Page 1

BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT B1

Heartland Rehabilitation Services

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving all of Campbell County

COUNTY RECORDER

E-mail: kynews@communitypress.com T h u r s d a y, J u l y

Volume 32, Number 22 © 2010 The Community Recorder ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Share your news

Have a great photo from your kid’s latest field trip? Trying to drum up publicity for your group’s event? Visit NKY.com/Share to submit your photos, news and events. It’s a one-stop-shop for submitting information to The Community Recorder, The Kentucky Enquirer, NKY.com and many other publications and websites.

In the garden

For the first time, the Campbell County Cooperative Extension office offered a fourday-long Kid’s Gardening Camp. The camp, open to kids ages 8-12, gave the children a chance to learn more about gardening and do fun activities, said Doris Meece, the office’s horticulture technician that ran the camp. “The goal of this camp is to not only teach the children about gardening, but also foster a love a gardening,” Meece said. “We hope these kids will grow up and continue gardening as adults.” LIFE, B1

8, 2010

Web site: NKY.com

B E C A U S E C O M M U N I T Y M AT T E R S

50¢

Family raises money for Bibles, hoops court By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com In a couple weeks Fort Thomas residents Tim and Ginny McLaren will see firsthand the location in Rwanda, Africa, where their son has been serving in the Peace Corp, and they’re hoping to make a difference during the visit. Stemming from a request from their son, Scott McLaren, the couple is raising money to buy 500 new English Bibles for the students at the school where Scott teaches. Scott said it’s a Catholic school, so they have plenty of Bibles, but they

are written in the local language and French. “English recently became the mandatory language for education here, so the Bibles will be a source for English vocabulary for them,” Scott said. “Plus they can take the Bibles home and help their siblings and parents learn English.” Scott said having Bibles of their own that they can take home will allow students to further their education on their own in their free time. After seeing the condition of the school’s highly used basketball court, Tim said he wanted to go

beyond raising money for the Bibles and also upgrade the court with new backboards, rims, nets and hopefully, a paved surface to replace the current dirt court. “I’d love to get enough money to buy the Bibles and make an entire playground system for these students,” Tim said. “It would be awesome if our small part of the world could help theirs with a place to play and a Bible to read.” Scott said he’s happy to see his parents getting involved in his work with the students. “I really want them to be able to

Group collecting gangster stories By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

Evening with Sting

CincinnatiMomsLikeMe is giving away tickets to An Evening with Sting featuring The Royal Philharmonic Concert Orchestra. To enter the contest, visit CincinnatiMomsLikeMe.com and click on the Contests tab. Two winners will be randomly selected to receive a pair of tickets to see Sting at PNC Riverbend Pavilion Tuesday, July 20 at 8 p.m. Deadline to enter is Wednesday, July 14.

AD also dean of students

Campbell County High School has hired a new athletic director with dual responsibilities as dean of students. At the same time, an 11-year member of the Campbell County Schools technology department has moved up to top spot. At the high school, Steve Hensley will fill the newly created position of athletic director/dean of students, while Brian Mercer, an employee in Campbell County Schools’ technology department has been selected as the new chief information officer. SCHOOLS, A5 For the Postmaster

Published weekly every Thursday. Periodical postage paid at Newport, KY 41071 USPS 450130 Postmaster: Send address change to The Campbell County Recorder 654 Highland Suite 27, Fort Thomas, KY 41075 Annual Subscription: Weekly Recorder & Sunday Enquirer In-County $18.02; weekly Recorder only all other in-state $23.32 Out-of - state $27.56; Kentucky Sales Tax Included

To place an ad, call 283-7290.

feel like they’re part of this and get to contribute to my work here,” Scott said. Tim and Ginny are going to see Scott in mid-July and hope to take as many Bibles and donations with them as they can. Donations can be sent in care of Debbie Mullins for Bibles and Basketball at 345 Linden Ave., Southgate, KY 41071. For more information, contact Tim at 781-9274 or e-mail t.mac@fuse.net. To contact Scott, e-mail t.scottmclaren@gmail.com.

Celebrating the Fourth

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Grayson Smith, left, Shelby Smith, Jackson Smith and Ben Hock watch the Fort Thomas Fourth of July parade.

Church holds sandwich outreach By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com Knowing that many people are struggling financially these days, the members of St. John’s United Church of Christ in Bellevue are using their resources to lessen the burden. On the fourth Sunday of every month the church is holding a free “grab and go” sandwich giveaway for the community. “We’ve been trying to come up with some kind of outreach for the community,” said church member Theo Baldwin. “We thought providing food would be something we could do that would help out.” Baldwin said the church has offered sit-down meals in the past, but decided some might like to be able to come, pick up some food and leave. “They can just come to the church, grab and sandwich or two and maybe some side items, and leave,” Baldwin said. Internally, the church is trying to get different groups to host the outreach each month. “Besides being an outreach

PHOTO SUBMITTED

Volunteers at St. John’s United Church of Christ in Bellevue make sandwiches for the church’s free sandwich giveaway, which is held the fourth Sunday every month. event, this will help us get different groups involved in the life of the church,” Baldwin said. Anyone is welcome at the events, which are from noon until about 1:30 p.m. the fourth Sunday of each month, including July 25, Aug. 22, Sept. 26, Oct. 24,

Nov. 28 and Dec. 26. Baldwin said any leftover food is donated to local charities in hopes of helping even more people. For more information about the sandwich outreach, call the church at 261-2066.

LOL is ... Local bloggers writing from your perspective on cooking, wine, romance and more! Visit: Cincinnati.Com/LOL or search: living

The creators of the Newport Gangsters, Gamblers and Girls historic walking tour are taking the city’s history to the big screen and asking for community support. The group is hosting an event from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, July 11 for area residents to come and share their stories about Newport’s Sin City days. “We’re pretty excited about it because we believe this is a great story and it hasn’t been told across the country yet,” said Jerome Gels, co-creator of the tour. “We’re hoping this event brings more stories, pictures, videos and artifacts from that time period.” Gels said the group will have about 20 people and numerous video cameras on hand to record stories people have about people and places including Red Masterson, Sleepout Louie, the 633/Flamingo Club and the Merchant’s Club. Gels said the group is hoping to hear from the Committee of 500 members, a group who formed to rid the city of illegal activities, and people that knew or encountered the gangsters and worked in the casinos. “This documentary will be a marketing device for the whole area because people will travel here to take the tour and will stop at local shops and restaurants.” The event is at the Syndicate and Gangsters Dueling Piano Bar at 56 East Fifth St. in Newport. The documentary, “Newport: Gangsters, Gamblers, and Girls,” is set to be released in the spring. To see a preview, visit http://newportdoc.blogspot.com. For details visit www.newportgangsters.com.

Share your story

Contribute to the “Newport: Gangsters, Gamblers, and Girls” documentary from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, July 11, at the Syndicate and Gangsters Dueling Piano Bar at 56 East Fifth St. in Newport.


A2

Campbell County Recorder

July 8, 2010

News

Inmates clean up Campbell County By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

Highways throughout the county are cleaner thanks to the inmates at the Campbell County Detention Center. In the 2008-2009 fiscal year, inmates spent 8,319 man hours cleaning up 3,057 bags of garbage, 155 tires, 45 hub caps and 10 road signs from highways throughout the county as part of the state’s Adopt-a-Highway program. “We cover more miles than any other organization in the county,” said Jailer Greg Buckler. “This is just another service we can

provide, and it helps keep the county clean and beautiful.” The week of June 6-12, the inmates participated in the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet’s Summer Scrub Program, collecting 115 bags of garbage in 32 hours. The recent clean-up included U.S. 27 in Alexandria and Newport, Moock Road in Southgate and Wolf Road in Grants Lick. “We had four inmates out there every day of that week,” Buckler said. “The program is a good opportunity for the inmates to go out and do something instead of always sitting

behind locked doors.” Buckley said only inmates that the state classifies as low level offenders are allowed to be part of the program. While spring and summer are busier than other seasons, Buckler said the inmates do various cleanup programs throughout the year. “We just want visitor and people in our community to be able to drive through our county and not see garbage along the streets,” Buckler said. For more information about the transportation cabinet’s Adopt-a-Highway program, visit http:// adopt-a-highway.ky.gov.

Sirens aimed at outdoor audience By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

When warning sirens blare, Campbell County officials ask that residents who are outdoors take shelter. There are more than 20 warning sirens positioned around the county. They can be set off for one defined geographic area or all at once, which what happened June 15 for a tornado warning, said Bill Turner, director of Campbell County’s Office of Emergency Management. The sirens are directed at an outdoor audience because most people live in houses where insulation and other factors make them hard to hear indoors anyway, Turner said. The sirens are positioned near parks, schools and other outdoor areas where people need to seek shelter upon hearing the sirens, he said.

“The intent is to let people know what is happening, and let them know they need to seek shelter and seek further information from the local media,” Turner said. And the sirens going off doesn’t always mean a storm, he said. It could be because of a hazardous chemical leak or some other emergency, Turner said. Once inside a house the best way to know what’s going on is to have a battery-operated alert weather radio because sometimes the power goes off in a storm, he said. The price of the alert radios has dropped to where they are relatively cheap, and the some models can be directed to broadcast only warnings for Campbell County, Turner said. People can also choose what they want warnings about, he said. If a person lives on a hilltop they might choose not to receive alerts about flash floods, he said. Campbell County Commissioner Dave Otto, a resi-

dent of Fort Thomas, said he was approached by people who were confused about what course of action to take when after the sirens went off during the tornado warning June 15. “I had people tell me that they heard the sirens, but they didn’t know what to do,” Otto said. It’s not that people didn’t know to go inside, but they often asked about what they should do once inside their house, he said. Otto said he went with his family to the basement, but then he realized they didn’t have a television or radio in the basement to keep up with whether the danger had passed. “I didn’t have a weather radio, and I was sneaking upstairs to check the TV and go back downstairs,” he said. Otto said it was a reminder for him that he was taking a risk by going upstairs without know the situation. “And actually since then I’ve bought a weather radio,” he said.

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

The former garage, now being renovated into conference rooms, sits behind the garden at the Weller Haus Bed & Breakfast.

Bed and breakfast expands By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

FREE Holistic Health Sampler Join us for a day filled with: •

Blood Pressure Screenings

Chair Massages

Tai Chi

Yoga

Acupuncture

Meditation

Reflexology Demonstrations

Presentations on Clinical Hypnotherapy and Craniosacral Therapy.

Saturday, July 17 10:00 am – 2:00 pm Location: Medical Offic Office Building, Suite 209 20 Medical V Village Drive, Edgewood, K KY 41017 Guests will recei receive a complementary Relaxation CD and can participate in hourly drawings for gift certificates for a Free Holistic H Health Center Service.

For more information call 859-301-5959. COVINGTON | EDGEWOOD | FALMOUTH | FLORENCE | FT. THOMAS | GRANT CE-0000408362

What used to be a threecar garage behind the Weller Haus Bed & Breakfast is being transformed into an conference center that will be available for a variety of events. Owner Leanne Saylor said one reason she decided to renovate the garage is to give those who are having outside weddings at the bed and breakfast a back-up in case it’s raining. “We also wanted to expand in the wedding business and allow for bigger wedding to take place here,” Saylor said. “The rooms can also be used for meeting and other functions.” The two new rooms include the carriage house that can accommodate 18 people and the banquet facility that can hold up to 50 people.

Index

Calendar ......................................B2 Classifieds.....................................C Life...............................................B1 Schools........................................A5 Sports ..........................................A7 Viewpoints ..................................A9

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving all of Campbell County

With the addition of the renovated garage to the two existing houses, the Weller Haus is expanding along Poplar Street in Bellevue. “We have a little compound going on now,” Saylor said. “A lot of people don’t even realize it’s here.” The bed and breakfast was opened in 1990 by the Weller family, who lived in one of the houses. In 1995, the Wellers bought their neighbor’s house and renovated it, giving them a total of five rooms between the two houses, Saylor said. When Saylor bought the bed and breakfast in 2004, she spent time renovating the rooms before moving on to the garage. “I don’t really have anymore renovation plans after this,” Saylor said. “I really don’t have anything left to renovate.” Saylor said even without the major renovations, there is still a lot to do around the bed and breakfast from fixing things to keeping up the garden. For more information about the Weller Haus or to make reservations, visit www.wellerhaus.com or search for the Weller Haus on www.facebook.com.

COUNTY RECORDER

Find news and information from your community on the Web Campbell County – nky.com/campbellcounty News Michelle Shaw | Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1053 | mshaw@nky.com Chris Mayhew | Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1051 | cmayhew@nky.com Amanda Joering | Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1052 | ajoering@nky.com Melanie Laughman | Sports Editor . . . . . . . . 513-248-7118 | mlaughman@nky.com James Weber | Sports Reporter . . . . . . . . . 578-1054 | jweber@nky.com Advertising Debbie Maggard | Advertising Manager. . . . . . 578-5501 | dmaggard@nky.com Michelle Schlosser | Account Rep . . . . . . . . 578-5521 | mschlosser@nky.com Delivery For customer service. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 781-4421 Sharon Schachleiter | Circulation Manager. . 442-3464 | sschachleiter@nky.com Judy Hollenkamp | Circulation Clerk . . . . . . . . 441-5537 | jhollenkamp@NKY.com Classified To place a Classified ad. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283-7290 | www.communityclassified.com To place an ad in Community Classified, call 283-7290.


News

CCF Recorder

July 8, 2010

A3

Kuper beloved at St. Mary School

County budget keeps belt tightened By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

The proposed 2010-11 Campbell County budget includes $32.4 million in expenditures. The proposed budget is available for viewing at the county’s website www.campbellcounty.ky.gov. Here’s some, but not all, of the major components of what the proposed budget pays for (numbers in the millions are rounded to the closest $10,000 mark): • Jail fund: $8.85 million (The county generates $4.4 million in jail revenues and subsidies and the remainder of the cost comes from the county’s general fund). • Road fund: $3.13 million (includes $984,900 in state contribution). • Bus services (Transit Authority of Northern Kentucky contribution): $4.18 million, is funded by the county’s payroll tax revenue. • School bus transportation contribution: $500,000. • Police department: $2.22 million. • County parks: $337,420. • Golf course program support: $100,000. • County worker’s benefits $2.61 million. Includes: Social Security, retirement, health and dental insurance, unemployment insurance, worker’s compensation, flexible spending and health savings accounts and tuition reimbursement. • Debt service payments for administration building and land for county building at 1098 Monmouth Street: $830,600. • Planning and Zoning: $415,340. • Animal shelter/animal control: $281,480. • Consolidated Dispatch Center support: $246,000. • Office of Emergency Management: $297,050. • Information Technology services/staff: $247,800. • Economic development: $159,300. • Combined salaries for all three county commissioners: $113,280. • Judge-executive’s salary (amount is set by the state): $97,900. • Election Commission expenses: $253,000. • County attorney’s office: $172,600. • Contribution to county clerk’s office contribution: $37,800. • Contribution to county sheriff’s office: $66,100 • Contribution to county coroner’s office: $113,900 • Contribution to Property Valuation Administrator: $185,100. • Fiscal department: $302,210. • Senior center: $197,850 Court meeting. Downturn is probably a massive understatement, Pendery said. “Our biggest source of revenue, payroll taxes, are expected not to grow,” he said. The proposed budget also doesn’t include any considerations for new positions and seeks to defer capital expenditures wherever possible including what is in the budget, Pendery said. Capital expenses that made the budget include: $80,000 for police vehicle replacement; $30,000 for a new roof for the police station; $25,000 for a new senior center roof; $125,000 for replacement of road depart-

T Toys

ardous employees, and 0.8 percent increase for hazardous employees like police officers. And revenues that offset the costs of running the county’s jail continue to decrease because of early release programs, Pendery said. According to a list of budget notes prepared by the county there’s a chance the county will lose more than $200,000 due to cuts in jail subsidies and early release programs. The county has set aside $50,000 to identify ways to reduce costs through efficiencies, Pendery said. “Expenditures are going to be kept as flat as they can be,” he said.

Don’t Leave This Ad At Home! Bring this ad in to

Sconces

20% to * 50%

CE-0000409563

www.lightingefx.com

per week

78 weeks

Leas e Z one Latonia 859-431-8666 Turfway 859-647-2160

SHARE at nky.com/share

AKESIDE TERRACE

SENIOR CITIZENS APARTMENTS Affordable living by the lake

Now accepting applications for residency (by appointment only) from senior citizens 62 years and older, in the low income bracket. 3520 Alexandria Pike Highland Heights, KY 41076

(859) 441-5166

TDD 800-247-2510 Fax (859) 441-3156

Creation/Evolution Seminar Did humans and dinosaurs coexist? Did humans evolve ve from ape-like creatures? How old is the Earth?

Point Pleasant Church of Christ 3259 Point Pleasant Rd., Hebron, KY

*on selected items. Must present ad to receive discount.

We Install!

1599

We invite you to join us as we investigate the evidence. These lectures are FREE and open to all ages.

Lamps

6920 Dixie Highway Florence, KY 859.282.6400

Sun. July. 18th

9:30am-Scientific Accuracy of the Bible 10:30am-7 Reasons Why We are Losing Our Kids 6:00pm - Atheism’s Attack on America

Mon. July 19th

7:00pm - Is Genesis a Myth followed by Q/A

Tues. July 20th

7:00pm - The Dinosaur Dilemma followed by Q/A Featuring Guest Speaker:

Outdoor Lighting Out

7714 Voice of America Drive West Chester, OH 513.777.1211 ShopLocal helps you get the best deal on whatever you’re looking for.

L

Laptops from $

The judge-executives from Boone, Campbell, Grant and Kenton County will speak at the next Eggs 'N Issues event, scheduled for July 13 at the Receptions Conference Center in Erlanger. Boone County Judge Gary Moore, Campbell County Judge Steve Pendery, Grant County Judge Darrell Link and Kenton County Judge Ralph Dress will give their annual "state of Northern Kentucky" address, touching on topics such as economic development, education and infrastructure. The event is sponsored by the Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce. The breakfast will begin at 7:15 a.m., and costs $15 for pre-registered Chambers members, or $20 at the door for Chamber members. Guest admission will be $25 at the door. For more information, visit www.nkychamber.com.

Chandeliers

SAVE

ShopLocal has great deals on everything from toys to tires. Your one-stopshop for the best deals on millions of products, from hundreds of online retailers and your favorite local stores.

ment equipment; $34,700 for replacement of computer hardware; $25,000 for replacement of a vehicle used by the golf course and parks department and $50,000 for resurfacing the road department’s lot. The county has also budgeted about $425,000 for road resurfacing, he said. “But if we’re able to because of conditions defer that expense we will,” Pendery said. At the same time, pension costs continue to rise for the county, although not as drastically as in past years, he said. The state required pension cost increases for the county in 2011 will be 4.8 percent or non-haz-

NKY judge-execs to give address

Brad Harrub, Ph.D.

CE-0000409685

Campbell County has drafted a budget that continues a second year of employee wage freezes as revenue is decreasing in areas like state jail subsidies and payroll tax revenue growth is flat. To balance the budget, the county is planning to use money from its reserves, about $6 million, to cover a $3.3 million deficit. Spending in the proposed budget is just over $32.4 million compared to $45.07 million budgeted for the current year. The bulk of the $13 million difference in spending was money the county borrowed and spent to construct the new county administration building on Monmouth Street in Newport, said Jim Seibert, fiscal affairs director. The proposed budget also continues a wage freeze for about 75 percent of county employees not covered by a labor agreement. When it comes to employees, the county has left two police department positions unfilled for the time being, and the same is true for the county’s human service director position, Seibert said. The positions will eventually be filled, but not until the county saves some money by leaving the positions vacant temporarily, Seibert said. On the revenue side, only the insurance premium tax revenue is expected to grow significantly, about 5.6 percent, mostly because of improved collection methods by the insurance industry, he said. Fiscal Court is required to pass a county budget for the new fiscal year starting July 1 prior to the end of June. The first reading of the proposed budget at the May 19 meeting. “Our 2010-11’ budget continues to reflect the reality of an economic downturn,” said Campbell County Judge-executive Steve Pendery at the May 19 Fiscal

Inside the budget

BRIEFLY

CE-0000371743

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Jim Kuper, of Alexandria, leaves work Friday, June 25, driving his tractor home as he typically does, along Jefferson Street in Alexandria after spending the day at St. Mary School, where he is a maintenance worker.

Jim Kuper, affectionately known as “Kup” by those at St. Mary School in Alexandria, is also known for his dependability. Each day, Kuper drives to and from work on his Ford tractor from his farm in Alexandria – clocking in first thing in the morning. St. Mary Principal Michele Ulrich said “Kup” is known as much for his knowledge of local history as he is for his work at the school. A member of the Campbell County Historical and Genealogical Society, Kuper sometimes tells teachers all about their family trees and distant relations based on their last name. “Mr. Kuper is a man who rides his tractor every day here to work, and he farms, he’s real unassuming,” Ulrich

on his own. “It’s just stuff I picked up,” he said. Kuper said his favorite event each year is the Alexandria fair, where he pulls a float or buggy with his two draft horses. He is related to many of the most prominent and older names around Alexandria including the Schultz, Steffen and Carmack families. Kuper said he also has lots of relatives in Newport and Fort Thomas. It’s a knowledge he puts to use. “I could name who is cousins with who the teachers are here,” he said. Kuper said he attended St. Mary School as a boy when water still came from a cistern, and they ate in the old church hall that’s still used as a practice gym for the school. “A big part of the city either went to school here or still goes here,” Kuper said of St. Mary.

said. Ulrich said “Kup” mainly works in the cafeteria, but pitches in everywhere around the school – smiling all the while. “He even comes up with his tractor and scrapes the snow for us, sweeps, he can do everything,” she said. Kuper said he just takes care of the cafeteria and comes to work each day. He raises cattle and hay on about six different farm plots around Alexandria in the Grandview Drive area. Kuper, 66, can explain the origins of Kentucky, splitting from Virginia, and then how Kenton, Pendleton and other counties were formed out of portions of the original boundaries of Campbell County. Kuper has previously taken a college-level Kentucky history class, but said most of his knowledge he learned

CE-0000407908

By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

Information: Call (859) 283-1075 or visit us at www.ppcofc.org


A4

CCF Recorder

News

July 8, 2010

Campbell superintendent’s contract extended to 2013

Spooning sprinkles

By William Croyle

Noah Roderick, 2, front, and his 3-year-old brother Dominic Roderick, background, slip spoons full of vanilla ice cream with rainbow sprinkles on a 90plus degree afternoon Wednesday, June 23 inside the air conditioning at Sharky’s Eats & Treats in Alexandria.

wcroyle@nky.com

Another year has been added to Anthony Strong’s contract. The superintendent of Campbell County Schools is in the midst of his second four-year contract that was due to expire June 30, 2012. The board of education, at Strong’s request, extended it last week to June 30, 2013.

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

ST PAUL CHURCH

The Right Brands... The Right Price... The Right Advice...

Florence, KY

FESTIVAL Friday July 16, from 6-11 pm Saturday July 17, from 5-11 pm Mass at 4 pm on Saturday

“One-year Tuition at any Catholic School” Raffle

ASK ABOUT 0% FINANCING

(only 500 chances, $4,428 value)

Live Music Friday, Drawing July 17, at 11:00 p.m. “Chain Reaction” and Saturday, “Above the Bar.” CE-0000407567

CE-0000394578 CE-0000409635

www.browntv.homeappliance.com

$7,000

Cash Give-A-Way 14 Total Winners

Locally Owned And Operated Since 1961

107 W. 11th Newport, KY 859-431-5484

-Special RaffleGRAND PRIZE

Our famous “CHICKEN CHARLIE” chicken dinner will be served from 4-8 on Saturday. Ky.Gaming Lic. # 0145

RIDES

FOOD FUN

GAMES

Strong, 45, has been superintendent since 2004. He said he sees the extension as a reflection of the work the staff throughout the district has done the last few years. “I think it shows the board’s long-term commitment to the leadership of this district, and it shows that the board is pleased with the direction we are going,” Strong said. The district has nearly 5,000 students in five elementary schools, a middle school, high school and day treatment center. Strong said that in the last six years, the district’s rank in state test scores among county districts has jumped from 76th to 16th. “We’re not where we want to be,” Strong said, “But, we’re getting there.” Board member Mike Combs said continuity in leadership at the top of the district is important to the district’s success. “When he came on board, we were under sanctions on No Child Left Behind (the district is no longer under sanctions), our

test scores at the elementary level since he got here have gone through the roof and we’ve made strides at the high school,” Combs said. “And he’s done it all in a funding environment that has been continuously declining.” Strong said one focus during the next three years will be to continue addressing No Child Left Behind issues. Last year, the district hit enough targets overall to make adequate yearly progress, the first time it had ever done that. However, two schools - Campbell County High School and Crossroads Elementary School - did not attain their goals among disabled students. Strong said the district is also working on achieving national accreditation, something it hopes to accomplish by November through the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. “We’re also continuing to work and focus on overall student achievement,” Strong said. “That’s why we’re here.”


SCHOOLS

CCF Recorder

July 8, 2010

ACHIEVEMENTS

Editor Michelle Shaw | smhaw@nky.com | 578-1053

|

NEWS

|

ACTIVITIES

|

HONORS

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

N K Y. c o m

A5

RECORDER

Special Olympics work inspires essay By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

Working with young swimmers training for the Special Olympics, 14-year-old Nicole Robertson was impressed so much by their zest for life that her experiences inspired an award-winning essay. Robertson entered the United Cerebral Palsy of Greater Cincinnati’s “Attitude” – A Disability Awareness Essay Contest and won the grand prize for her personal story about working with the swimmers. Robertson of Alexandria, a graduate of eighth grade at St. Mary School, will attend Campbell County High School this fall where she plans to try out for the swim team. Robertson said she was surprised by the positive attitude most Special Olympics athletes displayed despite their hardships. “They’re always trying their hardest and giving 110 percent,” she said. Robertson said she plans to continue working with the Special Olympics athletes when their practices start back up in the fall. “I wanted to use my talents to help,” she said. As part of her recognition cere-

PROVIDED

From left, Steve and Janet Robertson of Alexandria with their daughter Nicole Robertson, 14, before taking a limousine ride from the parking lot at St. Mary School in Alexandria to an awards luncheon May 18 for their daughter’s grand prize winning essay in the United Cerebral Palsy of Greater Cincinnati’s “Attitude” – A Disability Awareness Essay Contest. monies, Robertson and her parents were picked up in a limousine at the Alexandria school and taken to an awards lunch at PF Chang’s China Bistro May 18. She was also awarded a $50

shopping gift certificate and family passes to Kings Island for the summer. St. Mary School Principal Michelle Ulrich said Robertson’s essay was one of 232 submitted

District veterans take on new roles

Grant gives district more than $700,000 for programs

By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

The Newport Independent School District has more to offer its students this summer and upcoming school year thanks to a recent grant. The district recently won the 21st Century Community Learning Center Grant (CCLC), a federally supported program designed to improve academic performance, boost self-esteem, develop social skills and provide other educational services to students and families. Through the grant, the district will receive $712,500 during the next five years to develop and maintain programs at two schools in the district. “One of the goals of this program is to raise math and reading scores by finding creative ways to help students,” said Brennan Jackson, 21st CCLC director for the district. “We want to help them during the school year by offering different clubs and enrichment programs and we want to keep them active academically and athletically through the summer.” The grant is already benefiting students by helping fund the district’s SummerCare Program, where students in kindergarten through eighth grade can come, free of charge, to Newport’s Junior High School and participate in a variety of learning activities as well as games.

in the contest from around the Cincinnati area. Ulrich said eighth grade language arts teacher Pat Rice did a good job of drawing out the best in Robertson’s writing.

“She always has been a good writer, but Pat Rice made her blossom and perfected her skill,” Ulrich said. Rice said Robertson was already a strong writer at the start of her eighth grade year, but really found her voice by personalizing her stories. Robertson also won a spot in the district level of the USA Patriot’s Pen essay contest for a class essay she wrote about Christmas customs, relating it directly to her family traditions, Rice said. Robertson’s essay about going to her grandmother’s and baking told a personal story of the importance of simple pleasures such as a family tradition, Rice said. “It almost made me cry,” Rice said. Since Robertson is a competitive swimmer, her mother suggested she work with children involved in Special Olympics as a service project. The children Robertson was working with have many of the same problems and concerns as any teen has, she said. They have sleepovers with friends, and always have a great attitude about life, Rice said. “This particular essay, I think, was a very personal essay for her,” Rice said of Robertson.

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Children’s Inc. employee Stephanie Coyle tells a group of children what activity they will be doing during SummerCare Monday, June 21.

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Newport seventh-grader Star Yeager helps set up a team building activity during the district’s SummerCare program Monday, June 21. Every Friday, students in the program get to go swimming, Jackson said. “We’re still taking enrollment for the program and so far it’s been very, very positive,” Jackson said. Jackson said the hope is that the

grant will help establish these programs, then partnerships with the community will help sustain the programs once the grant runs out. For more information about the grant or the programs being offered contact Brennan Jackson at 292-3085.

Campbell County High School has hired a new athletic director with dual responsibilities as dean of students. At the same time, an 11-year member of the Campbell County Schools technology department has moved up to top spot. At the high school, Steve Hensley will fill the newly created position of athletic director/dean of students. Juli Hale, director of community relations for the district, said Hensley will take care of some disciplinary measures in his role as dean of students. “He has been a head coach for several schools, he’s been a teacher and he has been a principal in Ohio,” Hale said. “He seems to be a very strong fit and that is a unique job and it is unique to us.” The request to create the dual athletic director/dean of students position arose from CCHS Principal Renee Boots to allow other administrators to focus more on curriculum, according to minutes from the CCHS School Based Decision Making Council. No stranger to Campbell County, Hensley started his coaching career as an assistant football coach at CCHS in 1993 and started teaching at the school in 1993, according to a news release from the district. “Steve brings a tremendous excitement to the AD position,” said Boots in the news release.

New tech chief

Brian Mercer, an employee in Campbell County Schools’ technology department for 11 years has been selected as the new chief information officer. It’s the lead technology position in the district. Mercer will replace Linda Smith, who is retiring after 38 years in the district. Many people might already recognize Mercer from his work implementing the district’s awardwinning student robotics program. Mercer has an associates degree in PC support and administration and holds his Rank 1 in instructional technology with an emphasis on special needs, according to the district’s news release. “He has a history of building success and strong tradition.” Hensley had most recently spent the previous two years as assistant principal at Taylor High School in Ohio. Before that he spent two years as Taylor’s head football coach and as an English teacher. He’s also previously taught and coached at Ludlow and Newport high schools. “This was a chance for me to come back to the place where I started,” said Hensley in the news release. Hensley continued that he sees the position as a great opportunity. “This position plays to my skill set, allowing me to be involved in athletics and administration,” he said. “I want to build on the successes and achieve even better things.”

Highlands to pilot student laptop program By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

Some students at Highlands High School will be trying out a new laptop initiative this coming school year. Two junior early-bird AP English classes are participating in a pilot program where each student

rents one of the school’s laptops for $100 to use the entire school year. Diana McGhee, the district’s technology director, said the district upgraded the computer network this past school year to enable them to try out the program. “We realize that students today are using all kinds of technology,

and this is chance to tie that into their school work,” McGhee said. “This can help us bring their 21st century skills into the classroom.” McGhee said students will be able to use the laptops to take notes, work on projects and get files and information from their teacher, while the teacher will be able to monitor the students’ work

easily. Superintendent John Williamson, who teaches one of the two classes that are piloting the program, said laptops are a great new tool for learning. “Laptops give students access to information right when they need it,” Williamson said. “The ultimate goal is to get to the point

where all the high school students have laptops.” The program will give the district an idea of how the laptops affect learning and instruction, Williamson said. For the students in the pilot program, they’ll be given an option to buy the laptops, minus the rental fee, at the end of the year.


A6

CCF Recorder

Schools

July 8, 2010

COLLEGE CORNER National College grads

The Florence campus of National College, www.national-college.edu, announced the graduates recognized at the 2010 graduation ceremony. The following students received their degrees and diplomas at the ceremony held Wednesday, May 26 at Receptions, Inc.: • Sterling Ford of Alexandria - Diploma • Katrinka D. Hadley of Cold Spring - Diploma • Rebecca L. Verst of Cold Spring - Associate Degree, Honors • Kristine F. Smith of Fort Thomas - Associate Degree

Berea College graduates

Kelsey Schwab of Bellevue and Christine Morris of Fort Thomas were among the 191 students, who received degrees from Berea College, at commencement ceremonies May 23. Morris received the Martin Luther and Coretta Scott King Award for leadership in the promotion of interracial understanding on campus. For information about the school, visit www.berea.edu.

Miami University

Jeffrey Michael Deinlein of Fort Thomas was recently named to the dean’s list at Miami University. Students making the dean’s list achieved a 3.5 or better grade point average for the 2009-2010 second semester. • Riley W. Grimme recently graduated from Miami University. For details about MU, visit www.muohio.edu.

Dumaine is awarded a scholarship from COF

Anne Marie Dumaine of California was awarded a $5,000 four-year college scholarship from the Catholic Order of Foresters (COF). Dumaine is a COF St. Peter Court 1492 member and a Campbell County High School graduate. She was also a member of National Honor Society. Her extracurricular activities included soccer, basketball, Future Business Leaders of America, Faith Alive and Beta Club. Dumaine plans to major in biology at Xavier University. She is the daughter of Thomas and Pamela Dumaine. The Catholic Order of Foresters give out 20 college scholarships each year to high school seniors.

Speers Court Apts. One Bedroom Apartments for Senior Citizens.

If you’re looking for buyers, you’re in the right neighborhood.

Rent based on income.

Call: 859-261-0536

TTY 1-800-648-6056 T 1-800-648-6057

To place an ad call 513.242.4000 or 859.283.7290, or visit CommunityClassified.com

901 E. 5th St., Dayton, KY CE-0000371721

ECONOMY FULL SET DENTURES*...........$395 Custom Full Set Dentures........................$605 Custom Full Upper or Lower....................$405 Premium Full Set Dentures.......................$805 Reline (each)...............................................$150 Simple Extraction (each)...............................$75 Full-mouth X-ray (required for extractions)...............$75 Fees effective January 4, 2010

RODNEY ALAN STEVENS,DMD,P.S.C. 7699 US Highway 42 Florence, KY 41042

(859) 282-0660

General Dentist Rodney Alan Stevens, DMD

NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY

* SAME DAY SERVICE IF IN BEFORE 9 A.M.

DENTURE RELINES & REPAIRS

MINI DENTAL IMPLANTS

FIRST TIME DENTURE WEARER PACKAGES

EMERGENCY EXTRACTION SERVICES

PROVIDED

Afternoon walk

Everyone is a good sport when it comes to the walk-a-thon for St. Joseph School in Cold Spring. The annual fundraiser is an event many students and teachers look forward to with great anticipation. Shown: Students begins their walk around the school campus.

NKU launches new career website The Northern Kentucky University Career Development Center announced the launch of a new website. The site includes the new Norse Recruiting system located at www.myinterfase.com/nku/student, which automates numerous functions found within the career center and enhances the services offered to students and employers. Powered by CSO Research’s Interfase system, this new site streamlines student and employer registration, resume referrals, document management, placement tracking, job posting and management, interview scheduling, career fair management, resume books, and alumni mentoring. As a result, students will now have unlimited access to register, search jobs and send online inquiries. Students may manage multiple resumes, cover letters and other employment-related documents. Employers can

CLASS REUNIONS S A T U R D A Y, J U L Y 1 7 Campbell County High School graduates of 1990 are holding their 20th year class reunion, Saturday, July 17, 2010, at the Syndicate in Newport. The cost is $50 per person for appetizers, drinks and music. For more information, call 859-512-6213 or visit Facebook “CCHS Class of 1990 Reunion.” The Syndicate is located at 18 East 5th Street. S A T U R D A Y, A U G . 2 8 Ryle High School graduates of 2000 are holding their 10th year class reunion, Saturday, Aug.

CE-0000409059

04017-6

SAVE $100 -on-

Mini Dental Implants A denture stabilization system that could end your troubles ZLWK ORRVH¿WWLQJ GHQWXUHV

per SAVE $50denture

-on-

Traditional Service Sunday 8:30-9:30 a.m.

Premium

Complete or Partial Denture

Coupon must be presented when services are

-on-

Custom

Complete or Partial Denture Expires 8/31/10

Have a class reunion? E-mail akiefaber@nky.com.

Contemporary Service Sunday 10:45-11:45 a.m.

Rev. Dave Schwab, Pastor Dr. Randy Pennington, Director of Music Ministries Donald Hurd, Pipe Organist www.christchurchuccft.org

Offer good only at: Rodney Alan Stevens, DMD, P.S.C.

per SAVE $25denture

Walton Verona High School graduates of 1985 are holding their 25th year class reunion, Saturday, Sept. 11, 2010. For more information, contact Kevin Flynn at 859-485-6128 or e-mail kbflynn@insightbb.com.

Sunday School 9:45-10:45 a.m.

For more information,please call 1-800-DENTURE (1-800-336-8873) or visit our website at www.affordabledentures.com VALUABLE COUPON

S A T U R D A Y, S E P T . 1 1

859-441-2565

Affordable Dentures is opening soon in Carrollton, KY TENTATIVE OPENING DATE IS JULY 15, 2010 Please call 1-800-336-8873 for more information

28, 2010, at BlackFinn Restaurant and Saloon. For more information, call 614-5803712 or e-mail ryleclassof2000@gmail.com. The BlackFinn Restaurant and Saloon is located at 19 East 7th Street in Cincinnati.

15 South Fort Thomas Ave. Fort Thomas, KY 41075

We gladly accept Cash, Checks with ID,Visa, MasterCard and Discover as payment for our services.

2551 U.S. Hwy. 227 * Kroger Shopping Center Carrollton, KY 41008

quickly and easily post jobs on campus, choose to receive online applications directly from the system with current resumes attached, sign up for career fairs and more. “We are very excited about the launch of this new website as it exemplifies the focus of our office on supporting the needs of students, alumni and employers,” said Kevin J. Hardy, a coordinator of the NKU Career Development Center. “By implementing this new system we will continue to enhance our services related to full-time employment, internships/ cooperative education, alumni employment and more. Hardy said a thorough evaluation was done by members of the NKU community to select the software. “Without question, this software is leading the way in how career development centers in the future operate,” he said.

No matter who you are, or where you are on life’s journey, you are welcome here!

CE-0000408825

FIND news about the place where you live at cincinnati.com/community

PROVIDED

Business savvy

Highlands High School students Spencer Bankemper (left) and Austin Collinsworth pose with a check they received from winning second place at the Northern Kentucky University Entrepreneurship Challenge for their class’s new student-run business Bluebirds Apparel and Merchandise (BAM).

Bales named NKU 2010 Outstanding Professor Northern Kentucky University announced that Chase College of Law Professor Richard Bales has been selected as the 2010 Frank Sinton Milburn Outstanding Professor. "I am exceptionally proud to have received this recognition,” Bales said. “But teaching, like baseball, is a team sport. What I do inside and outside the classroom would not be possible without the incredible support of faculty colleagues, support staff and administrators both in the law school and the university, and of course our exceptional students. I am the luckiest person in the world to have the opportunity to work with such a fantastic group of people.” A member of the Chase faculty since 1998, Bales not only advises student organizations and coaches competition teams, but also directs Chase’s Center for Excellence in Advocacy and serves as advisory board chairman for the interdisciplinary NKU Alternative Dispute Resolution Center. The effectiveness of Bales’ approach is evident in his students’ performances in national competitions. All four arbitration teams he’s coached over the past two years have advanced to the national competition. The 2007-08 team finished third in the nation, and the 2009-10 team finished fifth in the nation. Bales also has helped prepare the Chase Wagner Employment Law Moot Court Team, which has reached the final round in a 44-team field for three consecutive years. Bales’ involvement with students extends to his scholarly work. He has

authored or co-authored five books, approximately 20 single-author articles and 30 co-authored articles over the past 10 years. Some of the co-authors are students. He also has helped a number of students write and publish articles in law journals, including Colorado Law Review, Penn State Law Review and St. John’s Law Review. In addition, Bales has written the teacher’s manual for two of his coursebooks and co-authored coursebooks for labor law and arbitration law. He gave students the opportunity to write a section of the teacher’s manual for one of the coursebooks, and they will receive publication credit. He served as interim dean of Chase in 2006, associate dean of faculty development from 2007-09 and led the law school’s self-study last year. Bales also helped develop curriculum for Chase’s Center for Excellence in Advocacy. The center offers skills courses, brings practitioners to campus for workshops and seminars, and connects students with externships and clerkships. Bales has expanded the center’s extracurricular programming, increased the number of alumni involved and developed a board of advisors. He also has developed a roundtable of recent graduates identified as rising stars of advocacy practice. He has served as director of the center since last fall. Finally, Bales drafted the Chase Concentration Program to give students an opportunity to focus a portion of their legal studies on a specialty area of law.


SPORTS BRIEFLY

McDole nabs scholarship

Northern Kentucky University baseball player Evan McDole was recently awarded an NCAA postgraduate scholarship of $7,500. McDole, a Bishop Brossart High School graduate, also earned the Great Lakes Valley Conference’s Richard F. Scharf Paragon Award, given annually to the top male and female student-athletes in the GLVC. A two-time captain for the NKU baseball team, McDole led the Norse to a pair of GLVC championships and to three consecutive trips to the NCAA Division II Tournament. He is graduating with a degree in accounting and business administration with a cumulative grade point average of 3.819. McDole was named GLVC and Midwest Player of the Year as a junior after guiding the Norse to their second consecutive conference crown. He hit .355 with 15 home runs and 55 runs batted in during 2009, while also being named the recipient of the ABCA Gold Glove award. In 2010, McDole was named to the Daktronics AllMidwest second team and to the All-GLVC second team after hitting .347 with 65 runs batted in, 22 doubles and six home runs. He helped the Norse to a 43-17 overall record and to the top of the GLVC East Division with a 24-6 mark. McDole is the 12th NKU student-athlete to receive the NCAA postgraduate scholarship.

Hirschauer nabs award

Newport Central Catholic Athletic Trainer Kelly Hirschauer was named High School Athletic Trainer of the Year by the Kentucky Athletic Trainers Society. In 2002, Hirschauer began her career at Newport Central Catholic as a certified Athletic Trainer. She is affiliated with the National Athletic Trainers Association and Ken- Hirschauer tucky Board of Medical Licensure. She also teaches Physical Education and Health Courses that include Sports Medicine at Newport Central Catholic High School.

Conference honor roll

Michael Buemi, a freshman men’s tennis player for Thomas More College and a Newport Central Catholic High School graduate, was recently named to the Presidents’ Athletic Conference Academic Honor Roll for the spring semester. Also named to the list was Thomas More freshman women’s basketball player Katie Kitchen, a Campbell County High School graduate. The PAC Academic Honor Roll honors student-athletes on winter and spring varsity sports teams who have earned a grade-point average (GPA) of 3.6 or higher on a 4.0 scale during their semester of competition. Follow Northern Kentucky sports on Twitter

twitter.com/crkysports

CCF Recorder

July 8, 2010

HIGH SCHOOL | Editor Melanie Laughman | mlaughman@nky.com | 513-248-7118

YOUTH

|

RECREATIONAL

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

N K Y. c o m

A7

RECORDER

Campbell teams pick up spring honors By James Weber jweber@nky.com

Bishop Brossart incoming senior Alicia Miller was named the Player of the Year in softball by the Kentucky Enquirer recently, when the newspaper published its list of spring sports all-stars. Miller had a 24-9 record and a 0.81 ERA this season for the Mustangs, who reached the 10th Region quarterfinals. She struck out 225 in 208 innings and hit .421 when being pitched to. Brossart teammate Lindsay Griffith was one of the 12 first-team allNorthern Kentucky selections by the paper. Paige Baynum was honorable mention. The Enquirer takes recommendations from local coaches for its all-star teams. The coaches also compile the official Northern Kentucky Athletic Conference honors, which have not been released because several schools have not submitted nominations.

The county had several honorable mention selections in softball. Bellevue had Maddie Blevins on the team. HIghlands’ catcher Allie Conner was honorable mention. NewCath had two in Danielle Hausfeld and Liz Kroger. Campbell County had one honorable mention pick in Brielle Byrne. Bishop Brossart had two firstteam picks in baseball. Travis Norton and Trevor Bezold were among the 13 first team all-Northern Kentucky picks by the Enquirer. Sam Liggett of Highlands was also a first-team selection. Area honorable mention picks included: Brossart: David Greis, Tanner Norton. Bellvue: Alex Hegge. Campbell County: Michael Kremer, Coy Shepard. Newport: Travis Jones. Newport Central Catholic: Jake Cain, Shaun Meyer. Campbell County High School cleaned up in the track honors.

Anna Carrigan was the girls’ athlete of the year. She was part of three individual state titles in the 3A state meet and set the all-Northern Kentucky record in the 400 meters. Camel head coach Brandon Napier was the girls’ coach of the year. Christina Heilman was also a first team choice. Kennedy Berkley, Carolynn Dreyer, Anne Marie Dumaine, Faith Roaden and Taylor Robinson were honorable mention. Robbie Scharold was the boys’ athlete of the year. He repeated as state champ in the Class 3A 800 meters, setting a state record. He also ran on two relays that broke Northern Kentucky records. Teammate Alexx Bernard was also first team, as was pole vaulter Doug Long. Austin Johnson, Doug Strange, Aaron Lyon and Ben Rawe were honorable mention. Three members of Highlands’ Class 2A state team champions

were first team all-stars. Ashley Collinsworth, the 100meter state champion was one of them, as was state pole vault champ Laura Geiman. The third was versatile Taylor Rosenhagen, who medalled at state in four field events. Abby Hills, Lindsey Scaggs and Maria Weyer were honorable mention. NewCath had one first team member in Class 1A state shot put champion Frannie Schultz. Kiley Bartels, Emma Heil, Aubrey Muench, and Sarah Suedkamp were honorable mention. Newport Central Catholic’s Sam Schaefer was honorable mention in boys. Also honorable mention were Sarah Klump and Nicole Ridder of Brossart, and Raven Rice of Newport. Newport’s Jordan Hatfield, the 1A state champ in the discus, was first team. Branden Carter, DaMarkco Foster and Rob Washington were honorable mention.

McDole ends baseball career with honors By James Weber jweber@nky.com

Evan McDole is spending his summer trying to squeeze as much baseball into his life before the next phase kicks in. McDole, a 2005 Bishop Brossart High School graduate, recently earned his diploma from Northern Kentucky University, where he just finished an outstanding career on the diamond and a degree in accounting. The numbers of bank statements will soon replace batting averages and wages will replace walks when McDole starts work at the Grant Thornton accounting firm in Cincinnati Oct. 4. Until then, McDole is studying for his CPA exam while working at NKU’s summer baseball camps. Despite being one of the best hitters in NKU history, McDole did not get much in the way of professional baseball offers. NKU had two pitchers, Kevin Jordan and Jason Cisper, taken in the major league entry draft earlier this month. “I’m just studying and enjoying life,” McDole said. “I never really got the opportunity (to play pro). No one was talking to me all year, but I’ve got a good

backup plan. I’m excited to start this phase in my life.” McDole hit .347 this year with six McDole home runs, 65 runs batted in and 51 runs scored, helping NKU to its third straight trip to the NCAA Division II tournament with a 43-17 record. He ended his career with the school’s career records in walks and doubles and tied for the career mark in RBI with 174. He was Great Lakes Valley Conference Player of the Year as a junior and helped the team to two conference titles. He won the ABCA Gold Glove award last year. “I enjoyed winning the GLVC title back to back,” he said. “Those seasons were really special Those were moments I’ll look back and enjoy, helping my school win.” This year, McDole was the male recipient of the 2009-10 Richard F. Scharf Paragon Award, which is given annually to the top male and female studentathletes in the Great Lakes Valley Conference. The Paragon Award is based upon academic excel-

PROVIDED

NKU’s Evan McDole hits the ball in a 2009 game. lence, athletic ability and achievement, character and leadership. He became the third NKU male to win the award, the first in 10 years. “That was another great honor, because it was athletics and academics,” he said. “It was nice to know that all the effort I put into the classroom gets recognized.” On top of that, he was recently named the GLVC Scholar-Athlete of the Year. NKU softball player Rose Broderick (Oak Hills) won the female league honor. McDole is a four-time

academic all-GLVC selection and two-time Academic AllAmerican. McDole had a cumulative grade-point average of 3.816. On campus, McDole has participated in Kids Night Out and is a Halloween Hoopla Leader. He has also donated his time in the community by making visits to the Children’s Hospital and serving as a reader at Mary Queen of Heaven Elementary School. McDole is also a Friend of Jaclyn team leader and a Caring Bridge participant. “If I were to put together

an All-Decade team, he would probably be my first choice,” NKU head coach Todd Asalon said last year. “He is just good on and off the field. That is what you look for in a ballplayer.” McDole will look to enjoy this summer while saying goodbye to NKU. “Being around the game and my teammates every day,” he said. “Every day was a blast to go to practice or the game. We had a bunch of good guys on the team. Having to wake up early and go to work will be a little different.”

July 15 deadline nears for Hall of Fame By James Weber jweber@nky.com

While he does not have nominations in his hands yet, Mike Bankemper expects there to be plenty of deserving options for the first class of Campbell County High School’s Athletics Hall of Fame. Bankemper, the cross country and wrestling coach at the school, and a former athletic director, is one of six members of the committee who will determine the inductees into the new hall of fame. Bankemper, a 1976 Campbell County graduate, said he will not get his first look at the nominations until at least July 9, the date the

Unlock your car-selling confidence.

school will reopen to coaches and employees. “From what I hear in the community, we’ll have plenty of nominations,” he said. “There are a lot of worthy athletes.” The school is accepting nominations until Thursday, July 15. Nomination forms are at www. campbellcountyschools.org and at all Citizens Bank locations. After July 15, the committee will meet and send applications to the nominees. The induction ceremony will be Oct. 30 at the Alexandria Community Center. Bankemper and former school athletic director Bob Jones put

together the committee with diversity in mind. “We tried to put together various sports and decades.” Bankemper said. “We have a variety of sports representatives, All these committee members have played in those sports.” The other members are Alan Ahrman (former principal and coach), Mike Ballinger, Dan Franzen (high school assistant principal), Sandi Kitchen (assistant softball coach) and Rich Mason (former coach and current board of education member). Candidates for membership in the hall must have performed with

excellence and lettered in a varsity sport. Graduates are eligible 10 years after graduation. Coaches must have served on the varsity level for at least 10 years with a minimum of four years as head coach. Coaches are eligible two years after retirement. The purpose of the hall, as noted in a release, is “to recognize and honor the great athletes and coaches who have brought fame” to the school, “to establish in the hearts of our youth a motivating influence to excel in athletics” and to “foster pride, preserve good sportsmanship, scholarship and citizenship in our school, city and community.”

Go to Cars.com and sell your car with confidence. Reach millions of car buyers. Upload photos of your car. Cars.com is the key to your car-selling confidence. ©2010 Classified Ventures, LLC™. All rights reserved.


A8

CCF Recorder

Sports & recreation

July 8, 2010

Few changes in KHSAA 2010-11 schedule By James Weber jweber@nky.com

KHSAA tourney schedule

There are just minor changes in the tournament schedule for the Kentucky High School Athletic Association for the upcoming school year. Only one site for a state championship event will change from the 2009-10 season. That affects Northern Kentucky fans, as the state volleyball tournament will move back from Northern Kentucky University’s Regents Hall to Bellarmine University in Louisville. NKU has hosted the tourney every other year since 2005 in the state’s current rotation. Another change involves the swimming meet, which

HDTV’s from

$

1599

per week

Leas e Z one Turfway 859-647-2160

Latonia 859-431-8666

Ugly Tub?

R e g la z e It! * TUB, TILE, and SINKS * Great Prices & Service * Choice of Colors * Friendly Sales Staff * Insured Local Crews * Serving You Since 1993 Ask for our Eco-Friendly 4 Hour Cure Coating!

CE-0000409333

$175

5 1 3 -7 7 1 -8 8 2 7 Uglytub.com

The full 2010-11 schedule of KHSAA state tournaments:

Girls’ golf: Oct. 4-6, Bowling Green Country Club, Bowling Green. Boys’ golf: Oct. 7-9, Bowling Green Country Club, Bowling Green. Volleyball: Oct. 29-30, Knights Hall, Bellarmine University, Louisville. Soccer: Nov. 3-6, Toyota Stadium, Georgetown College, Georgetown. Cross country: Nov. 13, Kentucky Horse Park, Lexington. Football: Dec. 3-4, LT Smith Stadium, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green. Wrestling: Feb. 17-19, Frankfort Convention Center, Frankfort. Swimming: Feb. 25-26, U of L Ralph Wright Natatorium, Louisville. Girls’ basketball: March 9-12, WKU E.A. Diddle Arena, Bowling Green. Boys’ basketball: March 16-19, UK Rupp Arena, Lexington. Tennis: May 26-28, UK Boone/Downing Tennis Complex and Sayre Athletic Complex, Lexington. Track: June 3-4, U of L Owsley B. Frazier Park, Louisville. Fast-pitch softball: June 10-11, Jack C. Fisher Park, Owensboro. Baseball: June 13-18, Applebee’s Park, Lexington. stays at the University of Louisville but will be two weeks later than normal because the university’s pool facility is hosting the Big East Conference swimming championships during the weekend normally slotted for the KHSAA meet. The site and weekends for the other sports’ championships remain the same as last year. One other change is the addition of a separate tournament to decide the team

championship in tennis. Currently, the team champion was determined by number of matches won during the state tournament. Notre Dame won the girls’ title this year. Per usual, the 2010 fall season will start quickly. Practices in all fall sports begin July 15. The first allowed date for a golf match is Aug. 2, volleyball Aug. 9, soccer Aug. 16, football Aug. 20 and cross country Aug. 23.

PROVIDED

Undefeated Colts

The St. Catherine Colts of Fort Thomas went undefeated in the 2010 Spring Northern Kentucky Soccer League in the third- and fourth-grade division. They finished the season 8-0. The Colts averaged six goals per game while only giving up a total of six goals all season or less than one per game. In front row, from left, are Ben Glaser, Noah Herman, Kyle Biery, Will Hochleutner, and Carter Holmes. In back row are Ryan Meyer, Jonathan Rust, Sean Bailey, Benjamin Murrin and William Frost. Coaches from left are Tom Murrin and William Frost. Unavailable when photo was taken was Assistant Coach Grayson Kohrs.

Steam baseball season heats up By Jake Meyer jmeyer@communitypress.com

The college baseball season may have come to a close last week, but for 33 college ballplayers with Major League dreams, the season is just beginning. Those ballplayers make up the roster of the Cincinnati Steam, which is beginning its fifth season of play in the Great Lakes Summer Collegiate League. The GLSCL is made up of

teams from Ohio and Indiana and is one of several summer, wooden bat leagues sponsored by Major League Baseball. For those players, who are mostly from Ohio, the Steam offers a chance to hone their skills, make the adjustment from metal to wood bats, and ultimately to show off for scouts, in the hopes of being drafted by a major league club. The Steam began play in 2006, in partnership with

the Cincinnati Reds, as a way to keep those players close to home in Cincinnati. “The Steam was created to keep local talent in town and give them a chance to play in the summer, in front of Major League scouts,� said manager Joe Regruth, who is in his second year as skipper of the Steam. Of the 33 players on the roster, two players were selected by Major League teams in the June amateur draft. Regruth speculates

 &KDPSLRQVKLS 6HDVRQ

5HGV .HHSVDNH 5HSULQWV 6WDUWLQJ 6XQGD\

that at least four or five other players have a good chance of being drafted and maybe one day making it to the Majors. But for right now the players goal is to improve their abilities before returning to their collegiate teams and also to win games, something the Steam has done a lot of the past two years. The Steam’s 40-game 2010 season opened June 11 and follows back-to-back GLSCL championship seasons. Beyond trying to win games, Regruth does not focus on teaching the players new skills, but rather augmenting the skills they already possess. “In the short summer season, there’s not a whole lot of teaching,� Regruth said. “It’s more about college teams and what they want the players to work on. We do everything we can to further their develop-

ment based on what their college coaches want.� The most difficult part of managing a roster full of college kids, Regruth said, is managing their playing time. “It’s hard knowing you can only put nine guys on the field with a roster of good baseball players,� Regruth said. “I try to keep guys busy enough to keep them developing.� For baseball fans, the Steam offers a chance to watch good baseball in a family setting, at family prices. Tickets for the team’s home games, which are played at Western Hills High School, cost just $5. Thursday, July 1, the Steam defeated Grand Lake to even its record at 7-7 on the season. They return home for three games beginning July 8 and remain home until the GLSCL Allstar Game July 14, also at Western Hills High School.

The Cincinnati Reds are celebrating the 20th anniversary of their 1990 World Championship season. Here’s your chance to experience some of the history-making moments covered by The Cincinnati Enquirer through our commemorative-page reprints that will be in the Sunday Enquirer July 11, 18 and 25.

-XO\ 

 -XO\

-XO\ 

902 Madison Ave. • Covington, KY 41011

7 Days A Week Great Pricing on Drinks! Great Place for Happy Hour!

Pick up The Enquirer at your local retailer or subscribe today. To subscribe, visit Cincinnati.Com/subscribe or call 1.800.876.4500.

$1 16 oz. Domestic Drafts With coupon.

New Owners: Tom Bockenstette & Curt Zinga!

And don’t miss the 1990 Team Celebration on Friday, July 16 at Great American Ball Park. CE-0000408481

CE-0000408465

859-261-5333 www.keeferspub.com


VIEWPOINTS

July 8, 2010

EDITORIALS

On Saturday, June 26, 2010, the Campbell Co. 4H Saddle Up Club Drill Team, The Mustangs, participated in the Trash 4 Cash program. The Mustangs are a mounted equestrian team. The Mustangs drill team worked for two hours cleaning up five miles of road near Campbell County High School. We started early to avoid the hottest part of the day but by the end of our task, we were soaked with sweat and a feeling of accomplishment. While most of the trash was empty cans or fast food wrappers and bags, some of the trash was more interesting. We found numerous cigarette butts and

packages, pop cans and bottles. We found several golf balls, a head-less dead snake and a used “positive” pregnancy kit. If people wouldn't litter and they would be more responsible and take better care of their community, others wouldn't have to clean up after them. So please, stop littering in Campbell County! And if you see someone cleaning up alongside the roadways wearing a bright neon yellow vest, it may just be a volunteer working to clean up our community, be sure to thank them! Melissa Hermes Cabin Creek East Cold Spring

CH@TROOM Last week’s question

What does patriotism mean to you? Who is the most patriotic person you know? Why? “I think the most ‘patriotic person’ cannot be a single individual. It is the men and women of the U.S. military who have perished in defense of this country.” B.L. “It’s simple. It’s loving your country, for all its good and its bad, and a willingness to stick out your neck and defend it when necessary. Some people make it out to be a bad quality, but it isn’t. Patriotism is what makes any nation, ours included, what it is. “The most patriotic person I know is me. I’m the type of person who sings the National Anthem at ballgames, salutes the flag whenever I ride by it, and love being a citizen of the United States of America.” C.J.G. “Patriotism means to me being proud of the country we live in, doing little things like displaying the American Flag each day, serving your country in the military when called to do so, casting your ballot thus insuring good politicians to protect our freedom. “As to the most patriotic person I know, I guess it would have to be some of the veterans I run into from time to time who have lost a limb or the like or the widow whose husband was killed many years ago while serving his country.” L.S. “Being patriotic is doing what is right for your country, not the popular thing. Too many groups and individuals wrap themselves in the flag and think they are patriots. “Real patriotism does not include the mindless parroting of the ultra-right wing. A true patriot does not need to yell epitaphs at our president because he is not ultra-conservative. “A true patriot needs to think and a lot of the flag wavers do it by rote. People who do not use cognitive reasoning are just puppets. “That does not mean we all should come to the same conclusions, only that Fox News and the pundits are a poor source for a thinking person. “Think. Then wave the flag.” J.Z. “Unfortunately many folks think that patriotism is unqualified support of our country no matter what activities are being conducted. “I believe that a true patriot is

LETTERS

|

COLUMNS

|

CH@TROOM

Next question Do you think weather warning sirens are effective? Why or why not? What changes would you make to the warning system? Send answers to mshaw@nky.com with “Chatroom” in the subject line. 1) a thoughtful person, 2) not afraid to articulate an opinion even when it is contrary to the popular opinion, 3) not afraid to be critical of activities in which the country is engaged (war or some other public policy) when their opinion is intellectually honest and thoughtfully supported by reason and logic. “A patriot is willing to support their country/government even when it means sacrificing personal pleasures and comfort to accomplish a desirable goal or resort. “As has been said a true patriot is one who can be critical even when their position is contrary to the popular opinion. Courage to be critical for improving a situation even when this subjects them to disparaging comments. “Making sure that they understand how government really works and what must be done to make it work the way it was designed. Going along with the crowd when they do not agree with the crowd is being a coward not a patriot. “Too many folks are ignorant of what our country really stands for. It is liberty and justice for all not just a few.” J.S.D.

E-mail: k

Stories about people overcoming the odds to make a difference or reach a dream are throughout history. It’s important to have goals and dreams. Studies show when people see themselves reaching their goals and dreams, they are more likely to make them happen. A positive view of personal future is also one of the 40 Developmental Assets, which are the building blocks that all youth need to grow up to be healthy, caring and responsible adults. Research shows that young people are more likely to grow up healthy when they are optimistic about their future. Youth who are hopeful about the future tend to have better relationships with their parents, increased selfesteem, and decreased emotional or behavioral problems, such as depression, early sexual activity and violence. According to the Attitudes and Behaviors survey, which measures the 40 Developmental Assets, about 70 percent of youth within Campbell County have a positive view of their future. Since kids are our future, it’s important to help them realize the positive aspects of their lives now and in

the years to come. Here are some ways you can help young people become more optimistic about the future: • Talk with them about the Eleshia future. Ask them Scholes what excites them about the future. Community • React posiRecorder tively when they guest tell you about columnist their dreams, no matter how farfetched or unreachable they may seem. Together choose one way to make a dream a reality. • Point out the good things you see people doing to improve the world. Encourage them to do the same. • When bad things happen or mistakes occur, help them to focus on solutions or positive aspects of the situation instead of problems. For more information about the 40 Developmental Assets and how you can help youth to have a bright future, please visit the Health Department’s website at www.nkyhealth.org/whatareassets. Information for this article was

COUNTY RECORDER

unit

RECORDER

About guest columns

We welcome guest columns on all sides of an issue; however, potential columnists should reserve space in advance with Editor Michelle Shaw by calling 578-1053. Include with your column your name, address, daytime telephone number, and a two-to-three line biography outlining your expertise related to this topic. Either include a color headshot of yourself, or make arrangements when you call to have your photo taken here. We reserve the right to edit for length, accuracy and clarity. Columns may be no more than 500 words. Deadline: Noon Monday for next Thursday’s issue. E-mail: mshaw@community press.com Letters, columns and articles submitted to The Community Recorder may be published or distributed in print, electronic or other forms. adapted from the Search Institute’s educational materials. For more information, visit www.searchinstitute.org. Eleshia Scholes is a Senior Health Educator for the Northern Kentucky Health Department.

PROVIDED

Retiring from the classroom

Bellevue City Councilman Tom Ratterman (left) recognizes Grandview Elementary School teachers Sandy Ruck and Carolyn Crail for their retirement.

Bellevue High School’s students of the month are recognized at the May School Board meeting. PROVIDED

Grandview Elementary School students of the month are recognized during the May School Board meeting. PROVIDED

A publication of Your Community Recorder newspaper serving all of Campbell County

ws@

A9

Looking forward to a bright future

“Loving your country, knowing that the U.S.A. is special, and understanding why our founding fathers fought for our freedom. “My brother is the most patriotic person I know.” C.A.S. “Patriotism to me is the love and devotion to our country. To be a patriot, one must obey and support the authority and interest of their country. “In today’s narration, I do not feel that our government stands behind our Constitution, as there seems to be ever-ending amendments trying to change our way of life. “Our freedom rights seem to less and less, not only physical but economically. Many surveys given on TV indicate that we are not happy campers. “We all can be patriotic, not only this July 4th, but everyday – flying our flag, say the pledge, singing the national anthem, viewing patriotic parades, and especially honoring our soldiers, past and present.” D.J.

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

N K Y. c o m

Editor Michelle Shaw | smhaw@nky.com | 578-1053

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Trash for Cash

|

Campbell County Recorder

Campbell County Editor . . . . . .Michelle Shaw smhaw@nky.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .578-1053

s

A WORLD OF DIFFERENT VOICES

Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Friday | See page A2 for additional contact information. 283-7285 | 228 Grandview Drive, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017 | 654 Highland Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075 | e-mail kynews@NKY.com | Web site: www.NKY.com


A10

CCF Recorder

July 8, 2010

*Must have Medco. Mean average annual savings calculated from a study through July 2009 of over 14 million lowest on-line savings opportunities on long-term prescriptions excluding Medicare and other non-qualifying participants. Your actual savings may not reach the projected average and may vary. For further details see medcopharmacy.com **Medco Pharmacy standard shipping on prescription items only. Medco Pharmacy, Making Medicine Smarter, Dr. Obvious, Ph.D. and the Obvious Choice are trademarks of Medco Health Solutions, Inc. Š2010 Medco Health Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.

CE-0000401895


BEST FRIENDS FOREVER B1

COUNTY RECORDER

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving all of Campbell County

Jacob and Seth Ryan

Volume 32, Number 22 © 2010 The Community Recorder ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

E-mail: kynews@communitypress.com T h u r s d a y, J u l y 1 5 , 2 0 1 0

pmckibben@nky.com

Campbell County residents made their way to Vet’s Pool in Newport July 8 to escape the afternoon heat, which reached above 90 degrees in the afternoon. LIFE, B1

Taking shelter

The Campbell County Animal Shelter is planning a kennel expansion, and how much state grant money the county receives will determine how big the expansion is when paired with a private donations fund. Fiscal Court endorsed the shelter’s application for $250,000 in state grant money for the construction of a new kennel area at the July 7 meeting. NEWS, A3

50¢

Boone only smoke ban holdout

By Paul McKibben

Making waves

Web site: NKY.com

B E C A U S E C O M M U N I T Y M AT T E R S

Northern Kentucky appears to be closer to having a regional public smoking ban with only the Boone County Fiscal Court lacking the votes to pass an ordinance. That was the sentiment expressed at Tuesday’s State of Northern Kentucky Address program at Receptions in Erlanger where the judge-executives from Boone, Kenton, Campbell and Grant counties spoke about several issues. Boone County Judge-executive Gary Moore said he doesn’t believe at this point Boone County has the votes to pass an ordinance.

“In talking with our commissioners and taking a look ... at the economic climate, I don’t think we’re there today,” he said. “So, it’s a work in progress. As we go forward, we’ll see where it goes.” Kenton County Judge-executive Ralph Drees said there are three out of four Kenton County Fiscal Court members who will probably vote for a ban. Campbell County Judge-executive Steve Pendery said three out of four Campbell County Fiscal Court members are in favor of a ban. Pendery said a number of states have enacted smoking regulations. “We’re not out there on the edge, the cutting edge here,” he said. “It’s more of a question of

why haven’t you done this than it is what are you doing with this astonishing new approach to life.” Moore said a draft ordinance is “floating around.” After the program, he told reporters there is not a final ordinance to base a decision on yet. He said there might even be more than one draft. He said he wasn’t sure if all three counties are working on one draft, but he has only seen one. Moore said he can’t say who the holdout is in Boone County on the ordinance. He said all four Boone County Fiscal Court members have questions. He acknowledged that the other two counties appearing to have the votes adds pressure to

Speed bumps recommended to slow drivers By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

Summer science

A Bellevue Independent School summer camp helped students see the fun in learning science. Through a partnership with the Boys and Girls Club, the district offered the week-long camp Monday, July 5, through Friday, July 9, for students in kindergarten to 12th grade. SCHOOLS, A5

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Saying good-bye

A horse-drawn carriage carries the body of Spc. Russell Madden through the streets of Bellevue after a small service at Gilligan Stadium Thursday, July 8. Madden, 29, a Bellevue resident, was killed June 23 in a grenade attack on an army convoy in Afghanistan.

Online community

Find your community’s Web site by visiting NKY.com/ community and looking for “Community News” near the top of the page. You’ll find local news, sports, photos and events, tailored to where you live. You can even submit your own articles and photos using Share, our online submission tool. For the Postmaster

Published weekly every Thursday. Periodical postage paid at Newport, KY 41071 USPS 450130 Postmaster: Send address change to The Campbell County Recorder 654 Highland Suite 27, Fort Thomas, KY 41075 Annual Subscription: Weekly Recorder & Sunday Enquirer In-County $18.02; weekly Recorder only all other in-state $23.32 Out-of - state $27.56; Kentucky Sales Tax Included

To place an ad, call 283-7290.

AUTO

|

HOME

|

Votes split over hiring process By Chris Mayhew

Managing Lakeside Terrace

cmayhew@nky.com

The often unanimous Fiscal Court votes to hire for county positions were instead split twice by no votes from Campbell County Commissioner Ken Rechtin at the July 7 meeting over his concerns the search process for applicants was inadequate. By a 2-1 vote in favor, Campbell County Fiscal Court rehired Pat Dressman, who retired as the full-time human services director March 30 to run her unsuccessful election campaign for a Kenton County commissioner spot. The county also voted to hire LaToya Malone as the full-time manager for the Lakeside Terrace senior apartments. Commissioner Dave Otto and Judge-executive LIFE

|

BUSINESS

|

The county had two qualified applicants for the manager position at Lakeside Terrace, which pays an hourly rate of $16.05, after advertising the position through the Internet, said Campbell County Administrator Robert Horine. “This is a substantial position with substantial pay,” said Commissioner Ken Rechtin, who voted against hiring for the position. “To only have two applicants for this position is unacceptable. I think we should go out and look again.” The position was not advertised in newspapers because it was deemed the cost was too expensive, Horine said. LaToya Malone, the person hired, has already worked at Lakeside Terrace for 22 months as a worker from a temporary agency, he said. Even if more people were interviewed it’s doubtful a more qualified person could be found, Horine said. Otto said in his business experience a person who has already shown has a good work ethic and is reliable is a better guarantee than hiring someone who might just “look good on paper.” Besides being well liked by the residents, Malone can handle light maintenance needs at Lakeside Terrace including HVAC problems and buffing of the floors, Otto said. Steve Pendery cast yes votes on both the hires. Commissioner Mark

A MEMBER SERVICE

|

Hayden was absent from the meet-

KENTUCKY FARM BUREAU

See VOTES on page A2

After months of research and studies of the speeding on West Southgate Avenue, the Fort Thomas City Council is leaving the next step to address the problem up to the residents. After receiving resident complaints about a high number of speeders on the street, the city began working with their engineer to analyze the problem and come up with possible solutions. After conducting several speed surveys, the engineer recommended installing four speed bumps along the street. At a meeting Tuesday, July 6, Councilman James Doepker reported that the safety committee of council had reviewed the report and recommended that the city move forward with the speed bumps. After council approved the recommendation, the project went into the hands of resident Melanie Etheridge, who has been working with the council for months to come up with a solution to the speeding. “I’m very excited that we’re moving forward with this,” Etheridge said. “I am truly thankful to everyone involved.” City Administrator Donald Martin said in order for the speed bumps to be installed, Etheridge must get 67 percent of the residents of West Southgate Avenue to sign a petition in favor of them within 30 days of council’s approval. If the petition is signed in time, Martin said the city will then validate the signatures by calling the residents, then begin making plans for the project. “With any luck I’ll be able to get this petition signed quickly so we can get the speed bumps installed and make our street safer,” Etheridge said.

KYFB.COM

In cities and small towns, Kentucky Farm Bureau is the insurance provider with a big commitment to securing your biggest investment — your home.

CE-0000406738

Boone County to pass it. Moore said health departments in most other communities are the enforcing agency. He said that should be the case here if something passes. The Northern Kentucky Independent District Health Department’s board does not have another meeting until September. Grant County Judge-executive Darrell Link said he was asked early on if he wanted to take part of the smoking ban discussion but said he opted out pretty quickly. The Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce hosted the program with The Kentucky Enquirer and nky.com the title sponsor. Dennis Hetzel of The Enquirer and nky.com moderated.

B I G O N C O M M I T M E N T. ®

Bob Woeste

Agency Manager

Teresa Kool Agent

Andrew Schultz Agent

107 Washington St. Alexandria, KY 41001

859-635-2101


A2

Campbell County Recorder

July 15, 2010

News

Index Calendar ......................................B2

Police reports..............................B5

Classifieds.....................................C

Schools........................................A5

Food.............................................B4

Sports ..........................................A7

Life...............................................B1

Viewpoints ..................................A9

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving all of Campbell County

COUNTY RECORDER

Find news and information from your community on the Web Campbell County – nky.com/campbellcounty News Michelle Shaw | Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1053 | mshaw@nky.com Chris Mayhew | Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1051 | cmayhew@nky.com Amanda Joering | Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1052 | ajoering@nky.com Melanie Laughman | Sports Editor . . . . . . . . 513-248-7118 | mlaughman@nky.com James Weber | Sports Reporter . . . . . . . . . 578-1054 | jweber@nky.com Advertising Debbie Maggard | Advertising Manager. . . . . . 578-5501 | dmaggard@nky.com Michelle Schlosser | Account Rep . . . . . . . . 578-5521 | mschlosser@nky.com Delivery For customer service. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 781-4421 Sharon Schachleiter | Circulation Manager. . 442-3464 | sschachleiter@nky.com Judy Hollenkamp | Circulation Clerk . . . . . . . . 441-5537 | jhollenkamp@NKY.com Classified To place a Classified ad. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283-7290 | www.communityclassified.com

To place an ad in Community Classified, call 283-7290.

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

On the run

Bucket brigade DJ Rodgers, a firefighter for the Alexandria Fire District, rushes a pair of full water buckets toward a ladder where one of his teammates in the Northern Kentucky Firefighter’s Regional Firefighter Olympics awaits to hand them up to fill a 55-gallon barrel in the old fashioned bucket brigade event Saturday, July 10.

ing. Rechtin said his no votes were against the hiring process the county was using and were not meant to cast doubt on the qualifications of the people being hired. Rechtin said the county wasn’t doing enough to advertise for and seek out the best applicants possible.“There is a 10 percent unemployment rate out there,” he said. “We should throw these out and see what’s available out there.” At the July 7 meeting Dressman’s new position, part-time human services manager at a maximum of 100 hours per month, was created. Dressman was hired without any solicitation by the county for other candidates for the new position. Dressman will be paid the same $34.93 hourly salary she earned before retiring. “She did retire from us,” Rechtin said. Maybe there’s an opportunity to give the position to another person, he said. Pendery said he’s glad to have Dressman back. “As a long time employer, when you find a good employee you try to keep them,” Pendery said. At a meeting April 7, in response to Dressman’s retirement, the county created a part-time $15.72 an hour position to handle some of her duties including reviewing and paying monthly claims from

COLD SPRING'S 5TH ANNIVERSARY SALE!

FREE Holistic Health Sampler Join us for a day filled with: •

Blood Pressure Screenings

Chair Massages

Tai Chi

Yoga

Acupuncture

Meditation

Reflexology Demonstrations

Presentations on Clinical Hypnotherapy and Craniosacral Therapy.

social service agencies in an attempt to save money. That person will remain in place and continue with those duties, Horine said. That position will remain, and Dressman will work less than 100 hours a month on an “as-needed” basis when the county requests her services and she is available, Horine said. The director’s position being vacant was meant as a short-term money savings solution and it’s been three months, Horine said. The county’s leaders have had no one they could turn to when it came to big decisions on how to manage the human services division that includes the county’s senior center and distributing funds to more than 40 social service agencies, Horine said. Otto said Dressman’s institutional knowledge was missed and sets her apart from any other potential job candidates because it would take money spent on job training to bring someone else up to speed. “We could get six applicants in, and they would be equal except for the knowledge,” Otto said. Pendery said he didn’t know if there was anyone as well qualified as Dressman to make decisions on how and where to expend the county’s senior and mental health tax funds. “I guess we won’t ever know either,” Rechtin said in response to Pendery’s statement.

Votes/Continued from A1

Saturday, July 17

We're celebrating 5 years of great colors, great advice and great customers with a special savings event. Join us for the biggest sale of the year at your Cold Spring Sherwin-Williams® paint store!

Saturday, July 17th One Day Only! 8am – 6pm

10:00 am – 2:00 pm Location: Medical Offic Office Building, Suite 209 20 Medical V Village Drive, Edgewood, K KY 41017 Guests will rece receive a complementary Relaxation CD and can participate in hourly drawings for gift certificates for a Free Holistic H Health Center Service.

40%OFF *

paints and stains

30% OFF 10% OFF *

*

painting supplies

wallcovering books

Only at your Cold Spring Sherwin-Williams store located at:

For more information call 859-301-5959. COVINGTON | EDGEWOOD | FALMOUTH | FLORENCE | FT. THOMAS | GRANT CE-0000408363

You asked then.You ask now. Ask Sherwin-Williams.™ Visit us at sherwin-williams.com *Retail sales only. Discount taken off of full retail price. Sale pricing or other offers that result in greater savings will supersede this offer. Excludes ceiling paint, primers, Design Basics® Paint, Minwax® Wood Finishes Quarts, ladders, spray equipment & accessories and gift cards. Other exclusions may apply. See store for details. Not valid on previous purchases. Valid only at the Cold Spring store on 7/17/10. ©2010 The Sherwin-Williams Company. CE-0000410122


News

July 15, 2010

CCF Recorder

A3

Animal shelter plans kennel expansion By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

The Campbell County Animal Shelter is planning a kennel expansion, and how much state grant money the county receives will determine how big the expansion is when paired with a private donations fund. Fiscal Court endorsed the shelter’s application for $250,000 in state grant money for the construction of a new kennel area at the July 7 meeting. The shelter was established in 1986 and accepted almost 2,900 animals in the 2008-09’ fiscal year. “The county is required by state law to have a shel-

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

The Campbell County Animal Shelter in Camp Springs is planning to renovate the existing kennel area after adding a planned second kennel area to quarantine sick and potentially vicious and aggressive animals. ter and care for animals,” said Campbell County Commissioner Ken Rechtin. About $50,000 in donations from private individuals and groups will pay for the 20 percent required

match for the grant, said Lisa Bowman, director of the shelter. There is a pool of about $3 million in state grants that all county shelter’s are eligible to apply for, Bow-

man said. “I hope we get it, keep your fingers crossed,” she said. “I hope we get some of it at least.” The shelter plans to move forward with an expansion in the next year either way, she said. How big the addition is will depend on how much grant money the county receives, she said. If the shelter receives the full $250,000 grant the addition will include 20 new kennels including a separated 10 kennel area for aggressive and sick animals. The plan includes an eventual renovation of the existing 30-kennel area that

is deteriorating, she said. And there will also be a separate grooming and bathing room for the animals, she said. State law requires a separate kennel area for sick and potentially vicious animals from the other animals that the shelter currently does not have, Bowman said. Diseases can spread easily between the animals, she said. “It’s for the safety of the public and for us,” she said. More kennel space will also help the county reduce the number of animals that end up being euthanized, Bowman said. For example, in Febru-

ary, the shelter took in nine dogs, four cats and a ferret that were confiscated in an animal cruelty case, she said. “They all had to be held until the court case was settled,” Bowman said. “That leaves less room to hold other animals coming in and we have to euthanize more.” Animal rescues and direct adoptions have helped the shelter reduce the rates of euthanized animals in recent years to about 20 percent, she said. “Our euthanasia rate would have been so much higher if it wouldn’t have been for the rescue groups,” she said.

Count: Kenton leads N.Ky. in homelessness; Boone third Louisville and Lexington, respectively, were the top two counties in homeless totals. Jefferson had 1,626 homeless, while Fayette had 1,551. Statewide results also showed: • 1,460 homeless respondents were severely mentally ill. • 2,032 homeless respondents were chronic substance abusers. • 1,071 homeless respondents were victims of domestic violence. • 564 homeless respondents were veterans. • 15 percent of homeless individuals were completely without shelter across the state on the day of the count. The count is a coordinated effort of Kentucky Housing Corporation (KHC), the

Kentucky Interagency Council on Homelessness, the Coalition for the Homeless in Louisville, and Central Kentucky Homeless and Housing Coalition in Lexington. The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development requires a count every other year. Kentucky, one of the few states to coordinate a statewide count, conducts a count every year on the last Thursday in January in an effort to achieve more current accuracy. “The count is a massive effort that asks local and state agencies, service providers, and volunteers to come together in the middle of winter to interview individuals, not just in a shelter or inside the office of a service agency, but outside in

the elements,” said KHC CEO Richard L. McQuady in a press release. “We appreciate the time and efforts of everyone who came out to participate in this very

Count Report is available at www.kyhomeless.org and www.kyhousing.org, under Specialized Housing, PointIn-Time Count. Kentucky News Service

Florence, KY

FESTIVAL CE-0000410323

Friday July 16, from 6-11 pm Saturday July 17, from 5-11 pm Mass at 4 pm on Saturday

“One-year Tuition at any Catholic School” Raffle (only 500 chances, $4,428 value)

-Special RaffleGRAND PRIZE

07/31/10

$7,000

Cash Give-A-Way

Live Music Friday, 14 Total Winners Drawing July 17, at 11:00 p.m. “Chain Reaction” and Saturday, “Above the Bar.” Our famous “CHICKEN CHARLIE” chicken dinner will be served from 4-8 on Saturday. Ky.Gaming Lic. # 0145

RIDES

FOOD FUN

GAMES

WATCH AND WIN!

WHO WE ARE

Cardinal Hill of Northern Kentucky is the oldest affiliated program of the Kentucky Easter Seal Society. Founded in 1923, we provide a medical model Adult Day Care Monday through Friday and Respite Services every Saturday

Up to $1,000 in cash prizes.

Watch CincyMomsLikeMe.com July 12-16 to see if you’re a winner. Daily prizes up to $25 and two grand prizes of $250 each. Go to CincyMomsLikeMe.com to learn more.

What makes us your BEST choice for quality care? We are 100% patient focused. Our goal is to provide you and your loved ones the highest quality care. Intergenerational Program Individualized Plan of Care Safe, pleasant, home environment Personalized nursing care with medical monitoring On-site speech therapy, occupational therapy and audiological services

Daily exercise program including Wii and an exercise room Crafts, sewing Cooking Class Board games, cards Fenced outdoor area with therapy garden and two shelters

Call for an Appointment Today (859) 525-1128

Brought to you by:

Open 7:30 am -5:30 pm Monday -Friday and 9 am -4:30 pm on Saturday

31 Spiral Drive Florence, Ky 41042 Now accepting new patients CE-0000410546

important event. These results are an important piece of planning the state’s efforts to assist homeless individuals and families.” The 2010 Point-In-Time

ST PAUL CHURCH

CE-0000407573

Results of the 2010 Point-in-Time Count of the Homeless were released June 30. The annual count, conducted Jan. 28 by the Kentucky Interagency Council on Homelessness, shows Kenton County had the most homeless people in the Northern Kentucky region, with little evidence of homelessness in the more rural counties of Grant and Gallatin. Kenton County had 406 individuals defined as homeless. Boone County had 116, Campbell County had 122, Grant County had one and Gallatin County had zero. Pendleton County did not participate. The count defined the homeless in various categories, including those in emergency shelters and motels, transitional housing and unsheltered. Kenton County had 187 in the emergency category, 124 in transitional and 95 unsheltered. Boone County had four emergency, 101 transitional and 11 unsheltered. Campbell County had 44 emergency, 43 transitional and 35 unsheltered. There were 6,623 homeless people identified throughout the state. The 2009 count found 5,999 homeless individuals, but organizers believe a winter storm at the time of that count altered the results. Jefferson and Fayette counties, homes of

We accept Self Pay, Home and Community Based Waiver, Supports for Community Living, Michele P Wavier, County and State Funding

where 8^cXn moms meet An affiliate of the Cincinnati.Com network. CE-0000408609


A4

CCF Recorder

News

July 15, 2010

St. Elizabeth opening diabetes center The St. Elizabeth Regional Diabetes Center will open July 22. St. Elizabeth Healthcare sais it will be the region’s largest and most comprehensive diabetes treatment center and the only one of its kind in the Greater Cincinnati region. There are 23.6 million children and adults in the U.S. who have diabetes, nearly 8 percent of the population, according to the American Diabetes Association. The center, part of St.

Davis - Smithson

Elizabeth Healthcare’s $29.2 million Covington building that opened last summer, will employ six board-certified endocrinologists, along with 14 diabetes educators and healthcare professionals skilled in diabetes care. The new center will use about 18,000 square feet of the 118,000-square-foot building. It will feature exam and treatment rooms, state-of-the-art equipment, a health-care library and conference rooms for education classes. Patients referred to the center can also take advantage of other services in the building, including lab and diagnostic imaging, physical therapy, the Women’s Wellness Center and the Wound Care Center.

The diabetes center’s endocrinologists will be able to offer support for a range of endocrine and metabolic disorders, including: abnormal weight-gain evaluation and therapy; adrenal disease; hypogonadism; lipid metabolism; osteoporosis, metabolic bone disease and calcium disorders; pituitary disease; polycystic ovarian syndrome; and thyroid disease, including ultrasoundguided biopsies and thyroid cancer. Diabetes patients are currently treated in a building on Thomas More Parkway, but oftentimes have to go to other buildings for extensive care. For information, visit w w w. s t e l i z a b e t h . c o m / diabetes. The phone number will be 859-655-8910. JOSEPH FUQUA II/STAFF

Kincaid Regional Theatre

Motorcycle rally

Denny Lovell of Cold Springs, left, and James Spencer of Bellevue pose for a picture with their motorcycles during the annual Charity Ride & Motorcycle Rally at Newport on the Levee Saturday, July 3, in Newport.

“Come Join Us… Adventure Awaits!”

BRIEFLY

“Paint Your Wagon”

Correction

In a story about the death of local solider Russell Madden in the July 8 issue of the Campbell County Recorder, some surviving family members were left out and listed incorrectly. Madden is survived by his mother Peggy Davitt and stepfather Mike Davitt of Newport, and father Martin Madden and stepmother Pamela Madden of Bellevue.

July 10 — July 31

Reserve your tickets now!

(859) 654-2636

www.krtshows.com

Partial funding has been provided by the Kentucky Arts Coun Council, a state agency in the Commerce Cabinet, with support from the National Endowment for the Arts.

Goodd L Life. a

CE-0000407908

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Davis of Cheviot, Ohio are pleased to announce the engagement of their daughter, Mary Darlene Davis to Charles William Smithson, son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Smithson, of Ft. Thomas, Ky. Miss Davis is a 2004 graduate of Mother of Mercy High School and a 2007 graduate of Cincinnati College of Mortuary Science. Mr. Smithson is a 2004 graduate of Highland High School. He attended the Gateway Technical Community College. Mary is employed at Frederick Funeral Home and Charles is employed at Fidelity Investments. They will reside in Colerain Township. An August 14, 2010 wedding is planned at St. Martin of Tours Church.

Swim clinic

Cherry Hill Swim Club is having a free competitive

The Right Brands... The Right Price... The Right Advice...

The Final Sunday Of The Month 11:30 am until 2:00 pm

Home of the World’s Largest TV!

Conner High

School Class of 1985 25 year reunion. Little Britain Carriage House 5307 Idlewild Rd. Burlington, KY 41005 Contact: Keith Kinser Keith.Kinser@motoristsgro up.com

ASK ABOUT 0% FINANCING

82” Diagonal Screen!

TURPIN CE-0000394569

Stop In To Experience It For Yourself!

Locally Owned And Operated Since 1961

107 W. 11th Newport, KY 859-431-5484

www.browntv.homeappliance.com

Customer Appreciation Day

Crafters’ Day Out

Hebron Baptist MOPS Crafters’ Day Out: Sat, 7/24/10, 9am-9pm, Hebron Baptist Church. Bring scrapbooking, couponing, or other projects to work on without interruptions. $45 per table. Breakfast, lunch & dinner provided. Doorprizes. Call Eryn Creusere 859-409-0827 today to reserve your s p o t . Hebronbaptistmops.web.c om for more info.

Friday, July 16

Our Master Chef invites you to join us for our elegant Barrington Champagne Brunch. Enjoy all your brunch favorites & lift a glass of bubbly, too.

Prize Raffle

Adults $15 • Children (6-12) $6 • Children Under 6 Free RSVP by Friday Before The Brunch • 859-572-0667

B-105 Live Radio Remote 12-2 pm

940 Highland Avenue • Ft Thomas Kentucky www.carespring.com CE-0000411018

CE-0000410099

CLASS of 1979 is having a 30+1 reunion on July 24th at Sweetwine Lodge on Nordyke Rd.Visit www,Turpin1979.com to view missing list, get reunion details & tickets

Food and Drinks from 10:30-3:00

Increased Pricing All Day!

(859) 363-8300

13229 Dixie Highway • Walton, KY 41094 (1 mile south of exit #171 off Interstate 75)

swim clinic from 9:30-11 a.m., Friday, July 23, at Cherry Hill Swim Club, 705 Peach Tree Lane, Erlanger. Swimmers can brush up on their racing skills before the All-Stars and NKSL Champ Meet. Contact Jerri Freimuth, Cincinnati Marlins South, at jfreimuth@cincy-marlins.com, or call 761-3320.

Wheelchair Games

The 30th National Veterans Wheelchair Games, is taking place through July 9 in Denver, Colo. Together, the Department of Veterans Affairs and Paralyzed Veterans of America are presenting the largest annual wheelchair sports event in the world for military veterans. Veterans participating in the Games have served during a number of different periods since World War II. This year, Army veteran Lisa Wilson,46, of Cold Spring is registered to compete in the games. For more information about the National Veterans Wheelchair Games, visit www.wheelchairgames.va.gov.

Library art show July 30

Enjoy an exhibition of art, music and food at Art After Hours, the Adult Summer Reading Finale of the Campbell County Public Library. This year’s art extravaganza will be from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Friday, July 30, at the Carrico/Fort Thomas branch, located at 1000 Highland Ave. In its third year, Art After Hours showcases the work of 15 local artists in painting, sculpting, photography and printmaking. Cincinnati’s own Lou Lauche Jazz Quartet will provide live music for the evening. There will be hors d’oeuvres donated from Lother’s Café, desserts from Fantasy in Frosting, and $1 wine samples from StoneBrook Winery with all proceeds donated to the library. For additional information, call the Carrico/Fort Thomas branch of the Campbell County Public Library at 859572-5033.

Laptops from $

1599

per week

78 weeks

Leas e Z one Latonia 859-431-8666 Turfway 859-647-2160


SCHOOLS

CCF Recorder

July 15, 2010

ACHIEVEMENTS

Editor Michelle Shaw | smhaw@nky.com | 578-1053

|

NEWS

|

ACTIVITIES

|

HONORS

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

N K Y. c o m

A5

RECORDER

Musical a twist on classic fairy tales By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

The Fort Thomas Community Children’s Theatre is taking a unique look at some well-known fairy tales in their upcoming production of the musical “Into the Woods.” Inspired by the 1976 book “The Uses of Enchantment,” the show intertwines the plot of several Brothers Grimm fairy tales like “Little Red Riding Hood,” “Jack and the Beanstalk” and “Cinderella” to shows what happens after the happily ever after ending. “I like to choose shows that the

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Bethany Metzner, who plays the witch, sings a song during rehearsals.

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Emily Hicks (left), who plays the baker’s wife, rehearses a scene with Joey Collopy, who plays the baker in the Fort Thomas’s Children’s Theatre production of “Into the Woods.”

kids will learn something from, but that are also fun,” said Director Caroline Stine. “This show has some really hard music, which is a challenge for me and the kids.” Stine said while she had to cut out some of the show’s really dark material, it still shows the fairy tales more like the original Grimms versions instead of the Disney versions. “This is really going to be a great show,” said stage manager Rachael Hawkins. “We have some really talented kids that are doing a great job.” Hawkins and Stine, along with many of the children in the production, have been working together since the mid-90s through the theatrical group, The Cliffview Players. Two of the shows lead roles, the baker’s wife and the witch, are

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Ben Justice, who plays Jack from Jack and the Beanstalk and Teresa Metzner, who plays Little Red Riding Hood, rehearse a scene from “Into the Woods.”

being played by teens from Cliffview, Emily Hicks and Bethany Metzner. Hicks, who is a senior at Highlands High School, said she decided to try out for the musical because of the work she’s done with the group in the past. “Being part of these productions every summer is like a tradition,” Hicks said. “A lot of know each other and are friends.” Metzner, a recent Highlands graduate, said even though the first couple weeks of rehearsal are always rough, she thinks it is going to be a good show. The show opens at 7 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 5 at the Performing Arts Center. Other showings are at 7 p.m. Friday, Aug. 6; 2 p.m. and 7 p.m.

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Matt Krieg, who plays Cinderella’s prince, and Michaela Bucher, who plays Sleeping Beauty, act out a scene from the musical. Saturday, Aug. 7; and 2 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 8. Tickets, which are $9 for adults

and $7 for students, are available at the door or in advance at www.showtix4u.com.

Summer science is no sweat in Bellevue By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

A Bellevue Independent School summer camp helped students see the fun in learning science. Through a partnership with the Boys and Girls Club, the district offered the week-long camp Monday, July 5 through Friday, July 9 for students in kindergarten to 12th grade. “We touched on all kinds of

science topics throughout the week,” said science teacher Hallie Booth. “My goal is to get the students interested in science and help them realize that it can really be fun.” With the help of “Dr. Discovery” Debbie Williams from Mad Science, Booth covered topics ranging from compounds and mixtures and energy to polymers and air pressure. Booth said the students spent

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Debbie Williams, known as Dr. Discovery, talks to kids about air pressure during Bellevue Independent Schools’ science camp Thursday, July 8.

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Fifth-grader Emily Seward tries out an experiment to see what happens to marshmallows in high air pressure.

the week seeing demonstrations and participating in hands-on activities. “Kids love the ‘ew factor’ so the more gross something is, the more they like doing it,” Booth said. Booth said while the camp had a good turnout, she hopes more students will come in the future. “It’s amazing to see these students coming in during their summer break to learn science,” Booth said. “To me, that’s exciting.” Rob Sanders, director of the district’s Family Resource Center, said the science camp, along with other camps throughout the summer, are offered to the students for free thanks to grant money and help from the Boys and Girls Club. For more information about the summer programs offered in Bellevue contact Rob Sanders at rob.sander@bellevue.kyschools.us or call 261-2108.

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Brothers Christian and Jeffrey Brinker help Dr. Discovery Debbie Williams demonstrate air pressure.


A6

CCF Recorder

Schools

July 15, 2010

Marching on

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Raven McNeese, 13, of Highland Heights, plays the vibraphone during practice inside Campbell County High School Monday, July 12, of the Campbell County Band of Pride.

Drummers of the Campbell County Band of Pride practice getting in step and staying on beat on the playground of Campbell County High School Monday, July 12. At far left in the back row on first bass drum is Aaron Carroll, 13, of Alexandria. Wearing a hat and playing tenors in the second row at far left is Rodney Dykes, 17, of Cold Spring, and Rachel Britton, is to the right of Dykes and playing tenors. In front from left on snare drums are Brian Goins, 15, of Melbourne; Rachael Schabell, 17, of Grant’s Lick; and Derick Pollitt, 16, of Melbourne.

GUARANTEED LOW PRICES REPLACEMENT WINDOWS Tilts-In For Cleaning

ANY SIZE $

189

*Over 200 LOCATIONS Call for a FREE in-home demo

DOUBLE STRENGTH DOUBLE PANE INSULATED GLASS Lifetime Warranty Including Glass Breakage *Model 4000 Wht DH up to 48" wide X 78" tall. Other fees, exclusions and conditions may apply.

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

EASY FINANCING

INSTALLED* No minimum

As Heard On Dave Ramsey

(513) 921-4189 • (859) 594-4189 • www.windowworldcincinnati.com CE-0000408005

Master Your Workload

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

From left, Aaron Weiner, 12, of Cold Spring; Courtney Combs, 17; Megan Maschinot, 13; and Nathan Cann, 14, all of Alexandria, practice playing the marimba during practice of the “front ensemble” of the percussion section of the Campbell County Band of Pride inside Campbell County High School Monday, July 12.

with a WORKMASTER™ tractor from New Holland. Available in 39 and 47 PTO hp and in 2WD or FWD, WORKMASTER tractors deliver dependable power, versatility and simple operation. Best of all, they’re easy to afford.

CLASS REUNIONS S A T U R D A Y, J U L Y 1 7 Campbell County High School graduates of 1990 are holding their 20th year class reunion, Saturday, July 17, 2010, at the Syndicate in Newport. The cost is $50 per person for appetizers, drinks and music. For more information, call 859-512-6213 or visit Facebook “CCHS Class of 1990 Reunion.” The Syndicate is located at 18 East 5th Street.

CE-0000410519

Creation/Evolution Seminar Did humans and dinosaurs coexist?

• PROVEN 4-CYL ENGINES • 8X8 TRANSMISSION WITH SHUTTLE • UNCLUTTERED PLATFORM • OUTSTANDING VISIBILITY • CAST IRON AXLE CONSTRUCTION • 2,500-LB 3-POINT LIFT CAPACITY

Did humans evolvee from ape-like creatures? How old is the Earth? We invite you to join us as we investigate the evidence. These lectures are FREE and open to all ages.

Point Pleasant Church of Christ 3259 Point Pleasant Rd., Hebron, KY

O

%

OR

FINANCING

*

CHOOSE CASH BACK!

*For agricultural use only-not intended for personal, family or household use. Customer participation subject to credit qualification and approval by CNH Capital America LLC. See your New Holland dealer for details and eligibility requirements. Down payment may be required. Offer good through September 30, 2010. Not all customers or applicants may qualify for this rate or term. CNH Capital America LLC standard terms and conditions will apply. Taxes, freight, set-up, delivery, additional options or attachments not included in suggested retail price. Offer subject to change or cancellation without notice. © 2010 CNH America LLC. All rights reserved. New Holland and CNH Capital are registered trademarks of CNH America LLC.

Sun. July. 18th

9:30am-Scientific Accuracy of the Bible 10:30am-7 Reasons Why We are Losing Our Kids 6:00pm - Atheism’s Attack on America

Mon. July 19th

7:00pm - Is Genesis a Myth followed by Q/A

Tues. July 20th

7:00pm - The Dinosaur Dilemma followed by Q/A Featuring Guest Speaker:

CE-0000410215

Store Hours: Mon - Fri: 8-5, Saturday: 8-12

CE-0000410825

Brad Harrub, Ph.D. Information: Call (859) 283-1075 or visit us at www.ppcofc.org

S A T U R D A Y, A U G . 2 8 Ryle High School graduates of 2000 are holding their 10th year class reunion, Saturday, Aug. 28, 2010, at BlackFinn Restaurant and Saloon. For more information, call 614-5803712 or e-mail ryleclassof2000@gmail.com. The BlackFinn Restaurant and Saloon is located at 19 East 7th Street in Cincinnati. S A T U R D A Y, S E P T . 1 1 Walton Verona High School graduates of 1985 are holding their 25th year class reunion, Saturday, Sept. 11, 2010. For more information, contact Kevin Flynn at 859-485-6128 or e-mail kbflynn@insightbb.com.

Have a class reunion? Please send your information to akiefaber@nky.com.

COLLEGE CORNER Brescia dean’s list

The following student from Brescia University in Owensboro, Ky. was named to the Spring 2010 Dean’s List for completing at least 12 credit hours with a 3.5 GPA. • Katie Marie Duff of Alexandria, Sophomore, Pyschology


SPORTS

CCF Recorder

July 15, 2010

HIGH SCHOOL | Editor Melanie Laughman | mlaughman@nky.com | 513-248-7118

YOUTH

|

RECREATIONAL

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

N K Y. c o m

A7

RECORDER

Freedom all-stars ready for second half By James Weber

FREEDOM TRAIL

jweber@nky.com

Tim Grogan would love nothing more than to end his baseball playing career with a championship. While his Florence Freedom professional team faces an uphill climb in the second half of the 2010 season, he is hopeful the team can turn it around. “We have to figure out how to win the close games, but we’re right in there,” he said. Grogan was one of three Freedom players selected to play in the Frontier League All-Star Game July 14 in Marion, Ill. Shortstop Stephen Shults and relief pitcher Liam Ohlmann also were set to go. Grogan, a Florence native and Covington Catholic graduate, is second on the team in home runs and RBI, and leads in runs scored. “I’m looking forward to it,” he said. “It should be fun there because they always draw well there. They should do it right up there.” Grogan is a veteran of the Freedom, who enter the halfway point with a 19-29 record. They are 20 games behind West Division leader Southern Illinois, who have a sizzling 39-9 record despite losing its last three

Stat leaders

Home runs: Stephen Shults 13, Tim Grogan 8, Johnny Welch 8, Billy Mottram 5, Michael Campbell 5. RBI: Shults 37, Campbell 25, Grogan 25, Justin Pickett 24, Welch 24. Runs scored: Grogan 38, Shults 34, Mottram 30, Welch 26, Justin Jacobs 20. Stolen bases: Mottram 11, Beau Manning 7, Campbell 6, Jimmy Baker 5, Welch 4. Batting average: Shults .371, Welch .325, Campbell .293, Grogan .287, Mottram .275. Wins: Andy Clark 4, Bryan Banes 3, Ben Shivers 3. Innings pitched: Tim Holmes 52.1, Banes 50, Clark 44.2. ERA: Liam Ohlmann 2.13, Jacinto Gonell 2.53, Shivers 2.94.

Upcoming schedule

DARREN WEIGL/STAFF

July 16-18: at Evansville. July 19-21: at Southern Illinois. July 22-24: at home vs. Evansville. July 25-27: at River City. July 28-30: at home vs. Normal. All games are broadcast on WKNR 106.7 FM and over the Internet at www.florencefreedom.com. For ticket and promotion information, visit the Freedom website or call 594-4487 (HITS).

Florence Freedom reliever Liam Ohlmann pitches June 21.

games. Florence is eight games behind second-place River City (27-21) for the division’s wild-card berth into the playoffs. Grogan, 26, is preparing to end his playing career after this season and join the Freedom front office as director of amateur baseball. “I haven’t been healthy for four years,” he said. “Hopefully I can make it through 96 games and we can make a run at this.” Shults, a 23-year old from Lawrenceburg, Tenn., is leading the entire league in home runs (13) and batting average (.371) at the halfway point. He leads the Freedom in RBI with 37. Shults came to the team

DARREN WEIGL/STAFF

Freedom shortstop Stephen Shults fires to first on a double play June 21. in a June 7 trade less than two weeks into the season. He was college teammates with Freedom players Justin Pickett and Michael Wheeler at the University of the Cumberlands.

He had spent three years in the Atlanta Braves organization battling injuries. His 13 homers this year is one less than he had in three years there. “I love the team,” he

said. “We’ve got great team chemistry. It’s a great group of guys. We’re having trouble pulling out the close games right now. We have a good team, we just have to get everything clicking.” Ohlmann, a 23-year old from Wallingford, Conn., has been unhittable in relief, giving up just nine hits in 25 innings. He has a 2.13 ERA. When they return to regular play, the Freedom will have six games on the road

before returning home Thursday, July 22, against Evansville. They need a quick start to get back into playoff contention. Grogan, a member of Cov Cath’s 2002 state title team, would welcome it. “That would mean the world,” he said. “I’ve won a championship in high school and in college. If I can do it at the professional level, it would be icing on the cake.”

Shooting team snares state medals By James Weber jweber@nky.com

The Northern Kentucky Scholastic Trap Shooting Program had several first-place winners recently at the annual state shoot in Berea, Ky. Thirty-five local competitors participated in the tourney, which is part of the National Scholastic Trap Shooting Program for college students and younger. The team, which practices at outdoor clubs in Alexandria and Kenton, has students from all over

Northern Kentucky. “A lot of the kids have no interest in other sports, so it is a good outlet for them to compete in a team type sport,” said head coach Dennis Menning of Alexandria. In trap shooting, competitors use shotguns to break a four-inch clay target going 45 miles per hour from the trap house. In competition the shooters try to break all 100 targets, alternating between five different stations. The pre-sub team representing Northern Kentucky was the over-

Bobby Moore lines up a practice shot in 2008.

FILE PHOTO

all team winner with a score of 316 out of 500. They were Jacob Bechtold, Mac Krallman, Tanner Hamilton, Jacob Graydon, and Marshall Krallman. Junior level shooters Andrew Elmore and Alec Wolfort tied for first place in individual honors, both hitting 98 out of 100 targets. Tanner Hamilton was third place in the pre-sub division with 89. Nicholas Sinclair won the Jerry Racke Memorial shootout, a 15person individual competition. In the state shoot, students are in five-person teams, competing in different age levels. Menning said the team has been practicing for three months. Several of the youths will go to the national tournament in Sparta, Ill. Aug. 7-8. Many kids join the program as soon they’re big enough to handle the guns. “You must have good handeye coordination to become a good shot. It becomes a very mental game when you begin breaking a good score. If you miss a target you cannot dwell on it, you must get your head back in the game and prepare for the next shot.” The seven N.Ky. teams at the state shoot: Collegiate: Second place with a score of 463 out of 500 - James Hellmann, Alexander Smith,

PROVIDED

Northern Kentucky’s third-place junior team at the state shoot, from left: Tyler Schnitzler, Quentin Penrod, Zachary Meiman, Shawn Butcher, Andrew Elmore. Christopher Hellmann, Jeremy Norris, Michael Buemi. Junior teams: Third place with a score of 467 out of 500 - Andrew Elmore. Quentin Penrod, Tyler Schnitzler, Zachary Meiman, Shawn Butcher. Fourth place with a score of 462 out of 500 - Michael Strange, Taylor Bisig, Alex Wolfort, Sean Hamons, David Able. Fifth place with a score of 427 out of 500 - Taylor Straman, Michael Krallman, Tanner Crowder, Daniel Giancola, Ken Padgett II.

Seventh place with a score of 409 out of 500 - Spencer Stephenson, Ethan Emmerich, Shelby Felty, Dakota Mockbee, James Popp. Sub-Junior: Fourth place winner with a score of 421 out of 500 - Bobby Moore, Charles Allen, Nicholas Staggs, Tim Jones III, Nicholas Sinclair. Pre-subs: First place with a score of 316 out of 500 - Jacob Bechtold, Mac Krallman, Tanner Hamilton, Jacob Graydon, Marshall Krallman.

SIDELINES Memorial run and walk

The 16th annual Brian Rohne Memorial 5K Run and Walk will be 7 p.m., Saturday, Aug. 14, on the campus of Northern Kentucky University. The Brian Rohne Memorial 5K is conducted in honor of former NKU cross country runner Brian Rohne, who was killed by an automobile in January of 1993 while on a training run on the AA Highway in Cold Spring, Ky. During the 1992 fall season, Rohne had earned most valuable run-

ner honors for NKU after being named All-Great Lakes Valley Conference. The cost is $18 if registration is postmarked by Aug. 7 (includes a Tshirt). The cost is $15 for Runners Club of Greater Cincinnati members and $20 for registration on the day of the event (near the Albright Health Center after 5:30 p.m.). On-line registration is available at www.rcgc.net. The top 250 finishers will receive a 16th annual commemorative award, and the winners of the various divi-

sions for runners and walkers will also receive awards. The course is 3.1 miles and held entirely on closed roads around NKU’s campus. Results of the race will be posted on the Runners Club of Greater Cincinnati Web site within 24 hours of the finish.

Fast Start volleyball

The Northern Kentucky Youth Volleyball Club is offering a new program called Fast Start for athletes who did not make their school program for

athletes who attend schools that do not have a volleyball program available and for athletes who want to learn the game right the first time. Athletes will practice two hours, two days a week for six week, at Town and Country Sports Complex, 1018 Town Drive, Wilder. The program begins Thursday, Aug. 12, and will conclude Sunday, Sept. 26. No session is planned Labor Day weekend. Program fee is $150. Unless a reserved spot can be filled, there will be no refunds.

Registration is available online at nkyvc.com. E-mail nkyvc@fuse.net.

Swim team try-outs

The M.E. Lyons/Anderson Barracudas Swim Team has two try-out dates set for swimmers who are interested in becoming a member of one of the premier YMCA/USA Swim Teams in the country. The M.E. Lyons YMCA/Anderson Barracudas Swim Team has consistently produced some of the top

swimmers in the area and provides an atmosphere of fun and camaraderie for swimmers aged 6 to 18 of all ability levels. The team has practice groups in both Anderson as well as at the Campbell County YMCA. The try-out dates are Monday, July 12, or Monday, July 26, at the M.E. Lyons YMCA, 8108 Clough Pike. Registration is at 4 p.m. and the try-out begins at 4:30 p.m. Try-outs are free. Call Jeremy Bannon or Cathi Sander at 474-1400.


A8

CCF Recorder

July 15, 2010

Sports & recreation

Hatfield qualifies for national track and field meet Jordan Hatfield, 18, of Southgate qualified for the USATF Region 5 Junior Olympics Track & Field Championships July 10-11 at Eastern Kentucky University. He qualified at Fern Creek High School in Louisville by winning the javelin with a throw of 157 feet, 10 inches. He also qualified for the high jump, discus, and shot put. Hatfield also qualified for the AAIU Junior Olympic

Games which will be at Norfolk State University in Virginia in early August. He qualified at Darling Stadium in Hampton, Virginia at the AAU Area 3 National Qualifier with a winning javelin throw of 164-11. He also qualified for discus placing third of 18 with a throw of 140-2. Hatfield is a 2010 Newport High School graduate and Class 1A state champion in the discus.

Northern Kentucky University cross country head coach Steve Kruse has added three more recruits to his 2010 women’s roster. Kelly Johnson and Kelsey Gaffney are a pair of freshmen runners who are joining the Norse, while Michelle Skjoldal has transferred to NKU and will also be a member of the team this fall. Johnson is a graduate of Milford High School, and she ran a personal best of 20:23 last season in the five-kilometer. Johnson also lettered in volleyball and track for Milford. Gaffney, a graduate of

Goshen High School, posted a time of 21:43 two years ago in a five-kilometer race for her personal best. Gaffney also earned letters in soccer, basketball and track while an athlete at Goshen. Skjoldal is a native of Lovell, Wyoming, who is transferring from Black Hills (S.D.) State University. While at Black Hills State, Skjoldal competed at the 2008 NAIA nationals at Kenosha, Wis., and placed 39th in that event with a time of 18:10. Skjoldal earned all-conference honors three times at Black Hills State and helped the team placed third at the 2006 NAIA nationals.

ECONOMY FULL SET DENTURES*...........$395 Custom Full Set Dentures........................$605 Custom Full Upper or Lower....................$405 Premium Full Set Dentures.......................$805 Reline (each)...............................................$150 Simple Extraction (each)...............................$75 Full-mouth X-ray (required for extractions)...............$75 )HHV HIIHFWLYH -DQXDU\  

RODNEY ALAN STEVENS,DMD,P.S.C. 7699 US Highway 42 Florence, KY 41042

(859) 282-0660

Lookout!

The 13U Northern Kentucky Lookouts took second place in the Kentucky State Tournament in Knoxville, June 12-13. Team members are Josh Watson (Fort Thomas), Eric Cox, Brady Sansome, Spencer Hackworth, Colten Gearhart, Robert Metz, Blake Losey (all of Alexandria), Cameron Kinney, Nick Brinkman (both Taylor Mill) Dakota Jones (Independence). Coaches are Jason Key and Darin Hackworth (Alexandria).

BRIEFLY NKU adds runners

PROVIDED.

General Dentist Rodney Alan Stevens, DMD

NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY

* SAME DAY SERVICE IF IN BEFORE 9 A.M.

DENTURE RELINES & REPAIRS

MINI DENTAL IMPLANTS

FIRST TIME DENTURE WEARER PACKAGES

EMERGENCY EXTRACTION SERVICES

NKADA hall of fame announced The NKADA Hall Of Fame Selection Committee met and selected the following deserving individuals to be inducted in the NKADA Hall Of Fame in October. The luncheon will be Saturday, Oct. 2 at Receptions. Ticket price will be $40 per person. This will be the first time the induction ceremony will be held as a luncheon on a Saturday. “The committee wanted to try doing this on a Saturday with two things in mind,� said NKAC President Mel Webster of Bishop Brossart. “One we think it will be easier for inductees that are now living out of town to attend, and second to try an accommodate so many that are involved with evening sports activities during this busy time of the year.� Jason West, Bellevue High School (1988-1992): One of the finest basketball and track performers to ever play at Bellevue High School. Also starred in cross country. Earned 10 varsity letters. The Marty Kehoe Award winner as a senior scored 1,052 career points. Voted all-state in track also as a senior leading Bellevue to state titles in 1991 and 1992. Janie Borcherding Shaffer, Beechwood High School (1986-1990): She was a standout at Beechwood in volleyball and tennis. She

was Female “Student Athlete of The year� in Kentucky in 1990. She earned nine varsity tennis letters. In volleyball she was a fourtime team Most Valuable Player and three-time Outstanding Class A Player of the Year. She was also the school’s Valedictorian. Eric Vanlaningham, Boone County High School (1988-1992): Prolific cross country performer at Boone, he was state cross country champion in 1990 and runner-up in 1991. He set a region record in the 3,200 in track both in 1991 and 1992 which still stands. He won the state title in the 3,200 in 1991-92. He was regional champion in the 3,200 (three years), 1,600 (two years) and 800 (two years). Jeff Knauf, Scott High School (1979-1983): Premier basketball and soccer player at Scott High School. Started all four years on the varsity soccer team and was first team all-region as a junior and senior. In basketball, he was a three-year starter and was the team’s Most Valuable Player as both junior and senior. He was honorable mention all-state twice. Ron Parry, Newport High School (1962-1966): Ron Parry was a standout at Newport High School in the 1960’s. Ronwas one of the Wildcats’ top football, basketball and baseball per-

formers. He lettered five times in baseball, three in football and two in basketball. He was team MVP his senior football season and All-State, and started five years in baseball. Ron Madrick, Holmes High School (1993-Present): Highly respected Athletic Director at Holmes High School during some of the school’s most successful athletic accomplishments. Has served as President of the NKAC and NKADA and has been a driving force in the success of the Athletic Director’s Hall of Fame, Was a highly successful football coach. Karen Bresser Jones, Notre Dame Academy (1987-1991): Karen was a four-time letterwinner from 1988-91 in swimming at NDA. She won five state championships and led her team to a KHSAA state championship in both 1989 and 1991 and regional titles in 1988 and 1990. As a senior she won state titles in the 100 backstroke, 200 medley relay, and 400 freestyle relay. She won the 100 backstroke three straight years. Jared Lorenzen, Highlands High School (19951999): Standout quarterback for the Bluebirds leading them to a 41-2 record as quarterback including state championships in 1996 and 1998. Kentucky’s “Mr. Football� his senior year. He

HDTV’s from

We gladly accept Cash, Checks with ID,Visa, MasterCard and Discover as payment for our services.

$

1599

per week

Leas e Z one

OPENING JULY 15, 2010 in Carrollton, KY Dr. Sy Dan Nguyen, P.S.C

Turfway 859-647-2160

Latonia 859-431-8666

2551 U.S. Hwy. 227 * Kroger Shopping Center Carrollton, KY 41008

(502) 732-8969

For more information,please call 1-800-DENTURE (1-800-336-8873) or visit our website at www.affordabledentures.com

9$/8$%/( &28321



SAVE $100 -on-

Mini Dental Implants $ GHQWXUH VWDELOL]DWLRQ V\VWHP WKDW FRXOG HQG \RXU WURXEOHV ZLWK ORRVHÂżWWLQJ GHQWXUHV

SHU SAVE $50GHQWXUH

-on-

Premium

Complete or Partial Denture

902 Madison Ave. • Covington, KY 41011

2IIHU JRRG RQO\ DW 5RGQH\ $ODQ 6WHYHQV '0' 36&

SHU SAVE $25GHQWXUH

-on-

Custom

Complete or Partial Denture

&RXSRQ PXVW EH SUHVHQWHG ZKHQ VHUYLFHV DUH

Hate your Ugly Tub?

R e g la z e It! Ask for our Eco-Friendly 4 Hour Cure Coating!

7 Days A Week Great Pricing on Drinks! Great Place for Happy Hour!

([SLUHV 

CE-0000409069

Follow Northern Kentucky sports on Twitter

twitter.com/crkysports

$1 16 oz. Domestic Drafts With coupon.

New Owners: Tom Bockenstette & Curt Zinga!

5 1 3 -7 7 1 -8 8 2 7 Uglytub.com

CE-0000408597

859-261-5333 www.keeferspub.com

also led his basketball team to the “Sweet 16� 1997 state runnerup spot. Becky Tenkman Mirick, Notre Dame Academy (1991-1995): One of the best volleyball players ever for the Pandas. She also played basketball. She was KHSAA state tournament Most Valuable Player in 1994 and Mizuno first team All-State in leading Notre Dame to the 1994 State Championship. Kellie Harrison Foote, Dixie Heights High School (1982-1986): She was a 13 time letterwinner at Dixie as a standout in volleyball, basketball and track. She was a two-time all-region performer in volleyball and basketball and three-time all-region in track. She once had 17 blocks in a basketball game. Jack Aynes, Ludlow High School (1947-1951):Jack Aynes earned an incredible 15 varsity letters during a stellar career at Ludlow High School from 1947-51. In football the co-captain was nominated to the East/West All-Star game. In basketball, he led his team to the 1950 district championship and in baseball lettered five years as a pitcher/catcher. He tossed two no-hitters, struck out 17 of 21 batters versus Beechwood, and led Ludlow to its’ first ever NKAC team championship. Justin Seiter, Bishop Brossart High School (19972000): Justin Seiter will forever be known for “The Shot,� a last second goal that beat Mason County and sent Bishop Brossart to the 2000 Kentucky Sweet 16. He recorded 1,124 career points, was team MVP and is in the 10th region Hall Of Fame. He was a standout basketball and baseball player. He went 12-1 as a senior pitcher, had 179 strikeouts in 147 innings during his career. He holds school record for average .444, home runs (24) and RBI (117). Tom Potter Distinguished Service Award: Carl Heck, Newport Central Catholic High School. Carl has been a long time contributor to Newport Central Catholic High School in many capacities including official scorer for the girl’s basketball program. Joe “Bones� Egan, Bellevue High School. He has been a long time contributor and volunteer at Bellevue High School for most of the athletic teams.


VIEWPOINTS

Campbell County Recorder

July 15, 2010

EDITORIALS

|

LETTERS

|

COLUMNS

|

CH@TROOM

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

N K Y. c o m

Editor Michelle Shaw | smhaw@nky.com | 578-1053

E-mail: k

ws@

unit

A9

RECORDER

Motorists asked to ‘share the road’ with motorcycles Motorists asked to ‘share the road’ with motorcycles The Kentucky Office of Highway (KOHS) joined other federal, state and local highway safety, law enforcement and motorcycle organizations to proclaim May “Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month.” Motorcycle fatalities nationwide have increased during the past decade. Motorcycle fatalities rose 2.2 percent nationwide in 2008 to 5,290, up from 5,174 in 2007. Officials hope the added safety emphasis in May helps remind motorists to share the road with motorcycles. Motorcyclists are reminded to make themselves visible to other motorists. “As the weather improves, more and more motorcyclists are hitting the roads,” said KOHS Executive Director Chuck Geveden. “And with that in mind, pedestrians, bicyclists and drivers of all vehicles, including SUVs, passenger cars or trucks, need to be extra attentive and make sure you ‘share the road.’ A motorcycle is one of the smallest vehicles on our roads, often hidden in a vehicle’s blind spot. Everyone needs to aggressively look for them.” Motorists and bicyclists should always make visual checks for motorcycles by checking mirrors and blind spots before entering or leaving a lane of traffic and at intersections. Pedestrians should also scan for motorcyclists who might be hidden by other traffic. “Motorcyclists have responsibilities, too,” said KOHS Director of Highway Safety Programs Boyd Sigler. “They should follow the rules of the road, be alert to other drivers, never ride while impaired or distracted, and always wear a Department of Transportationcompliant helmet and other protective gear.” Sigler said motorcyclists are much more vulnerable in crashes than passenger vehicle occupants. According to research from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, per vehicle mile traveled, motorcyclists are about 37 times more likely to be killed in traffic crashes.

Geveden offered several tips for drivers: • Allow motorcycles a full lane. Motorcycles have all of the rights and privileges of any motor vehicle on the road. • Visually check for motorcycles in mirrors and blind spots before entering or leaving a lane of traffic and at intersections. • Signal when turning, merging or changing lanes. • Be cautious of motorcycle turn signals – they can be misleading. Motorcycle signals are often not self-canceling and riders sometimes forget to turn them off. Wait to be sure the motorcycle is going to turn before you proceed. • Leave plenty of space when following motorcycles to give them enough time to maneuver or stop in an emer-gency. In dry conditions, motorcycles can stop more quickly than cars. Motorcyclists should consider these safety tips: • Avoid riding in poor weather conditions. • Wear brightly colored protective gear and a DOT-compliant helmet. • Use reflective tape and stickers to increase visibility. • Use turn signals for every turn or lane change, even if it appears no one else is around. • Combine hand signals and turn signals to draw more attention. • Keep a visible position in the lane of travel. • Never drive impaired. “Our message to all drivers and motorcyclists is simple. Share the responsibility and do your part in decreasing fatalities by safely sharing the road,” Sigler said. For more information visit http://highwaysafety.ky.gov and www.nhtsa.dot.gov.

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Moving to the music

Teacher Cynthia Lawrence leads a group of children during the Fort Thomas Independent Schools’ Summer Enrichment Program Music for Movers camp Wednesday, July 7.

About letters & columns

All submissions may be edited for length, accuracy and clarity. Deadline: Noon Monday E-mail: mshaw@ communitypress.com Fax: 283-7285. U.S. mail: See box below Letters, columns and articles submitted to The Community Recorder may be published or distributed in print, electronic or other forms.

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Kayleigh Nicholaus (left) and Cici Murphy dance during the camp.

CH@TROOM Last week’s question:

Do you think weather warning sirens are effective? Why or why not? What changes would you make to the warning system? “I live in an area that has an effective system, for which I am extremely grateful. When I hear the siren I turn on the TV for updates and plan accordingly. “Some people complain that they hear sirens too frequently for storms that are not life-threatening. I prefer to err on safety’s side. S.J.P. “I do not believe they are very effective. I live relatively close to the siren near Wilson School and can hear it clearly when I am outdoors. Inside is a different story. I am consistently surprised at how well my house dampens the sound. The same is true in a car. Even if I hear the siren, it does not tell me anything about the threat or where it is located. “I usually respond to the signs of threatening weather by checking my TV or the Internet. “I think the system of sirens is outmoded and a waste of money. In this day and age, you could send a text message to all the cell

phone towers in the threat area and reach a lot more people with more accurate information. The siren system is a truly blunt instrument.” F.S.D. “The systems are pretty good, but they need a dose of human common sense also. “The warning for the wind storm of 2008 was pretty poor. Damage was occurring south and west of us in Louisville and Lexington, yet, even though this storm was heading our way we got little warning of its severity. “It seems pretty obvious to me that simple weather observation should have alerted NOAA and private forecasters of the danger. Granted, to have near hurricaneforce winds in this area is very unusual, but it seems to me that many folks were ‘asleep at the switch.’ I know of a young boy who was severely injured by a falling tree. He still suffers from his injuries. It did not have to happen.” T.H. “Are weather warning sirens effective? Probably yes. “They certainly give more people a better chance of getting to

Next question

shelter than they would have without them (as do the warnings on radio and TV). However, they don’t do much to minimize the property damage that results from the severe weather. “Life is a crap shoot in some respects; we’ll never be totally safe, and even if we could be we would still have to be prepared to check out of this life at some point. (Insurance ads used to try to avoid using the term ‘death,’ and instead used quotation marks around some euphemism. So my wife and I use the term “quote quote” when we discuss this subject, to add a little humor.)” Bill B. “Weather sirens have a limited effect. I often strain to hear them. Not very loud in a lot of places. “How to improve would be more such sirens. Used only when there is imminent danger. “More use of TV broadcasting with louder noises coming from the sets. Mandated that every broadcaster use that method including FM and AM radio. Interrupt the program and cease the broadcast of the program.” J.S.D.

“Yes I do. The sirens are supposed to warn you in the event of a probable tornado, and they do sound when there is a tornado watch along with a severe thunderstorm warning. But many say this is ‘cry wolf.’ “Tornados happen very quickly if the conditions are right so when the sirens sound I often look at the sky and turn on the weather service to see the latest.” O.H.R. “NO! We need to go back to the good ol'days when you heard a siren it meant run to the basement. Now days I tend to ignore them because I do not know what they mean. Do we really need a siren for a severe thunderstorm? Or the constant interruption of our TV shows to pinpoint what street it is on. Come on really…it’s just a thunderstorm. I know they can do damage too but I have managed to survive without the warnings for 30 something years! Please weather people, just warn me when I am in imminent danger. Thank you and great question!” K.S.D. “Yes, I think they can be effective in saving lives. However, I

A publication of Your Community Recorder newspaper serving all of Campbell County

COUNTY RECORDER

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Noah Phillips sings along with a song during the camp.

Campbell County Editor . . . . . .Michelle Shaw smhaw@nky.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .578-1053

The Post Office has announced plans to raise its price for a first class stamp from 44 cents to 46 cents, effective in January. Do you think this increase is reasonable? Why or why not? Send answers to mshaw@nky.com with Chatroom in the subject line. think there needs to be consistency across the board as to when they will be blown and what the warning means. Then, and only then, will we all be on the same page as to what precautions to take.” B.N. “I can look outside and see bad weather, as well as hear storms/rain/hail. Warning sirens would be more effective if they sounded when a funnel cloud had been spotted in an area. People are in the, ‘Boy who cried wolf’ syndrome right now, and that is dangerous.” C.A.S. “You should only have sirens for tornados, because most people can’t remember the different signals for tornados and thunder storms.” N.P.

s

A WORLD OF DIFFERENT VOICES

Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Friday | See page A2 for additional contact information. 283-7285 | 228 Grandview Drive, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017 | 654 Highland Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075 | e-mail kynews@NKY.com | Web site: www.NKY.com


A10

CCF Recorder

July 15, 2010

*Must have Medco. Mean average annual savings calculated from a study through July 2009 of over 14 million lowest on-line savings opportunities on long-term prescriptions excluding Medicare and other non-qualifying participants. Your actual savings may not reach the projected average and may vary. For further details see medcopharmacy.com **Medco Pharmacy standard shipping on prescription items only. Medco Pharmacy, Making Medicine Smarter, Dr. Obvious, Ph.D. and the Obvious Choice are trademarks of Medco Health Solutions, Inc. Š2010 Medco Health Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.

CE-0000401897


Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

T h u r s d a y, J u l y

RECORDER

8, 2010

PEOPLE

SMALL BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT

|

IDEAS

|

RECIPES

New gardening camp a hit at extension office By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

From left, Steve Steller, physical therapist assistant; Elizabeth R. Guidi, and Robert A. Neltner, both physical therapists, outside the newly renamed Heartland Rehabilitation Services clinic in Alexandria. Neltner, the clinical director, founded the business as Commonwealth Physical Therapy & Rehabilitation 11 years ago. The business was purchased by Heartland four years ago.

Physical rehabilitation business changes name, not services Commonwealth Physical Therapy & Rehabilitation in Alexandria has undergone a name change to Heartland Rehabilitation Services. Started 11 years ago by Robert A. Neltner, the clinical director and a certified physical therapist, the business was sold four years ago to Heartland. “The big thing is the name has changed, but it’s the same exact people,” said Kenneth Lisicki, area rehab manager for Heartland. Located at 8109-4 Alexandria Pike in the Alexandria Center, the business features a unique to Campbell County aqua therapy pool complete with stairs, handrails, and an underwater treadmill that can be raised to accommodate people in wheel chairs. There is a full range of devices and programs for almost every type of ail-

ments from hip to athletic injuries, and a multi-cervical unit for rehabilitation of neck pain and spine disorders, Neltner said. Most people are referred by a doctor to the clinic. Residents of Kentucky are also allowed to self-refer and work out if insurance will pay for a treatment because of a state direct access law, Neltner said. Neltner said the clinic keeps late hours until 7 p.m. each Monday, Tuesday and Thursday to accommodate the work schedules of their patients.Every customer is seen by a certified therapist or therapist assistant for a personalized program to help them recover and get back to normal as soon as possible, Neltner said. “I think the greatest asset we have is the amount of time we spend with the patient,” Neltner said.

Children from across the county got a little dirty at the Campbell County Cooperative Extension office last week. For the first time, the extension office offered a four-day-long Kid’s Gardening Camp. The camp, open to kids ages 8-12, gave the children a chance to learn more about gardening and do fun activities, said Doris Meece, the office’s horticulture technician that ran the camp. “The goal of this camp is to not only teach the children about gardening, but also foster a love a gardening,” Meece said. “We hope these kids will grow up and continue gardening as adults.” From plant parts and soil to how to plant herbs, the children covered a lot during the camp.

THINGS TO DO Bark in the Park

Bring your dog to the Florence Freedom game, Sunday, July 11, for Bark in the Park night at Champion Window Field. Fans who bring their dog will receive a voucher for a free coney dog. Fans with dogs must sit in section 115 or in the lawn. The game, between the Freedom and the Washington Wild Things, begins at 6:05 p.m. For ticket information, call 594-HITS or visit www.florencefreedom.com. Champion Window Field is located 7950 Freedom Way.

The King of Pop

Who’s Bad: The Ultimate Michael Jackson Tribute Band will perform at the Madison Theater, Saturday, July 10, at 9 p.m. The show should spark memories of the late Michael Jackson, who died June 25, 2009. Doors will open at 8 p.m. Tickets are $12. For information, call 4912444 or visit www.madison theateronline.com. The Madison Theater is located at 730 Madison Ave. in Covington.

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Rylie Gerding helps her group make their own potting mix during the gardening camp.

“It’s fun to watch them and listen to what they have to say about gardening,” Meece said. Meece said she likes to show kids how fun gardening can be, and how it can be more than just a hobby. “Gardening is a wonderful pastime and vocation,” Meece said. “It’s very therapeutic and calming, even for the children.” Jaclyn Fischesser, a 10year-old from Alexandria, said she decided to attend the camp because it looked fun and she’s always liked gardening with her father. “My dad works outside and plants stuff at our house, and I like to help him,” Fischesser said. “The camp is really fun, and we get to see a lot of flowers, so it’s very pretty.” Meece said the office will likely offer the camp again in the future and that they offer other gardening events and activities.

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

From left: Samantha Webster, Anu Narayana and Mitchell Reis mix together the ingredients of their potting mix.

Senior shares passion for horseback riding Movie premiere

The Cincinnati premiere of the Pete Rose documentary “4192: The Crowning of the Hit King” will be shown at 7 p.m. Wednesday, July 14, at AMC Newport on the Levee. The film highlights the career of Pete Rose, who is one of the baseball’s most honored and controversial stars. Tickets for the show and for the after-party can be purchased by visiting 4192movie. eventbrite.com or by calling 261-6742. For details on the film, visit www.4192movie.com.

Share your events Go to nky.com and click on Share! to get your event into The Recorder.

CE-0000409495

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Doris Meece, horticulture technician at the Campbell County Cooperative Extension Service, helps a group of children make paper flowers during the extension office’s Kid’s Gardening Camp Tuesday, June 29.

DON’T MISS ty n u o C The Campbell

Lindsay Bosse was born to be a horse girl. That’s what she told her grandmother when she was 6 years old. The Northern Kentucky University senior business management/English literature major has virtually grown up on the back of horse. “It’s my job,” she said. “It’s what I do for fun. It’s basically my life. I get a huge adrenaline rush by jumping and perfecting and working on how well I set and working on courses. A lot of the other girls feel the same way because basically horseback riding is their lives.” Bosse transferred from the University of Cincinnati, where she served as the treasurer of its equestrian team. Upon her arrival, she determined to establish an equestrian team at NKU. She set up a table at NKU’s freshman orientation to find others who shared her pas-

ds Farm Tour a o r k c a B !

sion, and in 2008 the Norse Equestrian Club and Northern Kentucky Equestrian Team (NKET) were founded. The club is an officially recognized NKU student organization open to anyone interested in horseback riding. Members of the team, most of whom are also members of the club, participate in regional and national competitions, and 2009-10 saw unprecedented success. The team competes through an organization called the Intercollegiate Horse Show Association (IHSA), which is dedicated to giving riders a chance to compete individually or as a team in various equestrian events. IHSA represents more than 8,300 students from more than 370 colleges nationwide. “Many people say horseback riding isn’t a real sport,” Bosse said. “It takes as much practice as any-

thing else. You’re not just working on you and your team member’s communication, it’s communication between you and a 1,200pound animal.” This year Bosse, who serves as president of the NKET, qualified for IHSA nationals by finishing fourth in Intermediate Horsemanship in Morehead and then second in Intermediate Equitation for Zones at Findlay, Ohio. Last month, she competed at IHSA nationals in Lexington as one of the top 20 individuals nationally in the Intermediate Equitation competition. NKET Vice President Lauren Fehrenbach and team Historian Laura Weber also placed in regional competition. The growing interest in the organization Bosse helped build from scratch doesn’t really surprise her. “Everyone should try horseback riding at least once,”

she said. “If you live in Kentucky you pretty much should have been able to sit on a horse before.” And she said students concerned about a lack of experience or resources shouldn’t worry. She said the group welcomes anyone interested in horseback riding – even those with no experience and with no horse. “It’s very inclusive,” she said. “We try to be as open and accepting as possible. We want everyone to ride.” Dues for each semester are just $370, which includes weekly lessons from NKET coach Lynlee Foster at the H&H Ranch in Burlington. Bosse said that when you consider how costly it can be to participate at horse shows, often totaling in the thousands of dollars, that NKET’s involvement in IHSA makes it a much more affordable hobby for college students.

Sat. July 17th 9am-5pm Rain or Shine! FREE ADMISSION and FAMILY FRIENDLY! Miles of Smiles and Call us at 859 635-9587 or visit us for information and to download Memories Await! your map at http://home.fuse.net/campbellcd.


B2

CCF Recorder

July 8, 2010

THINGS TO DO THE NEIGHBORHOOD F R I D A Y, J U L Y 9

ATTRACTIONS

Ride the Ducks Newport, 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Ride the Ducks Newport, 1 Levee Way, A 60minute amphibious sightseeing tour of Newport, Covington and Cincinnati waterfronts. All ages. $15, $11 children. 815-1439. Newport. Bizarre and Beautiful Gallery, 9 a.m.-7 p.m. Newport Aquarium, Newport on the Levee, More than 20 species of the world’s most weird and wonderful aquatic creatures. With new technology, new display cases and expanded gallery. Free kids during summer family hours with every adult paying full price 4-7 p.m. until Sept. 3. Included with admission: $22, $15 ages 2-12. 261-7444; http://www.newportaquarium.com. Newport.

COOKING CLASSES

Simple Ideas for Farmers Market Foods, 3 p.m. Florence Branch Library, 7425 U.S. 42, Pick up recipes and ideas on ways to use and preserve foods found at farmers’ market. Samples available. Free. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 342-2665. Florence.

FARMERS MARKET

Campbell County Farmers’ MarketAlexandria, 3 p.m.-6 p.m. Southern Lanes Sports Center, 7634 Alexandria Pike, Parking lot. Includes produce, plants, flowers, jams, jellies, honey and arts and crafts. Presented by Campbell County Cooperative Extension Service. 572-2600; http://ces.ca.uky.edu/campbell/FarmersMarket. Alexandria.

FESTIVALS

St. Pius X Parish Festival, 6 p.m.-midnight, St. Pius X Church, 348 Dudley Road, Rides, games, food, music, silent auction and raffle with 2010 Chevrolet Camaro grand prize. Benefits St. Pius X Parish. Free. 341-4900. Edgewood.

MUSEUMS

Centennials: The City of Fort Mitchell, Boy Scouts of America and Devou Park, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Behringer-Crawford Museum, 1600 Montague Road, Celebrate a century of regional history. Find out about one of the founders of the Boy Scouts who was a resident of Covington, how the trolley from Cincinnati helped establish Fort Mitchell and how one of the largest urban parks in Greater Cincinnati is in Northern Kentucky. $7; $6 ages 60 and up; $4 ages 3-17; free to members. 491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

RECREATION

Children’s Flying Trapeze School, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Newport on the Levee, 1 Levee Way, Learn to fly circus-style. Must be in reasonable physical condition and able to hold your body weight while hanging from the bar. Dress: Wear stretchable comfortable clothing appropriate for hanging upside. Rain reschedules. Ages 6-12. Must be accompanied by adult. $7. Registration required. Presented by The Amazing Portable Circus. 513-921-5454; www.amazingportablecircus.com. Newport.

SHOPPING

Ladies Night, 5 p.m.-10 p.m. Art on the Levee Gallery, Newport on the Levee, Wine tasting with StoneBrook Winery, $5 for 6 tastes for all attendees. Ladies receive $1 off bottles of wine, 10 percent off cases of wine and 10 percent off art purchases. Includes music. Ages 21 and up. 261-5770; www.artonthelevee.com. Newport. Arrasmith Farm Open Field Daylily Sale, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Arrasmith Farm, 3595 Fender Road, Come stroll through row after row of blooms available for purchase directly from the field. 639-1711; www.arrasmithfarm.com. Melbourne.

SPORTS

Florence Freedom Baseball, 7:05 p.m. vs. Washington Wild Things. Postgame fireworks show. Champion Window Field, 7950 Freedom Way, VIP includes wait service. Lawn available on game day only. Fans must show a lawn chair or blanket at time of purchase. $10-$12 VIP, $9, $7 lawn. Presented by Florence Freedom Professional Baseball. Through Aug. 29. 594-4487; www.florencefreedom.com. Florence. S A T U R D A Y, J U L Y 1 0

AUDITIONS

Blithe Spirit, 4 p.m.-7 p.m. Stained Glass Theatre, 802 York St. Men and women, stage ages 20s-60s. Cold readings. British accent required. Possible callback on July 13. Productions: Jan. 20-Feb. 5, 2011. Presented by Footlighters Inc. e-mail ahamilton9@earthlink.net; www.footlighters.org. Newport.

FARMERS MARKET

Campbell County Farmers’ Market-Newport, 9 a.m.-noon, Historic Newport Business District, Monmouth Street, At 7th and Monmouth streets. Includes produce, plants, flowers, jams, jellies, honey and arts and crafts. Presented by Campbell County Cooperative Extension Service. 572-2600; http://ces.ca.uky.edu/campbell/FarmersMarket. Newport.

ON STAGE - STUDENT THEATER

Church Girls, 8 p.m. Stauss Theatre, 101 Fine Arts Center, Northern Kentucky University, Musical comedy. Chaos and calamity ensue when the Umatilla Second Christian Church Women’s Auxiliary League gets ready for its annual Mother’s Day Pageant. Dinner served in the Corbett Theatre Lobby one and a half hours prior to performance. $55 two shows, $30; show only $15 available beginning April 15. Registration required. Presented by Commonwealth Theatre Company. Through July 25. 572-5464; www.nku.edu/~theatre. Highland Heights.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Best of Shadowbox, 7:30 p.m. 10:30 p.m. Shadowbox Cabaret, Newport on the Levee, Sketch comedy shorts and music by BillWho?. $30, $20 seniors and students. Through Sept. 4. 957-7625; www.shadowboxcabaret.com. Newport.

ON STAGE - COMEDY

Lisa Landry, 7:30 p.m. $14. 10 p.m. $14. Funny Bone Comedy Club, 957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

ON STAGE - STUDENT THEATER

Church Girls, 8 p.m. Stauss Theatre, $55 two shows, $30; show only $15 available beginning April 15. Registration required. 5725464; www.nku.edu/~theatre. Highland Heights.

RECREATION

Flying Trapeze School, 2 p.m.-10 p.m. Newport on the Levee, $35-$55. Registration required. 513-921-5454; www.amazingportablecircus.com. Newport. Commodore Yacht Clubs Surf & Turf Charity Poker Run, 11 a.m.-2 a.m. Manhattan Harbour, 1301 Fourth Ave. Bikers and boaters join together to benefit local charity. Ride begins and ends at The Reef. Afterparty follows at The Reef with music, door prizes and split-the-pot. bit.ly/bCeFdb. Dayton, Ky.

SPORTS

Florence Freedom Baseball, 6:05 p.m. vs. Washington Wild Things. Post Game Band: Doghouse. Champion Window Field, $10$12 VIP, $9, $7 lawn. 594-4487; www.florencefreedom.com. Florence. Newport Gangster Walking Tour, 1 p.m. 5 p.m. Gangsters Dueling Piano Bar, 18 E. 5th St. Explore Newport’s connection to wellknown crime figures, including gangsters, gamblers and ladies of the night. See buildings that housed casinos, brothels and speakeasies. $15. 491-8000. Newport. S U N D A Y, J U L Y 1 1

ATTRACTIONS

Bizarre and Beautiful Gallery, 9 a.m.-7 p.m. Newport Aquarium, Included with admission: $22, $15 ages 2-12. 261-7444; http://www.newportaquarium.com. Newport. Blithe Spirit, 6 p.m.-9 p.m. Stained Glass Theatre, e-mail ahamilton9@earthlink.net; www.footlighters.org. Newport.

LECTURES

FESTIVALS

St. Pius X Parish Festival, 6 p.m.-midnight, St. Pius X Church, Free. 341-4900. Edgewood.

LITERARY BOOKSTORES

Growing Sound Concert, 2:30 p.m.-3:30 p.m. Barnes & Noble Newport, Newport on the Levee, Children’s Department, floor 2. Children’s music by David Kisor. Music based on latest child development research teaches key social and emotional skills that children need. Ages 8 and under. Free. 431-2075; www.growing-sound.com. Newport.

MUSIC - CONCERTS

Kelly Thomas, 8:30 p.m. With Noah Sugarman, 500 Miles to Memphis, Melismatics and 6 Nights Alone. Southgate House, 24 E. Third St. Ballroom. Doors open 8 p.m. $10 ages 18-20; $8 ages 21 and up. 431-2201. Newport. Who’s Bad - Michael Jackson Tribute Band, 9 p.m. Doors open 8 p.m. Madison Theater, 730 Madison Ave. $12. 491-2444; www.madisontheateronline.com. Covington.

FILE PHOTO

A crowd gathers at Devou Park for a past performance of the Kentucky Symphony Orchestra. This Saturday, July 10, KSO returns to the park with a 7:30 p.m. concert titled, “We’ve Got Your Bach.” Since Bach had 20 children with two wives, prizes will be awarded for the largest nuclear family and extended family in attendance. It is recommended that concert-goers bring their own seating. The event is free. Parking is a suggested $5 donation. For more information, visit www.kyso.org or call 431-6216. Devou Park Amphitheater is located at 1344 Audubon Road in Covington. M O N D A Y, J U L Y 1 2

ATTRACTIONS

TOURS

AUDITIONS

ON STAGE - COMEDY

Lisa Landry, 8 p.m. $14. 10:15 p.m. $14. Funny Bone Comedy Club, Newport on the Levee, 957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

For more about Greater Cincinnati’s dining, music, events, movies and more, go to Metromix.com.

Northern Kentucky History, Art and Culture Lecture Series, 2 p.m. The Devou Centennial- The Devou Family. With Joshua Byers, Northern Kentucky University student. Baker Hunt Art and Cultural Center, 620 Greenup St. Light refreshments. $7 per lecture. 291-0542; www.bakerhunt.com. Covington.

ON STAGE - COMEDY

Lisa Landry, 7:30 p.m. $12. Funny Bone Comedy Club, 957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

ON STAGE - STUDENT THEATER

Church Girls, 6:30 p.m. Stauss Theatre, $55 two shows, $30; show only $15 available beginning April 15. Registration required. 572-5464; www.nku.edu/~theatre. Highland Heights.

SPORTS

Florence Freedom Baseball, 6:05 p.m. vs. Washington Wild Things. Bark in the Park: The third annual weiner dog races. Family Fun Sunday: Autographs, running the bases and a pre-game parade for kids. Champion Window Field, $10-$12 VIP, $9, $7 lawn. 594-4487; www.florencefreedom.com. Florence.

Ride the Ducks Newport, 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Ride the Ducks Newport, $15, $11 children. 815-1439. Newport.

EXERCISE CLASSES

Zumba with Peggi, 7 p.m.-8 p.m. R.E.C.A. Roller Rink, 11 Viewpoint Drive, $60 for 10class punchcard, $8. 380-3659. Alexandria.

LITERARY - STORY TIMES

Preschool Story Time, 10 a.m. Newport Branch Library, 901 E. Sixth St. Stories, songs and crafts. Ages 4-5. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 572-5035. Newport. Toddler Story Time, 10 a.m. Cold Spring Branch Library, 3920 Alexandria Pike, Stories, songs and activities. Ages 2-3. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 781-6166. Cold Spring. Pajama Story Time, 7 p.m. Fort Thomas-Carrico Branch Library, 1000 Highland Ave. Stories, songs and activities. Ages 3 and up. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 572-5033. Fort Thomas. Tot Time, 11 a.m. Cold Spring Branch Library, 3920 Alexandria Pike, Short stories, games, dancing and baby signing. Ages 18 months2 1/2 years. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 781-6166. Cold Spring. T U E S D A Y, J U L Y 1 3

FARMERS MARKET

Campbell County Farmers’ MarketHighland Heights, 3 p.m.6 p.m. Vegetables. Campbell County Senior Center, 3504 Alexandria Pike, Parking lot. Presented by Campbell County Cooperative Extension Service. 572-2600; http://ces.ca.uky.edu/campbell/. Highland Heights.

About calendar

To submit calendar items, go to “www.NKY.com” and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to “life@communitypress.com” along with event information. Items are printed on a space-available basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to “www.NKY.com” and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page. W E D N E S D A Y, J U L Y 1 4

FARMERS MARKET

Earth Mother Market, 3 p.m.-7 p.m. Stables Building, 1038 S. Fort Thomas Ave. “Certified Organic” or “Certified Naturally Grown” growers. 572-1225; www.localharvest.org/farmers-markets/M30992. Fort Thomas.

FILMS

4192: The Crowning of the Hit King - Red Carpet Premiere, 7 p.m. AMC Newport On The Levee 20, One Levee Way, Suite 4100, Introductions 7 p.m. Movie is a love letter to baseball that Rose highlights the playing career of one of the game’s most honored and controversial stars. $200 VIP, gift bag and after-party; $50 seating and after-party: $20 seating. Registration required. 261-6742; 4192movie.eventbrite.com. Newport.

MUSIC - POP

Naked Karate Girl’s Legendary Big Wednesdays, 10 p.m. Jefferson Hall, 1 Levee Way, Suite 2118, $3. 491-6200. Newport.

ON STAGE - STUDENT THEATER

Church Girls, 8 p.m. Stauss Theatre, $55 two shows, $30; show only $15. Registration required. 572-5464; www.nku.edu/~theatre. Highland Heights.

T H U R S D A Y, J U L Y 1 5

CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS

Team In Training Meeting, 6:30 p.m. Claddagh Irish Pub Newport, One Levee Way, Learn more about Team In Training. Meet past participants, coaches, cancer survivors and Team In Training staff members. Free. Presented by The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society’s Team In Training. 513-361-2100. Newport.

LITERARY - STORY TIMES

Pajama Story Time, 6:30 p.m. Cold Spring Branch Library, 3920 Alexandria Pike, Ages 3 and up. Free. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 781-6166. Cold Spring. Baby Time, 10 a.m. Fort Thomas-Carrico Branch Library, 1000 Highland Ave. Clap, sing and bounce with your child. Walkers to age 2. Free. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 572-5033. Fort Thomas.

MUSIC - CONCERTS

Live at the Levee, 6 p.m.-9:30 p.m. Soul Pocket. Newport on the Levee, 1 Levee Way, Riverwalk Plaza. Summer concert series. 291-0550. Newport.

ON STAGE - STUDENT THEATER

Church Girls, 8 p.m. Stauss Theatre, $55 two shows, $30; show only $15 available beginning April 15. Registration required. 5725464; www.nku.edu/~theatre. Highland Heights.

KARAOKE AND OPEN MIC

Karaoke, 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Arnie’s on the Levee, 120 E. Third St. $3 Red Stag cocktails. 4314340. Newport.

LITERARY - STORY TIMES

PROVIDED

Monster Jam trucks, including Grave Digger, pictured, roar into Paul Brown Stadium Saturday, July 10. Twelve monster trucks will take on racing competitions and car-crushing freestyle moves. Party in the Pits begins at 2 p.m. and the show begins at 7 p.m. The Party in the Pits allows for a meet and get autographs with the drivers, see the trucks up close and watch the crew members ready the trucks for racing. There is also a live band, face painters, balloon artists and other family-friendly entertainment. Tickets are $10-$50, adults; and $5, children. Call 800-745-3000 or visit www.ticketmaster.com. For information, visit www.monsterjam.com/smashit.

Toddler Story Time, 10 a.m. Fort ThomasCarrico Branch Library, 1000 Highland Ave. Stories, songs, finger plays and craft. Ages 2-3. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 5725033. Fort Thomas. Preschool Story Time, 1:30 p.m. Cold Spring Branch Library, 3920 Alexandria Pike, Ages 4-5. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 7816166. Cold Spring. Preschool Story Time, 11 a.m. Fort ThomasCarrico Branch Library, 1000 Highland Ave. Stories, songs, finger plays and craft. Ages 4-5. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 5725033. Fort Thomas. Pajama Story Time, 7 p.m. Newport Branch Library, 901 E. Sixth St. Ages 3 and up. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 572-5035. Newport. Baby Time, 9:30 a.m. 10:30 a.m. Newport Branch Library, 901 E. Sixth St. Clap, sing and bounce with your child. Birth to age 2. Free. Registration required. 572-5035. Newport.

PROVIDED

Ringo Starr and his All Starr Band will perform at Riverbend at 8 p.m. Friday, July 9. Prior to the concert, at 6:30 p.m., Starr will exhibit his limited edition, signed computer artwork. There will also be signed drumheads, art T-shirts, books and more. Proceeds from exhibit sales benefit the Lotus Foundation. There is also a free pre-show cook-out at 6:30 p.m. Concert tickets are $49.50, $79.50 and $125. Call 800-745-3000 or visit www.ticketmaster.com.


Life

CCF Recorder

July 8, 2010

B3

Do we recognize much of our ego in Nellie? Let’s speak about our ego for a minute. The ego is our center of consciousness and our contact with the world around us. It’s our identity and who we think we are at any given moment. The ego’s characteristics? Our ego has a preference for certainty over uncertainty, predictability over surprise, clarity over ambiguity, control over others rather than tending to their preferences. In his book, “What Matters Most,” Dr. James Hollis describes our egos this way: “This Nervous Nellie ego flits about trying to make everything work… obsessed with staying in charge. Nellie seeks to live in a world of nouns, comforting nouns, that is, fixed identities… predictable entities that can be controlled, maneuvered, and contained. “And all the while, Nellie really swims in a sea of verbs. This is,

not things fixed, but things happening.” Do we recognize much of our ego in Nellie? The fantasy of controlling fortune or the Father Lou hearts and lives Guntzelman of others runs Perspectives deep in us. We connive, engage in manipulations, triangulations, twist truths, obsess about health and safety, put warning labels on everything from plastic bags to Levelor blind cords – all to better control others and the world around us. We even try to control God. We look for a never-fail prayer or point to our good behavior to finagle God into giving us what we ask or make happen what we want to happen. We use special

ego strategies in trying to control our spouse, friends, work colleagues and grown children – oblivious to the fact that their lives are in their hands, not ours. As individuals we do have certain responsibilities for our own lives, work, and any young children in our charge. But do we ever come to a time of greater maturation and spiritual growth when we realize the best thing we can do is resign as the General Manager of the Universe? Our priority then becomes: run our own lives as well as we can. We must realize life as a mystery, God is God, and my ego, Nellie, must tolerate questions, unfulfilled plans and unexpected happenings. Older adults who have lived full lives have many stories to tell. Their telling is often the occasion of laughter or tears or nostalgia. Later on, analyze their life stories. They often contain intriguing

wisdom we need to learn. The storytellers’ tales will include many times when they were evidently not in control of their lives. There were occasions when they barely survived a storm by hiding in the basement, when they were fired and had to find a new job, suffered an accident, had their heart broken by losing someone they deeply loved, were drafted and had to go off to war, or felt a confusing ecstasy the first time they fell in love. There were so many events and emotional times, positive and negative, when their egos were not in control and all they could do was to try to cope. Note something else about our senior storytellers. These earlier out-of-control events are worn as ribbons of honor on a military uniform coat. The tellers seem proud to have gone through uncertain times and

survived. Perhaps they have even become stronger because of them, and their lives more rich and colorful. Too much emphasis on control can mean we are trying to suppress the mystery of life. There is something rewarding and formative hidden in the ambiguities of life. Though we desperately seek on one level to control so much of life, in retrospect it seems on another level we value being out of control and in the hands of mystery. We want a life containing more adventure and courage than our Nervous Nellie ego can safely plan. As poet Mary Oliver says: “I don’t want to end up simply having visited this world.” Father Lou Guntzelman is a Catholic priest of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati. Contact him at columns@community press.com or P.O. Box 428541, Cincinnati, OH 45242.

Store makes him pay to get back his stolen goods Imagine having your house burglarized and then being told you have to pay to get back some of the stolen items. A young man says that’s what’s happened to him and he feels he’s been victimized twice. A recent ruling by Ohio courts says he’s right. Paul Ambrosius said someone broke into his Cheviot house in May and got away with a lot of items. “They came in and stole my laptop off a table, and my iPod and my Playstation 3,” he says. Ambrosius said the thieves had broken out a back window in order to unlock a door and enter. “The police came, did a report and everything and they told me to check out stores. There’s a couple of pawn shops and game-trading places. They told me to check those out and see if I can match my serial numbers up,” Ambrosius said. Fortunately, Ambrosius still had the box in which the Playstation 3 had been packed. It has the serial

number of the unit so he was able to use that to canvas l o c a l s t o r e s looking for Howard Ain the stolen Hey Howard! item. H e found one store that had taken in several Playstation 3 units and one of them had his serial number. Ambrosius immediately notified the police. “That night they found the guy and put him in jail,” he said. “His excuse was that somebody paid him to sell the Playstation and that was the only thing he knew about.” The man has since been convicted of receiving stolen property. Ambrosius says his big surprise was when he tried to get back the stolen items he had located. The store wanted him to pay the same amount the store had paid for the

Playstation, a game and controller. Ambrosius paid the money, $165, but isn’t at all happy he had to pay. “They want the people that got their stuff stolen to pay the price and not them – and that’s not fair,” he said. “I didn’t commit a crime and yet I have to pay out of my own pocket to get my own property back. It’s just not right.” Last year an Ohio Appeals Court agreed with him when it upheld a lower court ruling that the true owners of stolen property have a right to get it back from a licensed pawn shop without having to pay for it. That case involved a Canton pawn shop that had charged the owners of stolen jewelry to get it back. In Ambrosius’ case, he’s not sure whether or not the store that bought his items is a licensed pawn shop. Under the law, a purchaser other than a pawn shop can take good title to items, even from a thief, if they do so in good faith. In this case, Ambrosius

Discover OMNIMAX

argues the shop should have suspected the items were stolen when the seller accepted so little money for them.

He’s filed suit in small claims court arguing he should not have to pay to get back the goods. Howard Ain answers consumer

complaints weekdays on WKRC-TV Local 12. Write to him at 12 WKRC-TV, 1906 Highland Ave., Cincinnati 45219.

STARTING SUNDAY

THE

E T A U L M I T RED E C S EXPERIEN CALLING ALL DIE-HARD REDS BASEBALL FANS! The Enquirer is giving you a chance to tell a story of a lifetime with our Ultimate Reds Experience Sweepstakes July 11 - August 1.

OUR GRAND-PRIZE WINNER WILL: • Watch batting practice from the field • Throw out a first pitch at the August 30 game against Milwaukee • Enjoy the game from the exclusive Diamond seats Plus, each week one lucky winner will receive a membership and a $100 gift card to the Reds Hall of Fame and Museum. Look for complete details and your official Ultimate Reds Experience entry form in this Sunday’s Enquirer.

Double Feature

www.cincymuseum.org

OMNIMAX Season Sponsor

CE-0000408392

NKY.com/community

See Legends of Flight and Mysteries of the Great Lakes in the OMNIMAX® Theater! Pick up The Enquirer at your local retailer or subscribe today. To subscribe, visit Cincinnati.Com/subscribe or call 1.800.876.4500. CE-0000408470


B4

CCF Recorder

Life

July 8, 2010

Recipes that will have you in a pickle

So many of you are growing cucumbers and peppers that my mail on a daily basis has requests for recipes, mainly pickles. As for me, right now I’m making Mary Rudloff’s solar dills. Mary was my good friend, Ann’s Mom, and before she passed away she shared her wonderful German recipe for making dill pickles. You layer dill and cucumbers in a jar with a vinegar brine and lay, of all things, a piece of rye bread on top. “The yeast in the rye bread (and I recall Mary telling me only rye will work) makes the pickles ferment and they taste like old fashioned pickles from a barrel,” Mary told me. You let them sit in the sun three days, changing the bread daily. Anyway, I’m not sharing that recipe today since I have to make them again and measure as I go. Mary’s recipe, like so many heirloom ones, was a little of this and a little of

that. If they turn out as well as I think they are going to be, I’ll share in a colRita future umn. Heikenfeld MeanRita’s kitchen while, I’d e n j o y sharing your favorite canning recipes so send them in!

Bread & butter pickles

4 cups thinly sliced cucumbers, unpeeled 1 ⁄2 cup or so thinly sliced onion 1 cup sugar 1 ⁄2 teaspoon dill seed or handful fresh dill leaves, minced 1 ⁄4 cup cold water 1 ⁄8 teaspoon turmeric 1 ⁄4 teaspoon each: mustard seed and celery seed 1 tablespoon salt 1 ⁄2 cup vinegar, either cider or clear Mix cucumbers and onions together. Set aside.

Mix rest of ingredients and stir well to dissolve some of the sugar. Pour over cucumbers and onions. Put a plate on top to keep the veggies under the brine. Cover and refrigerate a day or so before eating. Can be kept up to a month, tightly covered in the fridge. Good add-ins: 1 garlic clove, smashed

1 quart 5 percent acid vinegar (I like cider, but clear works well, too) 1 quart water 3 tablespoons mixed pickling spices

Green or dry dill heads (1 large one per jar) or 2 tablespoons dill seed per jar Combine sugar, salt, vinegar and water in a big pot. Tie spices in a cheesecloth bag or put in teaball if you want. Simmer for 15 minutes. Pack cucumbers into hot clean jars, leaving 1⁄4” head space; put dill in each jar. Bring vinegar mixture to a boil and pour boiling liquid over cucumbers. Wipe rims clean, adjust caps and process pints and quarts 15 minutes in boiling water bath. This recipe makes about 7 pints. Good add-ins: Jalapeño or other hot pepper, sliced down the center; clove of garlic Kosher style: Add to each jar a bay leaf, a clove of garlic, 1⁄2 teaspoon mustard seed and if you like, a piece

My Mom’s dill pickles

You can use fresh or dry dill heads. If you have to use dill seed, use at least 2 tablespoons per jar. Don’t use waxed cucumbers from the store as they won’t pickle well. My mom, Mary Nader, gave me this recipe from her old Ball Blue Book. I have many fond memories of her with me making jars and jars of all kinds of pickles. 8 pounds pickling or small cucumbers, cut as desired or left whole 1 ⁄2 to 3⁄4 cup sugar 1 ⁄2 cup canning, pickling or Kosher salt

of hot pepper.

Sonia’s pickles

My sister, Sonia, loves her garden and each year makes these awesome pickles. 4 cups thinly sliced cucumbers, unpeeled 1 medium onion, sliced thin 2 tablespoons salt Up to 11⁄2 cups sugar 1 ⁄2 cup vinegar 11⁄2 teaspoons pickling spice 1 red bell pepper, diced (opt.) 1 clove garlic, smashed (opt.) Arrange cucumbers and onions in large bowl. Sprinkle with salt and mix. Pour enough water over to just cover them. Stir again. Soak at room temperature for two hours. Drain, but don’t rinse. Meanwhile, mix sugar, vinegar and pickling spice in small saucepan. Bring to a simmer and cook until sugar dissolves. Let cool while pickles are

soaking. After pickles have been drained, add bell pepper, then pour pickling brine over them. Mix. Put into containers. Let marinate overnight in refrigerator. Keeps at least three weeks, or up to six months in freezer.

Clarification

The full instructions for cooking “Love at First Bite’s” yellow squash and tomato parmesan are: Preheat oven to 350 degrees. In an 8-by-8 baking dish, layer half the squash and tomatoes on the bottom. Sprinkle half the cheese and half the oregano. Drizzle with half the butter. Make another layer with the squash, tomatoes and butter. Cover and bake 30 minutes. Top with remaining cheese and oregano. Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator and author. E-mail columns@community press.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-2487130, ext. 356.

Fri. Sat. Sun. SNUGGY’S WILL PAY YOUR SALES TAX ON ANY IN-STORE PURCHASE!

6 MONTHS MON NTHSS SAME E AS CASH! CASH H!

Serta® Serta a® Sav Savings vings so o iincredible, ncredible,, we D DARE ARE y you ou T TO OC COMPARE OMP PARE tthem! hem!

SPECIAL PRICING! Only

9 9 1

ttress Matt p To w lo il P n e e Qu

$

(set $299)

Factory Fact Fa ctory Price Reduct Reduction! ctio ion!! Delux Euroto Eurotop top

389

95 95

$

Queen en Set

Twin Full K King

479

9955

$

Purchase! Special S p Rest Gently Eurotop $249 $349 $589

Queen Set

699

95

$

Queen Set

CE-0000409027

(8 859 59)

371-7887

Mon-Sa Mo Sat 10 10-99 • Sun un 122-6

www.cincinnati.ccom/snuggys

Twin Full King

$559 $659 $999

20 $59 9 or le

model s

There has etter FEATURING b a n e be Memory ! y u b o t Foam! time FREE Local Delivery! ery! • F FREE REE S Set-Up et-Up • F FREE Removal (on most sets) Acro Ac ross ss frroom Flor Flo oren ence ce Ant ntiqque ue Mall

$339 $429 $799

Special Purchase! Perfect Sleeper Pillowtop Pillowto Firm

R E T T E B P SLEE W! NO never

8011 MALL RD

Twin Full King

Authorized Serta Dealer

ss


Community

CCF Recorder

July 8, 2010

B5

Pondarama features three Campbell County homes cial Night Tour. The Pond Tour includes waterfalls, streams with cascading water and many colorful fish, water plants and flowers. The scenic landscaped gardens compliment these water features. Tour-goers are encouraged to bring cameras and just enjoy a relaxing day in someone’s paradise. The Tour is divided into four areas around Cincinnati to make viewing the water gardens convenient and easy. Campbell County gardens that will be featured on the tour include: • Dave and Terri Jager of Fort Thomas This is a well-maintained small backyard that has been transformed into a backyard paradise. The backyard has a 11x16 Weathered Limestone Pond with a 25-foot stream with two waterfalls with an added touch of driftwood. Pavers are used to surround this area which opens up this area to several entertainment areas. Their home one of the older original homes in the Fort Thomas area.

PROVIDED

The water garden of Winston and Susie Faircloth of Cold Spring will be featured in this year’s Pondarama.

Golf outing nets $16,000 for the Campbell Lodge The 25th annual Lou Crawford Memorial Golf Outing benefiting the Campbell Lodge Boys’ Home located in Cold Springs was held Wednesday, June 9 at A.J. Jolly Golf Course. The event was attended by over 120 golfers and raised more than $16,000. The Crawford family was honored to be presented with a Kentucky Senate Citation for their 25 years of dedication to the Lodge. Lou Crawford was a founding board member and a past board president for the Boys’ Home. During the last 24 years, with the Crawford association, this event has raised well over $320,000. Jim Crawford, Lou Crawford’s son, said, “Crawford Insurance, as well as the Crawford family, has had a loyal association with the Campbell Lodge Boy’s Home for many years.”

Campbell Lodge Boys’ Home is a year-round residential facility for at-risk, pre-adolescent and adolescent boys ages 10-18. The Cold Spring Boys' Home has an innovative equine program which is a unique option for all residents. They are the only Children’s Home in Northern Kentucky to offer an equine assisted program which includes vocational, riding, and therapy components. The vocational program prepares residents for entry level positions in the equine industry. Outcome measures continue to show improvement on treatment goals for all residents. To learn more about the Campbell Lodge Boys’ Home, their programs, and how you can be involved, contact Barry Jones MSW, LCSW at 859-781-1214 or on line at www.clbh.org.

• Winston and Susie Faircloth of Cold Spring A wooded hillside that includes a large 21x16 Koi water garden with two streams, one of which is a 35-foot meandering stream and the other is a 10-foot stream. Built into the hillside where a perennial garden meanders in and out of the hillside along with large bounders and waterfalls. This location has several hummingbird and butterfly gardens. This home has a patio for entertaining. • Mike and Debbie Klein of Alexandria The Klein’s home is new to the tour this year. This is a very private setting where their back yard disappears into a large wooded area. There is a natural stone walk way that begins at the house back patio and leads down the hill then splits off each way to two large bridges that cross the

streams then lead to stone steps that take you to the larger paver patio featuring a built in fire pit and seat wall. This large Pondless begins with two streams about 30 feet each dropping down from the house across the sloping hill and crossing under stone walkways and stone bridges where the two streams join as one and drop to a basin at the bottom. This is where the paver for entertaining is located. This feature was installed last summer and the entire area is landscaped with natural plants and evergreen trees. Admission to the Pondarama 2010 Water Garden Tour is free. Simply go online to www.aquascapes.com and click on the Pondarama icon to download the Pondarama brochure and map of ponds. Saturday and Sunday tour locations can be picked

up at Meyer Aquascapes Headquarters, 11011 Sand Run Road, in Whitewater Township. Free pond literature will be available at this location as well as the friendly staff of Meyer Aquascapes. Dan Meyer, owner of Meyer Aquascapes has been installing custom Aquascape products since 1998. He is a certified contractor with Aquascape, Inc. and is an affiliated member of the

Better Business Bureau. For further information about the Aquascapes Water Features or to download the Tour locations, go to www.aquascapes.com click on Pondarama or call 513-941-8500.

Laptops from $

1599

Leas e Z one Latonia 859-431-8666 Turfway 859-647-2160

Accelerated Accel lerated Marketing Commercial, Industrial, Residential, Land, and B Buy-outs t Multi-property REAL ESTATE, Construction, Restaurant, Aucti Auctions Retail, Manufacturing, and Farm EQUIPMENT, Inventories,

Collections, Antiques, Estates, Charity Fund-raisers, Vehicles, Marine, Intellectual Property, and MUCH MORE!

No Matter the Asset, We Can Help.

Contact us to arrange a free, no-obligation initial consultation.

502.451.2010 www.AuctionsASAP.com S P

Friends for Life LEARN MORE BY CLICKING ON CANCER CARE AT STELIZABETH.COM When I was first diagnosed with cancer, all I could think was I have my whole life ahead of me - so let's get fighting. Luckily, St. Elizabeth had an extensive network of support for my battle. Their support community, including teams of specialists and Nurse Navigators, helped provide support and clarity through all of my stages of diagnosis and treatment. The journey was hard, but my group made it easier to bear. Having a place to share experiences and to get real answers to my questions made all the difference in the world. I think we went in looking to be survivors, and emerged as friends. St. Elizabeth support community and my friends - made me Better Together. CE-0000389174

per week

78 weeks

The Asset Liquidation Fast Track

CE-0000409531

Meyer Aquascapes announces their ninth annual Pondarama 2010 featuring 32 beautiful water features where homeowners are opening their piece of paradise to the public. Water features are located in Anderson, Amberley, Blue Ash, Bridgetown, Colerain, Delhi, Green Township, Evendale, Liberty Township, Loveland, Morrow, Middletown, North Bend, Reading, West Chester and Whitewater Township and in the following communities in Kentucky; Boone County, Cold Spring, Alexandria, Covington, Fort Thomas and Taylor Mill. Pondarama is a two-day, self-guided tour of water gardens that display ecologically balanced ponds of various sizes and shapes and Pondless waterfalls and streams. All water features are unique and built exclusively for the homeowner. This is the largest garden tour in the Cincinnati area. Tour begins Saturday, July 17 and Sunday, July 18 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. both days, rain or shine. Selected water features will be open Saturday evening for a spe-


B6

CCF Recorder

Community

July 8, 2010

BUSINESS NOTES Zeleznik receives award

91.7 WVXU has received more recognition for its program and talent excellence, this time from the Public Radio News Directors Inc. organization during their annual conference in Louisville. First and foremost, Maryanne Zeleznik, news director for WVXU, Zeleznik received the Leo C. Lee Award for a “lasting commitment to public

radio journalism.” As Zeleznik celebrates her 25th year in public radio news, the Public Radio News Directors Inc. organization is also celebrating its 25th anniversary. The Leo C. Lee Award has a prestigious list of previous winners including Susan Stamberg, Carl Kassel, Jay Allison, Linda Wertheimer, Ira Glass and David Isay. Zeleznik is a resident of Fort Thomas.

Federle passes exam

Stephen N. Federle, an electrical engineer, recently passed the Professional Engi-

neer’s exam. This exam can be taken after an engineering graduate works with a professional engineer for four years. The exam covers a wide range of topics and takes more than eight hours to complete. Federle is a graduate of Newport Central Catholic High School, University of Kentucky, and has worked for K.L.H. engineers for 11 years. With this distinction, he has earned the right to sign drawings which allows him to work independently on projects. In his current position, he works on projects for schools.

PROVIDED

‘Honey’-makers

Matt Birkely of Fort Thomas inspects his new bee hive.

ATTORNEY AT LAW

Criminal Law • Divorce Bankruptcy

283-1140

We are a debt relief agency. We help people file for relief under the bankruptcy code. This is an advertisement.

CONCRETE

K&M Construction NO JOB TOO SMALL FREE ESTIMATES

Union, KY (859)384-3291 (859)307-5513

The 2010 Protecting the Environment Award ceremony was held June 29 at Twenhofel Middle School. The award ceremony, hostCUSTOM REMODELING

PATRICK MONOHAN

EXCAVATING & GRADING

Sanitation District 1 honors local environmental heroes

DRIVEWAYS • CONCRETE PAVING • REPAIR

Decks • Concrete • Roofing • Tile & Stone Kitchen & Bath Remodel • Home Repair

Chris Ahlers

ahlerscontracting@yahoo.com

859-991-3559

fax: 859-918-1074

Mt. Zion Construction

Fully Licensed & Insured

MARK WEIGEL & SON General Contractor

859-663-0238

CE-1001570097-01

CE-1001571225-01

Steam Cleaning Carpet & Upholstery Commercial/Residential 24 Hour Water Extractions

• Additions • Barns • Concrete • Decks • Roofing • Septics Skid Loader and Backhoe

CE-1001573162-02

Cauley

CARPET CLEANING, LLC.

• All Types of Home Repair • Roofing • Decks • Basement and Bathroom • Remodeling

ROOTS INCLUDED!

& GUTTERS

CE-1001565688-01

859-803-3875

Licensed & Insured For Your Protection All Work Supervised By David Saner Quality Roofing For Two Generations FREE ESTIMATES CE-1001565725-01

(859) 356-3217

Call for a Free Estimate

KEVINS LAWNCARE

Currently Offering

COREY 859-393-4856

cohornconcrete@aol.com

www.cohornconcrete.com

All Types of Concrete Work

LAWNBOYS

Great Rates!

• Decorative Concrete • Patios • Sidewalks • Steps • Driveways

859.331.4733 • 859.240.2814

•Brick Repairs & Drainage • Bobcat, Excavator & Dump Truck Services • Retaining Walls • Foundation Repairs

we buy junk cars

Commercial & Residential

380-1236

www.nkylawnboys.com CE-1001571219-01

DL WEBSTER

859-393-4890 BUYING JUNK CARS

we buy junk cars

859-630-5953

Dump Site Available Serving all of Northern Kentucky for over 25 years.

LANDSCAPING L LANDSCAP ANDSCAP & MOWING

Driveways, Steps, Sidewalks, Patios, Porches, Retaining walls-concrete or landscape blocks. Fully insured & in business over 30 yrs in NKY. Free estimates, quick service.

NBD CONTRACTORS, INC.

Single Axle Dump Trucks For Hire

• Grass Cutting - $25/UP • Mulching - $150/UP • Landscaping - FREE ESTIMATES Call 859-331-8255

we buy junk cars

859-485-6535

• Shredded Topsoil • Gravel • Fill Dirt, etc. • Friendly Service • Great Rates

OVER 20 YEARS EXPERIENCE

CE-1001570005-01

OFFICE

CE-1001570922-01

10% DISCOUNT AND 1 YEAR WARRANTY

CE-1001568511-01

Phone:

859-525-7888

Pruning • Shearing Cleanups • Tear Outs Haulaway • Disposal GREEN TEAM

• Free Estimates • Fully Insured • Over 20 Years Experience

CE-1001570196-01

Hourly or Contract Discounts to Senior Citizens 30 years + experience Call 859-991-7234

Free Estimates • Fully Insured

SHRUB REMOVAL

CHRIS 859-393-1138

FREE ESTIMATES

Licensed & Insured

Overgrown

Specializing in new and old replacement of driveways, patios, sidewalks, steps, retaining walls, decorative concrete work, basement and foundation leaks & driveway additions. We also offer Bobcat, Backhoe, Loader, and Dumptruck work, regrading yards & lot cleaning.

Clifton - Findley

Laura Kay Findley and Bradley Wayne Clifton are proud to announce their marriage on July 10, 2010 during a seaside ceremony on Venice Beach in Venice, Florida. A reception will follow at the Nokomis Eagles Club. Laura, the daughter of Mike and Karen Findley, is a graduate of Northern Kentucky University and is currently employed as a case manager at Lighthouse Youth Services. Bradley, the son of Lois Clifton, attended Northern Kentucky University and Gateway Community and Technical College and currently owns Cliftons Creative Design. For more information please visit their site at www.bradleyandlauraswe dding.com.

ed by Sanitation District No. 1 of Northern Kentucky, recognized three Scout troops, six teachers and three individual students who have gone above and beyond to protect the environment and water resources in Northern Kentucky. For the second year in a row, the $2,500 in cash prizes was sponsored by Walmart in Fort Wright. Additional event needs and prizes were donated by John R. Green Co. of Covington, Kenton County School District, Kroger of Erlanger, Meijer of Florence, Natorp’s Garden Stores of Florence, Panera Bread of Crestview Hills, and the WAVE Foundation at the Newport Aquarium. The Scout troop winners have committed to completing projects with an emphasis on education and environmental service during the 2010-2011 school year. The recipients were: • Boy Scout Troop 727 of Burlington, $500 to complete a Gunpowder Creek cleanup. • Girl Scout Troop 281 of Alexandria, $500 to install a rain garden at the Campbell County Environmental Education Center. • Girl Scout Troop 9216 of Campbell County, $300 to install a rain garden at Cline Elementary School. • Six local teachers were awarded $200 mini-grants to purchase supplies for teaching water-related topics to their classes next

school year: • Laura Dennemann, St. Thomas School. Project: Curriculum that focuses on global water awareness. • Anita France, Immaculate Heart of Mary School. Project: Boone Woods Park creek testing. • Lisa Handlon, Taylor Mill Elementary. Project: School wetland planting, monitoring and curriculum. • Dr. Karen Keefer, Sanders Home School. Project: Storm water curriculum and installing pond pitcher pump. • Laura Martin, Silver Grove School. Project: Water cycle activity and lesson. • Dave Schlachter, St. Catherine of Siena School. Project: Learning water conservation lessons through gardening. Individual students William Sanders, Christopher Sanders and Kevin Sanders were recognized for loading a canoe and completing a springtime pond and shoreline cleanup in Hebron. All three boys attend Sanders Home School. SD1 has hosted the Protecting the Environment Award program since 2003. The purpose of the program is to get local individuals and groups involved in protecting the environment in Northern Kentucky, specifically our water resources. The program rewards those who are making a positive environmental and community impact through education and service.

Turpin

we buy junk cars

Movies, dining, events and more Metromix.com

class of 1979 is having a 30+1 reunion on July 24th with an ice breaker event on July 23. Visit our class website www.Turpin1979.com for full details & reunion ticket purchase.

PROVIDED

VIPs

Wanda Kay of Taylor Mill,Patty Seifert of Alexandria, Adam Calvert of Cincinnati, Bobby Mackey of Highland Heights, Denise Durnell of Bellevue and Jean Stamper of Wilder grab a booth in middle of the action at the VIP Party at Star Lanes and Toro on Newport on the Levee.


Community

CCF Recorder

July 8, 2010

B7

Working cooperatively

Participating in Repair Affair, Bank of Kentucky volunteers pose for a quick group photo before starting on home repair projects in Florence. Organized by People Working Cooperatively, the Repair Affair brought together more than 800 volunteers to help 100 lowincome, elderly and disabled homeowners with critical home repairs in Ohio, Kentucky and Indiana. PROVIDED

LUTHERAN

Survivors network offers tools There are more than 11 million cancer survivors living in the United States, and their ranks are growing. It is estimated that by 2020 there will be some 20 million people living with a history of cancer. With increased survivorship comes increased demand for services that help cancer patients get through their treatment and the American Cancer Society is there to help. The American Cancer Society Cancer Survivors Network offers numerous tools to assist individuals diagnosed with cancer to make the journey toward getting well, one step at a

time. The Cancer Survivors Network is part of the Cancer Resource Network, which is comprised of all the programs and services the American Cancer Society offers that address the needs of people touched by cancer. The society provides many ways to share experiences, learn about the disease and treatment options, and receive day-to-day help. Cancer Resource Network programs and services meet needs that may arise from the day of a diagnosis through years after completing treatment. The National Cancer Institute Center is available

anytime, day or night at 1800-227-2345 to provide information to help individuals understand their disease and make decisions about their care. By talking to a trained cancer information specialist, cancer patients and caregivers can learn about their cancer, medications that can treat their disease, treatment options and side effects and access treatment decision tools, and available cancer clinical trials. The specialist can also help patients identify questions they should ask their doctor and programs available in their community. On the American Cancer

Society’s website, cancer.org, patients and their families can access an online community where they can connect with others who share their experiences, confidentially tell their stories, and find hope and inspiration. Additionally, they are able to access cancer education classes that provide tips on how to deal with cancer treatment and the effects on appearance. As important, cancer patients are able to find local support groups for personal encouragement. Patients and caregivers can contact their local American Cancer Society

Thomas More is a proud member of the Yellow Ribbon Program, matching funds to cover the cost of education for Post-9/11 GI Bill recipients.

office at 297 Buttermilk Pike in Fort Mitchell to get help finding answers to financial and insurance questions, access transportation assistance to and from treatment, find a free or low cost place to stay if they are required to travel outside their community for treatment, and receive referrals to programs and services available in their community, including prescription drug assistance.

HDTV’s from

$

1599

per week

104 weeks

Leas e Z one Latonia 859-431-8666 Turfway 859-647-2160

Sunday Worship: Traditional 8:00 & 11:00am Contemporary 9:00am Sunday School 9:50am Contemplative 5:30pm

St. Luke Lutheran Church ELCA 4800 Alexandria Pk, Cold Spring, KY 859-441-2848 M Worship Sun 8:30 &10:30am Sunday School 9:30am All Are Welcome www.stlukecoldspring.org

NON-DENOMINATIONAL LOVE & FAITH FELLOWSHIP CHURCH

720 York St., Newport KY 41071 859-581-4244 Pastor: Gordon Milburn Sunday School: 9:30 am Sunday Morning Worship: 10:30 am Sun. & Wed. Eve Service: 6:00 pm

or accelerated formats development campus, including our new Veterans Student Group

“The liberal arts education I obtained at Thomas More College developed me into a disciplined thinker and ethical leader, which has been invaluable to me when facing critical decisions while serving on active duty.” —Thomas J. Beck ’04 CE-0000409139


B8

CCF Recorder

July 8, 2010

Community

Summer heat poses health risks With the summer heat continuing, issues like overexertion, heat stroke and dehydration have become important public health concerns. “Summer weather is inviting and encourages many of us to spend more time outdoors, but the rising temperatures also present serious health concerns,” said Department for Public Health Commissioner William Hacker, M.D. “Everyone should follow simple precautions that keep us safe from heatrelated illness and injury.” According to DPH, following these precautions can make the difference between just being hot or being seriously ill: • Stay cool indoors. The most efficient way to beat the heat is to stay in an airconditioned area. If you do not have an air conditioner, consider visiting a mall or public library. • Carefully schedule out-

door activities. If you must be out in the heat, try to plan your activities so that you are outdoors either before noon or in the evening. Rest periodically so your body’s thermostat will have a chance to recover. • Drink plenty of fluids. Increase your normal fluid intake regardless of your activity level. You will need to drink more fluids than your thirst level indicates. This is especially true for people age 65 or older who often have a decreased ability to respond to external temperature changes. In addition, avoid drinking beverages containing alcohol because they will actually cause you to lose more fluid. • Wear appropriate clothing and sunscreen. Choose lightweight, light-colored, loose-fitting clothing. In the hot sun, wear a widebrimmed hat that will provide shade and keep the head cool. Sunscreen should be SPF 15 or greater and

applied 30 minutes before going out into the sun. • Use a buddy system. When working in the heat, monitor the condition of your co-workers and have someone do the same for you. Heat-induced illness can cause a person to become confused or lose consciousness. • Monitor those at high risk. Those at greatest risk of heat-related illness include infants and children up to 4 years old, people 65 or older, people who are overweight, people who overexert during work or exercise, and people who are ill or on certain medications for blood pressure or diuretics. “We also cannot stress enough the dangers of extremely hot cars and not to leave children or pets in vehicles during these heat waves,” said Hacker. “Also, don’t forget to give your pet plenty of water, shade and a place to stay cool.”

PROVIDED

Carry Out gets new owner

Sam Jim of Newport proudly takes over new managment of the Alexandria Carry Out in Alexandria.

BRIEFLY Firefighters Olympics

Firefighters from departments across Northern Kentucky, including Alexandria, Southgate, Union, Erlanger and Hebron, will compete in the Northern Kentucky

Regional Firefighters Olympics Saturday, July 10. Firefighters from 8-10 teams across the region will compete in six competitions throughout the day, starting at 10 a.m. at the Alexandria V.F.W. Post, 8261 Alexandria

Pike. The competition is expected to go until around 4 p.m. The public is invited to come out and cheer on their local departments. The event is free to attend and food and drinks will be sold at the event.

Making strides Dates: July 9th 7:00 p.m.-Midnight July 10th 4:00 p.m.-Midnight July 11th 1:00 p.m.-10:00 p.m.

Admiss i $2 per p on e rson. After 9 pm und er must be accomp 18 an by pare nt/guar ied dian.

t: ainmseidne Straight Enterpt.m n . I idnight

8:00 er M Friday- - 7:30 p.m. Aft die Land y id a K Saturd y- 5:00 p.m. n Sunda Zak Morga Band me . No Na 6:00 p.m

513/772-7005 http://www.srsdeaf.org

Free P arking and Sh uttles!

Bahmann Foundation, Lot King Realty & Land Developers, Omni Fireproofing Co. LLC, Precision Strip Inc., Vi-Cas Mfg. Co.

Join the fight against breast cancer by participating in the American Cancer Society Making Strides Against Breast Cancer® five-mile walk Sunday, Oct. 17 at Yeatman’s Cove on the Cincinnati Riverfront. Registration begins at 8 a.m. The walk starts at 9 a.m. Registration for Cancer Prevention Study 3, a nationwide cancer research study that will recruit at the event, is from 8 a.m. until noon. This event typically attracts more than 10,000 people to honor and celebrate breast cancer survivors, educate women about the importance of reducing their cancer risk, and raise money to fund

If you’re looking for buyers, you’re in the right neighborhood. To place an ad call 513.242.4000 or 859.283.7290, or visit CommunityClassified.com

lifesaving research and support programs to further progress against this disease. To register or find more information, visit www.cancer.org/stridesonline or call 1-800-227-2345. Learn more about Cancer Prevention Study 3 at cancer.org/ cps3.

Newport yard sale

Kentucky Haus Artisan Center, 411 East 10th Street, corner of East 10th and Monroe, in Newport, will be part of the Newport East Row yard sale Saturday, July 10. From 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. guest can stop in and pick up a detailed map of the yard sale participants and enjoy a tasting featuring Kentucky Proud Food items. From noon to 2 p.m. Joe Offerman, a Kentucky Crafted Juried designer of wooden Santas, Nativity sets, Christmas ornaments and jewelry will host a Wood Carving Demonstration. Call 859-261-4287 or visit: www.kentuckyhaus.com for additional information and details.

Clabes appointed to board of directors

Girl Scouts of Kentucky’s Wilderness Road Council welcomes Judy Clabes, President and CEO of Judith

CE-0000408612

Clabes Associates, to the Board of Directors. Clabes recently received a Girl Scouts Distinguished Citizen Medal in acknowledgment of her outstanding contributions to the youth in Northern Kentucky. Clabes, a Paris resident, spent more than 36 years working for the Scripps Howard Foundation and 13 years working as editor of The Kentucky Post. She is currently President and Chairman of the Kentucky Commission on Philanthropy and Secretary and Board Member of Seedco, New York City. Girl Scouts of Kentucky’s Wilderness Road Council serves more than 22,000 girl and adult members in 66 Kentucky counties and Lawrence County, Ohio.

Calling all dogs

During the dog days of summer, Mansion Hill Studio and Gallery is looking for dogs of all shapes, sizes, and ages to become “dog models.” Photographs of the dog models will be used in the studio’s promotional and website materials. Dog owners will receive a complimentary photography session and credit toward an order. To book a session or for more information, please call 859-491-4919 or go to www.mansionshillstudio.com.

Day at the ballpark, sea

The Cincinnati Reds, Newport Aquarium, Ride the Ducks Newport and the Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame & Museum are now offering a full day of fun and baseball action, all rolled into one combo ticket. The combo ticket includes a Mezzanine level ticket to one of five Reds games this season, admission to the Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame & Museum, a spot on a Ride the Ducks sight-seeing tour and a pass to see the Newport Aquarium, including the brand new Bizarre and Beautiful gallery. Combo tickets are $48, a savings of more than $20. Games available in this combo deal include: • Saturday, July 17 - Colorado Rockies (Reds HOF Induction and Chris Sabo bobblehead giveaway) • Wednesday, July 21 Washington Nationals • Saturday, July 31 Atlanta Braves (Homer Bailey bobblehead giveaway) • Friday, Aug. 13 - Florida Marlins (Postgame fireworks) • Sunday, Aug. 15 - Florida Marlins (Kids backpack giveaway) For more information on this special deal or to purchase tickets, visit www.reds. com/aquariumcombo.

RELIGION NOTES Erlanger Church of Christ

Erlanger Church of Christ will have its Vacation Bible School July 12-16 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. For more information, call 859-727-1468. Erlanger Church of Christ is located at 458 Graves Avenue.

Highland Avenue Baptist Tabernacle

Highland Avenue Baptist Tabernacle Church will host the Ivan Parker celebration concert in honor of Leroy Mister July 30 at 7 p.m. The concert is free to the public. A love offering will be taken.

Doors will open at 6 p.m. For more information, contact the church at 781-4510. Highland Avenue Baptist Tabernacle Church is located at 1080 Highland Avenue in Fort Thomas. Have an event at your church? Please send your information to akiefaber@nky.com.

GUARANTEED LOW PRICES REPLACEMENT WINDOWS

CE-0000409727

Tilts-In For Cleaning

*Over 200 LOCATIONS Call for a FREE in-home demo

DOUBLE STRENGTH DOUBLE PANE INSULATED GLASS Lifetime Warranty Including Glass Breakage *Model 4000 Wht DH up to 48" wide X 78" tall. Other fees, exclusions and conditions may apply.

EASY FINANCING

ANY SIZE $

189

INSTALLED* No minimum

As Heard On Dave Ramsey

(513) 921-4189 • (859) 594-4189 • www.windowworldcincinnati.com CE-0000408002


ON

THE

RECORD

Carl Bauer

Carl W. Bauer, 73, Independence, died June 28, 2010, at his home. He was an accountant for Cincinnati Bell and an Army veteran. Survivors include his wife, Donna Richardson Bauer of Independence; sons, Dane Richardson, Eric Richardson, M.D., Cevan Bauer and Chad Bauer, all of Independence and Robert Bauer of Tampa. Fla.; daughters, Lori Beighle of Independence and Diane Keeler of Fort Thomas; 14 grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Burial was in Independence Cemetery in Independence. Memorials: National Multiple Sclerosis Society, 11700 Commonwealth Drive, Suite 500, Louisville, KY 40299.

Mary Dickson

Mary Ruth Dickson, 79, Alexandria, died June 26, 2010, in Newport News, Va. She was a team leader of housekeeping at Our Lady of Mercy, Newport News. Her husband, Thomas Dickson, died previously. Survivors include her daughter, Cindy Pyles of Newport News, Va. and four grandchildren. Cooper Funeral Home, Alexandria, handled the arrangements.

Mary Dirkes

Mary E. Dirkes, 49, Crescent Springs, died June 30, 2010, at Hospice of St. Elizabeth Healthcare, Edgewood. Her brother, Steven Dirkes, died previously. Survivors include her sisters, Anne Sanders of Fort Wright and Elaine Oldiges of Camp Springs; brothers, Nicholas Dirkes of Taylor Mill, Terrence Dirkes of Cincinnati and James Dirkes of Crescent Park. Burial was in Mother of God Cemetery, Fort Wright. Memorials: Alzheimer’s Association, 644 Linn St., Suite 1026, Cincinnati, OH 45203, or Multiple Sclerosis Society, Ohio Valley Chapter, 4440 Lake Forest Drive, Suite 120, Cincinnati, OH 45242.

Margie Ford

Margie Lother Ford, 80, Covington, died June 28, 2010, at Hospice of St. Elizabeth Health Care, Edgewood. She was a secretary for Robke Chevrolet Co. in Covington, a member of Hill Topers, Be Concerned, and St. Augustine Church in Covington where she served in the church’s St. Monica Society and was president of the church’s Pathfinder Seniors. Her husband, Jack Harold Ford, died previously. Survivors include sons, Tom and Mike Ford, both of Crestview Hills; brother, John Lother, of Fort Thomas; sister, Marcie Dailey of Villa Hills; six grandchildren and five great-grandchildren: Memorials: St. Augustine Church, 1839 Euclid Ave., Covington, KY 41014-1162 Allison & Rose Funeral Home, Inc. in Covington handled the arrangements.

| DEATHS | Editor Michelle Shaw | smhaw@nky.com | 578-1053 BIRTHS

About obituaries

upholsterer and caregiver for many friends. Her sister, Judy Spencer, died previously. Survivors include her sons, Bill and Jim Harris, both of Bellevue; sisters, Linda Dragan of Cincinnati, Beverly Markwell of Dayton and Joyce Downs of Elsmere; brother, William Hill Jr. of Florence and three grandchildren. Memorials: Hospice of the Bluegrass Care Center, 7388 Turfway Road, Florence, KY 41042.

Eddie Johnson

Eddie Florence Johnson, 75, Melbourne, died June 28, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. She was a nursing assistant at St. Luke Hospital East and a member of the Gabbard Tabernacle in Butler. Her grandson, Shane Purcell, died previously. Survivors include her husband, Roy Johnson; daughters, Mary Caldwell of Butler and Darlene Walton of Melbourne; sons, Darrell and Rick Purcell, both of Falmouth, and Edward Purcell of Foster; stepsons, Billy Johnson of Higginsport, Ohio, Gene Johnson of Bethel, Ohio and Eddie Johnson of Hammersville, Ohio; sisters, Glenna Browning of Falmouth, and Edna Dillon of Butler; brothers, Romey Gallagher of Washington, Anthony Gallagher of Flemingsburg, Wayne Gallagher of Falmouth and Ivan Gallagher of Berry; 15 grandchildren and 21 greatgrandchildren. Burial was in Butler Cemetery.

Joel Johnson Sr.

Joel Johnson Sr., 72, Dayton, died June 27, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He was a pouroff man with Reliable Castings and a member of the New Macedonia Old Regular Baptist Church. His son, Bishop Johnson, died previously. Survivors include wife, Gayle Johnson of Dayton; son, Joel Johnson Jr. of Erlanger; daughter, Teresa Donaldson of Florence; five grandchildren and 14 great-grandchildren.

Terri Seibert Krebs, 49, Newport, died June 30, 2010, at her home. She was a child care provider. Survivors include her husband, Mark Krebs; sons, Mark and Andrew Krebs, both of Newport; daughter, Mandy Hester of Newport; brothers, Joe and Wayne Seibert, both of Fort Thomas; sisters, Joyce Warren, Pam Slayline and Linda Adams, all of Fort Thomas, and one granddaughter.

POLICE

|

REAL

ESTATE

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

N K Y. c o m

E-mail: k

ws@

unit

B9

RECORDER

DEATHS

Basic obituary information and a color photograph of your loved one is published without charge by The Community Press. Please call us at 283-0404 for more information. To publish a larger memorial tribute, call 513-242-4000 for pricing details. For the most up-to-date Northern Kentucky obituaries, click on the “Obituaries” link at NKY.com.

Terri Krebs

CCF Recorder

July 8, 2010

Burial was in St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas. MuehlenkampErschell Funeral Home handled the arrangements. Memorials: Susan G. Komen for the Cure, 522 Cincinnati Mills Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45240, or Newport Central Catholic Tuition Assistance Program, 13 Carothers Road, Newport, KY 41071.

Shelby Martin

Shelby Lee Martin, 93, Latonia, died June 27, 2010, at Rosedale Manor in Latonia. He was a route manager for Pepsi Cola, a WWII Navy veteran and a member of Ashland Avenue Baptist Church in Latonia. His wife, Thelma Colvin Martin, died previously. Survivors include daughters, Roberta Ward of Latonia, Carolyn Baker of Alexandria; six grandchildren and 12 great-grandchildren. Burial was Thursday, July 1, in Floral Hills Memorial Gardens in Taylor Mill. Memorials: Ashland Avenue Baptist Church, 2735 Ashland Ave., Latonia, KY 41015.

Cyril Rolf

Cyril H. Rolf, 90, Fort Thomas, died June 28, 2010, in Fort Thomas. He was a service manager with Baldwin Piano Co., Cincinnati, a World War II Army veteran and a member of St. Catherine of Siena Church, Fort Thomas, where he served on the finance committee. His wife, Claire Rolf, died previously. Survivors include his sons, Mark Rolf of Fort Thomas, and Stephen Rolf of Voorhees, N.J.; daughters, Nancy Hassman of Fort Thomas, and Joan Kimble of Cincinnati; 10 grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Burial was at St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas. Memorials: Glenmary Home Missioners, P.O. Box 465618, Cincinnati, OH 45246, or St. Catherine of Siena Church, 1803 N. Fort Thomas Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075.

Ryder Jr. of Edgewood, David Ryder of Fort Thomas and Edward Ryder of Alexandria; daughters, Connie Robertson of Bellevue, Anna Kitchen of St. Mary’s, Ohio and Sharon Johnson of Virginia Beach, Va.; sister, Ruth Gander of Harrison, Ohio; 18 grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. Entombment was in St. Stephen Cemetery Mausoleum in Fort Thomas. Memorials: Hospice of the Bluegrass Care Center, 7388 Turfway Road, Florence, KY 41042.

Raymond Otto Sterr, 81, Newport, died June 26, 2010, at Baptist Convalescent Care in Newport. He was a deliveryman for Ohio Blueprint Company and a member of the Roller Coaster Club and the Jehovah’s Witness Kingdom Hall in Fort Thomas. Survivors include sister, Gladys Amanns of Newport. Burial was in Floral Hills Memorial Gardens in Taylor Mill.

George Schenk Jr.

Frances Swope

George J. Schenk Jr., 80, of Gatlinburg, Tenn., formerly of Florence, died July 1, 2010, at University Hospital, Corryville. He was a college professor at San Diego and Oregon State University. Survivors include his sons, Michael Schenk of Altadena, Calif., Martin Schenk of Hollywood, Calif., Andrew Schenk of Eagle, Idaho; daughters, Martha Faghani of Irvine, Calif., Margie Pittman of Missoula, Mont., Melissa Villarreal of Salem, Ore., Betsy Miller of Portland, Ore.; brothers, Tom Schenk of Fort Thomas, John Schenk of Fort Myers, Fla., Joe Schenk of Dayton, Ohio; sisters, Kay Schenk of Providence, R.I., Carol Yoder and Therese Jester, both of Cincinnati and Sr. Mary Hope Schenk, C.D.P. of Melbourne and nine grandchildren. Dobbling, Muehlenkamp-Erschell Funeral Home, Fort Thomas, handled the arrangements.

Ronald Schmitz

Ronald Edward Schmitz, 53, Grants Lick, died June 28, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He was a supervisor at the Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport and a member of St. Joseph Church, Cold Spring. Survivors include his sister, Pam Seibert of Alexandria. Burial was at St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas. Memorials: MADD, 4015 Executive Park Drive No. 215, Cincinnati, OH 45241.

Raymond Sterr

Frances Swope, 83, of Orange, Calif., formerly of Fort Thomas, died June 24, 2010, at St. Joseph Hos-

LEGAL NOTICE The Newport Planning and Zoning Board will hold a public hearing on Tuesday, July 27, 2010 at 5:00 p.m. in the Newport Municipal Complex, 998 Monmouth Street, Newport, Kentucky.The hearing will be held for interested parties to hear and present evidence relative to the following agenda items: PZ-10-05 The Applicant is requesting a Change of Concept Plan PZ-10-06 The Applicant is requesting a Map Amendment and Development Concept Plan Review Inquiries regarding this public hearing should be addressed to: J. Gregory Tulley AICP Development Services Director City of Newport 998 Monmouth Street Newport, Kentucky 41071 859-292-3637 2378

pital, Orange, Calif. She was a homemaker a member of First Baptist Church of Fort Thomas. She taught Sunday school at the church and was also a member of the Order of the Easter Star and a volunteer and PTA member at Woodfill and Ruth Moyer elementary schools in Fort Thomas. Her husband, Howard A. Swope, died in 1999. Survivors include her daughters, Mary Kaye Kessler of Springfield, Ky., Carol Smith of Orange, Calif.; brother, Ted Padgett of Fort Wright; sister, Patty Ebersole of Dry Ridge; five grandchildren and three greatgrandchildren. Burial was in Evergreen Cemetery, Southgate.

LEGAL NOTICE Notice is hereby given that the Campbell County & Municipal Board of Adjustment will hold a public hearing at the Alexandria Courthouse, 8352 E. Main Street, Alexandria, KY on Tuesday, July 20, 2010 at 7:00 PM, for the purpose of reviewing and hearing testimony on the following: CASE NUMBER : BA-03-10 CUP Optimist Playground-Shelter APPLICANT : Steve Bridewell LOCATION: The property is located on the east side of Electric Ave, 250’feet north of William Blat Ave, City of Southgate. REQUEST: The applicant is asking for a conditional use permit to build a shelter in the existing park. Persons interested in this case are invited to be present. Information concerning this case is available for public inspection at the Campbell County & Municipal Planning & Zoning Office, 1098 Monmouth Street, Suite 343, Newport, Ky. Monday-Friday during normal business hours. /s/Peter Klear, AICP Director of Planning & Zoning 1001572959

Charles Ryder

Charles Patrick Ryder, 76, Wilder, died June 28, 2010, in Wilder. He was a repairman for Cincinnati Bell, a Grand Knight of the Bishop Mulloy Council, a faithful navigator of the Bishop Flaget Assembly of Northern Kentucky, a leader with the Boy Scout Explorers and a member of the Cincinnati Bell Pioneer Camping Club. His wife, Carol Ann Ryder, died previously. Survivors include sons, Charlie

How to enter: You can enter your baby into the contest through mail or online. To mail in an entry complete the form and include a clear, color or black/white photo of your baby along with a suggested $5 entry donation to Newspapers In Education. NO PHOTOS WILL BE RETURNED. To enter online visit our Web site at Cincinnati.Com/babyidol and complete the entry form. All photos must be received by 5:00pm Monday, July 12, 2010. PHOTOS WILL BE PUBLISHED IN THE ENQUIRER. How to win: Sunday, August 1, 2010 all entrants will appear in The Enquirer and the first of three voting rounds will begin. We ask that all votes be accompanied by a donation to the Newspapers In Education program, however a donation is not necessary to vote or to win the Baby Idol 2010 contest. This contest is just one of the many fun and innovative programs we use to raise money to promote literacy in our local schools. Prizes: There will be one (1) First Place Winner, one (1) Runner-Up Winner and one (1) Randomly Selected Winner. First Place Winner will receive a $1,000.00 American Express gift card and a Gold Level Cincinnati Zoo family membership for the 2011 season. Runner-Up Winner and Randomly Selected Winner will each receive a $500 American Express gift card. Rules: All photographs must be of a baby or infant born on or after July 12, 2007. Baby’s name, Parent’s name and phone number should be written on the back of the photo. You must be the parent or legal guardian of the baby in the photograph in order to enter the contest. Professional photographs are allowed, with faxed copyright release from the photographer. We reserve the right to refuse a photograph submission that the staff defines as unacceptable or inappropriate.

Lillian ‘Kay’ Harris

Lillian “Kay” Harris, 64, Bellevue, died June 29, 2010, at Hospice of the Bluegrass Care Center in Fort Thomas. She was the owner of Dolls Etc., in Bellevue, member of First Baptist Church in Dayton, a seamstress,

Baby Idol 2010 Entry Form My Name__________________________________________________________________________ Address___________________________________________________________________________ City/State/Zip _____________________________________________________________________ Phone ( _______ ) ________________________ Baby’s Birth Day _____________________________ Baby’s Name: _________________________________ Baby’s First Initial of Last Name: ___________ Email: ____________________________________________________________________________

(We will email updated voting results for Baby Idol 2010 only.)

Yes! Enter my baby in the

contest and accept my donation of $5 to benefit Newspapers In Education. (Check box on the right.)

I am enclosing a check.

I am enclosing a money order.

(Make checks payable to Newspapers In Education.)

I am paying with a credit card:

Visa

MasterCard

Discover

AmEx

# _________________________________ Exp. Date ____________ Signature ___________________________

Photo Release — I hereby grant The Enquirer Publishing and all its entities permission to use the images of my child ________________________, solely for the purposes of Enquirer Lend-A-Hand, Inc.’s Baby Idol promotional material and publications, and waive any rights of compensation or ownership there to. Parent Signature ________________________________________ Date __________

CE-0000399741

AT PARTICIPATING KROGER STORES ONLY.

CE-0000408296

Mail to: The Enquirer 2010 Baby Idol, 312 Elm Street, Cincinnati, OH 45202. Photo deadline: 7/12/2010

NO PURCHASE OR DONATION REQUIRED TO ENTER. ALL FEDERAL, STATE, LOCAL AND MUNICIPAL LAWS AND REGULATIONS APPLY. VOID WHERE PROHIBITED. The Enquirer Lend-A-Hand Baby Idol 2010 Contest is open to Ohio, Indiana and Kentucky residents who are 18 years or older and a parent or legal guardian of a child at the time of entry. Employees of The Enquirer Lend-A-Hand, The Cincinnati Enquirer, Gannett Co., Inc., and each of their respective affiliated companies, and advertising and promotional agencies, and the immediate family members of, and any persons domiciled with, any such employees, are not eligible to enter or to win. Contest begins at 12:01 a.m. (EST) 5/23/10 and ends at 11:59 p.m. (EST) 9/8/10. Beginning at 12:01 a.m. (EST) 5/23/10 and ending at 11:59 p.m. (EST) 7/12/10, Enter by submitting a photo of your baby and a completed entry form. Entries must be submitted by a parent or legal guardian, 18 years or older. Children must have been born on or after 07/12/07 and Sponsor reserves the right to verify proof of age. Entries with incomplete or incorrect information will not be accepted. Only one (1) entry per child. Multiple births can be submitted as 1 entry with 1 photo. Enter online at Cincinnati.Com/babyidol. Enter by mail or in-person: complete an Official Entry Form available in The Cincinnati Enquirer, The Kentucky Enquirer, The Community Press and Recorder and at The Enquirer Customer Service Center, 312 Elm Street, Cincinnati, OH 45202. All entries must be received by 5:00 p.m. (EST) 7/12/10. Odds of winning depend on the number of eligible entries and votes received. Winners will be notified by telephone or email on or about 9/13/10. Participants agree to be bound by the complete Official Rules and Sponsor’s decisions. For a copy of the prize winners list (available after 9/18/10) and/or the complete Official Rules send a SASE to Baby Idol 2010 c/o The Enquirer, 312 Elm Street, Cincinnati, OH 45202 or contact Kristin Garrison at 513.768.8135 or at kgarrison@enquirer.com.


B10

CCF Recorder

July 8, 2010

Community NKY SUMMER CAMPS

F R I D A Y, J U L Y 9

SUMMER CAMP MISCELLANEOUS

Parent/Camper Day, 9:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Sunrock Farm, 103 Gibson Lane, parents join campers for a day of hands-on activities with animals and nature. $90 parent and child. Registration required. 781-5502; www.sunrockfarm.org. Wilder. Skidaddles Summer Camp, 7 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Skidaddles Inc. 8660 Bankers St. Explore wonders of nature, walk on the wild side, sports week, snacks, hands-on projects and more. Ages -1-5. $170 for five days, $140 for four days, $115 for three days. Registration required. 647-7529; www.skidaddles.com. Florence. S A T U R D A Y, J U L Y 1 0

SUMMER CAMP - SPORTS

Girls’ Volleyball Camp, noon-3 p.m. Continues 6-8:30 p.m. July 12, 13 and 14. Boone County High School, 7056 Burlington Pike, Gymnasium. Fundamental skills, position training, team competition and more. Grades 1-8. $55, $50 advance. Registration required. 512-5993. Florence. S U N D A Y, J U L Y 1 1

SUMMER CAMP -ACADEMIC

High School Summer Science, Technology, Engineering & Math Institute, 7 p.m. Thomas More College, 333 Thomas More Parkway, five days and nights high school students live on campus and work with professors. Participate in hands-on projects out in the field, on the Ohio River, at the Biology Field Station, at the Observatory and in science labs.Ages 912. $500; $50 discount if registration received by April 15. Registration required by May 31. 635-6941; http://www.thomasmore.edu/fieldstation. Crestview Hills.

FLORIDA

ANNA MARIA ISLAND Amazing value! $499/wk, 1BR 1 & 2 BR units. Charming beach cottage. Call now for best selection! 513-236-5091, beachesndreams.net

Beautiful Seagrove Beach Rent & Relax. Nr Destin, between famous Seaside & Rosemary Beach. Cozy Cottages to Gulf Front Condos. Web Specials. 1-800-537-5387 www.garrettbeachrentals.com

M O N D A Y, J U L Y 1 2

SUMMER CAMP - ACADEMIC CSI Camp, 8 a.m.-noon, daily through July 15. Gateway Community and Technical College Boone Campus, 500 Technology Way, Basic CSI techniques, including finger-printing, interrogation, photography and computer forensics. Staged crime scene on final day. Ages 11-12. Free. Registration required by June 30. 442-1104. Florence.

SUMMER CAMP - ARTS

Camp Carnegie Art and Drama Workshops, 1 p.m.-5 p.m. Production: The Bad Guy Talk Show. Workshop 3. Snack provided. Mondays and Wednesdays. July 14, 19, 21, 26 and 28. Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, 1028 Scott Blvd. Includes art making, dramatic exercises, writing, brainstorming, teambuilding, problem solving and performance in the Otto M. Budig Theatre. Ages 6-12. Free; $10 registration deposit. Registration required. 491-2030; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington. Newport Central Catholic Summer Drama Program, 9 a.m.-noon Grades K-4. Monday-Friday. Continues through July 22. Performance 7:30 p.m. on July 23. $150. Newport Central Catholic High School, 13 Carothers Road, Black Box Theatre. Lunch, acting, dancing and music. With drama coach and assistants. Each session limited to 30 students. Registration required. 2920001; www.ncchs.com. Newport. Camp Ernst Middle School Drama Camp, 9 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Grades: 3-5. Daily through July 15. Camp Ernst Middle School, 6515 Camp Ernst Rd. Disney’s Aristocats Kids performed by 3-5 graders. Dear Edwina Jr. performed by 6-8 graders. Seminars in theatre. With Karen Wiebe, director. Ages 3-8. $75 grades 6-8 for week; $65 grades 3-5 for week. Registration required by June 15. 534-4000.

FLORIDA

SIESTA KEY. Gulf front condo, directly on pristine Crescent Beach. All ammenities, nicely appointed. Available weekly, now to July 17th and after July 24th. 513-232-4854

CLEARWATER TO ST. PETE BEACHES Gulf front & bay side condos. All prices & sizes! Florida Lifestyle VAC. 1-800-487-8953. Jan. 2011, Monthly Discounts • www.ourcondo.com

DESTIN. Deeply discounted 2BR, 2BA condo, five pools, on-site restaurant & golf course. 513-561-4633 , local owner. Visit arieldunes.us

MANHATTAN--NYC HOTEL $129/2 persons. Singles $124. Suites $139-$159. Lincoln Ctr area, Hudson River views, 18 flrs, kitchenette, 5 mins to midtown, safe, quiet, luxury area. RIVERSIDE TOWER, Riverside & 80th St. Call 1-800-724-3136 or visit: www.riversidetowerhotel.com

EMERALD ISLE. Ocean Front luxury vacation homes with community pool. Call for free brochure. 1-252-354-5555 Spinnaker’s Reach Realty www.SpinnakersReach.com

Hike Parks + Parking FREE at Old Man’s Cave/Hocking Hills Rates $45/up. 1-800-254-3371 Inntowner Motel, Logan Ohio www.inntownermotel.com

Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Summer Program, 6:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Daily through July 16. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Highland Heights, 2907 Alexandria Pike, Hands-on activities, arts and craft projects, visits from community resources, field trips and more. Additional weekly summer fees for optional activities may apply. Ages 2-10. $130-$180 depending on age of child. Registration required by June 1. 581-6166. Highland Heights. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Summer Program, 6:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Daily through July 16. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Taylor Mill, 710 Valley Square Drive, Handson activities, arts and craft projects, visits from community resources, field trips and more. Additional weekly summer fees for optional activities may apply. Ages 2-10. $130-$180 depending on age of child. Registration required by June 1. 581-6166. Taylor Mill. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Summer Program, 6:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Daily through July 16. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Florence, 2012 Terrace Court, Hands-on activities, arts and craft projects, visits from community resources, field trips and more. Additional weekly summer fees for optional activities may apply. Ages 2-10. $130-$180 depending on age of child. Registration required by June 1. 581-6166. Florence. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Summer Program, 6:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Daily through July 16. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center, 11293 Grand National Blvd. Hands-on activi-

TENNESSEE

1-7 Affordable, Deluxe Chalets & Cabin Rentals. Pigeon Forge in the Smokies. Vacation/Dollywood Specials. Free brochure. Call 1-800-833-9987. www.firesidechalets.com

Hilton Head Island, SC

Visit www.hhisland.info and plan a getaway with Seashore Vacations. Our beach is free. Specials available for golf, tennis, dining, more. Visit our

SEABROOK EXCLUSIVES Villas & Private Homes. Ocean, golf, tennis, equestrian. Pet friendly rentals. Free brochure. Book online! 888-718-7949. www.seabrookexclusives.com

ties, arts and craft projects, visits from community resources, field trips and more. Additional weekly summer fees for optional activities may apply. Ages 2-10. $130-$180 depending on age of child. Registration required by June 1. 581-6166. Richwood. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Summer Program, 6:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Daily through July 16. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Fort Thomas, 29 Churchhill Dr. Hands-on activities, arts and craft projects, visits from community resources, field trips and more. Additional weekly summer fees for optional activities may apply. Ages 2-10. $130-$180 depending on age of child. Registration required by June 1. 581-6166. Fort Thomas. Skidaddles Summer Camp, 7 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Skidaddles Inc. $170 for five days, $140 for four days, $115 for three days. Registration required. 647-7529; www.skidaddles.com. Florence. SummerCare: Adventures in Wonderland, 7 a.m.-6 p.m. Daily through July 16. Fort Wright Elementary School, 501 Farrell Drive, make learning come alive with zany arts and crafts, science, reading, drama, math service learning, dance, sports and adventure. With field trips weekly activities and special visitors. Ages 5-11. $128 week; $29 per day. Registration required online. Presented by Children Inc. 431-2075; www.childreninc.org. Fort Wright. SummerCare: Adventures in Wonderland, 7 a.m.-6 p.m. Daily through July 16. Ockerman Elementary School, 8250 U.S. 42, make learning come alive with zany arts and crafts, science, reading, drama, math service learning, dance, sports and adventure. With field trips weekly activities and special visitors. Ages 5-11. $128 week; $29 per day. Registration required online. Presented by Children Inc. 431-2075; www.childreninc.org. Florence.

SUMMER CAMP - NATURE

Finstitute Summer Camp, 9:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Eco-Explorer. Daily through July 16. Newport Aquarium, Newport on the Levee, Newport Aquarium tours, animal encounters, games, arts and crafts and more. Ages 712. $190, $150 passholders; $170, $130 passholders advance by May 5. Registration required. Presented by WAVE Foundation at Newport Aquarium. 815-1442. Newport. Sunrock Farm Nature Camp, 9:30 a.m.2:30 p.m. Daily through July 16. Sunrock Farm, 103 Gibson Lane, hands-on activities with farm animals, creek exploration, woodland adventures, gardening, crafts and games. Campers bring own lunch. Ages 415. $195 per week. Registration required. 781-5502. Wilder. Young Stewards of the Earth, 8 a.m.-noon, Northern Kentucky Montessori Center, 2625 Anderson Road, Montessori-based camp. Learn to recycle, compost and reduce waste; importance of local farming and the origins of the food we eat; and importance of nutritious food and sustainable packaging. Twoweek sessions culminate with field trip including Turner Farms, the Cincinnati Zoo and Gorman Heritage Farm. Children may attend any number of weeks. Ages -3-7. $150-$180 per week. Registration required. 331-3725. Crescent Springs.

SUMMER CAMP RELIGIOUS/VBS

High Seas Vacation Bible School, 6 p.m.8:30 p.m. Daily through July 16. Florence United Methodist Church, 8585 Old Toll Road, Grades 1-6. Free. 371-7961; www.florenceumc.com. Florence.

GATLINBURG . Affordable rates. Fully furnished. 1-8 bdrms. Chalets, Cabins, Privacy, Views, Hot Tubs, Jacuzzis, Fireplaces. 1-800-235-2661 www.alpinechaletrentals.com

SUMMER CAMP - SPORTS Bishop Brossart High School Boys’ Soccer, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Daily through July 15. Bishop Brossart High School, 4 Grove St. Beiting Fields. With Brian Goller, instructor and coach. Grades K-8. $70, $60 before July 1. Registration required. 635-2108. Alexandria.

SUMMER CAMP - YMCA

GATLINBURG ! Luxurious cabins on trout streams. Park-like settings. Hot tubs. Close to National Park & Dollywood. Great rates! $105 & up. 800-404-3370 www.countryelegancecabins.com

SOUTH CAROLINA

site or call toll free: 800-845-0077.

EAST COAST, NEW SMYRNA BEACH Luxurious oceanfront condos & vacation homes. Closest & best beach to Disney. Ocean Properties Vacation Rentals 800-728-0513 www.oceanprops.com

SUMMER CAMP MISCELLANEOUS

OHIO

Vacation Resorts of South Carolina. Hilton Head or Myrtle Beach. Lovely 1 or 2BR condos, weekly rates from $775 to $2200! Excellent locations! www.vrosc.com. 877-807-3828 DESTIN. Local owner, 1 or 2 luxury condos. 2 BR, 2 BA overlooking gulf, sugar white beaches. Heated pool, hot tubs & more. 937-767-8449,or visit www.majesticsunindestin.com

Little Britain Stables Horse Camp, 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Daily through July 16. Little Britain Stables, 5309 Idlewild Road, Horse care, riding instruction, leading, lunging, ground driving, driving and riding. Ages 7-16. $300. Registration required. 586-7990; ww.LittleBritainStable.com. Burlington.

NEW YORK

NORTH CAROLINA Clearwater/Indian Rocks Beach BEST VALUE ON THE BEACH! CLEAN beach condo, 2BR, 2BA, pool. 513-875-4155 . Rent weekly. www.bodincondo.com

SUMMER CAMP - HORSES

NORRIS LAKE. Located at Powell Valley Resort. 2 BR/1BA, fully furnished priv. home. Covered porch, deck. Lake access. $95/nt. 423-5628353, www.norrislakehse.com

R.C. Durr YMCA Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. World of Discovery. Daily through July 16. R.C. Durr YMCA, 5874 Veterans Way, Themed weeks. Scholarships and care available. State child care assistance accepted. Ages 5-11. $170, $125 members. Registration required. 534-5700. Burlington. R.C. Durr YMCA Preschool Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-noon Part-day. Barn Yard Bonanza. Daily through July 16. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Barn Yard Bonanza. Daily through July 16. R.C. Durr YMCA, 5874 Veterans Way, Themed weeks. Scholarship and daycare available. State child care assistance accepted. Ages 3-5. $170, $125 members; partday: $105, $75 members. Registration required. 534-5700. Burlington. R.C. Durr YMCA Teen Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through July 16. R.C. Durr YMCA, 5874 Veterans Way, Themed weeks. Scholarships available. State child care assistance accepted. Ages 11-15. $175, $130 members. Registration required. 5345700. Burlington. Kenton County YMCA Traditional Day Camp, 8:45 a.m.-4 p.m. Hollywood Bound. Daily through July 16. Kenton County YMCA, 10987 Marshall Road, Weekly-themed activities. Scholarship assistance available. Ages 5-11. $120, $100 members; registration fee: $40 family, $25 child. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County YMCA. 781-1814. Independence. Advanced Camping Experience Camp, 8:30 p.m.-4 p.m. Daily through July 23. Kenton County YMCA, 10987 Marshall Road, Learn about leadership development, cultural awareness and self-worth. Scholarship assistance available. Ages 13-16. $120, $100 members; registration fee: $40 family, $25 child. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County YMCA. 356-3178. Independence.

Traditional Day Camp, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Hollywood Bound. Daily through July 16. Campbell County YMCA, 1437 S. Fort Thomas Ave. Swimming, environmental education, arts and crafts, service learning, science, literature, free time and more. Extended hours available. Financial assistance available. Ages 5-10. $140, $110 members. Registration required. 781-1814; www.myy.org. Fort Thomas. Campbell County YMCA Adventure Camp, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through July 16. Campbell County YMCA, 1437 S. Fort Thomas Ave. Teen Camping. Themes, activities, swimming and fun traditional day camp. Ages 11-12. $140, $110 members. Registration required. 572-3063. Fort Thomas. Campbell County YMCA A.C.E.S. Camp, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through July 16. Campbell County YMCA, 1437 S. Fort Thomas Ave. Work on learning projects in surrounding communities and participate in several team building experiences. Financial assistance available. Ages 13-16. $140, $110 members. Registration required. 572-3063. Fort Thomas. Campbell County YMCA Pre and post Camp, 6:30 a.m.-8:45 a.m. Pre-camp care. Daily through July 16. 4:15 p.m.-6 p.m. Post-camp care. Daily through July 16. Campbell County YMCA, 1437 S. Fort Thomas Ave. Extended care for any family available. Ages 5-16. Pre: $35, $25 members; post: $30, $20 members. Registration required. 781-1814; www.myy.org. Fort Thomas. R.C. Durr YMCA Summer Camp Leadership in Training Program, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through July 16. R.C. Durr YMCA, 5874 Veterans Way, Assist staff wit activities. Participants are selected through an interview process. Ages 13-16. $60, $30 members. Registration required. 534-5700; www.myy.org. Burlington. R.C. Durr YMCA Sports and Specialty Camps, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Soccer Camp and fine Arts Camp. Daily through July 16. R.C. Durr YMCA, 5874 Veterans Way, $175, $130 members. 534-5700; www.myy.org. Burlington. R.C. Durr YMCA Summer Day Camp, 6:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Daily through July 16. R.C. Durr YMCA, 5874 Veterans Way, Camp Outback. Campers develop healthy spirits, minds and bodies through variety of sports and activities. Ages 3-15. $125-$175 per week. Registration required. 534-5700; www.myy.org. Burlington. T U E S D A Y, J U L Y 1 3

SUMMER CAMP - ACADEMIC High School Summer Science, Technology, Engineering & Math Institute, 9 a.m. Thomas More College, $500; $50 discount if registration received by April 15. Registration required by May 31. 635-6941; http://www.thomasmore.edu/fieldstation. Crestview Hills. SUMMER CAMP - ARTS

6941; www.thomasmore.edu/fieldstation. Crestview Hills.

SUMMER CAMP - ARTS

Camp Ernst Middle School Drama Camp, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Production by 3-5 graders. Camp Ernst Middle School, $75 grades 6-8 for week; $65 grades 3-5 for week. Registration required by June 15. 534-4000.

SUMMER CAMP MISCELLANEOUS

Skidaddles Summer Camp, 7 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Skidaddles Inc. $170 for five days, $140 for four days, $115 for three days. Registration required. 647-7529; www.skidaddles.com. Florence. Advanced Circus Camp, 7 p.m. Public Camp Show. Includes T-shirt. Diocesan Catholic Children’s Home, 75 Orphanage Road, Intermediate and advanced circus students. Ages 7 and up. $360, $270 siblings. Registration required. Presented by My Nose Turns Red Theatre Company. 581-7100; www.mynoseturnsred.org. Fort Mitchell. S U N D A Y, J U L Y 1 8

SUMMER CAMP RELIGIOUS/VBS

Vacation Bible School, 6:30 p.m.-8:30 p.m. Daily through July 23. Grant’s Lick Baptist Church, 941 Clay Ridge Road, All children through high school learn about Jesus’ love, create crafts, sing songs and play games with visit to Saddle Ridge Ranch. Free. 6352444; www.grantslickbc.com. Alexandria.

SUMMER CAMP - YMCA Teen Adventure Trips, 8 a.m. Lake Champlain Bike Extreme Challenge. Biking, tubing and hiking. $1,090; coed teens entering grades 9-11. Eight days and seven nights. Daily through July 25. Camp Ernst, 7615 Camp Ernst Road, Exploring Little Miami Scenic Bike Trail. Swimming, canoeing and camping. Registration required. 586-6181; www.myycamp.org. Burlington. M O N D A Y, J U L Y 1 9

SUMMER CAMP - ACADEMIC Sr. Curator Archaeology Camp, 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through July 23. Behringer-Crawford Museum, 1600 Montague Road, Ages 11-17 work like an archaeologist, learning the tools of the trade and experiencing the past. $175, $150 members. Reservations required. 491-4003. Covington.

SUMMER CAMP - ARTS

Camp Ernst Middle School Drama Camp, 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Grades 6-8. Daily through July 21. Camp Ernst Middle School, $75 grades 6-8 for week; $65 grades 3-5 for week. Registration required by June 15. 534-4000.

Camp Carnegie Art and Drama Workshops, 1 p.m.-5 p.m. Production: The Bad Guy Talk Show. Workshop 4. Snack provided. Mondays and Wednesdays. July 14, 19, 21, 26 and 28. Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, Free; $10 registration deposit. Registration required. 491-2030; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

SUMMER CAMP - HORSES

SUMMER CAMP MISCELLANEOUS

Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Summer Program, 6:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Daily through July 23. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Highland Heights, $130-$180 depending on age of child. Registration required by June 1. 581-6166. Highland Heights. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Summer Program, 6:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Daily through July 23. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Taylor Mill, $130-$180 depending on age of child. Registration required by June 1. 5816166. Taylor Mill. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Summer Program, 6:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Daily through July 23. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Florence, $130-$180 depending on age of child. Registration required by June 1. 5816166. Florence. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Summer Program, 6:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Daily through July 23. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center, $130-$180 depending on age of child. Registration required by June 1. 581-6166. Richwood. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Summer Program, 6:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Daily through July 23. Abby’s Child Enrichment Center Fort Thomas, $130-$180 depending on age of child. Registration required by June 1. 581-6166. Fort Thomas. Skidaddles Summer Camp, 7 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Skidaddles Inc. $170 for five days, $140 for four days, $115 for three days. Registration required. 647-7529; www.skidaddles.com. Florence. SummerCare: Adventures in Wonderland, 7 a.m.-6 p.m. Daily through July 23. Fort Wright Elementary School, $128 week; $29 per day. Registration required online. 4312075; www.childreninc.org. Fort Wright. SummerCare: Adventures in Wonderland, 7 a.m.-6 p.m. Daily through July 23. Ockerman Elementary School, $128 week; $29 per day. Registration required online. 4312075; www.childreninc.org. Florence.

Skidaddles Summer Camp, 7 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Skidaddles Inc. $170 for five days, $140 for four days, $115 for three days. Registration required. 647-7529; www.skidaddles.com. Florence. W E D N E S D A Y, J U L Y 1 4

SUMMER CAMP - ACADEMIC High School Summer Science, Technology, Engineering & Math Institute, 9 a.m. Thomas More College, $500; $50 discount if registration received by April 15. Registration required by May 31. 635-6941; http://www.thomasmore.edu/fieldstation. Crestview Hills.

SUMMER CAMP MISCELLANEOUS

Skidaddles Summer Camp, 7 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Skidaddles Inc. $170 for five days, $140 for four days, $115 for three days. Registration required. 647-7529; www.skidaddles.com. Florence. T H U R S D A Y, J U L Y 1 5

SUMMER CAMP - ACADEMIC High School Summer Science, Technology, Engineering & Math Institute, 9 a.m. Thomas More College, $500; $50 discount if registration received by April 15. Registration required by May 31. 635-6941; http://www.thomasmore.edu/fieldstation. Crestview Hills. SUMMER CAMP MISCELLANEOUS

Skidaddles Summer Camp, 7 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Skidaddles Inc. $170 for five days, $140 for four days, $115 for three days. Registration required. 647-7529; www.skidaddles.com. Florence. F R I D A Y, J U L Y 1 6

SUMMER CAMP - ACADEMIC High School Summer Science, Technology, Engineering & Math Institute, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Thomas More College, $500; $50 discount if registration received by April 15. Registration required by May 31. 635-

Little Britain Stables Horse Camp, 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Daily through July 23. Little Britain Stables, $300. Registration required. 586-7990; ww.LittleBritainStable.com. Burlington.

SUMMER CAMP MISCELLANEOUS

SUMMER CAMP - NATURE

Finstitute Summer Camp, 9:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Frogs. Daily through July 23. Newport Aquarium, $190, $150 passholders; $170, $130 passholders advance by May 5. Registration required. 815-1442. Newport. Sunrock Farm Nature Camp, 9:30 a.m.2:30 p.m. Daily through July 23. Sunrock Farm, $195 per week. Registration required. 781-5502. Wilder.


Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

RECORDER

T h u r s d a y, J u l y 1 5 , 2 0 1 0

PEOPLE

|

IDEAS

|

RECIPES

BEST FRIENDS FOREVER

Summer splash

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Brothers Jacob and Seth Ryan of Fort Thomas pose for a picture at the Fort Thomas Swim Club.

Fort Thomas brothers are more like best friends When neighbors see 9year-old Jacob Ryan playing near his Wilbers Lane home, they can expect that his little brother Seth, 5, isn’t far behind. The Fort Thomas brothers, who spend a lot of time on hot days at the Fort Thomas Swim Club, said they play together a lot. “Seth is not like other kids that completely terrorize their brothers,” said Jacob. “We get along and like to play games together.” From swimming to playing in their yard, the boys are often found playing out-

side together, Jacob said. “I like my brother because he plays basketball and stuff with me,” Seth said. One of the brothers’ favorite memories together is a recent trip to Cumberland Lake, where they got to ride on a pontoon boat. Once summer break is finished, Seth will be starting kindergarten at Moyer Elementary, where Jacob attends. The boys said they’ll most likely stay close growing up. “Hopefully we’ll be friends forever,” Jacob said.

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Lena Watkins of Newport encourages her niece Cloee Watkins, left; nephew Donavin Watkins, 4, center; and daughter Kaylin Jones, 3, to jump into the waters of Vet’s Pool in Newport and escape the above 90 degree afternoon heat Thursday, July 8. Located at 26 Caroline Drive, Newport, Vet’s Pool is the only publicly operated pool in Campbell County. Hours are from noon to 6 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and noon to 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Admission is $3 for children ages 5-12 or seniors 65 and older, and $5 for age 13 and up. Admission is $2 after 3 p.m., and is always free for children ages 4 and younger. For information about pool passes and parties visit the Parks & Recreation home page under the government tab of www.newportky.gov.

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Swimming through the waters of Vet’s Pool, Jesse Byrne Jr., 8, hangs onto his dad, Jesse, with a smile.

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Breanna Chandler, 4, of Newport, and her aunt Merrie Chandler, splash and swim across Vet’s Pool in Newport .

THINGS TO DO Market in MainStrasse

The Covington Farmers Market will be stationed in the MainStrasse Village in Covington Saturday, July 17, from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. The market will feature mushrooms, onions, apples, baked goods, pumpkins, cut flowers and more. For more information, call 859-292-2163 or visit www.mainstrasse.org.

Antiques in Burlington

Strike a deal at the Burlington Antique Show Sunday, July 18, at the Boone County Fairgrounds from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. The antique show is expected to feature more than 200 vendors. Early buying will be available from 6 a.m. to 8 a.m. Cost to enter the antique show early is $5. The cost to enter after 8 a.m. is $3. The show is free for ages 12 and under. The Boone County Fairgrounds are located at 5819 Idlewild Road. For details, call 513-9226847 or visit www.burlingtonantiqueshow.com.

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Gangsters in Newport

Learn about Newport’s connection to well-known crime figures, including gangsters, gamblers and ladies of the night during the Newport Gangster Walking Tours Saturday, July 17, at 1 p.m. and 5 p.m. The tour, which lasts 90 minutes, will include buildings that housed casinos, brothels and speakeasies. The tour begins at the Gangsters Dueling Piano Bar, located at 18 E. 5th St., which is next to the Newport Syndicate. Tickets are $15. For more information, call 859-491-8000 or visit www.newportgangsters.com.

Matthew Russell, 32, of Newport, leaps into Vet's Pool from a diving board.

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Jake Lusk, left, 8, of Newport, winces as his friend Sylvan Frazier, 8, of Newport, shakes his head after a dip underwater.

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Share your events Go to nky.com and click on Share! to get your event into The Recorder.

CE-0000409497

DON’T MISS ty n u o C The Campbell

Cousins Samuel Russell, left, 9, and Paul Morris, 10, both of Newport, at Vet's Pool in Newport Thursday, July 8.

ds Farm Tour a o r k c a B !

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Robert Engram, 17, of Newport, dives into Vet’s Pool.

Sat. July 17th 9am-5pm Rain or Shine! FREE ADMISSION and FAMILY FRIENDLY! Miles of Smiles and Call us at 859 635-9587 or visit us for information and to download Memories Await! your map at http://home.fuse.net/campbellcd.


B2

CCF Recorder

July 15, 2010

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD F R I D A Y, J U L Y 1 6

COOKING CLASSES

Walk and Wok at the Boone County Farmers Market, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Boone County Cooperative Extension Service, 6028 Camp Ernst Road, Group walks at least a mile, visits farmers market to pick up produce, then cooks and eats lunch. Simple, healthy recipes shared. Ages 18 and up. $10. Registration required. 586-6101. Burlington.

FARMERS MARKET

Boone County Farmers Market, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Boone County Farmers Market, Ky. 18 and Camp Ernst Road, From apples to zucchini, and everything in between. With perennial plants, there are annuals and hanging baskets for all occasions. Presented by Boone County Cooperative Extension Service. 586-6101. Burlington. Campbell County Farmers’ MarketAlexandria, 3 p.m.-6 p.m. Southern Lanes Sports Center, 7634 Alexandria Pike, Parking lot. Includes produce, plants, flowers, jams, jellies, honey and arts and crafts. 572-2600; http://ces.ca.uky.edu/campbell/FarmersMarket. Alexandria.

MUSEUMS

Creation Museum’s Petting Zoo, 10:30 a.m.-8 p.m. Creation Museum, 2800 Bullittsburg Church Road, Outdoors. Children can touch and feed the animals. Included with admission: $21.95 ages 13-59, $16.95 ages 60 and up, $11.95 ages 5-12; $7 planetarium. 888-582-4253; www.creationmuseum.org. Petersburg.

MUSIC - CLASSIC ROCK

Metrio, 8:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. Rooftop Club. Chez Nora, 530 Main St. Featuring Mickey Foellger, Eddie Wilbers and Tom Kohlhepp. 491-8027; http://www.cheznora.com/. Covington.

MUSIC - COUNTRY

Whiskey Creek, 10 p.m. Peecox II, 12200 Madison Pike, 356-1440. Independence.

MUSIC - JAZZ

New Sleepcat Band, 7:30 p.m. Dee Felice Cafe, 529 Main St. Directed by Bill Gemmer and features John Von Ohlen. 261-2365; www.deefelice.com. Covington.

MUSIC - POP

Velvet Soul, 7 p.m. Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Free. 342-2665; www.bcpl.org. Burlington.

MUSIC - R&B

II Juicy, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Riverside Marina Bar and Grill, 145 Mary Ingles Highway (Ky. 8), Presented by Riverside Marina. 442-8111. Dayton, Ky.

ON STAGE - STUDENT THEATER

Church Girls, 8 p.m. Stauss Theatre, 101 Fine Arts Center, Northern Kentucky University, Musical comedy. Chaos and calamity ensue when the Umatilla Second Christian Church Women’s Auxiliary League gets ready for its annual Mother’s Day Pageant. Dinner served in the Corbett Theatre Lobby one and a half hours prior to performance. $55 two shows, $30; show only $15. Registration required. 572-5464; www.nku.edu/~theatre. Highland Heights.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Best of Shadowbox, 7:30 p.m. 10:30 p.m. Shadowbox Cabaret, Newport on the Levee, Sketch comedy shorts and music by BillWho?. $30, $20 seniors and students. Through Sept. 4. 957-7625; www.shadowboxcabaret.com. Newport. A Little Night Murder, 8 p.m. Monmouth Theatre, 636 Monmouth St. Interactive murder mystery. Family friendly. $14, $12 seniors, student and ages 12 and under. Call box office. Through July 31. 655-9140. Newport.

SPECIAL EVENTS

Lewis & Clark and the Indian Country National Touring Exhibit, 9 a.m.-9 p.m. Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, National traveling exhibit tells the story of the explorers’ historic 1804-1806 expedition from a different point of view-that of the Indians who lived along their route. Lewis & Clark crossed the traditional homelands of more than 50 Native American tribes. The exhibit examines this monumental encounter of cultures and examines its past and present effects on the lives of the tribes which still live in the region. Free. Presented by Boone County Public Library. Through Aug. 13. 342-2665; www.bcpl.org. Burlington. S A T U R D A Y, J U L Y 1 7

CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS

Freedom Dancers, 7:30 p.m.-10 p.m. Florence Christian Church, 300 Main St. Family-friendly group that square dances and line dances. $5. Presented by Southwestern Ohio/Northern Kentucky Square Dancers Federation. 513-929-2427; www.so-nkysdf.com. Florence.

FARMERS MARKET

Covington Farmers Market, 8 a.m.-2 p.m. MainStrasse Village, Main Street, Promenade. Mushrooms, onions, apples, baked goods, pumpkins, cut flowers and more. Presented by Covington Farmers Market. 292-2163. Covington. Simon Kenton High School Farmer’s Market, 8:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Independence Courthouse, 5272 Madison Pike, Includes local vendors’ produce and products and organic produce grown by Simon Kenton’s Future Farmers of America.803-9483. Independence.

HISTORIC SITES

Railway Museum of Greater Cincinnati, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Railway Museum of Greater Cincinnati, 315 W. Southern Ave. Climb aboard a caboose or a diesel switch engine. Collection of engines, cars and cabooses. $4, $2 ages 10 and under. 513-574-7672; www.cincirailmuseum.org. Covington. Dinsmore Homestead, 1 p.m.-5 p.m. Dinsmore Homestead, 5656 Burlington Pike, 1842 farmhouse and furnishings of the Dinsmore family. Tours begin on the hour; the last tour begins at 4 p.m. $5, $3 ages 60 and up, $2 ages 7-17, members and ages 6 and under free. 586-6117; www.dinsmorefarm.org. Burlington.

MUSEUMS

Creation Museum’s Petting Zoo, 9:30 a.m.6 p.m. Creation Museum, Included with admission: $21.95 ages 13-59, $16.95 ages 60 and up, $11.95 ages 5-12; $7 planetarium. 888-582-4253; www.creationmuseum.org. Petersburg. Centennials: The City of Fort Mitchell, Boy Scouts of America and Devou Park, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Behringer-Crawford Museum, $7; $6 ages 60 and up; $4 ages 3-17; free to members. 491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

For more about Greater Cincinnati’s dining, music, events, movies and more, go to Metromix.com.

MUSIC - BLUES

Sonny’s Solo Blues, 9 p.m.-midnight, Claddagh Irish Pub Newport, One Levee Way, 581-8888; www.claddaghirishpubs.com. Newport. Ricky Nye and the Red Hots Reunion Show, 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m. Sidebar, 322 Greenup St. Free. 431-3456. Covington.

MUSIC - COUNTRY

Whiskey Creek, 10 p.m. Peecox II, 356-1440. Independence.

MUSIC - JAZZ

New Sleepcat Band, 7 p.m. Dee Felice Cafe, 261-2365; www.deefelice.com. Covington.

ON STAGE - STUDENT THEATER

Church Girls, 8 p.m. Stauss Theatre, $55 two shows, $30; show only $15 available beginning April 15. Registration required. 5725464; www.nku.edu/~theatre. Highland Heights.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Best of Shadowbox, 7:30 p.m. 10:30 p.m. Shadowbox Cabaret, $30, $20 seniors and students. 957-7625; www.shadowboxcabaret.com. Newport. A Little Night Murder, 8 p.m. Monmouth Theatre, $14, $12 seniors, student and ages 12 and under. Call box office. 655-9140. Newport.

SPECIAL EVENTS

Lewis & Clark and the Indian Country National Touring Exhibit, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Boone County Main Library, Free. 342-2665; www.bcpl.org. Burlington.

TOURS

Campbell County Backroads Farm Tour, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Campbell County Conservation District, 8351 E. Main St. Suite 104, Self-guided auto tour may begin from any one of 16 farms in county. Includes wineries, animal and produce farms, a log cabin museum, an equestrian center, honey bee farm, horse farm and farmer’s markets. Free. 635-9587; http://home.fuse.net/campbellcd. Alexandria. Newport Gangster Walking Tour, 1 p.m. 5 p.m. Gangsters Dueling Piano Bar, 18 E. 5th St. Explore Newport’s connection to wellknown crime figures, including gangsters, gamblers and ladies of the night. $15. 4918000. Newport. S U N D A Y, J U L Y 1 8

ANTIQUES SHOWS

Burlington Antique Show, 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Boone County Fairgrounds, 5819 Idlewild Road, More than 200 vendors with antiques and vintage collectibles. Early buying, 6-8 a.m. with $5 admission. $3, free ages 12 and under. Presented by Burlington Antique Show. 513-922-6847; www.burlingtonantiqueshow.com. Burlington.

ATTRACTIONS

Bizarre and Beautiful Gallery, 9 a.m.-7 p.m. Newport Aquarium, Included with admission: $22, $15 ages 2-12. 261-7444; http://www.newportaquarium.com. Newport.

EXERCISE CLASSES

Yoga, 6:30 p.m. Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Bring mat. $25 per month. Registration required. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 342-2665; www.bcpl.org. Burlington.

LITERARY - LIBRARIES

Writer’s Group, 7 p.m. Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Share work, get feedback, encouragement and inspiration to write your masterpiece. Free. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 342-2665. Burlington.

LITERARY - STORY TIMES

Preschool Story Time, 10 a.m. Newport Branch Library, 901 E. Sixth St. Stories, songs and crafts. Ages 4-5. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 572-5035. Newport. Pajama Story Time, 7 p.m. Fort Thomas-Carrico Branch Library, 1000 Highland Ave. Stories, songs and activities. Ages 3 and up. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 572-5033. Fort Thomas. Tot Time, 11 a.m. Cold Spring Branch Library, 3920 Alexandria Pike, Short stories, games, dancing and baby signing. Ages 18 months2 1/2 years. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 781-6166. Cold Spring. T U E S D A Y, J U L Y 2 0

COMMUNITY DANCE Line Dancing, 7 p.m.-9 p.m. Lookout Heights Civic Club, 1661 Park Road, Holly and Bernie Ruschman, instructors. Beginners welcome. $6, $3 for first-timers. Presented by H & B Dance Co. 727-0904. Fort Wright. FARMERS MARKET

Campbell County Farmers’ Market-Highland Heights, 3 p.m.-6 p.m. Vegetables. Campbell County Senior Center, 3504 Alexandria Pike, Parking lot. Presented by Campbell County Cooperative Extension Service. 572-2600; http://ces.ca.uky.edu/campbell/. Highland Heights.

ON STAGE - STUDENT THEATER

ON STAGE - STUDENT THEATER

MUSEUMS

Creation Museum’s Petting Zoo, noon-6 p.m. Creation Museum, Included with admission: $21.95 ages 13-59, $16.95 ages 60 and up, $11.95 ages 5-12; $7 planetarium. 888-5824253; www.creationmuseum.org. Petersburg.

MUSIC - JAZZ

Church Girls, 6:30 p.m. Stauss Theatre, $55 two shows, $30; show only $15 available beginning April 15. Registration required. 572-5464; www.nku.edu/~theatre. Highland Heights.

ON STAGE - THEATER

A Little Night Murder, 8 p.m. Monmouth Theatre, $14, $12 seniors, student and ages 12 and under. Call box office. 655-9140. Newport.

About calendar

To submit calendar items, go to “www.NKY.com” and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to “life@communitypress.com” along with event information. Items are printed on a space-available basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to “www.NKY.com” and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page. W E D N E S D A Y, J U L Y 2 1

ART CENTERS & ART MUSEUMS

Artworks Mural Presentation, 10 a.m. Artisans Enterprise Center, 25 W. Seventh St. Interactive presentation with youth artists, the mayor and more. Screening of film about Covington by two youth artists, Amanda and Jacob. Presented by City of Covington. 2922322; www.covingtonky.com. Covington.

FARMERS MARKET

Earth Mother Market, 3 p.m.-7 p.m. Stables Building, 1038 S. Fort Thomas Ave. “Certified Organic” or “Certified Naturally Grown” growers. 572-1225; www.localharvest.org/farmers-markets/M30992. Fort Thomas.

LITERARY LIBRARIES

Chess Club, 7 p.m. Florence Branch Library, 7425 U.S. 42, Chess players of all ages and levels are invited to play. Free. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 342-2665; www.bcpl.org. Florence.

ON STAGE - STUDENT THEATER

Church Girls, 8 p.m. Stauss Theatre, $55 two shows, $30; show only $15 available beginning April 15. Registration required. 5725464; www.nku.edu/~theatre. Highland Heights.

T H U R S D A Y, J U L Y 2 2

EDUCATION E-mail Basics, 10 a.m. Florence Branch Library, 7425 U.S. 42, Learn to set up free account, how to prevent viruses and etiquette tips. Free. Registration required. 3422665. Florence. (Almost) Every Other Thursday Science, 10 a.m. Launch into Space with COSI On Wheels. Pioneer Park, 3950 Madison Pike, Shelterhouse 1. All ages. Free. Presented by Kenton County Parks and Recreation. 5257529. Covington. FARMERS MARKET

Dixie Farmers Market, 2 p.m.-6 p.m. Erlanger Baptist Church, 116 Commonwealth Ave. Fresh produce, fruits, baked goods and flowers. 727-2525. Erlanger.

FESTIVALS

Carmel Manor Festival, 1 p.m.8 p.m. Carmel Manor, 100 Carmel Manor Road, Dinner, flea market, games for all ages. 781-5111. Fort Thomas.

SPORTS

Florence Freedom Baseball, 7:05 p.m. vs. Evansville Otters. WEBN “Thirsty Thursday” featuring Miller Lite draft beers or Pepsi fountain drinks for $1. Champion Window Field, 7950 Freedom Way, VIP includes wait service. Lawn available on game day only. Fans must show a lawn chair or blanket at time of purchase. $10-$12 VIP, $9, $7 lawn. Through Aug. 29. 594-4487; www.florencefreedom.com. Florence.

LITERARY - STORY TIMES

Sunday Jazz in the Afternoon, 4:30 p.m.With The Phil DeGreg Trio. Dee Felice Cafe, 529 Main St. 261-2365; www.deefelicecafe.com. Covington.

Dinsmore Homestead, 1 p.m.-5 p.m. Dinsmore Homestead, $5, $3 ages 60 and up, $2 ages 7-17, members and ages 6 and under free. 586-6117; www.dinsmorefarm.org. Burlington.

Pictured is Rebecca Denison, founder of WORLD (Women Organized to Respond to Life-threatening Disease). The print is part of the Cincinnati Museum Center exhibit, “The Art of Caring: A Look at Life Through Photography,” on display through Sept. 19. It features more than 200 works portraying human emotion and the cycle of life. It is included with admission, $8.50; $7.50, 60 and up; $6.50 ages 3-12. Call 513-287-7000 or visit www.cincymuseum.org.

M O N D A Y, J U L Y 1 9

LEAP for Health, 10 a.m.-10:45 a.m. Boone County Farmers Market, Ky. 18 and Camp Ernst Road, Story time for preschoolers ages 4-6. Hear book, taste food sample from farmers market and participate in physical activity. Free. 586-6101. Burlington. Toddler Story Time, 10 a.m. Fort ThomasCarrico Branch Library, 1000 Highland Ave. Ages 2-3. Free. Registration required. 5725033. Fort Thomas. Preschool Story Time, 1:30 p.m. Cold Spring Branch Library, 3920 Alexandria Pike, Ages 4-5. Free. Registration required. 781-6166. Cold Spring. Pajama Story Time, 7 p.m. Newport Branch Library, 901 E. Sixth St. Ages 3 and up. Registration required. 572-5035. Newport. Baby Time, 9:30 a.m. 10:30 a.m. Newport Branch Library, 901 E. Sixth St. Clap, sing and bounce with your child. Birth to age 2. Free. Registration required. 572-5035. Newport.

HISTORIC SITES

PROVIDED © ANNIE LEIBOVITZ COURTESY LEIBOVITZ STUDIO

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

A horse meanders in a pasture in the morning light at Howard and Terry Kleier’s Lazy K Ranch on Siry Road in California June 25. The ranch is a tour stop on the 2010 Campbell County Backroads Farm Tour. The self-guided tour, which will take place July 17 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., includes 16 Campbell County farms. Those farms include wineries, animal and produce farms, a log cabin museum, an equestrian center, a honey bee farm, horse farm and farmers’ markets. For more information, call 635-9587 or visit http://home.fuse.net/campbellcd.

Church Girls, 8 p.m. Stauss Theatre, $55 two shows, $30; show only $15 available beginning April 15. Registration required. 5725464; www.nku.edu/~theatre. Highland Heights.

RECREATION

Cornhole Tournament, 7 p.m. Peecox II, 12200 Madison Pike, $5. 356-1440. Independence.

PROVIDED

An Evening with Sting is at 8 p.m. Tuesday, July 20, at Riverbend Music Center, 6295 Kellogg Ave. The concer features the Royal Philharmonic Concert Orchestra with Steven Mercurio, conductor. For tickets, call 800-745-3000 or visit www.ticketmaster.com.


Life

CCF Recorder

July 15, 2010

B3

Some factors involved in becoming mature

Consider, “If you find that your challenges balloon out when you think they should be diminishing; if you feel too tired to get up again but realize that life never lets you down very long; if life is even less fair than they warned you it would be; well, you are probably quite healthy and normal.” So writes psychologist Dr. Eugene Kennedy. What he’s expressing are some of the elements involved in becoming mature. When we’re young we think that becoming mature means that troubles level off and we’re more in control of life. The truth is that the difference between an adolescent and a mature adult is not that the adult has fewer problems. Rather, it’s because the

adult – if he or she is actually becoming m o r e mature – becomes m o r e ccomFather Lou aplished in Guntzelman coping. Coping Perspectives means figuring out healthy ways of dealing with the problems of life rather than seeking escapes from them. Mature adults come to realize, at least in some subtle way, that how we handle our problems and pressures is what brings about maturation. It may sound paradoxical, but Carl Jung said, “Man needs difficulties; they are necessary for health.”

The Aztecs had a saying: “A boy remains a boy until there is need of a man.” The same for all of us. The vexation and pain of our own problems powerfully show us the need for a mature man or woman to be standing in our shoes. If we’re courageous, we rise to the occasion. If we’re wimpy we opt out with some excuse, get high, or get lost in the world of technology. The contradictions, pressures and inconsistencies of life are the midwives that give birth to many precious human qualities. Jung also noted, “The serious problems of life are never solved, and if they seem to have been solved, something humanly important has been lost.” Another important factor in becoming mature is

Vigil honors POWs A candlelight vigil will take place at 8 p.m. Aug. 20 in honor of all the prisoners of war and missing in action that have never made it home. It will take place at the Florence Government Center Memorial Area.

The event is sponsored by Northern Kentucky Chapter 5 of Blue Star Mothers of America.

learning how to balance. To be mature is not a matter of getting 100 on some kind of Life Test. It is rather a balancing of the demands of life so that A equals B equals C. These alphabet letters, of course, represent various ingredients of a healthy life which have to be integrated in a reasonably harmonious balance. What are the ingredients that need balancing? Aspects such as self and others, gratification and discipline, bodily needs and spiritual needs, intellect and emotions, action and reflection, self-assertion and respect for others and the demands of relationships.

Bring this ad in to

Father Lou Guntzelman is a Catholic priest of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati. Contact him at columns@ communitypress.com or P.O. Box 428541, Cincinnati, OH 45242.

Sconces

Chandeliers

Lamps

Outdoor Lighting Out

SAVE

20% to * 50%

For information, contact Lorene Friedman at 859371-8520 or lorenefriedman@insightbb.com.

PONDARAMA Saturday, July 17 & Sunday, July 18

*on selected items. Must present ad to receive discount.

We Install!

Sponsored by Meyer Aquascapes

7714 Voice of America Drive West Chester, OH 513.777.1211

513 941-8500

Go to www.aquascapes.com Click on Pondarama to View or Download locations

CE-0000410998

pose of a martyr. We shirk our responsibilities, claim we haven’t had the right breaks, and say that our problems are always someone else’s fault. We need to roll up our sleeves and struggle with the inconsistencies of life, and listen to the advice of coach philosopher Lou Holtz: “Life is 10 percent what happens to you and 90 percent how you respond to it.”

Don’t Leave This Ad At Home!

FREE Self Guided Water Garden Tour Movies, dining, events and more Metromix.com

The over-riding goal is to become more human. Do the young have a more rugged road? Is it more difficult for most people to mature today? Author Joseph Gallagher thinks so. He writes; “The pressure problem of many people today is the problem of toomuch-ness… Too much noise, too much news, too many distractions, too many meetings, too many memos, too many social obligations, too many expectations, etc.” These make it more difficult to cope in a healthy way. Some of us opt out of maturing by adopting the

CE-0000409836

www.lightingefx.com

6920 Dixie Highway Florence, KY 859.282.6400

Lower Prices Are here to stay! Remke and bigg’s have come together to make your shopping experience better. We have been building a unique shopping experience for years. Now, Remke bigg’s brings the best of both worlds together... and that will make all the difference for you. To Our Remke Customers, you’ll experience lower prices on the brands you use the most. To Our biggs Customers, you’ll still get the same pump perks you know and love.

Matthew Remke

CE-0000403285

Bill Remke

We invite you to come experience the Remke bigg’s difference.

www.remkes.com


B4

CCF Recorder

July 15, 2010

Life

Zucchini: The other green summertime vegetable Last week it was all about pickling cucumbers. This week the requests are pouring in for zucchini bread recipes. The ones I’m sharing today are in my “Recipe Hall of Fame.� These are the most requested, especially Rita this time Heikenfeld of year. T h e Rita’s kitchen zucchini, like everything else in my garden, is a couple weeks early and I’m already picking every day. With county fairs coming up, I’ve had lots of requests for zucchini bread recipes that, as one reader said, “will win me that elusive ribbon.� One of the recipes I’m sharing today did just that: It won a blue ribbon for Susan Zugohoer, a Northern Kentucky reader. She shared her recipe several years ago and it’s a popular one. How’s that for a testimonial?

Susan’s blue ribbon zucchini bread

3 cups finely grated zucchini (squeeze moisture out before measuring) 3 cups sugar 11â „2 cups vegetable oil 4 eggs 3 cups flour 11â „2 teaspoons cinnamon 2 teaspoons baking powder 1 teaspoon baking soda 1 â „2 teaspoon salt 1 cup chopped nuts Grease and flour 9-by-13 pan or 3 loaf pans. Mix zucchini, sugar, oil and eggs. Beat two minutes. Combine dry ingredients. Add to mixture and blend well. Add nuts. Bake at 350 degrees for 45 minutes to one hour or until done. If desired, frost with cream cheese icing.

Chocolate zucchini bread/cake

It’s a cross between a bread and a cake, so either name is appropriate. This has become a favorite of everyone who has made it.

muffins/cupcakes. Bake at 350 degrees for 20 to 25 minutes or until toothpick inserted in center comes out clean. Check after 20 minutes.

Butterscotch zucchini bread

LISA J. MAUCH/STAFF

My editor Lisa Mauch’s version of the recipe for chocolate zucchini bread/cake. 11⠄2 cups shredded zucchini (squeeze moisture out before measuring) 1 cup flour 1 ⠄2 cup unsweetened cocoa powder, sifted 1 teaspoon baking soda 1 ⠄4 teaspoon baking powder 1 ⠄4 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon cinnamon 1 ⠄4 teaspoon allspice 1 ⠄2 cup canola oil 1 ⠄2 cup sugar 1 ⠄2 cup light brown sugar 2 large eggs 1 teaspoon vanilla 3 ⠄4 to 1 cup semi-sweet chocolate chips (mini chips are nice)

Preheat oven to 350. Spray 9-by-5 loaf pan. Set aside shredded zucchini. Whisk together flour, cocoa, baking soda, baking powder, salt, cinnamon, and allspice. Set aside. Beat oil, sugars, eggs, and vanilla until well blended, and fold in zucchini. Add flour mixture, mixing just until combined. Fold in chips. Bake until toothpick inserted in center comes out clean, about 55 to 65 minutes. Place on wire rack to cool 10 minutes, then remove and finish cooling. Variation: These also are good made as

Don’t take it out of the oven too soon. I baked one pan for 50 minutes – it looked great coming out of the oven, but it sunk in the middle when it cooled, a sure indication of underbaking. 3 eggs 1 cup oil 2 teaspoons vanilla (I used 1 tablespoon) 2 cups sugar 2 cups grated zucchini (squeeze moisture out before measuring) 2 cups flour 1 teaspoon baking soda 1 ⠄4 teaspoon baking powder 1 teaspoon salt 1 or 2 teaspoons cinnamon (I used 2) 1 ⠄2 teaspoon ginger 1 ⠄2 teaspoon nutmeg 1 ⠄2 cup rolled oats 1 package (3.4-ounce

size) instant butterscotch pudding mix 1 cup nuts, raisins or other dried fruit Beat eggs, oil, vanilla and sugar together well. Add zucchini. Then mix the flour and the rest of the dry ingredients together and then add to the egg mixture, blending well. Pour into two greased, floured, wax paper lined pans. Bake one hour at 350 degrees or until toothpick inserted in center comes out clean.

Lemon frosting

Mix and spread on bread after it cools. 2 cups confectioner’s sugar, sifted 2 tablespoons lemon juice 4 tablespoons butter, softened Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator and author. E-mail columns@community press.com with “Rita’s kitchen� in the subject line. Call 513-2487130, ext. 356.

Aquarium launches Fish-Facebook Contest Something fishy is going on at the Newport Aquarium Facebook page. Throughout the month of July, visitors to the page are encouraged to make a funny fish face photo and

post it on Newport Aquarium’s Facebook wall. Everyone who posts a photo will be entered to win a Family Four-Pack of Aquarium tickets and Penguin Encounters.

Two lucky winners will be selected at random: one adult and one child (12 and under). Need inspiration? The Newport Aquarium staff posted a video on the site

explaining the contest and demonstrating the best ways to make funny fish faces. Visit www.facebook.com/ newportaquarium to post a photo, to watch the video or to read the official sweepstakes rules. All photos must be post-

ed by 11:59 p.m. Saturday, July 31 to be eligible. No purchase is necessary to enter or win. Newport Aquarium is open to the public 365 days a year. Extended summer hours last until Sept. 4, during which the aquarium is open

from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Summer Family hours are from 4 to 7 p.m. Sunday through Friday. Two kids get in for free with each adult paying full price. For information on Newport Aquarium or for tickets and directions, visit www. newportaquarium.com.

It’s about comfort‌. it’s about caring‌it’s about support for the patient and family.   c ^^^Z[LSPaHIL[OJVTOVZWPJL We can’t control the amount of time someone has left, but we can add to the quality of that time. At St. Elizabeth Hospice, we help families say “let’s make the most of the time we have left together.â€? Hospice treats the person, not the disease. Our emphasis is on comfort, enabling patients to spend their last days with peace and dignity. We can help you and the ones you love.

:[ ,SPaHIL[O /VZWPJL  :V\[O 3VVW +YP]L ,KNL^VVK 2@  Serving Northern Kentucky for 30 years CE-0000394220

Follow Northern Kentucky sports on Twitter twitter.com/crkysports

CE-0000401437


ON

THE

RECORD

| DEATHS | Editor Michelle Shaw | smhaw@nky.com | 578-1053 BIRTHS

POLICE

|

REAL

ESTATE

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

N K Y. c o m

E-mail: k

ws@

POLICE REPORTS

FORT THOMAS Arrest

Brian McCoy, 39, 22 St. Nicholas Place, DUI at 700 block of Highland, June 24. Robert Beagle, 42, 126 South Fort Thomas Ave. No. 2, second degree burglary at 128 South Fort Thomas Ave., June 24. Joshua James Horvath, 18, 1321 Alexandria Pike No. 3F, possession of marijuana, unlawful transaction with a minor at 840 Alexandria Pike, June 29. Anthony Dugan, 32, 48 Hollywood C, warrant at 48 Hollywood C, June 29. Barbara Creech, 32, 327 Elm St., warrant at 1100 Highland Ave., June 29. Frances Rackley, 27, 1731 Esmonde St., warrant at I-471 north, June 30. William McCoon, 41, 1335 Mussell Shoals Road, first degree possession of a controlled substance, warrant at I-471 south, July 7. Eric Gabbard, 32, 929 Rutledge Ave. Apt. 2, DUI at Highland Avenue at Deshler, July 8. Travis Sentel Smith, 29, 3080 McHenry Apt. 1, possession of marijuana at 40 Hollywoods Apt. 1, July 2. Karyn Stubbs-Tippenhauer, 40, 336 River Road, warrant at 36 Grant St., July 1.

Shelton King, 22, 420 Fourth Ave., alcohol intoxication in a public place, theft by unlawful taking at Rossford Ave., June 30. Joseph Born, 27, 160 Pickets Charge No. 155, alcohol intoxication in a public place, carrying a concealed deadly weapon at 1972 Alexandria Pike, July 3. Clint Turner Jr., 38, 1601 Trankler Road, alcohol intoxication in a public place at 143 North Fort Thomas Ave., July 5. Jeremy Frances Horvath, 18, 1321 Alexandria Pike 3F, warrant at Tower Park, July 2. Benjamin Hartzel, 21, 112 Grant St., warrant at 1227 South Fort Thomas Ave., July 3.

Incidents/reports Second degree burglary

Reported at 128 South Fort Thomas Ave., June 24. Reported at 2 Walker Road, July 2. Reported at 100 Rosemont Ave., July 2. Reported at 255 Clover Ridge Ave., July 2. Reported at 120 Pickets Charge, July 2.

Theft by unlawful taking

Reported at 38 Rossford Lane, June 24. Reported at 1015 North Fort Thomas Ave., July 5.

Third degree burglary

Reported at 1041 South Fort Thomas Ave., June 27.

Third degree criminal mischief

Reported at 1538 Alexandria Pike, June 24. Reported at 917 Highland Ave., July 1.

HIGHLAND HEIGHTS/ SOUTHGATE Arrest

Michael Daniels, 25, 2653 Cardinal , DUI at 1972 Alexandria Pike, July 3. Irvin Bacon, 68, 10061 Persimmon Grove, warrant at Alexandria Pike and Johns Hill Road, June 30. Paige Ellis, 18, 1911 Glenway Ave., third degree trafficking a controlled substance at 40 Hidden Valley Drive, June 21. Armando Morales, 24, 26 East Robbins 2, DUI at I-471 north, June 20. Kimberly McGuire, 29, 113 Carlisle Ave., warrant at 525 Alexandria Pike, June 27. Richard Brock, 39, 128 Marshall Drive, fourth degree assault at 128 Marshall Drive, June 27. John Polick, 34, 1157 Park Ave., DUI at Industrial and Orchard, June 26.

Incidents/reports Second degree burglary

Reported at 7 Renshaw Road, June 29. Reported at 71 Elblaine Drive, June 21.

Second degree criminal mischief Reported at 1972 Alexandria Pike,

Kelly Bailer

Kelly Ray Bailer, 49, Alexandria, died July 2, 2010, at his home. He was a disabled construction worker. Survivors include his wife, Robin Bailer of Alexandria; mother, Iva Shelton of Covington; mother-in-law, Maggie Caudle of Alexandria; son, Clarence Bailer of Cold Springs; daughters, Michelle Caudle Phelps of Alexandria, Tracy Bailer, both of New Orleans, La.; brothers, Darrell Shelton, Mike Bailer, BJ Bailer, all of Covington; sisters, Teresa Morgan of Butler, Tina Tables of Ludlow, Robin Meade of Covington, Teresa Monroe of Kings Mill, Kate Moore of Covington, Vicki Dryer of Chester, Va.; and four grandchildren. Burial was in Floral Hills Cemetery in Taylor Mill.

Melissa Baldridge

Melissa Lyn Baldridge, 43, Southgate, died July 6, 2010, at her home. She was an accounting tech-

nician for the IRS in Covington. Her husband, Robert A. Baldridge, died previously. Survivors include her daughter, Jessica Baldridge of Southgate; sister, Beth Murphy of Las Vegas, Nev.; and brother, Jeff Vallandingham of Goodyear, Ariz. Burial was in Floral Hills Memorial Gardens in Taylor Mill. Memorials: Asperger’s Society at Visions Research, P.O. Box 1257, Solana Beach, CA 92075.

Theft by unlawful taking

Reported at 2 Tesseneer Drive, July 2. Reported at 215 Meadow Trail Drive, July 3. Reported at 2526 Alexandria Pike, June 29. Reported at Center and Maple, June 22. Reported at 2335 Alexandria Pike, June 22.

Theft by deception

Reported at 2301 Alexandria Pike, July 1.

Third degree criminal mischief Reported at I-471 south, June 22. Reported at 310 West Walnut St., June 25. Reported at 222 Renshaw Road, June 25.

NEWPORT

Arrest

Ladanvya Kyatte, 35, 200 Bluegrass 92C, fourth degree assault at 200 Bluegrass 92 C, July 8. Charles Ewing, 42, 608 Monmouth St., first degree possession of a controlled substance, possession of marijuana at 628 Monmouth St., July 9. Mitchell Fair, 19, 307 Beechwood Ave., possession of marijuana, tampering with physical evidence at 800 block of Dayton, July 8.

Laptops from Florence and Bret Barbiea of Springboro, Ohio; brother, Alvin Zimmerman of Independence; sister, Myrt McCann of Cold Spring; eight grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Burial was in St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas. Memorials: Hospice of St. Elizabeth Healthcare, 483 S. Loop Road, Edgewood, KY 41017.

$

RECEIVE UP TO

78 weeks

IN REBATES AND CREDITS.

NON-DENOMINATIONAL SERVING GREATER CINCINNATI FOR OVER 40 YEARS.

261-8269

www.tomrechtin.com

KY Master HVAC M00135

Antonio Ramires, 37, 815 Roberts St., fourth degree assault at Eighth and Roberts, July 7. Louis Vaccariello, 52, 5549 Old Blue Rock Road, first degree possession of a controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia, tampering with physical evidence at 628 Monmouth St., July 6. Thomas Meyer, 42, 10026 Glenkroll Court, first degree possession of a controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of marijuana at 628 Monmouth St., July 6. William Fisk, 39, 202 West 11th St. No. 4, possession of marijuana, receiving stolen property at 12th and Patterson, July 7. Hershel Roach, 47, 1727 Highwater Road, criminal possession of a forged prescription at 1301 Monmouth St., July 4. John Phillips, 32, 625 Monroe St., warrant, second degree possession of a controlled substance at 625 Monroe St., July 2. Donald Buck, 49, 1710 Eastern Ave.

The Community Recorder publishes the names of all adults charged with offenses. The information is a matter of public record and does not imply guilt or innocence. No. 5, theft by unlawful taking at 1 Pavillion Way, June 29.

Incidents/reports Fourth degree assault

Reported at 1301 Monmouth St., July 1. Reported at 400 Sweetbriar, July 1.

Second degree burglary

Reported at 302 Elm St., June 29.

Theft by unlawful taking

Reported at 101 Riverboat Row, July 7. Reported at 210 East Ninth St., July 7. Reported at 715 Overton, July 6. Reported at 1129 Columbia St., July 3. Reported at 404 East Fourth St., July 1. Reported at 901 East Sixth, July 6. Reported at 800 block of Monmouth St., July 6. Reported at 145 Fairfield Ave., July 6.

Theft by unlawful taking, third degree criminal mischief Reported at 1914 Monmouth St., June 27.

Theft of mail matter

Reported at 910 Roberts St., June 30.

Movies, dining, events and more Metromix.com

LUTHERAN

St. Luke Lutheran Church ELCA 4800 Alexandria Pk, Cold Spring, KY 859-441-2848 M Worship Sun 8:30 &10:30am Sunday School 9:30am All Are Welcome www.stlukecoldspring.org

• Receive up to $1200 in Manufacturers Rebates! • Receive up to a $1500 Federal Tax Credit! • Receive up to $250 Kentucky Tax Credit!

RECORDER

THIS SUNDAY

Deaths continued B6

Sunday Worship: Traditional 8:00 & 11:00am Contemporary 9:00am Sunday School 9:50am Contemplative 5:30pm

$2950

per week

Leas e Z one Latonia 859-431-8666 Turfway 859-647-2160

Lucille Barbiea

Lucille Margaret Barbiea, 87, of Florence, formerly of Fort Thomas, died July 3, 2010, at the Hospice of St. Elizabeth Healthcare, Edgewood. She was a homemaker, member of St. Thomas Church in Fort Thomas; Club 55 and Fort Thomas Seniors Citizens. Her husband, Melvin J. Barbiea, died previously. Survivors include her daughter, Deborah McCulloch of Florence; sons, Ken Barbiea of Fort Lauderdale, Fla., Dennis Barbiea of

1599

unit

LOVE & FAITH FELLOWSHIP CHURCH

720 York St., Newport KY 41071 859-581-4244 Pastor: Gordon Milburn Sunday School: 9:30 am Sunday Morning Worship: 10:30 am Sun. & Wed. Eve Service: 6:00 pm

THE

E T A U L M I T RED E C S EXPERIEN CALLING ALL DIE-HARD REDS BASEBALL FANS! The Enquirer is giving you a chance to tell a story of a lifetime with our Ultimate Reds Experience Sweepstakes July 11 - August 1.

OUR GRAND-PRIZE WINNER WILL: • Watch batting practice from the field

IT’S LIKE ONE BIG PLAYGROUP. JUST FOR MOMS.

• Throw out a first pitch at the August 30 game against Milwaukee • Enjoy the game from the exclusive Diamond seats Plus, each week one lucky winner will receive a membership and a $100 gift card to the Reds Hall of Fame and Museum. Look for complete details and your official Ultimate Reds Experience entry form in this Sunday’s Enquirer.

Brought to you by:

where 8^cXn moms meet

An affiliate of the Cincinnati.Com network.

CE-0000411170

Pick up The Enquirer at your local retailer or subscribe today. To subscribe, visit Cincinnati.Com/subscribe or call 1.800.876.4500. CE-0000408473

B5

About police reports

July 1.

DEATHS

CE-0000410107

CCF Recorder

July 15, 2010


B6

CCF Recorder

Deaths

July 15, 2010

From B5

Tom Bauer

Tom Bauer, 81, Fort Thomas, died July 6, 2010, at Carmel Manor Nursing Home, Fort Thomas. He was a brewer with Wiedemann Brewery, Newport, member of St. Therese Parish in Southgate, coached semi-pro baseball and women’s slow pitch softball including the Dairy Cottage Team that won the first Women’s Slow Pitch Championship in Cincinnati, the Girl’s ASA World Champs in 1961. He was a Korean War Army veteran. His wife, Melba L. Andriot Bauer, died April 19. Survivors include his sons, Frank Winburn of Fort Thomas, Lonnie Winburn of South-

gate, and Tom Winburn of Margate, Fla.; daughter, Cindy Winburn of Wilder; sisters, Edie Case of Silver Grove and Joan Bauer of Fort Thomas; five grandchildren; and 10 great-grandchildren. Burial was in St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas. Memorials: Alzheimer’s Association, 644 Linn St., Suite 1026, Cincinnati, OH 45203; or St. Philip’s Church, 1404 Mary Ingles Highway, Melbourne, KY 41059.

Lloyd Bockerstette

Lloyd Harry Bockerstette, 85, Butler, died July 5, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. He was a trucker who hauled cattle to market,

member of the Second Twelve Mile Church, and treasurer for Pleasant Hill (Fryer) Cemetery in Pendleton County. Survivors include his wife, Geneva Fern Bockerstette; sons, Dale Bockerstette of Campbell County and Rick Bockerstette of Pendleton County; seven grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren. Burial was in Pleasant Hill Cemetery. Memorials: Pleasant Hill (Fryer) Cemetery, 197 Norris Road, Butler, KY 41006.

Bruce Collins

Bruce M. Collins, 66, of Cold Spring, formerly of Fort Thomas, died July 2, 2010, at Hospice of St.

Elizabeth Health Care, Edgewood. He was a Lieutenant with the Campbell County Police Department and Campbell County Attorney’s Office, a member of the Fraternal Order of Police and The Blue Knights International, and a United States Air Force veteran. Survivors include his wife, Mary Collins of Cold Spring; son, Robert Collins of Louisville; daughter Kim Sweeney of Aurora, Ind.; and three grandsons. Memorials: Hospice of St. Elizabeth Health Care, 483 S. Loop Road Edgewood, KY 41017; Baptist Convalescent Center, 120 Main St., Newport, KY 41071.

William Corbin

William R. Corbin, 74, California, died July 3, 2010, at his home. He was the retired Associate Superintendent of the Campbell County Board of Education and a member of the First Christian Church in Fort Thomas, the Northern Kentucky Education Association, and the Campbell County Retired Teachers Association. Survivors included his wife, Jane Rouse Corbin of California, Ky. Burial was in Grandview Cemetery in Mentor. Memorials: First Christian Church of Fort Thomas Building Fund, 1031 Alexandria Pike, Fort Thomas, KY 41075.

Harrison Deaton

23 SCOOP*

$

We are a debt relief agency. We help people file for relief under the bankruptcy code. This is an advertisement.

Now Accepting Credit Cards!

DELIVERY 7 DAYS A WEEK www.jsmulchandmore.com *2/3rd Of Yard / Includes Tax

MULCH AND MORE

L.L.C.

(859)363-8049 186 Campbell Rd Exit 171 • To 25 South (1.2 Miles)

Mon-Sat

Steam Cleaning Carpet & Upholstery Commercial/Residential 24 Hour Water Extractions Fully Licensed & Insured

Hourly or Contract Discounts to Senior Citizens 30 years + experience Call 859-991-7234

(859)630-9118 Remodeling and Complete Home and Business Repairs. 27 years experience Free Estimates! Insured.

SHRUB REMOVAL

Drywall, Painting, Doors, Trim Metal Roofs, Decks, Pressure Washing, and More! We also flip properties.

HDTV’s from

$

KEVINS LAWNCARE

week

Leas e Z one Latonia 859-431-8666 Turfway 859-647-2160

& GUTTERS

Rosemary Fehler

Rosemary Catherine Pirman Fehler, 93, Southgate, died June 25, 2010, at Hospice of the Bluegrass Care Center in Fort Thomas. She was a homemaker, a bookkeeper for the Vista Development Corporation, a member of St. Paul United Church of Christ in Fort Thomas, and Southgate Super Seniors. Her husband, Byron G. Fehler, Sr., and son, Byron G. Fehler, Jr., both died previously. Survivors include her sons, Donald Fehler of Highland Heights, Daniel Fehler of Fort Thomas; seven grandchildren; and 10 great-grandchildren. Burial was in Evergreen Cemetery in Southgate. Dobbling Funeral Home in Fort Thomas handled the arrangements. Memorials: St. Paul United Church of Christ, 1 Churchill Dr., Fort Thomas, KY 41075.

Edith Feiler

Edith Feiler, 75, Newport, died July 6, 2010, at Hospice of the Bluegrass Care Center, Fort Thomas. She was a homemaker and member of The Bridge Community Church in Wilder. Her son, Glenn T. Feiler, died previously. Survivors include her husband, David Feiler; sons, David J. Feiler of Berry and Michael B. Feiler of Silver Grove; sister, Alice Perry of Bellevue; six grandchildren; and 11 great-grandchildren. Burial was in Evergreen Cemetery, Southgate.

John Fleming

John S. Fleming, 87, Dayton, died June 29, 2010, at Good Samaritan Hospital. He was a World War II Army Air Corps veteran and a member of Highlands Country Club in Fort Thomas. Survivors include his wife, Pat Fleming; and daughter, Cindy Fleming. Inurnment was in Woodland Mausoleum in Dayton, Ky.

Preston Fryman

Preston David Fryman, 86, Carlisle, died July 3, 2010 at the University of Kentucky Medical Center. He was born August 16, 1923 in Mason Co. to the late Charley & Edith Herndon Fryman, was a retired employee of Cincinnati Gas & Electric and a member of the First Baptist Church of Carlisle. Survivors include his wife of 67 years, Beulah Linville Fryman; son, David P. (Toddy) Fryman, Jr. of Dry Ridge; daughters, Diana Owens

CE-1001570922-01

Free Estimates • Fully Insured

Currently Offering

Phone:

OVER 20 YEARS EXPERIENCE

• Grass Cutting - $25/UP • Mulching - $150/UP • Landscaping - FREE ESTIMATES Call 859-331-8255

10% DISCOUNT AND 1 YEAR WARRANTY

859-525-7888

CE-1001565688-01

LEGAL NOTICE

LAWNBOYS

OFFICE

Licensed & Insured For Your Protection All Work Supervised By David Saner Quality Roofing For Two Generations

LANDSCAPING L LANDSCAP ANDSCAP & MOWING

859-485-6535

Great Rates!

COREY 859-393-4856

Commercial & Residential

380-1236

cohornconcrete@aol.com

www.cohornconcrete.com

www.nkylawnboys.com

FREE ESTIMATES CE-1001565725-01

(859) 356-3217

CE-1001571219-01

• Decorative Concrete • Patios • Sidewalks • Steps • Driveways CE-1001570196-01

15

99 per

104 weeks

Call for a Free Estimate

• Free Estimates • Fully Insured • Over 20 Years Experience

• Shredded Topsoil • Gravel • Fill Dirt, etc. • Friendly Service • Great Rates

859.331.4733 • 859.240.2814

Single Axle Dump Trucks For Hire

•Brick Repairs & Drainage • Bobcat, Excavator & Dump Truck Services • Retaining Walls • Foundation Repairs

• Additions • Barns • Concrete • Decks • Roofing • Septics Skid Loader and Backhoe

MARK WEIGEL & SON General Contractor

859-663-0238

CE-1001573162-02

DRIVEWAYS • CONCRETE PAVING • REPAIR

Licensed & Insured

OHN’S PAINTING & RESTORATION

Pro-Prep Work & Repairs • Prep & Paint Int & Ext • Paint Aluminum Siding • Replace Stucco, Window Seals, Etc “We Can Have Your House Ready To Sell 1-3 Days”

FREE ESTIMATES • INSURED

859•466•8678

Decks • Concrete • Roofing • Tile & Stone Kitchen & Bath Remodel • Home Repair

Chris Ahlers

ahlerscontracting@yahoo.com

859-991-3559

fax: 859-918-1074

we buy junk cars

DL WEBSTER

859-393-4890 BUYING JUNK CARS

we buy junk cars

Union, KY (859)384-3291 (859)307-5513

J

we buy junk cars

NO JOB TOO SMALL FREE ESTIMATES

Dump Site Available Serving all of Northern Kentucky for over 25 years.

CE-1001570005-01

CONCRETE

K&M Construction

CUSTOM REMODELING

EXCAVATING & GRADING

David John Durso, 62, Bellevue, died July 7, 2010, at Hospice of Bluegrass Care Center, Fort Thomas. He was a personal trainer for Urban Active in Florence and Erlanger, an Army veteran and licensed with the national Federation of Professional Trainers. Survivors include his mother, Betty Durso of Bellevue; brothers, Dennis Durso of Louisville, Douglas Durso of Frankfort, Dale Durso of Fort Thomas and Duncan Durso of Cincinnati; sisters, Donna Sayers of Bellevue, Debbie Botts of Hebron, Denise Durso of Fort Thomas, Deana Durso of Bellevue, and companion, Beverly Hamel of Burlington.

859-250-1281

859-803-3875

Specializing in new and old replacement of driveways, patios, sidewalks, steps, retaining walls, decorative concrete work, basement and foundation leaks & driveway additions. We also offer Bobcat, Backhoe, Loader, and Dumptruck work, regrading yards & lot cleaning.

CHRIS 859-393-1138

CE-1001574697-01

ROOTS INCLUDED!

Pruning • Shearing Cleanups • Tear Outs Haulaway • Disposal GREEN TEAM

David Durso

New Construction Homes Additions • Doors • Windows Decks • Siding • Concrete Tile Roofing • Home Remodeling FULLY INSURED • FREE ESTIMATES ACCEPTING ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS

Overgrown

www.cauleycarpetcleaning.com

FREE ESTIMATES

CE-1001556584-01

• Top Soil • Playground Chips • Grass Seed • Seasonal Firewood • Sand • Gravel • Limestone • Pine Mulch • Bagged Mulch • Straw • Pine Straw

CE-1001570097-01

19 SCOOP*

$

CEDAR OR DYED RED OR BLACK

283-1140

CE-1001571225-01

• All Types of Home Repair • Roofing • Decks • Basement and Bathroom • Remodeling

DARK HARDWOOD BARK

ATTORNEY AT LAW

Criminal Law • Divorce Bankruptcy

Cauley

Mt. Zion Construction

BULK MULCH

PATRICK MONOHAN

Harrison Deaton, 78, Alexandria, died July 4, 2010, at his home. He was a member of the Bakers union. Survivors include his wife, Mary Lou Deaton of Alexandria; daughters, Diana Jones of Alexandria, Kimberly Barrett of Florence; sisters, Linda Baker, Janice Turner; brother, Marvin Deaton; four grandchildren; and six great-grandchildren. Burial was in Alexandria Cemetery.

Linnemann Family Funeral Home and Cremation Center, Erlanger, handled the arrangements. Memorials: American Cancer Society, 297 Buttermilk Pike, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017.

we buy junk cars

The Campbell County Fiscal Court, at a regular meeting of the court on Wednesday, July 7, 2010 at 7:00 p.m., at the Campbell County Courthouse, 8352 East Main Street, Alexandria, Kentucky, adopted the following ordinance upon the second reading, said ordinance having been read by title and summary given for the first time at the June 16, 2010 regular meeting of the Court. CAMPBELL COUNTY FISCAL COURT CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY ORDINANCE O-07-10 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CAMPBELL COUNTY FISCAL COURT DISCONTINUING BOB HUBER DRIVE, COUNTY ROAD #1246 LOCATED OFF OF US 27 IN UNINCORPORATED CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY, WHICH HAS NOW BEEN REPLACED WITH THE RECONSTRUCTION OF US 27 PURSUANT TO KRS 178.070, INCLUDING RIGHT-OF-WAY OWNED BY THE CAMPBELL COUNTY ECONOMIC PROGRESS AUTHORITY (CCEPA) AND IDENTIFIED IN PIDN 999-99-35-473.00, AND AUTHORIZING THE NECESSARY LEGAL ACTION AS TO SUCH The full text of Ordinance O-07-10 will be on file in the Office of the County Clerk, Newport, Kentucky and is on file in the Office of the Fiscal Court Clerk, Newport, Kentucky, and same is available for inspection and use by the public during regular business hours. I, Paula K. Spicer, Clerk of the Campbell County Fiscal Court, hereby certify that this summary was prepared by me at the direction of the Campbell County Fiscal Court and that said summary is a true and accurate summary of the contents of Ordinance O-07-10. Paula K. Spicer Fiscal Court Clerk

1001575204

Carlisle and Janie (Marty) Thomas of Florence; brothers, Charles Fryman of Silver Grove and Everett Fryman of Wilder; sister, Julie Moran of Florida; 13 grandchildren, 15 greatgrandchildren and 3 great-great grandchildren. Mathers-Gaunce Funeral Home handled the arrangements. Burial was in Elizaville Cemetery. Memorial contributions are suggested to the church.

Joyce Guzauskas

Joyce Opal Dahlstrom Guzauskas, 70, of Erlanger, formerly of Alexandria, died July 1, 2010, at Woodcrest Manor, Elsmere. She was a self-employed housekeeper. Her daughter, Cindy Guzauskas, died previously. Survivors include her son, John Guzauskas of Florence. Chambers and Grubbs Funeral Home handled the arrangements. Memorials: Boone County Animal Shelter, 5643 Idlewild Road, Burlington, KY 41005.

Barbara Hamlin

Barbara A. Hamlin, 49, Newport, a homemaker, died July 6, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. Survivors include her sons, James and Johnathan Hamlin of Florence; daughter, Pamela Waddle of Ludlow; brother, Edward C. Carberry Jr. of Edwardsburg, Mich.; sisters, Dorothy Carberry of Fort Thomas, Rebekah Pinkston of Niles, Mich.; and nine grandchildren. Fares J. Radel Funeral Home, Newport, handled the arrangements.

Bud Haynes

Bud Haynes, 60, Alexandria, died July 5, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. He was an Army veteran and a driver for Chicago Airport. Survivors include his daughter, Victoria Granger of California; mother, Dorothy Haynes of Alexandria; sisters, Sue Keith of Joliet, Ill. and Nancy Loyd of Sycamore, Ill.; and four grandchildren.

Mark Inloes

Mark Townsend Inloes, 49, Brooksville, died July 4, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. He owned Lenoxburg Motorcycle and was a member of New Hope Church of Christ. Survivors include his wife, Elaine Spaulding Inloes; daughter, Mellissa Newman of Highland Heights; sons, Mark Inloes and Michael Inloes of Foster and sister, Dori Bachman of California. Burial was in Lenoxburg Cemetery, Foster.

Judith ‘Peaches’ Jacks

Judith “Peaches” Jacks, 68, Dayton, died July 3, 2010, at her home. She was the owner of the Dream Bar in Newport and also worked at Dayton Chili. Survivors include her sons, John Jacks III and Bobby Jacks, both of Dayton; Michael Everman of Texas and Gary Everman of Newport; daughters, Deborah White of Dayton, Treasa Cummings and Marla Purcell, both of Falmouth; sisters, Rose Cheeks of Highland Heights, Terri Fischer of Melbourne, Diane Bruce of Bellevue and Linda Thompson of Dayton; brothers, Tom Schweinzger of Dayton and Ernie Schweinzger of Florence; many grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Burial was in Evergreen Cemetery. Dobbling, Muehlenkamp & Erschell Funeral Home handled the arrangements.

Spc. Russell Madden

Spc. Russell E. Madden, 29, Fort Thomas, died June 23, 2010, in a rocket-propelled grenade attack on an Army convoy in the Charkh District of Afghanistan. He was an honor graduate of basic training at Fort Still, Okla., a member of Delta First Squadron, 91st Calvary Regiment, 183 Brigade Combat Team, recipient of a Posthumous Award promotion to Specialist, a Bronze Star, Purple Heart, NATO Medal-Combat Action Badge, and when home, active in youth football in Bellevue. Survivors include his wife, Michelle Reynolds Madden of Fort Thomas; son, Parker Madden of Fort Thomas; step-son, Jared Pulsfort of Fort Thomas; mother, Peggy Davitt of Newport; father, Martin Madden of Bellevue; step-mother, Pamela Madden of Bellevue; stepfather, Mike Davitt of Newport; brother, Martin Madden of Bellevue; sister, Lindsey Madden of Bellevue; grandfather, William Strange of Falmouth and grandmother, Peggy Strange of Falmouth. Burial was in St. Stephen Cemetery in Fort Thomas. Memorials: Spc. Russell E. Madden Memorial Fund, c/o any Fifth Third Bank.

Deaths continued B7


On the record

CCF Recorder

July 15, 2010

DEATHS From B6

Thomas Mattingly

Thomas Lee Mattingly, 57, Alexandria, died July 3, 2010, at Bardstown Hospital. He was the owner of the Mattingly Expert Tree Service. Survivors include his wife, Mabel Mattingly; sons, Thomas Mattingly Jr. of Alexandria, Brian Thacker of Somerset, Billy and Jeffrey Thacker of Tallahassee, Fla.; daughters, Nichole Mattingly of Falmouth, Sheri Eggleston of Bardstown and Tonia Rodgers of Columbus, Ga.; brothers, Edwin Bray of Fairfield, John Mattingly of Butler, Rodney Mattingly of California; sisters, Linda Ferrel of California, Betty Smith of Lakeside Park and Deborah Bishop of Florence; 14 grandchildren and one great-grandchild.

John ‘Sonny’ Owens

John R. “Sonny” Owens, 72, Fort Mitchell, died July 2, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Florence. He worked for Wiedemann Brewing Co. Survivors include his daughter, Pamela Leopold of Loveland, Ohio; son, John R. Owens Jr. of Maineville, Ohio; brothers, Jerry Owen of Morehead, George Owen of Latonia and Timmy Owen of Erlanger; sisters, Rose McCarver of Texas, Violet Garneau of Covington, Linda Paynter of Alexandria, Wanda Cullum of Aurora, Ind., and Darlene Collins of Newport; and four grandchildren. Entombment was in Highland Cemetery Mausoleum, Fort Mitchell. Memorials: St. Elizabeth Healthcare Dialysis Unit, 483 South Loop Road, Edgewood, KY 41017.

Mary Jean Pelle

Cincinnati; sisters, Peggy Crawley of Cincinnati and Barb Miller of Green Hills; brothers, Ron Petering of Columbus, Ohio and Roger Petering of Franklin, Ohio; caretaker, Stevie Vogel; and five grandchildren Burial was in Evergreen Cemetery, Southgate.

Joseph Schacherer

Joseph M. Schacherer, 95, Bellevue, died July 8, 2010, at the Baptist Convalescent Center in Newport. He was a former city councilman for Dayton, Ky., and a member of the Divine Mercy Parish and the Holy Name Society. His first wife, Anna Rolfes Schacherer, died previously. Survivors include his wife, Laura Hagemeyer Schacherer of Bellevue; daughters, Jo Ann Thomas of Bellevue, Edwina Domaschko of Aurora, Ind., Jackie Glore of Florence, Jerri Payne of Fort Thomas, Debbie Schacherer of Covington; sons, Joe Schacherer, Jr. of Oceana, Calif., David Schacherer of Edgewood, Bob Schacherer of Gardena, Calif.; stepdaughters, Karen Hamilton of Fort Thomas, Cheryl Champlin of Columbus, Laurie MacLeod of Hawthorne, Fla.; step-son, Richard Hagemeyer of Alexandria; brothers, Ed Schacherer of Dayton, Ohio, Paul Schacherer of Dayton, Ohio; 24 grandchildren, 18 great-grandchildren, and 2 greatgreat grandchildren. Burial was in the St. Stephen Cemetery in Fort Thomas. Dobbling, Muehlenkamp-Erschell Funeral Home in Bellevue handled the arrangements. Memorials: Muscular Dystrophy Association, 1080 Nimitzview Dr., Suite 208, Cincinnati, OH 45230.

Bobby Sebastian

Bobby Sebastian, 65, Newport, died July 5, 2010, at his home. He was a self-employed carpenter, member of Masonic Lodge 109 in Covington and former district deputy grandmaster. Survivors include his wife, LaVonda Sebastian of Newport; sons, Mike Sebastian of Villa Hills, Bobby, Jerry and Joey Sebastian, all of Newport; daughter, Lisa Schlueter of Hebron; sisters, Aloma Herald of Michigan and Terri Gosney of Burlington; eight grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Burial was in Peach Grove Cemetery. Memorials: Bobby Sebastian family, c/o Cooper Funeral Home, 10759 Alexandria Pike, Alexandria, KY 41001.

Randall Sizemore

Randall Sizemore, 47, Newport, died July 6, 2010, at his home. He was a blacktop contractor. Survivors include his sons, Chris Purnell of Dayton, and Randall Purnell of Dry Ridge and daughter, Christina Purnell of Covington. Cooper Funeral Home, Alexandria, handled the arrangements.

Loretta Snyder

Loretta Julia Snyder, 90, Newport, died July 6, 2010, at Hospice of the Bluegrass Care Center, Fort Thomas. She was a nurse’s aide for St. Luke Hospital in Fort Thomas. Survivors include her daughter, Pat Lepper of Alexandria; sons, Larry Snyder of Alexandria and David Snyder of Milan, Ind. Burial was in St. Stephen Ceme-

tery, Fort Thomas. Memorials: Hospice of the Bluegrass Northern Kentucky, 7388 Turfway Road, Florence, KY 41042.

Linda Winterman

Linda Faye Morris Winterman, 55, of Cincinnati, formerly of California, died July 5, 2010, at Mercy Hospital Western Hills. She was a member of Cincinnati West Baptist Church in Addyston. Survivors include her sisters, Jean Zint of Erlanger, Leova Gish of Highland Heights, Ella Wilson of Burlington, Mae Russell of Pendleton County, Sylvia Gibson of Deshler, Ohio, Anna Schnitzler, Maggie Hyde and Pearl Stockton, all of Falmouth; and brothers, Walter Morris of Fort Thomas, Jerry, Golden and John H. Morris Jr., all of Pendleton County. Burial was in Highland Cemetery, Fort Mitchell.

Christopher Young

Christopher David Young, 36, Dayton, died July 7, 2010, in Covington. He was a self-employed drywall finisher and Navy veteran. Survivors include his son, Christopher David Perkins; daughter, Chelsea Young; father, William Young; mother, Sheila Mullins; and sister, Tammy Spradlin. Burial was in St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas.

Kevin Ziolkowski

Kevin Ziolkowski, 41, Hebron, died July 2, 2010, at his home. He worked for Procter and Gamble and was a member of Delta

Mary Jean Pelle, 63, died June 30, 2010, in Townview Health and Rehabilitation Center, Cannonsburg Pa. She was preceded in death by her brothers Arthur Pelle and Raymond Pelle. Her survivors are brothers Jack Pelle of Cold Spring, William Pelle and Thomas Pelle of Melbourne, her sisters Ruth Schalk of California, Rose Prodoehl and Cathy Bertram of Cold Spring and Sandra Twehues of Dearborn Michigan.

Raphael Petering

Raphael Petering, 82, Southgate, died July 6, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. He was a commercial artist, a World War II Navy veteran, a glider pilot with Caesar Creek Soaring Club and member of the Moeller High School Football Boosters. Survivors include his wife, Rose Petering; son, Ray Petering of Columbus, Ohio; daughters, Liz Appel of Florida, Shelly McGraw of Eastgate and Wendy Vogel of

MARRIAGE LICENSES Amy Walerius, 24, of Fort Thomas and Andrew Atkinson, 26, of Louisville, issued June 7. Suzanne Reis, 24, and Stephen Weghorn, 30, both of Covington, issued June 8.

IN THE SERVICE Huff completes training

Navy Seaman Recruit Cody L. Huff recently completed U.S. Navy basic training at Recruit Training Command, Great Lakes, Ill. During the eight-week program, Jenkins completed a variety of training which included classroom study and practical instruction on naval customs, first aid, firefighting, water safety and survival, and shipboard and aircraft safety. An emphasis was also placed on physical fitness. The capstone event of boot camp is “Battle Stations.” This exercise gives recruits the skills and confidence they need to succeed in the fleet. “Battle Stations” is designed to galvanize the basic warrior attributes of sacrifice, dedication, teamwork and endurance in each recruit through the practical application of basic Navy skills and the core values of Honor, Courage and Commitment. Its distinctly “Navy” flavor was designed to take into account what it means to be a Sailor. Huff is the son of Marcy L. and David J. Huff of Alexandria. He is a 2008 graduate of Campbell County High School.

FLORIDA Beautiful Seagrove Beach Rent & Relax. Nr Destin, between famous Seaside & Rosemary Beach. Cozy Cottages to Gulf Front Condos. Web Specials. 1-800-537-5387 www.garrettbeachrentals.com

NEW YORK MANHATTAN--NYC HOTEL $129/2 persons. Singles $124. Suites $139-$159. Lincoln Ctr area, Hudson River views, 18 flrs, kitchenette, 5 mins to midtown, safe, quiet, luxury area. RIVERSIDE TOWER, Riverside & 80th St. Call 1-800-724-3136 or visit: www.riversidetowerhotel.com

NORTH CAROLINA

SOUTH CAROLINA

CLEARWATER TO ST. PETE BEACHES Gulf front & bay side condos. All prices & sizes! Florida Lifestyle VAC. 1-800-487-8953. Jan. 2011, Monthly Discounts • www.ourcondo.com

DESTIN. Deeply discounted 2BR, 2BA condo, five pools, on-site restaurant & golf course. 513-561-4683 , local owner. Visit arieldunes.us

DESTIN. Local owner, 1 or 2 luxury condos. 2 BR, 2 BA overlooking gulf, sugar white beaches. Heated pool, hot tubs & more. 937-767-8449,or visit www.majesticsunindestin.com

OHIO

GLENLAUREL • Scottish Inn with Cottages. Luxurious hideway in Hocking Hills. Fine dining, hot tub frolics, onsite spa. 50% off 1st night/1st time guest. Exp. 7/31/10 Call for details. Peaceful rest awaits! 877.322.7031 • www.glenlaurel.com

SOUTH CAROLINA

Vacation Resorts of South Carolina. Hilton Head or Myrtle Beach. Lovely 1 or 2BR condos, weekly rates from $775 to $1400! Excellent locations! www.vrosc.com. 877-807-3828 Hilton Head Island, SC

SEABROOK EXCLUSIVES Villas & Private Homes. Ocean, golf, tennis, equestrian. Pet friendly rentals. Free brochure. Book online! 888-718-7949. www.seabrookexclusives.com

TENNESSEE

Crit Luallen Auditor Of Public Accounts To the People of Kentucky Honorable Steven L. Beshear, Governor Jonathan Miller, Secretary Finance and Administration Cabinet Honorable Steve Pendery, Campbell County Judge/Executive Honorable John Dunn, Campbell County Sheriff Members of the Campbell County Fiscal Court Independent Auditor's Report We have audited the Campbell County Sheriff's Settlement - 2008 Taxes for the period March 21, 2008 through April 15, 2009. This tax settlement is the responsibility of the Campbell County Sheriff. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on this financial statement based on our audit. We conducted our audit in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United States of America, the standards applicable to financial audits contained in Government Auditing Standards issued by the Comptroller General of the United States, and the Audit Guide for Sheriff's Tax Settlements issued by the Auditor of Public Accounts, Commonwealth of Kentucky. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statement is free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statement. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion. As described in Note 1, the Sheriff's office prepares the financial statement in accordance with the modified cash basis, which is a comprehensive basis of accounting other than accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. In our opinion, the accompanying financial statement referred to above presents fairly, in all material respects, the Campbell County Sheriff's taxes charged, credited, and paid for the period March 21, 2008 through April 15, 2009, in conformity with the modified cash basis of accounting. In accordance with Government Auditing Standards, we have also issued our report dated May 19, 2010 on our consideration of the Sheriff's internal control over financial reporting and on our tests of its compliance with certain provisions of laws, regulations, contracts, and grant agreements and other matters. The purpose of that report is to describe the scope of our testing of internal control over financial reporting and compliance and the results of that testing, and not to provide an opinion on the internal control over financial reporting or on compliance. That report is an integral part of an audit performed in accordance with Government Auditing Standards and should be considered in assessing the results of our audit.

Crit Luallen Auditor of Public Accounts May 19, 2010 State law requires the Auditor of Public Accounts to annually audit fiscal courts, County clerks, and sheriffs; and print the results in a newspaper having general circulation in the county. The complete audit and any other audit of state agencies, fiscal courts, county clerks, sheriffs, and property valuation administrators may be viewed in the reports section of the Auditor of Public Accounts' website at www.auditor.ky.gov or upon request by calling 1-800-247-9126. Telephone 502.564.5841 Facsimile 502.564.2912 WWW.AUDITOR.KY.GOV An Equal Opportunity Employer M/F/D

CE-1001574205-01

1-7 Affordable, Deluxe Chalets & Cabin Rentals. Pigeon Forge in the Smokies. Vacation/Dollywood Specials. Free brochure. Call 1-800-833-9987. www.firesidechalets.com

GATLINBURG . Affordable rates. Fully furnished. 1-8 bdrms. Chalets, Cabins, Privacy, Views, Hot Tubs, Jacuzzis, Fireplaces. 1-800-235-2661 www.alpinechaletrentals.com

GATLINBURG ! Luxurious cabins on trout streams. Park-like settings. Hot tubs. Close to National Park & Dollywood. Great rates! $105 & up. 800-404-3370 www.countryelegancecabins.com

Visit www.hhisland.info and plan a getaway with Seashore Vacations.

The Honorable Steve Pendery, Campbell County Judge/Executive Honorable John Dunn, Campbell County Sheriff Members of the Campbell County Fiscal Court Independent Auditor’s Report We have audited the accompanying statement of revenues and expenditures, regulatory basis of the Sheriff of Campbell County, Kentucky, and the statement of revenues, expenditures, and fund balances of the Sheriff’s operating fund and county fund with the State Treasurer - regulatory basis for the year ended December 31, 2008. These financial statements are responsibility of the Sheriff. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audit. We conducted our audit in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United States of America, the standards applicable to financial audits contained in Government Auditing Standards issued by the Comptroller General of the United States, and the Audit Guide for County Fee Officials issued by the Auditor of Public Accounts, Commonwealth of Kentucky. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion. As described in Note 1, the Sheriff prepares the financial statements on a regulatory basis of accounting that demonstrates compliance with the laws of Kentucky, which is a comprehensive basis of accounting other than accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. In our opinion, the accompanying financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the revenues and expenditures of the Sheriff and the revenues, expenditures, and fund balances of the Sheriff’s operating fund and county fund with the State Treasurer for the year ended December 31, 2008, in conformity with the regulatory basis of accounting described in Note 1. In accordance with Government Auditing Standards, we have also issued our report dated May 19, 2010 on our consideration of the Sheriff’s internal control over financial reporting and on our tests of its compliance with certain provisions of laws, regulations, contracts, and grant agreements and other matters. The purpose of that report is to describe the scope of our testing of internal control over financial reporting and compliance and the results of that testing, and not to provide and opinion on the internal control over financial reporting or on compliance. That report is an integral part of an audit performed in accordance with Government Auditing Standards and should be considered in assessing the results of our audit. This report is intended solely for the information and use of the Sheriff and Fiscal Court of Campbell County, Kentucky, and the Commonwealth of Kentucky and is not intended to be and should not be used by anyone other than these specified parties. Respectfully submitted,

site or call toll free: 800-845-0077.

SIESTA KEY. Gulf front condo, directly on pristine Crescent Beach. All ammenities, nicely appointed. Available weekly, now to July 17th and after July 24th. 513-232-4854

Basic obituary information and a color photograph of your loved one is published without charge by The Community Press. Please call us at 283-0404 for more information. To publish a larger memorial tribute, call 513242-4000 for pricing details. For the most up-to-date Northern Kentucky obituaries, click on the “Obituaries” link at NKY.com.

209 St. Clair Street Frankfort, Ky 40601-1817

Our beach is free. Specials available for golf, tennis, dining, more. Visit our

EAST COAST, NEW SMYRNA BEACH Luxurious oceanfront condos & vacation homes. Closest & best beach to Disney. Ocean Properties Vacation Rentals 800-728-0513 www.oceanprops.com

About obituaries

Respectfully submitted,

EMERALD ISLE. Ocean Front luxury vacation homes with community pool. Call for free brochure. 1-252-354-5555 Spinnaker’s Reach Realty www.SpinnakersReach.com Clearwater/Indian Rocks Beach BEST VALUE ON THE BEACH! CLEAN beach condo, 2BR, 2BA, pool. 513-875-4155 . Rent weekly. www.bodincondo.com

Sigma Phi Fraternity. Survivors include his wife, Lila Ziolkowski of Hebron; children, Keanu and Kiara Ziolkowski, both of Hebron; mother, Alice Ziolkowski of Milwaukee, Wis.; mother-in-law, Vivienne Macedonio of California; father-in-law, Don Macedonio of California; sisters, Chris Schneider of Milwaukee, Wis., Karen Sobczak of Milwaukee, Wis., Donna Matias Bell of California; and brothers, Keith Ziolkowski of Milwaukee, Wis., Peter Matias of California. Memorials: The Ziolkowski family for the education of their children.

B7

NORRIS LAKE. Located at Powell Valley Resort. 2 BR/1BA, fully furnished priv. home. Covered porch, deck. Lake access. $95/nt. 423-5628353, www.norrislakehse.com

www.NorrisLakeCedarCottage.com Great 2 BR, 1½ bath cottage on the water. Sleeps 7. Two fireplaces, pri vate boat dock. $650/wk, $220 wknd. 865-363-4330 865-966-1775

Crit Luallen Auditor of Public Accounts May 19, 2010 State law requires the Auditor of Public Accounts to annually audit fiscal courts, county clerks, and sheriffs; and print the results in a newspaper having general circulation in the county. The complete audit and any other audit of state agencies, fiscal courts, county clerks, sheriffs, and property valuation administrators may be viewed in the reports section of the Auditor of Public Accounts’ website at www.auditor.ky.gov or upon request by calling 1-800-247-9126 209 St. Clair Street Frankfort. Ky 40601-1817

Telephone 502.564.5841 Facsimile 502.564.2912 WWW.AUDITOR.KY.GOV An Equal Opportunity Employer M/F/D

CE-1001574210-01


B8

CCF Recorder

July 15, 2010

HIGHLAND HEIGHTS SOUTHGATE POLICE AUTHORITY ACTUAL BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 7/1/10 THROUGH 6/30/11

COMMISSIONERS ORDINANCE NO. 0-2010-012 AN ORDINANCE ADOPTING THE BUDGET FOR THE CITY OF NEWPORT, KENTUCKY FOR THE FISCAL YEAR JULY 1, 2010 TO JUNE 30, 2011, INCLUDING AN ESTIMATE OF REVENUES AND RESOURCES AND MAKING THE ANNUAL APPROPRIATION IN ACCORDANCE THEREWITH.

RESOURCES AVAILABLE: Fund Balance Carried Forward

$

Estimated Revenues

_____________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ WHEREAS, an annual budget proposal and message has been prepared and delivered to the Board of Commissioners of the City of Newport;

Cities Contributions Other

$ 2,098,300.00 $ 121,100.00

Total Estimated Revenue

$ 2,219,400.00

and Total Resources Available for Appropriations

WHEREAS, the Board of Commissioners has reviewed such budget proposal and made necessary modification;

$ 2,219,400.00

Appropriations:

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY OF NEWPORT, KENTUCKY: SECTION I That the annual budget for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2010 and ending June 30, 2011, is hereby adopted. NEWPORT COMMUNITY CAPITAL NEWPORT REDEVELEMPLOYEE GENERAL DEVELOPPROJON THE REFUSE OPMENT BENEFITS FUND MENT ECTS LEVEE FUND REVOLVING FUND FUND FUND FUND LOAN FUND RESOURCES AVAILABLE:

Personnel General Expense Capital Outlay Dept Service

$ 1,823,700.00 $ 337,200.00 $ – $ 58,500.00

Total Appropriations

$ 2,219,400.00

Excess of Resources Over/Under Appropriations

$

Estimated Fund Balance End of Year

$

DATE ADOPTED MAY 6, 2010

FUND BALANCE/ -1,88,369 RETAINED EARNINGS CARRIED FORWARD

3,54,552

5,05,904

83

7,944 5,075,752

62,571

HIGHLAND HEIGHTS SOUTHGATE POLICE AUTHORITY _________________________________________ By: Greg Meyers, Chai h rman of the Board

Cash Interfund Transfers - In

37,710

0

0

0

0

0

Date

_________________

0

Transfer from Developer

HIGHLAND HEIGHTS SOUTHGATE POLICE AUTHORITY AMENDED BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 7/1/09 THROUGH 6/30/10

Capital Lease Proceeds Loan Proceeds

ACTUAL

RESOURCES AVAILABLE:

Note Proceeds

Fund Balance Carried Forward

AMENDED

$

Cities Contributions Other

$ $

2,037,525.00 101,250.00

$ 2,037,525.00 $ 133,050.00

Total Estimated Revenue

$

2,138,775.00

$ 2,170,575.00

$

2,138,775.00

$ 2,170,575.00

Personnel General Expense Capital Outlay Dept Service

$ $ $ $

1,791,975.00 299,800.00 10,000.00 37,000.00

$ 1,788,000.00 $ 348,575.00 $ – $ 34,000.00

Total Appropriations

$

2,138,775.00

$ 2,170,575.00

0 Excess of Resources Over/Under Appropriations

$

$

$

$

Bond Proceeds

$

Estimated Revenues ESTIMATED REVENUES: Property Taxes

20,74,040

0

0

0

0

8,75,000

0

Licenses & Permits 95,58,400

0

0

0

0

0

0

Fines & Forfeits

1,75,400

0

0

0

0

0

0

Charges for Service

9,82,840

0

0

0

0 26,50,000 10,77,480

Uses of Property

11,20,840

0

0

0

0

6,40,000

0

Refunds & Reimbursements

15,300

53,880

0

0

0 25,00,000

0

Intergovernmental 12,48,460 12,27,600

6,00,000

0

0

0

Interest

2,000

500

0

0

150

3,00,000

500

Miscellaneous

10,000

0

0

0 11,44,120

48,000

0

Special Events

0

0

0

0

1,51,87,280 12,81,980

6,00,000

0 11,44,270 70,13,000 10,77,980

16,36,532 11,05,904

83 11,52,214 1,20,88752 11,40,551

Total Estimated Revenues

TOTAL RESOURCES 1,50,36,621

0

0

APPROPRIATIONS:

Total Resources Available for Appropriations Appropriations:

Estimated Fund Balance End of Year DATE ADOPTED MAY 6, 2010 HIGHLAND HEIGHTS SOUTHGATE POLICE AUTHORITY

General Government

14,86,420

0

0

0

0

0

0

Public Safety

88,40,520

0

0

0

0

0

Development Services

3,24,120

0

0

0

0

0

0 _________________________________________ By: Greg Meyers, Chai h rman of the Board 0

Community Services

13,44,630

0

0

0

0

0

0

Municipal Complex Building Maintenance

1,81,020

0

0

0

0

0

0

Debt Service

28,52,000

0

0

0

0 29,68,540

0

0 12,51,050

6,00,000

0 11,36,590 28,76,240 10,77,900

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS 1,50,28,710 12,51,050

6,00,000

0 11,36,590 58,44,780 10,77,900

Other

Excess of Resources Over/(Under) Appropriations

7,911

385,482

505,904

83

Contributed Capital

0

0

0

0

0

0

Transfer to Developer

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Interfund Transfer - Out

0

0

0

0

0

0

(37,710)

Estimated Fund Balance/Retained Earnings End of Fiscal Year

7,911

3,85,482

5,05,904

15,624 6,243,972

83

15,624 62,43,972

62,651 0

24,941

SECTION II That this Ordinance shall be signed by the Mayor, attested by the city clerk, recorded, published and effective upon publication. PASSED:

First Reading

28/06/2010

PASSED:

Second Reading

29/06/2010

Campbell County Schools.

We’re here for you! Community Classified is here to lend a helping hand. Computers, vehicles, jobs, real estate, pets ... you name it! Sell it faster, easier, better!

MAYOR JERRY PELUSO Attest: Evone Bradley, CKMC City Clerk Call Community Classified

513-242-4000

the 15th day of July, 2010 CE-1001573390-01

_________________

To place your BINGO ad call 513.242.4000

______________________________________________

Published: In full in the Campbell County Recorder,

Date

www.communityclassified.com

Each year, the Special Education Department at Campbell County Schools selects specific records used to identify, evaluate and place children and youth in special education to be destroyed. This year, the records of former students graduating Campbell County Schools prior to 2003 will be destroyed. However, a permanent record of a child’s name, address, phone number, grades, attendance record, classes attended, grade level completed, and year completed may be maintained without time limitations. Contact Marlene Jones, Director of Special Education at 635-2173, or at Campbell County Schools, 101 Orchard Lane, Alexandria, KY by September 10, 2010 if you would like to inspect or obtain copies of those records prior to destruction.


July 15, 2010 Legal Notice The Campbell County Fiscal Court at a special meeting of the court on Wednesday, June 30,2010 at the Campbell County Courthouse, 8352 E. Main Street, Alexandria, Kentucky, adopted the following ordinance upon the second reading. First readings of the ordinance with title read and summary given, took place in Newport, KY on May 19, 2010 and in Alexandria, KY on June 2, 2010. CAMPBELL COUNTY FISCAL COURT

COMMISSIONERS ORDINANCE NO. 0-2010-011 AN ORDINANCE AMENDING COMMISSIONERS ORDINANCE NO. 0-2009-008, AMENDING THE ADOPTED BUDGET FOR THE CITY OF NEWPORT, KENTUCKY FOR THE FISCAL YEAR JULY 1, 2009 TO JUNE 30, 2010, INCLUDING AN ESTIMATE OF ALL REVENUES AND RESOURCES AND MAKING THE ANNUAL APPROPRIATION IN ACCORDANCE THEREWITH. ___________________________________________________________ BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY OF NEWPORT, KENTUCKY:

ORDINANCE NO. 0 - 05 -10

SECTION I NEWPORT COMMUNITY CAPITAL EMPLOYEE NEWPORT GENERAL REDEVELOPMENT REFUSE DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS BENEFITS ON THE FUND REVOLVING LOAN FUND FUND FUND FUND LEVEE FUND FUND

AN ORDINANCE OF THE CAMPBELL COUNTY FISCAL COURT RELATING TO THE ANNUAL BUDGET AND APPROPRIATIONS OF CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 2010-2011 (FY11) WHEREAS, the proposed budget of the Campbell County Fiscal Court was tentatively . approved by the Fiscal Court on the 19th day of May 2010.

RESOURCES AVAILABLE:

BE IT ORDAINED BY THE FISCAL COURT OF CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY: SECTION ONE The following budget is adopted for the fiscal year 2010-2011 (FY11) and the amounts stated are appropriated for the purposes indicated: 01- General Fund General Government Protection to Persons & Property General Health & Sanitation Social Services Recreation & Culture Debt Services Capital Projects Administration Total General Fund 02 - Road Fund

Roads Debt Services Capital Projects Administration

1,961,200 90,300 608,200 466,900 --------------------------------$ 3,126,600 ===============

03 - Jail Fund Protection to Persons and Property Debt Services Administration Total Jail Fund 04 - L.G.E.A. Fund Total L.G.E.A Fund 75· Jail Commissary Fund Protection to Persons and Property Administration Total Commissary Fund

Roads

3,449,300 3,114,580 414,080 721,640 492,720 1,033,120 1,112,750 3,438,360 --------------------------------$ 13,776,550 =============== $

Total Road Fund

Roads

$

$

5,870,360 1,130,780 1,825,200 --------------------------------$ 8,826,340 =============== $ 51,000 --------------------------------$ 51,000 =============== $

139,500 37,800 --------------------------------$ 177,300 ===============

76 - Developers Road Escrow Fund $ 115,000 --------------------------------Total Dev. Road Escrow Fund $ 115,000 ===============

86 - Senior Citizens Tax Fund General Government $ 4,600 Social Services 454,700 Debt Services 16,600 Administration 75,600 --------------------------------Total Senior Citizens Tax Fund $ 551,500 =============== 87 - Mental Health Tax Fund General Government $ 9,200 General Health and Sanitation 756,300 Administration 20,200 --------------------------------Total Mental Health Fund $ 785,700 =============== 88 - Payroll Tax Fund General Government Bus Services Administration Total Payroll Tax Fund Grand Total All Funds

$ $

79,000 4,682,300 208,000 --------------------------------$ 4,969,300 =============== $ 32,379,290 ===============

SECTION TWO This Ordinance shall be published in the Campbell County Recorder by title and summary within thirty (30) days following adoption. SECTION THREE This Ordinance becomes effective upon passage and publication. Approved by the Campbell County Fiscal Court this 19th day of May 2010. BY:_________________________ Campbell County Judge/Executive

FUND BALANCE/ RETAINED EARNINGS CARRIED FORWARD Cash Interfund Transfers - In

41,828 91,281

312,594 283,412

555,014 555,014

1,066 83

576,480 972,820

0 19,210

0 0

0 0

62,700 3,336,728 87,374 3,442,462

3,777 15,891

0 0

Transfer from Developer

Bond Proceeds Refunding Bonds Gain on Sale of Assets Loss on Sale of Assets

1,816,480 1,878,560

875,000 875,000

Licenses & Permits 9,978,600 9,423,130 Fines & Forfeits

213,550 150,080

Charges for Service

980,360 966,340

Uses of Property

1,103,860 1,123,290

Refunds & Reimbursements

11,450 25,040

Special Events Total Estimated Revenues

TOTAL RESOURCES

2,300,000 1,047,480 2,636,930 1,052,000 250,000 646,000

625,000 650,670

53,880

287,500 263,350

0 2,500,000 26,540 2,650,130

881,850 1,004,020

227,600 24,574

600,000 0

4,500 1,000

1,500 390

5,000 760

120 270

300,180 313,750

6,480 2,160

1,012,860 1,032,500

48,000 48,000

10,000 10,000

3,500 350

0 0 15,000,650 14,581,460 15,618,958 15,645,561

General Government

1,607,250 1,614,000

Public Safety

8,645,530 8,816,910

Community Services Municipal Complex Building Maintenance Debt Service

282,980 78,844 595,574 381,466

1,148,980 912,270 1,703,994 1,467,284

1,066 1,075,680 9,984,908 1,054,757 83 1,146,684 11,133,662 1,068,241

Date Submitted:

1,577,720 1,859,730 188,260 182,670 2,886,880 2,907,030 249,800 26,914

606,480 25,380

0 935,780 2,976,240 1,013,000 0 1,138,740 2,820,740 968,850

15,353,770 15,814,720

249,800 26,914

606,480 25,380

0 935,780 6,206,710 1,013,000 0 1,138,740 6,057,910 968,850

265,188 (169,159)

345,774 354,552

1,097,514 1,441,904

Transfer to Developer Interfund Transfer - Out Estimated Fund Balance/Retained Earnings End of Fiscal Year

Approved as to Form and Classification Date: May 25,2010

State Local Finance Officer I certify that this budget, incorporating the changes, if any, as required by the State Local Finance Officer, has been duly adopted by the Campbell County Fiscal Court of Campbell County, Kentucky on this 30 day of June, 2010

CE-1001573299-01

1,066 139,900 3,778,198 83 7,944 5,075,752

41,757 99,391

Attest:_____________________________ Fiscal Court Clerk

0 0 0 (19,210)

265,188 (188,369)

Sealed proposals will be received at the Office of the City Clerk, 5694 East Alexandria Pike, Cold Spring, Kentucky, 41076, until 11:00 A.M. local time on JULY 23, 2010, for furnishing all labor, materials, and equipment necessary to complete the project known as the COLD SPRING 2010 / 2011 STREET PROGRAM, and, at the same time and place, publicly opened and read aloud.

Specifications will also be on file in the plan room of the F. W. Dodge Corporation and Allied Construction Industries (ACI).

3,230,470 3,237,170

Contributed Capital

May 19,2010

County Judge/Executive

County Judge/Executive

Excess of Resources Over/(Under) Appropriations

CITY OF COLD SPRING CAMPBELL COUNTY LEGAL NOTICE

Contract documents, bid sheets, plans and specifications can be obtained at the office of CDS Associates, Inc., 7000 Dixie Highway, Florence, Kentucky, 41042, after JULY 15, 2010, at a cost of $50.00 per set (non-refundable). Plans requested by mail will be an additional $ 1 0 . 0 0 per set. Checks to be made payable to CDS Associates, Inc.

NOTICE OF AVAILABILITY All interested persons and organizations in Campbell County are hereby notified that a copy of the County’s adopted budget in full is available for public inspection at the Office of the County Judge/Executive during normal business hours.

I, Michael A. Duncan, an attorney licensed to practice law in the Commonwealth of Kentucky, for Ziegler & Schneider, P.S.C., City Attorneys for the City of Alexandria, in Campbell County, Kentucky, do hereby certify that this Notice of Adoption, Title and Summary of Ordinance 2010-10 was prepared by me, and that it represents an accurate description of the summary of the contents of the Ordinance. The full text of the Ordinance, the Exhibit, and other information relative to the Ordinance, are on file at the office of the City Clerk, 8236 West Main Street, Alexandria, Kentucky 41001.

0 1,012,980 6,648,180 1,050,980 0 1,059,310 7,174,480 1,052,350

448,130 434,380

Other

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS

The Dayton Independent School offers the following vocational education programs for students in Grades 9 - 12: Family and Consumer Sciences and Industrial Technology. The following vocational school classes are available to students in Grades 11 - 12: Auto Mechanics, Business and Office, Carpentry, Electricity, Health Services, Machine Shop, Welding, Auto Body, Drafting, Masonry, Visual Art, Diesel Mechanics, Graphic Arts & Child Development. Keyboarding is offered to students in Grades 9-12.

/s/ Michael A. Duncan Michael A. Duncan For Ziegler & Schneider, P.S.C. City Attorneys 1001573350

APPROPRIATIONS:

Development Services

Any person having inquiries concerning Dayton Independent Schools compliance with the Office of Civil Rights Law, Title VI, Title VII, Title IX, ADA and Section 504, is directed to contact Gregory Baxter, Director Dayton Independent Schools, 200 Clay Street; Dayton, KY at 491-6565.

ORDINANCE NO. 2010-10: AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF ALEXANDRIA, IN CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY, AMENDING ORDINANCE 2009-04, THE CITY’S BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 2009/2010, BY TRANSFERRING FUNDS TO AND AMONG THE VARIOUS BUDGET ACCOUNTS ACCORDING TO ATTACHED EXHIBIT “A”, IN ORDER TO END THE FISCAL YEAR IN BALANCE. This Ordinance amends the City’s budget for the 2009/2010 fiscal year in order to end the year in balance by transferring the sum of $159,000.00 around within the various budget accounts.

ESTIMATED REVENUES:

Miscellaneous

Students, their parents, employees, and potential employees of the Dayton Independent Schools are hereby notified that the Dayton Independent School district does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, religion, marital status, sex, or disability in employment programs, vocational programs, or activities set forth in compliance with the Office of Civil Rights, Title VI, VII, Title IX, ADA and Section 504.

NOTICE OF ADOPTION, TITLE AND SUMMARY OF ALEXANDRIA ORDINANCE 2010-10 I hereby certify that the following is the Title and Summary of Ordinance 2010-10 of the City of Alexandria, in Campbell County, Kentucky, adopted by City Council on July 1, 2010:

Note Proceeds

Interest

PUBLIC NOTICE DAYTON INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS NON-DISCRIMINATION POLICY STATEMENT

AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER 1001574316

Loan Proceeds

Intergovernmental

B9

Adult Education classes are offered to individuals pursing a GED certificate.

0 516,720

Capital Lease Proceeds

Property Taxes

CCF Recorder

540,000 936,000

345,774 354,552

557,514 505,904

(36,480) (36,820)

1,066 139,900 3,778,198 83 7,944 5,075,752

5,227 62,571

SECTION II That this Ordinance shall be signed by the Mayor, attested by the City Clerk, recorded, published and effective upon publication. PASSED: First Reading 6/282010 PASSED: Second Reading 6/29/2010 ______________________________________________ MAYOR JERRY PELUSO Attest: Evone Bradley, CKMC City Clerk Published: In full in the Campbell County Recorder, the 15th day of July, 2010 CE-1001573383-01

Each bidder is required to submit with his proposal a bid bond or certified check equal in amount to five percent (5%) of the base bid. The bidder to whom the contract is awarded will be required to furnish a surety bond in an amount equal to onehundred percent (100%) of the contract amount. The successful bidder will be required to have a current occupational license in the City of Cold Spring before the Contract will be awarded. Proposals must contain the full name of the party or parties submitting the same and all persons interested therein. It is the intent and requirements of the City that this project be completed no later than JULY 31, 2011. Bidders must comply with the Prevailing Wage Rates on Public Improvements in Campbell County and the City of Cold Spring, as ascertained and determined by the Kentucky Revised Statute as provided in Section 337.505 through 337.550 of the Commonwealth of Kentucky. The Board of Council of the City of Cold Spring, Kentucky, reserves the right to waive irregularities and to reject any or all bids. Mark Stoeber, Mayor Publishing Date: Campbell County Recorder - JULY 15, 2010 1001574767


B10

CCF Recorder

July 15, 2010

PREVIEW NIGHT & FAMILY COOKOUT WEDNESDAY, JULY 21 ST | 5:30 PM

(MGL SQ DMP ? NPMEP?K RF?R GLAJSBCQ Ü L GLRPMBSARGML RM 2FMK?Q +MPC !MJJCEC Ü  –L?LAG?J ?GB MTCPTGCU Ü  A?KNSQ RMSP Ü  QRSBCLR JGDC QCQQGML Ü  AMMIMSR DMP NPMQNCARGTC QRSBCLRQ ?LB RFCGP D?KGJGCQ $GLB MSR FMU RFC NCPQML?JGXCB ?RRCLRGML F?LBQ ML JC?PLGLE ?LB GLAJSQGTC D?GRF AMKKSLGRW ?R 2FMK?Q +MPC UGJJ NPCN?PC WMS DMP WMSP UFMJC JGDC.

TO REGISTER FOR THE JULY 21ST PREVIEW NIGHT, CALL (859)344-3332 OR VISIT WWW.THOMASMORE.EDU.

CE-0000409594


campbell-county-recorder-071510  

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving all of Campbell County Heartland Rehabilitation Services By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you