holds left in the area,” Orth said. “We want people to know we’re still here and we’re not going anywhere.” For more information about the location and

Fryer

Army Pvt. Felicia N. Fryer has graduated from Basic Combat Training at Fort Sill, Lawton, Okla. During the nine weeks of training, the soldier studied the Army mission and received instruction and training exercises in drill and ceremonies, Army history, core values and traditions, military courtesy, military justice, physical fitness, first aid, rifle marksmanship, weapons use, map reading and land navigation, foot marches, armed and unarmed combat, and field maneuvers and tactics. Fryer is the daughter of Tracy L. Fryer of Alexandria,

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the private is a 2005 graduate of Campbell County High School.

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A4

CCF Recorder

News

August 26, 2010

BRIEFLY Police identify victim

The Campbell County Police Department has identified the driver killed in a single vehicle roll-over crash early Wednesday morning in the area of 9800 Flagg Springs Pike as 21-year-old Daniel Mattingly, of California. Police responded to the single vehicle crash in the California area near the intersection of Ky. 10 (Flagg Springs Pike) and Ky. 1996 at 3:15 a.m. Wednesday, Aug. 18. Officers found Mattingly, the only occupant in a 1998 GMC pickup truck, dead, according to a news release

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St. Philip Centennial

St. Philip Church and School in Melbourne is hosting a Centennial Celebration for all alumni and former parishioners at 4:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 18, at the church, 1402 Mary Ingles Way. The celebration will begin will Mass, followed by school tours, dinner, entertainment and dancing in the Parish Center. The cost is $20 per person in advance. Check can be made payable to St. Philip Church and should be sent to 1402 Mary Ingles Way, Melbourne, KY 41059. Reservations must be received by

Sept. 5. For more information call 859-635-0559 or 859-4416132, or visit stphilipky.org.

Dunk a principal

The third annual Dunk the Principal fundraiser for Special Olympics Northern Kentucky Area 7 will be in the Alexandria Shopping Center lot at 8109 Alexandria Pike starting at 11 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 28. The event is sponsored by City Brew Coffee. The schedule of participants has been confirmed, and the first person into the booth will be Campbell County School District Superintendent Anthony Strong until 11:30 a.m. The remaining schedule of dunking booth targets includes: • 11:30 a.m. Scott Schweitzer, varsity baseball coach for Campbell County School. • Noon: Reiley Elementary School Principal Julie Hubbard. • 12:30 p.m.: St. Mary School’s Principal “Michelle Ulrich’s Crew.” • 1 p.m.: Bishop Brossart High School’s varsity baseball coach Matt Grosser. • 1:30 p.m. Grant’s Lick Elementary School teacher Jill Ahrman. • 2 p.m.: Crossroads Elementary School’s Principal

“Kim Visse’s Crew.” • 2:30 p.m.: Christie Henson and Kathy Gutzwiller of Campbell County Middle School. • 3 p.m.: Campbell Ridge Elementary School Principal Anthony Mazzei. • 3:30 p.m.: Cline Elementary School’s teacher Matt Record. DHL has pledged a match of every $1 donation up to $1,000, said Shari Hennekes, the event organizer, from City Brew Coffee. There will also be a silent auction, food, music, face painting and games.

Soldier meets president

Staff Sergeant Kevin Stafford greeted the commander in chief, President Barack Obama Saturday, Aug. 14, at Tyndall Air Force Base in Panama City, Fla. Stafford has been stationed in Panama City for several years and will be deployed to Germany in October for six months. Stafford graduated Campbell County High School in 1995.

Johnson recognizes

Fashion jewelry company Lia Sophia has recognized Lisa Johnson of Wilder as a Monthly Achiever. Johnson, who is ranked among the top sales representatives in the organization, is now part of group of company advisors and managers who have been acknowledged for their jewelry sales efforts. The monthly achievers are recognized in lia sophia’s national monthly newsletter, which is distributed throughout the organization. Accumulated monthly sales can qualify advisers and managers for awards.

Business after hours

Network and welcome the newest member of the Fort Thomas Business Association at their After Hours at 5:30 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 26, at The Candy Cottage, 3 N. Fort Thomas Ave. For more information, go to www.ftba.biz

FTBA meeting

The Fort Thomas Business Association will hold their regular meeting from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. Thursday, Sept. 23, at The Community Center mess hall, in Tower Park. The meeting will include a candidate forum for upcoming Campbell County elections. Candidates from the fol-

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Offices closed Sept. 3

Both the Campbell County Clerk and the Campbell Circuit Court Clerk’s offices will be closed Friday, Sept. 3 due to a required state furlough. Because of the Labor Day holiday, both offices will reopen on Tuesday, Sept. 7. The offices closing includes both offices where residents can renew or obtain driver’s licenses in Alexandria and Newport. The furloughs require a shutdown of the Kentucky Department of Transportation’s computer services, according to a news release from the Circuit Court Clerk. The state furlough plan was a measure announced by Gov. Steve Beshear to offset the state’s budget deficit.

Michel is ‘best’ lawyer

Thirty-five attorneys from Keating Muething & Klekamp (KMK) have been selected by their peers for inclusion in “The Best Lawyers in America 2011.” Lisa Wintersheimer Michel of Ft. Thomas was included in the list. She practices employee benefits law at KMK.

Church anniversary

Community Family Church will host anniversary services Sept. 12-15. Services Sunday, Sept. 12, will be at 9 a.m., 11 a.m., and 6:30 p.m. All other services begin at 7 p.m. nightly. Speakers scheduled for the event includes Tommy Bates, pastor of Community Family Church Sept. 12 morning services; Dr. Aimraj Marahajah Sept. 12 in the evening; Larry Stockstill, Sept 13; Tommy Barnett, Sept. 14; and Perry Stone, Sept. 15. The church is located at 11875 Taylor Mill Road, Independence. For further information, please call the church office at 859-356-8851.

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News

CCF Recorder

August 26, 2010

A5

Amy Alwell

(Master Designer) 12 Years Experience

Introducing...

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CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Kyle Dulaghan, left, of California, and Logan Schneider of Alexandria, both freshman football players for Campbell County High School, paint the bottom of a goal post at the football field in Alexandria Saturday, Aug. 21 during the seventh annual “Pride Inside” volunteer cleanup of the stadium.

cmayhew@nky.com

Campbell County Fiscal Court Commissioners have now seen a draft of a comprehensive smoking ban ordinance, but it’s still preliminary and one of many options the county has available. A copy of one version of a draft ordinance was shared with the commissioners Friday, Aug. 13. Campbell County Judgeexecutive Steve Pendery said at the Aug. 18 Fiscal Court meeting there isn’t any smoking legislation to talk about at the moment, and the county doesn’t have any final draft that people can look at and review. Pendery said there is no timeline for when there will be a proposed ordinance the public can comment on and review, when answering questions from residents at the meeting. Commissioners Dave Otto and Mark Hayden both said at the meeting until now they hadn’t seen any kind of draft ordinance for a smoking ban.

Campbell County Administrator Robert Horine said he was directed by Pendery to circulate a copy of an April 29 draft ordinance to the commissioners that the public had gotten a hold of so the commissioners could see what their constituents were asking about in emails and phone calls. Horine said he also sent commissioners an updated copy of the April 29 draft. The April 29 draft was produced by staff of the Fiscal Court in Boone, Kenton and Campbell counties because all three counties were still involved in discussing the issue at that time, he said. Boone County has officially dropped out of talks of approving smoking legislation. Horine said the April 29 draft ordinance was sent to Campbell County’s commissioners with an “information only” heading. “We didn’t say review this and let us know what you think,” he said. Plus, the smoking ban draft ordinance shared with the commissioners is one of many variations on file that staff has created over the

Chamber awards dinner is Sept. 9 Each year at its annual dinner, the Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce’s largest event of the year, volunteers are recognized for outstanding service with the presentation of three chamber awards. Established in 1968, the Walter R. Dunlevy/Frontiersman Award recognizes an individual who has a lifelong history of outstanding service to the Northern Kentucky community, outstanding service to the nominee’s profession or industry and exemplifies the highest standards of personal integrity and family responsibilities. The 2010 Frontiersman Award will be presented to Joe Gross, president and CEO of St. Elizabeth Healthcare. The Walter L. Pieschel (MVP) Award, sponsored by PNC Bank, is named in memory of the Northern Kentucky chamber’s first volunteer leader. The award recognizes an individual chamber member who has provided outstanding volunteer service to the chamber as a committee member, a committee chair or in any

The Walter R. Dunlevy/Frontiersman Award recognizes an individual who has a lifelong history of outstanding service to the Northern Kentucky community. other special capacity during the past 12 months. This year’s recipient will be Laura Kroeger, vice president of resource development/external affairs and executive director, Gateway Community & Technical College Foundation. The Northern Kentucky Unity Award is presented to an individual or organization who has shown leadership in seeking regional solutions to Northern Kentucky’s challengers; Leadership in encouraging Northern Kentuckians to address and solve common challenges and issues and leadership in bringing Northern Kentuckians together to solve regional challenges. The 2010 Unity Award will be presented to Northern Kentucky Area Development District. Accepting the award on behalf of NKADD this year will be John Mays, executive director.

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This year’s annual dinner takes place Thursday, Sept. 9, and has been themed “Celebrating Local and International Business.” It will be at Northern Kentucky Convention Center, One West RiverCenter Blvd., Covington. The event will highlight a few of the chamber’s many accomplishments from the past and to look toward the future. Guest emcee Clyde Gray, anchor on WCPO-TV Channel 9, will assist with passing the gavel from 2009-2010 Chair Gary Beatrice to 2010-2011 Chair Eric Haas. The reception is 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Dinner and program begins at 7 p.m. The cost to attend is $65 per person. The attire is business or black tie optional. Reservations can be made by calling 859-578-6397 or online at www.nkychamber.com.

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last two years, Horine said. Despite the commissioners seeing a copy of one possible ordinance, it doesn’t mean that’s “the ordinance,” he said. “Judge Pendery has not made any recommendation,” Horine said. “He (Pendery) has not made any proposal, he has just said give them the information.” Horine declined to discuss the differences in the different versions of the smoking ordinance options on file except to say they are less than a comprehensive ban. “One of the obvious things that can vary is how comprehensive the ordinance is,” he said. Horine said despite the ongoing public debate, sharing details about the different variations on ordinances is premature because they are all possible drafts Pendery could recommend. “There are other versions that are available in staff files that could be pulled out and used if the judge-executives want to pursue this any further,” Horine said.

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Schools

August 26, 2010

CCF Recorder

A7

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G.I. Jobs dubs NKU ‘military-friendly’ Northern Kentucky University announced that it has received the honor of being listed in the 2011 Guide to Military Friendly Schools. The guide, published by G.I. Jobs magazine, will be released in September. This honor recognizes NKU as being in the top 15 percent of all colleges and trade schools in America in terms of giving military personnel and veterans the highest value and a warm campus welcome. Student veterans at NKU connect through their student veteran organization, Veterans for Education and Transition Support (VETS), which is an official chapter of the national Student Veterans of America. VETS will be led this school year by William Schwartz, senior and secondary education major. According to Dave Merriss, chairman of the Veteran Advocacy Committee and faculty advisor to VETS, not every university has a student veteran organization. NKU’s active and recognized student organization was an important factor in the selection of the universi-

ty as “Military Friendly” by G.I. Jobs. NKU has more than 400 student veterans currently taking advantage of benefits at NKU. “It is generally felt by all, and especially the members of the Veteran Advocacy Committee, that we at NKU owe a debt to veterans that can be repaid by developing and encouraging services for veterans that facilitate the education and completion of our degree programs,” Merriss said. “We want veterans to enroll at NKU and we want them to succeed because we know they bring a maturity and experience to the classroom that is important. “As we expected, the Post 9/11 GI Bill has brought an increase of student veterans to NKU,”

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The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet has announced the beginning of the 2010 Adopt-a-Highway Poster Contest. Students from across the Commonwealth are invited to submit creative works for use in the Adopt-a-Highway calendar for 2011. The contest is aimed at educating and encouraging children not to litter and to spread the message to others. The entry form with the necessary certificate of authenticity can be obtained by contacting the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet, Office of Public Affairs. The form also is available online at http:// adopt-a-highway.ky.gov. Click on poster contest. Entries must be postmarked by Sept. 30.

cil on Education and the Student Veterans Association. The panel then makes the decision as to what schools are included on the list based on criteria such as certifications, programs and policies, financial and nonfinancial support, and enrollment figures.

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Merriss said. “We are looking forward to further growth in our student veteran numbers. NKU is committed to assisting all eligible veterans in their transition to academic life. “The work that the Veteran’s Advocacy Committee has done and will do in the future is extremely important for the student veterans, their retention and overall academic success.” The honor of being named military friendly by G.I. Jobs magazine is a highly competitive process that is determined by the Military Friendly Schools Academic Advisory Panel. The panel is made up of eight higher education administrators, the Veterans Association, the College Board, the American Coun-

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A8

CCF Recorder

Schools

August 26, 2010

NKU’s largest grant to help nursing program The Northern Kentucky University College of Health Professions announced that it has received its largest grant to date – a $717,600 Health Resources and Services Administration grant administered through the Bureau of Health Professions. The grant, which is effective through June of 2013, will be used for the revision and expansion of NKU’s Nurse Executive

Leadership (NEL) program. The NEL program was originally established as the Nurse Administration Program in 1992. The program adds additional learning experiences that are necessary for leading complex health care organizations. The grant will allow NKU to revise of the program to include an Excel boot camp, increased cultural and rural content and an

accounting course. “The Department of Advanced Nursing Studies excels in online graduate education and will deliver the didactic components using online course delivery, thus facilitating recruitment and retention of nurses from rural and remote areas,� said Dean of the College of Health Professions and Regents Professor Denise Robinson. “The revision of the Nursing Adminis-

tration program will offer the state-of-the-science in nurse executive leadership. It will enable graduates to meet the challenges of increasingly complex care across populations and health care delivery systems.� The program is designed to prepare nurse leaders who will address the needs of today’s challenging health care environment. The NEL curriculum includes a

combination of classroom and clinical experiences. Students gain experience in organizational problem solving, information technology, human resource management and finance. Graduates of the program are prepared to assume executive leadership positions in an unlimited number of healthcare settings including acute care hospitals, long-term care and community settings.

Program aims to ease college transitions The path from high school to postsecondary education will be made clearer for career and technical education students who participate in Close the Deal. The new program will offer informational workshops for students and parents at over 50 locations across the state. The sessions will cover issues such as applying to college, college costs and using financial aid and KEES money. Participants will also learn about the opportunities that are available to students interested in transferring high school credit to college.

“Making the transition from high school to a postsecondary institution is critical in today’s world, and it is important to understand how to connect the dots,� said Education and Workforce Development Cabinet Secretary Joseph. U. Meyer. “The Close the Deal sessions will provide a roadmap for students and parents to help chart the path to higher learning.� The Office of Career and Technical Education (OCTE), Kentucky Department of Education (KDE), and the Kentucky Community and Technical College (KCTCS) are working together to host Close the

Deal kick-off events. These regional rallies will promote services that will be offered at the local meetings statewide. Locally, the Close the Deal kick-off event will be held at noon Tuesday, Aug. 31, at Turkey Foot Middle School, 3230 Turkey Foot Road, Edgewood. The Close the Deal program is being funded through a grant provided by Kentucky CAN! The grant is designed to build upon existing efforts of the KnowHow2Go initiative to improve college access in a local community. For information, go to www.knowhow2goky.org/

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SPORTS

CCF Recorder

August 26, 2010

HIGH SCHOOL | Editor Melanie Laughman | mlaughman@nky.com | 513-248-7118

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Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

N K Y. c o m

A9

RECORDER

Mustang boys’ soccer off to 2-1 start

By James Weber jweber@nky.com

The Bishop Brossart High School boys’ soccer team is going into the All “A” Classic regional tournament on a strong note. Brossart beat Madison Southern and Conner by a combined score of 7-1 to win the Scott Christian Memorial Tournament Aug. 20-21. The Mustangs rebounded from a season-opening 2-0 loss to Pendleton County. “It gave us an opportunity to get on the right track,” head coach Brian Goller said. “Pendleton outplayed us and deserved that win.” Brossart beat Conner 5-0 to end the tournament. “Our strength is possession,” Goller said. “We do a good job of passing the ball around. Sometimes we don’t look to score as much as we should. I’m happy they stayed aggressive the whole way through. Our defense has done a great job so far.” Goller’s top returners are seniors Sam Perkins, David Braun, Dylan Dierig and Corey Hartig. Braun was the tournament MVP. Hartig, Dierig and Nick Birkenhauer were all-tourney picks.

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

Brossart senior Dylan Dierig (left) battles with Conner sophomore Stephen Dunaway for the ball during Brossart’s 5-1 win over Conner Saturday, Aug. 21. The game was part of the Scott Christian Memorial Tournament hosted by Scott High School at Twenhofel Middle School in Independence. Perkins is the top playmaker in the middle. Braun was the leading scorer last year. Dierig is the top striker. Hartig is the starter in goal. Bruan, Dierig and Evans all have two goals in the team’s first three games. Other seniors are Josh Beckerich, Andrew Klear, Ben Luerson, David Schuler, Dan Schultz and Michael Zilliox.

Brossart was set to play Calvary Aug. 24 in the first round of the regional tourney. A win would likely pit the Mustangs against St. Henry Thursday, Aug. 26. “We’ve struggled with St. Henry in the past,” Goller said. “They’ve been close games and we always seem to come up on the short end. We have to come in with a tougher mentality.”

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

Brossart goalkeeper Corey Hartig leaps to make a save during Brossart’s 5-1 win over Conner Saturday, Aug. 21. The game was part of the Scott Christian Memorial Tournament hosted by Scott High School at Twenhofel Middle School in Independence.

Area strong in girls’ soccer Here is a look at local girls’ soccer teams this season, most information taken from coach questionnaires: Bellevue went 4-16-1 last year and returns Brad Gough as head coach for a second season. Megan Arnzen, Brittany Bohn, Leah Diodato, Katie Curry, Kaylynn Dill, Lauren Riehl, Nicole Roenker, Briana Taylor, Katie Ball, and Maddie Martin. The top newcomer is Kendal Tallon. Arnzen is in line to be Bellevue’s first college soccer recruit. Bishop Brossart welcomes a new head coach in Terry Bray, who takes over a Mustang team that went 7-8-3 last year. Bray led Holy Cross to the state final in 2003. He welcomes back two returning starters in senior defender Nicole Ridder and junior midfielder Maria Silbersack. Top newcomers are soph-

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

Newport Central Catholic junior Aubrey Muench (left) scored NCC’s first two goals in a 6-0 win at Dixie Heights Aug. 19.

omore striker Amanda Hasl, sophomore midfielder Rachel Hartig, freshman striker Abby Stadtmiller, and sophomore midfielder Sarah Klump. Bray said the team has little varsity experience and will improve as the season progresses. Campbell County went 11-3-3 last year, and returns Dave Morris for his fourth season as head coach. The Camels return nine starters in Kaitlin Bryan, Carolynn Dreyer, Anna Carrigan, Sarah Carroll, Julie Ampfer, Christina Heilman, Lynsey Lapre, Megan Rauch, and Taylor Robinson. Top newcomers are Shelby Davis, Kristen Rice and Jessica Garza. The Camels allowed just eight goals all year and only lost to rivals Newport Central Catholic and Highlands. Robinson moves to sweeper to replace Anne Marie Dumaine, the all-state player who signed with Xavier University. Bryan was the team’s top scorer last year and leads a fast, explosive offense. Bryan has four goals already this year. Dayton welcomes a new head coach in Melissa Hawkins. The Greendevils went 5-7 last year. Returning starters are Rachael Ackerson, Nikita Williams, Shawnda Davidson, Shelly Centers, Debra White, and Angela Taylor. Top newcomers are Nicole Schowalter and Heather Schowalter. “It will be a challenging year as we lost six seniors

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

Newport Central Catholic sophomore Courtney Hagedorn (left) and Dixie Heights freshman Kaelin Shay contest the ball during NCC’s 6-0 win at Dixie Heights Aug. 19. last year and are rebuilding,” Hawkins said. “However, I have high expectations for our girls and we expect to be competitive in our division.” Highlands is 2-2 so far this under head coach Tommy Kearns. Returning seniors are Sydney Groneck, Ashley Collinsworth, Alli Diehl, Caitlin Pendery, MacKenzie Cole, MacKenzie Grause, Caroline Newman and Jordan Earlywine. Highlands hosts Lexington Catholic Aug. 26 and goes to Notre Dame Aug. 28. Newport Central Catholic went 10-5-3 last year under Kevin Turnick, who returns for his 12th season as head coach. Top returning players are senior goalkeeper Madison Freeman, junior midfielder Aubrey Muench, senior forward Olivia Huber, sophomore forward Christina Seibert, senior defender Kelsey

Johnson, sophomore defender Courtney Hagedorn and senior midfielder Morgan Dubuc. Freeman was third team all-region last year with six shutouts. Muench was second team all-region and had seven goals and four assists last year. Huber is the top returning scorer on the team with 12 goals and six assists. Seibert had four goals and six assists a year ago. Dubuc is a thirdyear starter. Top newcomers are freshman forward Samantha Bunzel and sophomore defender Emily Weyer. NewCath returns two of its top three scorers and three of its defenders. “Team speed will be an advantage for us and we will take advantage of our track athletes,” Turnick said. “The key to success will be the development of the depth on our rosters. “

Highlands senior Alex Dean passes the ball Aug. 19 during St. Henry’s 2-1 home win over Highlands.

Boys’ soccer teams hit the pitch By James Weber jweber@nky.com

Here is a look at other local boys’ soccer teams, with most information taken from coach questionnaires: Campbell County is 1-1 to start the year, beating Dixie Heights and losing to South Oldham. The Camels have a key early test with Scott Aug. 26 at home. Highlands is 2-1 to start the season. The Bluebirds play at Greenwood Aug. 28. The scoring has been spread out so far. Samson Lewis, Jordan Drinkhouse and Tucker Beerman have two goals apiece. Seniors are Drinkhouse, John Foellger, Brandon Killen, Alex Dean, Mitchell

gl fir At an st ce

jweber@nky.com

gl fir At an st ce

By James Weber

Payne, Michael Kruer, Nathan Templeton and Kevin Breslin. Newport Central Catholic is 2-1 to start the year and plays in the All “A” regionals this week. Steve Bornhoffer welcomes back seniors Chris Calhoun, Tyler Grome, Joe Humbert, Troy Kremer, David McGarr, Evan Neises, Chris Quitter, Aaron Schultz and Ethan Trauth. Dean is a first team all-region defender from last year. Lewis was third team. Austin Juniet has five goals already this season.


A10

CCF Recorder

August 26, 2010

Sports & recreation

Thoroughbreds win Eviston’s debut By James Weber jweber@nky.com

Eddie Eviston’s debut as head coach at Newport Central Catholic was a winning one. NewCath rallied for a 3528 win over Dixie Heights in the Skyline Chili Crosstown Showdown at the University of Cincinnati Aug. 20. Brady Hightchew threw for 225 yards and two

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touchdowns, and rushed for the winning score with four minutes left in the game, capping a 22-point rally in the fourth quarter. NCC trailed 28-13 entering the period. The TD passes were to Brian Doyle and Brennan Daunt. Chris Kelly rushed for 118 yards and two touchdowns. NewCath hosts Aiken 7 p.m. Friday, Aug. 27, at Newport Stadium. Highlands won its 29th straight game with a 45-14 win over DuPont Manual Aug. 20 in Fort Thomas. Corey Compton made a successful debut as a starting back with three touch-

FALL LEAGUES NOW FORMING!

downs. Patrick Towles threw a TD pass to Andrew Gold. Drake Bruns had an interception return and Colin Seidl had a TD run. Compton and Jordan Streeter each had 64 yards on the ground. Towles threw for 156. Highlands scored two touchdowns in the final minute of the first half, the second coming after an Austin Abner at midfield. A long pass from Towles to Austin Sheehan set up a score by Compton to give Highlands a 28-0 lead in the locker room. Josh Quillen had a fumble recovery for the Highlands defense. Highlands will host Ryle 7 p.m. Friday, Aug. 27 for the first of two meetings with the Raiders this year. Highlands beat Ryle in both meetings last year - 37-14 and 31-14, on its way to a 15-0 season. Bishop Brossart started off on a strong note with a 34-19 win at Betsy Layne Aug. 20. The Mustangs scored three touchdowns in the fourth quarter to pull away. Brossart senior running back Andrew Guidugli had 106 yards rushing and

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

GARY LANDERS/STAFF

Newport Central Catholic High School’s Brady Hightchew, 13, celebrates his game winning touchdown with teammate Chris Kelly, 3, against Dixie Heights High School during their game in the Skyline Chili Crosstown Showdown played at Univerity of Cincinnati’s Nippert Stadium Friday, Aug. 20. NewCath won 35-28. three touchdowns. Junior quarterback Jesse Orth threw for 128 yards and a touchdown to Ryan Enzweiler. Luke Dischar returned an interception for a score in the fourth quarter to help the cause. Brossart travels to Trimble County 7:30 p.m. Fri-

Highlands senior Jordan Streeter (44) lost his helmet while trying to score a touchdown in the first half of the Bluebirds’ season opener Aug. 20 against DuPont Manual. Highlands won 45-14. day, Aug. 27. Trimble lost to Magoffin County 20-12 to start the year. Bellevue fell 33-19 to Holy Cross in Russ Shearer’s first game as head coach. D.J. Slater scored two touchdowns, one on an 82yard interception return. Jacob Sparks connected with Dylan Huff for a TD pass in the fourth quarter. Other local teams opted to play a second scrimmage game last weekend and will start their official schedule this week. The teams who played their opening games last weekend will get a bye week later in the year.

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• Newport Central Catholic boys’ soccer team beat Western Hills 3-0, Aug. 17. NCC’s Austin Juniet scored two goals and Evan Nieses scored one. Troy Kremer and Grosser were NCC’s goalies. • In volleyball, NCC beat Lloyd 25-5, 25-18, Aug. 17. • In boys’ golf, NCC beat Campbell County 162-177, Aug. 18. NCC’s Drew McDonald medaled after shooting 4 over par 39 on the front nine at A.J. Jolly.

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• Campbell County girls’ golfers beat Bishop Brossart 246-266, Aug. 17. Campbell’s Kara McCord shot a 55 on the front nine at Hickory Sticks. • In boys’ golf, Brossart lost to Highlands 166-180, Aug. 18.

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Kentucky kickoff

The video from the Aug. 18 broadcast of the Second Annual Northern Kentucky High School Football Preview can still be viewed online at www.tristateinternetsportsradio.com. The audio and video are available for an on-demand re-broadcast and podcast at www.tristateinternetsportsradio.com. Join Matt Buttelwerth, “The Coach� Aaron Stamm and the entire Tri State Internet Sports crew as they kick off the 2010 Northern Kentucky high school football season.


Sports & recreation

August 26, 2010

CCF Recorder

A11

Clippers take titles; one swims 10K For the second time in the history of the club, the Northern Kentucky Clippers won both the short course and the long course championship meets in the same year, the weekend of July 17. Swimmers from Ohio and Northern Kentucky with state qualifying times, participated in the Ohio Junior Olympics Long Course Championship. This is the first time the club has scored more than 3,000 points with swimmers only being allowed to compete in seven individual events. After four days of swimming, the Clippers came out on top, out scoring the second-place Dayton Raiders swim club by over 500 points. The official scores were as follows: • First place – Clippers with 3,046 points; second place, Dayton Raiders with 2449.50 points; and third place, Cincinnati Marlins with 1,951 points. • The Clipper’s 10 and under girls, 11-12 girls, 1112 boys and 13-14 girls were the overall age group champions. • Clippers set 14 new team records and 11 new relay records. • Individual event winners were: 10 and under girls – Sophie Skinner, 50 backstroke, 50 freestyle, 100 backstroke, 100 freestyle; and Sam Glass, 50 butterfly and 100 butterfly. • 11-12 girls – Olivia Hagen, 400 freestyle and 200 freestyle; and Katherine Akin, 50 butterfly. • 11-12 boys – Brendan Meyer, 400 freestyle. • 13-14 girls – Sharli Brady, 200 freestyle, 400 IM, 200 butterfly, 200 IM, 100 freestyle, 100 butterfly. • 13-14 boys – Chase Vennefron, 200 breaststroke. Relay even winners

PROVIDED

Northern Kentucky Clipper swimmer Carlie Herich shows off her medal after competing in the 2010 U.S. Master National Open Water Championship the weekend of July 17. were: • 10 and under girls – 200 freestyle and 200 medley • 11-12 girls – 200 freestyle, 200 medley, 400 freestyle, and 400 medley. • 11-12 boys – 200 freestyle, 200 medley, 400 freestyle, and 400 medley.

SIDELINES Elite baseball tryouts

The 2011 9U Kentucky Hitmen Baseball club is looking for 2 to 3 skilled players to fill its roster for the upcoming season. E-mail kentuckyhitmen@gmail.com or call 640-6677 to schedule a private tryout. The team will compete in the nationally recognized Southwest Ohio League (SWOL).

Baseball tryouts

The Force 16U baseball team is looking for five players for the 2011 season. The Force is a four-year AABC Baseball Club that plays both National and American teams in the SWOL league. The team’s home field is on Round Bottom Road, Milford; they also play several games out of Talawanda High School. The Force will try for three major tournaments in the 2011 season: the Buckeye Elite, Black Swamp Invitational and a World Series. Several smaller tournaments may also be played. Head coach Steve Marshall has 15 years coaching high-school age kids. He also heads up the Champion Baseball High School Elite Fall Ball League with Mike Bricker. This league is played in the Fall and Showcases the Top Varsity players in the Tristate to more than 60 colleges and scouts. A total of 20 to 30 boys get college scholarships through this program alone. Assistant Coach Michael Heck played four years in college, where he set several hitting records as well as got the MVP award his senior year of college. Assistant Coach Jeff Cobb, pitched at Xavier University until suffering an arm injury. The team’s goal is to compete and improve all players to have the level of play it takes for high school baseball and beyond. Call Steve at 200-9346 or e-mail cmarsh734@yahoo.com. CE-0000415318

PROVIDED

The Northern Kentucky Clippers swim team clamber to reach the prize after winning the Ohio Junior Olympics Long Course Championships at Miami University in Oxford, the weekend of July 17. This is their second state championship this year, after securing the state short course title in the spring. • 13-14 girls – 200 medley, 400 freestyle, and 400 medley. Meet records: • Sharli Brady – 13-14 girls 200 freestyle and 100 butterfly. • Sophie Skinner – 10 and under 50 backstroke and 100 backstroke. State records: • 10 and under boys –

200 medley relay (but placed second). • 10 and under girls – 200 freestyle relay. This same weekend, Northern Kentucky Clipper, Carlie Herich completed her first ever 10k open water swim by competing in the 2010 U.S. Master National Open Water Championships. This 10k swim also

marks a first for the Clippers as well. Herich has always been intrigued by the idea of trying a 10k. She has had success in previous open water swims but none of them were as long as the 6.2 miles. After two hours and 16 minutes she climbed out of the lake nearly one minute

and 30 seconds faster than the next closest female competitor. Only five male competitors finished ahead of her. The competition had more than 100 participants ranging from 18-66. The next goal for her will be to participate in the U.S. Swimming Open Water Nationals next year.


MY FAVORITE TEACHER B1

Judy Pieper

Volume 32, Number 30 © 2010 The Community Recorder ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Opportunity’s knocking

The 28th annual Opportunity Day hosted by the Father DeJaco Council 5220 of the Knights of Columbus is scheduled for Sept. 18. The event serves not only as a supervised fun for disabled children and adults, but also as a break for their caregivers. The council is currently seeking additional volunteers, corporate sponsors and donations of money to help make this year’s event another success. NEWS, A3

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving all of Campbell County

COUNTY RECORDER

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2, 2010

Web site: NKY.com

B E C A U S E C O M M U N I T Y M AT T E R S

School district sets tax rate

By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

The Campbell County School District by a 4-1 vote set a new tax rate at a special Aug. 26 meeting in Alexandria, that will generate 4 percent more revenue than the compensating rate for the previous year. The new real property tax rate for 2011 will be 54.7 cents per $1,000 of valuation on personal property and real estate and 54.2 cents per $1,000 for motor vehicles. The projected revenues gained by the rate are estimated by the school district at $16.5 million.

The previous year’s tax rate was 52.2 cents per $1,000 on real estate, personal property and motor vehicles and raised a total revenue of $16.56 million. Despite having the higher tax rate, the projected amount of revenue is lower because of property values going down, said Mark Vogt, director of finance for the district, at the meeting. The rate had been at 52.2 cents since the 2009 budget year. No one attended a public hearing before the new tax rate was set. Board member Rich Mason said the district’s rate has

remained remarkably stable for years, but the district needed to take the 4 percent revenue increase to keep pace with dwindling state funding. “When you look at what we’re faced with, we don’t have any other choice based on what is happening,” Mason said. In 1993 the district received 30.9 percent of its revenue from local property taxes, and 69.1 percent from state appropriations. By 2010 the school district received 56 percent of its budget from local property taxes and 44 percent from state funding. The state funding formula was

Campbell County Schools has added more room for Camels fans at high school football games, including a new oasis area complete with a student-made desert mural. Bob Miller Stadium, behind Campbell County Middle School in Alexandria, is a great place to watch a game, and a bigger area behind the seats was needed to accommodate the estimated 4,000 to 5,000 people attending each game. SCHOOLS, A6

Have a great photo from your child’s first day back to school? Trying to drum up publicity for your group’s event? Visit NKY.com/Share to submit your photos, news and events. It’s a one-stop-shop for submitting information to The Community Recorder, The Kentucky Enquirer, NKY.com and our other publications and websites. For the Postmaster

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once changed by a lawsuit, and if it comes to that again to make sure state funding is more evenly distributed then so be it, Mason said. Mason said the changes made to the funding formula after the lawsuit didn’t make it so it would help every district equally, and districts in Northern Kentucky and a few other areas are the ones that have been affected negatively. “I’ve said it before, if it takes a lawsuit, it takes a lawsuit, that’s how we got here in the first place,” Mason said.

Midway to host music festival

More room for fans

The crown of Gateway Community and Technical College’s is complete and welcoming students. The 103,000-square-foot Center for Advanced Manufacturing is set to train new employees for one of the area’s top job markets. Construction began on the center in 2007 after the Kentucky General Assembly appropriated $28.5 million for the project. LIFE, B1

50¢

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Mike Humbert, cake artist and co-owner of Fantasy in Frosting on Monmouth Street, puts the final touches on a cake.

Library card helping patrons save on more than just books By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

In honor of National Library Card month card holders in Northern Kentucky can get discounts at a variety of local businesses during September. For the fifth year, the public libraries in Campbell, Kenton, Boone and Grant counties have partnered with restaurants, service companies, retail stores and health and fitness businesses to offer library card holders discounts. “This is a very practical way for us to support National Library Card Month,” said Kiki Dreyer Burke, public relations manager for the Campbell County Public Library. “It helps the businesses get some publicity and us get new people to come in and get a card.” Dreyer Burke said the library is always looking for ways to bring in new patrons, and that a lot of people haven’t been to the library

Where to go Businesses offering discounts in Campbell County include: • City Brew Coffee, Alexandria • Country Heart Florist & Gifts, Alexandria • Lunch Etc, Alexandria • Avenue Brew, Bellevue • Bellevue Breadery, Bellevue • Splendid Things, Bellevue • Chan’s Asian Wok, Cold Spring • Blue Marble Children’s Bookstore, in years and don’t know what they’re missing. “The libraries have really changed and evolved over the years and offer so much more now,” Dreyer Burke said. “Once we get people in the door, they’re amazed and they come back.” Businesses throughout the county are offering discounts, including Avenue Brew in Bellevue, Blue Marble Children’s bookstore in Fort Thomas and Fantasy in Frosting in Newport.

Fort Thomas • Cobblestone Cafe, Fort Thomas • Salon 602, Fort Thomas • Beach’s Sew & Vac, Newport • Fantasy in Frosting, Newport • Kentucky Haus Artisan Center, Newport • Wags-N-Whiskers Pet Grooming, Newport • Town & County Sports & Health Club, Wilder Nancy Snodgrass, co-owner of Fantasy in Frosting, said the business has participated in the program the past two years and has had customers come in and use their card to get a discount. “I think of this as a way to not only support the library, but also support my business,” Snodgrass said. “In the past it has worked out well.” The program runs Sept. 1-30. For a complete list of participating businesses, visit a branch of the library or go to www.cc-pl.org.

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The Midway District will once again be the spot for businesses, bands and the community to come together for the annual Fort Thomas Renaissance Merchants and Music festival. The event, which is in its seventh year, is from 4 p.m. to 11 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 25 at the corner of South Fort Thomas Avenue and River Road. “The original concept behind this event was to draw attention to Fort Thomas businesses,” said Ken Bowman, chair of the Renaissance Board. “This event really sheds a positive light on this town.” About 30 local businesses will have booths at the event with information about what they offer. For the first time this year, food vendors from outside the city will join some of the city’s restaurants selling food and drinks to the crowd, who will be entertained by live music throughout the day. The Rusty Griswolds and G. Miles & the Hitmen will be opening for the headlining act, the Edgar Winter Band. “Having Edgar Winter play is pretty huge, especially with our budget,” Bowman said. Bowman said about 6,000 people usually attend the event, which is family-friendly and includes a children’s play area. Renaissance Manager Debbie Buckley said the event is a big deal for the city. “Merchants and Music brings in lots of people who might never have had a reason to visit Fort Thomas,” Buckley said. “They are introduced to our businesses, meet our friendly city and enjoy the music at the same time.” For more information, call 572-1278.


A2

Campbell County Recorder

News

September 2, 2010

Ship out with One Book One Community By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

Opening the next Northern Kentucky One Book One Community selection is almost as good as grabbing a paddle or setting sail if you have a heart for the sea, a river or adventure on the water. This year’s selection for the annual regional reading initiative is the non-fiction book “A Pearl in the Storm: How I found My Heart in the Middle of the Ocean” by

Index Calendar..................................B2 Classifieds.................................C Life...........................................B1 Police reports........................B10 Schools....................................A6 Sports ......................................A9 Viewpoints ............................A12

Kentucky author Tori Murden McClure. The story focuses on McClure’s solo rowing adventure across the Atlantic Ocean. The Campbell County Public Library is launching its own portion of the two-month-long reading adventure at the Cold Spring Branch, 3920 Alexandria Pike, at 7 p.m. Friday, Sept. 10, with real boats and model ships on display and live performance by the Celtic-inspired musical group

Maidens IV. Janet Arno, adult services librarian, said the library took a diverse approach when organizing programs centered around the book and included topics not only about the sea, but also about local waterways like the Licking River. That’s why Jim Thaxton, a nature enthusiast and outfitter, will be presenting “Touched by a River” Sept. 29 at the Cold Spring Branch, Arno said.

“I felt that most people, they will look at Tori’s remarkable adventure and think, ‘Oh, I could never do that,’” Arno said. But, there’s plenty of adventures to be had on local waterways, especially with the county’s access to the Licking River, she said. Each Campbell County library branch will have its own programs centered around water-related topics. The culminating event will be a talk by McClure, who is presi-

dent of Spaulding University and a resident of Louisville, at the Newport Branch Nov. 3. In the book there are themes about athleticism, health and water adventure that provide a wide range of opportunities for different programs, said Kiki Dreyer Burke, public relations manager for the library. For information about programs at all the Campbell County branches visit www.nkyonebook.org or www.cc-pl.org.

Newport dealing with revenue shortfall that has become annual trend By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com The effects of the economy are taking a toll on the City of Newport. In a recent city update given to the Newport Business Association, City Manager Tom Fromme outlined the issues the city is facing, from another revenue short-

fall this past year to problem properties that are costing taxpayer dollars. “The economy is on the top of everyone’s mind, and it has surely affected the city,” Fromme said. Fromme said the city’s revenue was down $600,000 for the 20092010 fiscal year, a trend that has been occurring for

several years in a row. The shortfall was a factor in several layoffs of city staff in July to get a balanced budget for the current fiscal year. Fromme said the loss of several big corporations, like Humana and Heinz, took away much needed payroll tax dollars from the city.

“When the economy goes down, payroll tax goes down,” Fromme said. “We’re just trying to keep our head above water.” Unlike many other cities whose total revenue is made up of a high percentage of property taxes, Newport only gets 10 percent of its revenue from property tax and about 50 percent from payroll tax. This is due mainly to the fact that Newport is made up of about 50 percent rental properties, which often hold less value. For example, Fromme

Tax

said, a five-family house near his Newport home is only valued at $60,000. Many of the properties in the city that get the most police calls, which costs the taxpayers money, are rental properties. Fromme said while having some rental properties is a good things, the high percentage that Newport has just eats up the city’s resources and causes population counts to be off. Without an accurate population count, the city loses tax dollars and grant opportunities.

Continued from A1

The lone dissenting vote came from outgoing board member Mike Combs of Alexandria, who said he’d be willing to take a lower increase below the 4 percent that would only cover the cost of teacher raises for the coming year. Combs said his vote was a protest for the district and board not doing enough to save money in other areas, especially by not competitively bidding out all contracts in previous

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years. Board member Janis Winbigler said before making her vote that while the district has made great strides in saving money by receiving competitive bids on more contracts, but said the district still has room for improvement in that area. Winbigler said she did credit Combs for raising the level of concern at looking at every contract, but believes the district is moving in the right direction in that area.

COUNTY RECORDER

Find news and information from your community on the Web Campbell County – nky.com/campbellcounty News Michelle Shaw | Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1053 | mshaw@nky.com Chris Mayhew | Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1051 | cmayhew@nky.com Amanda Joering | Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1052 | ajoering@nky.com Melanie Laughman | Sports Editor . . . . . . . . 513-248-7118 | mlaughman@nky.com James Weber | Sports Reporter . . . . . . . . . 578-1054 | jweber@nky.com Advertising Debbie Maggard | Advertising Manager. . . . . . 578-5501 | dmaggard@nky.com Michelle Schlosser | Account Rep . . . . . . . . 578-5521 | mschlosser@nky.com Delivery For customer service. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 781-4421 Sharon Schachleiter | Circulation Manager. . 442-3464 | sschachleiter@nky.com Judy Hollenkamp | Circulation Clerk . . . . . . . . 441-5537 | jhollenkamp@NKY.com Classified To place a Classified ad. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283-7290 | www.communityclassified.com To place an ad in Community Classified, call 283-7290.

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News

September 2, 2010

CCF Recorder

A3

Help Knights of Columbus share smiles By Chris Mayhew

helping someone fish, take the boat ride on the lake or watching some of the guests get up on stage with the live band during the concert and dance and sing along.

cmayhew@nky.com

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During the Sept. 20, 2009 Knights of Columbus Opportunity Day, guests countdown to release balloons at the Knights’ grounds south of Alexandria. From left in front are parents Don and Gail Cecconi, with their son Neal, and Paul Middleton, 21, with his grandfather Ray Smith of Covington, waiting with camera in hand for the signal to let their balloons fly.

How to help

The annual Knights of Columbus’ Opportunity Day the parents and caretakers for children and adults with disabilities and special needs is Saturday, Aug. 18 near Alexandria. The Knights are seeking additional volunteers and corporate and private sponsors. For information about the event, visit the website www.kofcdejaco.org. it every year than I think the kids do,” Meyer said. The council is currently seeking additional volunteers, corporate sponsors and donations of money to help make this year’s event another success, he said. A donation of about $50 covers the cost of one child’s day at the Knights of Columbus’ grounds, Meyer

said. Many people who volunteer are tasked with jobs like escorting one or two guests around the grounds between activities ranging from hot air balloon and pontoon boat rides to dinner, a petting zoo and fishing. “We also have to have people to hand out prizes and help with games around the rides,” Meyer said. Deputy Grand Knight Mike Ward of Alexandria, who is also Alexandria’s chief of police, said his wife and two daughters come to volunteer. They spend the day taking a couple of children or adults around the property and spend the entire day with them including helping them sit down to dinner.

Each year there are around 250 people out volunteering from the five parishes in the council’s district including St. Mary in Alexandria and Sts. Peter & Paul in California, Ward said. Additionally, students from public schools like Campbell County High School come out and volunteer, he said. “It’s an incredible event, it’s a way to give caretakers a day of rest,” Ward said. Dave McGrath of Alexandria, chancellor of the council, regularly volunteers his own time and that of his five children ranging in age from 12 to 25. Bringing his family to Opportunity Day is a great way to instill morality and remind his family how lucky they are, he said. McGrath said it’s fun

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It will take about one volunteer for each of the 150 or so disabled children and adults attending the annual Knights of Columbus’ Opportunity Day near Alexandria Sept. 18 to help make it a success. Father DeJaco Council 5220 has hosted the event around the group’s lake south of Alexandria for 28 years as a day of supervised fun for disabled children and adults, but also as a break for their caregivers, said Chris Meyer, Grand Knight of the council and event organizer. The event was first founded by Knights members including Larry Sendelbach of Cold Spring, who has a disabled daughter, Meyer said. “It’s a daunting task to take care of one of these special needs kids, so it was designed to give these parents a day off,” Meyer said. The parents and caregivers have the choice of either leaving, or staying and watching the person they brought have fun, he said. Meyer took over organizing the event from the Sendelbach family in recent years after being a regular volunteer for the event. Meyer said it’s fulfilling to share time with the special needs children and see them smile. “And the payoff for the volunteers, I get more out of

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The state’s Department of Insurance is moving at a brisk pace to implement all the changes mandated by federal health insurance reform, department officials reported to lawmakers. “The passage of this bill has put a huge workload on the department,” Insurance Commission Sharon Clark told members of the Interim Joint Committee on Banking and Insurance. But, she said, staff have been working diligently and efficiently to protect consumers during the transition. All told, the department has projected it will need only eight additional staff to meet all the requirements of the federal plan, and all of them will be federally funded, time-limited jobs paid for through grants. Although some implementation timelines run until 2014, one deadline has already passed, Clark said. Kentucky has opted not to operate a new highrisk pool, instead allowing federal officials to operate the program. “We were seriously concerned about the adequacy of funding,” she said, because only $63 million was allocated for the pool’s operation. The state will continue to maintain its current highrisk pool, which pre-dated the new law, she added. Another pressure on the department is the set of restrictions on new health insurance plans, separate from grandfathered plans that were already written when the bill was signed into law March 23. The distinction means that different plans will be held to different standards depending on the length they’ve been in place. Many new restrictions will be enforced on all plans, including the ban on rescissions on the extension

McGrath said his children quickly realized that they were having fun spending the day with someone with a disability. “They all want to participate now,” he said.


A4

CCF Recorder

County receives agricultural funding Rep. Joe Fischer (R)-Fort Thomas, announced that the Kentucky Agricultural Development Board has awarded the Campbell County Conservation District $32,575 in agricultural funding. “Campbell County has a long and storied history as an agricultural based economy,” Fischer said. “This additional funding will allow farmers to seek improvements that will help them grow their business.” The $32,575 in funding, awarded through the County Agricultural Investment Program (CAIP) is designed to provide farmers with incentives allowing them to improve and diversify their current production practices. Since 2001 the Kentucky Agricultural Development Board has awarded more than $304 million to county, regional and state projects with the goal of increasing income from agricultural based businesses and creation of new business opportunities for farmers.

News

September 2, 2010

Bank VP shaves head for United Way By Justin B. Duke jbduke@nky.com

A charity gained some money; a man lost some hair. Mark Exterkamp, executive vice president for Bank of Kentucky, won – or lost –

the company’s Big Wigs Give Their Fair Hair competition. The competition was a weeklong coin war where employees could donate to the United Way in jars for one of the company’s five executive vice presidents.

JUSTIN B. DUKE/STAFF

Mark Exterkamp, executive vice president for Bank of Kentucky, checks his new look after having his head shaved for charity.

JUSTIN B. DUKE/STAFF

Barber Forrest Stamper shaves Bank of Kentucky Executive Vice President Mark Exterkamp’s head.

The owner of the jar with the most money would have his head shaved. The competition brought in close to $1,200 as part of the company’s $75,000 corporate donation drive. Exterkamp’s jar brought in more than $1,000. “It was a landslide,” said Diane Czerwonka, director of human resources. Exterkamp, a Fort Thomas resident, learned he

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raised the most money just moments before sitting down in the barber’s chair. He didn’t expect to win, so he didn’t prepare his family for the potential of a new haircut when he got home from work. “I look like I just came from Chernobyl or something,” Exterkamp joked. “Or I was raising money for United Way.” Bank of Kentucky has donated to United Way since it opened in 1990. “We love United Way. We love what they stand for,” said Exterkamp, who works at the operations center on Tanner’s Gate in Flo-

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rence. While he wasn’t happy to have the new look, Exterkamp was happy to make helping the charity fun. “It should tell you something about our culture,” he said. “You aren’t going to find many companies whose upper management would do something like this.” Now that the competition is over, Exterkamp was looking for a way to get employees excited for next year’s drive. “Next year we’re doing tattoos – we’re upping the game,” he joked.

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News

September 2, 2010

CCF Recorder

A5

Eagle scout makes gates for school By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

In the field

Kimi Wyatt, left, a senior at Thomas More College, shows Congressman Geoff Davis, R-Hebron, a beaker full of daphnia cultures used in water toxicology testing during his visit to the college’s Biology Field Station on the Ohio River in California Thursday, Aug. 26. Davis listened to a presentation about research going on at the station along with the college’s president and representatives of the college’s board of trustees and Toyota North America. The field station, located at 8309 Mary Ingles Hwy., California, will have an open house for the public to review changes at the station and what’s happening there from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 19. It’s the first open house in more than 10 years. For information visit the website www.thomasmore.edu/fieldstation.

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

From left, Congressman Geoff Davis, R-Hebron, shares a laugh Thomas More College President Sr. Margaret Stallmeyer, and Anthony Depenbrock, a trustee of the college, during a visit to the college’s Biology Field Station on the Ohio River in California, Ky., Thursday, Aug. 26.

BRIEFLY Garbage truck crash kills Fort Thomas man

The crash of a garbage truck into a car in the early morning hours of Saturday, Aug. 28, killed a Fort Thomas man. Police have identified the man who was killed early Saturday when a garbage truck ran into his car on U.S. 27. Mark Foster, 40, of Fort

Thomas, died at the scene of the 3:30 a.m. crash, said Lt. George Schreiner. Foster had just left work at Sara Lee in Claryville and was stopped at the red light on northbound U.S. 27 at Viewpoint Drive when a Rumpke garbage truck rear-ended his car. The truck driver, Duane Yates, 57, of Georgetown, Ohio, told police he just looked

up and “there the car was,” Schreiner said. Because there were no skid marks before impact, police think that Yates may have momentarily dozed off just before the crash, Schreiner said. No charges have been filed but the Campbell County Major Accident Reconstruction Team is investigating the crash, he said. -The Enquirer

Nathan Brugger has designed and built a decorative and functional swinging gate commemorating the centennial of St. Philip Parish church and school in Melbourne. Brugger started designing the gate in March 2009, and with assistance from other parish families obtained the supplies and some welding expertise to help him finish the gate. Brugger said the gate’s final installation was in time for the Sunday, July 25 service and before his 18th birthday Aug. 25 – a requirement for Eagle Scout projects is for them to be completed by age 18. The gate was designed to match the black metal fencing used around St. Philip School, he said. There was a gap in the fence that needed a permanent fix after some wooden gates were tried to keep balls from the playground from rolling onto nearby Rt. 8, Brugger said. “I think one of the reasons for me choosing the gate project was during school hours when the kids are playing at recess, and the ball rolls down and they don’t want the kids running into the street,” he said. Brugger said he received help drawing and designing the fence from his friend’s dad, who is an architect, and from his own dad, who is an engineer.

PROVIDED

Nathan Brugger of Melbourne, stands in front of Ky. 8 and the decorative gates at St. Philip School in Melbourne he designed, helped made, and donated July 25, 2010 for his Boy Scouts of America Eagle Scout project to help keep students from running into the road while playing games like kickball. Photo Provided Brugger said he sanded and cut the steel into sizes as needed himself. St. Philip Parish member Roger Brown, who has welding experience, put in a lot of time helping out, Brugger said. On each side of the gate there is a circular decorative seal with the St. Philip emblem with “1910” on one side celebrating the church’s centennial, and “Living Faith,” a motto of the church. Brugger said he’s been told his experience designing the gate will come in handy when applying for a co-op through college. A 2010 graduate of Bishop Brossart High School, Brugger will attend the University of Louisville in the fall where he will study civil

engineering. His father, Jerry said he wanted to make sure Nathan was supported in the process by him, but that he was able to take a back seat in the process because Nathan was never far off course. Jerry said he was impressed by Nathan’s willingness to exceed the necessary requirements for the project and learn about seeing a project through all of its steps. Nathan could have had enough service hours in by building the gates from prefabricated store-bought materials, Jerry said. “He wanted to learn the whole process so he wanted to literally undertake building the whole thing from the raw materials,” Jerry said.

65th Anniversary 1945 - 2010

Hamilton County Soil and Water Conservation District's 65th Annual Meeting/Open House Date: Thursday, September 16, 2010 Time: 2:00 pm - 7:30 pm Cost: Free Place: District Office 22 Triangle Park Drive Cincinnati, Ohio 45246 Light refreshments will be served starting at 2:00 pm and

a short business meeting will start at 6:30 pm Please joins us at our new office Between 2 pm - 7:30 pm Silent auction to fund Odegard/Diebel Memorial Scholarship Please RSVP so we may plan for refreshments. Please call 513-772-7645 or mail RSVP to: Hamilton County SWCD, 22 Triangle Park Drive, Cincinnati, Ohio 45246-3411.

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SCHOOLS A6

CCF Recorder

September 2, 2010

ACHIEVEMENTS

Editor Michelle Shaw | smhaw@nky.com | 578-1053

|

NEWS

|

ACTIVITIES

|

HONORS

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

N K Y. c o m

RECORDER

Expansion means more room for Camel fans By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

Campbell County Schools has added more room for Camels fans at high school football games including a new oasis area complete with a student-made desert mural. Bob Miller Stadium, located behind Campbell County Middle School in Alexandria, is a great place to watch a game, and a bigger area behind the seats was needed to accommodate the estimated 4,000 to 5,000 people attending each game, said Greg Rose of Alexandria, chairman of the Camel Athletic Boosters. Renovations have included paving what had been a gravel area underneath the stadium seats and painting a mural, Rose said. The ticket booth and a fence around the stadium area were also moved further out into the parking lot behind the school to create another area where people can congregate, he said. The newly opened area at the entrance of the stadium will serve as the location of the “Camel Kick-

Off Cookout and Rock The House” tailgate event from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. Friday, Sept. 17. There will be music by a band of Campbell County High School students, “Dirty Tree Tribe 2” and hot dogs and soda on sale for $1. Kickoff to the game against Newport Central Catholic High School will be at 7:30 p.m. Tyler Shelton, a junior at the high school, painted a graffiti mural behind the stands, and also helped paint some new “mean” Camel heads on the doors of an off-the-field shed to create a more consistent camel logo throughout the stadium, Rose said. Overall, the new mural, logos and renovations give an upgrade to the facility built back in the 1940s, he said. All the efforts are about making Friday nights special by adding a little more brightness to the stadium area, Rose said. “We’re trying to create an atmosphere and area where it’s more than just a football game on Friday night, but an event, and make it the place to be,” he said.

PROVIDED

Campbell County High School junior Tyler Shelton paints a desert landscape with camels Saturday, Aug. 24 at Bob Miller Stadium in Alexandria, the home field of the school’s football team.

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Highlands Middle School students gather on the plaza for the school’s Kick-off party in celebration of Highlands’ football home game Friday, Aug. 27.

It’s party time AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Parent volunteer Paige Sutkamp spray paints Spencer Dee’s hair blue during the event. AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Sixth-graders Addie Parris (left) and Claire Snider pose for a picture while enjoying some pizza during the event.

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

The Highlands Middle School cheerleaders put on a show during the event.

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Seventh-grader Jake Farley throws a football at a target during a game at the event.

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Sixth-grade Luke Lafrange gets his face painted by volunteer Sarah Bates.


Schools

September 2, 2010

CCF Recorder

A7

Marlins hire coach, seek swimmers Former Cincinnati Marlin, Sue (Hartman) House will take over head coaching duties at the Cincinnati Marlins South location, which practices at Northern Kentucky University. House comes to the Marlins after 29 years as the head coach of East Central High School swim team in Indiana. During her career, House coached swimmers to three individual high school state

titles and more than 20 swimmers to Indiana agegroup state titles. Sue was named Coach of the Year by the Eastern Indiana Athletic Conference 20 times for the girls and 22 times for the boys. She was also named the Indiana High School Coach of the year in 2002. In addition to her coaching accomplishments, Sue has been the swim lesson coordinator for the East Central Community

for the last 30 years. This program teaches 200-300 swimmers each year. She is a Red Cross instructor for water safety, lifeguarding, and CPR. The Cincinnati Marlins will have an open house at the Northern Kentucky University location from 6:30-8 p.m., Wednesday, Sept. 15, for any swimmer interested in joining the Marlins. Visit www.cincy-marlins. com or call 513-761-3320.

PROVIDED.

New Cincinnati Marlins Head Coach Sue House, on left, celebrates her new position with Head Marlin Coach Chris Wolford and Assistant Marlin Coach Jerri Freimuth.

NEWS FROM NKU Professor recognized

Dr. Kristi Haik, an associate biology professor at Northern Kentucky University, has received the Council on Undergraduate Research (CUR) Biology Division Mentor Award for her efforts in serving as a role model to students and other mentors of undergraduate research nationwide. The award, in its inaugural year, was highly competitive. CUR represents more than 900 colleges and universities across the country and received applicants from all over. Twenty-three students mentored by Haik have completed 73 abstracts at local, state and national conferences. These students also wrote 23 grant proposals, 22 in which were awarded. Many of her students have also cowritten publications for various peer-review journals. Dr. Haik and her students base most of their research around the brain, specifically, developing models and treatments for neurological diseases, disorders and injuries. Their current projects include investigating uses of nanotechnology, Parkinson’s disease and heavy metal toxicity.

Helping communities

Last Saturday, nearly 200 entering Northern Kentucky University Chase College of Law students participated in a community service project that took them to various locations throughout Northern Kentucky. In its second year, the program requires that all firstyear law students perform a morning of public service for a number of local charitable organizations. The students braved the rain and humid weather and

spent the morning painting, cleaning, providing maintenance help, weeding, landscaping, sorting clothing and cleaning up a local highway. Students worked in small groups at Campbell Lodge Boys’ Home, Redwood School & Rehabilitation Center, Fort Thomas Veterans Hospital, New Perceptions, Brighton Center, Alexandria Fairgrounds and WNKU. The first-year students enjoyed the opportunity to serve the community while getting to know their new classmates. Following the service project, students gathered back on NKU’s campus for lunch and a student organization fair where they learned all about the different organizations run by and for Chase law students.

Program applications

The Northern Kentucky University Program for Talent Development and Gifted Studies is now accepting applications for its fall 2010 ExploreMore! Enrichment Program. Classes will begin October 2 and continue for six consecutive Saturdays until November 6. Geared to gifted students in grades K-8, the ExploreMore! Enrichment Program offers a broad range of courses to qualified students. Students will have the opportunity to select an interactive, hands-on course that matches their interests and abilities. This fall’s classes include topics like gobs of goo; spaghetti, ,marshmallow and imagination; frog dissection; video game design; and physics. Class sizes are limited to provide an optimum teaching and learning environment. Classes are taught by quali-

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fied teachers, focus on a central theme and designed to allow students to explore their natural curiosities. A full brochure can be downloaded at http:// gifted.nku.edu/docs/fallexploremore.pdf. All applications must be postmarked by September 17. For more information, contact Dr. Kim Code or Dr. Kevin Besnoy at (859) 572-1957 or gifted@nku.edu.

NKU to host piano

Northern Kentucky University announced that it will help Cincinnati Public Radio celebrate a combined 150 years of quality public broadcasting on 90.9 WGUC, 91.7 WVXU and 88.5 WMUB by hosting a piano from the public art installation, “Play Me, I’m Yours” by artist Luke Jerram. The piano was installed on the northwest corner of NKU’s University Center – just across the Student Union – on Thursday, Aug. 26, and remain until Sept. 17. The piano, painted by the stu-

NKU provost honored

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given for exemplary leadership in advancing civic engagement in higher education. Wells is the fifth recipient of the William M. Plater Award for Leadership in Civic Engagement, given since 2006 by the American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU) and its American Democracy Project. In honoring Wells as this year’s recipient, the AASCU selection committee cited NKU’s consistent commitment to civic learning as manifested by programming, funding and administrative structure. “It is evident that student civic learning occurs at NKU with exceptional regularity and success, and

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dents at ArtWorks, is there for anyone to discover and play. It acts as a “blank canvas” for the public to play and enjoy, creating art at locations all around the city. The installation also includes the website, www. cincinnatipianos.com, where the community is encouraged to upload videos, pictures and recordings of the pianos. The site also provides a place to share thoughts and ideas about the project.

To advertise call 513.768.6000


A8

CCF Recorder

September 2, 2010

Schools

NKU receives grant for STEM Northern Kentucky University announced that it has received a $999,930 National Science Foundation grant to help recruit and retain science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) students. The grant, which NKU is calling Focus on Occupations, Recruiting, Role Models, Community and Engagement (FORCE), will be administered over five years. “It’s pretty prestigious,” said Dr. Bethany Bowling, co-principal investigator for the grant. NKU was one of 22 schools that received the grant out of 186 schools proposals submitted. Bowling said the hope is

that the FORCE program will increase the retention of freshman STEM students from about 30 percent to 60 percent and increase the STEM graduation rate by 50 percent. “We will be presenting and publishing information about various aspects of the project,” Bowling said. She and others will collect data to measure the program’s success. As part of the program, 10 NKU students have been selected as STEM ambassadors to assist with FORCE. Two students from each of the programs involved – biology, chemistry, computer science, mathematics and physics – will have the

responsibilities of holding study sessions, assisting in recruitment efforts and getting STEM majors involved with campus activities. The STEM ambassadors are mostly juniors selected because of their success in harder classes and campus involvement. Each STEM ambassador will be awarded a $3,000 stipend for the year. To kick off FORCE, there will be a summer research celebration Sept. 1 from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. on the fourth floor of NKU’s Dorothy Westerman Herrmann Natural Science Center. The event will involve an ice cream social for all STEM majors.

REUNIONS Dayton all-alumni event

PROVIDED

State of the University

President James C. Votruba delivers the 2010 Northern Kentucky University Fall Convocation (State of the University Address) in Greaves Concert Hall before a full audience of faculty, staff and community guests Aug. 20.

The Dayton High School Class of 1965 is holding an open reunion to anyone who attended Dayton High School, Saturday, Sept. 25, at Guys and Dolls, 4210 Alexandria Pike, in Cold Spring. There will be a cash bar from 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. and a buffet dinner including chick-

en, pot roast, potatoes, salad, dessert and coffee, tea or cokes from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. The evening will continue with dancing after dinner. The cost is $30 per person. The night prior to the reunion, Friday, Sept. 24, there will be a tailgate for alumni before the Dayton vs

Beechwood game, at Superior Coal, 9th and Vine from 4 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Bring food and drinks, but no alcohol is permitted. Contact Buddy Dittus at 859-586-9896 or oedittus@oedin.net or send check to Tim Testerman, 164 Burgess Lane, Florence KY 41042.


SPORTS BRIEFLY

New preps blog

There are several ways to keep in touch with high school sports coverage the Community Recorder newspapers provide. • Preps blog – www. cincinnati.com/blogs/press preps • Twitter – www.twitter. com/crkysports • Facebook – www.facebook.com/presspreps • Online stories and photos – nky.com/preps

This week at Highlands

• The Highlands girls’ volleyball team beat Lexington Catholic 25-20, 25-14, Aug. 23. Cooper beat Highlands 25-24, 13-25, 25-23, Aug. 26. On Aug. 24, the girls beat Lloyd 25-10, 25-18. • In girls’ soccer, Highlands beat Lexington Catholic 4-1, Aug. 26. Highlands’ Grause scored two goals and Abner and Newman scored one goal each. • In girls’ golf, Highlands beat Newport Central Catholic 210-244, Aug. 26. Highlands golfer Lauren Harret medaled with 8 over par 44 on the front nine at Hickory Sticks. • The boys’ soccer team tied with Greenwood 4-4, Aug. 28. Highlands’ Beerman scored two goals and Foellger and Nehus scored one goal each.

This week at Bishop Brossart

• The Bishop Brossart boys’ golf team placed first with a 355 in the 10th Regional All “A” Tournament, Aug. 23. • In boys’ soccer, Brossart shut out Calvary Christian 70, Aug. 24. Brossart’s Hardig made three saves; Dierig scored two goals; and Braun, Perkins, Frommeyer, Luerson and Wilson each scored one goal. On Aug. 26, the boys lost to St. Henry 2-1 in the All “A” Classic semifinals. • In girls’ volleyball, Brossart beat Dixie Heights 25-14, 21-25, 25-19, Aug. 24. On Aug. 26, the girls beat St. Patrick’s 25-16, 25-12 in the 10th Region All “A” Classic first round. • The girls’ soccer team shut out Holmes 10-0, Aug. 25. Brossart’s Anstead and Ledonne each made one save; Maria Silbersack and Elizabeth Schmidt scored two goals each; and Fielders, Sarah Klump, Anstead, Greely, Hardig and Stadtmiller scored one goal each. • On Aug. 25, the Dixie Heights girls’ golf team beat Bishop Brossart 205-251. Dixie’s Megan Mauer medaled with 10 over par 46 on the back nine at Pioneer. The Brossart girls beat Scott 213-227, Aug. 26. Brossart’s Madi Schneider and Lauren Seiter both medaled after shooting 14 over par 48 on the front nine of Flagsprings Golf Course.

This week at NCC

• The Newport Central Catholic boys’ soccer team beat Covington Latin 7-1, Aug. 24. NCC’s Guthier scored four goals and Juniet scored three. On Aug. 26, the NCC boys beat Villa Madonna 2-1 in the All “A” Classic semifinals. On Aug. 28, NCC beat St. Henry 2-1. • In girls’ soccer, NCC beat Holy Cross 2-0, Aug. 25. Madison Freeman made six saves. Olivia Hagedorn and Christina Seibert scored NCC’s goals. On Aug. 28, the NCC girls tied with Ryle 1-1. Kelsey Johnson scored NCC’s goal. • In boys’ golf, NCC beat Bishop Brossart 165-179. NCC’s Colin Dupont medaled with 4 over par 40 on the back at A.J. Jolly. • In girls’ golf, Highlands beat Newport Central Catholic 210-244, Aug. 26.

CCF Recorder

September 2, 2010

HIGH SCHOOL | Editor Melanie Laughman | mlaughman@nky.com | 513-248-7118

YOUTH

|

RECREATIONAL

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

N K Y. c o m

A9

RECORDER

Campbell football teams have strong week By James Weber jweber@nky.com

Bishop Brossart High School rolled over Trimble County 42-6 in prep football to improve to 2-0 this season. Jesse Orth threw for 220 yards and three touchdowns, two in the fourth quarter as the Mustangs pulled away. The TD passes were to Connor Boesch, Ryan Enzweiler and Spencer Brown. Enzweiler and Jacob Elbert each had 70 rushing yards and a TD run. Boesch had an interception return for a score in the fourth quarter to break the game open. Brossart makes a threehour trip south to play Caverna 7 p.m. Friday, Sept. 3. Campbell County High School took the first step toward putting a disappointing 2009 season in the rear view mirror by beating Norwood 50-7 on the road. Norwood had beaten the Camels 30-20 last year. Campbell County had three interceptions and two long punt returns, one each by Corey Cox and Jake Rebholz. Michael Kremer threw for 179 yards and three touchdowns, one each to Corey Cox, Nate Geiman and Jake Ritter. Danny Glasgow had two touchdowns. Rebholz scored on an interception return. Campbell goes back across the river to play Roger Bacon 7:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 3. The Camels won 31-28 last year. Russ Shearer’s first Bellevue/Newport High School rivalry game was a wild one, but it ended with a celebration for the first-year Tiger head coach. The Tigers beat the Wildcats 35-34 to improve to 11 this season. It was Newport’s season opener. Both teams scored five touchdowns, but ultimately Bellevue’s special teams and two-point conversion offense were one point better than Newport’s.

Highlands’ Devin Bruns sacks Ryle quarterback Conner Hempel Aug. 27. Bellevue rallied from 11 points down at halftime to win. Bellevue had 341 yards offense to 330 for Newport. D.J. Slater rushed for 198 yards and four touchdowns. Dylan Huff had a TD run and key two-point conversion in the fourth quarter for the eventual winning points. Demetri Brown rushed for two touchdowns for Newport and threw TD passes to Quin McDay and Rob Washington. Brown had 173 yards in the air and 113 on the ground. Washington was the top receiver with four catches for 86 yards. Robert Engram returned a fumble 51 yards for a touchdown for Newport. Marc Marshall recovered two Bellevue fumbles for the Wildcats. Jacob Whaley led with 22 tackles.

AMANDA DAVIDSON/STAFF

AMANDA DAVIDSON/STAFF

Highlands Daniel Gold, (16) greets Brian Gall in the end zone after scoring a touchdown during Highlands’ 29-14 victory over Ryle Aug. 27 in Fort Thomas. Newport plays at Pendleton County 7:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 3. Newport won 35-14 last year. Pendleton

beat Dayton 14-6 last week. Bellevue plays at Holmes 7 p.m. Friday, Sept. 3. Holmes won 24-8 last year

and beat Lloyd 46-0 last week. Dayton High School lost 14-6 to Pendleton County Saturday, Aug. 28. Dayton travels across the river to play Taylor 7:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 3. Taylor beat Dayton 20-16 last year and bested Dayton’s fellow river town/1A district rival Ludlow 36-20 last week. Highlands High School defeated Ryle 29-14 in Fort Thomas to improve to 2-0 this season. Highlands had 443 yards offense. Jordan Streeter had 104 yards rushing. Corey Compton had two TD runs as part of a personal 96-yard ground effort. Patrick Towles had 151 passing yards and a TD pass to Andrew Gold. Brian Gall had a TD run. Gold’s TD catch came as time expired in the first half to post Highlands to a 1413 deficit. Gold had three catches for 65 yards. Austin Sheehan had one catch, but a big one for 61 yards. Drake Bruns had an interception and a fumble recovery on defense. Josh Quillen had a fumble recovery. Highlands won its 30th straight game and has not lost to another Kentucky team since 2006. The teams will meet again Oct. 28 in Union, as the teams signed to meet each other twice each of the past two years. But first, Highlands will host Beechwood 7 p.m. Friday in Fort Thomas. Beechwood lost 35-21 to Dixie Heights last week. Newport Central Catholic rolled to a 44-6 win over Aiken at Newport Stadium. to improve to 2-0. Chris Kelly rushed for 163 yards and two touchdowns. Brady Hightchew rushed for a score and threw for 102 yards. Jake Cain had two TD runs and Jake Giesler had a fumble return for a score. NewCath hosts Madison Central 7:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 3. MC, a 6A school, lost Bell County 55-8 last week and is 1-1.

Area cross country looks strong for ’10 By James Weber jweber@nky.com

Bishop Brossart High School returns five starters from a boys’ cross country team that finished fourth in the region and fourth in the state in Class 1A last year. Returning starters are seniors Zach Holtkamp, Andy Wolfer, Jack Foster, and Barrett Kues; and junior Brian Neltner. Holtkamp battled illness last season but still finished 10th in the state. Freshman Michael Caldwell is the top newcomer. The Mustangs run in the Ryle Invitational Sept. 4. Robbie Scharold is gone from Campbell County High School after finishing sixth in the state meet in cross country last year in Class 3A. The Campbell County boys’ cross country team returns five starters as the Camels look to move on after sending Scharold to run for the University of Kentucky. Ben Rawe, Kyle Clark,

FILE PHOTO

Zach Holtkamp is one of Brossart’s top returning runners. Kevin Zalac, Garrett Mahoney, and Austin Bryant are the returning starters for the Camels, who finished 14th at state overall last year. The top newcomer is Tyler Hubbard. The Camels return five starters from last year’s girls’ team that qualified for state. Campbell runs in the Ryle Invitational Sept. 4 to start the season then will run at Grant County Sept. 11.

Loren Martin, Faith Roaden, Jessica Holden, Emily Ripberger, and Haley Rose are the returning starters. Taylor Robinson, who finished 23rd at state last year, is devoting herself to soccer this fall and is not with the cross country team. Bellevue High School has high hopes under thirdyear head coach Caleb Finch. Returning boys’ runners include sophomores Jordan Roberts, Nolan Rechtin and Noah Placke; and eighthgrader Tony Isbell. Top newcomers are junior Kenny Patton and seventh-grader Chris Riehl. Finch is hoping the Tigers can have a full girls’ team at regionals. Sophomore Maddie Blevins is the top runner. Finch said overall numbers are up in the program. Bellevue runs in the Ryle Invitational Sept. 4. Brady Kennedy takes over the Dayton High School program this season.

He has 10 girls and five boys, including Elizabeth Combs, Sydney Duke, Tyler Duke, Chris Johnson, Casey Kohls, Cheyenne Lambert, Jessica Lambert, Adam Roth, Katie Tillman, Morgan Tucker, Mark Tumler, Mason Tumler, Miranda Walling, Gwen Watson, and Megan Wear. Walling led the girls’ team at the Holmes meet to start the 2010 season Aug. 28, placing 43rd. Johnson led the boys’ team in 29th. The Highlands boys’ cross country team was fourth in the Holmes Licking River Run Aug. 28 to start the 2010 season. Senior Travis Hilker was the top Bluebird in 18th place. Garrett Wehrle was 21st and senior Christian Heck 22nd. Highlands was 11th in the state in 2A last year. Highlands High School was third in the girls’ race at the Licking River Run Aug. 28. Lauren Ossege was third. Paige Dauer was 15th, Kelsey Clark 23rd, Corrine

FILE PHOTO

Junior Ben Rawe is one of Campbell County’s top runners.

Carnohan 25th and Ashley Gish 26th. Highlands qualified for state last year. Newport Central Catholic High School was eighth in the girls’ race at Holmes to start the year Aug. 28. Senior Mallory Niemer was 17th to lead the way. Junior Alex Schalk was 34th. NewCath was eighth in boys, led by Connor Bartels in ninth. Silver Grove High School will have a program for a second straight year. The Big Trains will run at Ryle Sept. 4.


A10

CCF Recorder

Sports & recreation

September 2, 2010

Mustangs get double dose of All ‘A’ titles By James Weber jweber@nky.com

The Bishop Brossart golf teams pulled off the double play Aug. 23 in the All “A” Classic 10th Region golf tournaments. Both teams won the regional and will represent the school at the state tournament Sept. 11 in Richmond. “The big thing is it was one of our goals,” said boys’ head coach Chris Holtz. “It was rewarding to accom-

plish that. We got beat last year and it was nice to get it back.” The boys’ team shot a team score of 355 to beat Paris by seven shots. Sophomore Jimmy Kelley was second overall with an 85 and the top Mustangs. The next three Mustangs were close behind. Balance has been a strength. Kelley, Eric Walz, Matt Striegel and Bryan Kraus have taken turns leading the Mustangs in a given match. Perhaps their

best match was a victory over rival Campbell County, as Walz and Kelley both shot 40 to beat the Camels 166-176. “I have four guys who are pretty consistent and I can put them in any order and a fifth who is working his way into that conversation,” Holtz said. “Our top guy could be any of them on any day and that’s a good thing.” Brossart also beat Ninth Region champ St. Henry this year.

Other members are seniors Ben Kroger and Jordan Verst, sophomore Ian Nieses and freshman Ray Twehues. The girls’ team was led by sophomore Lauren Seiter, who was the overall medalist. Freshman Brittany Burkhart has been one of the team leaders as well. Brossart is a young team with no one older than a sophomore. The Mustangs have three of those in Seiter, Catherine DeMoss and Amanda Pfefferman; two freshmen in Burkhart and Madison Schneider; and an eighth-grader in Taylor Burkhart. Schneider and Seiter both shot 49’s in a recent win over Scott.

BRIEFLY This week at Silver Grove

Gary is 40 years

• The Silver Grove boys’ golf team placed seventh in the 10th Regional All “A” Tournament, Aug. 23. • In girls’ volleyball, Beechwood beat Silver Grove 24-13, 25-12, Aug. 24.

old, but running marathons makes him feel like he’s still 20.

Campbell County’s Shelby Davis (12) battles for the ball against Cooper’s Jennifer Brandstetter (17) Aug. 25.

Camels beat Cooper

Campbell County beat Cooper 3-0 in girls’ soccer Aug. 25 in Alexandria. The Camels improved to 2-3 heading into a home match with Scott Aug. 30. Anna Carrigan, Lynsey Lapre and Kaitlin Bryan scored for Campbell.

PHOTOS BY JOSEPH FUQUA II/STAFF

This week at Bellevue

• The Villa Madonna girls’ volleyball team beat Bellevue 25-12, 25-10, Aug. 24. • The Covington Latin girls’ soccer team beat Bellevue 9-1, Aug. 26. Bellevue’s Bohn scored the team’s only goal.

This week at Campbell

• The Campbell County boys’ soccer team beat Conner 1-0, Aug. 24. Campbell’s Cameron Malicoat made 10 saves, and Colton Tanner scored the goal. On Aug. 26, Scott tied with Campbell County 1-1. Campbell’s goal was scored by Tanner. • In boys’ golf, Campbell County lost to Pendleton County 176-177, Aug. 24. Campbell County beat Highlands 166-172, Aug. 25. Campbell’s Jake Ripberger shot 4 over par 40 on the front nine at Hickory Sticks.

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Campbell County’s Jessica Garza (20) battles for the ball against Cooper’s Emma Harkins (45) in the first half of their Aug. 25 game. Campbell County beat Cooper 3-0.

The 2011 9U Kentucky Hitmen Baseball club is looking for two or three skilled players to fill its roster for the upcoming season. E-mail kentuckyhitmen@gmail.com or call 640-6677 to schedule a private tryout. The team will compete in the nationally recognized Southwest Ohio League (SWOL).

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Campbell County’s Kristen Rice (18) heads the ball against Cooper’s Stephanie Brandstetter (24) Aug. 25.


Sports & recreation

CCF Recorder

September 2, 2010

A11

NKU volleyball picked to finish 4th PROVIDED

Hitting it sweet

Northern Ky Hitmen 16U won the 2010 Battle of the Borders Tournament. Players on the team are from Boone, Kenton and Cambell counties. Teams from Oh, Ky, In and Mi were represented. On knees: Ricky Pangallo, Jeffrey Guidugli, Vinnie Pangallo and Jimmy Tomlin Standing: Coach Rick Pangallo, Brady Hightchew, Evan Winchester, Zach Wynn, Blake Maines, Kyle Fuller, Spencer Brown, Kyle Jefferds, Charlie Reekers and Coach Joe Zimmerman Not Pictured: Justin Kohake, Alec Smith and Jesse Orth Sorry, also not pictured is Coaches Jim Smith and Dave Kohake

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The Northern Kentucky University volleyball team has been picked to finish fourth in the Great Lakes Valley Conference preseason poll, which was released Tuesday. NKU, which posted a 2012 record last season, received 158 total points in the poll. The Norse were 10-4 in the GLVC last year and finished fourth in the league standings. NKU, which returns five starters this year, has won at least 20 matches for 17 consecutive seasons. Defending GLVC champion Indianapolis is the preseason pick to win the GLVC. The Greyhounds, who also won the NCAA Division II Midwest Region championship last fall, collected 193 total points and 11 first-place votes in the poll. Indianapolis posted a 38-2 overall record last season, including a 13-1 mark in the GLVC. Lewis totaled 179 total points and picked up two first-place votes to finish second in the poll. The Flyers (32-5, 14-0 GLVC) finished atop the GLVC regular-season standings in 2009. Missouri-St. Louis garnered 163 total points and one first-place vote to take third place in the preseason poll. The Tritons posted a 2111 overall record last year, including an 11-3 GLVC record. NKU begins its season Sept. 3 by meeting threetime defending NCAA Division II national champion Concordia-St. Paul in the University of Tampa Classic. Concordia-St. Paul finished with a 37-0 record last season en route to its third straight national championship. The Golden Bears won 32 matches by 3-0 sweeps and have dominated NCAA Division II volleyball during the past three years with 74 straight victories. The Norse also face Nebraska-Kearney (33-3 last season), Central Missouri (34-5 last season) and Tampa (31-3 last season) during that same two-day tournament in Florida. Those three teams also advanced to the NCAA Division II Tournament last year, with Tampa earning a trip to the Elite Eight. NKU plays its home opener Tuesday, Sept. 7, against the College of Mount St. Joseph. The next evening, Charleston (W.Va.) visits Regents Hall to meet the Norse. The Norse begin GLVC play Sept. 17 with a match at Southern Indiana. NKU plays host to Drury Oct. 1 in its first GLVC home match, followed by a showdown against Rockhurst on Oct. 2 in Regents Hall.

Bengals-Ravens Home Opener (9/19) tickets available; visit Bengals.com or 513.621.8383.


VIEWPOINTS

A12

Campbell County Recorder

September 2, 2010

EDITORIALS

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LETTERS

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COLUMNS

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CH@TROOM

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

N K Y. c o m

Editor Michelle Shaw | smhaw@nky.com | 578-1053

RECORDER

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Thank you, Fort Thomas

As it appears, the summer is quickly drawing to an end in Ft. Thomas. As autumn arrives schedules get busier and the hustle and bustle of school and fall activities can consume our lives. Nonetheless, at this time the Beiting Family would like to stop and take a moment to express our appreciation to the entire Ft. Thomas community. It was nearly three months ago on May 26 that we discovered that our father, Larry Beiting, was diagnosed with a meningioma, a type of brain tumor. Although benign, the alarming news stopped us right in our tracks. Many questions surfaced as we were curious as to how it developed, what sort of effects is it having, what's the proper treatment,

just to name a few. Yet, we never questioned whether or not we would be going through it alone. We were very confident in our community and they certainly were there to support and pray for us in more ways than we ever could have imagined. Larry's surgery was a long and arduous one but most importantly a success as the surgeon was able to remove the egg-sized tumor located in his mid-left parietal portion of his brain. His road to recovery has continued to progress smoothly as he transitioned from in-patient rehab for two weeks following his hospital stay at University Hospital and now at home as an out-patient in therapy at Drake Rehab Hospital. We are very grateful for the terrific work by the skilled surgeons,

nurses and therapists that have all had a big hand in Larry's great health improvements. However, the outpouring of support by many members of the Ft. Thomas community has attributed to his success as well. The wonderful meals that have been supplied to assist us in this time of need have helped tremendously as well. We as a family are so proud to call Ft. Thomas our home. The small-town charm and southern warmth and generosity that we knew Ft. Thomas possessed, was confirmed to us this summer and for that we thank you all. The Beiting Family Fort Thomas

Many thanks

I would like to compliment

Branch Manager Dave Anderson for developing the Campbell County Cold Spring library into such a wonderful asset for our community. On Tuesday, Aug. 17, I participated in the library’s Hoxworth Blood Center mobile blood drive. It was uplifting to see so many young people donating blood. The van was filled with donors and more coming in as I left. This event is one of numerous yearround events sponsored by Dave and his staff that enrich our wonderful city. Mark A. Stoeber Mayor, City of Cold Spring

Trash for Cash

On August, 14, 2010, Boy Scout Troop 751of Southgate, Kentucky did a 10-mile loop

around Persimmon Grove in Alexandria. We organized our cleanup by placing a group of four or five scouts with an adult in different places throughout the loop. It took around three hour to complete. We found a ton of cigarettes, aluminum cans and plastic bottles, etc. When you pick up other peoples trash it makes you realize what a mess people are creating for our community and for all you smokers out there please do us all a favor and put your cigarettes in an ash tray don't throw them out the window. It just takes a few minutes to dump them in a trash can. Jacob Melville Linden Avenue Senior Patrol Leader BSA Troop 751 Southgate

CH@TROOM Last question

What do you think about Kentucky Speedway getting a NASCAR Sprint Cup event for 2011? Do you plan to attend? “Having watched the track since its inception, I think it is great that it is finally getting a race. It is a wonderful opportunity for more people to see a beautiful part of Kentucky. And it doesn’t hurt that the race can bring in some much needed revenue.” J.H. “I think the speedway and NASCAR will be an economic stimulus to the state. I doubt that I attend but glad the facility is being used. It should significantly help the Sparta area’s economy.” G.G. “Anything that helps the local economy (legally) is a good thing! I’m all for the Speedway event, if they can get it. I won’t be attending, though. Not my cup of STP. :-)” B.B. “NASCAR is an example of what went on 100 years ago in business when Rockefeller and Standard Oil ran the little guys out of the oil business. “Bruton Smith, who recently bought the Kentucky Speedway, also owns seven other major speedways. The former owner of the Kentucky Speedway, Jerry Carroll, created Kentucky Speedway from nothing. “NASCAR would not award him a major ‘Cup’ race. It was not until after Bruton Smith purchased the speedway in 2008 that NASCAR thought about allowing a ‘Cup’ race there. “Carroll had filed a federal lawsuit to challenge NASCAR’s decision to not award a ‘Cup’ race there until Bruton Smith owned

Next question Would you consider buying one of the new models of electric cars, such as Nissan Leaf or Chevy Volt? Why or why not? Send your answer to “mshaw@nky.com” with Chatroom in the subject line. the speedway. “There is no better example of modern day restraint of trade that is illegal than what has occurred with NASCAR and Bruton Smith. “One plus one still adds up to two. I am an ardent race fan. I will never attend a race at Kentucky Motor Speedway. “I prefer to go to Lawrenceburg, which is one of the best-kept secrets in local auto racing. Go to Winchester and Salem, Ind., for the best racing for a more affordable price. “O’Reilys Raceway Park on the west side of Indianapolis also provides local race fans with excellent racing. “Kentucky Speedway and NASCAR is a monopoly which I will not support.” J.S.D. “It’s not likely that I’ll ever attend a NASCAR event at the Kentucky Speedway, however, I think the Speedway is one of the jewels in the Queen City’s crown and wish it every success.” R.V. “I think it is great that Kentucky Speedway got a NASCAR race. Will I go? No, I don’t like racing, but many others do!” K.S. “Hallelujah! Thanks to Bruton Smith. He’s my hero! Absolutely I will attend and renew my season ticket holder status.” Florence

FILE PHOTO

James Buescher (3) leads Justin Lofton in the Buckle Up Kentucky 150 ARCA RE/MAX Series race at Kentucky Speedway in May 2009. The track will host the sport’s biggest names next July when a Sprint Cup Series race comes to Sparta.

For more viewpoints from around Greater Cincinnati, go to cincinnati.com/opinion

JOE SIMON/STAFF

Courtside

Chad VonLuehrte of Downtown, Whitney Headlee of Louisville, John Lanni of Bellevue and Greg Meyer of Covington at the Linder Family Tennis Center in Mason for the womens semifinals.

Support young people with love, care and attention Is there a magic formula for making a difference in the life of a youth? Unfortunately, there is not; but research over the past two decades has confirmed that having caring and supportive relationships with family members is critical to raising healthy, resilient youth. Supporting youth includes the many ways we care, love and accept them both verbally and nonverbally. When we hug them and tell them “I love you,” the expression is obvious. Paying attention, listening, and taking an interest in what they’re doing are less obvious ways of giving support, but are just as important. Research also shows that when youth feel support from their family, they are less likely to engage in risky behaviors such as substance use or sexual activity. Family support has the power to build a youth’s self esteem and their ability to thrive. According to a 2007 survey of Campbell County youth, 69 percent reported having high levels of love and support from their family. The love and support of the

family lays a foundation for our youth. They are the future of Campbell County. Here are some tips to help build family support in your home: Jody • Prepare and Christerson eat a family meal together. Community • Have a game Recorder weekly guest night. Take turns the columnist choosing game. • Find lots of ways to show your family members you love them: leave notes where they will find them, do a chore that isn’t your responsibility, give hugs, be kind to one another. • Spend alone time with each of your children. Take a walk, listen to music or just hang out. For more information about how to help youth achieve a healthy future, please visit the Health Department’s website at www.nkyhealth.org/whatareassets.

A publication of Your Community Recorder newspaper serving all of Campbell County

COUNTY RECORDER

Campbell County Editor . . . . . .Michelle Shaw smhaw@nky.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .578-1053

About guest columns

We welcome guest columns on all sides of an issue; however, potential columnists should reserve space in advance with Editor Michelle Shaw by calling 578-1053. Include with your column your name, address, daytime telephone number, and a two-to-three line biography outlining your expertise related to this topic. Either include a color headshot of yourself, or make arrangements when you call to have your photo taken here. We reserve the right to edit for length, accuracy and clarity. Columns may be no more than 500 words. Deadline: Noon Monday for next Thursday’s issue. E-mail: mshaw@community press.com Letters, columns and articles submitted to The Community Recorder may be published or distributed in print, electronic or other forms. This article contains information from the Search Institute: www.search-institute.org. Jody Christerson is a Senior Health Educator for the Northern Kentucky Health Department.

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RECORDER

T h u r s d a y, A u g u s t 2 6 , 2 0 1 0

PEOPLE

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BEST FRIENDS FOREVER

By Jason Brubaker jbrubaker@nky.com

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Best friends Abby Jones, left, of Cold Spring and Sydney Schroder, of Wilder, both 7, spend time together in Jones’ front yard Aug. 4.

Born to be best friends and just have fun together, Abby said. “We like to play the same things,” Abby said. The girls even created their own dance where they smack their hands together in unison in a move inspired by the basketball players John Wall and DeMarcus Cousins’ celebration moves from last season’s University of Kentucky basketball team. Despite being opposites, the girls have always been friends, Kristy said. Sydney doesn’t like school, and Abby does. Sydney is talkative, and Abby is quiet. The girls know each other so well they show up wearing the same outfits without having talked or text messaged about their plans, Heather said. “Sometimes we think they have a secret language,” Kristy said.

PROVIDED

Share your summer

Sunflowers in the 900 block of Park Ave., Newport. To share your summer photos go to NKY.com/Share.

Share your events Go to nky.com and click on Share! to get your event into The Recorder.

COLLAGE KEITH BARKLAGE/STAFF

Before they could crawl, 7-year-olds, Abby Jones of Cold Spring and Sydney Schroder of Wilder, were destined to be friends. The girls’ mothers, Heather Schroder and Kristy Jones, are close friends and their two 7-year-old daughters were born one week apart. Their families regularly vacation together, and the girls often have sleepovers at one another’s house. “She’s pretty much like my sister,” Sydney said. Sydney said she cried the entire school-day last year when she found out she wouldn’t be in the same classroom as Abby. Sydney said Abby never makes her mad. “I like her laugh,” Sydney said of Abby. “Her laugh makes me laugh.” They play soccer, basketball and softball together

2010 AllTech FEI World Equestrian Games

From Rome to Jerez de la Frontera to The Games will begin on Sept. 25 Aachen to ... and run through Oct. 10 at the Lexington? Kentucky Horse Park in Lexington. When the General admission tickets will be $25, 2010 Alltech and will give guests access to the FEI World Horse Park grounds, Equine Village, Equestrian Alltech Experience Pavilion, trade G a m e s show and Kentucky Experience. begin at the Tickets for the eight discipline K e n t u c k y competitions, which include paraHorse Park in Lexing- dressage, reining, vaulting and ton on Sept. 25, it will endurance, will be sold separately and range in price from $25 - $140. mark the first time the For more information, including a Games have been held full schedule of competitions, visit outside of Europe www.alltechfeigames.com. since their inception in 1990. The Games will serve as the world championships for eight separate equestrian disciplines, and 62 countries will be represented in the events. “There’s definitely a sense of pride to know that people from all over the world will be here in Kentucky,” said Kristin Bednarski, a public relations assistant for the 2010 Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games. “This is going to be huge, not just for the city, but for the entire state.” The Games are expected to draw more than 400,000 people over the 16-day event, which will offer not only the competitions, but also a trade show and family-friendly Equine Village. The village will include hand-on activities, demonstrations and a Kid Zone, complete with a pony petting area, mechanical cutting horse and even an old stagecoach. There will also be a special “Kentucky Experience,” where guests can sample bourbon, enjoy Bluegrass music, and learn about other unique aspects of Kentucky culture and tourism. John Long, CEO of the United Equestrian Foundation, said the Games are sure to attract a wide range of people, even those who aren’t familiar with equine competitions. “It’s kind of like people who don’t watch football enjoying the Super Bowl – the enormity of the event is part of what makes it fun,” he said. As the public relations coordinator for the Games, Louise Bowden agrees. She also said this so compelling to watch.” that for people Bowden said that preparing for the Games has been outside of the hard work, as temporary buildings, stadiums and equine industry, structures are being constructed all over the 1,200it’s easy to acre Horse Park in anticipation of the crowds. All of underestimate the horses for the Games, a number that could be close the significance to 800, will be stabled at the Horse Park, and there are and magnitude expected to be close to 6,000 volunteers on hand of the Games. throughout the games to help with various events. After all, not “It’s been a lot of work to get ready, and it’s pretty everyone knows hectic right now as it’s getting closer,” she said. “But what para-dresit’s also a lot of fun just to be a part of this.” sage is or how to Guests can purchase general admission tickets for score reining, $25 to have access to the Horse Park grounds, Equine and they may Village, trade show and Kentucky Experience, while not be able to tickets to each of the competitions are extra, with appreciate a prices ranging from $25 to $140 depending on the great driving event. performance. A full schedule of events and prices, as well as However, to the competitors, she said these Games are everything. directions and lodging information, is available at And if people are going to see an event for the first www.alltechfeigames.com. “In terms of the number of visitors and the revtime, why not watch the absolute best? “This is the pinnacle of competition for these ath- enue generated, this is going to be a historic event for letes – it’s like their World Cup,” she said. “This is as the state,” said Long. “The excitement is growing, and big as it gets for the athletes, and that’s what makes we just can’t wait for the Games to start.”

When the 2010 Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games begin at the Kentucky Horse Park in Lexington on Sept. 25, it will mark the first time the Games have been held outside of Europe since their inception in 1990. The Games will serve as the world championships for eight separate equestrian disciplines, and 62 countries will be represented in the events.

LOL is ... Local bloggers writing from your perspective on cooking, wine, romance and more! Visit: Cincinnati.Com/LOL or search: living


B2

CCF Recorder

August 26, 2010

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD F R I D A Y, A U G . 2 7

FARMERS MARKET

Campbell County Farmers’ MarketAlexandria, 3-6 p.m., Southern Lanes Sports Center, 7634 Alexandria Pike, Parking lot. Includes produce, plants, flowers, jams, jellies, honey and arts and crafts. Presented by Campbell County Cooperative Extension Service. 859-572-2600; ces.ca.uky.edu/campbell/FarmersMarket. Alexandria.

HISTORIC SITES

Campbell County Log Cabin Museum, 10 a.m., Campbell County Log Cabin Museum, Free, donations requested. 859-466-0638. Alexandria.

MUSIC - CLASSIC ROCK

Terry and the Rockets, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Riverside Marina Bar and Grill, 145 Mary Ingles Highway (Ky. 8), Free. Presented by Riverside Marina. 859-442-8111; www.RiversideMarinaKY.com. Dayton.

ON STAGE - COMEDY

Love

Loni Love, 8 p.m. and 10:15 p.m., Funny Bone Comedy Club, Dinner available. $14. 859-957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Best of Shadowbox, 7:30 p.m. and 10:30 p.m., Shadowbox Cabaret, $30, $20 seniors and students. 859-957-7625; www.shadowboxcabaret.com. Newport. Big River: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, 7:30 p.m., Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, 1028 Scott Blvd., Music and lyrics by Roger Miller. Book by William Hauptman. $26; $23 Carnegie, Enjoy The Arts and WVXU members; $21 with groups of 10 or more; $19 students. Through Sept. 4. 859-957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

RECREATION

Children’s Flying Trapeze School, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., Newport on the Levee, $7. Registration required. 513-921-5454; www.amazingportablecircus.com. Newport.

SPORTS

Florence Freedom Baseball, 7:05 p.m. vs. River City Rascals, Champion Window Field, Fireworks after the game. $10-$12 VIP, $9, $7 lawn. 859-594-4487; www.florencefreedom.com. Florence. S A T U R D A Y, A U G . 2 8

CRUISES

River DMF, 11 p.m.-2 a.m., BB Riverboats Newport Landing, 101 Riverboat Row, Celebrating two-year anniversary. Three-hour tour on the Belle of Cincinnati with DJs, dancing, special guests, surprises, hors d’oeuvres, beer, wine and more. Bring extra cash for liquor or commemorative eye patch. Ages 21 and up. Check online for ticketing events: bit.ly/db9fhX. $40, $35 online, $30 Cash inperson at Fabricate: 4012 Hamilton Ave., Northside. Reservations required. Presented by The Projectmill. 630-802-2543; bit.ly/9O5L0I. Newport.

FARMERS MARKET

Campbell County Farmers’ Market-Newport, 9 a.m.-noon, Historic Newport Business District, Seventh and Monmouth streets. 859-572-2600; ces.ca.uky.edu/campbell/FarmersMarket. Newport.

HISTORIC SITES

Campbell County Log Cabin Museum, 10 a.m., Campbell County Log Cabin Museum, Free, donations requested. 859-466-0638. Alexandria.

MUSIC - BLUES

Hot Summer Nights with Voodoo Puppet, 10 p.m.-2 a.m., Mansion Hill Tavern, 502 Washington Ave., Danceable blues and boogie, blues-inspired classic rock, classic R&B, funk and soul. Motown dance party between sets. Drink specials. Ages 21 and up. 859581-0100; www.voodoopuppet.net. Newport.

MUSIC - ROCK

Mad Anthony CD Release Party, 9 p.m., Southgate House, 24 E. Third St., Whole House. Doors open 8 p.m. With Banderas, Knife the Symphony, the Frankl Project, the Harlequins, the Dukes, Max & Sara (Alone At 3am), Junebaby (Margaret from the Seedy Seeds) and the Host (acoustic). $8 ages 1820, $5 ages 21 and up. 859-431-2201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Best of Shadowbox, 7:30 p.m. and 10:30 p.m., Shadowbox Cabaret, $30, $20 seniors and students. 859-957-7625; www.shadowboxcabaret.com. Newport. Big River: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, 7:30 p.m., Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, Sign-language interpreted and closed-captioned. $26; $23 Carnegie, Enjoy The Arts and WVXU members; $21 with groups of 10 or more; $19 students. 859-957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

RECREATION

Children’s Flying Trapeze School, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., Newport on the Levee, $7. Registration required. 513-921-5454; www.amazingportablecircus.com. Newport.

RELIGIOUS - COMMUNITY Co-Ed Golf Outing, 7 a.m.-6 p.m., Boone Links Golf Course, 19 Clubhouse Dr., Includes round of golf, cart and dinner for $75. Hole Prizes available and Mulligans available for purchase. Benefits Florence Christian Church special projects. $75. Reservations required. Presented by Florence Christian Church. 859-468-1522; 859-647-6110; www.florencechristian.org. Florence.

SHOPPING

Shop Til You Rock, 1-6 p.m., Florence Mall, 2028 Mall Road, Music-inspired mall tour invites teens to experience ultimate rock star treatment with live music, games, prizes and deals. Music by All Out Best, $4. 859-3711231; www.shoptilyourock.com. Florence.

SPECIAL EVENTS

Farmers’ Fair, 10 a.m.-10 p.m. Music by Comet Bluegrass Allstars., Roebling Point Entertainment District, Foot of Roebling Suspension Bridge, Court St. and Park Place. Day-long street fair and farmers market celebrating local food culture. Keynote speaker: Emmy-nominated actor Ed Begley Jr. from Planet Green’s “Living with Ed.” Ethical butcher Berlin Reed to do rendition of The “Bacon Gospel.” Petting farm, face painting and educational activities such as planting seeds for children. Benefits Central Ohio River Valley Food Guide, Slow Food Cincinnati, Ohio Valley Foodshed and Future Farmers of America Northern Kentucky Chapter. Presented by Farmers’ Fair. 859-261-7777; www.farmersfair.org. Covington.

For more about Greater Cincinnati’s dining, music, events, movies and more, go to Metromix.com.

SPORTS

Florence Freedom Baseball, 6:05 p.m. vs. River City Rascals, Champion Window Field, Post Game Band: 24/7. $10-$12 VIP, $9, $7 lawn. 859-594-4487; www.florencefreedom.com. Florence. Absolute Action MMA Takeover, 7:30 p.m., Turfway Park, 7500 Turfway Road, Mixed martial arts cage fighting. Outdoors, inclement weather moves indoors. $50 table seating, $35 VIP, $25. 859-803-3100; www.aamma.net. Florence.

TOURS

Newport Gangster Walking Tour, 1 p.m. and 5 p.m., Gangsters Dueling Piano Bar, 18 E. Fifth St., Explore Newport’s connection to well-known crime figures, including gangsters, gamblers and ladies of the night. See buildings that housed casinos, brothels and speakeasies. $15. 859-491-8000. Newport. Bootleggers and Bourbon, 6:30 p.m., Gangsters Dueling Piano Bar, 18 E. Fifth St., Includes bourbon tasting, dinner and new tour route with new gangster stories. $45. Presented by The Newport Gangsters. 859951-8560; www.newportgangsters.com. Newport. S U N D A Y, A U G . 2 9

HISTORIC SITES

Campbell County Log Cabin Museum, 10 a.m., Campbell County Log Cabin Museum, Free, donations requested. 859-466-0638. Alexandria.

MUSIC - JAZZ

Sunday Jazz in the Afternoon, 4:30 p.m., Dee Felice Cafe, 529 Main St., 859-2612365; www.deefelicecafe.com. Covington.

ON STAGE - COMEDY

The Teddy Bear and Doll Show, 7:30 p.m., Funny Bone Comedy Club, Dinner available. $12. 859-957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Shakespeare in the Park, 7 p.m., Presidents Park, 281 Dudley Road, “Hamlet.” Shakespeare classic. Part of summer tour. Bring seating. Free. Presented by Cincinnati Shakespeare Company. 859-331-5330; www.cincyshakes.com. Edgewood. Big River: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, 3 p.m., Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, $26; $23 Carnegie, Enjoy The Arts and WVXU members; $21 with groups of 10 or more; $19 students. 859957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

RECREATION

Children’s Flying Trapeze School, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., Newport on the Levee, $7. Registration required. 513-921-5454; www.amazingportablecircus.com. Newport.

SPORTS

Florence Freedom Baseball, 6:05 p.m. vs. River City Rascals, Champion Window Field, Fan Appreciation Night: Giveaways. Family Fun Sunday: Autographs, running the bases and a pre-game parade for kids. $10-$12 VIP, $9, $7 lawn. 859-594-4487; www.florencefreedom.com. Florence.

PROVIDED

It’s a Salsa Café with Latin dancing and dining at York St. Café, from 8 p.m. to 1 a.m. Friday, Aug. 27, at 738 York St., Newport. Salsa band Acapulco, pictured, will perform, with free dance lessons by Kama Salsa, and Latin hits and classic salsa by DJ Los Rumberos. $5 for the dance party. Dinner is 5-11 p.m., featuring Latin-Caribbean cuisine and cocktails. Call 261-9675. M O N D A Y, A U G . 3 0

EDUCATION

When the IRS Comes a Calling, 1 p.m., Boone County Cooperative Extension Service, 6028 Camp Ernst Road, Discussion on letters, notices and other correspondence sent by the IRS. Learn about collection options including payment plans and Offers in Compromise. Find out what options you have when you don’t agree with the IRS. Ages 21 and up. Free. Registration required. 859586-6101; www.ca.uky.edu/boone. Burlington.

LITERARY - STORY TIMES

Preschool Story Time, 10 a.m., Newport Branch Library, 901 E. Sixth St., Stories, songs and crafts. Ages 4-5. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 859572-5035. Newport. Toddler Story Time, 10 a.m., Cold Spring Branch Library, 3920 Alexandria Pike, Stories, songs and activities. Ages 2-3. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 859-781-6166. Cold Spring. Pajama Story Time, 7 p.m., Fort Thomas-Carrico Branch Library, 1000 Highland Ave., Stories, songs and activities. Ages 3 and up. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 859-572-5033. Fort Thomas.

MUSIC - CONCERTS

Hoots and Hellmouth, 9 p.m., Southgate House, 24 E. Third St., Doors open at 8 p.m. $10, $8 advance. 859-431-2201; www.ticketweb.com. Newport. Adam Lambert, 8 p.m., Madison Theater, 730 Madison Ave., Standing only on main floor. Doors open 7 p.m. Singer, songwriter and actor from San Diego. $33. Tickets sold online only. Presented by AEG Live. 859491-2444; www.aeglive.com. Covington.

About calendar

To submit calendar items, go to “www.NKY.com” and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to “life@communitypress.com” along with event information. Items are printed on a space-available basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to “www.NKY.com” and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page. W E D N E S D A Y, S E P T . 1

T H U R S D A Y, S E P T . 2

FARMERS MARKET Earth Mother Market, 3-7 p.m., Stables Building, 1038 S. Fort Thomas Ave., certified organic or certified naturally grown growers. Rain or shine. Family friendly. Presented by Fort Thomas Renaissance. 859-572-1225; www.localharvest.org/farmersmarkets/M30992. Fort Thomas.

FESTIVALS Alexandria Fair & Horse Show, 6-11 p.m., Alexandria Fairgrounds, Includes quad races, pageants and children’s activities. $8. 859-6352667. Alexandria.

FESTIVALS

Alexandria Fair & Horse Show, 5-11:30 p.m., Alexandria Fairgrounds, 100 Fairgrounds Lane, All ages. Includes parade. $8. 859-635-2667. Alexandria.

LITERARY - CRAFTS

Play Art, 4 p.m., Newport Branch Library, 901 E. Sixth St., Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 859-572-5035. Newport.

LITERARY - STORY TIMES

Toddler Story Time, 11 a.m., Fort ThomasCarrico Branch Library, Free. Registration required. 859-572-5033. Fort Thomas. Toddler Story Time, 11 a.m., Cold Spring Branch Library, Free. Registration required. 859-781-6166. Cold Spring.

MUSIC - POP

Naked Karate Girl’s Legendary Big Wednesdays, 10 p.m., Jefferson Hall, 1 Levee Way, Suite 2118, $3. 859-491-6200. Newport.

HISTORIC SITES

Campbell County Log Cabin Museum, 10 a.m., Campbell County Log Cabin Museum, Free, donations requested. 859-466-0638. Alexandria.

LITERARY - STORY TIMES

Pajama Story Time, 6:30 p.m., Cold Spring Branch Library, Free. 859-781-6166. Cold Spring. Baby Time, 10 a.m., Fort Thomas-Carrico Branch Library, Free. 859-572-5033. Fort Thomas.

SUPPORT GROUPS

Adoption Support Group, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Newport Syndicate, 18 E. Fifth St., Covers adoption topics allowing time to share. Free. Presented by Adoption Support Group. 859380-7325. Newport.

T U E S D A Y, A U G . 3 1

FARMERS MARKET

Campbell County Farmers’ Market-Highland Heights, 3-6 p.m., Campbell County Senior Center, 3504 Alexandria Pike, Parking lot. Presented by Campbell County Cooperative Extension Service. 859-572-2600; ces.ca.uky.edu/campbell/. Highland Heights.

HISTORIC SITES

Campbell County Log Cabin Museum, 10 a.m., Campbell County Log Cabin Museum, Free, donations requested. 859-466-0638. Alexandria.

KARAOKE AND OPEN MIC

Karaoke, 9 p.m.-2 a.m., Arnie’s on the Levee, 120 E. Third St., $3 Red Stag cocktails. 859431-4340. Newport.

LITERARY - STORY TIMES

PROVIDED

The American Idol Live! Tour 2010, featuring season nine top 10 contestants, including winner Lee DeWyze and runner-up Crystal Bowersox, comes to Riverbend Music Center at 7:30 p.m. Monday, Aug. 30. Tickets are $26, $50.50, $70.50 and for a lawn four-pack, $79. For tickets, visit www.Riverbend.org or call 800-745-3000. Also pictured, and performing at the concert, are: Didi Benami, Andrew Garcia, Casey James, Aaron Kelly, Michael Lynche, Siobhan Magnus, Katie Stevens and Tim Urban.

Toddler Story Time, 10 a.m., Fort ThomasCarrico Branch Library, 1000 Highland Ave., Stories, songs, finger plays and craft. Ages 2-3. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 859572-5033. Fort Thomas. Preschool Story Time, 1:30 p.m., Cold Spring Branch Library, 3920 Alexandria Pike, Ages 4-5. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 859781-6166. Cold Spring.

J. P. BALL, CARTE DE VISITE, 1867.

Work by James Presley “J.P.” Ball, a 19th century African-American photographer and abolitionist, who lived in Cincinnati, is on display at the Cincinnati Museum Center through October. The 900-square-foot free exhibit, “An American Journey: The Life and Photography of James Presley Ball,” features 60 original images of famous figures such as Frederick Douglass, pictured. Visit www.cincymuseum.org or call 513-287-7000.


Life

CCF Recorder

August 26, 2010

B3

Silence frightens but has so much to say

about us “The eternal silence of and our these infinite spaces terrifies fate. me.” So stated Blaise PasW h y cal, famed philosopher, scido we disentist, mathematician and l i k e writer about the vastness of silence so the universe. much? Notice it was not the O n e sheer size of “these infinite Father Lou reason is spaces” that amazed him. It Guntzelman we fear was their silence that terriat fied him. Perspectives looking all that is The gaping stillness of a night sky can remind us of within us. We’re masters at our human solitude. For so avoiding confrontation with many, noise and busyness who we really are and are familiar; solitude and what’s going on in our depths. silence frighten us. True, our advances in Theologian Nicholas Lash writes, “I have a sus- technology can be extremely helpful in picion that one onversing reason why The gaping stillness cwith another some scientists seem so of a night sky can and transacting our busikeen to supremind us of our nesses. pose that But at somewhere, in human solitude. For other times some vastly so many, noise and technology is distant region, the Trothere must be busyness are like jan horse that that which we could recogfamiliar; solitude delivered a i d d e n nize as ‘livand silence frighten henemy withing,’ and as capable of us. in the camp. Technolocommunicatgy has ing with us … Meeting them would give us already given us multiple company and diminish our ways to avoid silence: radio, TV, computers, cell phones, terrifying isolation.” He could have a point. internet, games, e-mails, Our fear of silence and soli- text-messaging, etc. We can go to bed with tude is confirmed when we recall how even early music or TV and awake to Greeks and Romans popu- the same. Want to avoid lated the distant skies with silence? There’s an app for spirits, deities and astrologi- that. An old paradoxical saycal animals. Horoscope readers today ing claims that the cure for find solace in the belief that loneliness is solitude. For the stars and planets are when we have conquered really entities concerned solitude’s fear, we discover

we are not alone. Bringing a temporary halt to our hurrying and doing permits us to tap into our conversations with ourselves within. Dr. James Hollis notes, “The chief pathology of our time is the capacity of the world to distract us from this conversation.” Psychological observations have proven that the three places we can come to know ourselves the best are marriage, psychotherapy and silence. Our first tries at bringing more silence into our lives can be agitating. We become anxious, feeling weird at doing this, and checking the time to see when our time is up so we can get on to better things. Actually, we have to go through the frightening silence to come to the eloquent silence. After working our way through the scary part of silence, we come to an inner place where the quality of the silence changes. In this more peaceful place we are mostly with our self, and with God. This apparently empty space of silence is actually indescribably full. Then it is that we discover that eloquent silence is not an absence, but a presence; not boring but refreshing; not stressful but serene. Author Pico Iyer describes this serenity found in silence: “Eloquent silence is that enchanted place where space is cleared, time subsides, and the horizon expands.

“In silence, we often say, we can hear ourselves think; but what is truer to say is that in silence we can hear ourselves not think, and so sink below our selves into a place far deeper than mere thought allows. In silence, we might

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host that she is – invites us to revel in her silence. Father Lou Guntzelman is a Catholic priest of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati. Contact him at columns@ communitypress.com or P.O. Box 428541, Cincinnati, OH 45242.

better say, we can hear someone else think.” As the heat and humidity moderate in late summer and autumn, nature calls us more insistently to come away for awhile from expressways, malls and crowds – and like the great

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B4

CCF Recorder

Life

August 26, 2010

Save some summer vegetables for autumn soups There are certain soups that transcend trendy and become real heirloom favorites. The soup recipes I’m sharing today fit those criteria. They are the ones that are my most popular. Now I know it may be too hot to make them now, but tuck these jewels away – autumn isn’t far away!

Rita’s 30-minute vegetable soup

One of my most requested recipes, this is a favorite with kids and adults. Also, throw in any stray vegetables lurking in the fridge. Ditto with extra cooked pasta or rice. And if your family does-

Rita Heikenfeld Rita’s kitchen

n’t like s p i c y soup, use regular canned d i c e d tomatoes. Pass plenty of cheddar or Parmesan.

l pound lean ground beef: sirloin or ground round 1 generous cup chopped onion 1 teaspoon garlic 1 jar, 20-30 oz. chunky garden style pasta sauce 2 cans beef broth Water to taste (start with 1 soup can of water and go from there)

1 can, 10 oz., chopped tomatoes and chilies 1 pound or so frozen mixed vegetables, thawed if you have time Several handfuls any fresh greens (opt.) Cheddar or Parmesan for garnish Sauté meat, onion and garlic together in large stockpot. “Sauté” simply means browning the meat with the onion and garlic. Drain any fat. Now add everything else but the greens. If you have the 30 oz. jar of pasta sauce, add almost all but taste before adding the rest. Bring to a boil and let simmer for 20 minutes or until veggies are tender.

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Tony Palazzolo’s version of Frisch’s vegetable soup

“A result of over a dozen attempts, and I think it is very close to Frisch’s,” wrote Tony, an Anderson Township reader. The last time I made this, I used about a pound of frozen mixed vegetables for the peas, corn, beans and lima beans. I also omitted the fresh carrots, since carrots were included in the frozen mixed vegetables. I used quick cooking barley and brown rice, as well. 4 tablespoons vegetable oil 1 cup onion, diced 1 ⁄2 cup each diced: carrots, celery 1 ⁄2 cup each frozen vegetables: peas, corn, cut green beans, baby lima beans (can use canned baby limas) 1 can, 14.5 oz, diced tomatoes with juice 2 quarts beef broth 1 quart water 1 ⁄2 teaspoon each thyme, garlic powder

3

⁄4 teaspoon black pepper 1 cup potato, diced 1 ⁄4 cup pearl barley 1 ⁄4 cup long grain rice Salt to taste

In a large soup pot, sauté onion, carrot, and celery until onion is soft but not browned, about 10 minutes. Add rest of ingredients except potato, rice and barley. Bring to boil and lower to simmer partially covered for 30 to 45 minutes. Add potato, rice and barley, bring back to boil, lower to simmer, partially covered, for another 30 minutes or until potato, rice and barley are done. Add salt and pepper.

Amy Tobin’s Italian wedding soup

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⁄2 pound ground veal or beef 1 ⁄2 cup plain breadcrumbs 1 ⁄2 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese 1 ⁄4 cup grated onion 1 large egg 1 ⁄2 teaspoon salt Freshly ground pepper, to taste Combine the escarole, carrots, and stock in a large pot. Bring to a simmer and cook until the escarole is almost tender, about 30 minutes. *To make the meatballs: Combine ground meat, breadcrumbs, cheese, onion, egg, salt and pepper. Shape into tiny balls, less than 1 inch in diameter. When the escarole is almost tender, stir in the pasta and return the soup to the simmer. Drop the meatballs into the soup. Cook over low heat, stirring gently, until the meatballs and pasta are cooked, about 20 minutes. Taste for seasoning. Serve hot with cheese. Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator and author. E-mail columns@community press.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-2487130, ext. 356.

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shows a Boone, Campbell, Grant or Kenton County Public Library card. This is the fifth year that Northern Kentucky Libraries have collaborated with local retailers on this regional effort to illustrate the importance of having and using a library card and to reward patrons who are already

active library users. For a list of participating businesses and the discounts, pick up a brochure at any participating business or library branch, or visit one of the library’s websites: www.bcpl.org, www.cc-pl.org, www.grantcountypubliclibrary.org or www.kentonlibrary.org.

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Community

CCF Recorder

August 26, 2010

NKU presents Six@Six lecture series A new lecture series titled Six@Six will bring the expertise of Northern Kentucky University professors to audiences at three local venues – the Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, the Mercantile Library and the Behringer-Crawford Museum. Six@Six will begin Sept. 1 and conclude next spring, with the three venues (Carnegie, Mercantile and BCM) each hosting two of the six lectures. Each lecture will begin at 6 p.m. and cost $6 per person (free for students). Patrons also have the option of buying the series for $30. The idea behind the series is to export some of the magic happening inside NKU’s classrooms to the community at large. Sort of like going to college, minus the tuition and the 8 a.m. classes. The six lectures for the first Six@Six season are: • Sept. 1, Mercantile Library, 6 p.m. - “Abraham Lincoln: Public Speaker,” by Dr. James Ramage. Ramage will talk about the great speaking ability of our 16th president, focusing on the Gettysburg Address and the Cooper Institute speech in New York City.

• Oct. 21, BehringerCrawford Museum, 6 p.m. “The Art of the Quilt: Stitched [Hist]stories,” by Dr. Kimberly Allen-Kattus. Her lecture will feature the storytelling ability of quilts and how they afford their users the opportunity to share personal and, at times, communal stories. • Nov. 11, Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, 6 p.m. - “Covering the World in a Dangerous Age,” by Mr. John Daniszewski. A senior managing editor for the Associated Press, Daniszewski directs the wire service’s international coverage. He will discuss the perils – and the importance – of international journalism in a dangerous world. • Dec. 7, Mercantile Library, 6 p.m. - “Amazing Caves, Amazing Microbes: The Geomicrobiology of Caves,” by Dr. Hazel Barton. Dr. Barton will discuss the role of bacteria in caves, highlighting their importance in this dark, damp environment. • March 31, BehringerCrawford Museum, 6 p.m. “Simple Gifts from Our Past: Frontier Shakers in the Ohio River Valley,” by Dr. Carol Medlicott. She will relate the

Shakers’ little known early years in the Ohio River Valley and examine the Shakers’ vital role in the region’s emerging cultural diversity and economic vitality. • April 13, Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, 6 p.m. - “The Marriage of Music and Word: Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Fearless Carousel,” by Dr. Mark Hardy, who will be directing Carousel in April at the Carnegie. Six@Six is the latest of example of NKU’s commitment to connecting campus and community. It is coordinated by NKU’s Scripps Howard Center for Civic Engagement, which also directs NKU’s participation in the Northern Kentucky Forum as well as other public engagement activities. While the forum is focused on public policy and current events, the Six@Six lectures are focused on timeless topics drawn from the full range of academic study at the university. Tickets are available at sixatsix.nku.edu or by calling 859-572-1448 or mailing the Scripps Howard Center for Civic Engagement, NKU Founders Hall 536, Highland Heights, KY 41099.

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CCF Recorder

Community

August 26, 2010

Styx concert is coming The Florence Freedom has announced its first concert in the 2010 Miller Lite Summer Concert Series. Rock band Styx will perform Saturday, Sept. 4. Prior to the Styx performance, ticket holders can attend “Freedom Fest” featuring local bands playing on the stadium concourse

15 South Fort Thomas Ave. Fort Thomas, KY 41075

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Traditional Service Sunday 8:30-9:30 a.m.

The Point to host night at the casino

beginning at 6 p.m. Seating options include premium Gold Circle seating for $50. There are also Infield Floor seating for $39.50 and stadium reserved seating for $28.50. Purchase tickets at the field box office, by calling 594-HITS or at www.florencefreedom.com.

Contemporary Service Sunday 10:45-11:45 a.m.

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The Point’s Junior Board is planning its annual fundraising event scheduled for Friday, Aug. 27, in collaboration with Frank Pistachio and Boogie Nights at Hollywood Casino in Lawrenceburg, Ind. Kicking off the evening of fun, food and flare, Anthony Frommeyer will launch his Frank Pistachio couture clothing line with a fashion show followed by an evening of dancing to

1970s and 1980s popular hits. “The event is a win-win for all. The Junior Board’s goal is to raise $20,000 to subsidize the cost of maintaining The Point’s residential program,”said Jill Disken, junior board cochair. This event is sponsored in part by Chris Pieper, Morgan Stanley Smith Barney, Motion Industries, Inc., and Greater Cincinnati

Marine, LLC. “It’s a blessing to have the support of the community and we are pleased to have the opportunity to work in conjunction with Anthony Frommeyer and the overly accommodating management team of Boogie Nights and Hollywood Casino to plan this premiere event.” The Point has a longstanding relationship with Hollywood Casino which

has outsourced cleaning of the hotel linens to The Point Commercial Laundry for approximately nine years. Tickets can be purchased at www.thepointarc.org or call 859491-9191. Tickets are $40 for VIP and $20 for general admission. Doors open at 7 p.m. Round trip bus transportation is available. Call for more details.

Campbell County YMCA has new executive director The YMCA of Greater Cincinnati has recently named Dana Ensley as executive director of the Campbell County YMCA. A strategic thinker and organizer, Ensley sees the YMCA as a partner and collaborator to develop young people to their fullest potential, build healthier lives,

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Center prototype, was a Champion Team member for the YMCA of Greater Cincinnati strategic vision plan, and has provided senior leadership as co-chair for the association’s Health and Wellness Task Team. She has also directed the association’s Ohio State funded diabetes prevention program. Ensley has a bachelor of science degree with a concentration on exercise science and master of science degree with a concentration on adult fitness from Madison University; and has also earned YUSA organizational leader certification. In 2009 she was recognized as Association of YMCA Professionals (AYP) Chapter 32 direc-

tor of the year, with an association leadership award and a program excellence award. “Working for the YMCA has been a great way to make a positive impact in the community and in people’s lives. It is great to be part of a team at the Campbell County YMCA who is so committed to providing an environment where neighbors can connect and grow,” said Ensley. The YMCA of Greater Cincinnati is one of the area’s largest nonprofits focused on engaging individuals and families in youth development, healthy living and social responsibility. This year more than 125,000 people will come to the YMCA.

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Community

CCF Recorder

August 26, 2010

St. Elizabeth to hold ‘ParTee’ start at Twin Oaks. Afternoon play will begin at 1 p.m. at Twin Oaks and noon at Highland Country Club. A full registration entitles participants to golf carts and greens fees, lunch and dinner for a foursome, morning refreshments, prizes for first and second place, and a variety of door prizes. More than 300 business and community leaders, physicians and health care professionals attend the event. This year will also feature the new “Helicopter Golf Ball Drop Contest.” Numbered golf balls will be sold

It’s time again for another day on the links to benefit health-related projects for Northern Kentucky residents. The annual St. Elizabeth Golf ParTee will be held Sept. 14 at Twin Oaks Golf & Plantation Club and Highland Country Club. Proceeds from the event will benefit the new St. Elizabeth Regional Diabetes Center and a second da Vinci robotic surgical system. The event is sponsored by the St. Elizabeth Healthcare Foundation’s Business Support Committee. Morning play will begin at 7:30 a.m. with a shot gun

throughout the summer and at the golf outing. The balls will be dropped from a helicopter at the Golf ParTee. The ball landing closest to the pin will be worth $1,000. Golf balls will be sold for $5 each. In addition to the golf, one player will win a $5,000 grand raffle prize. Grand raffle tickets will sell for $25 each and will be sold throughout the summer up until the Golf ParTee dinner Sept. 14. For additional information regarding the Golf ParTee, please call the St. Elizabeth Healthcare Foundation at 859-301-3920.

B7

Readers on vacation

Campbell County residents and friends brought their issues of the Campbell County Recorder on the “RECEnt Expedition to Glacier National Park” in northwest Montana. Pictured are: first row: Leslie Rece Williamson, Robertson County (formerly of California, KY); Karen Ware, Cold Spring; and Diana Schnneider, Cold Spring. Standing, left to right, Tom Singleton and Laura Rece Singleton, California; Alan Williamson, Robertson County; Steve and Mary Sue Schwartz, Hebron; Jim and Tricia Thornton Kremer, California; Rosalee Beiting, Alexandria; Luann Rece, Stoughton, Wisconsin; Tom and Doris Montgomery, Harrison, Ohio; and David Rece, Stoughton, Wisconsin (formerly of California, KY).

Catholic Charities hosting fundraiser have our event at such a wonderful location. The Drees Pavilion is a gift to Northern Kentucky and we are privileged to host the CaSSba at Devou Park,” said Vicky Bauerle, event coordinator. Several items will be up for bid in silent and live auctions including University of Kentucky basketball tickets, a golf getaway and Bengals and Reds tickets.

Catholic Charities’ will host its 23rd annual fundraiser, the CaSSba, from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 29, at the Drees Pavilion at Devou Memorial Overlook. The Bank of Kentucky and KW Mechanical will serve as event sponsors. The event will feature hors d’oeuvres with the support of McHale’s Catering. “We are really lucky to

“The reverse raffle adds some great drama to the day,” said Bill Jones, Catholic Charities’ executive director. Tickets are $40 for presale, $45 the day of the event and reverse raffle tickets cost $50. For more information about the event, call Vicky Bauerle at 859-581-8974, ext. 116, or visit www.covingtoncharities.org.

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B8

CCF Recorder

On the record

August 26, 2010

POLICE REPORTS ALEXANDRIA

Arrests/citations

Mickey J. Stamper, 36, 120 Picketts Charge, Apt. 120, DUI - aggravated circumstances - first offense,

careless driving, warrant at Alexandria Pike, July 31.

Incidents/investigations Fourth degree assault domestic violence Reported at Redbud Lane, July 31.

Second degree cruelty to animals

Dog left outside and tied to house in heat died and owner of house cited at 6604 Alexandria Pike, Aug. 2.

Theft by unlawful taking

LUTHERAN

Report of Ipod and cash taken for repair and Ipod not returned at 3765 Parkview Drive, Aug. 2. Report of catalytic converter sawed off vehicle at 7500 Alexandria Pike, Aug. 3. Report of cash and pocket knife taken from vehicle at 8283 Main St., Aug. 3.

Theft by unlawful taking, theft of legend drug

Report of prescription medications, change and wallet taken from vehicle at 28 Sheridan Drive, July 28.

Third degree burglary

Report of money taken from residence at 8539 East Main St., Aug. 1.

BELLEVUE

Arrests/citations

Alyssa Carnes, 19, 229 Edan, first degree criminal trespassing at 1 Harbor Green, Aug. 7. Matthew Raymond Scott, 19, Center St., warrant at 340 Division St., Aug. 9. Victoria Thompson, 43, 357 Berry Ave., warrant at 357 Berry Ave., Aug. 11.

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William Emery, 18, 728 Central Ave., criminal possession of a forged instrument at Sixth and Oak, Aug. 12. Julie Dwyer, 36, 307 Walnut, theft by unlawful taking at 145 Fairfield Ave., Aug. 13. Robert Kessinger, 58, 2224 Certer Road No. A1, alcohol intoxication in a public place at Buckhead Lot, Aug. 14. Daniel Wirth, 28, 3613 Jaqueline Drive, DUI at Berry at Ross, Aug. 16. Michael Hatch, 18, homeless, alcohol intoxication in a public place, trespassing at 800 Taylor Ave., Aug. 16. William Cashwell, 38, 417 Sixth St., possession of drug paraphernalia, first degree possession of a controlled substance at 411 Fairfield, Aug. 16. Lisa Miller, 46, 618 Sixth Ave., alcohol intoxication in a public place at Fairfield and Washington, Aug. 16. Bobby Lowery, 38, 618 Dayton Ave. No. 3, warrant at 405 Fairfield Ave., Aug. 16. James Nelson, 28, 301 Sixth Ave. No. 5, DUI at 145 Fairfield Ave., Aug. 17.

Incidents/investigations Fourth degree assault

Woman reported man punched her in face while in parking lot at Alexandria Pike, July 25.

Theft by unlawful taking

Report of prescription drugs taken at Spireridge Court, Aug. 12. Report of cash taken from purse at 5010 Alexandria Pike, Aug. 15.

Theft by unlawful taking or shoplifting

Report of meat products taken from meat counter without paying at 5400 Alexandria Pike, July 24. Report of cigarettes taken without paying at 5710 Alexandria Pike, July 27. Report of jewelry, perfume and clothing taken without paying at 395 Crossroads Blvd., Aug. 3.

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The Community Recorder publishes the names of all adults charged with offenses. The information is a matter of public record and does not imply guilt or innocence. trolled substance at Alexandria Pike at Canon Ridge, Aug. 10. Timothy Brinnon, 32, 830 Alexandria Pike No. 111, DUI at US 27 and Grandview, Aug. 11. Nancy Stilson, 47, 1595 Hill Tree Drive, second degree disorderly conduct, alcohol intoxication in a public place, resisting arrest, third degree assault at 85 North Grand Ave., Aug. 14. Timothy Newkirk, 27, 90 Gettysburg Square Road, alcohol intoxication in a public place at 90 Gettysburg Square Road, Aug. 14. Connie Donnelly, 34, 258 Sergeant Ave., DUI at Mary Ingles Highway at Tower Park, Aug. 14. Kevin Glaser, 35, 2450 Doevieu, DUI at I-471 south, Aug. 15. Matthew Robinson, 22, 918 Washington Apt. 1, giving officer false name and address, warrant at Gettysburg Square at Newman, Aug. 16. Mark Padgett Jr., 20, 8195 Day Pike, warrant at 525 Alexandria Pike, Aug. 17.

Incidents/investigations Theft by unlawful taking

Report of plunger, glass vase, paper towels, toilet paper, soap dispensers and flower arrangements taken from clubhouse bathroom at 932 Matinee Blvd., Aug. 2.

At 56 Tower Hill Road, Aug. 11. At 631 South Fort Thomas Ave., Aug. 12.

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At 21 Montvale Court, Aug. 15.

Arrests/citations

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720 York St., Newport KY 41071 859-581-4244 Pastor: Gordon Milburn Sunday School: 9:30 am Sunday Morning Worship: 10:30 am Sun. & Wed. Eve Service: 6:00 pm

Arrests/citations

Brittany E. Ammer, 21, 2725 Greenville Road, second degree robbery at 395 Crossroads Blvd., July 31.

Third degree criminal trespassing/third degree burglary

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Report of wallet fell out of pocket was returned but license and Social Security Card taken at 5400 Alexandria Pike, July 29.

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About police reports

Joshua Pfetzler, 23, 242 Rossford Ave., first degree possession of a controlled substance at 242 Rossford Ave., Aug. 10. Teresa Seal, 32, 680 Barley Circle, possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia, tampering with physical evidence, first degree promoting contraband, third degree possession of a con-

Theft by unlawful taking from auto

At 97 Mayo Ave., Aug. 14.

Unauthorized use of a motor vehicle

HIGHLAND HEIGHTS/ SOUTHGATE Arrests/citations

Marlon Barber, 32, 106 Park Place, warrant at 3809 Canyon Court, Aug. 16.

Police reports continued B9

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Dr. Tom and Mary Donovan celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary on August 20th, 2010. They were married at St. Thomas Church in Ft. Thomas, Ky. They have nine children and thirteen grandchildren. We are all very thankful to have them as our parents and grandparents. Congratulations to a wonderful couple! May God continue to bless them.

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Mr. and Mrs. Daryl Knauer announce the engagement of their daughter, Elisabeth to Collin Turner, son of Mr. and Mrs. Allen Turner, both of Ft Thomas, Kentucky. Ms. Knauer graduated summa cum laude from Western Kentucky University with a degree in Psychology, and is a clinical psychology doctoral student at LaVerne University in California. Mr. Turner graduated from Western Kentucky University with a BA in Music Theatre. A Summer 2011 wedding is planned.

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On the record

CCF Recorder

August 26, 2010

B9

POLICE REPORTS From B8 Matthew Deaton, 26, 930 Walnut St., warrant at 85 North Grand Ave., Aug. 16. Gabriel Hernandez, 25, 35 Kuchle Drive, fourth degree assault, alcohol intoxication in a public place at Combs Hehl Bridge, Aug. 15. Bryan Bartlett, 23, 842 Banklick, DUI at 11th and Monmouth, Aug. 15. Adam Sellers, 31, 1018 Clubhouse Drive, possession of drug paraphernalia at 261 Meadow Trail Drive, Aug. 14. Michael Hoff, 23, 813 Stone Bridge Drive, DUI at 430 Johns Hill Road, Aug. 14. Robert Burkhart, 36, 227 Meadow Trail Drive, fourth degree assault at 227 Meadow Trail Drive, Aug. 14. Duane Wiles, 43, 601 Dunwoodie Drive, DUI at I-275 and Alexandria Pike, Aug. 13. Gerald Berkemeier, 24, 2526 Alexandria Pike, alcohol intoxication in a public place at 2200 Alexandria

Pike, Aug. 12. James Benge, 34, 700 University Lane, possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia at Alexandria Pike and Moock Road, Aug. 11. Michael Robinson, 56, 1130 Fairbanks Ave., first degree possession of a controlled substance, prescription drug not in proper container at I-275 east, Aug. 11. Ernest Roberts, 28, 1126 Featherstone Court, alcohol intoxication in a public place, second degree disorderly conduct at 1 Levee Way, Aug. 8. Robert Hunt, 24, 10961 Woeste Road, possession of drug paraphernalia at I-275 west, Aug. 6.

Incidents/investigations Second degree burglary

At 27 Highland Meadows Circle Apt. 4, Aug. 6.

Theft by unlawful taking from auto

At 2413 Alexandria Pike, Aug. 11.

Third degree criminal mischief

At 778 Ravine Circle Apt. 3A, Aug. 7.

NEWPORT

Arrests/citations

Rudy Rupee, 22, 918 Washington No. 4, receiving stolen property at Eighth and Park, Aug. 17. Ronald Davis Sr., 45, 537 Erlanger Road Apt. 5, first degree trafficking a controlled substance at Ninth and Central, Aug. 14. Michael Buemi, 21, 301 Shelby St., second degree burglary at 200 block east Fifth St., Aug. 13. Brandi Chipman, 21, 118 Jefferson Davis Place, theft by unlawful taking at 1301 Monmouth St., Aug. 12. Jamal Taylor, 19, homeless, receiving stolen property at 601 Central Ave., Aug. 12. Diago Harris Jr., 19, 4518 Winton Road Apt. 7, first degree possession of a forged instrument at Fifth and Central, Aug. 12. Phillip Snyder, 30, 122 East 13th St. Apt. 1, alcohol intoxication in a public place, fourth degree assault at 700 block of Orchard, Aug. 12.

Incidents/investigations First degree possession of a controlled substance, second degree possession of a controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia At Seventh and York, Aug. 15.

Second degree criminal possession of a forged instrument At 136 East Third St., Aug. 10.

Theft by unlawful taking

At 644 Monroe, Aug. 16. At 200 Riverboat Row, Aug. 13. At 1301 Monmouth St., Aug. 11.

Third degree burglary

At 342 Monmouth St., Aug. 15.

CAMPBELL COUNTY Arrests/citations

Allana Smith, 31, 201 Washington St., second degree fleeing or evading police on foot, warrant at 201 Washington St., Aug. 12. Tyler P. Bezold, 23, 11249 Persimmon Grove Pike, speeding, DUI - first

offense - aggravated circumstances at Racetrack Road, Aug. 13. Natasha N. Newsome, 18, 135 S Grand Ave., DUI - first offense at Ky. 8 and Neises Road, Aug. 13.

Report of debit card taken and later used at gas station in Covington at 7729 Mary Ingles Hwy., Aug. 12.

Domestic dispute

Report of car and copper taken at 3147 Ten Mile Road, Aug. 5. Report of aluminum car wheels and tires taken at 529 Boone-Smith Road, Aug. 9.

Report of dog attacked by neighbor’s pit bull dogs at 248 Demossville Road, Aug. 9. Reported at Yelton Hill, Aug. 6.

First degree theft of controlled substance

Report of medication taken at 7648 Truesdell, Aug. 12.

Receiving stolen property over $500 Report of Stihl products reported stolen sold at pawn shop at 1914 Monmouth St., Aug. 4.

Second degree burglary

Report of door forced open and prescription medication, jewelry and safe box taken at 11651 Flagg Springs Pike, Aug. 11.

Ruth Bauman

Ruth Davis Bauman, 89, of Bellevue, died Aug. 16, 2010, at Carmel Manor Nursing Home, Fort Thomas. She was a clerk with Campbell County Courthouse, chairwoman for the Executive Committee of the Campbell County Democratic Party, founding member of the Licking Valley Girl Scout Council and helped start the Bellevue Vets Girls Volleyball League. Her husband, Bill Bauman, and son, Mike Bauman, died previously. Survivors include her son, David Bauman of Cold Spring; daughters, Connie Jones of Cold Spring and Terri Rockenfield of Anderson Township, Ohio; companion, Bob Blaut of Alexandria; eight grandchildren; 12 great-grandchildren and three greatgreat-grandchildren. Burial was in St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas. Memorials: Carmel Manor, 100 Carmel Manor Road, Fort Thomas, KY 41075; or Licking Valley Girl Scout Council, 607 Watson Road, Erlanger, KY 41018.

Anna Mae Brown

Anna Mae Brown, 76, Newport, homemaker, died Aug. 3, 2010, at her home. Her husband, Alfred Scott Brown, and daughter, Patricia Brown, died previously. Survivors include a daughter, Brenda Brown, and son, Charles Brown, both of Newport. Burial was in St. Stephens Cemetery in Fort Thomas. Memorials: Hospice of the Bluegrass, 7388 Turfway Road, Florence, KY 41042.

er for Advo Door Store in Norwood; a veteran of the United States Marine Corps during Vietnam; a member of St. Joseph Church in Cold Spring; and an avid golfer. He was preceded in death by a son, Robbie Eberhard. He is survived by his wife, Diane Sexton Eberhard; a son, Nick Eberhard of Cold Spring; two daughters, Staci Eberhard of Fort Thomas and Kari Bezold of California, Ky.; and four grandchildren. Burial was in St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas. Memorials: St. Joseph Church Capital Campaign Fund, 4011 Alexandria Pike, Cold Spring, KY 41076; St. Elizabeth Hospice, 483 South Loop Drive, Edgewood, KY 41017.

Frank Ellis

Hall; sons, Kevin Hall of Fort Thomas and David Hall of Bellevue; brother, Herald Hall of Alexandria; sisters, Lucille York and Betty Hampton, both of Cold Spring and three grandchildren. Burial was in Oakland Cemetery, Grant’s Lick. Memorials: Grants Lick Baptist Church, 941 Clay Ridge Road, Alexandria, KY 41001; or Hospice of the Bluegrass-Northern Kentucky, 7388 Turfway Road, Florence, KY 41042.

Edwin P. Hammons

Edwin P. “Ed” Hammons, 68, of Erlanger, formerly of Ludlow, died Aug. 16, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Florence. He was a security officer at Loreal Co., Guardsmark Security, was a Vietnam War Army veteran and

member of Main Street Baptist Church of Florence. His son, Hayden Hammons, died in 1962. Survivors include his wife, Linda Crawford Hammons; daughters, Teri Hammons of Newport and Amber Lyons of South Shore, Ky.; son, Tory Hammons of Covington; sister, Martha Daley of Florence; brothers, Harry Hammons of Crestview Hills, Harold Hammons of Felicity, Ohio and Charles Hammons of Ludlow; four grandchildren; two stepgrandchildren; one great-grandson; and four stepgreat-grandchildren. Memorials: Main Street Baptist Church of Florence, 213 Main St., Florence, KY 41042.

Deaths continued B10

Carlis Ray Hall, 72, Cold Spring, died Aug. 14, 2010, at Hospice of the Bluegrass Care Center, Fort Thomas. He worked as a general service person for Good Year Tire Store, KOI and Neltner’s, was a member of the Teamsters Union and Grant’s Lick Baptist Church. Survivors include his wife, Loretta

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Report of washing machine, tools and copper taken from toolshed at 8796 Mary Ingles Hwy., Aug. 4.

Verbal domestic

Reported at Mary Ingles Highway, Aug. 6.

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Lynn E. “Skip” Eberhard, 66, Alexandria, died Aug. 19, 2010, at Hospice of St. Elizabeth Health Care in Edgewood. He was an industrial plant manag-

Third degree burglary no forced entry

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Frank C. Ellis, 62, Villa Hills, died Aug. 19, 2010, at Hospice of St. Elizabeth Health Care in Edgewood. He was a service tech for Modern Office Methods. Survivors include his mother, Cecile V. Green of Madison, Maine; son, Mark Ellis of Bellevue; daughter, Keri Ann Bowyer of Crescent Springs; sister, Linda Rossi of Haver Hill, Mass.; brothers, Bill Ellis of Fountain Valley, Calif., and Bob Ellis of Lynn, Mass.; and six grandchildren. Memorials: American Cancer Society, 297 Buttermilk Pike, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017.

Lynn ‘Skip’ Eberhard

Third degree burglary

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Robert J. Anstead, 58, Covington, died Aug. 19, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He was a member of the St. Benedict Holy Name Society; a member of St. Benedict Church and of Southside Baptist Church in Covington; and a member of the Northern Kentucky Young Democrats. He is survived by his fiancée, Patti Emerson of Covington; brothers James Anstead of Wilder, Thomas Anstead of Alexandria, Gregory Anstead of San Antonio, Michael Anstead of Lexington, and David Anstead of Covington; and a sister, Martha Coffman of Fort Thomas. Memorials: American Diabetes Association, P.O. Box 11454 Alexandria, VA 22312.

Theft-receipt of stolen credit/debit card

Incidents/investigations Animal complaint

DEATHS Robert J. Anstead

Theft by unlawful taking

Report of cash taken from residence at 400 West Miller Road, Aug. 5.

107 W. 11th Newport, KY 859-431-5484

www.browntv.homeappliance.com


B10

CCF Recorder LEGAL NOTICE

The Cold Spring Planning and Zoning Commission will conduct a public hearing in the Cold Spring City Building at 5694 East Alexandria Pike, Cold Spring, Kentucky, on WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2010, at 7:30 PM. The purpose of this public hearing is to hear any interested party who wishes to speak or present any pertinent information relative to the following described item(s): APPLICANT: Steve Chuke LOCATION: an approximate 7.5-acre area located at the southwest corner of the intersection of Alexandria Pike with Buning Lane REQUEST: review of a proposed amended Stage II Development Plan for the site which is currently zoned SDA (a special development zone); the applicant proposes to use the existing lake on the property for a pay fishing lake Information about this proposal is available for public review weekdays between 8 AM and 5 PM at NKAPC, 2332 Royal Drive in Fort Mitchell. If you have a disability for which the planning commission needs to provide accommodations, please notify the staff at least seven days prior to the public hearing. You may submit your request by calling 859.331.8980, faxing 859.331.8987, or emailing postmaster @nkapc.org. Andrew M. Videkovich, AICP NKAPC Principal Planner

Deaths

August 26, 2010

4108

LEGAL NOTICE The Campbell County Fiscal Court, at a special meeting to be held on Wednesday, September 1, 2010, at 4:00 p.m. at the Campbell County Courthouse, 8352 East Main Street, Alexandria, Kentucky, will call for second reading and consideration of passage the following ordinance, said ordinance having been read by title and a summary given for the first time at the August 18, 2010, special meeting of the Court. CAMPBELL COUNTY FISCAL COURT CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY ORDINANCE NO. O-09-10 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CAMPBELL COUNTY FISCAL COURT AMENDING CHAPTER 94 OF THE CODE OF ORDINANCES RELATING TO HORSE TRAIL RULES AND REGULATIONS The full text of Ordinance O-09-10 will be on file in the Office of the County Clerk, Newport, Kentucky, and is on file in the Office of the Fiscal Court Clerk, Newport, Kentucky, and same is available for inspection and use by the public during regular business hours. I, Paula K. Spicer, Clerk of the Campbell County Fiscal Court, hereby certify that this summary was prepared by me at the direction of the Campbell County Fiscal Court and that said summary is a true and accurate summary of the contents of Ordinance O-09-10. Paula K. Spicer Fiscal Court Clerk 1001584662 LEGAL NOTICE Deadline extension: Bids are now due Friday, September 3, 2010 at 12:00 at the Housing Authority offices

NOTICE OF ADOPTION, TITLE AND SUMMARY OF ALEXANDRIA ORDINANCE 2010-13 I hereby certify that the following is the Title and Summary of Ordinance 201013 of the City of Alexandria, in Campbell County, Kentucky, adopted by City Council on August 19, 2010: ORDINANCE NO. 2010-13: AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF ALEXAN DRIA, IN CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY, AMENDING ORDINANCE 2010-08, THE CITY’S BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 2010/2011, BY TRANS FERRING FUNDS TO AND AMONG THE VARIOUS NAMED BUDGET ACCOUNTS, IN ORDER TO APPROPRI ATE FUNDS FOR A POLICE CRUISER TO REPLACE THE ONE THAT WAS RECENTLY DESTROYED IN AN ACCIDENT; AND BY CREATING A NEW POLICE BUDGET ACCOUNT FOR GRANTS EXPENSES. This Ordinance amends the City’s budget for the 2010/2011 fiscal year in order to transfer funds to and among the various budget accounts as follows: transfer $13,700 from #01.00.8955 MISCELLA NEOUS income account, to #01.20.9610 Police CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS expense account; and transfer $10,895 from #01.80.8000 ROAD FUND account, to #01.20.9610 Police CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS expense account; for a total of $24,595 to be made available to pay for the replacement police cruiser and equipment. This Ordinance also creates a new budget account in the Police Expense budget in order to provide for appropriations of grant monies received. ********************************************* I, Michael A. Duncan, an attorney licensed to practice law in the Commonwealth of Kentucky, for Ziegler & Schneider, P.S.C., City Attorneys for the City of Alexandria, in Campbell County, Kentucky, do hereby certify that this Notice of Adoption, Title and Summary of Ordinance 2010-13 was prepared by me, and that it represents an accurate description of the summary of the contents of the Ordinance. The full text of the Ordinance, the Exhibit, and other information relative to the Ordinance, are on file at the office of the City Clerk, 8236 West Main Street, Alexandria, Kentucky 41001. /s/ Michael A. Duncan Michael A. Duncan For Ziegler & Schneider, P.S.C. City Attorneys 4993 INVITATION TO BID August 26, 2010 PROJECT: 36-Inch Project Materials Bid SEALED BIDS WILL BE RECEIVED AT: Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) 2835 Crescent Springs Road Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 UNTIL:

Date: Time:

September 7, 2010 9:00 a.m., local time

INVITATION TO BID

At said place and time, and promptly thereafter, all Bids that have been duly received will be publicly opened and read aloud.

Housing Authority of Newport will be accepting sealed bids for parking reconfiguration and landscaping adjustments at its’ Grand Towers building located at 1359 Grand Ave. in the City of Newport, Kentucky. Bids are due no later than 12:00 p.m., local time, August 16, 2010, at the offices of the Housing Authority of Newport, located at 30 East 8th. St., Newport, KY 41071 at which time and place all bids will be publicly opened and read aloud. Bids are to be marked “Grand Towers parking Project #10-22”.

The Northern Kentucky Water District is requesting bid prices for the purchase of the following items: 3 - 36” Gate Valves (250 psi) (less accessories) and 2 36”X36”X36” ductile iron mechanical joint tee as described in the Specifications and other Documents prepared by the Northern Kentucky Water District. Freight shall be included in the bid price. All deliveries are to be made to the Northern Kentucky Water District at 2835 Crescent Springs Road, Erlanger, Kentucky.

The information for Bidders, Form of Bid, Form of Contract, Plans, Specifications and Forms of Bid Bond, Performance and Payment Bond, and other contract documents may be obtained at the HAN offices or by contacting Randy Schweinzger at (859) 5812533, ext. 217. The hearing and/or speechimpaired may call our TDD line at (859) 5813181.

The quantities provided in the Bidding Documents are estimated and are provided for the comparison of bids only. The quantities purchased shall be based on the quantities actually ordered and received by the District. Bidder is not to state a minimum delivery number for any item. A minimum delivery requirement represented as a weight or otherwise, will invalidate the bid.

HAN will conduct a pre-bid conference at 10:00 a.m., August 5, 2010 at Grand Towers. A certified check or bank draft, payable to Housing Authority of Newport, U.S. Government Bonds, or a satisfactory bid bond executed by the Bidder and acceptable sureties in amount equal to five (5) percent of the bid shall be submitted with each bid. The successful Bidder will be required to furnish and pay for satisfactory performance and payment bonds. All Bidders shall include with their bid a statement from an acceptable surety that if their bid is accepted the surety will furnish to the Bidder the required performance and payment bond or bonds required by the contract documents. Attention of Bidders is particularly called to the requirements as to conditions of employment to be observed and minimum wage rates to be paid under the contract, Section 3, Segregated Facility, Section 109 and E.O. 11246 and Title VI. MBE/WBE firms are encouraged to bid. No bidder may withdraw their bid within 60 days after the actual date of opening thereof. HAN reserves the right to waive any informali ty, irregularity, or defect in any proposal, and to reject any/or all proposals should it be deemed in the best interest of HAN to do so. It is the intent of HAN to award a contract to the lowest responsible and responsive bidder. HAN is an Equal Opportunity Employer. 126792/1001583013

All Bids must be in accordance with the Bidding Documents on file, and available for examination at: Northern Kentucky Water District, 2835 Crescent Springs Road, Erlanger, Kentucky. Copies of the Bidding Documents may be obtained from the office at the address indicated above by contacting Denise Manning at (859) 426-2718. There is no charge for these documents. Bids will be received on a unit price basis as described in the Bidding Documents. Bids may be submitted for any one item, multiple items, or all of the items listed in the Bid Form. Owner reserves the right to reject any or all Bids, including without limitation the right to reject any or all nonconforming, non-responsive, incomplete, unbalanced, or conditional Bids, to waive informalities, and to reject the Bid of any Bidder if Owner believes that it would not be in the best interest of Owner to make an award to that Bidder. Owner also reserves the right to negotiate with the selected Bidder to such an extent as may be determined by Owner. Minority Bidders are encouraged to bid. Bids shall remain subject to acceptance for 60 days after the day of bid opening. Richard Harrison, V.P. Eng. & Distribution Northern Kentucky Water District 1001584675

From B9

Allene Hines

Allene Hines, 81, Highland Heights, died Aug. 15, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. She was a homemaker and aide for Lakeside Nursing Home in Highland Heights. Her husband, Harold Hines, died previously. Survivors include her daughters, Sherry Wilkens of Alexandria and Sheila Mains of Highland Heights; sons, Robert Hines of Highland Heights, David Hines of Alexandria and Steven Hines of Newport; 11 grandchildren; 12 great-grandchildren. No public services. The body was donated to the University of Cincinnati Medical College. Fares J. Radel Funeral Home is handling arrangements. Memorials: Hospice of the Bluegrass Northern Kentucky, 7388 Turfway Road, Florence, Kentucky, 41042.

Della Mae Isbel

Della Mae Isbel, 64, Newport, a homemaker, died Aug. 17, 2010. at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. Survivors include her daughters, Penny Kunkel of Wilder and Cindy Barnett of Cold Spring; son, Scott Isbel of Hamilton, Ohio; brothers, Sam Johnson of Dry Ridge, Woody Johnson of Burlington, Eddie Johnson of Florence, Noah Johnson of Morning View, Jimmy Johnson of Sparta, and Richard Johnson of Corinth; sisters, Mildred Lainhart of Oklahoma and Sherry Freeman of Florence; four grandchildren; and nine great-grandchildren. No public services. Cooper Funeral Home, Alexandria is handling arrangements.

COMMISSIONER’S SALE BOONE CIRCUIT COURT, CASE NO. 10-CI-0112 WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.

PLAINTIFF(S)

Wanda Jacobs

Rose Mary Mann, 80, Mentor, died Aug. 19, 2010, at Baptist Convalescent Center in Newport. She worked for McAlpin’s Department Store in Cincinnati. Her cousin, Cecile Auchter of Mentor, survives. Memorials: Mentor Baptist Church Building Fund, 3724 Smith Road, Mentor, KY 41007; or Hospice of the Bluegrass Northern Kentucky, 7388 Turfway Road, Florence, KY 41042.

Gertrude Knight

Daniel Mattingly

Gertrude “Trudy” Knight, 86, Wilder, died Aug. 20, 2010, in Villa Hills. She was a cafeteria manager and teachers’ assistant with Newport Independent School District, volunteer for Campbell County Extension Service in Highland Heights where she received a degree in master gardening, member of the Ladies Auxiliary of the Newport Elks 273 and the LawlerHanlon Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 5662 in Newport. Her son, Michael Knight, died previously.

COMMISSIONER’S SALE BOONE CIRCUIT COURT, CASE NO. 08-CI-1360 US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION

PLAINTIFF(S)

NOTICE OF SALE VERSUS} DEFENDANT(S)

By virtue of a judgment and order of sale of the Boone Circuit Court rendered JULY 14, 2010 the above case, I shall proceed to offer for sale at the Justice Center Building in Burlington, Kentucky, to the highest bidder, at public auction on THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2010 at the hour of 9:00 a.m. or thereabouts, the following described property to-wit: ADDRESS: 535 ARTHUR CT. FLORENCE, KY 41042 Group No. 4341 Situated in the County of Boone and Commonwealth of Kentucky to-wit: Being Unit 22-3, a condominium unit in Sherwood Lakes Condominiums, according to Master Deed recorded in Deed Book 614 page 19 of the Boone County Court Clerk’s Records at Burlington, Kentucky and as shown in Plat Cabinet 4, Slide 217 in the office aforesaid. Subject to covenants, conditions and restrictions as set forth in the Master Deed. There are excepted from the warranty covenants set forth herein matters of zoning, conditions and restrictions and easements of record. Being the same property conveyed to Kenneth E. Courts, unmarried, and Missy L. Sterneberg, unmarried, from Amstar Development, LLC by Deed dated May 31, 2005 and recorded June 13, 2005, in Deed Book 897, Page 469 of the records of the Boone County Clerk’s Office, Burlington, Kentucky. TERMS OF SALE: The property shall be sold as a whole. The purchaser may pay all or part of the purchase price in cash, and may pay the balance of the purchase price on a credit of 30 days after date of sale; said credit shall be granted only upon the execution by the purchaser of bond, with surety thereon, and said surety shall be a lending institution authorized and doing business in Kentucky, or a reputable fidelity or surety company, authorized and doing business in Kentucky, and only if said surety be acceptable to the Commissioner of the Boone Circuit Court; and an authorized officer of the surety must be present at the sale or must have given the Commissioner adequate assurance of its intent to be surety prior to or at the sale; and said Bond shall be, and shall remain, a lien on the property sold as additional security for the payment of the full purchase price, and shall have the full force and effect of a Judgment; and said Bond shall bear interest at the rate of Twelve (12%) Percent per annum until paid. The purchaser shall be required to pay the sum of 10% of the bid amount in cash or certified check on the purchase at the time of sale. The successful bidder at the sale shall, at bidder’s own expense, carry fire and extended insurance coverage on any improvements from the date of sale until the purchase price is fully paid, with a loss payable clause to the Commissioner of the Boone Circuit Court. Failure of the purchaser to effect such insurance shall not affect the validity of the sale or the purchaser’s liability thereunder, but shall entitle, but not require, a lien holder herein, after giving notice to the Commissioner, to effect said insurance and furnish the policy or evidence thereof to the Commissioner, and the premium thereon or the proper portion thereof shall be charged to the purchaser as purchaser’s cost. The property shall be sold subject to ad valorem taxes for the year 2010 and all subsequent years thereafter; easements, restrictions and stipulations of record; assessments for public improvements levied against the property, if any; existing zoning ordinances, statutes, laws, or regulations; and any facts which an inspection and accurate survey of the property may disclose. The amount of the liens before the Court in this action total $79,433.06 together with interest, assessments, taxes and costs herein expended. BIDDERS SHALL BE PREPARED TO COMPLY WITH THESE TERMS /s/ MASTER COMMISSIONER, BOONE CIRCUIT COURT 6025 Rogers Lane, Burlington, KY 41005 (859) 334-3916/1 mc/nos/98. www.boonecountyky.org (Link to Departments/Agencies to Master Commissioner) 1001583333

COMMISSIONER’S SALE BOONE CIRCUIT COURT, CASE NO. 10-CI-1110 EVERHOME MORTGAGE COMPANY

VERSUS} EDDIE MILLS, ET AL

NOTICE OF SALE VERSUS}

KENNETH E. COURTS, ET AL

PLAINTIFF(S)

DEFENDANT(S)

Rose Mary Mann

Daniel Mattingly, 21, California, died Aug. 18, 2010, in Campbell County. He was self-employed. Survivors include his parents, Rodney and Tammy Mattingly of California; and brother, Rodney Mattingly Jr. of Grants Lick. Burial was in Grandview Cemetery, Mentor.

Michele McWilliams

Michele McWilliams, 44, Alexandria, a homemaker, died Aug. 16, 2010, at Hospice of the Bluegrass Care Center, Fort Thomas. Her husband, Timothy Hansen, died previously. Survivors include her son, Steven McWilliams of Portage, Wis.; mother, Patricia Mitchell of Portage, Wis.; sisters, Tammi Artz of Birnamwood, Wis. and Mandi Miller of Milwaukee, Wis.; brother, Mike McWilliams of Portage, Wis. and companion, Mandy Berry of Alexandria. No public services. Alexandria Funeral Home is handling arrangements. Memorials: Hospice of the Bluegrass-Northern Kentucky, 7388 Turfway Road, Florence, KY 41042.

Shirley Marie Pond

BRAD W. HEARN, ET AL DEFENDANT(S)

By virtue of a judgment and order of sale of the Boone Circuit Court rendered AUGUST 26, 2008 the above case, I shall proceed to offer for sale at the Justice Center Building in Burlington, Kentucky, to the highest bidder, at public auction on THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2010 at the hour of 9:00 a.m. or thereabouts, the following described property to-wit: ADDRESS: 5833 GREEN DRIVE FLORENCE, KY 41042 Being all of Lot 41 of the Greenview Subdivision, First Edition, as shown on the Plat for said Subdivision recorded in Plat Book 3, page 19 of the Boone County Court Clerk’s records, at Burlington, Kentucky. Being all of the same property conveyed to The Campbell Brothers Co., Inc. as set forth in Deed Book 903, page 778, filed of record 9/26/05. Being all of the same property conveyed to Ronald P. Blanchard as set forth in Deed Book 304, page 274, filed of record 6/10/83. Being the same property conveyed to Brad W. Hearn and Lara D. Hearn, husband and wife, from the Campbell Brothers Co., Inc., a Kentucky Corporation, by deed dated July 31, 2006 and recorded August 16, 2006, in Deed Book 920, Page 725 of the records of the Boone County Clerk’s office, Burlington, Kentucky. TERMS OF SALE: The property shall be sold as a whole. The purchaser may pay all or part of the purchase price in cash, and may pay the balance of the purchase price on a credit of 30 days after date of sale; said credit shall be granted only upon the execution by the purchaser of bond, with surety thereon, and said surety shall be a lending institution authorized and doing business in Kentucky, or a reputable fidelity or surety company, authorized and doing business in Kentucky, and only if said surety be acceptable to the Commissioner of the Boone Circuit Court; and an authorized officer of the surety must be present at the sale or must have given the Commissioner adequate assurance of its intent to be surety prior to or at the sale; and said Bond shall be, and shall remain, a lien on the property sold as additional security for the payment of the full purchase price, and shall have the full force and effect of a Judgment; and said Bond shall bear interest at the rate of Twelve (12%) Percent per annum until paid. The purchaser shall be required to pay the sum of 10% of the bid amount in cash or certified check on the purchase at the time of sale. The successful bidder at the sale shall, at bidder’s own expense, carry fire and extended insurance coverage on any improvements from the date of sale until the purchase price is fully paid, with a loss payable clause to the Commissioner of the Boone Circuit Court. Failure of the purchaser to effect such insurance shall not affect the validity of the sale or the purchaser’s liability thereunder, but shall entitle, but not require, a lien holder herein, after giving notice to the Commissioner, to effect said insurance and furnish the policy or evidence thereof to the Commissioner, and the premium thereon or the proper portion thereof shall be charged to the purchaser as purchaser’s cost. The property shall be sold subject to ad valorem taxes for the year 2010 and all subsequent years thereafter; easements, restrictions and stipulations of record; assessments for public improvements levied against the property, if any; existing zoning ordinances, statutes, laws, or regulations; and any facts which an inspection and accurate survey of the property may disclose. The amount of the liens before the Court in this action total $100,598.99 together with interest, assessments, taxes and costs herein expended. BIDDERS SHALL BE PREPARED TO COMPLY WITH THESE TERMS /s/ MASTER COMMISSIONER, BOONE CIRCUIT COURT 6025 Rogers Lane, Burlington, KY 41005 (859) 334-3916/1 mc/nos/98. www.boonecountyky.org (Link to Departments/Agencies to Master Commissioner) 100158

COMMISSIONER’S SALE BOONE CIRCUIT COURT, CASE NO. 09-CI-2318 GMAC MORTGAGE, LLC

NOTICE OF SALE

By virtue of a judgment and order of sale of the Boone Circuit Court rendered JULY 14, 2010 the above case, I shall proceed to offer for sale at the Justice Center Building in Burlington, Kentucky, to the highest bidder, at public auction on THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2010 at the hour of 9:00 a.m. or thereabouts, the following described property to-wit: ADDRESS: 2139 PETERSBURG ROAD HEBRON, KY 41048 Group No. 82 A certain tract or parcel of land in Boone County, in the State of Kentucky, described as follows: Being the North or from portions of Lots No. 43 and 44 of Hebron Heights subdivision as shown in Plat Book #1, page 60, Boone Clerk’s records and described thus; Beginning at the most Easterly corner of Lot #44 of said Subdivision in the South line of Highway #20; thence along said highway North 87-45 W 50 feet; thence S 2-15 W. 138.5 feet; thence S 87-45 E 50 feet; thence N 2-15 E 138.5 feet to the beginning. Tract #2: Near the Town of Hebron and situated in what is knows as Hebron Heights Subdivision and being the from portion of Lots numbers 42 and 45. See Plat recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 60, Boone County Clerk’s Office, Burlington, Kentucky. Said lots each have a depth of 138 feet, the same as lots 43 and 44 which are now also owned by the grantors. Being the same property conveyed to Mary M. Spencer and Kathy Spencer Mil s, wife and husband, from Mary M. Spencer and Kathy Spencer Mil s, for and during their joint lives, with remainder in fee simple to the survivor of them, by Deed dated 9/07/2004, recorded 9/09/2004, Deed Book 882, page 271, Boone County Clerk’s Records. TERMS OF SALE: The property shall be sold as a whole. The purchaser may pay all or part of the purchase price in cash, and may pay the balance of the purchase price on a credit of 30 days after date of sale; said credit shall be granted only upon the execution by the purchaser of bond, with surety thereon, and said surety shall be a lending institution authorized and doing business in Kentucky, or areputable fidelity orsurety company, authorized and doing business in Kentucky, and only if said surety be acceptable to the Commissioner of the Boone Circuit Court; and an authorized officer of the surety must be present at the sale or must have given the Commissioner adequate assurance of its intent to be surety prior to or at the sale; and said Bond shall be, and shall remain, a lien on the property sold as additional security for the payment of the full purchase price, and shall have the full force and effect of a Judgment; and said Bond shall bear interest at the rate of Twelve (12%) Percent per annum until paid. The purchaser shall be required to pay the sum of 10% of the bid amount in cash or certified check on the purchase at the time of sale. The successful bidder at the sale shall, at bidder’s own expense, carry fire and extended insurance coverage on any improvements from the date of sale until the purchase price is fully paid, with a loss payable clause to the Commissioner of the Boone Circuit Court. Failure of the purchaser to effect such insurance shall not affect the validity of the sale or the purchaser’s liability thereunder, but shall entitle, but not require, a lien holder herein, after giving notice to the Commissioner, to effect said insurance and furnish the policy or evidence thereof to the Commissioner, and the premium thereon or the proper portion thereof shall be charged to the purchaser as purchaser’s cost. The property shall be sold subject to ad valorem taxes for the year 2010 and all subsequent years thereafter; easements, restrictions and stipulations of record; assessments for public improvements levied against the property, if any; existing zoning ordinances, statutes, laws, or regulations; and any facts which an inspection and accurate survey of the property may disclose. The amount of the liens before the Court in this action total $70,469.44 together with interest, assessments, taxes and costs herein expended. BIDDERS SHALL BE PREPARED TO COMPLY WITH THESE TERMS /s/ MASTER COMMISSIONER, BOONE CIRCUIT COURT 6025 Rogers Lane, Burlington, KY 41005 (859) 334-3916/1 mc/nos/98. www.boonecountyky.org (Link to Departments/Agencies to Master Commissioner) 1001585099

Survivors include her husband of 67 years, Harold Knight; daughters, Trudy Murray of Edgewood and Michele Black of Cincinnati, Ohio; son, Kenneth Knight of Fairfield, Ohio; nine grandchildren; and 16 great-grandchildren. Burial was in Floral Hills Memorial Gardens, Taylor Mill. Memorials: St. Paul’s United Church of Christ, 1 Churchill Drive, Fort Thomas, KY 41075.

Wanda Dorman Jacobs, 80, Dry Ridge, died Aug. 15, 2010, at Robertson County Health Care, Mt. Olivet. She was a seamstress with Safeguard Corp. in Covington, member of the Community Pentecostal Church and past Matron for the Order of Eastern Star 334. Her husband, James Jacobs, died in 1986. Survivors include her daughter, Brenda Brewer of Dry Ridge; son, Jeff Gosney of Cincinnati; stepdaughter, Betsy Jacobs of Fort Thomas; sisters, Lorraine Mason of Cincinnati and Ruby Miller of Peebles, Ohio; brothers, Ronald Dorman of Crittenden, Fred Dorman of Taylor Mill and Bill Dorman of Chipley, Fla.; six grandchildren; seven great-grandchildren and two great-great-grandchildren. Burial was in Floral Hills Memorial Gardens, Taylor Mill. Memorials: Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, P.O. Box 643270, Cincinnati, OH 45264.

PLAINTIFF(S)

NOTICE OF SALE VERSUS} SHERRY WOLFE, ET AL DEFENDANT(S)

By virtue of a judgment and order of sale of the Boone Circuit Court rendered MARCH 3, 2010 the above case, I shall proceed to offer for sale at the Justice Center Building in Burlington, Kentucky, to the highest bidder, at public auction on THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2010 at the hour of 9:00 a.m. or thereabouts, the following described property to-wit: ADDRESS: 4523 RIVER ROAD HEBRON, KY 41048 Group No. 2009 The following described real estate, in the County of Boone and Commonwealth of Kentucky, to-wit: On the road leading from Constance to Taylorsport and beginning at a point in said road a corner of Joel Peeno; thence with his line N. 47 W. passing an iron pin spike on the South side of the road at nine feet in all 646.3 feet to a set stone on the brow of a hil Peeno’s corner, thence with his line N. 53’ 30" W., 38.50 feet to stake in said line; thence with another lf his lines N. 44’ 30" W, 48 feet to a stake in said line on the brow of a hil ; thence N. 45’ 36" E., 674.40 feet to point in the center of the road; thence with the road S 45E., 9.20 feet to a point in said road; thence S. 31 E 97 feet to the beginning, containing 1.444/1000 acres, more or less. Being the same property conveyed to Sherry Wolfe, an unremarried person who acquired title by virtue of a deed from Ed Wolfe, an unremarried person and Sherry Wolfe, an unremarried person, dated July 14, 2004, filed July 15, 2004, recorded in Deed Book D878, Page 854, County Clerk’s Office, Boone County, Kentucky. Subject to all restrictions, conditions and covenants and to all legal highways and easements. TERMS OF SALE: The property shall be sold as a whole. The purchaser may pay all or part of the purchase price in cash, and may pay the balance of the purchase price on a credit of 30 days after date of sale; said credit shall be granted only upon the execution by the purchaser of bond, with surety thereon, and said surety shall be a lending institution authorized and doing business in Kentucky, or a reputable fidelity or surety company, authorized and doing business in Kentucky, and only if said surety be acceptable to the Commissioner of the Boone Circuit Court; and an authorized officer of the surety must be present at the sale or must have given the Commissioner adequate assurance of its intent to be surety prior to or at the sale; and said Bond shall be, and shall remain, a lien on the property sold as additional security for the payment of the full purchase price, and shall have the full force and effect of a Judgment; and said Bond shall bear interest at the rate of Twelve (12%) Percent per annum until paid. The purchaser shall be required to pay the sum of 10% of the bid amount in cash or certified check on the purchase at the time of sale. The successful bidder at the sale shall, at bidder’s own expense, carry fire and extended insurance coverage on any improvements from the date of sale until the purchase price is fully paid, with a loss payable clause to the Commissioner of the Boone Circuit Court. Failure of the purchaser to effect such insurance shall not affect the validity of the sale or the purchaser’s liability thereunder, but shall entitle, but not require, a lien holder herein, after giving notice to the Commissioner, to effect said insurance and furnish the policy or evidence thereof to the Commissioner, and the premium thereon or the proper portion thereof shall be charged to the purchaser as purchaser’s cost. The property shall be sold subject to ad valorem taxes for the year 2010 and all subsequent years thereafter; easements, restrictions and stipulations of record; assessments for public improvements levied against the property, if any; existing zoning ordinances, statutes, laws, or regulations; and any facts which an inspection and accurate survey of the property may disclose. The amount of the liens before the Court in this action total $58,850.08 together with interest, assessments, taxes and costs herein expended. BIDDERS SHALL BE PREPARED TO COMPLY WITH THESE TERMS /s/ MASTER COMMISSIONER, BOONE CIRCUIT COURT 6025 Rogers Lane, Burlington, KY 41005 (859) 334-3916/1 mc/nos/98. www.boonecountyky.org (Link to Departments/Agencies to Master Commissioner) 1001585130

Shirley Marie Pond, 56, of Newport died Aug. 14, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. She was a packer for Duro Paper Bag Co. Survivors include her husband, Daniel Pond of Newport; sons, Michael and Jonathon Pond, both of Newport; daughters, Teresa Cline, Tracey and Tessa Pond, all of Somerset; brothers, Horace Miller of Independence and Jimmy Miller of Newport; sisters, Daisy Shietze of Independence, Betty Noble of Newport and Marie Heather of Batavia; 14 grandchildren and two greatgrandchildren. Burial was in Kentucky Veterans Cemetery North, Williamstown.

Carol Ann Root

Carol Ann Root, 82, Fort Thomas, a homemaker, died Aug.19, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. Her husband, Jack H. Root Sr., died previously. Survivors include her sons, Jack H. Root Jr. of Fort Thomas and Taylor Root of Seattle and one grandchild. Burial was in Evergreen Cemetery, Southgate.

Mary Schmits

Mary Grothaus Schmits, 89, Bellevue, died on Aug. 16, 2010, at Carmel Manor Nursing Home, Fort Thomas. She was the former owner of Loyal Cafe in Bellevue, member of Divine Mercy Parish and the Loyal Boosters. Her husband, William Frank Schmits, died previously. Survivors include her sons, William E. Schmits of LaMirada, Calif., Daniel Schmits of Newport, Gerald and Stephen Schmits of Bellevue; daughters, Marilyn Lombardo of Alexandria, Beverly Dawson of Bellevue; brothers, Roman Grothaus of Modesto, Calif., Leonard Grothaus of Cold Spring, Vernon Grothaus of Fort Thomas and Norbert Grothaus of Milford; 20 grandchildren and 35 great-grandchildren. Burial was in St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas. Memorials: Alzheimer’s Association, 644 Linn St., Suite 1026, Cincinnati, OH 45203.

Norman Ginn Siry

Norman Ginn Siry, 78, Alexandria, died at home on Aug. 20, 2010. He was a maintenance machinist for The Cincinnati Enquirer; a veteran of the United States Air Force during the Korean War; a member of the Alexandria Masonic Lodge No. 352, and the Scottish Rite. He is survived by his wife, Judy Siry of Alexandria; sons Dan Siry of Cincinnati, Steve Siry of Alexandria, and Rick Siry of Grants Lick; and seven grandchildren. Burial was at Oakland Cemetery, Grants Lick.

Deaths continued B11


On the record

August 26, 2010

CCF Recorder

B11

DEATHS From B10

Charlie Stamper

Charlie Stamper, 59, of Westminster, S.C., formerly of Newport, died Aug. 13, 2010, at his home. He was a lead instructor for heavy equipment training at Performance Training Services in Rockdale, Texas. His son, Daniel Stamper, died previously. Survivors include his wife, Lucinda Stamper; sons, Matthew Stamper of Bellevue, Benjamin Stamper of Hebron and James Monds of Rockdale, Texas; daughter, Danielle Monds of Martinsville, Ohio; sister, Wanda Simmons of Alexandria and seven grandchildren.

James D. Stewart

James D. Stewart, 44, Newport, died Aug. 3, 2010, at University Hospital, Corryville. He was a selfemployed roofer. His son, Joshua Stewart, died previously. Survivors include his wife, Tammy Stewart of Ludlow; daugh-

ters, Michelle Stewart of Cincinnati, Angelica Stewart of Grant County and Angela Stewart of Ludlow; son, James Stewart II of Ludlow; stepson, Michael Jarman of Ludlow; mother, Ruth Stewart of Dayton; sisters, Ruth Ann Stewart of Newport, Connie Stewart of Fort Thomas and Bonnie Stewart of Newport; brothers, John Stewart of Newport and Charles Stewart of Dayton and three grandchildren. Burial of cremated remains was in Evergreen Cemetery, Southgate. Memorial Fund, c/o any First Security Trust Bank.

William Strasinger

William Russell Strasinger, 84, of Fort Thomas, died Aug. 18, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He was a mechanical engineer with McCloud Co., a World War II Navy veteran, member First Baptist Church of Newport and the Experimental Aircraft Association. His first wife, Jacqueline Strasinger, died previously.

Survivors include his wife, Norma Strasinger; son, Dennis Smith of Burlington; daughters, Debbie Stahlhut of Fort Thomas, Karen Orrender of Fort Thomas and Renee DeJarivette of Alexandria; brothers, Irvin and Donald Strasinger, both of Covington and sister, Janet Strasinger-Braun. Burial was in Gate of Heaven Cemetery, Cincinnati. Memorials: First Baptist Church of Newport, East Eighth and York St., Newport, KY 41071.

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issued July 29. Heather Jimenez, 38, of Salem and Selvin Lopez, 31, of Honduras, issued Aug. 3. Sarah Strickloy, 31, of Covington and Ian Stansel, 35, of Chicago, issued Aug 4. Kimberly Carmack, 30, and Kevin Galbaugh, 29, both of Fort Thomas, issued Aug. 4. Amber Baker, 22, of Fort Thomas and Kenneth Moore, 27, of Covington, issued Aug. 5. Mackenzie Ferguson, 19, of Cincinnati and Joseph Chaney, 23, of Indiana, issued Aug. 6. Mary Rodriguez, 58, and Donald Cook, 62, both of Texas, issued Aug. 7. Sarah Schoettelkotte, 28, and Andrew McGraw, 28, both of Cincinnati, issued Aug. 7. Jennifer Burt, 31, of Cincinnati and Bradley Taylor, 32, of Fort Thomas, issued Aug. 7. Jeanne Blanchard, 60, of Fairborn and James Raines, 59, of Hamilton, issued Aug. 7. Emily Henderson, 26, of Santa Barbara and Ren Ariizumi, 30, of

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Denise Dill of Bellevue; sons, Aaron Williams of Independence, Mike, J. D., Andy and Austin Williams, all of Alexandria; sister, Wanda Ford of Newport; brother, John Stamper of Newport and 12 grandchildren. Memorials: Darlene Kay Williams Memorial Fund, c/o Dobbling, Muehlenkamp-Erschell Funeral Home, 241 Fairfield Ave., Bellevue, KY 41073.

Darlene Kay Williams

Darlene Kay Williams, 57, Alexandria, a homemaker, died Aug. 18, 2010, at her home. Her husband, James R. “J.R.” Williams died in 2009 and son, Jimmy Williams, died previously. Survivors include her daughter,

Ron Zeis

Ron Zeis, 58, Highland Heights,

Ervin Turner

Ervin Turner, 66, Newport, died Aug. 20, 2010, at Hospice of the Bluegrass - Northern Kentucky Care Center in Fort Thomas. He was an HVAC installer and an avid Cincinnati Reds fan who enjoyed hunting, fishing and spending time with family. Survivors include sons Richard Turner of Dayton and Jason Turner of Hebron; daughters Janet Jackson of Mt. Washington and Lisa Turner

Seattle, issue Aug. 10. Victoria Michell, 45, and Rick Zimmerman, 45, both of Fort Thomas, issued Aug. 10. Molly Meyer, 30, of Fort Thomas and Matthew Mexing, 26, of Cincinnati, issued Aug. 10. Emily Stewart, 24, of Cincinnati and Jason Prater, 29, of Fort Thomas, issued Aug. 10. Laura Roberts, 44, of Anchorage and Gary Trice, 55, of Miami, issued Aug. 10. Tanya Bailey, 43, of Wilmington and Donald Adams, 54, of Georgetown, issued Aug. 11. Patricia Woods, 31, of Cincinnati and Nick Timmions, 32, of Miami, issued Aug. 12.

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Pursuant to KRS 132.027, the City of Crestview, KY will hold its public hearing on the 7th day of September 2010 at 7:15p.m. The meeting will be held at 14 Circle Dr., (the Crestview City Bldg.) for the purpose of hearing comments from the public regarding the institution of proposed tax rates for the 2010-2011 Fiscal Year. As required by law,

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Revenue

Preceding Year’s Rate & Revenue Generated

.173 (Real) .615 (Tangible)

$33,296.00 $1,598.00

Tax Rate Proposed & Revenue Expected

.186

$35,790.00

Compensating Rate & Revenue Expected

.179 (Real) .618(Tangible)

$34,443.00 $1,652.00

Expected Revenue Generated from New Property

Zero

Expected Revenue Generated from Personal Property

Zero

.643

$1,718.00

The City of Crestview proposes to exceed the compensating tax rate by levying a real property tax rate of _.186_ (per $100.00 of assessed value) and a personal property tax rate of _.643_ (per $100.00 of assessed value). The excess revenue generated will be utilized for the following purposes: _________________________________General Fund ________________________ THE KENTUCKY GENERAL ASSEMBLY HAS REQUIRED PUBLICATION OF THIS ADVERTISEMENT AND THE INFORMATION CONTAINED HEREIN.

per week

104 weeks

died Aug. 14, 2010, in Springfield Township, Ohio. He was a systems analyst for AT&T Cincinnati, member of AT&T Pioneers, Highland Heights Volunteer Fire Department for 20 years where he served as captain and EMT and an amateur radio operator. Survivors include his wife, Debra McGaha Zeis; daughters, Sara Zeis of Cincinnati and Abby Zeis of Highland Heights and brother, Bob Zeis of Villa Hills. Burial was in St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

Tax Rate (Per $100.00 of Assessed Value)

MARRIAGE LICENSES Ashley Whitney, 20, of Cincinnati and Richmond Appau, 33, of Ghana, issued July 6. Elizabeth Goubeaux, 27, of Dayton and Marlon Styles, 28, of Cincinnati, issued July 6. Amy Karbasi, 25, of Springfield and Brett Morgan, 25, of Portsmouth, issued July 6. Heidi Brown, 22, of Millersburg and Gregory Rogers, 59, of Tiffin, issued July 12. Amber Wayson, 23, of Fort Thomas and Bryan Scharstein, 26, of Cincinnati, issued July 12. Julie Hollyday, 28, of Toledo and Graham Hentschel, 26, of Cincinnati, issued July 14. Carrie Spath, 48, of Knoxville and Kenneth Maltry, 56, of Cincinnati, issued July 17. Julie Funk, 41, of Milwaukee and Matthew Galbrth, 35, of Quincy, issued July 19. Cassandra Johnson, 28 and Edward Etter IV, both of Cincinnati, issued July 19. Yaz Warren, 34, and Anthony Thomas, 48, both of Cincinnati,

of Fort Mitchell; a sisters, Sadie Webb of Cold Spring; and nine grandchildren. Burial was at Rice Cemetery in Union.

Publication date:

August 26, 2010

Karen Bond, Mayor City of Crestview

ORDINANCE NO.2010-1 CITY OF CALIFORNIA, KENTUCKY AN ORDINANCE ADOPTING THE CITY OF CALIFORNIA, KENTUCKY ANNUAL BUDGET FOR THE FISCAL YEAR JULY 1, 2010 THROUGH JUNE 30, 2011 ESTIMATING REVENUE AND RESOURCES AND APPROPRIATING FUNDS FOR THE OPERATION OF THE CITY OF CALIFORNIA, KENTUCKY. WHEREAS, an annual budget proposal and message has been prepared by the Treasurer; and whereas, the City Commission has reviewed such budget proposal and have made necessary modification, Now therefore, BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY OF CALIFORNIA, KENTUCKY: SECTION I That the annual budget for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2010 and ending June 30, 2011 is hereby adopted as follows: a. The attached sources of income 2010 and 2011 is hereby incorporated by reference as if fully set forth herein. This would be $207400.00 b. The attached budget expenditures for 2010-2011 is hereby incorporated by reference as if fully set forth herein. This would be $207400.00. SECTION II That this Ordinance shall be effective and shall provide for orderly management of City resources on July 1, 2010 through the end of the fiscal year, June 30, 2011. SECTION III That this Ordinance shall be signed by the Mayor, attested by the City Clerk and recorded and published. The same shall be in effect at the earliest time provided by law. First reading this 18th day of May, 2010. Second reading this 15th day of June, 2010.

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CITY OF CALIFORNIA BUDGET 2010-2011 Carry over from 2009-2010 Taxes (property, franchise, insurance & tangible) Interest Municipal Road Aid Fund Business Account Total Income

$150,000.00 40,000.00 15,000.00 1,700.00 700.00 $207,400.00

EXPENSES ADMINISTRATION Postage & Office Supplies Attorney Fees Insurance State & County Fees Clerical Fees Rent Auditor

1000.00 4200.00 4700.00 600.00 2400.00 600.00 1300.00

SAFETY Street Lights Port-a-lets Emergency Expense

2200.00 2400.00 5000.00

MAINTENANCE New City Building Street & Tree Services Garbage pickup & community cleanup Tractor Maintenance Recreation Facilities (city maintenance) Programs/Special Events City Park Fireworks MISCELLANEOUS Goodwill Tax Refunds Total Expenses

150,000.00 3,000.00 7,500.00 2,000.00 5,000.00 2,000.00 4,000.00 6,500.00

CE-1001584002-01

1000.00 2000.00 $207,400.00

Campbell County Schools - Notice The purpose of this notice is to inform the public that the Annual Financial Report for 2009-10, as submitted to the Kentucky Department of Education, has been posted to the Campbell County School website for public viewing. If you wish to review this report, go to the following a d d r e s s : http://www.campbel lcountyschools.org. Click on “OUR DISTRICT” tab at the top of the page. Click on “BOARD INFORMATION” on the left side of the screen and then click on “CCBOE Financial Report” under the “Reports” section at the bottom of the screen. Please contact Mark Vogt at the Central Office at 859-6352173, Extension 524, if you are unable to access this report. 1001584696 LEGAL NOTICE In accordance with Chapter 65 and 424 of the Kentucky Revised Statutes, the financial records of the Campbell County Public Library District for the Period of July 1, 2009 through June 30, 2010 may be inspected at the Campbell County Public Library, 3920 Alexandria Pike, Cold Spring, Kentucky during administrative office hours; Monday through Friday 9 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. Inquiries should be made to JC Morgan, Library Director. Campbell County Public Library District The Campbell County Public Library Board of Trustees regular monthly meeting is held on the third Tuesday of each month at 4:30 p.m. in the Conference Room at the Campbell County Public Library. District Librarian: JC Morgan, 204 Cobblers Drive, Cold Spring, Kentucky Board Members: President: Dr. Ann Painter 2976 Fender Road Melbourne, KY 41059 Term expires: September 30, 2010 Vice-President: Rebecca Kelm 669 Silver Ledge Drive Cold Spring, KY 41076 Term expires: September 30, 2013 Treasurer: Donald Grosenbach 2 Millstone Court Cold Spring, KY 41076 Term expires: September 30, 2012 Secretary: Angela Siddall 501 East Second Street Newport, KY 41071Term expires: September 30, 2013 Member: Judy Voelker 322 Grandview Bellevue, KY 41073 Term expires: September 30, 2012 1001584237 To place your BINGO ad call 513.242.4000

Community Classified

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B12

CCF Recorder

August 26, 2010

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Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

T h u r s d a y, S e p t e m b e r

RECORDER

2, 2010

MY FAVORITE TEACHER

PEOPLE

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IDEAS

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RECIPES

Gateway opens new manufacturing center

By Justin B. Duke jbduke@nky.com

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Holy Trinity teacher Judy Pieper teaches her sixth-grade religion class.

Holy Trinity teacher brings experience to classrooms, college textbook Holy Trinity Junior High School in Newport is celebrating an accomplishment of one of their own. Teacher Judy Pieper, who teaches religion and language arts, recently received word that her responses to several case studies will be included in a new college textbook, “Child and Adolescent Development.” “This is a pretty big deal for her and for us,” said Principal Jeff Finke. “We’re very proud of her and are grateful to have her teaching here.” Pieper, an Erlanger resident, has been teaching 19 years, two of those at Holy Trinity. While she has a degree in journalism and a passion for writing, Pieper said she feels that God led her into a career of teaching. “I feel this is my vocational calling,” Pieper said.

“I’ve taught in Catholic schools my whole career, and I’m a strong believer faith-based education is where I need to be.” Pieper said she contributed to the textbook by using her own experiences in teaching and as the mother of five children ages 13 to 32. The book will be used to teach future teachers. “This opportunity was a creative and educational outlet for me,” Pieper said. “I enjoy writing, and it is nice to be recognized like this.” Finke said Pieper is very knowledgeable about the subjects she teaches, loves her faith and is able to communicate that to the students. “She has already made a big impact on the school in the two years she has been here,” Finke said.

The crown of Gateway Community and Technical College’s Boone Campus is done and welcoming students. The 103,000-squarefoot Center for Advanced Manufacturing is set to train new employees for one of the area’s top job markets. “We have a good manufacturing base in Northern Kentucky,” said Tony Clarke, chair of Gateway’s manufacturing and trades technologies division. Construction began on the center in 2007 after the Kentucky General Assembly appropriated $28.5 million for the project. The building’s key component is its lab, which contains more than $700,000 worth of hands-on equipment for learning robotics, machine tool technology, electrical technology and more. Surrounding the lab are classrooms. “The instructors get to lecture in the classrooms then come out into the lab,” Clarke said. The lab floor was designed with the future in mind. Most of the equipment is on wheels or sits on a raised tile floor. As equipment advances, it can be replaced as Gateway gets the money, and the tiles can be removed to add in new components. “We set it up to be flexible,” Clarke said. When deciding on what equipment should be in the labs, landing students in jobs was one of the main goals, he said. “We regularly meet with employers to see what they want,” Clarke said. While the economy has taken its toll on manufacturing as it has on many other industries, knowing what employers want has brought opportunities to Gateway students, he said.

JUSTIN B. DUKE/STAFF

Kevin Donohoo, associate professor for industrial maintenance, explains electrical equipment to Eric Hockenberry, front, and Darcy Driscoll. “We’ve seen an uptick in demand for co-ops and job postings,” Clarke said. Having all the equipment in one lab and continued talk with employers will bring better ways to train students, he said. “One thing employers always ask for is a multiskill technician,” Clarke said. Gateway is looking for ways to integrate the curriculum of the different programs so graduates leave with a multitude of skills, he said.

More are welcome

JUSTIN B. DUKE/STAFF

Gateway’s Center for Advanced Manufacturing is now open for students on the Boone Campus.

By having such a large space to work, Gateway will be able to handle even more students in its manufacturing and trades technologies division. The manufacturing division has grown by about 20 percent in the last year, Clarke said. “We’re growing, and we’re accommodating that growth,” he said.

PROVIDED

Share your summer

JUSTIN B. DUKE/STAFF

Gateway worked with employers to decide what equipment would go in the Center for Advanced Manufacturing.

Nathan and Kyle Biery, ages 7 and 9, respectively, from St. Therese School in Southgate, were selected, honored and excited to throw out the first pitch at a recent Florence Freedom game. To share your photos, visit NKY.com/Share.

Not just manufacturing

Share your events Go to nky.com and click on Share! to get your event into The Recorder.

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The lab of the Center for Advanced Manufacturing is surrounded by classrooms to allow for easy access.

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KYFB.COM

In cities and small towns, Kentucky Farm Bureau is the insurance provider with a big commitment to securing your biggest investment — your home. KENTUCKY FARM BUREAU CE-0000406765

In addition to the manufacturing classrooms and labs, the Center for Advanced Manufacturing also houses an expanded library, admissions, financial aid and disability services, offices for the president, human resources and academic affairs.

Students can also use Gateway’s Assessment Center, which provides professional testing for individuals and employers. For more information about Gateway Community and Technical College and the Center for Advanced Manufacturing visit gateway.kctcs.edu.

B I G O N C O M M I T M E N T. ®

Bob Woeste

Agency Manager

Teresa Kool Agent

Andrew Schultz Agent

107 Washington St. Alexandria, KY 41001

859-635-2101


B2

CCF Recorder

September 2, 2010

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD F R I D A Y, S E P T . 3

ART & CRAFT CLASSES

The Great American Aran Afghan Knit Along, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Knit On, 735 Monmouth St., Squares feature variety of stitches from basic cables to more challenging designs. For advanced beginner to advanced knitters. Family friendly. $210 for 21 sessions in advance; $12 per session, plus materials. Registration required. 859-2915648; www.knit-on.com. Newport.

FARMERS MARKET

Campbell County Farmers’ MarketAlexandria, 3-6 p.m., Southern Lanes Sports Center, 7634 Alexandria Pike, Parking lot. Presented by Campbell County Cooperative Extension Service. 859-572-2600; ces.ca.uky.edu/campbell/FarmersMarket. Alexandria. Boone County Farmers Market Florence Satellite, 2-6 p.m., Florence Branch Library, 7425 U.S. 42. Presented by Boone County Cooperative Extension Service. 859-3422665; www.boonecountyfarmersmarket.org. Florence.

FESTIVALS

Alexandria Fair & Horse Show, 4-11 p.m., Alexandria Fairgrounds, 100 Fairgrounds Lane, Includes horse show. All ages. $8. 859-635-2667. Alexandria.

HISTORIC SITES

Campbell County Log Cabin Museum, 10 a.m., Campbell County Log Cabin Museum, 890 Clay Ridge Road, Historical and agricultural museum. Grounds open every day. Two log cabins open Sunday and Monday or by appointment. On-site visitors guide. Includes 40 pieces of horse-drawn farm equipment, antique tractors, windmills, farm tools and more. No restrooms. Mostly handicapped accessible. Closes at dark. Free, donations requested. 859-466-0638; e-mail kennethareis@yahoo.com. Alexandria.

Big River: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, 7:30 p.m., Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, 1028 Scott Blvd., Music and lyrics by Roger Miller. Book by William Hauptman. Adapted from novel by Mark Twain. Directed by Dee Anne Bryll and Ed Cohen. $26; $23 Carnegie, Enjoy The Arts and WVXU members; $21 with groups of 10 or more; $19 students. Through Sept. 4. 859-957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

RECREATION

Children’s Flying Trapeze School, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., Newport on the Levee, 1 Levee Way, Learn to fly circus-style. Must be in reasonable physical condition and able to hold body weight while hanging from the bar. Ages 612. Must be accompanied by adult. $7. Registration required. Presented by The Amazing Portable Circus. Through Oct. 17. 513-9215454; www.amazingportablecircus.com. Newport.

AUDITIONS Katalyst Talent Agency Open Call, 2-5 p.m., Katalyst, LLC, 3037 Dixie Highway, Suite 214, All experience levels seeking representation with Katalyst. First come, first served. Requirements at Web site. Family friendly. Free. 859581-4555. Edgewood. CIVIC

MUSIC - CONCERTS

S A T U R D A Y, S E P T . 4

Computer Recycling, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., Kentucky eScrap, 7430 Industrial Road, Computer and electronics recycling. Anything with power cord. If it plugs in or consumes power, it can be recycled. Computers, keyboards, mice, cables/wires, LCD monitors, network equipment, office equipment, audio equipment, telephones, cell phones, power supplies, circuit boards, ink and toner cartridges and more. 859-292-8696; www.KYescrap.com. Florence.

CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS

Kentucky Kuzzins, 8-10:30 p.m., Promenade Palace, 3630 Decoursey Pike, Mainstream level Western-style square dance club for experienced dancers. $5. Presented by Southwestern Ohio/Northern Kentucky Square Dancers Federation. 513-929-2427; www.so-nkysdf.com. Covington.

FARMERS MARKET

Hot Band, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Riverside Marina Bar and Grill, 145 Mary Ingles Highway (Ky. 8), Free. Presented by Riverside Marina. 859442-8111. Dayton, Ky.

MUSIC - CONCERTS

FESTIVALS

Dierks Bentley, 6 p.m., Champion Window Field, 7950 Freedom Way, With James Otto and Jypsi. Doors open 5:30 p.m. $52, $43.50, $35. Presented by B-105.1 FM. 859-594-4487; www.florencefreedom.com. Florence.

MUSIC - ROCK

The Websters, 10 p.m., Jefferson Hall, 1 Levee Way, Suite 2118, 859-491-6200. Newport. The Make Shifts, 8 p.m., York St. Cafe, 738 York St., 859-261-9675; www.yorkstonline.com/. Newport.

ON STAGE - COMEDY

Christopher Titus, 8 p.m. and 10:15 p.m., Funny Bone Comedy Club, Newport on the Levee, Comedian and actor. Dinner available. $22. Special engagement. No coupons or passes will be accepted. 859-957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Best of Shadowbox, 7:30 p.m. and 10:30 p.m., Shadowbox Cabaret, Newport on the Levee, Sketch comedy shorts and music by BillWho? $30, $20 seniors and students. Through Sept. 4. 859-957-7625; www.shadowboxcabaret.com. Newport.

MUSIC - BENEFITS

The Catfish Nation Celebration, 8 p.m., Madison Theater, 730 Madison Ave., Celebrate life of Phelps “Catfish” Collins, rhythm guitarist and Cincinnati native. He died Aug. 6 after battling cancer. With comedians, dancers, poets, singers and bands. Hosted by Bootsy Collins. BenBootsy Collins efits Catfish Musicians Fund. Free, donations accepted. Presented by The Bootsy Collins Foundation. 859-4912444; www.bootsycollins.com. Covington.

Campbell County Farmers’ Market-Newport, 9 a.m.-noon, Historic Newport Business District, Monmouth Street. Presented by Campbell County Cooperative Extension Service. 859-572-2600; ces.ca.uky.edu/campbell/FarmersMarket. Newport.

MUSIC - CLASSIC ROCK

For more about Greater Cincinnati’s dining, music, events, movies and more, go to Metromix.com.

Old Timer’s Day Festival, 11 a.m.-11:30 p.m., Rabbit Hash General Store, 10021 Lower River Road, Music by Gunpowder Creek, Jake Speed and the Freddies, the Downtown County Band, Michael McEntyre and the Marmalade Brigade, Kelly Thomas and the Fabulous Pickups, Keshvar Project, Magnolia Mountain, the Whiskey Bent Valley Boys, Pure Grain and others. Games, food, drinks, art show, artistic demonstrations, children’s activities, belly dancing performance and more. Hayrides take guests from parking areas to festival. 859-334-3151. Boone County. Alexandria Fair & Horse Show, 9 a.m.-11 p.m., Alexandria Fairgrounds, Includes horse show and flag raising. $8. 859-635-2667. Alexandria. St. Cecilia Parish Festival, 6 p.m.-midnight, St. Cecilia Church - Independence, 5313 Madison Pike, Country music by Marty Raybon. Food, games, rides, euchre, grand raffle and more. Presented by St. Cecilia ChurchIndependence. Through Sept. 6. 859-3634311. Independence.

HISTORIC SITES

Campbell County Log Cabin Museum, 10 a.m., Campbell County Log Cabin Museum, Free, donations requested. 859-466-0638; email kennethareis@yahoo.com. Alexandria.

Kentucky Symphony Orchestra, 7:30 p.m., Devou Park, 1344 Audubon Road, Amphitheater. Cirque De Devou. Circus Mojo brings trapeze artists, acrobats, daring feats of skill and clowns. Bring seating, picnics welcome. Free, $5 suggested donation. Presented by Kentucky Symphony Orchestra. 859-431-6216; www.kyso.org. Covington.

ON STAGE - COMEDY

Kenny Smith, 7:30 p.m. and 10 p.m., Funny Bone Comedy Club, Newport on the Levee, Comedian. Dinner available. $14. 859-9572000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Best of Shadowbox, 7:30 p.m. and 10:30 p.m., Shadowbox Cabaret, $30, $20 seniors and students. 859-957-7625; www.shadowboxcabaret.com. Newport. Big River: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, 3 p.m. and 7:30 p.m., Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, $26; $23 Carnegie, Enjoy The Arts and WVXU members; $21 with groups of 10 or more; $19 students. 859-957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

TOURS

Newport Gangster Walking Tour, 1 p.m. and 5 p.m., Gangsters Dueling Piano Bar, 18 E. Fifth St., Explore Newport’s connection to well-known crime figures, including gangsters, gamblers and ladies of the night. $15. 859-491-8000. Newport. S U N D A Y, S E P T . 5

PROVIDED

Styx will perform at Champion Window Field, 7950 Freedom Way, in Florence, at 6 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 4. Also performing will be the Rusty Griswolds. Tickets are $50, $39.50, $28.50. The day prior, Friday, Sept. 3, Dierks Bentley will take to the field at 6 p.m., with James Otto and Jypsi. Tickets to that concert are $52, $43.50 and $35. For tickets to either concert, call 594-4487 or visit www.florencefreedom.com.

SPECIAL EVENTS

Rubber Duck Regatta, 3 p.m., Purple People Bridge, Pete Rose Way, Cincinnati; Third Street, Newport, Celebrating 16th anniversary. More than 100,000 ducks race along Serpentine Wall for prizes. Owner of duck to cross finish line first wins brand new 2010 Honda Fit Sport and chance to win $1 million if their duck is the Million Dollar Duck. Benefits Freestore Foodbank. $100 for 24; $50 for 12; $25 for six; $5 per duck. Advance purchase required. Presented by Freestore Foodbank. 513-929-3825; www.rubberduckregatta.org. Newport. M O N D A Y, S E P T . 6

FESTIVALS Alexandria Fair & Horse Show, 9 a.m.-11 p.m., Alexandria Fairgrounds, Includes horse show. $8. 859-635-2667. Alexandria. St. Cecilia Parish Festival, 1-9 p.m., St. Cecilia Church - Independence, Family Day. Chicken dinners available. Music by the Remains and the Van Dells. 859-363-4311. Independence. HISTORIC SITES

FESTIVALS

Alexandria Fair & Horse Show, 9 a.m.-11 p.m., Alexandria Fairgrounds, Includes horse show and children’s activities. $8. 859-6352667. Alexandria. St. Cecilia Parish Festival, 6 p.m.-midnight, St. Cecilia Church - Independence, Classic rock with AM and the Frontiers, Journey tribute band. 859-363-4311. Independence.

HISTORIC SITES

Campbell County Log Cabin Museum, 10 a.m., Campbell County Log Cabin Museum, Free, donations requested. 859-466-0638; e-mail kennethareis@yahoo.com. Alexandria.

MUSIC - BLUES

Noah Wotherspoon Band, 6 p.m. and 10 p.m., Mansion Hill Tavern, 859-581-0100. Newport.

Campbell County Log Cabin Museum, 10 a.m., Campbell County Log Cabin Museum, Free, donations requested. 859-466-0638; e-mail kennethareis@yahoo.com. Alexandria.

SUPPORT GROUPS

Adoption Support Group, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Cornerstone Church of God, 3413 Hillcrest Drive, Covers adoption topics allowing time to share. Free. Presented by Adoption Support Group. 859-380-7325. Erlanger. T U E S D A Y, S E P T . 7

CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS

Triangle Toastmasters Meeting, 7-8:30 p.m., Campbell County Cooperative Extension Service, 3500 Alexandria Pike, Become a confident, more effective speaker. Free. Presented by Triangle Toastmasters. 859652-3348. Highland Heights.

FARMERS MARKET

Campbell County Farmers’ Market-Highland Heights, 3-6 p.m., Campbell County Senior Center, 3504 Alexandria Pike, Parking lot. Presented by Campbell County Cooperative Extension Service. 859-572-2600; ces.ca.uky.edu/campbell/. Highland Heights.

About calendar

To submit calendar items, go to “www.NKY.com” and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to “life@communitypress.com” along with event information. Items are printed on a space-available basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to “www.NKY.com” and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page. W E D N E S D A Y, S E P T . 8

T H U R S D A Y, S E P T . 9

FARMERS MARKET Earth Mother Market, 3-7 p.m., Stables Building, 1038 S. Fort Thomas Ave., Certified organic or certified naturally grown growers. Rain or shine. Family friendly. Presented by Fort Thomas Renaissance. 859-572-1225; www.localharvest.org/farmersmarkets/M30992. Fort Thomas.

CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS Tri-State Artists Meeting, 7-9 p.m., Florence Government Center, 8100 Ewing Blvd., Meet with local artists to exchange ideas and see what is going on in the art community. Call to confirm meeting location. Ages 18 and up. Free. 859-992-1857; www.bcvaa.org. Florence.

LITERARY - CRAFTS

Play Art, 4 p.m., Newport Branch Library, 901 E. Sixth St., Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 859-572-5035. Newport.

LITERARY - STORY TIMES

Toddler Story Time, 9:30 a.m. and 10:30 a.m., Newport Branch Library, 901 E. Sixth St., Stories, songs, finger plays and craft. Ages 2-3. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 859-572-5035. Newport. Baby Time, 10 a.m., Cold Spring Branch Library, 3920 Alexandria Pike, Clap, sing and bounce with your child. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 859-781-6166. Cold Spring. Lap Time, 9:30 a.m., Fort Thomas-Carrico Branch Library, 1000 Highland Ave., Quiet rhymes, bounces, lullabies and books with your baby. Ages birth to walkers. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 859-572-5033. Fort Thomas.

MUSIC - POP

Naked Karate Girl’s Legendary Big Wednesdays, 10 p.m., Jefferson Hall, 1 Levee Way, Suite 2118, $3. 859-491-6200. Newport.

MUSIC - CABARET

Don Fangman Sings Sinatra, 6:30-9 p.m., Knotty Pine on the Bayou, 6720 Licking Pike, Songs also by Dean Martin, Michael Buble, Andrea Bocelli and Neil Diamond. Free. Reservations required. 859-781-2200; www.fangsingsfrank.com. Cold Spring.

MUSIC - CONCERTS

Hawthorne Heights, 8:30 p.m., Southgate House, 24 E. Third St., Doors open 7:30 p.m. $15, $10 advance. 859-431-2201; www.ticketweb.com. Newport.

MUSIC - ROCK

Andre Williams, 9:30 p.m., Southgate House, 24 E. Third St., Doors open at 8:30 p.m. $10, $8 advance. 859-431-2201; www.ticketweb.com. Newport.

ON STAGE - COMEDY

Kyle Dunnigan, 8 p.m., Funny Bone Comedy Club, Newport on the Levee, Comedian and actor. Dinner available. $15. 859-957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

SPECIAL EVENTS

End-of-Summer Splash, 6:30-10 p.m., Newport Aquarium, Newport on the Levee, Plaza in front of the Aquarium. Entertainment provided by DV8. Drinks available for purchase. Free admission. 859-261-7444; www.newportaquarium.com. Newport.

LITERARY - STORY TIMES

Toddler Story Time, 10 a.m., Fort ThomasCarrico Branch Library, 1000 Highland Ave., Stories, songs, finger plays and craft. Ages 2-3. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 859572-5033. Fort Thomas. Preschool Story Time, 1:30 p.m., Cold Spring Branch Library, 3920 Alexandria Pike, Ages 4-5. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 859781-6166. Cold Spring. Pajama Story Time, 7 p.m., Newport Branch Library, 901 E. Sixth St., Ages 3 and up. Registration required. 859-572-5035. Newport.

PROVIDED

Queen Elizabeth I and more than 150 costumed characters welcome visitors at the Ohio Renaissance Festival, held Saturdays, Sundays and Labor Day, Sept. 4 through Oct. 17, at Renaissance Park, Ohio 73, Harveysburg, Ohio. There are 11 stages, thrice daily jousts, more than 140 arts and crafts shops, with many displaying crafts such as stone carving and glassblowing, and food, including turkey legs, ales, and steak on a stake. For the opening weekend, Sept. 4-6, adult tickets (ages 13 and up) are buy one admission, get one admission free. Adult tickets are $19.99, children 5-12 years old, $9.99; and under 5 years old, admitted free. Visit www.renfestival.com.

SUPPORT GROUPS

Survivors of Suicide, 7-9 p.m., Christ Church, United Church of Christ, 15 S. Ft. Thomas Ave., For anyone who has lost a loved one to suicide. Free. Presented by Survivors of Suicide. 859-441-1958. Ft. Thomas.

PHOTO BY LANNY NAGLER

Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park premieres “High,” starring movie and stage actress Kathleen Turner, pictured, with actor Evan Jonigkeit, Saturday, Sept. 4. The play will open on Broadway after showing in Cincinnati through Oct. 2. Turner plays Sister Jamison Connelly, who works in a church-sponsored rehab center. “High” is for mature audiences only. No one under 18 admitted. For tickets, call 800-582-3208 or visit www.cincyplay.com.


Life

CCF Recorder

September 2, 2010

B3

How are celebrities and heroes different? Are being a celebrity and a hero the same thing? No way! It’s much more demanding to be a real hero than a celebrity. Why? Because being a celebrity flows right along with our human ego desires. From birth we all like to be approved, applauded and considered special. We thrill when we cause a look of awe in someone else’s eyes. Though these desires to be admired are natural and normal, yet they’re also precarious because of what they can lead us to surmise about ourselves. Society extols the body more than the soul. We learn quickly that the way to be a celebrity is through qualities of our body: coordination, having a wellformed and beautiful body, good voice, being able to hit or throw a ball far, act well, etc. These positive talents can be stepping stones to celebrity in America and of benefit to those

who possess them. Being a hero is far more difficult. That’s because being heroic requires going against the natural Father Lou desires of our Guntzelman ego. It means Perspectives achieving harder and higher goals that usually lie dormant in us – sacrificing our comfort, pleasure or risking our life for the good of another, overcoming self-centeredness, acting altruistically. For example, we all have a natural desire for self-preservation. When a soldier risks his or her life to save a combat buddy, or a passerby braves a river current to save someone from drowning, they go against their natural instinct of self-preservation and

make a more difficult choice to risk themselves for the good of another. That’s a hero. We often see this displayed in police, fire or medical personnel. Whereas celebrity-hood deals with talents of the body, being a hero deals with the deeper talents of the soul and heart. It involves varying amounts of courage. JetBlue’s Steven Slater (sliding down the chute away from his duties) and Lady Gaga are celebrities. The 10 non-military aid workers risking their lives to help poor Afgans for many years, and recently murdered by the Taliban, are heroes. That doesn’t mean celebrities are awful people. It just means it takes so much more giving of ourselves to be called a hero or role model. We don’t lack celebrities today. We lack heroes. We lack people

who will go against societal pressures, easy instinct, greed and self-centeredness for higher goals such as love, the common good, and genuine concern for others. We need people who will choose an action because it is right, and not because it will “make more money,” “make me famous,” or “get me elected.” Occasionally there are publicly noticed heroes. But there are even more silent heroes. Silent heroes are people not recognized by others. They are mothers and fathers who go against the natural desire of their own comfort and choose instead the growth and good of their children; businesspersons who forego a lucrative deal because it’s unjust; students who refuse to cheat on their exams; spouses who won’t betray the other … they’re all heroes of the strong, silent sort. Celebrities attract us to them-

selves; heroes attract us to goodness and service. Celebrities give autographs; heroes give powerful examples to live by. The distinction between celebrity and hero is crucial, especially for teens and young adults. For, as Dr. Drew Pinsky states, “They are the sponges of our culture. Their values are now being set. Are they really the values we want for our young people to be absorbing? Do we want them to have a revolving-door love life, or a stable relationship? … “I speculate that what drives us toward this phenomenon of elevating people to almost godlike status is not so much the glamour we like focusing on – rather it’s the dysfunction.” I wonder why. Father Lou Guntzelman is a Catholic priest of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati. Contact him at columns@community press.com or P.O. Box 428541, Cincinnati, OH 45242.

When you’re flooded with FEMA insurance demands More than 300 Hamilton County homeowners are a m o n g thousands f r o m around the nation who have been told they must purchase Howard Ain ff el doe ro adl Hey Howard! insurance to protect their homes. But many say new federal flood plain maps are just plain wrong. John Wright of Springfield Township said he’s upset that the new Federal

Emergency Management Flood maps show he’s in a flood plain. He said he’s certain it’s not true, but when he failed to buy flood insurance his mortgage lender bought it for him. “They’re getting $2,175 from me for flood insurance unless I appeal the process,” said Wright. So, Wright has begun his appeal by first hiring a survey company to check his property. There is a creek in his backyard, but during the six years Wright has lived there he said, “We’ve never had any water at all in our backyard – much less come up

the hill to the property.” Nevertheless, it’s that creek that FEMA saw on aerial maps which prompted it to designate Wright’s house as being in a flood plain. Wright argues FEMA never took into account the elevation of his house compared with that of the creek. The company Wright hired to survey his property has completed its work and he said. “They told me the elevation (of my house) was 20 feet above the creek. They are dealing with FEMA as far as the appeals process but they told me they didn’t think I’m in a flood zone

Fuel your car-shopping confidence. Go to Cars.com and become a more confident car shopper. Find the right car for you with research tools like our Lifestyle and Green Buying guides, and consumer and expert reviews. Even compare mileage side-by-side. Fill up with car-shopping confidence at Cars.com.

whatsoever,” he said. The survey cost Wright more than $700 and, combined with the cost of the flood insurance, he said it’s costing him dearly for what he says is a monumental mistake by FEMA. Other homeowners have also fought the new flood plain designation.

So much fuss has been raised by homeowners that the U.S. House of Representatives passed a measure calling for reimbursement of those who successfully challenge FEMA. The measure has yet to be passed by the Senate. Bottom line, if you’re been told your house is now

in a flood plain and you believe FEMA is wrong, the first thing to do is hire a surveyor to check out your property. Howard Ain answers consumer complaints weekdays on WKRC-TV Local 12. Write to him at 12 WKRC-TV, 1906 Highland Ave., Cincinnati 45219.

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B4

CCF Recorder

Life

September 2, 2010

Tune in for the highly sought radio rolls recipe I’m looking out at the cornfield right now and it is amazing to me how much change can occur in a garden over the span of a couple weeks. Now the stalks are turning brown and there are just a few stray ears stubbornly hanging on. My peppers and tomatoes are still bearing nicely, and the gourds climbing up the corn stalks look healthy, so the kids will have fun picking those in a couple of months.

Radio roll recipe

I have to thank Mount Lookout reader Tom Heitkamp for sleuthing out this recipe and tweaking it to his satisfaction. For Pat and other readers who remembered these rolls from their childhood. Apparently, it’s a German bakery specialty, and there are two versions of it: Tom’s and the elephant ears made with a puff type pastry (though the elephant ears are shaped a bit differ-

Rita Heikenfeld Rita’s kitchen

ent). T o m made this recipe a couple of times and he told me he is h a p p y with this o n e . Thanks, Tom!

Rolls: 1

⁄2 cup shortening (Crisco) 1 teaspoon salt ⁄4 cup sugar 1 ⁄2 cup boiling water 1 package active dry yeast 1 ⁄2 cup lukewarm water (110-115 degrees F.) 1 large egg, beaten 21⁄2 cups all-purpose flour 2 cups All Bran 1

Filling:

1 stick butter, softened 1 cup brown sugar, packed 1 cup chopped nuts (Tom uses walnuts)

Glaze: 1

⁄4 cup butter (1/2 stick) 1 ⁄2 cup brown sugar, packed 2 tablespoons milk 1 cup powdered sugar

Place shortening, sugar and salt in mixing bowl; pour boiling water over, whisk to blend and let cool until lukewarm. Meanwhile, dissolve yeast in lukewarm water. Add yeast mixture, egg, flour and All Bran to cooled ingredients. Stir until well blended. The dough will be soft. Place dough, covered, in refrigerator overnight. When ready to bake, combine filling ingredients in a small bowl; stir well to blend and set aside. Remove dough from refrigerator, and on a wellfloured work surface, roll out dough to a 10-by-16by-1⁄4 thick rectangle. Spread filling mixture evenly on top to within 1⁄2 inch of edges. Starting with a long side, roll up like a jelly roll into a log; moisten

seam and pinch to seal. Roll log back and forth to even it, extending it to 20 inches long. Cut log crosswise into ten 2-inch thick slices. Place slices, cut side down, on greased or parchment-lined baking sheets pressing and patting them into 31⁄2-inch rounds. Cover lightly and place in warm place to rise. When rolls are puffy (after 11⁄2 to 2 hours), place baking sheets on upperthird and lower-third oven racks of preheated 350degree oven and bake for 20 to 25 minutes or until lightly browned, rotating positions halfway through for even baking. For glaze, melt butter in small saucepan. Add brown sugar; bring to a slow boil, stirring constantly, for two minutes. Remove from heat. Add milk, stir to blend. Return to heat and heat to a boil. Remove from heat, add powdered sugar and whisk until smooth. Glaze thickens on cool-

ing; if necessary, reheat glaze to maintain spreading consistency. Remove rolls from oven, and immediately brush them with glaze mixture. Let rest on baking sheets 10 minutes then cool on wire racks. Makes 10 rolls. More roll recipes: For some similar roll recipes, go to Rita’s online column at www.communitypress.com or call 513-591-6163.

Carol Etter’s easy chocolate zucchini bread/cake

Make cake mix according to package directions. Add zucchini and chocolate pieces. Bake in a tube pan, sprayed, at 350 degrees 40 minutes or until cake tester is clean. Cool on rack for minimum 1⁄2 hour before removing from pan. Complete cooling and ice if desired.

Can you help?

Here’s another fun recipe to add to your zucchini bread/cake file. Carol told me she has made my chocolate zucchini bread/ cake recipe and liked it. “Very moist and freezes well,” she said. She saw an even easier version in a magazine, and says it’s also very moist and easy. One chocolate cake mix 1 cup shredded and squeezed zucchini

g! n i en e p O nc d n re a o r l G In F

1 cup mini semisweet chocolate pieces

Shillito’s chicken pot pie. For Irene Johnson. “I believe it was in the Enquirer many years ago, in the 1980s or ’90s,” she told me.

Coming soon

• Like Panera’s black bean soup • Bravo’s dipping sauce Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator and author. E-mail columns@community press.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-2487130, ext. 356.

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Community

CCF Recorder

September 2, 2010

B5

Sergeants graduate from Academy of Police Supervision

AMANDA DAVIDSON/STAFF

Cardboard Boat Regatta

Andrew Maus, 8, of Melbourne, Ky, paddles his cardboard boat, during New Richmond’s annual Cardboard Boat Regatta, Aug.21. The annual races are a part of New Richmond’s Riverdays Festival. Maus finished in second place.

AUTO

BRIEFLY Flea market

Newport Elks Ladies Auxiliary will host a flea market from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 11, at the Newport Elks, 3704 Alexandria Pike, in Cold Spring. More than 50 vendors will be selling goods at the event.

Art in the Park

Bellevue’s Art in the Park celebrates its ninth year from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 11, at Bellevue Beach Park, foot of Ward Avenue, on the riverfront. Admission is free. More than 80 regional artists working in a variety of media will have work dis-

played at the event. The exhibit and sale is also a juried competition; local arts personalities will judge each category, and attendees are encouraged to cast their votes for the People’s Choice Award.

Back to school dance

The Alexandria Fire Explorer Post 100 in conjunction with the Alexandria Police Explorers will once again begin hosting their monthly Youth Dances, for the 2010-2011 school year, Friday, Sept. 10, for area students in grades four through eight. The dances will be held at The Alexandria Firehouse Hall

Alexandria Police Department Sgt. Gary R. Frodge and Highland Heights Southgate Police Authority sergeants Samuel E. Hodge and Gregory A. Spaulding were among law enforcement officers from 16 agencies across the commonwealth to be recognized at a graduation ceremony for completing the Kentucky Department of Criminal Justice Training’s Academy of Police Supervision. APS, also called the sergeant’s academy, is a three-week, 120-hour training program targeted for newly promoted sergeants or officers who are on their agency’s promotion list to become sergeants. While in APS, students participate in classes focusing on the role of a supervisor, as well as

at 7951 Alexandria Pike, from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. on the second Friday of each month, during the school year. Admission is $5 at the door and concessions are available for $1 each at the dance. The only way students can leave is if a parent/guardian/ adult representative comes to the hall door to pick up the child. All proceeds from this event benefit the Alexandria Fire Explorer Post 100 and the Alexandria Police Explorer Post. For further information or questions, please feel free to contact the Alexandria Firehouse at 859-635-5991.

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BUSINESS

Criminal Justice Training’s Kentucky Leadership Institute, which is consists of a series of three progressive leadership courses aimed at developing and shaping future and current leaders in law enforcement agencies across the commonwealth. The Department of Criminal Justice Training is a state agency located on Eastern Kentucky University’s campus. The agency is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies and was the first accredited public safety-training program in the nation. In 2006, the academy also became the first law enforcement-training academy in the nation to be designated as a CALEA flagship agency.

Thank you for voting us the Top Three Agents in Northern Kentucky!

Burlington / Hebron 859-409-9972

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leadership, resolving conflict, managing diversity, monitoring officer performance, professional image, legal issues for supervisors, ethics, interpersonal communication, effective written communication, making decisions, solving problems, managing critical incidents, public speaking, emotional survival, budgeting, media relations and others. Friday’s graduating class is the 39th to complete APS since the program began in 2003. Henderson Police Department Chief John C. Reed Jr. served as guest speaker. Kentucky State Police Sgt. Harvey E. Baxter served as class speaker. Baxter is the first KSP trooper to complete the APS course. APS is a stepping stone to the Department of

Benefiting Daniel’s Care Pediatric Hospice and Palliative Care

Twin Oaks Golf & Plantation Latonia, Kentucky Friday, September 24, 2010 Registration begins at 11:00AM

If you have been trying to get pregnant without success call the Institute for Reproductive Health.

12:00 Noon Shotgun Start 18 Hole Scramble

2:15PM Shotgun Start 9 Hole Scramble

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65 per person

Dinner Only $

20 per person

50 per person

Price Includes… Boxed Lunch, Compliments of McAllister’s Deli • Green Fee/Cart Fee • On course bottled water, soft drinks & beer • Buffet Dinner

Qualified participants will receive study related procedures and investigational study medication at no cost.

Make checks payable to: Hospice of the Bluegrass Or visit our website to pay online:

www.hospicebg.org

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Call the Institute for Reproductive Health. 513-924-5550

Or register and pay by telephone:

(859) 441-6332

Participants may also want to be part of the Great Sandpail Ball Drop - $5/ticket Bid on the opportunity for your twosome to play with Gary Burbank (aka Earl Pitts aka Gilbert Gnarley) and his golf partner for the round! Advance bidding may be called in to Dare Miller – 859-441-6332.


B6

CCF Recorder

Community

September 2, 2010

Second annual John Morrell All-Star Blast at the Ballpark Now fireworks fans can enjoy the area’s most fanfriendly Riverfest fireworks party and support people with cancer at the same time by attending the second annual John Morrell All-Star Blast at the Ballpark, at Great American Ball Park Sunday, Sept. 5. Guests will feel like allstars as they arrive at 5:30 p.m. and pull right into reserved stadium parking. Throughout the evening they will mingle with former Reds players, tour behindthe-scenes areas of the stadium and the Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame, enjoy a dinner buffet in the FOX Sports Ohio Champions Club, and at 9:05 p.m. they will take in the WEBN/ Cincinnati Bell Riverfest Fireworks from seats in the upper deck. Proceeds from this grand slam event will support The Wellness Community (TWC), a nonprofit cancer support agency that provides professionally led programs of emotional support, education, and hope at no cost for people with cancer, their loved ones and caregivers, and cancer survivors. In addition to title sponsor, John Morrell & Co, other event sponsors

PROVIDED

Bill Krul , left, and Matthew Krul of Dayton and Hal Wendling of Fort Thomas at last year’s All-Star Blast at the Ballpark. include Bartlett & Co., Bob Sumerel Tire & Service, CTS Telecommunications, Enerfab, Mercy Health Partners, Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP, LOCAL 12-WKRC, Jeff Wyler Automotive Family,

KOI Auto Parts, Lithko Contracting, Oil Distributing Co., O’Rourke Wrecking Co., Print Management, Rough Greenhouses, AAA, Barnes Dennig, Frost Brown Todd LLC, Hospice

of Cincinnati, ILSCO, Kohnen & Patton, Sunrise Advertising, Total Quality Logistics, Hyde Park Blast, Patty Brisben Foundation, St. Elizabeth Healthcare, Aramark, John Henry

L

Homes, Klosterman Baking Co., North American Properties, and Legacies. Ticket prices begin at $49 for children 3-12, $99 for teens and young adults aged 13-20, and $149 for

adults 21 and over. There is no fee for children under 3 years old. For tickets or more information, call The Wellness Community at 513-7914060 or visit the event website at thewellnesscommunity.org/cincinnati/. Planning for this year’s event is being led by event co-chairs Craig Sumerel and Rick Setzer, along with committee members Joe Desch and J. Kampinga. All proceeds will help The Wellness Community, an affiliate of the Cancer Support Community, fund the nearly 150 programs a month it offers for people in our area affected by cancer. There is never a fee to participate. Programs are available at TWC locations in Blue Ash and Fort Wright, as well as offsite outreach locations in Avondale, Bond Hill, Clifton, downtown, and Western Hills. For more information about any of TWC’s programs including cancer and caregiver support groups, stress management classes, and educational programs, visit TheWellnessCommunity.org/Cincinnati where a “virtual visit” video is available for viewing, or call 513-791-4060.

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The Northern Kentucky University Institute for Nonprofit Capacity will host a free workshop titled “New Clients, New Needs, New Responses” Tuesday, Sept. 14, from 8 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. in Room 104 of NKU’s Student Union. The workshop will show how agencies can adapt and utilize new processes to meet new frontline needs. It will address challenges posed by the economy. John Young, CEO of Freestore Foodbank, will provide an overview of the changing landscape and new challenges that the economy has posed for nonprofit service providers and for those they serve. Guests will learn how an agency can craft new methods of meeting the changing needs of the economy. Young has been on the ground floor of serving the expanding poor. “Everyone who makes it in this world has help,” he said. “All of our lives are intertwined and we are all connected, one dependent upon the other.” Prior to coming to Freestore Foodbank, Young served as welfare reform executive for Hamilton County Job and Family Services. Young, who serves on numerous nonprofit boards, obtained his bachelor’s of science from Xavier and a master’s in education from the University of Cincinnati. The workshop is sponsored by Community Tech Knowledge, which enables nonprofits to efficiently track clients, programs, outputs, outcomes and the impact of services and funding on communities. The workshop is free, but pre-registration is required. To register, visit the NKU Connections website at www.peopleware.net/index. cfm?siteCode=0971&.


Community

Rubber ducks drop Sept. 5

PROVIDED

The 16th annual Rubber Duck Regatta is being held Sunday, Sept. 5, as part of the WEBN Riverfest celebration. members are making. “I’ve enjoyed the satisfaction of feeding families

around the Tristate, and a real sense of making a difference,” he said. “I’m

looking forward to additional community involvement this year, and believe that the committee members will help make that happen.” The Rubber Duck Regatta, which nets more than $500,000 each year for the Freestore Foodbank and its 325 nonprofit member agencies, is the world’s largest and longest-running rubber duck race. Sunday, Sept. 5, as part of the WEBN Riverfest celebration, as many as 125,000 ducks will be dropped into the Ohio River to race 100 yards along the Serpentine Wall. The owner of the first duck to cross the finish line will win a brand new 2010 Honda Fit Sport and possibly $1 million, if their duck is the “Million Dollar Duck.” Individuals can buy ducks online at www.rubberduckregatta.org; by phone at 513-929-DUCK (3825); and at all KEMBA Credit Union locations and Kroger stores. Brochures are also available at all Frisch’s and Skyline Chili restaurants and area Honda dealerships.

‘Challenge’ wants you up and moving number or prizes. A number of Challenge related activities are being offered throughout the area. One grand prize of an overnight stay and breakfast for two at General Butler State Resort Park will be awarded to an individual whose name will be drawn at random from all who complete the challenge. Eight iPod Shuffles and eight Living Well Books will be awarded with one partic-

ipant drawn at random from each county. Challenge 10-10-10 is designed to motivate people to get out, be active, and discover all the area has to offer. Individuals might choose to walk, swim, run, bike, or visit a gym. All physical activities count from active gardening to golf without a cart. Contact the Boone County Cooperative Extension Service at 859-586-6101

for a brochure or more information. You may also find information and an entry form online at www. ca.uky.edu/pendleton.

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97 Three Mile Rd. Wilder, Ky. 41076 859-441-5433

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Celebrate Their 50th Wedding Anniversary September 3rd, 2010

The Tilley’s have three children; son, Bryan and Rita Tilley, who reside in Kingsport, TN, daughters, Rhonda Honaker and her two children who reside in Florence, KY, and Dana and David Lutz and their four children, who reside in McEwen, TN. On Saturday, September 11th, friends and family are invited to celebrate with the Tilleys at their Open House, between 2:00 pm and 6:00 pm, at 1000 Hunterallen Drive, Florence, KY.

RINKS BINGO R

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Family Worship Center

Father Heitzman and all the children attending.

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Ryann Weiner from Florence and Jeb Bennett from Bowling Green Ky, will be married at The Gardens of Park Hills. Parents; Lee and Sheila Weiner with Ron and Susan Bennett in attendence.

50th Anniversary

Vern and Barbara (Schwier) Altemeyer were married on August 10, 1960 in Hebron, Kentucky.

513-931-4441 • 513-931-0259

The final Children’s Mass for the summer at St. Therese Church in Southgate was held Aug. 13. Shown here before the start of Mass in front (l-r) Elena Amann, Nick Gish, and Cole Amann. Back is Rev. Clarence Heitzman, pastor.

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Bill Dankworth of Maineville is doing his part to help tackle the issue of hunger in his community. As part of the 16th annual Rubber Duck Regatta, Dankworth is volunteering on the event’s steering committee to help support the Freestore Foodbank’s largest fundraiser of the year. This seventh year in a row that Dankworth, who is Vice President of Process Change at Kroger, has served on the steering committee. In addition to maintaining the Freestore Foodbank’s relationship with Kroger, which also includes the ability for Kroger customers to “adopt” a duck while in the checkout lane of their local Kroger store, he helps secure additional sponsorships for the event. Although Dankworth represents Kroger as a sponsor of the Rubber Duck Regatta, he is committed to the organization on a personal level as well. As the incoming chair of the Freestore Foodbank Board of Directors, he recognizes the difference he and his fellow committee

CCF Recorder

September 2, 2010

720 York St., Newport KY 41071 859-581-4244 Pastor: Gordon Milburn Sunday School: 9:30 am Sunday Morning Worship: 10:30 am Sun. & Wed. Eve Service: 6:00 pm

Robin & Carol Woods (Cincinnati), and Terry & Charlene Kennedy (Alexandria), are pleased to announce the engagement of their children, Joshua Woods and Jennifer Kennedy. Jennifer is a 2001 graduate of Campbell County High School, a 2005 graduate of Morehead State University, and a 2010 graduate of the University of Dayton, where she earned her PhD in Physical Therapy. She is employed at Wellington Orthopedics and Sports Medicine in Cincinnati. Joshua is a 2002 graduate of Purcell Marian High School, and a 2009 graduate of the University of Dayton, with a degree in Exercise Physiology. He is employed with Good Samaritan Hospital, Dayton (Oh) and is the Worship Leader at Compass Community Church, Cincinnati.

Vern is a 1956 graduate of Scottsburg High School, and was a member of the Indiana All-Star Basketball Team that year. He attended Transylvania University in Lexington, Kentucky one year and then transferred to the University of Illinois where he graduated in 1960. He worked for Eli Lilly and Company in Indianapolis for thirty-three years. He was inducted into the Indiana Basketball Hall of Fame in 1985. Barbara is a 1953 graduate of Hebron High School and a 1959 graduate of Transylvania University, where she earned a teaching degree. She taught in Champaign, Illinois for one year and in Indianapolis and Carmel for five years. In 1965 they were moved to Toronto, Canada, and in 1967 to Mexico City, returning to Indianapolis in November, 1968. They are the proud parents of one son, Stuart, his wife Shelli (Salmon) Altemeyer and one grandson, Grey. The plan to celebrate by going on a Caribbean cruise with Stuart and Shelli.

Garrison

50th Anniversary

Ellen & Bill Garrison celebrated their 50th Wedding Anniversary on Aug 28th. They were married in New York on 8-28-60. They have 3 children 3 granddaughters and 2 great-grandsons. Bill & Cindy Garrison, Stephanie Joshua is the grandson of & Carly. Dave Garrison. Shirley Swartz Cathy & Duane Rolfsen, (Senecaville), the late Ri- Elizabeth & Kevin Baker, chard Swartz (Pleasant Owen & Luke. Bill is reCity) and the late Harriett tired and Ellen works part& Raymond Woods time at St Elizabeth. The occasion was celebrated (Cambridge). with a family dinner at The Wedding is set for Pappadeaux’s in SpringCongratulations Sept. 25, 2010, in Erlanger dale. from your family, we love Ky. you!


B8

CCF Recorder

Community

September 2, 2010

Big Brothers, Sisters benefit from 5K Not even the pouring rain could keep hundreds of runners away from the 14th annual WCPO Kroger Big K 5K benefiting Big Brothers Big Sisters of Greater Cincinnati. The race raised more than $45,000 for the agency, and brought another victory for one of Cincinnati’s finest runners. Brian List of Miamiville, who won the Flying Pig marathon this past May,

crossed the finish line first in this race as well, with a time of 15 minutes, 50 seconds. Doug Higgins of Northside was second and Eric Vanlaningham of Burlington came in third. Marissa Carducci of Cincinnati was the first woman to finish the race, crossing the line at 23 minutes, 9 seconds. Nine-year-old Pasha Pence of Anderson Town-

LEGAL NOTICE

ship took first place in the kid’s race and couldn’t wait to get to Kings Island with the tickets he won. All money raised helps the Big Brothers Big Sisters of Greater Cincinnati match Tri-State children who are facing adversity with adult mentors. The friendships are professionally supported by case workers who work with the volunteers-Big Brothers and Big Sisters-as well as the Little Brothers and Sisters to ensure the match is successful. Next year’s WCPO Kroger Big K 5K is scheduled for Aug. 20. Big Brothers Big Sisters hopes to grow the event to celebrate the 15th anniversary of the race.

Big Brothers Big Sisters CEO Kathy List of Cold Spring with race winner Brian List of Milford.

PROVIDED

TRANSIT AUTHORITY OF NORTHERN KENTUCKY (T.A.N.K.) As required by KRS 65.070(c), the names and addresses of the members of the T.A.N.K. governing body and its chief executive officer are as follows: 1. Chief Executive Officer:

2. Board Members:

Andrew C. Aiello, General Manager 3375 Madison Pike Fort Wright, Kentucky 41017 Telephone Number-(859) 814-2143

Bryan Carlisle 10751 Omaha Trace Union, Kentucky 41091

Dale L. Furtwengler 46 Gunpowder Ridge Ft. Thomas, Kentucky 41075

Jean Miller Steve A. McCoy 2491 Legends Way 9266 Tranquility Drive Crestview Hills, Kentucky 41017 Florence, Kentucky 41042 Bill Voelker 10028 Timbercreek Court California, Kentucky 41007

Brian Ellerman 560 East Fourth Street Newport, Kentucky 41071

Timothy Donoghue 8671 Valley Circle Drive Florence, Kentucky 41042

Harry L. Riggs, Jr. 3111 Hudnall Lane Edgewood, Kentucky 41017

Dave Sogar 3261 New Orleans Court Edgewood, Kentucky 41017 In accordance with Chapters 65 and 424 of the Kentucky Revised Statutes, Transit Authority of Northern Kentucky financial records may be examined by the general public at the TANK general office, 3375 Madison Pike, Fort Wright, Kentucky, during normal business hours when said office is open. David L. Anneken Secretary-Treasurer Transit Authority of Northern Kentucky

LEGAL NOTICE The Bellevue Board of Adjustment will hold a public hearing on Tuesday, September 14, 2010, at 6:30 p.m. in the Callahan Community Center, 322 Van Voast Avenue, Bellevue, Kentucky. The meeting will be held for all interested parties to hear and present evidence relative to the following agenda items: · Application 10-002 submitted by Kaye Miracle requesting a Conditional Use Permit for a Child Care Center located at 364 Taylor Avenue, Bellevue, KY 41073. For more information please contact John M. Yung, Zoning Administrator, at 431-8866. 1001586152 To place your BINGO ad call 513.242.4000

LEGAL NOTICE The Campbell County & Municipal Planning & Zoning Commission will hold a public hearing on Tuesday, September 14, 2010, 7:00 P.M. at the Campbell County Courthouse, 8352 E. Main Street, Alexandria, Ky, for the purpose of hearing testimony for the following: FILE NUMBER: 85-10-TXA-01 Text Amendment APPLICANT: Campbell County Planning & Zoning Department on behalf of the Campbell County Administrator REQUEST: Proposed text amendment to the Campbell County Zoning Ordinance Article X Adding a new Section 10.28 ACD Agricultural Cluster District Overlay Zone Persons interested in this case are invited to be present. Information concerning this case is available for public inspection at the Campbell County & Municipal Planning & Zoning Office, 1098 Monmouth Street, Suite 343, Newport, Ky. Monday-Friday during normal business hours. Peter J. Klear, AICP Director of Planning & Zoning Date: August 26, 2010 Published: September 2, 2010 Campbell County Recorder

PROVIDED

‘Fellow’ abroad

Ryan Moran in front of the world’s largest religious complex, Angkor Wat, Cambodia. Moran, 2010 valedictorian of Campbell County High School, traveled to Vietnam and Cambodia as a James Graham Brown Fellow at the University of Louisville.

6415

Volleyball match to benefit teens

6494

LEGAL NOTICE CITY OF FORT THOMAS, KENTUCKY TAX RATE INFORMATION - 2010 Tax Rate Proposed for 2009 Revenue Anticipated Tax Rate Proposed for 2010 Revenue Anticipated

$ .343/ $100 $ 3,778,719 $ .331 / $100 $ 3,933,394

Compensating Tax Rate 2010 Revenue Anticipated

$ .318 / $100 $ 3,778,911

Revenue From New Property Revenue From Personal Property

$ $

17,692 36,639

Final Round Voting Ballot

General Areas of Allocation: Personnel, Utilities, Supplies A Public Hearing will be held on Thursday, September 16, 2010 at 6 p.m. at the City Building, 130 N. Ft. Thomas Avenue, Ft. Thomas, Kentucky. The purpose of this Hearing is to receive taxpayer input on the proposed tax rate for 2010. This Notice is required by KRS 132.027, as passed by the Kentucky General Assembly. SIGNED: Melissa K. Kelly, City Clerk 859-441-1055

Name: ________________________________________________________________________

6133

CITY OF HIGHLAND HEIGHTS, KENTUCKY ORDINANCE NO. 06-2010 AN ORDINANCE AMENDING THE TEXT OF ORDINANCE NO. 16-83 COMMONLY REFERRED TO AS THE CITY OF HIGHLAND HEIGHTS ZONING ORDINANCE BY REMOVING DRIVE IN AS A PERMITTED USE IN THE GENERAL COMMERCIAL ZONE AND DEFINING FAMILY DINING STYLE RESTAURANTS AND PERMITTING A DRIVE THROUGH FOR SUCH FACILITIES. BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY OF HIGHLAND HEIGHTS, KENTUCKY AS FOLLOWS: Section I That public hearings were held on June 8, 2010 to consider the removal of drive ins as a permitted use in the General Commercial Zone and to permit family dining style restaurants and allow such restaurants to include a drive through facility. Section II That following public hearings on the matter the City's Planning and Zoning Commission recommended to the city council that the zoning ordinance be amended as provided below. Section III Section 1O.16GC: B. Permitted Uses. 16. Eating and drinking places, excluding drive-ins (not drive thru) 17. Eating and drinking places, including drive-ins Family dining style restaurants, which may include a drive-through facility, provided that a drive-through facility may be permitted in the case of "family dining style restaurants" which serves meals for breakfast, lunch and dinner, with waiter/waitress tableside service, and not serve alcoholic beverages. Section IV That this Ordinance shall be signed by the Mayor, attested by the City Clerk/Treasurer, recorded and published. Same shall be in effect at the earliest time provided by law. First reading of this 20 day of July, 2010. Second reading of this 17 day of August, 2010.

CE-1001585536-01

ATTEST: JEAN RAUF CITY CLERK/TREASURER Ord10.06

Mail to: The Enquirer Baby Idol 2010, 312 Elm St., Cincinnati, OH 45202 or drop off ballot between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. weekdays to the Customer Service Center in the lobby at 312 Elm St., Cincinnati, OH 45202.

MAYOR GREGORY V. MEYERS

Contact Phone: ________________________________________________________________ Note: ONLY ORIGINAL BALLOTS accepted, no photocopies. One free vote per ballot. All voting ballots must be received by 11:59 p.m. September 8, 2010.

FREE VOTE: Baby’s No: _________ Baby’s Name: ___________________________________________ VOTE: Baby’s No: ______________ Baby’s Name: ___________________________________________ # of votes: _______

Donation Method:

X $.25 = $________

Check (Make checks payable to Newspapers In Education.)

Money Order

Credit card

Credit card #: ___________________________________________________ Exp. Date: ______________________________________________________ Signature: ______________________________________________________ Date: ___________________________________________________________

You can vote online now at Cincinnati.Com/babyidol NO PURCHASE OR DONATION REQUIRED TO ENTER. ALL FEDERAL, STATE, LOCAL AND MUNICIPAL LAWS AND REGULATIONS APPLY. VOID WHERE PROHIBITED. The Enquirer Lend-A-Hand Baby Idol 2010 Contest is open to Ohio, Indiana and Kentucky residents who are 18 years or older and a parent or legal guardian of a child at the time of entry. Employees of The Enquirer Lend-A-Hand, The Cincinnati Enquirer, Gannett Co., Inc., and each of their respective affiliated companies, and advertising and promotional agencies, and the immediate family members of, and any persons domiciled ed with, any such employees, are not eligible to enter or to win. Contest begins at 12:01 a.m. (EST) 5/23/10 and ends at 11:59 p.m. (EST) 9/8/10. Vote for or your favorite baby photo by submitting an original ballot with a donation of $.25/vote to Enquirer Lend-A-Hand. Voting will begin at 12:01 a.m. (EST) T) 8/1/10 and end at 11:59 p.m. (EST) 9/8/10. Vote online at Cincinnati.Com/babyidol. Vote in person or by mail: Original Ballots available at in The Cincinnati na Enquirer, The Kentucky Enquirer, The Community Press & Recorder and at The Enquirer Customer Service Center M-F, 8 am – 5 pm. One vote per Original O Ballot without a donation. No facsimiles or mechanical reproductions permitted. 1 First Place Winner will receive a $1000.00 American Express gift card and a Cincinnati Zoo Gold Level family membership for the 2011 season (ARV:$164.00). 1 Randomly Selected Winner will receive a $500.00 American Express gift card. 1 Runner Up Winner will receive a $500 American Express gift card. Winners will be notified by telephone or email on or about 9/13/10. Participants agree to be bound by the complete Official Rules and Sponsor’s decisions. For a copy of the prize winners list (available after 9/19/10) and/or the complete Official Rules send a SASE to Baby Idol 2010 c/o The Enquirer, 312 Elm Street, Cincinnati, OH 45202 or contact Kristin Garrison at 513.768.8135 or at kgarrison@enquirer.com. CE-0000399890

The Northern Kentucky Youth Foundation has announced that tickets are on sale for its first Celebrity Volleyball Invitational which will take place at Thomas More College in Crestview Hills. This event, scheduled to run from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Sept. 11, will host a celebrity match featuring local and state politicians, school administrators and television/radio personalities. In addition to the celebrity match, a police versus firefighter competition is planned to take place. Tickets priced at $10 are now on sale and can be purchased through the Northern Kentucky Youth Foundation’s website at www. nkyyouth.org. Due to the amount of seats available, a limited amount of tickets will be for sale at the door, therefore, it is strongly suggested to purchase tickets in advance. Lazer Kraze, a local business in Erlanger, as well as an official sponsor of the Northern Kentucky Youth Foundation, has printed a free laser tag mission pass on the back of each event ticket (value of $8). Due to the generosity of local businesses and individuals, the foundation has committed 100 percent of all ticket sales to helping local teens and families. It is anticipated that within one month after this event, at least one youth center will be setup in the Northern Kentucky area. For a list of all participants, sponsors or to purchase tickets, visit www. nkyyouth.org.


Community

September 2, 2010

Being a Girl Scout leader is one way adults lend their talents to help build tomorrow’s leaders. By providing girls with opportunities for skill building, supportive relationships and opportunities to belong, both adults and girls experience the integration of family, school and community efforts. For girls to truly benefit from Girl Scouting, they need the guidance of caring, concerned adults. For more information about volunteering, call the Girl Scouts of Kentucky’s Wilderness Road Council at 859-342-6263 or 800716-6162, visit www.gs

kentucky.org or e-mail joingirlscouts@gswrc.org. Many people hesitate to become a Girl Scout volunteer because they don’t think they have the time. However, Girl Scout volunteers have the opportunity to structure their Girl Scout troop to meet their time constraints. Susan Hansell is the new CEO of Kentucky’s Wilderness Road Council. She encourages adults to join in the fun of Girl Scouting, “Whether a person has time to give once a week or once a year, there are volunteer opportunities that will make a difference in the lives of our girls.”

NOTICE TO BID The Boone County Fiscal Court will receive sealed bids in the Office of the Assistant County Administrator, Second Floor, Administration Building, 2950 Washington Street, Burlington, Kentucky 41005, until 2:00 p.m., September 13, 2010 for Countywide drop-box recycling in Boone County. Bids will be opened and publicly read aloud at that time in the Fiscal Courtroom, First Floor, Administration Building. Late or facsimile bids will not be accepted. A pre-bid conference will be held on September 9, 2010 at 2:00 p.m. (local time) at the Public Works Department located at 5645 Idlewild Road Burlington, KY 41005. Questions should be directed to Mary Dickey at 859-334-3600. BID ENVELOPE MUST BE LABELED: "SEALED BID: Bid for County of Boone Drop-box recycling." Envelope must also be labeled with the vendor name and address. Specifications may be obtained in the office of the Assistant County Administrator, Second Floor, Administration Building, Burlington, Kentucky, 859-334-2200. Boone County reserves the right to reject any and all bids, to waive any informalities and to negotiate for the modifications of any bid or to accept that bid which is deemed the most desirable and advantageous from the standpoint of customer value and service and concept of operations, even though such bid may not, on its face, appear to be the lowest and best price. No bid may be withdrawn for a period of thirty (30) days after scheduled time of receipt of bids. Gary W. Moore Boone County Judge/Executive 1001586586 LEGAL NOTICE The Newport Board of Adjustments will hold a public hearing on Thursday, September 16, 2010 at 4:30 p.m. in the Newport Municipal Complex, 998 Monmouth Street, Newport, Kentucky. The hearing will be held for interested parties to hear and present evidence relative to the following agenda items:

Cheers

PROVIDED

Nicole Moran of Alexandria, a senior at the University of Louisville, was awarded an English-Speaking Union Scholarship to study creative writing at the University of Edinburgh (in Scotland). While there, she spent a week traveling in London. Shown above, Moran outside of Buckingham Palace.

BA-10-19 324 E 4th Street, Newport, Kentucky The applicant is requesting a conditional use and parking variance for a daycare Requested by: Ken Schumacher BA-10-20 214 E 4th Street, Newport, Kentucky The applicant is requesting a parking variance Requested by: Rick Anthony BA-10-21 846 Monmouth Street, Newport, Kentucky The applicant is requesting a variance for a sign Requested by: Brian Wiefering BA-10-22 1143 Central Avenue, Newport, Kentucky The applicant is requesting a conditional use for a school Requested by: New Macsedonia Baptist Church BA-10-23 172 Main Street, Newport, Kentucky The applicant is requesting a front yard variance to construct a porch Requested by: Greg Davis

PROVIDED

Moran in front of Stonehenge.

Summerfair Cincinnati is now accepting poster design entries The Summerfair poster design competition is now accepting entries for the 2011 poster design. The winning designer will receive a $2,000 prize. Deadline for entries is Friday, Nov. 12 at 5 p.m. Entries may be dropped off at the following locations: • Fabulous Frames and Art: 1741 East Kemper Road, 513-772-1011; 8002 Hosbrook Road, 513-7929977; 17 W. Fourth St., 513-579-9998; 10817 Montgomery Road, 513489-8862; 9632 Colerain Ave., 513-385-9213 • Frame & Save locations: 2940 Wasson, 513-5319794; 9697 Kenwood Road, 513-791-2995; 1050 Hansel Ave., 859-3711050; 7751 Cox Road, 513-

759-6600 • Bowman’s Framing Inc. 103 North Ft. Thomas Ave., 859-781-2233 • Frame USA 225 Northland, 513-733-9800 • Browning’s of Wyoming 1424 Springfield Pike, 513821-7079 • Summerfair Office 7850 Five Mile Road, 513531-0050 In order to qualify, artists must live within a 40-mile radius of Greater Cincinnati. Entries can be submitted in any medium (pastels, oils, gouache, full-color photos, prints, etc.). Threedimensional, sculptural or bas-relief designs must be submitted as an entry-size 2-D reproduction for judging. Computer-generated art is also an acceptable format.

The design itself must include specific information about Summerfair 2011 (date, location, etc.) and convey Summerfair’s position as Cincinnati’s premier annual fine arts and crafts fair. It should also reflect the “feel” of the Summerfair event that includes a wide range of artistic mediums, musical performances, delicious foods and a hands-on youth arts area. The winner will be selected by a panel of practicing artists and designers from Greater Cincinnati in collaboration with Summerfair Cincinnati membership. For a downloadable application, visit www.summerfair.org or call the Summerfair Cincinnati office at 513-531-0050.

B9

NOTICE TO BID

Girl Scout leaders needed Each year hundreds of girls in Kentucky’s Wilderness Road Council sign up to be Girl Scouts but don’t have the opportunity to benefit from Girl Scout’s many opportunities because of a lack of leaders. “There’s nothing worse than a little girl wanting to be a Girl Scout and not having a troop to put her in,” said Ruby Webster, GSKWRC membership director. “It’s a continuing challenge to find leaders.” Girl Scouts volunteers say they enjoy building relationships with other adults and learning valuable skills through Girl Scouts’ training and leadership experience.

CCF Recorder

Inquiries regarding this public hearing should be addressed to: J. Gregory Tulley AICP Planning and Development Director City of Newport 998 Monmouth Street Newport, Kentucky 41071 859-292-3637 2240092/1586412

LEGAL NOTICE HIGHLAND HEIGHTS PLANNING & ZONING PUBLIC HEARING The City of Highland Heights Planning and Zoning Commission will conduct a Public Hearing on Tuesday, September 14, 2010 at 7:00pm, at 176 Johns Hill Road. The meeting will be held for all interested parties to hear and present evidence relative to the following application: P&Z CASE #04-2010. The Text Change will be for proposed changes to the Highland Heights Zoning Ordinance Section 12.1 M – Specific off Street Parking Requirements. If there is a need for the City to be aware of a specific disability, you are encouraged to contact the City Building at 859441-8575 so that suitable arrangement can be considered prior to the date of the meeting. The City Office is open MondayFriday 9:00am to 5:00pm. The City will make every reasonable accommodation to assist a qualified disabled person in obtaining access to the meeting. Immediately following the Public Hearing, the regularly scheduled Planning and Zoning meeting will begin. Jean A. Rauf, Clerk/Treasurer CMC Secretary to Planning and Zoning 1001586150

The Boone County Fiscal Court will receive sealed bids in the Office of the Assistant County Administrator, Second Floor, Administration Building, 2950 Washington Street, Burlington, Kentucky 41005, until 2:00 p.m., September 13, 2010 for refuse collection and mixed office paper recycling for County-owned properties in Boone County. Bids will be opened and publicly read aloud at that time in the Fiscal Courtroom, First Floor, Administration Building. Late or facsimile bids will not be accepted. A pre-bid conference will be held on September 9, 2010 at 10:00 a.m. (local time) at the Public Works Department located at 5645 Idlewild Road Burlington, KY 41005. Questions should be directed to Mary Dickey at 859-334-3600. BID ENVELOPE MUST BE LABELED: "SEALED BID: Bid for County of Boone Refuse Collection Services." Envelope must also be labeled with the vendor name and address. Specifications may be obtained in the office of the Assistant County Administrator, Second Floor, Administration Building, Burlington, Kentucky, 859-334-2200. Boone County reserves the right to reject any and all bids, to waive any informalities and to negotiate for the modifications of any bid or to accept that bid which is deemed the most desirable and advantageous from the standpoint of customer value and service and concept of operations, even though such bid may not, on its face, appear to be the lowest and best price. No bid may be withdrawn for a period of thirty (30) days after scheduled time of receipt of bids. Gary W. Moore Boone County Judge/Executive 1001586592

LEGAL NOTICE CAMPBELL COUNTY FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT #1 THERE WILL BE A PUBLIC HEARING AT THE CAMP SPRINGS FIRE STATION ON SEPTEMBER 2, 2010. THE PURPOSE OF THIS PUBLIC HEARING IS TO DISCUSS THE PROPERTY TAX RATE FOR CAMPBELL COUNTY FIRE DISTRICT #1 FOR 2010. THE HEARING WILL BEGIN AT 7:15 P.M. AT THE CAMP SPRINGS FIRE STATION, 6844 FOUR MILE ROAD, CAMP SPRINGS, KENTUCKY 41059. THERE WILL BE A MEETING OF THE FIRE DISTRICT BOARD BEGINNING AT 7:30 P.M. ON SEPTEMBER 2, 2010. THIS IS TO CONDUCT THE BOARD’S MONTHLY MEETING, AND WILL INCLUDE ACTION TO ENACT THE PROPERTY TAX RATE FOR 2010, TANGIBLE TAX RATE AND VEHICLE AND WATER CRAFT TAX RATES FOR 2010. THE TAX RATE FOR 2009 WAS .200 CENTS PER 100.00 OF ASSESSED VALUE. THIS RATE PRODUCED APPROXIMATELY $670,878.02. THE PROPOSED PROPERTY TAX RATE FOR YEAR 2010WILL BE .200 CENTS PER 100.00 OF ASSESSED VALUE. THE TOTAL REVENUE THIS WILL GENERATE WILL BE APPROXIMATELY $671,558.82. THE COMPENSATING TAX RATE AND EXPECTED REVENUE FOR YEAR 2010, .1998 PER 100.00 OF ASSESSED VALUE. THE REVENUE THIS WILL GENERATE WILL BE APPROXIMATELY $670,887.26. THE TOTAL TAXABLE VALUE OF ALL PROPERTY IN FIRE DISTRICT ONE FOR 2010 IS $335,779,410.00. THE TAX REVENUE FROM NEW CONSTRUCTION WILL BE $11,914.65. THE PROPOSED TAX OF .200 CENTS PER 100.00 OF ASSESSED VALUE ON ALL VEHICLES AND WATER CRAFT. THE PROPOSED TANGIBLE TAX RATE FOR YEAR 2010 SHALL BE .200 CENTS PER 100.00 OF ASSESSED VALUE. THE REVENUE THIS WILL GENERATE WILL BE APPROXIMATELY $36,317.30. THIS ADVERTISEMENT IS REQUIRED BY THE KENTUCKY GENERAL ASSEMBLY UNDER PROVISIONS OF KRS 132.023 (2) (b) 8. 5519

NOTICE Fort Thomas Planning Commission Public Hearing The Planning Commission of the City of Fort Thomas, Kentucky, will hold a Public Hearing on Wednesday, September 15, 2010 in the Council Chambers of the City Building at 130 N. Ft. Thomas Avenue, Ft. Thomas, KY for the following agenda item: 7:00 PUBLIC HEARING: A hearing for a Zoning Text Amendment related to Sign Regulations. 7:30 PUBLIC HEARING: A hearing for a Zoning Map Amendment (R-1B to R-3) for property located at 139 Newman Avenue, Geraldine McMath, Trustee, Applicant and Verna Jane Schwarberg Living Trust, Owner. A copy of the proposed amendments may be examined by interested parties at the General Services Department during normal business hours. The City of Fort Thomas will make every reasonable accommodation to assist qualified disabled persons in obtaining access to available services or in attending City activities. If there is a need for the City to be aware of a specific disability, you are encouraged to contact the City Building at (859) 5721210 so that suitable arrangements can be considered prior to the delivery of the service or the date of the meeting. General Services Department (Publication Date: 09/02/2010) 6215


B10

ON

RECORD

CCF Recorder

THE

ALEXANDRIA

Arrests/citations

David E. Holbrook, 33, 201 Washington St., theft by unlawful taking, third degree criminal trespassing at 4 Willow Court, Aug. 5.

Incidents/investigations Second degree criminal mischief Report of headstone knocked off its pedestal in cemetery at 7 Spillman Drive, Aug. 12.

Theft by unlawful taking

Report of vehicle window broken and medication taken at 7901 Alexandria Pike, Aug. 10.

Theft by unlawful taking or purse snatching

Report of purse set down taken at 3667 Neltner Road, Aug. 11.

Third degree criminal mischief

Report of paint balls shot at window of residence at 37 Paul Lane, Aug. 11.

BELLEVUE

Arrests/citations

James Nelson, 28, 301 Sixth Ave. No. 5, DUI at 145 Fairfield Ave., Aug. 17. Desarah Hearld, 19, 840 Patterson St.,

September 2, 2010

| DEATHS | Editor Michelle Shaw | smhaw@nky.com | 578-1053

alcohol intoxication in a public place at 200 block of Poplar, Aug. 22. Kimberly Powell, 47, 420 Washington Ave., warrant at 240 Washington, Aug. 24.

FORT THOMAS

Arrests/citations

Stephen Downey, 42, 205 Bluegrass No. 53, receiving stolen property at Memorial Parkway, Aug. 19. Matthew Hacker, 28, 3918 Trevor, warrant at 30 Crowell, Aug. 21. Jack Kleier, 27, 25 Ash St., DUI, third degree possession of a controlled substance, warrant at 940 Highlands Nursing home, Aug. 22. Richard Brown III, 35, 9609 North Central Ave., warrant at 30 Boardwalk Ave., Aug. 22.

Incidents/investigations Second degree burglary

At 632 South Fort Thomas Ave., Aug. 19. At 20 Garrison Ave., Aug. 22.

Theft by unlawful taking

At 931 Alexandria Pike, Aug. 17. At 725 Alexandria Pike, Aug. 17. At South Fort Thomas Ave., Aug. 18. At 35 Brentwood Place, Aug. 19.

About police reports

The Community Recorder publishes the names of all adults charged with offenses. The information is a matter of public record and does not imply guilt or innocence.

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RECORDER

POLICE REPORTS HIGHLAND HEIGHTS/SOUTHGATE Arrests/citations

Andrea Long, 43, 57 Rose Ave., second degree burglary at 57 Rose Ave., Aug. 23. Isabel Buruca, 25, 1017 Columbia St., possession of marijuana, DUI at Alexandria Pike and Highland Avenue, Aug. 22. Jason Lowery, 32, 402 Monument St., warrant at Alexandria Pike and Renshaw, Aug. 21. Chearity Smith, 30, 2409 Swope Road, warrant at 1914 Monmouth St., Aug. 21. Craig Mullins, 46, 2211 Sylved Lane, possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of a controlled substance, warrant at I-471 north, Aug. 21. Colleen Doyle, 31, 1650 Bridgetown Road No. 1, warrant, possession of drug paraphernalia at I-471 north, Aug. 21. Beatrice Russell, 39, 2335 Alexandria Pike, third degree possession of a controlled substance, alcohol intoxication in a public place at 2335 Alexandria Pike, Aug. 20. Greg Maltaner, 54, 2335 Alexandria Pike, second degree disorderly conduct at 2335 Alexandria Pike, Aug. 20. James Watts, 26, 1102 Seventh Ave., first degree possession of a controlled substance, possession of

drug paraphernalia at 2700 Alexandria Pike, Aug. 18.

Incidents/investigations Theft by unlawful taking

At Moock and Fox Chase, Aug. 23.

Unauthorized use of a credit card At 28 Highland Meadows Circle Apt. 7, Aug. 19.

CAMPBELL COUNTY Arrests/citations

James R. Schaub, 37, 747 Pintail Court, warrant at 747 Pintail Court, Aug. 13. Eric N. Follis, 37, 22 Redbud Court, warrant at 22 Redbud Court, Aug. 13. David A. Russell, 36, 215 Frankfort St., warrant at Ky. 9 and Dead Timber, Aug. 13. James Keeney, 45, 719 Overton St., warrant at 6835 Murnan Road, Aug. 14. Frederick C. Steinhauer, 50, 13250 Peach Grove Road, DUI - first offense at 13250 Peach Grove Road, Aug. 14. Deidra L. Kelley, 42, 10069 Shagy Bark Court, warrant at I-275 at mile marker 74.1, Aug. 14. Thomas G. Fuller, 45, 6335 Mary Ingles Hwy., Apartment 5, fourth degree assault at 6335 Mary Ingles Hwy., apartment 5, Aug. 15. Gregory A. Johnson, 47, 9989 Persimmon Grove Pike, warrant at Ky. 536 at U.S. 27, Aug. 16. Ryan G. Hornback, 19, 785 Shenan-

doah Lane, warrant at 785 Shenandoah Lane, Aug. 16. Anthony P. Beckelhimer, 33, 112 Kennedy Road, warrant at U.S. 27 and Summerlake Drive, Aug. 16. C.R. Logan, 53, 1170 Nancy Lee Lane, first degree possession of a controlled substance - first offense, second degree possession of a controlled substance drug unspecified - first offense at Ky. 9 and Ky. 547, Aug. 17. Thomas J. Siegel, 20, 976 Kenton Station Road, DUI - second offense - aggravated circumstances, third degree criminal trespassing, failure to notify address change to transportation department at 6528 Mary Ingles Hwy., Aug. 20.

Incidents/investigations Civil dispute

Reported at 10509 Michael Drive, apartment 10, Aug. 17.

Damage to property

Report of fire hydrant ran over by mowing service at 1442 Racetrack Road, Aug. 19.

First degree criminal mischief

Report of air conditioning unit intentionally damaged at 10559 Lynn Lane, unit 11, Aug. 13.

Suspicious activity

Report of person on property walking around with flashlight at 10768 Pleasant Ridge Road, Aug. 14.

Theft by unlawful taking

Report of jewelry taken at 3180 Uhl Road, Aug. 13. Report of firearms taken from residence at 754 Clay Ridge Road, Aug. 17. Report of soda machine broken into and money taken at 9722 Alexandria Pike, Aug. 18. Report of cash taken from inside school office at 909 Camel Crossing, Aug. 18.

Third degree criminal mischief

Report of vehicle’s tire flattened at 10567 Lynn Lane, unit 12, Aug. 12.

Third degree criminal mischief

Report of door damaged at 9646 Alexandria Pike, unit 7, Aug. 13.

Third degree terroristic threatening

Report of threats made by customer over phone to kill person at business at 10269 Alexandria Pike, Aug. 18.

Verbal domestic

Reported at Mary Ingles Highway, Aug. 15.

MARRIAGE LICENSES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN BY PROPER ORDER OF THE CAMPBELL DISTRICT COURT THAT THE FOLLOWING WERE APPOINTED FIDUCIARIES OF THE ESTATES LISTED BELOW. ALL PERSONS HAVING A CLAIM AGAINST THE ESTATE SHALL PRESENT THEM VERIFIED ACCORDING TO LAW TO THE FOLLOWING FIDUCIARIES NO LATER THAN SIX MONTHS FROM THE DATE OF OPENING. DECEASED JEANNE M. HORN

FIDUCIARY MAUREEN WATERS 26 DIANA CT. FT THOMAS KY 41075 VINCENT HAMBRICK US BANK 1 FINANCIAL SQ. LOUISVILLE KY 40202 JOSEPH RHEIN LINDA REAVES 41 WINDING WAY FT THOMAS KY 41075 GLORIA WINTERS MICHAEL WINTERS 4752 E OLEAN RD. VERSAILLES IN 47042 PEGGY WINTERS 4752 E OLEAN RD. VERSAILLES IN 47042 PATRICIA WALSH DEBORAH SMITH 44 ROSSFORD AVE. FT THOMAS KY 41075 JOHN F HENRY THOMAS M HENRY 30 BRAMBLE DR. BUTLER KY 41006 RUTH LANGENBAHN JAY LANGENBAHN 622 WATCH COVE CT CINCINNATI OH 45230 JO ANN STEWART CARRIE DOWNARD 321 ERVIN TERRACE DAYTON KY 41074 ANGELA DUELL 312 VINE ST, DAYTON KY 41074 ROSELLA WEAR DANNY CADE 12156 LEES RD. ALEXANDRIA KY 41001 DONALD GUSTAFSON PENNY FREPPOP 17 BUDDE CT FT THOMAS KY 41075 MARY WOODRUFF CYNTHIA SCOTT 1005 7TH AVE. DAYTON KY 41074 DONALD STRETCH BARBARA STRETCH 113 WHISPERING WOODS ALEXANDRIA KY 41001 NICHOLAS HULL PATRICIA HOLZHAUSER 2702 KIMBRELL RD. LENOIR CITY TN 37772 MARY HUFFAKER WILLIAM HUFFAKER 4156 WHITES RD. COVINGTON KY 41015 JOHN ROUSE ROBERT ROUSE 9241 FLAGG SPRINGS PK CALIFORNIA KY 41007 MILDRED CLARK CAROLYN GLAHN 446 POLES CREEK RD. COLD SPRING KY 41076 MAXINE SIEBENTHALER KATHLEEN SCHMITS 6460 EUCLID AVE. CINCINNATI OH 45243 ROBERT DURROUGH LYDIA DURROUGH 5 N ROSEWOOD CT. ALEXANDRIA KY 41001 GARY DEATON MELINDA DEATON 3908 MICHAEL DR. CINCINNATI OH 45255 MARY FENNELL LINDA FENNELL 7012 NOB HILL DR. FT THOMAS KY 41075 LAWRENCE BROSSART NORMAN BROSSART 2280 CALIFORNIA CROSSROAD CALIFORNIA KY 41007 ROSEMARY LENNON PATRICIA ABRAMIS 11 STURBRIDGE DR. COLD SPRING KY 41076 HILDA YATES KATHLEEN DROEGE 9 TERRACE AVE. CRESTVIEW KY 41076 JULIA PLUNKETT JEAN PLUNKETT 147 MANOR LANE FT THOMAS KY 41075 MARY RICHARDSON FRANKIN HARPER SR. 3700 HOLLY LANE ERLANGER KY 41018

ATTORNEY JOHN FISCHER, PO BOX 1 DAYTON KY 41074

LEO STRASSBURGER LEO BROERING TODD ROOT

JANN SEIDENFADEN 122 N. FT. THOMAS AVE. FT THOMAS KY 41075 JANN SEIDENFADEN 122 N. FT. THOMAS AVE. FT THOMAS KY 41075 JAMES LUERSEN 515 MONMOUTH ST. NEWPORT KY 41071

EDWARD RUST

JANN SEIDENFADEN 122 N. FT. THOMAS AVE. FT THOMAS KY 41075 GREG KRIEGE 3699 ALEXANDRIA PK COLD SPRING KY 41076 JAY LANGENBAHN 312 WALNUT ST STE 3100 CINCINNATI OH 45202 FRED SUMME 4 W 4TH ST. NEWPORT KY 41071

FRANCIS MCGARRELL

ROBERT JENNINGS 3 WHISPERING WOODS LN ALEXANDRIA KY 41001 J.B. LIND 221 E 4TH ST. STE. 2000 CINCINNATI OH 45202 SCOTT MCMURRAY 515 MONMOUTH ST NEWPORT KY 41071 JOHN BANKEMPER 30 MT. PLEASANT LANE FT THOMAS KY 41075

BERNICE RUST MELVIN CHENOT SR. REBECCA PARKER

LAURA BAKER MICHAEL BRAECKEL AUBREY JOSLYN HAROLD SCHACK ROBERT MCALLISTER MARY SCHOECH MARY HERTZENBERG MARY SCHREIBER MARTIN HARTMAN

JOHN LANGE IV 4 W 4TH ST. NEWPORT KY 41071 HARRY RUST PO BOX 312 ALEXANDRIA KY 41001 MOTT PLUMMER 53 VILLAGRANDE BLVD FT THOMAS KY 41075 JILL SCHERFF 255 E 5TH ST. CINCINNATI OH 45202 MARK WEGFORD 401 WASHINGTON ST. ALEXANDRIA KY 41001 MATTHEW DARPEL 507 CENTRE VIEW BLVD CRESTVIEW HILLS KY 41017 MICHAEL MENNINGER 600 VINE ST. STE 2500 CINCINNATI OH 45202 HARRY RUST PO BOX 312 ALEXANDRIA KY 41001 SCOTT MCMURRAY 515 MONMOUTH ST NEWPORT KY 41071 SCOTT MCMURRAY 515 MONMOUTH ST NEWPORT KY 41071 JENNIFER LEONARD 105 E 4TH ST STE 300 CINCINNATI OH 45202 GRED KRIEGE 3699 ALEXANDRIA PK COLD SPRING KY 41076

ELAINE BAYNUM MARY NOEL RALPH HERZOG MARIE SUHRE

MARY PETREY LEONA JUMP JOSEPH BOLTON JO ANN TROUT ROSE M KRAMER CHARLES RYDER SR.

MARTHA E. JONES 1018 LINCOLN RD. DAYTON KY 41074 DIANA BROERING 117 BONNIE LESLIE AVE. BELLVUE KY 41073 MARLENE ROOT 421 FAIRVIEW BELLEVUE KY 41073 MARY JO SCHREIBER 202 COBBLERS DR COLD SPRING KY 41076 MARY JO SCHREIBER 202 COBBLERS DR COLD SPRING KY 41076 DEBORAII QUARAGA 519 HALLAM AVE. ERLANGER KY 41018 DONALD PARKER 6815 ERIKA LANE NASHVILLE IN 47448 CYNTHIA HOFFSTEDDER 151 VALLEYVIEW DR SOUTHGATE KY 41071 KAREN WILKES 1163 FALLKIRK CT GREENWOOD IN 46143 ROSEMARY BRAECKEL 625-A OVERTON ST NEWPORT KY 41071 BARI JOSLYN 16 SUPERIOR DR FT MITCHELL KY 41017 JOAN SCHACK 10069 WOESTE RD. ALEXANDRIA KY 41001 JOYCE MCALLISTER 9 FAIRWAY DR. SOUTHGATE KY 41071 LINDA MIDDENDORF 217 VAIL CT SOUTHGATE KY 41071 GREGORY HERTZENBERG 11837 SKYVIEW DR. ALEXANDRIA KY 41001 RAYMOND BOUGHNER 55 GARDEN WAY FT THOMAS KY 41075 JEFFREY HARTMAN 1617 S ARGYLE PL CINCINNATI OH 45223 SHEILA HOFSTETTER 8916 MARY INGLES HWY. CALIFORNIA KY 41007 MELVA PRATHER 124 ORCHARD TERRACE ALEXANDRIA KY 41001 JOHN OLLBERDING 221 MARYINGLES HWY MELBOURNE KY 41059 RONALD SUHRE 2217 WIDEVIEW DR. COVINGTON KY 41012 ROBERT SUHRE 2141 WEST HORIZON HEBRON KY 41042 CLARENCE PETREY 110 BLOSSOM LANE SOUTHGATE KY 41071 BARRY WOODS 407 JONES RD. WALTON KY 41094 SHIRLEY BOLTON 4902 MARY INGLES HWY COLD SPRING KY 41076 NOEL TROUT 6 CHARITY HILL DR COLD SPRING KY 41076 DAVID KRAMER 207 THOMAS MORE PKWY CRESTVIEW HILLS KY 41017 CHARLES RYDER JR. 773 WOODVIEW DR. EDGEWOOD KY 41017

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Amber Wayson, 23, of Fort Thomas and Bryan Scharstein, 26, of Cincinnati, issued July 12. Samantha Brock, 20, of Edgewood and John Raymond III, 21, of Cincinnati, issued July 15. Heather Ilg, 21, of Fort Thomas and Michael Heringer, 22, of Cincinnati, issued Aug. 10. Beth Barrett, 37, and Jay York, 36, both of Fort Thomas, issued Aug. 12. Carrie Brauch, 38, of Covington and John Cameron, 42, of Quebec, issued Aug. 12. Brittany Laycock, 20, and Clarence Turner, 47, both of Fort Thomas, issued Aug. 13. Jessica Cole, 20, and William Meyers, 25, both of Oklahoma, issued Aug. 13. Lisa Huffman, 27, of Lexington and Austin Kelly, 32, of Richmond, issued Aug. 13. Stephanie Atkins, 26, and Christopher Long, 25, both of Cincinnati, issued Aug. 13. Rebecca Jones, 34, of Cincinnati and Keith Bischoff, 30, of Fort Thomas, issue Aug. 17. Pamela Points, 37, of Covington and Donald Prather, 28, of Cincinnati, issued Aug. 17. Linda Blevins, 26, of Fort Thomas and Michael Richter, 42, of Buffalo, issued Aug. 18. Rachel Bankemper, and Ronald Casebolt Jr. II, both of Fort Thomas, issued Aug. 18. Nicolette King, 34, and Craig Schultz, 39, both of Cincinnati, issued Aug. 18. Jennifer Wooley, 22, and Alexander Gilbert, 20, both of Cincinnati, issued Aug. 18. Erica Bertke, 29, of Cincinnati and Joseph Nickov, 28, of Salt Lake City, issued Aug. 19. Jessica Birkenhauer, 29, of Cincinnati and Anthony Rawe, 36, of Covington, issued Aug. 20. Jamie Whalen, 26, and Trhy Tilley II, 26, both of Covington, issued Aug. 20. Bridget Manning, 32, of Cincinnati and Michael Burkhardt, 32, of Fort Thomas, issued Aug. 20. Nichole Hall, 29, of Covington and Carlos Permeil, 43, of England, issued Aug. 20. Kathryn Simonson, 25, of Cincinnati and Andrew Vandiver, 26, of Owenboro, issued Aug. 20. Amanda Rich, 25, of Maysville and David Sheeley, 25, of Louisville, issued Aug. 20.


Deaths Helen Marie Alberta

Helen Marie Alberta, 52, Bellevue, died Aug. 23, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. She was a homemaker and member of First Baptist Church of Bellevue. Her husband, David Ray Alberta, died in July. Survivors include her daughter, Jennifer Givens; mother, Belvia Cash, both of Bellevue; and one grandson. Burial was in Floral Hills Memorial Gardens, Taylor Mill. Memorials: Multiple Sclerosis Society, 4460 Lake Forest Drive, Suite 236, Blue Ash, OH 45241.

Calvin Ard

Calvin Ard, 86, Alexandria, died on Aug. 5, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. He was an automotive mechanic and Army veteran. His daughter, Darlene Thomas, and two great-grandchildren died previously. Survivors include his sons, Calvin C. Ard of Newport and Steven Ard of Alexandria; daughters, Christine Evans of Alexandria, Cindy, Martha and Shannon Ard of Newport; former wife, Katherine Senters of Newport; 24 grandchildren; and 15 greatgrandchildren. A memorial service will be announced at a later date.

Lawrence Arnzen

Lawrence “Larry� Arnzen, 65, Fort Thomas, died Aug. 25, 2010, at the home of a family member in Highland Heights. He was a human resource representative with Duke Energy, a member of St. Therese Church in Southgate, a Marine Corps veteran and an avid bowler. Survivors include his sisters, Janet Gish of Highland Heights and Joyce Emminger of Taylor Mill; nieces, nephews, great-nieces and greatnephews. Visitation will be 4-7 p.m., Friday, Sept. 3, at Muehlenkamp-Erschell Funeral Home in Fort Thomas. Mass of Christian Burial will be 10 a.m., Saturday, Sept. 4, at St. Therese Church in Southgate. Burial will be in St. Stephen Cemetery in Fort Thomas. Memorials: St. Henry District High School, 3755 Scheben Drive, Erlanger, KY 41018 or Hospice of St. Elizabeth Health Care, 483 S. Loop Drive, Edgewood, KY 41017.

Notice to local funeral homes

The Community Recorder will continue to publish obituaries on an unpaid basis. While the Recorder’s format will not change, the way that we obtain the obituaries will change. For four years, the Recorder has shared obituary resources with the Kentucky Enquirer through NKY.com. As the Kentucky Enquirer changes over to a paid obituary format, the Recorder asks that funeral homes send all obituaries to our RecorderObits@nky.com e-mail address. Fax obituaries to 859-283-7285 are also accepted, however email is the preferred format.

Jude Carnes-Oder

Jude Nicholas Carnes-Oder, 16 hours, Dayton, died Aug. 21, 2010, at Good Samaritan Hospital, Clifton Heights. Survivors include his mother, Sarah Carnes; father, Matthew Oder Sr.; sister, Ava Carnes Stewart; brother, Matthew Oder Jr.; grandparents, Wray Jean Carnes, Kenneth Hilligas, Matthew and Alberta Oder all of Dayton; great-grandmothers, Frankie Glasscock of Dayton, Betty Wondrely of Newport and Patricia Fieger of Cincinnati. Services have taken place. Burial is in Alexandria Cemetery.

Hazel Chism

Hazel Krechting Chism, 91, Highland Heights, a homemaker, died Aug. 26, 2010, at Hospice of St. Elizabeth Healthcare, Edgewood. Her husband, Jesse Clay Chism, died previously. Survivors include her daughter, Judy Chism Gardner of Highland Heights; son, Gary Chism of Covington; sister, Kathryn Daley of Newport; four grandchildren; and 10 greatgrandchildren. Burial was in Evergreen Cemetery, Southgate. Memorials: Hospice of St. Elizabeth Healthcare, 483 South Loop Drive, Edgewood, KY 41017.

Etta I. Cook

Etta I. Schindler Cook, 80, of Cincinnati, formerly of Newport, died Aug. 24, 2010, at Hospice of Hamilton. She was a computer operator for Diversified Ophthalmics in Cincinnati,

member of the Cold Spring Baptist Church, White Shrine of Jerusalem and Alexandria Chapter of the Eastern Star. Her Husband, Harry Cook, died previously. Survivors include her sons, Terry Cook of Cincinnati and Darrell Cook of Richmond; four grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren. Memorials: Gideon’s International, P.O. Box 140800, Nashville, TN 37214-0800.

Dillard Gray

Dillard Gray, 89, of London, Ky., died July 25, 2010, at St. JosephLondon. He was a retired electrical supervisor for the U.S. Government, a member of the Circle of Faith Church, and a veteran of the U.S. Navy . Survivors include his wife, Maxine Owens Gray; five sons, Lon Gray of Melbourne, Johnny Hensley of Frankfort, Gary Hensley of Mexico, Doug Owens and the Rev. Joe McQueen of London; three daughters, Patricia Ashcraft of California, Ky., Bonnie Kania of Walton and Linda Begley of Corbin; 12 grandchildren; 22 great-grandchildren and one great-great grandchild. Burial was at the Gray Cemetery in Flat Lick, Ky. Memorials: Alzheimer’s Association, 644 Linn St., Cincinnati, OH 45203; or Campbell County Animal Shelter, 1989 Poplar Ridge Road, Melbourne, KY 41059.

Thomas, died Aug. 23, 2010, in Fort Thomas. He was a supervisor for AT&T in Cincinnati, a member of Telephone Pioneers of America Chapter 15, Knights of Columbus in Seneca, S.C., and a World War II Army veteran. His wife, Barbara Jean Hannon, died previously. Survivors include his caregivers, Sister Janet Carr, C.D.P. of Melbourne, and Tom and Mary Carr of Cold Spring. Burial was in Oconee Memorial Park, Seneca, S.C. Memorials: Sisters of Divine Providence, 1000 St. Anne Drive, Melbourne, KY 41059.

Doris Lay

Doris Linneman Lay, 87, Villa Hills, a homemaker, died Aug. 24, 2010, at Villaspring of Erlanger Health Care & Rehabilitation Center. Her first husband, William Linneman; second husband, Fred A. Lay; and son, Gary Linneman, died previously. Survivors include her son, Keith Linneman of Covington; stepdaughter, Tami Clark of Villa Hills; brother, Richard Storer of California; three grandchildren; and one great-grandchild. Burial was in Highland Cemetery. Memorials: Alzheimer’s Association, 644 Linn St., Suite 1026, Cincinnati, OH 452032.

Alan G. Matisak

Alan G. Matisak, 58, Highland Heights, died Aug. 21, 2010, at Hospice of St. Elizabeth Healthcare, Edgewood. He was a carpet salesman. Survivors include his sons, Chris Matisak of Highland Heights and Shaun Matisak of Lexington; brother, Phil Matisak of Independence; sister, Marilyn Stull of Denver, Colo.; and caregiver, Vickie Koors.

Matthew A. Mosher

Margaret Newfarth

Dorothy Rehkamp

Margaret “Peggy� Newfarth, 87, of Newport, died Aug. 26, 2010, at Hospice of the Bluegrass Care Center, Fort Thomas. She was a homemaker and member of Brighton Center Seniors. Her husband, Jack Newfarth and son, Steven Newfarth, died previously. Survivors include her sister, Nancy Downard of Dayton; three grandchildren; six great-grandchildren; and one great-great-grandchild. Memorials: Hospice of the Bluegrass Northern Kentucky, 7388 Turfway Road, Florence, KY 41042.

Kari Loretta Rash

Kari Loretta Rash, 41, Dry Ridge, died Aug. 22, 2010, at her home. She was a homemaker and member of First Love Community Church in Dry Ridge.

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Dorothy Rehkamp, 83, Florence, died Aug. 24, 2010, at her home. She was a homemaker and member of St. Timothy Church in Union. Survivors include her husband, George Rehkamp; sons, George and Bill Rehkamp of Florence; daughters, Eileen Messer, Diane Bressler, Mary Scheitz, Barb Bulmer, and Karen Menke of Florence, and Jeanne Sperry of Edgewood; brothers, Al Merkle of Fort Thomas, John Merkle of Cincinnati and Robert Merkle of Crestview Hills; sister, Rosalyn Smith of Cincinnati; 32 grandchildren; and 15 great-grandchildren. Burial was in St. John Cemetery, Fort Mitchell. Memorials: Passionist Nuns, 1151 Donaldson Hwy., Erlanger, KY 41018; or New Perception Inc., 1 Sperti Dr., Edgewood, KY 41017.

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Basic obituary information and a color photograph of your loved one is published without charge by The Community Press. Please call us at 2830404 for more information. To publish a larger memorial tribute, call 513242-4000 for pricing details. For the most up-to-date Northern Kentucky obituaries, click on the “Obituaries� link at NKY.com.

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Matthew Ara Mosher, 42, Fort Thomas, formerly of Kalamazoo, Mich., died Aug. 26, 2010, in Switzerland County, Ind. He was a social studies teacher at Harrison High School in Harrison, Ohio, and an Air Force veteran who served in Iraq. His father, Ara Mosher, died previously. Survivors include his wife, Roberta Mosher of Fort Thomas; mother, Margaret Mary Mosher of Kalamazoo, Mich.; sisters, Theresa Henehan of St. Paul, Minn., Ruthanne Mosher and Rosellen Mosher, both of Kalamazoo, Mich., and Peggy Mosher of Cincinnati; brother, Andrew Mosher of Chicago; and five nieces. Burial was in Spring Grove Cemetery in Cincinnati. Memorials: CCAT Center of Chemical Addiction and Treatment, 830 Ezzard Charles Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45214.

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When stars are born, with a touch of Gold The Aug. 5 doings at Gold Star Chili in Bellevue, Ky., had everything you need for a swell affair – the unveiling of a wonderful mural painted by a worldrenowned artist, good food and good people. Wyoming was well represented: artist C.F. Payne, 1972 Wyoming High School graduate; Charlie Howard, fourth generation Wyomingite and director of marketing for Gold Star Chili, and Justin and Shawnta Buckner, Wyoming residents depicted in the mural. To top it off, Brownings of Wyoming framed the original mural painted by Payne. Since Greater Cincinnati is known as “Chilitown USA,” and Gold Star is “The Flavor of Cincinnati,” Payne was the natural choice to promote the restaurant that best understands the connection the people have to their Cincinnati-style chili. As stated by Charlie, “Mr. Payne is a life-long resident of Cincinnati neighborhoods and a Cincinnatistyle chili fan. Even though he is best known for his illustrations of famous personalities, the heart of his work is the depiction of

Evelyn Perkins Community Press columnist

everyday people – the kind of regular, hardworking individuals and families who have been Gold Star’s core customer for the past 45 years. This illustration is really a trib-

ute to them.” The huge mural is of just those folks that Charlie mentioned – actual Gold Star Chili customers and employees. A call went out through the Enquirer for models, and the response was fabulous. Many of them attended the unveiling. Payne has been referred to as our generation’s Norman Rockwell for his slice of life portrayals, and it’s easy to understand how on point his work is when you meet him. He and his wife, Paula, are just like your next-door neighbor. His Aug. 2, 2010, cover of Time magazine is a perfect example of how his work captures the spirit of the moment.

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From B11

John W. Rogers

EVELYN PERKINS/CONTRIBUTOR

Artist C.F. Payne and Gold Star Chili director of marketing Charlie Howard in front of the mural Payne painted for Gold Star. The couple directly above them are the Buckners from Wyoming. items targeted to the football fans. Gold Star CEO Mike Rohrkemper commented that dining in neighborhood chili parlors is a sign of being from Cincinnati, and that Gold Star gets to know its customers and actively participates in the neighborhoods where they live and work. “So, we are honored that C.F. Payne took on this concept for us in the mural. It is friendly and neighborhood

oriented.” Payne thanked the models and Charlie for his idea to go to the public for them. They came on a dreary day and were very cooperative. He graciously autographed my copy of Time, signed poster-sized copies of the mural and posed for photos with models at the spot where they appear in the mural. Evelyn Perkins writes a regular column about people and events in the Tri-County Press area.

John W. Rogers, 74, Highland Heights, died Aug. 24, 2010, at Mountaincrest Nursing Home, Cincinnati. He was a credit manager for General Electric Corp., Cincinnati, an Army veteran, member of Asbury Methodist Church in Highland Heights and the Cincinnati Museum of Art. His wife, LaVerne Rogers, died in 2004. Survivors include his sons, Christopher Rogers of Fischer, Ind., John Rogers III of Highland Heights and David Rogers of Marietta, Ga.; stepsons, Jack, Albert, Jim, David and Thomas Lokesak; stepdaughters, Ann Cox, Terri Quackmeyer and Debbie Gabbard; and sister, Diane Gill of Washington, Ind. Burial was in Mother of God Cemetery, Fort Wright.

Janet Stewart

Janet Holtz Stewart, 40, of Knightdale, N.C., formerly of Cold Spring, died Aug. 24, 2010. Survivors include her son, Charlie Hubig of Melbourne; parents, Art and Mary Ann Holtz of Cold Spring; brother, Mark Holtz of Mount Airy; and sister, Judy Jones of Cold Spring. Memorials: Bishop Brossart High School Tuition Assistance Fund, 4 Grove St., Alexandria, KY 41001.

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The Bellevue location was chosen because owner “Chili Rick” Schmidt is characterized in the painting. Charlie says, “The mural depicts the ultimate Cincinnati-style chili parlor experience and the Bellevue store truly fits the profile. The illustration will be reproduced and installed as a wall mural in select Gold Star Chili restaurants throughout the Greater Cincinnati area.” Several selections from the illustration “will be framed and installed in Gold Star restaurants to provide an in-store ambiance that visually depicts Gold Star Chili’s brand position, The Flavor of Cincinnati.” You’ll see this same artwork in future advertising and on Gold Star menus. Over the next four years, Payne will create a series of paintings that offer a tribute to Bengals fans, and leverage Gold Star’s NFL sponsorship status as the “Official Chili” of the Cincinnati Bengals. The artwork will then be applied to upscale Bengals collectible merchandise, and sold during football season with the purchase of specific food

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