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Your Community Recorder newspaper serving all of Campbell County

COUNTY RECORDER

Email: kynews@communitypress.com Website: NKY.com T h u r s d a y, J u l y

7, 2011

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Volume 33, Number 22 © 2011 The Community Recorder ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Community Choice Awards

From east to west, north and south, whatever community you’re in, we know you love your local pizza place, have your favorite beauty salon, and won’t miss your favorite local festival. Now you can show all of your favorites how much you love them by voting for them in the 2011 Community Choice Awards! Vote online at www. cincinnati.com/community choice. Everyone who votes is entered into a drawing to win a $250 gift card!

Cardinal Hill changes ownership

Northern Kentucky's first audiology service has a new owner. Starting July 1, Cardinal Hill of Northern Kentucky will be taken over by the Community Foundation of Northern Kentucky. At that point, the Community Foundation will handle administrative and operational oversight. NEWS, A4

Camps come to Silver Grove

There’s something to keep busy almost every weekday this summer at Silver Grove Independent School with the addition of camps for the first time for all ages. Superintendent Ken Ellis said teachers requested the camps and are staffing them on a volunteer basis. SCHOOLS, A6

Share your news

Visit NKY.com/Share to submit your photos, news and events. It’s a one-stop-shop for submitting information to The Community Recorder, The Kentucky Enquirer, NKY.com and our other publications and websites. For the Postmaster

Published weekly every Thursday. Periodical postage paid at Newport, KY 41071 USPS 450130 Postmaster: Send address change to The Campbell County Recorder 654 Highland Suite 27, Fort Thomas, KY 41075 Annual Subscription: Weekly Recorder & Sunday Enquirer In-County $18.02; weekly Recorder only all other in-state $23.32 Out-of - state $27.56; Kentucky Sales Tax Included

To place an ad, call 283-7290.

A group of student apprentices and artists work on the new mural, which includes a timeline of Newport’s history.

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Young artists bring mural to Newport By Amanda Joering Alley

ajoering@nky.com

During the next few weeks, Newport residents and visitors will have a chance to see the creation of a mural showing the city’s history. Newport-based organization Art Machine, Inc., has partnered with Artworks, a nonprofit organization that hires young artists to create community murals, to create a mural on the Combined Lock Services building on Monmouth Street. The mural, designed by project manager and lead artist Kyle Penunuri, will depict Newport’s history, spanning back decades

before the city was even founded. The mural will include scenes of plants, buildings and prominent people involved with the city, including General James Taylor and Mildred Dean, Penunuri said. “I’m going for a high level of realism in this mural,” said Penunuri, who came up with the design after meeting with city officials and residents. “It’s just amazing what a mural like this adds to a community and how it creates a bond between a physical place and the people there.” To create the mural, Artworks hired Penunuri, an assistant lead artist and eight local high school student apprentices from the Cincinnati area.

The group began working on the mural Monday, June 20, and is scheduled to complete the piece by Friday, July 29. Apprentice Karron Flagg, a 17year-old high school student from Cincinnati, said he wanted to be a part of the project to expand his horizons and give something back to the community. “I’ve already seen improvement in my work and have learned a lot since we started,” Flagg said. Inaya Smith-Sellers, 15, also from Cincinnati, said the project has given her a chance to do something she loves, stay busy during the summer and meet new, like-minded people.

“This is a chance for me to experience what it is like to have a job doing something I am very passionate about, art,” Smith-Sellers said. “I’ve always been into art, so being part of the project just made sense.” Penunuri said after working on an Artworks mural last year in North Fairmont, he was hooked on the program. “It is kind of magic the way it works with these students,” Penunuri said. “’It just opens up a lot of opportunities for them.” For more information about Artworks, visit www.artworkscincinnati.org. For more about your community, visit www.nky.com/newport

Constable sent resignation to Pendery’s email By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

Cameron Tracy Alexander, the District 3 constable who moved into District 2, sent his resignation to Campbell County Judge-executive Steve Pendery’s personal email account June 16. Pendery said on Tuesday, June 28, that no formal resignation email had been sent by Alexander

to his county email and that he doubted the constable had his personal email address. Pendery said he would check his personal email for any communication from Alexander. Alexander told The Campbell County Recorder Tuesday, June 28, that he had sent a resignation email to Pendery sometime between a week and two weeks after stating verbally his intent to

resign on June 6 to county officials. County officials had requested a written resignation of Alexander. Campbell County Administrator Robert Horine said Thursday, June 30, that Pendery found a resignation email sent by Alexander to a personal email address the judgeexecutive has. Horine said Pendery’s personal email doesn’t have a good spam filter, and with so much unwanted

email its possible that Alexander’s email wasn’t noticed initially. Alexander’s email stated that he resigned effective June 6 because he moved out of district, said Horine. The resignation was to be on the agenda for official acceptance at the July 6 fiscal court meeting, said Horine. For more about your community, visit www.nky.com/campbellcounty

Cold Spring watching NKAPC developments By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

COLD SPRING – Being the only city outside of Kenton County using the services of the Northern Kentucky Area Planning Commission, Cold Spring is watching from afar as detractors are attempting to eliminate the agency. Representatives of Northern Kentucky’s Tea Party and the Northern Kentucky Home Builders Association have united to put eliminating NKAPC’s taxing authority in Kenton County on the ballot in November. “In general it’s business as usual,” said Mayor Mark Stoeber. Cold Spring maintains its own planning and zoning commission, but all other building inspection

Cold Spring is the only jurisdiction using the full spectrum of services offered by NKAPC beside Kenton County cities and government. and planning services are performed by under a contract. Stoeber said NKAPC’s director Dennis Gordon called to advise him about the ongoing issue. The question of legal legitimacy of an agency being formed is “somebody else’s issue,” he said. That doesn’t mean the city isn’t paying close attention, Stoeber said. “We, of course, are looking at contingency plans and other things,” he said. “That’s just the responsible thing to do.”

NKAPC offers having all things needed by the city in one spot including building, street and subdivision inspectors, Stoeber said. “That is an extreme advantage, and they’re the only provider that provides that,” he said. The city has always looked at the value it receives from NKAPC’s services in regards to costs and considered alternatives, but having to “cobble together” the information and planning it takes was taken into account, Stoeber said. Cold Spring is the only jurisdiction using the full spectrum of services offered by NKAPC beside Kenton County cities and government, said Gordon. “We administer 20 different zoning ordinances in Kenton County,” he said. “One more does-

n’t make much of a difference.” NKAPC does work with Campbell County’s Property Valuation Administrator and county clerk’s office on the GIS electronic mapping system, Gordon said. Other governments including Pendleton County only use a few of NKAPC’s services, he said. Cold Spring and NKAPC have a long and mutually beneficial relationship, Gordon said. “I think city leaders there recognize what Kenton County officials recognize,” he said. “That is when you are able to pool your resources and put together a critical mass of staff with those resources – everybody wins.” For more about your community, visit www.nky.com/coldspring


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Campbell County Recorder

News

July 7, 2011

Free lunches served in Highland Heights By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

HIGHLAND HEIGHTS Thanks to a partnership between two churches and a nudge from two Cold Spring elementary schools, there are free summer lunches three days a week for anyone under age 18 at Asbury United Methodist Church. Free lunches provided through a federal meals program are served from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Monday, Wednesday and Friday each week in the church’s basement hall, 2916 Alexandria Pike, Highland Heights, through Aug. 5. The church started serving meals June 13. Highland Methodist Church in Fort Thomas cooks the meals and delivers them to Asbury

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Methodist Church where volunteers dish them out. Stan and Melissa Irwin of Highland Heights brought their three children Friday, June 24, for a lunch including pizza and slices of watermelon. “You put your pride aside for your children,” Stan said. There are more people out there who might bring their children for lunch if they only knew of the program, he said. Stan, said he worked as a jet mechanic, and later as an assistant supervisor for Fischer Homes until he hurt his back around 2008. Stan said he’s been on disability and unemployed since then. The family heard about the meals program through Crossroads Elementary School where their youngest daughter finished fifth grade this year, he said. Leigh Ann Chamberlin of Cold Spring, a volunteer for Asbury United Methodist, said she is part of a large group of volunteers that

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Mariah Irwin, left, and her 11-year-old sister Leilani, both of Highland Heights, savor slices of watermelon for dessert at the free federal summer lunch program at Asbury United Methodist Church in Highland Heights Friday, June 24. help serve the meals. The idea for a free summer meal program came from Cline Elementary School and Crossroads Elementary School, Chamberlin said. “We met with principals from two of the local elementary schools, and they’re the ones that said there is a need for it,” she said. Last summer, Crossroads’ principal Kim Visse and her staff delivered food for meals on their own time to families in the school’s

take-home back pack program, Chamberlin said. Chamberlin said Highland Methodist Church found out about the need of children in the area from the schools, and Pam Voelker of Alexandria, a member of Asbury United Methodist, helped coordinate with the schools. Voelker said she made a flyer for both schools, enough for each child to take them home to their parents. Each of the two schools has a high percentage of

students eligible for free and reduced lunches, she said. “Once we found out over 50 percent and over 60 percent of students qualified for free and reduced lunch, we saw that the need was there,” Voelker said. The service area for the two schools includes both Cold Spring and Highland Heights. Crossroads kindergarten teacher, Diane Rinehard of Alexandria, said the teachers were encouraged by their principal to help volunteer at the summer pro-

gram. Rinehard, who was volunteering June 24, said she was going to be back Monday, June 27, and later when a need is expressed. Rinehard said she’s likes that families she sees during the school year are receiving food assistance through the summer months while school is out. “I saw two of my students here today, which is neat to see them,” she said. For more about your community, visit www. nky.com/highlandheights

Cold Spring prepares for fireworks discussion By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

COLD SPRING - Council is saving a fireworks debate, in reaction to a new state law expanding what is legal to sell, until after the July 4 holiday. The law was made effective on an emergency basis, almost on an immediate basis, by the legislature this spring to allow for fireworks sales before the holiday, but the city has been playing catch-up, said Mayor Mark Stoeber. House Bill 333 allows for the sale of fireworks that explode and shoot into the air, including firecrackers, bottle rockets and Roman candles, to persons age 18 and older, according to the

Kentucky Legislative Research Commission. Council tabled a text amendment to its zoning laws Monday, June 27, to allow fireworks sales in observance of the new state law already in effect. Zoning for fireworks sales will be discussed at the caucus meeting of council at 7:30 p.m. Monday, July 11. Stoeber said the city has been approached by prospective businesses, seeking to operate permanent fireworks sales locations, and existing business that are seeking temporary fireworks sales at their current locations. “They want permanent locations, and in order to do that we have to have a text amendment to our zone,” Stoeber said. Some temporary firework tent sales are already in operation in Cold Spring, he said. Council member Stuart

House Bill 333 allows for the sale of fireworks that explode and shoot into the air, including firecrackers, bottle rockets and Roman candles, to persons age 18 and older. Oehrle said the city needs to find out where fireworks are mentioned in the existing zoning language. “Because now fireworks means a far different class of devices,” Oehrle said. Council member Adam Sandfoss said at the June 27 meeting that council should ask the Northern Kentucky Area Planning Commission to provide input about fireworks and zoning and table the zoning text amendment. Fireworks are legal, said council member Lou Gerding. NKAPC provides zoning, but there is no need to bring them in to talk about fireworks zoning, Gerding said. “They’re not going to be able to tell us where the fire-

works business should go,” he said of NKAPC. Council member Rob Moore, who operates an auto sales business off the AA Highway, said he is already selling fireworks there on a temporary basis to make extra money. Moore said he is selling mortars, bottle rockets and other novelties after obtaining a fireworks license from the state and a temporary building permit from NKAPC. “It’s a legal business that the state has implemented, so I’m going to take advantage of it,” he said. “It’s just temporary.” For more about your community, visit www. nky.com/coldspring

Index

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving all of Campbell County

Greater Cincinnati & Northern Kentucky

COUNTY RECORDER

Email: kynews@communitypress.com Website: NKY.com

Find news and information from your community on the Web Campbell County – nky.com/campbellcounty News Michelle Shaw | Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1053 | mshaw@nky.com Chris Mayhew | Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1051 | cmayhew@nky.com Amanda Joering | Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1052 | ajoering@nky.com Melanie Laughman | Sports Editor . . . . . . . . 513-248-7118 | mlaughman@nky.com James Weber | Sports Reporter . . . . . . . . . 578-1054 | jweber@nky.com Advertising Debbie Maggard | Advertising Manager. . . . . . 578-5501 | dmaggard@nky.com Michelle Schlosser | Account Executive . . . 750-8687 | mschlosser@nky.com Sheila Cahill | Account Relationship Specialist 578-5547 | scahill@nky.com Delivery For customer service. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 781-4421 Sharon Schachleiter | Circulation Manager. . 442-3464 | sschachleiter@nky.com Judy Hollenkamp | Circulation Clerk . . . . . . . . 441-5537 | jhollenkamp@NKY.com Classified To place a Classified ad. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283-7290 | www.communityclassified.com

To place an ad in Community Classified, call 283-7290.

Calendar .................................B2 Classifieds................................C Food........................................B4 Life..........................................B1 Police reports.........................B7 Schools...................................A6 Sports .....................................A9 Viewpoints ...........................A10


News

July 7, 2011

CCF Recorder

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V.F.W. donates to vets hospital house By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

Members of Campbell Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3205 in Alexandria stopped in at the Fisher House on the campus of the Cincinnati VA Medical Center and donated a $2,000 check Wednesday, June 29. The money was raised from the sales of poppies said Mark See, post commander. The sale of the decorative bright red artificial “poppy� flowers is a tradition for veterans groups to raise money. “This is really from the community,� he said, as he presented the check to the medical center’s director and other VA representatives. Since opening in 2001, more than 10,000 people have stayed at the house, said Karrie Hagan, manager

Between 100 to 120 people stay in the 16 bedrooms at the Fisher House each month. of the house. Veterans, their family members and caregivers all come and stay at the house, Hagan said. “For the veterans, it’s really a home away from home,� she said. Between 100 to 120 people stay in the 16 bedrooms at the house each month, Hagan said. There’s hardly ever an empty room, she said. One room is typically kept open for the families of patients brought to the hospital in the middle of an emergency, like having been flown by helicopter from the scene of an acci-

dent, she said. The government provides for the maintenance of the house, and the donations of community groups like that of the Campbell County V.F.W. Post pays for meals and other expenses for families during their stay, Hagan said. The families have so much to worry about in terms of medical care, it’s nice for them to not have to worry about where they will stay or how they will eat during their visit, she said. For more about your community, visit www.nky.com/alexandria

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

From left, Ron Allari of Alexandria, JW Crail of Grant’s Lick, Fisher House manager Karrie Hagan, chief of volunteer services Tracy Butts, medical center director Linda Smith, Mark See of Alexandria and Dennis Bush of Grant’s Lick, during a check presentation ceremony inside the Fisher House at the VA Hospital in Cincinnati Wednesday, June 29.

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Pavilion work

In a close up of the work, Don Steffen of Steffen Builders, finishes guiding a beam into place for the new Silver Grove park centennial pavilion between Ash and Oak streets Wednesday, June 29. The city is preparing for the Founders Day celebration Saturday, July 23. A centennial parade at 11 a.m. will kick-off the day. A celebration at the city park will follow the parade from noon to 11 p.m. with festivities including games, live music and a pig roast.

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CCF Recorder

News

July 7, 2011

Fourth fun

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Visitors check out cars in a classic car show, part of Fort Thomas’s Independence Celebration Saturday, July 2.

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Members of the Highlands High School band perform during the parade.

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The Campbell County Democrats participate in the parade.

Members of Richard Woeste’s Family Court Judge campaign throw candy during Fort Thomas’s Fourth of July parade.

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Paul Hehman (right) and CJ Parker, volunteers with the Melbourne Fire Department, ride in the parade.

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Fort Thomas Fire Chief Mark Bailey (right) and retired chief Dale Edmondson stand by the 1959 Peter Pirsch Pumper they spent the past five years restoring.

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By Justin B. Duke jbduke@nky.com

FLORENCE - Northern Kentucky's first audiology service has a new owner. Starting July 1, Cardinal Hill of Northern Kentucky will be taken over by the Community Foundation of Northern Kentucky. At that point, the Community Foundation will handle administrative and

operational oversight. Cardinal Hill's Florence facility, at 31 Spiral Drive, was home to adult day care, respite care, speech therapy, audiology and other services. The facility will now operate under the names Speech and Hearing of Northern Kentucky and Adult Day Care of Northern Kentucky. The new names are the

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Foundation's. The two organizations spent eight months working out the deal, so the Community Foundation had a lot of time to see how well the two matched up, Erler said. "We've done our due diligence over eight months," she said. Founded in Covington in 1923 as part of Kentucky Easter Seals, Cardinal Hill of Northern Kentucky had a long history of pioneering services to meet pressing community needs. It was the first facility in Northern Kentucky to offer audiology services to children and adults and was the first adult day care center to offer daily care and nursing services to younger adults, as well as those over 60. The Florence center, which opened in February 2001, is designed to meet the goals of comprehensive rehabilitation. It focuses on new approaches in therapy utilizing specially designed spaces and equipment.


News

CCF Recorder

July 7, 2011

NKU launches economic analysis tool As part of its regional stewardship mission, The Center for Economic Analysis and Development (CEAD) housed in the Haile|US Bank College of Business at Northern Kentucky University recently launched the Kentucky Regional Economic Analysis Project (KY-REAP). This free tool draws from a national network of economic data that CEAD has broken down for each county in Kentucky. “I envision this tool being used by Kentucky city and county officials, as well as community organizations around the commonwealth, to prepare grants and to analyze their com-

munities,” said Janet Harrah, senior director of CEAD. “Knowing as much as possible about our communities as we come out of this recession will position Kentucky for greater economic development.” This interactive, Webbased program, available at http://kentucky.reaproject.o rg, is a source of data at the county, metropolitan statistical area and state levels. With just a few clicks of the mouse users can view annual data spanning 40 years. Population, personal income, employment by industry, earnings by industry, average earnings per job

and the levels of government transfer payments can be accessed instantly for all 120 Kentucky counties. What makes KY-REAP unique is the analysis that accompanies the data. Using the wide variety of analysis tools incorporated into KY-REAP, users can quickly gain insight into the economies of Kentucky counties and regions. Among the tools included in the Kentucky Regional Economic Analysis are comparative trend analysis; comparative economic indicators; major components of income; shift-share analysis; location quotient analysis; industry structure and performance; income struc-

ture and growth; leading, slipping, gaining and lagging analysis; and selected economic indicators. The system uses data compiled by the U.S. Department of Commerce’s Bureau of Economic Analysis. Spanning the years 1969 to 2009, the data are updated as new data are received from the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis with the most recent data provided for 2009. CEAD is committed to maintaining Kentucky data going forward. CEAD supports regional economic development and promotes activities that strengthen Kentucky’s competitive position.

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Silver Grove offers summer camps for first time By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

SILVER GROVE - There’s something to keep busy almost every weekday this summer at Silver Grove Independent School with the addition of camps for the first time for all ages. Superintendent Ken Ellis said

teachers requested the camps and are staffing them on a volunteer basis. The district has had free federal summer meals programs in previous years, but in the past couple of years the district didn’t participate for some reason, Ellis said. Now, there are between 50 to 75 children in the building each

day for the camps or for lunch, he said. Camps include volleyball and basketball clinics, a “You Can Be the Cake Boss” design and decorating camp, a greenhouse camp and story times. “We’ve had reading camps before where we’d open up the library and they could come in,”

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

From left, Sophie Turner of Fort Thomas, 10, and MyKayla Kendrick of Wilder, 12, decorate flower pots during the greenhouse summer camp at Silver Grove School Wednesday, June 29.

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Randi Lynn Durbin, 9, of Silver Grove, inserts a decorative paper liner she colored into a clear plastic flower pot and seals the top with a white plastic cap during the greenhouse camp at Silver Grove School Wednesday, June 29.

said associate principal Lisa Hilf. Now this year, there was a chess camp and librarians from the Campbell County Public Library came in for stories and crafts camp, Hilf said. “It’s just to get more kids involved in the summer and keep the kids active whether mentally or physically, so they’re not just sitting,” she said. Parent Barbara Durbin of Silver Grove said she decided to volunteer each day to help support the camps and the lunches because it’s good for the children. “I am loving the camps,” said Durbin, as two of her three children made decorative flower pots

in the library as part of a greenhouse camp June 29. “My kids have been to every one of the camps,” she said. Instead of sitting home and playing video games the children are learning, Durbin said. All the funding for materials was provided by a $900 grant from the Greater Cincinnati Foundation, said librarian Michele Turner, who volunteers her time to help keep the librarian open once a week to students from 12:303:30 p.m. each Tuesday. “All of the staff are volunteering,” she said. For more about your community, visit www.nky.com/campbellcounty

Fort Thomas offers program for special needs By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

For this first time this summer, Fort Thomas Independent Schools offered a specialized camp for students with special needs. As part of the district’s Summer Enrichment Program, they offered a camp called “Life Skills Plus: Recipes,” geared towards teaching students with special needs about nutrition and how to make simple, healthy recipes. Andrea Smith, a special educa-

As part of the district’s Summer Enrichment Program, they offered a camp called “Life Skills Plus: Recipes,” geared towards teaching students with special needs about nutrition and how to make simple, healthy recipes. tion teacher at Highlands Middle School who ran the camp, said she wanted to offer something for her students with special needs, and a cooking class seemed like

something that would be fun and educational. “Cooking is something we don’t really have time to cover in class,” Smith said. “We’re learning

recipes the students can do on their own with minimal adult supervision and by using very few ingredients.” During the camp, which ran Monday, June 20, through Friday, June 24, the students learned the recipes and cooked three dishes a day. The students then complied all the recipes into a cookbook to take home at the end of the week. Rita Byrd, assistant superintendent for the district, said the summer program are selected from proposals that teachers and other

interested parties submit. “(Smith) has been interested in offering a specialized class for several year, but this is the first year she’s been available,” Byrd said. “We have offered specialized programs, but not one as specific as this summer.” Smith said she hopes to expand on the Life Skills Plus camps next summer, adding more topics and lessons for students with special needs. For more about your community, visit www.nky.com/fortthomas

Boosters, PTO raise $40,000 for new Moyer’s playground By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Willow Downs plays on the new playground at Moyer Elementary School.

FORT THOMAS - Students at Moyer Elementary School will have a new playground to use when they return to school this August thanks to the school’s Boosters and PTO. The groups each contributed $20,000 a piece to fund the new $40,000 playground, which was completed in June. Principal Jay Brewer said when the school’s 10-year-old playground started having structural issues last year, staff members and parents quickly formed a committee to address the problem. “A new playground wasn’t really on the horizon for us, but the old one just started to deteriorate so quickly, we had to do something,” Brewer said. The committee decided the playground needed to be replaced. They researched and picked a new playground and figured out funding for the project. “The PTO and Boosters really came through by donating $20,000 each and the district provided some of its employees to help with the project,” Brewer said. “So many parents helped with this project, it was really amazing

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Moyer Elementary School now has a new $40,000 playground. to see the support we had.” PTO president Stephanie Recht organized a “community build day” and had parent volunteers come to help with the assembly of the new playground, saving the school thousands in additional costs. “It was quite a task putting the playground together, and I’m so thankful that so many parents were willing to step up and help,” Recht said. Recht said the PTO decided to

help fund the playground using money they raised from their annual Santa House event because they felt that it was something that would benefit all the students of the school. “The playground funds just aren’t in the school board’s budget, so we knew we’d need to help if we wanted to provide a better, safer playground for our children,” Recht said. For more about your community, visit www.nky.com/fortthomas


Schools

July 7, 2011

CCF Recorder

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Scholarship winners

Ron Heiert, development director at Bishop Brossart High School, poses with Michael Neltner Memorial Scholarship winners Seth Feinauer of Cold Spring and Brianna Hurd of Melbourne. Both students are current eighth-graders at St. Philip, Melbourne. PROVIDED

Gateway honors student writers Gateway Community and Technical College recognized nine student writers of short stories, creative nonfiction and poetry at its annual Night of Excellence awards convocation May 17. The nine were among 46 students who entered a total of 84 works in the college’s annual Voices writing competition. ““This year’s entries were of such high quality, and all of them will be published in our annual anthology of student work,” said Melissa Fry, associate professor of English, who coordinates the yearly writing competition. Entries were

evaluated by volunteer judges from Gateway’s faculty and staff. Winners in the short story category include Anne Lammers, first place, a second-year student from Florence for “Crimson;” Tommie Maines, second place, a second-year student from Park Hills, for “The Farmhouse;” and Anthony Nunez, third place, a second-year student from Florence for “Far from Metropolis.” Creative non-fiction winners include Shirley Stivers of Bellevue, a third-year student, first place, for “My ‘Uh-oh’ Crayons;” Melinda Maier of Lakeside Park, a

second-year student, second place, for “Networking with Intimacy;” and Charef Tekouk of Florence, a second-year student, for “How Soccer Earned Me the Worst Spanking Ever.” Winners in the poetry competition are Teresa Meyer, a fourth-year student from Covington, first place for “Voices II;” Bethany Survant, a secondyear student from Florence, second place for “Taking the Hill;” and Rachele Johnson, third-year student from Edgewood, third place for “Lonely Strange Fellow.” A copy of Voices can be viewed online at gateway.kctcs.edu.

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Face-lift

Crews work on the second phase of the Highlands High School renovation, which includes replacing the front of the south building.

A Bobcat carries away debris from the construction site at Highlands High School.

Kentucky students honored at National SkillsUSA Championships Student from Kentucky high school and college technical education programs won the nation’s highest awards at the SkillsUSA National Leadership and Skills Conference. Industry leaders representing over 1,100 businesses, corporations, trade associations and unions recognized the students for their demonstrated excellence in 94 hands-on occupational and leadership contests, such as robotics, criminal justice, aviation maintenance and public speaking. All contests are designed, run and judged by industry using industry standards. The SkillsUSA Championships have been a premier event since 1967. Top student winners received gold, silver and bronze medallions. Many also received prizes such as

tools of their trade and/or scholarships to further their careers and education. The SkillsUSA Championships is for high school and collegelevel students who are members of SkillsUSA. In addition, for the fifth year, high scorers in the contests received Skill Point Certificates. The Skill Point Certificate was awarded in 86 occupational and leadership areas to students who achieved a high score defined by industry. The Skill Point Certificates were introduced in 2007 as a component of the SkillsUSA Work Force Ready System. Locally, Kevin Wells of California, a student at C E McCormick Area Technology Center in Alexandria, was awarded a Skill Point Certificate in Masonry. “Over 5,600 students from every state in the

nation came to compete in the SkillsUSA Championships this week,” said SkillsUSA executive director Tim Lawrence. “This is the SkillsUSA partnership at its best. Students, instructors and industries are working together to ensure America has a skilled workforce and every student excels. These students prove that career and technical education expands opportunities.” According to Lawrence, recent survey data says that 75 percent of these students will go on to higher education. Included in that number are 40 percent who will be attending college and working at the same time. Of those graduating from school, 76 percent plan to work in the field for which they’ve trained. “They’re the employees industry wants to hire and promote,” Lawrence said.

Campbell Co. students graduate from EKU The following students from Campbell County graduated from Eastern Kentucky University on May 7: Sahra Bernard of Alexandria, bachelor of fine arts, art; Clyde Jamisonof Alexandria graduated magna cum laude bachelor of arts in English teaching; Erin Jury of Alexandria, MAED, instructional leadership; Lauren Keaton, bachelors of science, general

dietetics; Amanda House of Wilder graduated cum laude with a bachelor of science degree in criminal justice; Sara Hunt of Cold Spring graduated magna cum laude with a bachelor of science degree in elementary education teaching; Courtney Jackson of Highland Heights graduated magna cum laude with a bachelor of arts degree in political science; Maggie Lafleur of New-

port graduated with a bachelor of arts in journalism; and Brittany Schutzman of Highland Heights graduated with a bachelor of science in nursing degree in nursing; Lauren Yeager of Fort Thomas graduated cum laude with a bachelor of science degree in general dietetics; Sarah Powell of Fort Thomas graduated magna cum laude with a bachelor of arts degree in art.


A8

CCF Recorder

Schools

July 7, 2011

Student has it her way Campbell County High School senior Olivia Stacey received a $1,000 Burger King Scholars Award based on a combination of academic achievement, work experience and community involvement.

Greater Cincinnati Area franchisee, Fire Grill LLC, announced Stacey’s award as part of the 2010 Burger King Scholars Program, which granted $1.4 Million in scholarships to 1,257 students nationwide.

Funds raised in Fire Grill’s Burger King restaurants during the past year went toward Stacey’s scholarship award. “Olivia Stacey is an excellent example of the young people in this community. She certainly has a promising future,” said Dave Devoy, CEO of Fire Grill. “I am very proud that my managers and team members were instrumental in raising the funds for Stacey’s Burger King Scholars Award,” he said.

The Have It Your Way Foundation administers the Burger King Scholars Program. To qualify for an award, a high school senior must maintain a 2.5 or higher grade point average, work part-time, be involved in cocurricular and/or community service activities, and demonstrate financial need. For more information on the program or how to apply for future scholarships, visit the website at www.haveityourwayfoundation.org.

PROVIDED

Renee Boots, Rita Miller, Doug Waynescott, Olivia Stacey, Garon Wuest. Fire Grill LLC, Franchisee of 43 Burger Kings throughout the Greater Cincinnati area, recently awarded seven scholarships to various seniors throughout the Tristate.

REUNIONS Brossart Class of 2001 reunion

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SPORTS

CCF Recorder

July 7, 2011

HIGH SCHOOL | Editor Melanie Laughman | mlaughman@nky.com | 513-248-7118

YOUTH

|

RECREATIONAL

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

N K Y. c o m

Email: kynews@communitypress.com

A9

RECORDER

Curley adjusting well with Freedom By James Weber jweber@nky.com

Chris Curley’s second year in professional baseball has been smooth in some ways, but rough in others. The former Beechwood High School standout has been sleeping in his own bed while he plays for the Florence Freedom this year. In the first month of the season, he has become one of the top offensive players in the Frontier League. In the field, it has been a different story, as Curley has been adjusting to playing extended time at second base for the first time in his baseball career. That has not been smooth, as Curley has 13 errors in his first 37 games, including two in a loss to Rockford June 30. Seven of the errors have come at shortstop. Curley has played third base most of his life. “I have to learn to move to my right instead of my left,” he said. “That’s a big difference. It’s just instinct. I just have to get used to it.” Curley was a standout bat and pitcher at Beechwood. He hit 11 homers his senior year in 2006, helping the Tigers finish as state runner-up. He went 9-0 on the mound that year including a complete-game shutout in the semifinals. He played college ball at Campbellsville, becoming one of the top players in the NAIA in three years. Curley was named the Mid-South Conference Player of the Year and a Second Team All-American as a junior, hitting .403 with 19 home runs. In his three-year career at CU, he broke records for home runs in a single season (19), career

Three Freedom players league all-stars FLORENCE – Florence Freedom outfielder Cole Miles, infielder Chris Curley and catcher Justin Holloway have been selected as Frontier League AllStars. They will be a part of the West squad for the AllStar Game at 7:05 p.m. Wednesday, July 13, at All Pro Freight Stadium in Avon, Ohio, home of the Lake Erie Crushers. Miles was named a starting outfielder for the West after hitting .341 during his first 39 games of the season, the fifthbest average in the Frontier League. He is also second in the league with 59 hits, second with 21 stolen bases and leads the league with six triples. The former 19th-round draft pick of the Atlanta Braves in 2005 has 20 multi-hit games in his first season with the Freedom. Curley, a Beechwood High School graduate from Edgewood, was selected as a reserve infielder. He leads the league with 36 runs scored, is tied for eighth with a .331 batting average, ranks tied for fourth with nine homers and is tied for second with 38 RBI. Curley is also a former Braves farmhand who spent the last two seasons in the organizahome runs (37), career hits (219) and career RBI (163). His career batting average is .386. He played in the Atlanta Braves organization in

tion before coming to Florence in 2011. Holloway, in his second season with the Freedom, was named a reserve catcher. The Pasadena, Texas, native is hitting .297 with three homers and 14 RBI in 18 games this season. He has hit safely in 13 of those 18 contests and is batting .310 with two homers and eight RBI in his last eight games. Florence, 22-19 through July 4, is 7.5 games out of first place in the West Division. They start a three-game series at Rockford on Tuesday before coming home for a three-game series against Traverse City from Friday through Sunday to take them into the All-Star break. The Florence Freedom Professional Baseball team is a member of the independent Frontier League. Tickets for this coming weekend and any other home game can be purchased and printed in advance at www.florencefreedom.com or by calling the Freedom box office at (859) 594-HITS (4487). See more sports coverage at www.cincinnati.com/blogs/ presspreps. 2010 but was released during spring training. With the Freedom, he is hitting .333 through June 30 with nine home runs and 36 RBI. He was third in the

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

Florence Freedom second baseman Chris Curley warms up between innings during a June 30 Frontier League professional baseball game. league in both homers and RBI. “I just try not to think too much, make solid contact,” he said. “The ball is falling in more for me.” “He has the ability to hit any pitch,” first-year Freedom manager Fran Riordan said earlier this season. “He’s the kind of hitter who knows what his strengths are and really plays to his strengths in the batter’s box. He does a great job of staying inside the ball and I think he has one of the

most polished two-strike approaches on our ball club. He’s been getting an opportunity to play here every day and we’re seeing his offensive capability. We’re sure glad to have him.” Curley eventually wants to get back into the Major League system but is enjoying his time playing at home in front of family and friends. “I’ve had a lot of fun playing here,” he said. “I get to see family every night. You can’t beat that.”

While the Freedom have struggled of late with a 1918 record through June 30, Curley is optimistic the team can make a run as they have just hit the one-third marker of the season. “We’ve hit a bit of a rough spot lately, but we’re turning it around,” he said. “We’ll be fine. We all get along well and have fun in the locker room.” See more sports coverage at www.cincinnati.com/blogs/ presspreps.

Time to register for Bluegrass Games

By James Weber jweber@nky.com

Registration deadlines are fast approaching for Kentucky’s annual version of the Summer Olympics, the Bluegrass State Games. Kentucky residents are invited to participate in a number of sports throughout July and August. An opening ceremony will take place at 3:30 p.m. Friday, July 15, at Whitaker Bank Park. Registration for many sports will be online or on-site only after the first week of July. Visit www.bgsg.org for more informa-

tion or registration on a particular sport. One event will be in Northern Kentucky, skateboarding July 2224 at Ollie’s Skatepark in Florence, which often hosts X-Games type events. If you are participating this year, drop us a line at jweber@nky.com or 859-5781054 and you may be included in a future story. 5K Run/Walk: July 16, Nicholasville. Baseball, 10U: Aug. 5-7, Lexington. Baseball, 12U: July 29-31, Lexington.

Baseball, 8U: July 29-31, Lexington. Baseball, 7U: July 29-31, Lexington. Basketball: July 23, Lexington. Bowling: July 23-24, Lexington. Cheer and Dance: Oct. 29, Georgetown. Chess: July 16, Winchester. Cornhole: July 23, Lexington. Cross country: Aug. 20, Lexington. Cycling: July 10, Lexington. Disc Golf: July 16, Lexington. Fencing: Aug. 6, Louisville. Flag Football: July 30-31, Lexington. Golf: July 23-24: Lexington.

Lacrosse: July 16, Lexington Martial Arts: July 30, Frankfort. Mountain Biking: July 17, Frankfort. Racquetball: July 16-17, Lexington. Sailing, yachts: Aug. 13, Grand Rivers. Sailing: July 23, Louisville. Shooting: July 10-17, various. Skateboarding: July 22-24, Florence. Soccer: July 16-17, 23-24, Versailles and Lexington. Softball: July 8-31, Lexington, Richmond. Swimming: July 30-31, Lexington.

Table Tennis: July 24, Lexington. Tee Ball: July 15-17, Lexington. Tennis: July 8-10, Lexington. TOPS Soccer: July 16, Lexington. Ultimate Frisbee: July 23-24, Berea. Volleyball, indoor: July 29-31, Lexington. Volleyball, outdoor: July 15-17, Frankfort and Lexington. Wrestling: July 22-23, Lexington. See more sports coverage at www.cincinnati.com/blogs/presspreps.

West team wins hoops all-star games By James Weber jweber@nky.com

The West won both the junior and senior all-star games June 22 at Scott High School as many of the best players in Northern Kentucky got together. In the senior game, Beechwood’s Tyler Fangman led the victorious West team with 31 points as the squad beat the East 90-81. Lloyd’s Donnie Cheatum added 21 points. Ryle’s Bobby Staufer led

the East team with 30 points and Simon Kenton’s Nick Gray had 22. The West team won the junior game 69-56. Dixie Heights’ Parker Stansberry led the West with 16 points. Brady Hightchew of Newport Central Catholic led the East with 16.

Senior game

East (81) – Gray (Simon Kenton) 9 0 22, Hammons (Silver Grove) 1 0 2, Stauffer (Ryle) 15 0 30, Haynes (Scott) 2 0 4, McLean (Villa

Madonna) 1 0 2, Mullins (Ryle) 0 0 0, Doyle (Newport Central Catholic) 2 2 7, Brown (Boone County) 7 0 14. Totals 37 2 81. West (90) – Fangman (Beechwood) 12 1 31, Cheatum (Lloyd) 8 2 21, Thelen (Covington Catholic) 4 1 10, Trammel (Dixie Heights) 4 1 10, Langley (Cooper) 6 0 13, Camarena (Ludlow) 2 0 4, Patula (St. Henry) 1 0 3. Totals 37 5 92. Dick Vories Mr. Hustle Award: East – Cameron

Haynes (Scott); West – Asiel Langley (Cooper). Tony Commodore MVP Award: East – Bobby Stauffer (Ryle); West – Tyler Fangman (Beechwood).

Junior game

East (56) – Towles (Highlands) 4 0 8, Rogg (Dayton) 1 2 4, Jennings (Brossart) 2 1 5, Griffin (Campbell County) 0 0 0, Hightchew (Newport Central Catholic) 5 6 16, Massey (Covington

Catholic) 2 0 4, Dunn (Newport) 3 0 6, Ryan (Newport Central Catholic) 4 0 11, Phelps (Villa Madonna) 1 0 2, Dedden (St. Henry) 0 0 0. Totals 22 9 56. West (69) – McQueary (Boone County) 4 0 10, Webster (Cooper) 2 0 5, Huff (Conner) 3 0 6, Burger (Holy Cross) 3 3 9, Hall (Lloyd) 0 0 0, Cruse (Beechwood) 3 2 8, Stansberry (Dixie Heights) 6 4 16, Engel (Ludlow) 1 0 2, Mullins (Ryle) 2 0 6, Cham-

bers (Simon Kenton) 3 1 7. Totals: 27 10 69. Dick Vories Mr. Hustle Award: East – Dalton Griffin; West – Alex Webster. Tony Commodore MVP Award: East – Brady Hightchew (Newport Central Catholic); West – Parker Stansberry (Dixie Heights). See more sports coverage at www.cincinnati.com/blogs/pres spreps.


VIEWPOINTS

A10

Campbell County Recorder

July 7, 2011

EDITORIALS

|

LETTERS

REBECCA BUTTS/STAFF

Party in the Park

Cover Model entertained the crowd at Party in the Park Wednesday. Chrissy Jones of Fort Thomas and Jonathan Luke of Western Hills.

Teens, parents share responsibility

Reality gap

Despite these disturbing statistics, 92 percent of teens consider themselves to be safe, cautious drivers. And few seem to sense the

dangers lurking on the roadway once school’s out for summer – despite the fact that young drivers are behind the wheel 44 percent more hours each Stephen Gray week in the sumWallace mer than during the rest of the Community year or that sumRecorder mer is the most guest popular time of columnist year for kids to be driving under the influence of alcohol or other drugs. According to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, June, July, and August are the deadliest months for teen motor vehicle fatalities when almost 1,000 teenagers die (994 in 2009). Close calls cause the majority of teens to change their driving behaviors, but only for a while. In fact, nearly half of them say their renewed commitment to more responsible driving lasted only a month or less. And what improvements in driving habits teens do report are more likely to involve paying better attention to other drivers than to texting or speeding less. Apparently, it takes a tough lesson – actually getting in a crash – for teen drivers to significantly change their driving behaviors. Nearly 70 percent of teen drivers who have been in a collision say the experience changed their driving habits, with the majority of them (58 percent) saying those improvements are “forever.” There’s got to be a better way.

A shared responsibility

COLUMNS

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CH@TROOM

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

Keeping young drivers safe behind the wheel has never been timelier, and some new help is on the way. The Parent/Teen Driving Contract developed by Liberty Mutual and SADD which can be found at www.libertymutual. com/teendriving is both a conversation starter about safety and a customized agreement that promotes dialogue and saves lives. In short, it helps families create and sustain important driving rules for both sides – because responsibility is, indeed, a two-way street. This parent-teen dialogue is not a close call. Stephen Wallace, author of “Reality Gap: Alcohol, Drugs, and Sex – What Parents Don’t Know and Teens Aren’t Telling,” serves as national chairman and chief executive officer of SADD Inc. (Students Against Destructive Decisions).

We moved to Fort Thomas six years ago, and I was flabbergasted that motorists were allowed to park facing the wrong way on the street. I have never seen this allowed anywhere else in the U.S. I have visited or been a resident. It seems only “common sense” that motorists should only park in the direction of traffic.

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County Email: kynews@communitypress.com

N K Y. c o m

Editor Michelle Shaw | mshaw@nky.com | 578-1053

Keep wrong-way parking ordinance

As high school students pour out of the classroom and into their cars, it’s a good reminder that the summer season almost always proves to be the most dangerous for teen driving. And the news is not getting any better. A new study by SADD (Students Against Destructive Decisions) and Liberty Mutual Insurance gives parents reason to pause before handing over the keys to their newly released young driver, revealing an alarmingly high number of teens who have had “near misses” while behind the wheel. It also delivers some insight into what may be chief contributors to those events – even if they differ from what most young people think. According to the study, 68 percent of teens admit to having narrowly avoided a crash. Yet, perhaps not surprisingly, teens are more likely to blame external factors than to point the finger at themselves – even when they are at fault. Indeed, one in three drivers (34 percent) who say they have had a “near miss” blame another driver, while 21 percent say weather was the primary cause. Yet when asked what they were doing in the car at the time of the incident, teens admitted to an array of distracting or dangerous behaviors: 30 percent were speeding, 21 percent were texting, 20 percent were talking to their passengers, and 17 percent were changing songs on their MP3 player. Ironically, only 9 percent of teens believed excessive speed was the primary contributor to a close call, while 13 percent said texting while driving was to blame. Another 6 percent passed along responsibility to friends who distracted them. It’s no surprise that our “close call kids” are likely to report they regularly engage in dangerous or distracted driving behaviors: • 36 percent say they regularly talk on the cell phone while driving; and • 33 percent say they regularly text behind the wheel. Those numbers are significantly lower for the 32 percent of teen drivers who report never having had a close call.

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RECORDER

About guest columns

We welcome guest columns on all sides of an issue; however, potential columnists should reserve space in advance with Editor Michelle Shaw by calling 578-1053. Include with your column your name, address, daytime telephone number, and a two-to-three line biography outlining your expertise related to this topic. Either include a color headshot of yourself, or make arrangements when you call to have your photo taken here. We reserve the right to edit for length, accuracy and clarity. Columns may be no more than 500 words. Deadline: Noon Monday for next Thursday’s issue. E-mail: mshaw@communitypress.com Letters, columns and articles submitted to The Community Recorder may be published or distributed in print, electronic or other forms. To change this ordinance to allow wrong-way parking is absurd. The residents should be educat-

ed and the ordinance should be enforced. Linda Parks Fort Thomas

Remembering America’s other forgotten war I was watching the National Memorial Day Parade on May 30th and couldn’t help but notice something was missing. Among the bands, flags and floats marching in Washington, D.C., that day were World War II Veterans, Korean War Veterans, Vietnam War Veterans, Veterans of Desert Storm, the First Gulf War and Veterans of the current wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. All these veterans well deserve the recognition of their sacrifice and accomplishments but there is one group that was curiously absent. Veterans who fought and won the Cold War. Sadly, with the well deserved recognition finally being given to the Veterans of the Korean War, the Cold War has now become America’s new “Forgotten War.” When the Cold War ended with the collapse of the Soviet Union, America achieved a victory of immense proportions. The long Cold War was over and we had won.

Surprisingly, the greatness of our accomplishment notwithstanding, the celebration of that victory was muted, short and over before it began. Those who served during the period of the Cold War from 2 September 1945 thru 26 December 1991, received a flimsy paper certificate signed, not by the President, but by the Secretary Of Defense. This certificate was available, if one applied until 2008. Otherwise, recognition of Cold War service and sacrifice was non-existent. Legislation has been proposed on numerous occasions get Congress to approve a Cold War Victory Medal. The proposal is usually attached to the Defense Appropriations Bill and is either dropped in committee or stripped out during the joint reconciliation conference.

Master Sgt. Thomas Vance Community Recorder guest columnist

In 2009 the bill was stripped out in committee. This time it may be different. There are now in Congress two bills to correct their oversight. The Senate bill, S 402, the Cold War Service Act of 2011 is sponsored by Senator Olympia Snowe (R) of Maine and co-sponsored by Senators Collins (R) Maine, Webb (D) Virginia and Kerry (D) Massachusetts. The House bill , HR 1968 is sponsored by Representative Steve Israel (D) of New York and is co-sponsored by Representative Judy Chu (D) of California. This time the House and Senate have both put forth bills and will be in agreement. You can help by contacting your Senators and Representatives and urging them to co sponsor these bills. Lets remind Congress of Cold War Veterans, their service, their sacrifice and their Victory. Let us insure that they will never be forgotten. Master Sgt. Thomas Vance is retired from the United States Air Force and is a resident of Alexandria.

Pool restrictions lifted, but efforts to contain shigella continue Many families have been visited by an unwelcome guest this spring and summer: the Shigella bacteria. Between April 1 and June 28, more than 100 cases of Shigella were reported in Northern Kentucky. Shigella is a bacteria that infects the bowels. It causes an illness called Shigellosis, with symptoms including diarrhea, fever, stomach cramps, nausea or vomiting. Shigella primarily infects young children, since it is spread through contact with the stool of an infected person. We’ve had to take many steps to contain the Shigella outbreak, the most visible one being restricting children who are not toilet trained from public pools. We realize that many families were inconvenienced by this rule; however, it was one we felt was necessary. As we move to the peak of summer, it appears that our efforts to contain Shigella have been working. Although cases continue to be reported, the bacteria is restricted to child care centers and has not infiltrated local pools. Thus, we eased the restrictions on diapers in pools as of June 30. Our work on this outbreak is not done yet, though. We are still seeing some children in child care centers becoming infected with the bacteria, and it can have serious complications, including high fevers and seizures. The illness

can also spread to family members and others in the community if frequent and proper hand washing procedures are not followed. We will continLynne ue to focus our Saddler disease prevenefforts on Community tion child care centers, Recorder as we have done guest since the Shigella columnist cases first began in April. The Health Department has supplied all licensed child care with educational information about the outbreak and steps they should take to prevent or stop the spread of these germs. We have emphasized hand washing, which is the most effective way to prevent transmission. Any child care center that has cases is visited by a team of Health Department staff. They are required to follow sanitization and cleaning guidelines and exclude children who are sick. Centers are also not permitted to use water tables or pools. While closing a child care center might seem like a solution, it’s typically not the case. Children from the closed center could end up in other centers, or gathered at homes, potentially exposing a

Any child care center that has cases is visited by a team of Health Department staff. They are required to follow sanitization and cleaning guidelines and exclude children who are sick. Centers are also not permitted to use water tables or pools. greater number of children to the bacteria. Should cases continue in one particular child care, we will look at more restrictive measures. The Health Department and child care center staff cannot contain this outbreak on our own. We need help from parents. If your child is sick with diarrhea, please don’t send him/her to child care or to the pool. Practice good hand washing to keep Shigella and other illnesses at bay. These steps will not only protect your child, but also his/her classmates. Shigella thrives in the summer months. We hope that our aggressive approach, initially targeting pools and child care centers, will ensure that more families can enjoy a swim or an afternoon of play without worry. Lynne Saddler, MD, MPH is the District Director of Health for the Northern Kentucky Health Department.

A publication of Your Community Recorder newspaper serving all of Campbell County

COUNTY RECORDER

Campbell County Editor . . . . . .Michelle Shaw mshaw@nky.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .578-1053 Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Friday | See page A2 for additional contact information.

Email: kynews@communitypress.com Website: NKY.com

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T h u r s d a y, J u l y

RECORDER

7, 2011

PEOPLE

|

IDEAS

|

RECIPES

BEST FRIENDS FOREVER

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Mary Dierig and Judy Schroder relax at the Fort Thomas Swim Club, where they met and became friends in the 1970s.

Trips to the pool lead to lifelong friendship By Amanda Joering Alley

ajoering@nky.com

What started as trips to the Fort Thomas Swim Club pool with their children led to a lifelong friendship for a group of Fort Thomas women. In the early 1970s, Fort Thomas resident Mary Dierig joined the the swim club and quickly became acquainted with the other mothers who frequented the pool, including resident Judy Schroder. Since then, the two women and four others have developed a friendship that has gone well beyond the waters of the swim club. “This all started from us just sitting around the pool with our children,” Schroder said. “Now it’s more than

that, it’s a group of great friends that are there when you need them.” While the group spent many days year-after-year at the club, some of them have since moved away or stopped being members of the club, leading the women to start a girls night out, Dierig said. “Even though we don’t all come here anymore, we all still get together for our girls night and go out to dinner and sit around and talk,” Dierig said. Dierig and Schroder, who both still live in the city, still frequent the swim club. “We’re here pretty much every day the sun is out in the summer,” Schroder said. For more about your community, visit www.nky.com/fortthomas

AT THE LIBRARY Cold Spring

• Book Club 11 a.m. Tuesday, July 12 Discussion of this month's book “Antony & Cleopatra” by Adrian Goldsworthy. Visitors welcome. • Origami with Jonathan Heart 4 p.m. Tuesday, July 12 Learn the ancient Japanese art of folding paper with Jonathan Heart. Learn how to make art from simple pieces of paper. All supplies provided. Ages 9-14. Registration required. • Photography: Composition and Elements 7 p.m. Wednesday, July 13 A session with awardwinning local photographer Dale Voelker. Voelker will discuss camera types and their uses, the relationship of light and exposure settings, aperture, focus, depth of field, basic elements of composition and quality of light. Adult and teen. Registration required. • Adventure Club: Cincinnati Museum Center presents One World, Many Cultures 4 p.m. Thursday, July 14 This fun and interactive program will use maps, clothing, games and music to explore the cultures of the world. Ages 6-11. Registration required.

Fort Thomas

• Family Craft: Sand Painting 5:30 p.m. Friday, July 8 Can't get to the beach this year? Bring the beach to Fort Thomas instead. Beat the heat and give sand painting a try. Families welcome. Registration required. • Summer Reading Midsummer Picnic 11 a.m. Saturday, July 9 A free hot dog lunch to celebrate Summer Reading. Don't forget to enter to win weekly prizes and register for free summer programs. • Crazy Cool Carnival Noon Saturday, July 9 Step up and join for the fun. The carnival has come to the library with food, games and more. Families welcome. Registration required. • Brown Bag Book Club Noon Monday, July 11 A discussion of this month's book “In the Country of Men” by Hisham Matar. Bring a brown bag lunch and the library provides beverages. Visitors welcome. • Adventure Club: Kentucky Down Under 4 p.m. Monday, July 11 Learn about Australia's culture and meet some native animals. Ages 6-11. Registration required.

Bob Schack leads “Dave,” a 4-year-old bull, uphill with a bucket of feed towards a barn at Little Rock Farm in Melbourne in June of 2010.

Tour highlights what’s new on the farm By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

Ten years ago, Campbell County boasted no wineries, direct to consumer beef sales or community agriculture businesses. Now, people taking a drive on the annual “Backroads” tour will see what’s new on the farm. The 15 stops on this year’s 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, July 23, “Backroads Farm Tour” will feature four vineyards and wineries, and for the first time two direct beef sales farms and a farm where 4-H youth members will show how they raise cattle and pigs. The free driving tour is self-guided, and maps detailing each stop on the tour will be available at the Campbell County Conservation District office, 8351 E. Main St., Alexandria. Additional locations to find maps and information about the tour will be detailed in advertisements in this newspaper. The tour is a chance to showcase the county’s agriculture to the public, said Linda Bray-Schafer of Grant’s Lick, chair of the Campbell County Farmland Work Group’s Backroads Farm Tour committee. Farming has indeed changed in recent years, said Bray-Schafer. “With the loss of the tobacco crop for the farmers, they’ve been searching for a new crop,” she said. “And that crop is agritourism.” Wineries and vineyards on this year’s tour include Seven Wells Vineyard & Winery on Siry Road in Grant’s Lick, Camp Springs Vineyard and winery on Four Mile Road in Camp Springs, Bryan Vineyards on

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Picturesque scenes like this barn with a rock foundation painted white at the intersection of Nine Mile Road and Four Mile Road in Camp Springs is one of the spots people taking the 2011 Campbell County BackRoads Farm Tour July 23 are sure to pass. Clay Ridge Road in Grant’s Lick, StoneBrook Winery on Vineyard Lane in Camp Springs. There’s also been a push by consumers to start buying their food more locally, said Bray-Schafer. Greensleves Farm on Pleasant Ridge Road near Alexandria will have presentations during the tour showing guests the benefits of sustainable farming and the importance of community-supported agriculture. The tour also features stops including Little Rock Farm on Ten Mile Road in Melbourne and Neltner’s Farm on Four Mile Road in Camp Springs where visitors will be able to buy and tasted home grown vegetables, fruits and other products, she said. Other stops on the tour will include Beezy Bee on Fisher Road in California where visitors will find out about where honey comes from and have a chance to

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CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

FILE

The tasting room of StoneBrook Winery in Camp Springs sits atop a knob hill at the end of a short gravel driveway.

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Greg Wehrman takes in a view of his family’s Seven Wells Vineyard & Winery on Siry Road near Grant’s Lick. take some home, the Campbell County Log Cabin Museum on Clay Ridge Road in Grant’s Lick, and Seiter Farm on Ky. 10 in California, a 450-acrea corn, soybean, wheat, alfalfa and tobacco farm. Stop to see and find out about horses and other livestock include the Lazy K Ranch on Siry Road in Grant’s Lick, and Flagg Sprng Ranch on Schababerle Hill Road in California. The Campbell County Beef Association will also set up at some of the tour stops and grill, Bray-Schafer said. “So, people will be able to sample our locally grown beef,” she said. Each year, new stops are added to the tour to maintain a variety, Bray-Schafer said. Bryan Vineyards on Clay Ridge Road in Grant’s Lick, Martin’s Family Farm on Fisher Road in California,

Bezold’s Beef Farm on Fisher Road in California, and Clearview Ridge Farm on the AA Highway in California are all new to the tour, she said. Clearview, a traditional livestock farm that includes chickens, goats, horses and cattle, will be a free tasting stop where people will be able to sample a variety of beef cuts, Bray-Schafer said. At the Martin’s Family Farm the feature for visitors will be demonstrations of how the children of Theresa and Jo Martin raise livestock including cattle and pigs to show through 4-H and sell, said Own Prim, Campbell County 4-H extension agent. “These are the animals that the kids will have at the Alexandria Fair in August,” Prim said. For more about your community, visit www. nky.com/campbellcounty


B2

CCF Recorder

July 7, 2011

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD F R I D A Y, J U L Y 8

ATTRACTIONS Penguin Palooza, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Newport Aquarium, Newport on the Levee, Six Rockhopper penguins and six Inca Terns added to new habitat and new playground area. $22, $15 ages 2-12. 859-261-7444; www.newportaquarium.com. Newport.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Best of the Best, 7:30 p.m. 10:30 p.m., Shadowbox Cabaret, Newport on the Levee, Most popular-by-demand sketches and songs. Food and drink available. $20-$30. Through July 9. 859-957-7625; www.shadowboxcabaret.com. Newport. Pseudonym, 8 p.m. Dinner Service Begins at 6:30 PM, Stauss Theatre, Northern Kentucky University, 101 Fine Arts Center, This new musical revue, directed by Roderick Justice, is fast, fun and powerful! The characters find themselves hiding behind their PSEUDONYMS in a musical that is definitely not what it may seem. Dinner is included in ticket price. $30. Reservations required. Presented by Commonwealth Theatre Company. Through July 24. 859-572-5464; theatre.nku.edu. Highland Heights.

SPORTS FESTIVALS

St. Thomas Summer Festival, 6 p.m.-11 p.m. Entertainment by Matt Fassler, smoked pulled pork BBQ dinners and Xavier University Athletic Department passes out free Xavier memorabilia., St. Thomas Church, 26 East Villa Place, Inflatable rides, kids games, major raffle, jewelry raffle, booths, silent auction. One-day ride pass: $15. Free. Through July 9. 859-441-1282. Fort Thomas.

HEALTH / WELLNESS

Health Screenings, 9 a.m.-noon, Homan Chiropractic Newport, 52 Carothers Road, Brief health questionnaire, blood pressure, height, weight, pulse and spinal/postural evaluation. Free. Through Dec. 30. 859-291-2225. Newport.

MUSEUMS

Cincinnati Meets the Beatles! 1964 & 1966 The Liverpool Sensations Invade the the Tri- State, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, 1600 Montague Road, Exhibit features stunning photos of news photographer Gordon Baer. Family friendly. Included with admission: $7, $6 seniors, $4 children; free for members. 859491-4003. Covington.

MUSIC - CLASSIC ROCK Cincy Rockers, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Guys ‘n’ Dolls Restaurant and Nightclub, 4210 Alexandria Pike, $5. 859-441-4888. Cold Spring.

MUSIC - CONCERTS

Concerts and Friday Family Fun Nights Series, 9 p.m. “The Karate Kid” starts at dusk., Independence Memorial Park, 2001 Jack Woods Parkway, Presented by City of Independence. 859-356-6264; www.cityofindependence.org. Independence.

MUSIC - COUNTRY

Cross-Tie, 10 p.m., Peecox II, 12200 Madison Pike, 859-356-1440; www.peecox.com. Independence. Theresa Dunn as Reba McIntyre, 7 p.m., Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Tickets required. Free. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-3422665. Burlington.

Florence Freedom Baseball, 7:05 p.m. vs. Traverse City Beach Bums. Fireworks Friday. Boy Scout Sleep-over., Champion Window Field, 7950 Freedom Way, If Freedom wins on Wednesday, special prizes for fans. Reading Club Nights presented by Xavier University: participating children win free tickets. . $12 VIP, $10 reserved, $7 lawn. Presented by Florence Freedom Professional Baseball. 859-594-4487; www.florencefreedom.com. Florence. S A T U R D A Y, J U L Y 9

ATTRACTIONS

Penguin Palooza, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Newport Aquarium, $22, $15 ages 2-12. 859-2617444; www.newportaquarium.com. Newport.

FESTIVALS

St. Thomas Summer Festival, 5 p.m.-11 p.m. Meet Big Time Rush star Ciara Bravo. St. Thomas Church, Free. 859-441-1282. Fort Thomas.

MUSEUMS

Cincinnati Meets the Beatles! 1964 & 1966 The Liverpool Sensations Invade the the Tri- State, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, Included with admission: $7, $6 seniors, $4 children; free for members. 859-491-4003. Covington.

MUSIC - ACOUSTIC

Sasha, 7 p.m.-10 p.m., Argentine Bean Bistro and Wine Bar, 2875 Town Center Blvd., Gypsy Latin Jazz. Free. 859-426-1042; www.argentinebean.net. Crestview Hills. Bertsch and Walsh: a Tall Duo, 8:30 p.m., Hayloft Tavern, 7501 Alexandria Pike, Free. 859-635-5638. Alexandria.

MUSIC - CLASSIC ROCK

The New Lime, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Grandview Tavern & Grille, 2220 Grandview Drive, Columbia recording artists will perform musi from 1960s-’70s. No cover. 859-341-8439. Fort Mitchell. Classics IV, 8 p.m.-1 a.m., Guys ‘n’ Dolls Restaurant and Nightclub, 4210 Alexandria Pike, $30 VIP, $25. 859-441-4888; www.guysndollsllc.com. Cold Spring.

MUSIC - JAZZ

New Sleepcat Band, 7:30 p.m., Dee Felice Cafe, 529 Main St., Directed by Bill Gemmer and features John Von Ohlen. 859-2612365; www.deefelice.com. Covington.

MUSIC - R&B

The Juice, 8:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m., The Reef, 1301 Fourth Ave., Blues, soul and rock and roll. Free. 859-261-8801. Dayton.

MUSIC - ROCK

The Truth, 10 p.m., Peecox, 635 Donaldson Highway, 859-342-7000; www.peecox.com. Erlanger.

ON STAGE - COMEDY

Larry Reeb, 8 p.m. $15. Ages 21 and up., 10:30 p.m. $15. Ages 18 and up., Funny Bone Comedy Club, Newport on the Levee, 859-957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

Rusted Root

MUSIC - CONCERTS

Rusted Root, 9 p.m. Doors open 8 p.m., Southgate House, 24 E. Third St., Ballroom. Band from Pittsburgh. $25, $20 advance. 859-431-2201; www.ticketfly.com. Newport.

MUSIC - JAZZ

New Sleepcat Band, 7 p.m., Dee Felice Cafe, 859-261-2365; www.deefelice.com. Covington.

For more about Greater Cincinnati’s dining, music, events, movies and more, go to Metromix.com.

MUSIC - POP

Daniel Orlando, 8 p.m. With Cincy Brass and Up Dog. $5., York St. Cafe, 738 York St., 859-261-9675; www.danorlandomusic.com. Newport.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Pseudonym, 8 p.m. Dinner Service Begins at 6:30 PM, Stauss Theatre, Northern Kentucky University, $30. Reservations required. 859572-5464; theatre.nku.edu. Highland Heights.

RECREATION

King’s Basketball Academy Developmental Program, 7 p.m.-8 p.m. Daily through Dec. 31., Town and Country Sports and Health Club, 1018 Town Drive, Players report once a week for a 30 minute technical skill based training session. Games of 30 minutes follows training. No standings, stats or scores recorded. Ages 1-4. $62.50 each six-week program per player. Registration required online. 859-442-5800; www.towncountrysports.com. Wilder. Open Play Paintball, 3 p.m.-5 p.m., Town and Country Sports and Health Club, 1018 Town Drive, Golf Range Clubhouse to pay and for orientation. Ages 10 and up. Ages 17 and under must bring a waiver signed by a parent prior to play. $25, $12 500 additional paintballs, $10 marker/gun, gloves, mask and vest. 859-442-5800; www.towncountrysports.com. Wilder.

RELIGIOUS - COMMUNITY

Dead Men Walking Motorcycle Ministry Ride, 11:15 a.m., Kroger Marketplace Newport, 130 Pavilion Parkway, Join Biker Rev. Robert Ashley Beagle for a motorcycle ride. Meet in (the new Krogers) parking lot in Newport (off of the second exit before you hit the Big Mac Bridge heading North). 859292-5640; http://tinyurl.com/3kgv4za. Newport.

SPECIAL EVENTS

Bold and the Beautiful Live, 7 p.m.-11 p.m., Newport Syndicate, 18 E. Fifth St., Meet cast members of CBS’ daily soap opera, “The Bold & The Beautiful.” With Brandon Beemer (Owen), Zack Conroy (Oliver) and Cincinnati native Adam Gregory (Thomas). Ask questions, get autographs and take pictures with stars. Ages 18 and up. $129, $99, $59. Presented by Mike Davis’ SoapTour.com. 859-491-8000; www.cincyticket.com. Newport. Northern Kentucky Pride, 10 a.m.-7 p.m., Goebel Park, Philadelphia Street between 5th and 6th streets, Community celebration for lesbian, gay, bi-sexual and transgender residents of area. Performances from nationally and locally known female impersonators, local bands, artists, organizations and businesses throughout the region. Includes Kids Zone with face painting, clowns, stilt walkers and various carnival-type games. Part of Cincinnati Pride Equinox Festival. Presented by Equinox Cincinnati. 859-292-2151; www.equinoxcincinnati.com. Covington.

TOURS

Newport Gangster Walking Tour, 10:30 a.m. 1:30 p.m. 5 p.m., Gangsters Dueling Piano Bar, 18 E. Fifth St., Explore the streets where gangsters made their millions, gamblers lost their fortunes and their lives, and ladies of the night earned their reputations. $15. Presented by American Legacy Tours. 859-491-8000; www.newportgangsters.com. Newport.

FILE PHOTO

The Kentucky Symphony Orchestra will kick off the 2011 Summer Series at Devou Park with “The Blue & Gray Revisited” at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, July 9, at Devou Park in Covington. The concert with tell America’s Civil War through music with Civil War re-enactors and the KSO Chorale. Free concert admission and parking. A $5 donation is suggested. Blankets, lawn chairs and picnics are welcome. Concessions are available. For more information, visit www.kyso.org. Pictured is the KSO performing a summer concert in Devou Park in 2010. S U N D A Y, J U L Y 1 0

AUDITIONS

Dancing at Lughnasa by Brian Friel, 2 p.m.-4 p.m., Village Players, 8 N. Fort Thomas Ave., Cold readings from the script; Irish dialects used. Callbacks, if necessary, July 12. Cast requirements: five women, three men. Ages 25-55. Free. 317-6968085; www.villageplayers.biz/auditions.aspx. Fort Thomas.

ON STAGE - COMEDY

Larry Reeb, 7:30 p.m. $15. Ages 21 and up., Funny Bone Comedy Club, 859-957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Pseudonym, 6:30 p.m. Dinner Service Begins at 5 PM, Stauss Theatre, Northern Kentucky University, $30. Reservations required. 859572-5464; theatre.nku.edu. Highland Heights. M O N D A Y, J U L Y 1 1

AUDITIONS Dancing at Lughnasa by Brian Friel, 7 p.m.-9 p.m., Village Players, Free. 317696-8085; www.villageplayers.biz/auditions.aspx. Fort Thomas. RELIGIOUS COMMUNITY

Northern Kentucky Women’s Outpost, 9:30 a.m.-11 a.m., World Peace Bell Center, 425 York St., Second Floor meeting room. Features women speaking to women. Meetings are encouraging, uplifting and nondenominational. Music, scripture reading, guest speaker and light refreshments. Free. Presented by Northern Kentucky Women’s Outpost. 859-781-4044; www.outpostwomensministries.com. Newport.

SUMMER CAMP NATURE

Traditional Farm Camp, 9:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Daily through July 15., Sunrock Farm, 103 Gibson Lane, Ages 5-11. $195. 859-7815502; www.sunrockfarm.org. Wilder. T U E S D A Y, J U L Y 1 2

About calendar

To submit calendar items, go to “www.NKY.com” and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to “life@communitypress.com” along with event information. Items are printed on a space-available basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to “www.NKY.com” and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page. W E D N E S D A Y, J U L Y 1 3

ATTRACTIONS

Penguin Palooza, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Newport Aquarium, $22, $15 ages 2-12. 859-2617444; www.newportaquarium.com. Newport.

EDUCATION

Adult Learn to Golf Clinic, 6:30 p.m.-7:30 p.m. Continues weekly through Aug. 3. Registration due by July 11., Town and Country Sports and Health Club, 1018 Town Drive, Beginners and advanced beginners. $69. Registration required. 859-442-5800; www.towncountrysports.com. Wilder.

T H U R S D A Y, J U L Y 1 4

MUSIC - CABARET Don Fangman Sings Sinatra, 6:30 p.m.-9 p.m., Knotty Pine on the Bayou, 6720 Licking Pike, Songs also by Dean Martin, Michael Buble, Andrea Bocelli and Neil Diamond. Free. Reservations required. 859781-2200; www.fangsingsfrank.com. Cold Spring.

FILMS

Met Opera Live in HD Summer Encores, 6:30 p.m. “La Fille du Regiment” with Natalie Dessay, Juan Diego Florez, Felicity Palmer, Alessandro Corbelli adn Marian Seldes. Marco Armiliato conducts., Rave Motion Pictures Florence 14 Theater, 7860 Mall Road, Experience the world-class productions of the Metropolitan Opera without traveling to New York. $12.50. Presented by Fathom Events. 859-282-7504; www.fathomevents.com. Florence.

Naked Karate Girls

MUSIC - CONCERTS

Live at the Levee, 6 p.m.-9:30 p.m. The Naked Karate Girls., Newport on the Levee, 1 Levee Way, Riverwalk Plaza. Summer concert series. Free. 859-291-0550; www.newportonthelevee.com. Newport.

MUSIC - BLUES

ON STAGE - COMEDY

ON STAGE - THEATER

ON STAGE - THEATER

Blues Jam, 8:30 p.m., Midway Cafe, 1017 S. Fort Thomas Ave., Hosted by Dick and the Roadmasters, award-winning blues band. Free. 859-781-7666. Fort Thomas. Pseudonym, 8 p.m. Dinner Service Begins at 6:30 PM, Stauss Theatre, Northern Kentucky University, $30. Reservations required. 859572-5464; theatre.nku.edu. Highland Heights.

Steve White, 8 p.m. $15. Ages 18 and up., Funny Bone Comedy Club, Newport on the Levee, 859-957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport. Pseudonym, 8 p.m. Dinner Service Begins at 6:30 PM, Stauss Theatre, Northern Kentucky University, $30. Reservations required. 859572-5464; theatre.nku.edu. Highland Heights.

ATTRACTIONS

Penguin Palooza, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Newport Aquarium, $22, $15 ages 2-12. 859-2617444; www.newportaquarium.com. Newport.

EDUCATION

Ladies Instructional Golf Clinics, 6:30 p.m.-7:30 p.m. Continues weekly through Aug. 2. Registration due by July 10., Town and Country Sports and Health Club, 1018 Town Drive, Beginners and advanced beginners. $69. Registration required. 859-4425800; www.towncountrysports.com. Wilder.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Pseudonym, 8 p.m. Dinner Service Begins at 6:30 PM, Stauss Theatre, Northern Kentucky University, $30. Reservations required. 859572-5464; theatre.nku.edu. Highland Heights.

SUPPORT GROUPS

THANKS TO HOLLY YURCHISON

The Showboat Majestic presents “Forty-Second Street,” a celebration of Broadway and those putting on the shows, through July 24. Musical numbers include “We’re in the Money” and “Lullaby of Broadway.” Tickets are $17, $16, seniors and students. Call 513-241-6550 or visit www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. Pictured are: Sara Dreibebis (Ensemble), left, Abby Wagner (Ensemble), Devi Reisenfeld (Ann Reilly “Anytime Annie”), and Abby Sheridan (Peggy Sawyer).

Table Talk: Caregiver Support Group, 3:30 p.m.-5 p.m., Fort Thomas-Carrico Branch Library, 1000 Highland Ave., For caretakers of medically fragile, elderly and terminally ill patients. Refreshments. Meets second Tuesday. Free. Presented by Hospice of the Bluegrass - Northern Kentucky. 859-572-5033; www.hospicebg.org. Fort Thomas.

THANKS TO NATALIE BOWERS

The Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center and the Artisan Enterprise Center (AEC) will have a closing reception for “Carnegie Balloon Project: Inflation” from 6-10 p.m. Friday, July 8, at the AEC, 25 W. Seventh St., in Covington. Artist Sherri Besso, a Cincinnati native, created a sculptural installation using 1,400 Mylar balloons inside the AEC gallery. This is the fourth in a series of balloon art installations presented by The Carnegie. The show is curated by Gallery Director Bill Seitz. The closing reception will include music by DJ Seb B, and food and refreshments. The event is free. The installation will close on Friday, July 15. AEC hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday - Friday. For more information, visit www.covingtonarts.com.


Life

CCF Recorder

July 7, 2011

B3

Just you and me and our furry baby makes three

At bedtime one night recently, my husband Tom said, “Not tonight Sweetie, I have a headache.” And he wasn’t referring to what you might think; he was referring to our dog Nosey sleeping on the bed. Now, we discussed where pets should sleep a few columns back, but haven’t addressed what pet ownership can mean to fledgling romantic relationships. When I was single and lived in a condo, I had a white teddy bear hamster named Squeaker Snow. He was the perfect single-girl pet. To make a long story short, my co-workers and I began a running joke about things like the martinis that Squeak was going to have waiting for me when I got home from work, what Squeak and I were going to have for dinner or what Squeak and I were going to do that weekend. It was all great, giggly

fun. At the same time there was a man I fancied w h o worked in another Marsie Hall division of Newbold the company. Marsie’s W e Menagerie seemed to have a mutual attraction, but he never asked me out. One day, we were having lunch together in the break room. “So, how long have you been married?” he asked, conversationally. I was surprised. “I’m not married,” I replied, “Where did you get that idea?” “Well, I always hear you talking about Squeak, so I just assumed,” he trailed off. You should have seen the look on his face when I

PHOTO BY MARSIE NEWBOLD

Being on the same page when it comes to pets can keep a relationship strong. Here, Marsie and Tom share some quality time with Nosey. explained that my “husband” was in fact, an albino rodent. So, needless to say I know firsthand how pets can come between two consenting adults. Doris Marks Callis of Mount Lookout also does. “I was unmarried and looking for three years,” she says. “I dated tons, but could never find someone who would embrace my zoo of three dogs and two cats. I was not willing to settle for someone who merely tolerated them like the guy who

said, ‘Sorry Babe, I’m just not a pet lover.’ “My pets are like children to me,” she explains. “So, I came up with a simple hurdle, I would only get married if I met someone I would rather wake up next to than my dog, Nancy.” It took some time, then she met “The Guy,” Marc. He was a kindred soul who owned a dog named Elvis to whom he was very attached. Now she wakes up next to him and Nancy and they all slept together happily until Elvis ran away. Jenny Durbin of Silverton is still miffed over one of her experiences. “I was dating a doctor,” she says, “And it was going really well until my puppy licked his hand and he freaked! ‘Is there a place where I can wash up?’ he asked holding his hand like it was on fire.” “Yes, your house,” I said. “It’s really hard to

Hugent o b l e r went back to the store that sold her the tires. “We got t h e m Howard Ain inspected Hey Howard! and they said the tires were fine. I would hope they’d be fine. When there are only 26,000, 27,000 miles on a tire you would hope they were fine, that they would last longer.” Hugentobler said she’s not sure what to do. One shop says she needs new tires. The other shop says the tires are perfectly fine. All she wants is to be safe. So I checked her tires and found two were made in 2007, and the other two were made in 2008. You can determine the age of the tire by checking the tire identification number on the sidewall of the tire. It begins with the letters “DOT,” and the last four dig-

its state the week and then the year in which the tire was manufactured. Federal regulators say the effects of aging may not be visible on a tire, but the age does matter. Hugentobler said, “I was pretty upset that they did that. The put two-year-old tires on an SUV that could destroy it if the tire went out.” The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration said tires tend to last about six years from the date of manufacture, so Hugentobler should have a few years left on her tires. NHTSA said tire degradation occurs over time, mostly from chemical reactions. Generally, it said, your tire tread will wear out before aging becomes a concern – unless they were old when they were first put on your vehicle. However, spare tires are prone to aging problems because they are not generally rotated onto your car. They stay unused until needed and, depending on

know. She has been happily married for 13 years and her counsel is, “Make sure you are both on the same page about animals before you bring one home. Your pet, your relationships and ultimately your marriage will thank you!” For more pet care tips, visit www.marsiesmenagerie.com. If you have any ideas for future stories please contact Marsie Hall Newbold at marsolete@insightbb.com.

July 8, 9, 10, 2011 FREE Parking & Shuttle

Admission $2 Kiddie Land Ride pass Sunday -

How ‘new’ are the new tires you just bought? The next time you buy new tires you need to do more than figure out which brand to buy, you need to make sure the tires you get are really new. That’s right, there’s a chance the tires you buy could have been sitting on a store shelf for years before being put on your vehicle. Kristin Hugentobler of Fairfield said she never gave it a second thought when she bought a set of tires for her SUV back in 2009. “They just put them on and we paid them. We got a good deal out of it and we assumed it was a good deal,” she said. So, Hugentobler said she was very surprised when she got her vehicle inspected recently. “He checked the tires and said the tires are dry rotted and to have them replaced before the fall. … He also showed me the manufacture date – they sat on the shelf for approximately two years before they put them on our vehicle,” she said.

believe his reaction considering when we met it was at a nursery and I had a 20pound bag of manure on my shoulder. Right next to my head!” she giggles. Well, if dog slobber, pee or poop were poison, Jenny and I agree, we both would have been dead long ago; so Doctor Man probably didn’t assume room temperature because of his “injury.” My friend, Mona Bronson-Fuqua of Westwood, is one of the wisest people I

how long that is, when you do need them they may be hazardous – even if there is a lot of tread remaining. So, it’s not the tread you need to check on your spare tire, but the date it was manufactured because aging can impair the structural integrity of the tire. Howard Ain answers consumer complaints weekdays on WKRC-TV Local 12. Write to him at 12 WKRC-TV, 1906 Highland Ave., Cincinnati 45219.

All you can ride 1-5 pm $15 $

WIN 24,000 Tickets $50 each! Only 5,000 tickets sold!

Sponsors: Bahmann Foundation, Cargill Flavors,

Everdry Waterproofing, Omni Fireproofing Co., LLC, Vi-Cas Mfg. Co., Western & Southern Financial Fund.

CE-0000465431

Adult Day Program

atLegacyCourtMemoryCare

Being a caregiver for someone with Alzheimer’s disease or related dementia can be a very rewarding, yet challenging job. The goal of the Adult Day Program at Legacy Court is to help create a support network which allows those affected with memory loss to enjoy life on their own terms, and allows caregivers the peace of mind to attend to everyday life.

Call us today to see how the Adult Day Program can add balance and peace of mind to your life. (513) 457-4209 Monday through Friday 7AM to 7PM $

65 per day

(includes 2 meals per day)

Legacy Court Purposeful activities, socialization & companionship are provided for our adult day participants in the secure environment at Legacy Court. Peace of mind is provided to our caregivers, knowing your loved one is engaged and cared for by the qualified, loving staff of Legacy Court.

From east to west, north and south, whatever community you’re in, we know you love your local pizza place, have your favorite beauty salon, and won’t miss your favorite local festival. Now you can show all of your favorites how much you love them by voting for them in the 2011 Community Choice Awards!

Vote online at: www.cincinnati.com/communitychoice Voting starts June 29th and ends at midnight July 17.

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Independent Living | Assisted Living Memory Care | Rehabilitation Skilled Nursing | Adult Day Programs 230 West Galbraith Road | Cincinnati, OH 45215 (513) (513)948-2308 457-4209 | www.seniorlifestyle.com

Everyone who votes is entered into a drawing to

win a $250 gift card!

No purchase necessary. Must be a resident of Ohio, Kentucky or Indiana who is 18 years or older to enter. Deadline to enter is 7/17/11 at 11:59 p.m. Winner will be selected randomly. One sweepstakes entry per person. For a complete list of rules go to: www.cincinnati.com/ communitychoice or visit The Enquirer Customer Service Center, 312 Elm Street, Cincinnati, OH 45202 during regular business hours.


B4

CCF Recorder

Life

July 7, 2011

Grandkids ‘eyeing’ new potatoes in the garden When I was tillbeef roast, tied ing the garden the Small new potaother day, I accitoes, 1 to 11⠄2 pounds dentally tilled up Shallots: about a some potatoes. pound, peeled, They were tiny, of trimmed and cut in course, but darned half lengthwise cute and fit nicely Olive oil around an eye of Garlic powder Rita round roast beef Salt and pepper Heikenfeld that I made for dinner. Preheat oven to Rita’s kitchen I must have 400 degrees. Toss missed picking up potatoes and shalsome, though, because lots with a small amount of granddaughter, Eva, found oil and add salt and pepper two more when she was and a bit of garlic powder to them. Pour onto rimmed helping hoe the rows. She was excited to find baking sheet or roasting potatoes so soon (it’s always pan. Rub roast with a bit of oil a contest when the grandkids dig potatoes to see who and season with salt, pepper can find them first, so Eva and garlic powder (not too much garlic powder) and won by default this year). She insisted we fry them, place in center of baking unpeeled and sliced, along- sheet or pan. Surround with veggies. side her morning eggs. That was fine with me as pota- Roast, tossing veggies occatoes have lots of potassium sionally, until beef registers 130 degrees for medium and vitamin C. rare, about 50 to 60 minutes or so. Roast beef with new Let meat rest, loosely potatoes and shallots covered with foil, about 10 Sunday dinner! minutes. Serves four. Gilding the lily: Toss 11⠄2 pounds eye of round potatoes and shallots with

2-3 tablespoons minced rosemary along with the other seasonings.

Like Marzetti’s slaw dressing

1 â „2 cup sugar 2 tablespoons each: cornstarch and butter

Cream cheese

topping: For Frances 3 oz. cream Ridge. I’ve made this cheese, room for years and it’s a temperature really good dressing. 2 tableNow it’s a little spoons butter, thinner than COURTESY RITA HEIKENFELD softened Marzetti’s (they use Rita’s clone for Marzetti slaw dressing is equally good on salads as 11⠄2 teaxanthan gum which it is with cabbage. spoons vanilla helps make it thick, 1 cup powcreamy and stable) ries we have this year will but it’s made with common be made into a nice filling dered sugar ingredients you probably for tarts, since I don’t have Bring water, berries, have on hand. enough to make a batch of sugar, cornstarch and 2 I just whipped up a batch jam. today and served it over a I think I pruned the canes tablespoons butter to a boil. fresh tomato salad with back too far in early spring. Boil one minute, stirring green onions from the gar- As my husband Frank likes constantly. Remove from den. Yum! to say, “I can tell you weren’t heat and let cool. Stir together cream raised on a farm!� cheese, 2 tablespoons butter, Whisk together: 1 cup mayonnaise 1 package phyllo tart vanilla and powdered sugar. 1 Spoon filling into tart ⠄3 cup sugar shells, thawed or make your 2-3 tablespoons cider own pie shells in mini-muf- shells and top with dollop of vinegar fin tins with homemade or cream cheese mixture. Makes 15 to 20 tarts. 1 scant tablespoon Dijon store-bought pie crust Tips from Rita’s or regular mustard kitchen: The filling makes a Filling: 1 good topping, served warm, ⠄3 cup water Mini berry tarts over ice cream. 1 pint berries What few black raspber-

Homemade shower gel

This is fun for the kids to make and just may encourage them to take a bath! I like to make this with the little ones when they start with the “I’m bored – there’s nothing to do� lament. 3

â „4 cup distilled water â „4 cup unscented shampoo 1 teaspoon salt Essential oil for scenting (opt.) Food coloring (opt.) 1

Heat water and shampoo over low heat until shampoo is completely liquefied. Add salt and stir until well blended and thickened. Stir in food coloring and essential oil, as many drops as you like. Don’t go too heavy on the coloring. Let cool. Pour into squeeze bottle or jar. Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator and author. E-mail columns@community press.com with “Rita’s kitchen� in the subject line. Call 513-2487130, ext. 356.

" $    !

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Community

CCF Recorder

July 7, 2011

B5

Campbell County homes in water garden tour

PROVIDED

The garden of Winston and Susie Faircloth, 3552 Blangey Road in Cold Spring, will be featured in this year's Pondarama water garden tour.

CAMPBELL COUNTY This summer marks the 10th anniversary of Meyer Aquascapes’ Pondarama Water Garden Tour. A new format for 2011 introduces three new mini tours in Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky each featuring 10 to 15 water gardens. On July 16-17, two Campbell County homes will be featured on the water garden tour. The garden of Dave and Terri Jager of Fort Thomas offersa weathered limestone pond that has a 25-foot stream with two waterfalls with an added touch of driftwood. Pavers are used to surround this area which opens up this area to several entertainment areas. Home is one of the older original homes in the Fort Thomas area. The Cold Spring garden of Winston and Susie Faircloth will also be featured on the tour. Their hillside garden includes a large 21x16 Koi water garden with two streams, one of

PROVIDED

The garden of Dave and Terri Jager, 25 West Villa Place in Fort Thomas, will be featured in this year’s Pondarama water garden tour. which is a 35 foot meandering stream and the other one is a 10 foot stream. This location has several lush hummingbird and butterfly gardens. Admission is free to the Pondarama Water Garden

Tours. Hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day. Go online to www. aquascapes.com and follow instructions to download the Pondarama locations and directions or call 513941-8500.

Medical Reserve Corps to host volunteer session

Whalen joins Huff Realty

J o h n Whalen has joined Huff Realty’s sales Whalen team operating out of the Campbell County office. To contact him, call 859442 4232 or email jwhalen@ huff.com.

the year aimed at both basic functions and specialized skills. Anyone age 18 or older is eligible, and people with both medical and non-medical training are encouraged to join. For information about the Medical Reserve Corps or to register for the orientation, contact Jean Caudill at 363-2009 or Jean.Caudill@ nkyhealth.org, or visit www. nkyhealth.org/mrc.

Jessica Brockman of Independence, Jillian Richards of Milford, Janet Richards of Milford, Mary Beth and Rob Schuter of Eastgate and Katie Sutter of Fort Thomas take in the music of Brad Paisley at Riverbend Music Center.

JOE SIMON/STAFF

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OF NORTHERN KENTUCKY

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Publishes every Tuesday in The Kentucky Enquirer, every Thursday in The Community Recorder. Search ads online any day, any time at NKY.com.

Ask for our Eco-Friendly 4 Hour Cure Coating!

Expires 9/1/2011

To place an ad call 513.768.8608, fax 513.768.8632 or email tgilland@enquirer.com

LOVE & FAITH FELLOWSHIP CHURCH

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Concrete Services:

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Brick • Block • Concrete • Stone Replacement or New Structures, Driveways, Patios, Porches, Steps, Retaining Walls. Chimneys built or repaired, Tuck Pointing. Foundation Repairs... waterproofing, drainage & downspout Lines. Bobcat • Backhoe • Dump Truck Service Custom Quality Work Since 1968

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PUBLIC NOTICE

The Kentucky State Treasury’s UNCLAIMED PROPERTY program has more than a $300 million in property that needs to be returned to its rightful owners.

John & Marjorie Board were married at St. Henry Church July 1, 1961. They were blessed with a son, daughter, and grandchildren. Eternal love from Tom, Amie, Dominique, Todd, Andrea, & Brady.

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BUSINESS NOTES

The Northern Kentucky Medical Reserve Corps is a branch of the federal government’s Medical Reserve Corps program, and its goal is to provide a volunteer pool for the region that can enhance and support first responders, public health agencies and the health care infrastructure during a crisis. Volunteers could have opportunities to serve in their own community, the Tristate region or for communities in need around Kentucky. Volunteers will be offered trainings throughout

CE-1001648529-01

The Northern Kentucky Medical Reserve Corps provides citizens of both medical and non-medical backgrounds with a way to respond to events such as vaccination campaigns and other public health emergencies. Anyone interested in joining the Medical Reserve Corps is invited to attend an orientation session from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Saturday, July 16, at the Health Department’s District Office, 610 Medical Village Drive, Edgewood, Ky. A light breakfast will be provided.

In concert

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WHATEVER YOUR BUSINESS OR SERVICE — LIST IT IN THE NORTHERN KENTUCKY BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL SERVICE DIRECTORY! To advertise contact Terri Gilland at 513.768.8608, fax 513.768.8632 or email tgilland@enquirer.com


B6

CCF Recorder

Community

July 7, 2011

Covington couple recognized for gifts to Northern Kentucky University The Greater Cincinnati Planned Giving Council (GCPCG) recently recognized Covington residents Eva and Oakley Farris with a Voices of Giving Award for having contributed with a planned gift to the longterm sustainability of Northern

Kentucky University. The Farrises always felt strongly that it is not enough to make money. Their great gratification has come from sharing their wealth to enhance the quality of life in Northern Kentucky from the arts to edu-

cation. Murals, buildings and scholarships are all part of their gifts to the community. In 1997, the couple turned their attention to NKU with gifts that have included high-tech classrooms, the Archives’ Special Collec-

Public Hearing Notice To all interested citizens of Newport, Kentucky The City of Newport desires to obtain the approval of the Kentucky Department of Local Government (DLG) to expend program income received from prior Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) programs previously completed by the City. Prior to submission of the City’s request for use of these funds for acquisition and clearance of blighted properties for new housing development, the City will hold a public hearing to obtain the views of the public. This public hearing will be held at 10:30 am EDT, July 15, 2011 in the first floor City Commission meeting room, Newport City Hall, 998 Monmouth Street, Newport, Kentucky. The purpose of this hearing is to obtain views on housing and community development needs, review proposed activities and solicit public comments. Technical assistance is available to help groups representing low and moderate income persons in developing proposals. The following information concerning the CDBG program and the City’s CDBG program income is now available for public inspection during regular business hours at the customer service counter on the second floor of City Hall. A. B. C.

D. E.

Amount of funds available and range of activities that may be undertaken. Estimated amounts of funds proposed to be used for activities benefiting persons of low and moderate income. Plans for minimizing displacement of persons as a result of activities associated with CDBG funds and plans for providing assistance to those persons to be actually displaced as a result of CDBG-funded activities. Records regarding the past use of CDBG funds. A Summary of other important program requirements.

Comments on Application Beginning July 7, 2011, a copy of the material to be submitted to DLG by the City will be on file for citizen review and comment during regular business hours at the customer service count, 2nd floor, City Hall, 998 Monmouth Street, Newport, Kentucky.

Legal Notice The Newport Board of Adjustments will hold a public hearing on Thursday, July 21, 2011 at 4:30 p.m. in the Newport Municipal Complex, 998 Monmouth Street, Newport, Kentucky. The hearing will be held for interested parties to hear and present evidence relative to the following agenda items: BA-11-08 642 Monmouth Street, Newport, Kentucky The applicant is requesting conditional use in the CBD Requested by: Olivia Salcido Garcia Inquiries regarding this public hearing should be addressed to: J. Gregory Tulley AICP Planning and Development Director City of Newport 998 Monmouth Street Newport, Kentucky 41071 859-292-3637 1001648534

Written comments on the proposed use of CDBG program income may be submitted to the attention of Thomas J. Fromme, City Manager, 998 Monmouth Street, Newport, Kentucky 41071 until close of business on July 14, 2011. Discrimination Clause The City of Newport does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, religion or disability, and provides, upon request, reasonable accommodation, including auxiliary aids and services, to afford an individual with a disability an equal opportunity to participate in all services, programs and activities. Any persons requiring special needs assistance to attend the public hearing should contact City Clerk Evonne Bradley at 859-292-3666 at least five days prior to the hearing. The TDD number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-648-6057. CE-1001649637-01

FLORIDA

DESTIN. Luxury 2 BR, 2 BA oceanfront condos. Heated pool, spas, kids’ pool & tennis. Sleeps 6. Local owner. www.us-foam.com/destin . D- 513-528-9800, E- 513-752-1735

FLORIDA

PANAMA CITY BEACH The Summerhouse - 2B/2B Family Accommodations . Beach side pools, tennis, WiFi & More. 800/354-1122 THE BEST BEACH VACATION VALUE! www.SummerhousePC.com

NEW YORK Beautiful Seagrove Beach Rent & Relax. Nr Destin, between famous Seaside & Rosemary Beach. Cozy Cottages to Gulf Front Condos. Web Specials. 1-800-537-5387 www.garrettbeachrentals.com

MANHATTAN--NYC HOTEL $129/2 persons. Singles $124. Suites $139-$159. Lincoln Ctr area, Hudson River views, 18 flrs, kitchenette, 5 mins to midtown, safe, quiet, luxury area. RIVERSIDE TOWER, Riverside & 80th St. Call 1-800-724-3136 or visit: www.riversidetowerhotel.com

Clearwater/Indian Rocks Beach GULF BEACHES BEST VALUE! Beach condo, 2BR, 2BA, pool. Rent weekly. Local owner. 513-875-4155. www.bodincondo.com

CLEARWATER TO ST. PETE BEACHES Gulf front & bay side condos. All prices & sizes! Florida Lifestyle VAC. 1-800-487-8953. Jan. 2012, Monthly Discounts • www.ourcondo.com

SOUTH CAROLINA

DESTIN, FLORIDA 50 Steps to the beach! Beautiful lowrise condos w/pools. 850-830-8133, email destinbeaches4u@yahoo.com or visit www.asummerbreeze.com

individuals to leave a bequest or other planned gift to a nonprofit cause important to them. For more information, please visit www.gcpgc.org.

CitiFiancial changes to OneMain Financial The CitiFinancial office, located at 26 M.L.Collins Blvd., in Cold Springs, will change its name to OneMain Financial. Branch manager Alan Willard indicates the name change will not impact the products and services customers have come to know. “We’ll continue to work with each customer, oneon-one, to find a loan option that’s right for them and be here when they need us,” he said. “The new name better fits who we are and what we do.” OneMain Financial’s Chief Executive Officer, Mary McDowell, said, “We’re excited to open our doors today as OneMain Financial, a brand we think will really connect with consumers. We’re proud of the fact that we’re able to meet

our customers where, when, and how they want to be met, right here in Cold Springs.” OneMain Financial employees include, Kelly Kitts and Kristen Hiatt. “It’s gratifying for me, and everyone at the branch to know we’re helping our neighbors,” Willard said. To celebrate the new name, the OneMain Financial Branch will hold a sweepstakes throughout the month of July. Customers and members of the community may be eligible to win a Blu-ray player. In addition, an official launch celebration event will be held on July 7, at noon, at 26 M.L. Collins Blvd., in Cold Springs. The Cold Springs branch will also host the OneMain Financial show car July 7.

The show car event is scheduled to begin at noon and will conclude at 6 p.m. Throughout the day, OneMain Racing giveaway items will be provided. OneMain Racing is the primary sponsor on Kevin Harvick, Inc.’s No.2 Chevrolet Impala for 30 NASCAR Nationwide Series events in 2011. Veteran Sprint Cup driver, Elliott Sadler pilots the OneMain Financial car for all 30 of the sponsored events. “I encourage customers and members of the community to stop by the branch and say hello, enjoy some light refreshments, enter the sweepstakes and learn more about OneMain Financial,” Willard said. The celebration event is free and open to the public.

Share in your community. Your News. Your Web site.

SEABROOK EXCLUSIVES Villas & Private Homes. Ocean, golf, tennis, equestrian. Pet friendly rentals. Free brochure. Book online! 888-718-7949. www.seabrook-vacations.info

TENNESSEE

1-7 Affordable, Deluxe Chalets & Cabin Rentals. Pigeon Forge in the Smokies. Vacation/Dollywood Specials. Free brochure. Call 1-800-833-9987. www.firesidechalets.com

A Beautiful Cabin Getaway Gatlinburg/Pigeon Forge. Hot tub, jacuzzi, fireplace, gas grill. $85/nt, 5 nt special $375. 800-793-8699. smokymtncrossrdrentals.com

Plan a stay with Seashore Vacations. Oceanfront condos. Walk to dine and shop. Golf discounts. Free tennis. Call 1-800-845-0077 or book online at www.seashorehhi.com.

N. MYRTLE BEACH Coastal Condos, Inc. 1-4 bdrm oceanfront & ocean view units. Call 1-800-951-4880 or visit www.coastalcondos.com

ensure the viability of charitable organizations. It is among the first Planned Giving Councils nationwide to launch the Leave a Legacy Program that encourages

PROVIDED

NORTH MYRTLE BEACH. Oceanfront condos. 1, 2 & 3 bedroom units with pools, spas & tennis. Hi-speed Internet, kiddie waterslide. 800-345-5617 www.oceancreek.net

SOUTH CAROLINA

HILTON HEAD ISLAND, SC

Oakley and Eva Farris.

© 2011 CareerBuilder, LLC. All rights researved.

NORTH CAROLINA EMERALD ISLE. Ocean Front luxury vacation homes with community pool. Call for free brochure. 1-252-354-5555 Spinnaker’s Reach Realty www.SpinnakersReach.com

tions, the reading room in the W. Frank Steely Library, and the renovation of the auditorium and amphitheater which bear Eva. G. Farris’ name. By donating to the university’s scholarship funds, in particular the Haile/US Bank College of Business, they have enabled NKU to retain and nurture the best and brightest students who have gone on to become business leaders in the region. In 2009, Oakley and Eva pledged a retained life estate gift to NKU for the College of Informatics. The Greater Cincinnati Planned Giving Council is a professional association of individuals who help to

NORRIS LAKE. Powell Valley Resort. Upscale 2BR, 1BA, covered porch, deck, lake access. all amenities, $95/nt. Special offer with two night minimum! 432-562-8353 bolt1898@gmail.com

From Kenton County to Florence to Union, the Cincinnati.com Network is providing the local information YOU want. From what’s going on with your neighbors to what’s happening around your community, the Cincinnati.com Network provides comprehensive and engaging community news and information. Visit NKY.com/local to check out your new community Web site TODAY and find out what’s happening in your backyard.

While you’re checking out the community Webpage, add your own news and photos. It’s fun and easy. You can post anything from an anniversary to an event using Share. Visit NKY.com/share


THE

RECORD

| DEATHS | Editor Michelle Shaw | smhaw@nky.com | 578-1053 BIRTHS

COLD SPRING

Arrests/citations

Donald E. McIntyre, 53, 10 Glenridge Drive, second degree disorderly conduct at 10 Glenridge Drive, June 14. Mark A. Bamforth, 22, 331 Poplar Thicket Road, warrant at 1237 Rockyview Drive, June 8. Terry L. Kilgore II, 23, 7132 Rosewood Court, receiving stolen property under $500, theft by unlawful taking or shoplifting at 5400 Alexandria Pike, June 8. Donald Mars Kilgore III, 21, 7132 Rosewood Court, theft by unlawful taking or shoplifting, first degree possession of controlled substance - drug unspecified at 5400 Alexandria Pike, June 8. Nolan Sinclair Jr., 21, 701 Berry Ave., theft by unlawful taking or shoplifting, first degree possession of controlled substance - drug unspecified at 5400 Alexandria Pike, June 8. Natalie R. Pricetree, 22, 7213 Van

HIGHLAND HEIGHTS/ SOUTHGATE

Kirk Ave., theft by unlawful taking or shoplifting, first degree possession of controlled substance drug unspecified, second degree disorderly conduct at 5400 Alexandria Pike, June 8. James R. Myers, 40, 3017 Meadowland Drive, warrant at U.S. 27, June 9.

|

REAL

ESTATE

N K Y. c o m

Incidents/investigations Second degree burglary

Report of coins taken at 20 Chapman Lane, June 17. Report of front door found forced open and electronics taken at 130 Hidden Ridge Court, June 17.

Theft by unlawful taking

Report of fence cut and copper wire taken at 1122 Industrial Road, June 20. Report of two juvenile’s bicycles taken from church parking lot at 4011 Alexandria Pike, June 21.

Theft by unlawful taking or shoplifting

Report of juveniles took items from store without paying at 395 Crossroads Blvd., June 4. Report of juvenile took items for store without paying at 4140 Alexandria Pike, June 4. Report of merchandise taken without paying at 5400 Alexandria Pike, June 9.

Total Res. Available for Appropriation

Theft by unlawful taking

At 2 Katherine Court, June 19.

$201,979

$761

$138,976 $29,271

$0

$1,793

$170,040 $340,080

$0

$451,456

$2,007,218

$71

$71,253

$60,714

$0 $2,139,256

$1,821,600

$0

$62,110

$58,880

$1,942,510

$55,000

($55,000)

$58,570

($58,570)

$0

$2,281,639 $29,366

$273,232

$6,475

$0 $2,590,712

$2,019,146 $29,271

$62,110

$2,023

$2,112,550

$0

$0

Anticipated Expenses Administration

$0

$236,756 $667,186

Police

$0

$0

$0

$0

$669,796

Streets

Waste Collection

$21,047

$188,952

$0

$30,088

$0

$25,742

$9,745

$197,000

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$150,573

$0

$0

$0

$62,937

Garage #2

$102,962

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$6,256

$0

$1,500

$156,829 $145,195

$0

$0

$0

$0

$62,937

$0

$0

$0

$0

$102,962

$59,611

$98,206

Excess Res. Available over/under Appropriations

$341,802 $311,942

$59,611

Total Anticipated Appropriations

$197,000 $195,600

$143,695 Parks

$30,088 $35,487

$311,942

Community Center

$315,696 $188,952

$195,600 $341,802

Fire

$667,186 $669,796

$294,649

Sewers

$250,399 $236,756

$0

$98,206

$2,097,596

$0

$21,047

$6,256

$0 $2,124,899

$1,930,300

$9,745

$0

$1,500

$1,941,545

$29,366

$252,185

$219

$88,846 $19,526

$62,110

$523

$184,043 $29,366

$252,185

$219

$0

$465,813

$184,043 $171,005 $0

$465,813

$88,846 $19,526 $62,110 $523 This ordinance will become effective and in force from and after its adoption and publication as provided by law.

$171,005

Enacted on this 29th day of June, 2011 James G. Hamberg, Mayor City of Southgate Attest: Jody Anderson, City Clerk 06/28/2011

Second Reading:

06/29/2011

Next Payday Advance (Min. $200 loan)

Check Exchange Turfway 859-647-2160 Latonia 859-431-8666 Newport 859-491-6888 Florence 859-647-2160

possession of burglary tools at 20 West Sixth St., June 22. Godira Morrison, 37, 531 Ripple Creek Drive, possession of drug paraphernalia, tampering with physical evidence at 401 Central, June 22. Brian Curley, 29, 216 West Fifth St. No. 210, fourth degree assault at 216 West Fifth St. No. 210, June 21. Thomas Bridewell, 38, 2999 Western Hills Road, reckless driving, second degree possession of a controlled substance, prescription drug not in proper container at

Published:

07/07/2011

Brighton and 11th, June 21. Charles Stewart, 35, 940 Brighton St., fourth degree assault at 940 Brighton St., June 20.

Incidents/investigations Second degree burglary

At 109 West 10th St., June 20.

Second degree criminal mischief At 728 Monroe, June 25.

Theft by unlawful taking

At 648 Monmouth St., June 27.

Theft by unlawful taking, receiving stolen property

At 1765 Monmouth St., June 24.

The Section 8 Rental Assistance Waiting List in the 87 counties where Kentucky Housing Corporation (KHC) administers the program will be open the months of July and January, every year.

If you wish to apply for rental assistance, you may complete the pre-application available at www.kyhousing.org or contact one of KHC’s office to request the application. To receive rental assistance through KHC you must choose one of the eligible counties. A list of these counties is available at www.kyhousing or you can request this list from one of KHC’s offices. Eastern Kentucky Western Kentucky Central Kentucky (866) 209-6525 (866) 855-7317 (877)552-7368 TTY 711 (toll-free) (toll-free) (toll-free) CE-0000467651

will be received until 2:00 P.M. E.S.T. on July 28, 2011, at which time they will be publicly opened and read. This project will generally consist of: EQUESTRIAN BARN • Installation of a 36-ft x 150-ft pole barn structure with twenty-eight (28), 10-ft x 12-ft stalls and a 10-ft walkway through the building, pre-engineered wood roof trusses, metal roofing with 6-ft overhangs, metal siding on exterior walls, pad-lockable, galvanized steel six-rail gates, and solid 2-ft x10-ft wood walls in each stall. The building will have electric lighting.. RV CAMP SITES • • • • • • • •

RECORDER

About police reports

Sealed bids for the furnishing of all labor, materials, equipment and services for the AJ JOLLY PARK EQUESTRIAN BARN AND RV CAMPGROUND

Removal of trees; Grading for stone RV pads; Installation of 2-inch and ¾-inch domestic PE water piping; Installation of freeze-less yard hydrants (spigots); Design-Build underground electric system to service the Equestrian Barn RV pads; Installation of 20-30-50 amp electric pedestals; Installation of compacted stone for RV pads; Seeding and restoration.

Proposals will be received and opened at: CAMPBELL COUNTY FISCAL COURT TREASURER’S OFFICE (CONFERENCE ROOM 137) 1098 MONMOUTH STREET NEWPORT, KENTUCKY, 41071 Specifications and Contract Documents may be examined and obtained at: CARDINAL ENGINEERING CORPORATION ONE MOOCK ROAD WILDER, KENTUCKY 41071 Copies of the Specifications and Contract Documents may be obtained upon payment of $60.00 for each set at CARDINAL ENGINEERING. The payment is non-refundable for anyone desiring specifications and bid documents. Inquiries regarding bid specifications contact: Jerry Noran - Cardinal Engineering IMPORTANT INSTRUCTIONS TO BIDDERS Read all instructions, terms and conditions carefully 1. Each bid must show the bidders name and/or company name. Item(s) being bid on must be marked with an individual bid amount. Bids must be placed in a sealed envelope and clearly marked "Sealed Bid". Campbell County Fiscal Court will not be held responsible for any premature opening or failure to open a bid not properly addressed or identified as stated above. 2. Bids must be completed, signed in ink and received at Campbell County Fiscal Court, Treasurer’s Office, 1098 Monmouth Street, Newport, KY 41071, no later than the date and time specified for opening of bids, at which time all received bids will be opened and read publicly in Conference Room 137 at the above address. 3. Quotations must be submitted indicating a lump sum basis with the bid amount being both designated in dollars and cents amount. 4. Firm prices are requested unless otherwise stated in the bid packet. 5. Right is reserved to reject any or all bids, also to award the item(s) separately or all to one Bidder. If bidding on all or none basis, that fact must be stated. 6. The County reserves the right to accept or reject any and/or all bids and to waive irregularities and to negotiate with the best qualified bidder if they deem it to be in the best interest of the County to do so. 7. Reciprocal preference for Kentucky resident bidders as described in KRS 45A.490494 shall be applied in accordance with 200 KAR 5:400. 8. The successful bidder is responsible for all licenses, insurance, Hazardous Communication Program (OSHA) and other incidentals. 9. The successful bidder must have (or obtain) a business license issued by the Occupational License Department of Campbell County. 10. Bidders are invited to attend a public bid opening; also, to review complete bid files after awards have been made. 11. Bids shall be accompanied by a certified check or bid bond in an amount equal to ten (10) percent of the bid to insure the execution of the contract for which the bid is made. In case the bid is not accepted, the check or bid bond will be returned to the Bidder, but if the Bid is accepted and the Bidder shall refuse or neglect to enter into a contract with the County within ten (10) days from the time he is notified of the acceptance of his bid, the check or bid bond shall be forfeited to the County as liquidated damages for failure to do so. 12. The successful bidder will be required to furnish an acceptance performance bond in the amount of One Hundred Percent (100%) of the contract price, and a certificate of insurance. Paula Spicer Campbell Fiscal Court Clerk

CE-1001649491-01

Est. Fund Balance at End of Fiscal Year

$10 OFF

B7

The Community Recorder publishes the names of all adults charged with offenses. The information is a matter of public record and does not imply guilt or innocence.

INVITATION TO BID CAMPBELL COUNTY FISCAL COURT

$219,421 $29,295

$250,399

Arrests/citations

Sherry Sweigart, 49, 50 East 11th St., theft by unlawful taking at 82 Carothers Road, June 27. Jason Griffith, 41, 21 Jolina Court, violation of EPO at 1100 block of Monmouth St., June 25. Albert Roy Myers, 48, 716 Putnam St., violation of EPO at 716 Putnam St., June 21. Grant Messer, 29, 1019 Fifth Ave., first degree criminal mischief, third degree burglary, possession of burglary tools at 20 West Sixth St., June 22. Robert Mills, 33, 3765 Saint Lawrence Ave., third degree burglary, first degree criminal mischief,

Second degree burglary

At 30 Hidden Valley Drive Apt. 32, June 19.

ORDINANCE 11-03 AN ORDINANCE APPEALING ORDINANCE 11-01 AND AMENDING THE ANNUAL BUDGET FOR THE CITY OF SOUTHGATE, KENTUCKY, FOR THE FISCAL YEAR JULY 1, 2010 THOUGH JUNE 30, 2011, BY ESTIMATING REVENUES, RESOURCES AND APPROPRIATING FUNDS FOR THE OPERATIONS OF THE GOVERNMENT OF THE CITY. WHEREAS, an annual budget proposal and message have been prepared and delivered to the City Council; and WHEREAS, the City Council has received such budget and has made the necessary modifications. The annual budget for the fiscal year beginning on July 1 2010, and ending on June 30, 2011, is hereby amended and adopted as follows: Southgate Special Sewer General Memo Municipal Community LGE Center Inc. Fund Fund Totals Road Aid A

Transfer of Funds

NEWPORT

At 30 Woodland Hills Drive, June 26.

CITY OF SOUTHGATE CAMPBELL COUNTY, KY

Estimated Revenues

At 2443 Alexandria Pike, June 20.

Incidents/investigations First degree criminal mischief

Report of rock thrown through living room window by juvenile at 6271 Davjo Drive, June 3.

Fund Bal. Forward

Third degree criminal mischief

Jeffrey Hampton, 37, 9722 Cherbourg Drive, DUI at Alexandria Pike and Nunn Drive, June 27. Jeffrey Alwell, 32, 3426 Eight Mile Road, alcohol intoxication in a public place at 38 Woodland Hills Drive Apt. 38-12, June 27. Troy Merrill, 37, 1015 Walnut St. No. 2, warrant at 500 Pooles Creek Road, June 26. Autumn Lainhart, 34, 825 Grand Ave., warrant at 2298 Alexandria Pike, June 24. Donald Fryman, 35, 2127 Linden Road, warrant at 1923 Alexandria Pike, June 24. William Scott Byrd, 39, 205 Bluegrass Ave. 78C, second degree burglary at 271 Bluegrass Ave., June 23. Darren Davidson, 19, 4460 Winters Lane, second degree possession of a controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia at I-471 at Alexandria Pike, June 27.

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County Email: kynews@communitypress.com

At 252 Meadow Trail Drive, June 19.

Arrests/citations

Third degree criminal mischief

First Reading:

POLICE

POLICE REPORTS

CE-0000462689

ON

CCF Recorder

July 7, 2011

PUBLIC NOTICE Fort Thomas Independent Schools Non-Discrimination Policy Statement Students, their parents, employees, and potential employees of the Fort Thomas Independent Schools are hereby notified that the Fort Thomas Independent School District does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, religion, marital status, sex, or disability in employment programs, vocational programs, or activities set forth in compliance with the Office of Civil Rights Law, Title VI, VII, Title IX, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and Section 504. The Fort Thomas Independent School District contracts with the area vocational schools in offering the following vocational education programs for students in grades 11 and 12: Health Sciences I and II; Electrical Construction I and II; Auto Body Repair I and II; Automotive Technology I and II; Masonry I and II; Carpentry I and II; Welding I and II; Information Technology I and II. The following career and technical education courses are offered at Highlands High School to students in grades 9-12: Business Principles and Applications; Computer and Technology Applications I, II, III, and IV; Business Law/Business Management; Business Economics/Sports Marketing; Cooperative Business and Office Program; Accounting and Finance Foundations; Financial Accounting; Financial Services I & II; Computer Troubleshooting; Business Office Assistant; AP Computer Science; Contemporary Issues; Life Skills; Child Care Services; Parenting and Child Development; Food and Nutrition; Fashion and Interior Design I and II; Hospitality Careers; Technology Concepts; CADD I: Technology Design & Applications I ; CADD II: Technology Design & Applications II; Special Technology Topics: Manufacturing; Conceptual Engineering Technology; Special Technology Topics: Engineering. Any person having inquiries concerning the Fort Thomas Independent Schools compliance with the Office of Civil Rights Law, and/or Title VI is directed to contact the Superintendent, John R. Williamson; inquiries concerning Title VII, Title IX, ADA, and/or Section 504 should be directed to the Assistant Superintendent for Student Services, Ms. Rita Byrd. They may be reached at the Fort Thomas Independent Schools, 28 N. Ft. Thomas Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075 (Phone 859.781.3333) Days and Hours Available: Monday through Friday, 8:00am - 4:30pm. If you or someone you know requires translation or an oral or manual explanation of this or any other district notice, please contact the superintendent’s office at 859.781.3333 for assistance. 9368

Attention Realtors To advertise your Open House or Feature Home, call your advertising representative.

513.768.8319

1001649689

LOST & FOUND Ads are FREE!!

513.242.4000

To place your BINGO ad call 513.242.4000


B8

CCF Recorder

July 7, 2011

DEATHS Nora Allen-Kimbrough

RESOURCES AVAILABLE Fund Balance Carried Forward Estimated Revenues

$

-

Cities Contributions Other

$ $

2,057,970.00 95,150.00

Total Estimated Revenue

$

2,153,120.00

$

2,153,120.00

Personnel General Expense Capital Outlay Dept. Service

$ $ $ $

1,674,520.00 404,600.00 5,000.00 69,0000.00

Total Appropriations

$

2,153,120.00

Excess of Resources Over/Under Appropriations

$

-

Estimated Fund Balance End of Year

$

-

Total Resources Available for Appropriations Appropriations

That the budget for the fiscal year beginning 7/1/2011 and ending 6/30/2012 is hereby adopted as follows: DATE ADOPTED: MAY 5 2010 Carl Mullen Executive Officer James Hamberg Chairman of Highland Heights Southgate Police Authority

VOTE: YES - 6

NO - 0

ATTEST Gregory Meyers CE-1001648986-01

Campbell County Fire Protection District #6 July 1, 2011-June 30, 2012 General Budget Summary Revenues Taxes (all categories) Permits and Licenses Payments in Lieu of Taxes Intergovernmental Revenues Charges for Services Other Revenues Interest Earned Total Revenues Receipts and cash Carryover from Prior Fiscal Year Bonded Debt, Public Corporation & G.O. Transfers to Other Funds Transfers from Other Funds Borrowed Money (all short term/single year) Governmental Leasing Act All Other Borrowed Money Total Receipts and Cash Total Available (sum of Total Receipts, Cash & Total Revenues)

$84,700 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $3,500 $88,200

$251,029 $0 ($0) $0 $0 $0 $0 $251,029 $339,229

Appropriations Personnel Operations Administration & Reserves Capital Outlay Debt Service Total Appropriations 1001648720

$17,500 $50,200 $100 $0 $0 $67,800

NOTICE OF BOND SALE The Secretary of Campbell County School District Finance Corporation, Alexandria, Kentucky, will until 1:00 P.M., E.T., on July 20, 2011, receive at the Office of the Executive Director of the Kentucky School Facilities Construction Commission, 229 West Main St., Suite 102, Frankfort, Kentucky 40601, sealed competitive bids for approximately $17,200,000 of the Corporation’s School Building Revenue Bonds, Series 2011, dated August 1, 2011, being fully registered bonds in denominations in multiples of $5,000 (within the same maturity), maturing as to principal in varying amounts on August 1 in the years 2012 through 2031. Bonds ma turing on or after August 1, 2022, are subject to redemption prior to their stated maturities on or after August 1, 2021. Electronic bids may be submitted via the BiDCOMP™/PARITY™ system, in the manner described below. The Corporation reserves the right to increase (by up to $510,000) or decrease (by up to $2,710,000) the amount of Bonds to be purchased by the successful bidder, in increments of $5,000 at the sale price per $1,000 of Bonds; such increase or decrease to be made in any maturity. Bids must be on Official Bid Form contained in the Preliminary Official Statement, available from the undersigned or Ross, Sinclaire & Associates, LLC, 325 West Main Street, Suite 300, Lexington, Kentucky 40507 which has been deemed "final" by the Corporation within the meaning of Securities and Exchange Commission Rule 15c2-12 (the "Rule"). Reference is made to the Official Terms and Conditions of Bond Sale contained in the Preliminary Official Statement for further details and bidding conditions. For further information regarding the BiDCOMP™/PARITY™ system may be obtained from BiDCOMP™/PARITY™, 1359 Broadway 2nd Floor, New York, NY 10018, Telephone: (800) 850-7422. Sale on tax-exempt basis, subject to approving legal opinion of Peck, Shaffer & Williams LLP, Bond Counsel, Covington, Kentucky. The Corporation has not designated the Bonds as "qualified tax-exempt obligations" pursuant to Section 265 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended. Right to reject bids or waive informality reserved. CAMPBELL COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT FINANCE CORPORATION By: /s/ Dr. Shelli Wilson Secretary

CITY OF SOUTHGATE CAMPBELL COUNTY, KY ORDINANCE 11-04 AN ORDINANCE REPEALING ORDINANCE 11-02 AND ADOPTING THE ANNUAL BUDGET FOR THE CITY OF SOUTHGATE, KENTUCKY, FOR THE FISCAL YEAR JULY 1, 2011 THOUGH JUNE 30, 2012, BY ESTIMATING REVENUES AND RESOURCES AND APPROPRIATING FUNDS FOR THE OPERATIONS OF THE GOVERNMENT OF THE CITY. WHEREAS, an annual budget proposal and message have been prepared and delivered to the City Council; and WHEREAS, the City Council has received such budget and has made the necessary modifications. The annual budget for the fiscal year beginning on July 1 2011, and ending on June 30, 2012 is hereby adopted as follows: Special Municipal Southgate General Sewer Road Community Memo Fund Fund Aid Center, Inc LGEA Totals Fund Bal. Forward $184,043 $29,366 $252,185 $219 $0 $465,813 Estimated Revenues $2,211,243 $0 $71,960 $62,990 $0 $2,346,193 Transfer of Funds $61,500 ($61,500) $0 Total Res. Available for Appropriation $2,456,786 $29,366 $324,145 $1,709 $0 $2,812,006 Anticipated Expenses Administration $242,562 Police $834,434 Streets $466,805 Sewers $26,107 Waste Collection $200,683 Fire $340,474 Community Center $135,273 Parks $64,016 Garage #2 $108,055 Total Anticipated Appropriations $2,419,809

$0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0

$0 $0 $190,495 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0

$0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $1,500 $0 $0

$0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0

$242,562 $834,434 $657,300 $26,107 $200,683 $340,474 $136,773 $64,016 $108,055

$0

$190,495

$1,500

$0

$2,610,404

Excess Res. Available over/under Appropriations $38,377 $29,366 $133,650 $209 $0 $201,602 Est. Fund Balance at End of Fiscal Year $38,377 $29,366 $133,650 $209 $0 $201,602 This ordinance will become effective and in force from and after its adoption and publication as provided by law. Enacted on this 29TH day of June 2011.

James G. Hamberg, Mayor City of Southgate

Attest: Jody Anderson, City Clerk First Reading:

6/28/2011

Second Reading:

6/29/2011

Published:

7/07/2011 CE-1001649489-01

COMMISSIONERS ORDINANCE NO. 0-2011-008 AN ORDINANCE ADOPTING THE BUDGET FOR THE CITY OF NEWPORT, KENTUCKY FOR THE FISCAL YEAR JULY 1, 2011 TO JUNE 30,2012, INCLUDING AN ESTIMATE OF REVENUES AND RESOURCES AND MAKING THE ANNUAL APPROPRIATION IN ACCORDANCE THEREWITH. WHEREAS, an annual budget proposal and message has been prepared and delivered to the Board of Commissioners of the City of Newport; and WHEREAS, the Board of Commissioners has reviewed such budget proposals and made necessary modification; NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY OF NEWPORT, KENTUCKY: SECTION I That the annual budget for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2011 and ending June 30, 2012 is hereby adopted. NEWPORT COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT CAPITAL EMPLOYEE NEWPORT ON GENERAL DEVELOPMENT REVOLVING PROJECTS BENEFITS THE LEVEE REFUSE FUND FUND LOAN FUND FUND FUNDS FUND FUND RESOURCES AVAILABLE: FUND BALANCE/RETAINED (445,084) 392,402 385,843 0 71,650 6,746,422 130,540 EARNINGS CARRIED FORWARD Cash Interfund Transfers-IN 402,080 31,770 0 0 0 0 0 Transfer from Developer Capital Lease Proceeds Loan Proceeds Note Proceeds Bond Proceeds ESTIMATED REVENUES Property Taxes 2,130,950 0 0 0 0 875,000 0 Licenses & Permits 9,425,000 0 0 0 0 0 0 Fines & Forfeits 220,400 0 0 0 0 0 0 Charges for Service 956,840 0 0 0 0 2,700,000 1,134,500 Uses of Property 1,100,440 0 0 0 0 640,000 0 Refunds & Reimbursements 15,300 53,880 1,273,220 0 0 2,600,000 0 Intergovernmental 1,271,200 594,470 0 142,000 0 0 Interest 1,000 350 50 0 170 300,000 500 Miscellaneous 5,000 0 0 38,000 1,023,580 48,000 0 Special Events 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total Estimated Revenues 15,126,130 648,700 1,273,270 180,000 1,023,750 7,163,000 1,135,000 TOTAL RESOURCES APPROPRIATIONS General Government Public Safety Development Services Community Services Municipal Complex Building Maintenance Debt Service Other TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS Excess of Resources Over/(Under) Appropriations Contributed Captial Transfer to Developer Interfund Transfer - Out Estimated Fund Balance/Retained Earnings End of Fiscal Year

15,083,126

1,072.872

1,659,113

180,000

1.562.900 8.620.470 371,410 1,469.140

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

191,110 2,703.360 0

0 0 737,086

0 0 1,266,550

0 0 180.000

0 0 1,054,830

164,736 0 0 (91,770)

335,786 0 0 0

392.563 0 0 (362,380)

0 0 0 0

40,570 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

159,080 0 0 (39,700)

335,786 30.183 0 40,570 8,335,362 119,380 SECTION II That this Ordinance shall be signed by the Mayor, attested by the City Clerk, recorded, published and effective upon publication. PASSED:

72,966

FIRST READING - 6-27-11

PASSED:

SECOND READING - 6-28-11

____________________________________ MAYOR JERRY PELUSO 1001649599

Published: In full in the Campbell County Recorder, the 7th day of July, 2011

Jason Lee Bieber

Jason Lee Bieber, 38, of Cold Spring, died June 24, 2011. He was a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in Lakeside Park. Survivors include his wife, Rae J. Bieber; sons, Nathan Bieber and Nolan Bieber; daughter, Skylar Bieber; father, Leroy Bieber; mother, Lora Bieber; and brother, David Bieber. Burial was in Alexandria Cemetery.

Edith ‘Charlene’ Dyer

Edith “Charlene” Neal Dyer, 70, of Florence, died June 26, 2011, at her residence. She was a retired clerk. Survivors include her sons, Kevin Ray Sandrock of Alpine, Tenn., and Wayne Beason of Florence; daughters, Michelle Rex of Erlanger, Jalynda Ashmall of Hartford, N.Y., and Kim Garheld of Burlington; brother, Wayne Neal of Coral Gables, Fla.; six grandchildren; and seven greatgrandchildren. Interment was at Floral Hills Memorial Garden, Taylor Mill. Memorials: Elsmere Baptist Church, 250 Garvey Ave., Elsmere, KY 41018.

Alfred Faulhaber

Alfred “Al” Faulhaber, 86, of Butler, formerly of Campbell County, died June 27, 2011, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He was a lifelong farmer and a member of St. Francis Xavier Catholic Church in Falmouth. His wife, Pauline Kremer Faulhaber, died previously. Survivors include his sons, Mark Faulhaber and Mike Faulhaber, both of Butler, and Paul Faulhaber of Bardstown; brother, Tony Faulhaber of California; sisters, Sister Bernadette Faulhaber of Minneapolis, Minn., and Margaret Lauer of Fort Thomas; eight grandchildren; five great-grandchildren; and loyal companion, Buster. Entombment was at St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas.

Mildred A. Huffman

0 0 2,697,820 0 2,876,240 1.106,460

8,335,362 0 0 0

Edgar “Eddie” F. Bias, 66, of Dayton, died June 25, 2011, at his residence. He worked at Salvage Yard Company in Cincinnati. Survivors include his wife, Judy Ellison Bias. Interment was at Alexandria Cemetery, Alexandria.

Eileen A. Goetz, 84, of Villa Hills, died June 27, 2011, at Barrington of Fort Thomas. She was a member of St. Joseph Church in Crescent Springs and the Ladies Auxiliary with the Villa Hills Civic Club, a volunteer at Redwood School and active with the Voice of Villa Hills. Her husband, Pete Goetz, died June 20, 2011. Survivors include her daughter, Nancy Barton of Covington; sons, Steve Goetz of Lexington, Jim Goetz of Covington, Tom Goetz and Andy Goetz, both of Villa Hills, and Mark Goetz of Fort Thomas; 14 grandchildren; and one great-grandchild. Interment was at Mother of God Cemetery, Fort Wright. Memorials: Redwood School & Rehabilitation Center, 71 Orphanage Road, Ft. Mitchell, KY 41017.

1,095,400 13,909,422 1,265,540 0 0 0 0

Edgar ‘Eddie’ Bias

Eileen A. Goetz

CE-1001649351-01

HIGHLAND HEIGHTS SOUTHGATE POLICE AUTHORITY RESOLUTION A RESOLUTION OF THE HIGHLAND HEIGHTS SOUTHGATE POLICE AUTHORITY OF THE CITIES OF HIGHLAND HEIGHTS AND SOUTHGATE, KENTUCKY ADOPTING THE HIGHLAND HEIGHTS SOUTHGATE POLICE AUTHORITY ANNUAL BUDGET FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 07/01/2011 THROUGH 06/30/2012 BY DOCUMENT REVENUES AND RESOURCES AND APPROPRIATING FUNDS FOR THE OPERATION OF CITY GOVERNMENT WHEREAS, a budget proposal and message has been prepared and delivered to the Governing Board of Highland Heights Southgate Police Authority; and WHEREAS, the governing board having reviewed such budget proposal and made necessary modifications; and NOW THEREFORE, be it resolved by the Governing Board of the Highland Heights Southgate Police Authority.

Nora Lee Allen-Kimbrough, 88, of Newport, died June 24, 2011, at St. Elizabeth Florence. A son, Carlton Kimbrough, died previously. Survivors include her daughter, Barbara Burton of Newport; son, William Carpenter of Cincinnati; siblings, Imogene Riley of Covington and Ella Britley of Cincinnati; nine grandchildren; 16 greatgrandchildren; and seven greatgreat-grandchildren. Interment was at Mary E. Smith Cemetery.

Mildred A. Molique Huffman, 96, of Fort Thomas, died June 25, 2011, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. She retired from sales for the former Ideal Shoe Store in Cincinnati and was a member of VFW Ralph Fulton Post No. 6423 Auxiliary and the Fort Mitchell Baptist Church. Her husband, James L. Huffman; a son, James Huffman; and her brothers, Edward and Leonard Molique, died previously. Survivors include her son, Edward Huffman of Cincinnati; daughter, Charlene Marthis of Mason, Ohio; seven grandchildren; and many great-grandchildren. Interment was at Floral Hills Memorial Gardens, Taylor Mill. Memorials: Ralph Fulton VFW Post No. 6423, 4435 Dixie Hwy., Elsmere, KY 41018 or Fort Mitchell Baptist Church, 2323 Dixie Hwy., Ft. Mitchell, KY 41017.

Deaths continued B9


On the record From B8

Carol Ann Long

Carol Ann Long, 61, of Florence, died June 27, 2011, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. She was a longtime secretary for Judge Anthony Frohlich and a member of St. Paul Church in Florence. Survivors include her husband, Jimmy Long; daughters, Angie Kelsch of Augusta, Ky., and Stephanie Vieyra of Elsmere; sister, Jenny O’Brien of Dayton; brothers, Joe Watson of Erlanger, Bob Watson of Alexandria, Bill Watson of Independence, Ron Watson of Dayton and Mike Watson of Alexandria; and five grandchildren. Burial was at Forest Lawn. Memorials: Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45229; Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, 2300 Wall St., Suite H, Cincinnati, OH 45212; or St. Elizabeth Hospice, 483 S. Loop Drive, Edgewood, KY 41017.

About obituaries

Basic obituary information and a color photograph of your loved one is published without charge by The Community Press. Please call us at 2830404 for more information. To publish a larger memorial tribute, call 513242-4000 for pricing details. For the most up-to-date Northern Kentucky obituaries, click on the “Obituaries” link at NKY.com.

Gladys “Mimi” Cundiff Marsh, 91, of Highland Heights, died June 28, 2011. Survivors include her husband, William E. Marsh; daughters, Marcy Lewis Schweitzer and Amy Biddle; sister, Jean Hornbeck; five grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren. Interment was at Spring Grove Cemetery. Memorials: Steve Lewis Memorial Fund, Wyoming School Foundation, Wyoming, OH 45215 or Hospice of the Bluegrass, 7388 Turfway Road, Florence, KY 41042.

was elected to the Kentucky House of Representatives. He was president of the Covington Kenton Jaycees and past president of the Catholic Social Service Auxiliary and Covington/Kenton Lions Club. A grandson, Quinn Stapleton, and two sisters, Loraine Kaiser and Louise Mraz, died previously. Survivors include his wife, Sandy Amend Clore; sons, Walter Schmaedecke of Berea and Will Schmaedecke of Ft. Myers, Fla.; daughter, Sara Thilman of Portland, Ore.; stepson, Ed Clore of Fort Thomas; stepdaughter, Karen Ford of Walton; brother, Walter Schmaedecke of Sun City, Fla.; sister, Marcie Hundsrucker of Toledo, Ohio; and six grandchildren. Interment was in St. John Cemetery, Fort Wright. Memorials: The Cathedral Foundation, 1140 Madison Ave., Covington, KY 41011; Covington/Kenton Lion’s Club, P.O. Box 17641, Covington, KY 41011; or St. Elizabeth Hospice, 483 S. Loop Road, Edgewood, KY 41017.

George W. Ragan

Wanita I. Smith

Gladys ‘Mimi’ Marsh

George W. Ragan, 82, of Cold Spring, died June 28, 2011, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He was a member of St. Joseph Church in Cold Spring and an engineer for CSX Railroad. His sisters, Jane Foss and Mary Stumpf, died previously. Survivors include his wife, Marian Menkedick Ragan; daughters, Debbie Neace and Donna Weinel, both of Alexandria; sons, David Ragan of Highland Heights and Warren Ragan of Alexandria; stepdaughter, Susan McCall of Cincinnati; 11 grandchildren; and six great-grandchildren. Burial was in St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas.

Sharon A. Richmond

Sharon A. Richmond, 60, of Newport, died June 23, 2011, at her home. She was a laundry attendant. A son, Steven W. Richmond, and a sister, Dorothy Mae Bramble, died previously. Survivors include her daughter, Tammy Richmond; son, Robert Sparks; sisters, Josephine Bramble and Betty Moore; brother, Jack Bramble; niece, Patsy Williams; three grandchildren; and two greatgrandchildren.

William Schmaedecke

William Schmaedecke, 75, of Crestview Hills, died June 24, 2011, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. He was a district court judge in Kenton County and a member of the Cathedral Basilica of the Assumption and the Bishop’s Choir for more than 63 years. In 1972 he

Wanita I. Smith, 79, of Fort Thomas, died June 29, 2011, at her residence. She was a manager with Cincinnati Bell Telephone, a member of Cincinnati Bell Telephone Pioneers and an avid bowler. Survivors include her husband, William P. Smith; sons, Gary Smith of Los Angeles, Calif., and David Smith of Fort Thomas; daughter, Laura Jane Knaebel of Manilus, N.Y.; 10 grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren. Burial was in Evergreen Cemetery, Southgate. Memorials: First Baptist Church of Fort Thomas, 600 N. Fort Thomas Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075.

George M. Snyder

George M. Snyder, 86, of Newport, died June 28, 2011, at Hospice of Cincinnati at Mercy Health Plaza. He was a former Newport police officer and retired as a foreman with Interlake Steel. His first wife, Virginia Carr Snyder, and second wife, Gloria Walker Snyder, died previously. Survivors include his daughters, Judy Scroggins and Lynn Murray; stepdaughter, Jo Ann Dunaway; sisters, Peggy Hacker and Doris Nunan; five grandchildren; and seven great-grandchildren. Burial was in St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas. Memorials: Indianspring of Oakley, 4900 Babson Place, Cincinnati, OH 45227 or Hospice of Cincinnati at Mercy Health Plaza, 7691 Five Mile Road, Cincinnati, OH 45230.

MARRIAGE LICENSES Brandi Clemons, 20, of Bellevue and Roman Enzweier, 22, of Fort Thomas, issued June 22. Megan McGrath, 23, of Cincinnati and Joseph Hill, 24, of Fort Thomas, issued June 23. Samantha Geiger, 24, of Cincinnati and Todd Moore, 32, of Morehead, issued June 23. Chelsy Harris, 19, of Fort Thomas and Donald Morgan, 20, of Edgewood, issued June 23. Danielle Gilland, 18, of Greensburg and William Elswick, 23, of Fort Thomas, issued June 24. Jennifer Desmond, 29, and Christopher Markus, 32, both of Cincinnati, issued June 24. Nancy Roland, 47, and Jerry Hensley, 43, both of Bellefontaine, issued June 24. Stacey Johnson, 35, of South Dakota and Mark Padgett, 34, of Cincinnati, issued June 25. Madeline Gilker, 21, and Cortes Glover, 34, both of Cincinnati, issued June 25. Casey Ferguson, 29, of Cincinnati and Brent Cole, 30, of Fort Thomas, issued June 8. Stephanie Gallagher, 30, of

Rochester and Theo Dolan, 38, of Philadelphia, issued June 9. Brenda Girdler, 28, of Fort Thomas and Michael Sceifres, 28, of Cincinnati, issued June 10. Nancy Steffen, 30, of Cincinnati and James Lindle, 25, of Dansville, issued June 10. Donna Dawson, 54, of Dayton and Fredrick Freihofer, 48, of Cincinnati, issued June 10. Nancy Nash, 56, of Cincinnati and Peter Laber, 60, of Dayton, issued June 11. Kristina Noel, 23, of Cookeville and Brad Bolte, 24, of Cincinnati, issued June 11. Rebecca Torline, 25, of Fort Thomas and Nathan Fey, 26, of Cincinnati, issued June 11. Joi Kleinholz, 47, and Robert Klienholz, 49, both of Cincinnati, issued June 11. Alexandra Anderson, 23, of Owensboro and Adam Kremer, 24, issued June 13. Jodi Krift, 26, and Chad Bertke, 28, both of Fort Thomas, issued June 13. Lisa Napier, 30, of Florence and Michael Matuskiewicz, 30, of Springville, issued June 13.

Attention Realtors To advertise your Open House or Feature Home, call your advertising representative.

513.768.8335 or 513.768.8319

LEGAL NOTICE SECTION 00 11 00 - INVITATION TO BID Housing Authority of Newport will be accepting sealed bids for a General Contract for the replacement of windows at Grand Towers Apartments on Grand Avenue in the City of Newport, Kentucky. Bids are due no later than 3:30 p.m., local time, July 22, 2011, at the offices of the Housing Authority of Newport, located at 30 East 8th. St., Newport, KY 41071 at which time and place all bids will be publicly opened and read aloud. Bids are to be marked "Grand Towers Window Replacement #11-11 ". General Contractors submitting a bid for general construction may obtain a maximum of one (1) complete set of Contract Documents from Hub + Weber Architects, 542 Greenup Street, Covington, Kentucky, (859) 491-3844 - for a deposit of $50. Checks shall be made out to Newport Millennium Housing Corporation III. Deposit will be refunded with the return of the set in good condition. Contract Documents may also be purchased from Phipps Reprographics, 6920 Plainfield Rd, P.O. Box 36172, Cincinnati, OH 45236-0172, Tel: 513.793.1030. Copies of the Contract Documents are open to the public inspection and may be examined at the following offices: FW Dodge Corporation 7265 Kenwood Road Suite 200 Cincinnati, Ohio 45236

Allied Construction Industries 1010 Yale Ave. Cincinnati, Ohio 45206

HAN will conduct a pre-bid informational meeting at 3pm local time, June 30, 2011 at their offices. Construction would begin within ninety (90) days of execution of contract. A certified check or bank draft, payable to NMHC III, U.S. Government Bonds, or a satisfactory bid bond executed by the Bidder and acceptable sureties in amount equal to five (5) percent of the bid shall be submitted with each bid. The successful Bidder will be required to furnish and pay for satisfactory Performance and Payment bond in an amount equal to one hundred (100) percent of the contract price. All Bidders shall include with their bid a statement from an acceptable surety that if their bid is accepted the surety will furnish to the Bidder the required performance and payment bond or bonds required by the contract documents. Attention of Bidders is particularly called to the requirements as to conditions of employment to be observed and minimum wage rates to be paid under the contract, Section 3, Segregated Facility, Section 109 and E.O. 11246 and Title VI. MBE/WBE firms are encouraged to bid.

CCF Recorder

B9

PUBLIC NOTICE DAYTON INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS NON-DISCRIMINATION POLICY STATEMENT Students, their parents, employees, and potential employees of the Dayton Independent Schools are hereby notified that the Dayton Independent School district does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, religion, marital status, sex, or disability in employment programs, vocational programs, or activities set forth in compliance with the Office of Civil Rights, Title VI, VII, Title IX, ADA and Section 504. Any person having inquiries concerning Dayton Independent Schools compliance with the Office of Civil Rights Law, Title VI, Title VII, Title IX, ADA and Section 504, is directed to contact Ron Kinmon, Director Dayton Independent Schools, 200 Clay Street, Dayton, KY at 491-6565. The Dayton Independent School offers the following vocational education programs for students in Grades 9 - 12: Family and Consumer Sciences and Industrial Technology. The following vocational school classes are available to students in Grades 11 - 12: Auto Mechanics, Business and Office, Carpentry, Electricity, Health Services, Machine Shop, Welding, Auto Body, Drafting, Masonry, Visual Art, Diesel Mechanics, Graphic Arts & Child Development. Keyboarding is offered to students in Grades 9-12. Adult Education classes are offered to individuals pursing a GED certificate. AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER 1001646560

No bidder may withdraw their bid within 60 days after the actual date of opening thereof. HAN reserves the right to waive any informality, irregularity, or defect in any proposal, and to reject any/or all proposals should it be deemed in the best interest of HAN to do so. It is the intent of HAN to award a contract to the lowest responsible and responsive bidder. HAN is an Equal Opportunity Employer. 1001646305

COMMISSIONERS ORDINANCE NO. 0-2011-007 AN ORDINANCE AMENDING COMMISSIONERS ORDNANCE NO. 0-2010-011. AMENDING THE ADOPTED BUDGET FOR THE CITY OF NEWPORT, KENTUCKY FOR THE FISCAL YEAR JULY 1, 2010 TO JUNE 30,2011, INCLUDING AN ESTIMATE OF REVENUES AND RESOURCES AND MAKING THE ANNUAL APPROPRIATION IN ACCORDANCE THEREWITH. BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY OF NEWPORT, KENTUCKY: SECTION I

GENERAL FUND RESOURCES AVAILABLE FUND BALANCE/ RETAINED EARNINGS CARRIED FORWARD CASH Interfund Transfers -In Transfer from Developer

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT FUND

NEWPORT REDEVELOPMENT REVOLVING LOAN FUND

CAPITAL PROJECTS FUND

EMPLOYEE BENEFITS FUND

NEWPORT ON THE LEVEE FUND

REFUSE FUND

(188,369) (697,809)

354,552 354,582

505,804 488,663

83 85

7,944 53,200

5,075,752 5,098,392

62,571 102,020

37,710 177,650

0 42,370

0 0

0 0

0 0

0

0

0 Capital Lease Proceeds Not Proceeds Bond Proceeds Refunding Bonds Gain on Salese of Assets Loss on Sale of Assets ESTIMATE REVENUES: Property Tax Licenses & Permits Fines & Forfeits Charges for Service Uses of Property Refunds & Reimbursements Intergovernmental Interest Miscellaneous Special Events Total Estimated Revenue TOTAL RESOURCES APPROPRIATIONS: General Government Public Safety Development Services Community Services Municipal Complex Building Maintenance Debt Service Other TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS Excess of Resources Over/{Under) Appropriations Contributed Capital Transfer to Developer Interfund Transfer - Out Estimated Fund Balance/ Retained Earnings End of Fiscal Year

2,074,040 2,110,490 9,558,400 9,473,790 175,400 159,950 982,840 934,530 1,120,840 1,104,600 15,300 26,600 1,248,460 1,968,200 2,000 800 10,000 2,500 0 0 15,187,280 15,781,460 15,036,621 15,261,301

875,000 875,000 0

0 0

0

0 1,930 0 137,620 600,000 289,170 0 140 0 0 0

1,281,980 862,880 1,636,532 1,259,832

600,000 428,860 1,105,904 917,523

53,880 1,227,600 808,600 500 340

10,000 29,480

2,650,000 2,707,400 640,000 611,870 2,500,000 2,905,000

1,077,480 1,097,100

Contract documents, bid sheets, plans and specifications can be obtained at CDS Associates, Inc., 7000 Dixie Highway, Florence, Kentucky 41042 for $100.00 per set, (non-refundable). Plans requested by mail will be an additional $15.00 per set. Checks shall be made payable to CDS Associates, Inc. Specifications will also be on file in the plan room of the Allied Construction Industries, (ACI). Each bidder is required to submit with his proposal a bid bond in the amount of 100% or certified check equal to ten percent (10%) of the base bid. The bidder to whom the contract is awarded will be required to furnish a surety bond in an amount equal to onehundred percent (100%) of the contract amount. Bid security furnished in Bond form shall be issued by a Surety Company or Corporation licensed in the State of Kentucky to provide said surety. Proposals must contain the full name of the party or parties submitting the same and all persons interested therein. It is the intent and requirements of the owner that the abatement portion of this project be completed no later than December 31, 2011. When the total overall project exceeds $250,000, all bidders must comply with the prevailing wage rates in the State of Kentucky. It is anticipated that the Prevailing Wage Law will apply to this project.

500 300

0

300,000 303,000 48,000 48,000 0

0

The Council of the City of Fort Thomas reserves the right to waive irregularities and to reject any or all bids.

0 0 83 85

1,144,270 1,031,770 1,152,214 1,084,970

7,013,000 7,450,270 12,088,752 12,548,662

1,077,980 1,097,400 1,140,551 1,199,420

0

The Council of the City of Fort Thomas shall authorize acceptance of the bid made by the responsible bidder who, in Council’s judgment, offers the best and most responsive proposal to the City, considering quality, service, performance record, and price; or Council may direct the rejection of all bids. The City may award based on "functional equivalence" concerning specified work or products. By the order of the Council of the City of Fort Thomas. Mary H. Brown Mayor, City of Fort Thomas

15,028,710 15,584,015

1,251,050 867,430 1,251,050 867,430

600,000 392,520 600,000 392,520

0 0 0 0

1,136,590 1,013,320 1,136,590 1,013,320

2,968,540 2,946,990 2,876,240 2,855,250 5,844,780 5,802,240

7,911 (322,714)

385,482 392,402

505,904 525,003

83 85

15,624 71,650

6,243,972 6,746,422

0 (139,160)

0 (85)

0

0 0

505,904 385,843

83 0

15,624 71,650

6,243,972 6,746,422

0 (123,370) 7,911 (445,084)

Sealed proposals will be received at the office of the City Clerk, Municipal Building, City of Fort Thomas, Campbell County, Kentucky, until 2:00 P.M. local time on JULY 14, 2011, for furnishing all labor, materials, and equipment necessary to complete project known as SALE AND RESTORA TION OF V. A. HOMES, and, at said time and place, publicly opened and read aloud.

150 270 1,134,120 1,002,020 0

1,486,420 1,539,900 8,840,520 9,247,145 324,120 337,070 1,344,630 1,413,560 181,020 187,080 2,852,000 2,859,260

CITY OF FORT THOMAS, KENTUCKY CAMPBELL COUNTY LEGAL NOTICE

The successful bidder will be required to have a current occupational license in the City of Fort Thomas before the Contract will be awarded.

385,482 392,402

1,077,900 1,030,480 1,077,900 1,030,480 62,654 168,940 (37,710) (38,400) 24,941 130,540

SECTION II That this Ordinance shall be signed by the Mayor, attested by the City Clerk, recorded, published and effective upon adoption. PASSED: First Reading June 27, 2011 PASSED: Second Reading June 28, 2011 ___________________________________ Mayor JERRY PELUSO Published: In full in the CCR, the 7th day of July 2011.

CE-1001649348-01

DEATHS

July 7, 2011

Publishing Date: Campbell County Recorder – JULY 7, 2011 1001649058


B10

CCF Recorder

July 7, 2011

Fort Thomas Planning Commission Public Hearing The Planning Commission of the City of Fort Thomas, Kentucky, will hold a Public Hearing on Wednesday, July 20, 2011 in the Council Chambers of the City Building at 130 N. Ft. Thomas Avenue, Ft. Thomas, KY for the following agenda items: 7:00 PUBLIC HEARING: A hearing for a Preliminary Subdivision Review for property located at 139 Newman Avenue, Geraldine McMath Trustee, Owner, Jerri McMath, Applicant. A copy of the proposed plans may be examined by interested parties at the General Services Department during normal business hours. The City of Fort Thomas will make every reasonable accommodation to assist qualified disabled persons in obtaining access to available services or in attending City activities. If there is a need for the City to be aware of a specific disability, you are encouraged to contact the City Building at (859) 5721210 so that suitable arrangements can be considered prior to the delivery of the service or the date of the meeting.

COMMONWEALTH OF KENTUCKY COUNTY OF CAMPBELL CITY OF COLD SPRING, KENTUCKY ORDINANCE NO. 11- 980 AN ORDINANCE AMENDING THE COLD SPRING POLICE DEPARTMENT POLICE AND POLICY PROCEDURE MANUAL Whereas, the city of Cold Spring, by ordinance number 03-827 repealed all prior policy and procedure manuals and adopted the current policy and procedure manual of the Cold Spring Police Department; and Whereas, the Cold Spring Police Chief and the Cold Spring Safety Committee have reviewed said policy and procedure manual and recommended certain changes; and Whereas, along with the aforementioned individuals, the Mayor and city council members have met and reviewed the proposed policy and procedure manual changes. NOW THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY OF COLD SPRING, COMMONWEALTH OF KENTUCKY:

General Services Department

COMMONWEALTH OF KENTUCKY COUNTY OF CAMPBELL CITY OF COLD SPRING, KENTUCKY ORDINANCE NO. 11- 979 AN ORDINANCE AMENDING THE COLD SPRING POLICY AND PROCEDURE MANUAL Whereas, the city of Cold Spring, by ordinance has previously adopted a policy and procedure manual for Cold Spring employees; and Whereas, the Cold Spring Personnel Committee have reviewed said policy and procedure manual and recommended certain changes; and

Section I The City of Cold Spring amends and adopts the changes, set forth and attached hereto as Exhibit “A” all of which are incorporated by reference herein, to the policy and procedure manual adopted by Ordinance No. 03-827. Exhibit A consists of changes/additions of the following policies/procedures: Policy No. 47 Job Descriptions Section II That should any section or part of any section or any provision of this Ordinance be declared invalid by a Court of competent jurisdiction, for any reason, such declaration shall not invalidate, or adversely affect, the remainder of this Ordinance. Section III

Whereas, along with the aforementioned individuals, the Mayor and city council members have met and reviewed the proposed policy and procedure manual changes.

That this Ordinance shall take effect and be in full force when passed, published and recorded according to law.

NOW THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY OF COLD SPRING, COMMONWEALTH OF KENTUCKY:

1st Reading -June 13 , 2011. Vote: 4 , Yes, 1 , No

Section I

2nd Reading- June 27, 2011. Vote: 5 , Yes, 1 No

The City of Cold Spring amends and adopts the changes, set forth and attached hereto as Exhibit “A” all of which are incorporated by reference herein, to the policy and procedure manual for the City of Cold Spring.

City of Cold Spring, Kentucky By:/s/ Mark Stoeber Mark Stoeber Mayor

Exhibit A consists of changes/additions of the following policies/procedures: Chapter 3 – Pay Plan Section 11 – Service Benefit Allowance Page 17 Chapter 10 – Disciplinary Action Page 32 Section ( C ) Chapter 11 - Separations Section 1 – Resignation – NEW ADDTION: Section 4 – Disability Page 36 NEW CLAUSE: (C) Chapter 12 Training Section 4 – Formal Education: Tuition Reimbursement Plan Page 38 Chapter 14 - Attendance and Leave Section E Page 44 Chapter 18 - Retirement and Insurance Programs Section 2 – Health Care Insurance Page 56 Section II That should any section or part of any section or any provision of this Ordinance be declared invalid by a Court of competent jurisdiction, for any reason, such declaration shall not invalidate, or adversely affect, the remainder of this Ordinance. Section III That this Ordinance shall take effect and be in full force when passed, published and recorded according to law. Adopted this 27th day of June 2011. 1st Reading - June 13th, 2011. Vote: 5 , Yes, 0 , No 2nd Reading - June 27th _, 2011. Vote: 6 , Yes, 0 , No City of Cold Spring, Kentucky

Attest:

By: /s/ Mark Stoeber Mark Stoeber Mayor

__/s/ Rita Seger Clerk 1001649235

Adopted this 27

day of June 2011.

Attest: /s/ Rita Seger Clerk 1001649236 INVITATION TO BID Neighborhood Foundations will be accepting sealed bids for the renovation work at 1040 Columbia St., located in the City of Newport, Kentucky. Bids are due no later than 12:00 p.m., local time, July 29, 2011, at the offices of Neighborhood Foundations, located at 30 East 8th. St., Newport, KY 41071 at which time and place all bids will be publicly opened and read aloud. Bids are to be marked “1040 Hamlet St. Renovations Project #11-16”. Must be a certified Lead Renovator. A copy of certification must be presented with bid. Copies of Bidding Documents may be picked up at Neighborhood Foundation offices. Neighborhood Foundations will conduct a pre-bid walkthrough of the building at 10:00 a.m., local time, July 14, 2011. A certified check or bank draft, payable to Housing Authority of Newport, U.S. Government Bonds, or a satisfactory bid bond executed by the Bidder and acceptable sureties in amount equal to five (5) percent of the bid shall be submitted with each bid. The successful Bidder will be required to furnish and pay for satisfactory performance and payment bonds. All Bidders shall include with their bid a statement from an acceptable surety that if their bid is accepted the surety will furnish to the Bidder the required performance and payment bond or bonds required by the contract documents. Attention of Bidders is particularly called to the requirements as to conditions of employment to be observed and minimum wage rates to be paid under the contract, Section 3, Segregated Facility, Section 109 and E.O. 11246 and Title VI. MBE/WBE firms are encouraged to bid. No bidder may withdraw their bid within 60 days after the actual date of opening thereof. NF reserves the right to waive any informality, irregularity, or defect in any proposal, and to reject any/or all proposals should it be deemed in the best interest of NF to do so. It is the intent of NF to award a contract to the lowest responsible and responsive bidder. NF is an Equal Opportunity Employer. 1001649153

HIGHLAND HEIGHTS SOUTHGATE POLICE AUTHORITY RESOLUTION A RESOLUTION OF THE HIGHLAND HEIGHTS SOUTHGATE POLICE AUTHORITY OF THE CITIES OF HIGHLAND HEIGHTS AND SOUTHGATE, KENTUCKY AMENDING THE HIGHLAND HEIGHTS SOUTHGATE POLICE AUTHORITY ANNUAL BUDGET FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 07/01/2010 THROUGH 06/30/2011 BY ESTIMATING REVENUES AND RESOURCES AND APPROPRIATING FUNDS FOR THE OPERATION OF CITY GOVERNMENT. WHEREAS, the July 1, 2010 through June 30, 2011 Highland Heights Southgate Police Authority budget needs to be amended to reflect actual numbers; and WHEREAS, this resolution is the actual budget for the Highland Heights Southgate Police Authority from July 1, 2010 through June 30, 2011. NOW, THEREFORE, be it resolved by the Governing Board of the Highland Heights Southgate Police Authority. RESOURCES AVAILABLE ACTUAL AMENDED Fund Balance Carried Forward $ Estimated Revenues Cities Contributions $2,098,300.00 $2,098,300.00 Other 84,920.00 $ 121,100.00 $ Total Estimated Revenue $2,219,400.00 $2,183,220.00 Total Resources Available for Appropriations $2,219,400.00 $2,183,220.00 Appropriations: Personnel $1,823,700.00 $1,728,070.00 General Expense $ 337,200.00 $ 389,650.00 Capital Outlay $ 14,000.00 51,500.00 Dept Service $ 58,500.00 $ Total Appropriations $2,219,400.00 $2,183,220.00 Excess of Resources Over/Under Appropriations $ Estimated Fund Balance End of Year $ That the amended budget for the fiscal year beginning 7/1/2010 and ending 6/30/2011 is hereby adopted as follows: Yes No DATE ADOPTED MAY 5, 2010 Vote 6 0 Carl Mullen Executive Officer James Hamberg ATTEST Chairman of Highland Gregory Meyers Heights Southgate Police Authority CE-1001648983-01

LEGAL NOTICE Notice is hereby given that the Campbell County & Municipal Board of Adjustment will hold a public hearing at the Alexandria Courthouse, 8352 E. Main Street, Alexandria, KY on Tuesday, July 19, 2011 at 7:00 PM, for the purpose of reviewing and hearing testimony on the following: CASE NUMBER: APPLICANT: LOCATION: REQUEST:

BA-06-11 Newport Fraternal Order of Police 1110 Waterworks Road, City of Woodlawn. A conditional use allowing for a community recreational facility.

CASE NUMBER: APPLICANT: LOCATION:

BA-07-11 Vickie Ripberger 732 Boone Smith Road, Unincorporated Campbell County. To reduce the required minimum front yard depth from 100’ feet to 42.7’ feet to replace an existing mobile home.

REQUEST:

Persons interested in this case are invited to be present. Information concerning this case is available for public inspection at the Campbell County & Municipal Planning & Zoning Office, 1098 Monmouth Street, Suite 343, Newport, Ky. Monday-Friday during normal business hours. ______________________ Peter Klear, AICP Director of Planning & Zoning 1001649520

Date: June 29, 2011 Published: July 7, 2011 Campbell County Recorder

Campbell County Fire Protection District No. 6 District Board Membership Third Wed. Every Month 7:30 p.m. at Firehouse PresidentChair/Fireman Thomas L. Hater 3572 Eight Mile Road Melbourne, KY 41059 859-448-0907

Term expires 6/30/2014 First Full Term

Vice Pres./Court Appointee Earl Greis 7314 Mary Ingles Highway Melbourne, Ky 41059 (859) 635-4363

6/30/2012 Third or more full term

Secretary/Treasurer/Fireman Ervin Messmer 5930 Mary Ingles Highway Melbourne, KY 41059 (859) 441-3339

6/30/2013 Third or more full term

Court Appointee Donald Kuntz 5986 Mary Ingles Highway Melbourne, KY 41059 (859) 441-2672

6/30/2011 First full term

Member/Property Owner Martin Meyer 7218 Mary Ingles Highway Melbourne, KY 41059 (859) 635-1901

6/30/2014 First full term

Member/Property Owner Charles Parker 6212 Mary Ingles Highway Melbourne, KY 41059 (859) 781-6011

6/30/2013 Second full term

Member/Court Appointee Edward B. Schroeder 3887 Nine Mile Road Melbourne, KY 41059 (859) 441- 4721

6/30/2013 First full term 1001648704

Win a classic car at the Levee Newport on the Levee is celebrating 10 years as the No. 1 entertainment and dining destination in the Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky area by giving away a raven black, 1957 Ford Thunderbird to one lucky winner. The public will have a chance to win the “T-Bird” by entering a raffle that runs through Aug. 28. Additional sponsors of the raffle include Airport Ford, The Newport Foundation, Inc., and Southbank Partners. There are three ways to enter the raffle at Newport on the Levee’s Welcome Center: • One free ticket for every $100 in same day purchases at Newport on the Levee establishments. Must show receipts in order to be eligible. • One free entry for every $50 gift card purchased at Newport on the Levee. • Purchase a raffle ticket for $20. Welcome Center Hours: Monday-Thursday: 10 a.m. to 9 p.m., Friday and Saturday: 10 a.m. to 10 p.m., Sunday: 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.

BRIEFLY Two-day camp for girls

Daisies and Brownies in the area are invited to a twoday camp July 23 and July 24. The camp is not overnight; it runs from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, July 23, and 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, July 24. The camp is being hosted at St John's Lutheran Church, 5977 Lower Tug Fork Road, Camp Springs. The cost for the camp is $15. Campers should bring their own lunch. Drinks will be provided. Contact Vickie Wira with any questions 513-5204130 or by email vickiewira@ jssoap.com.

The Classics

On Saturday, July 9, the founders of the soft southern rock sound, The Classics IV will be making a concert appearance at the Guys'n Dolls Night Club in Cold Spring. At the Guys'n Dolls during the concert there will be activities to raise money The Dennis Yost Severe Brain Trauma Foundation “Awakening.” In 2008 Dennis Yost died from complications of severe brain trauma from a fall and was living in the Cincinnati area, where his wife Linda resided.

IN THE SERVICE Webster completes Navy basic training

Navy Seaman Andrew G. Webster, son of Regina and William Webster of Alexandria, completed U.S. Navy basic training at Recruit Training Command, Great Lakes, Ill. During the eight-week program, Webster completed a variety of training, which included classroom study and practical instruction on naval customs, first aid, firefighting, water safety and survival, and shipboard and aircraft safety. The capstone event of boot camp, “Battle Stations,” gives recruits the skills and confidence they need to succeed in the fleet. Webster is a 2010 graduate of Campbell County High School.

campbell-county-recorder-070711  

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