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CAMPBELL COUNTY RECORDER THURSDAY, JUNE 27, 2013

GIVING FIELDS B1

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving all of Campbell County 75¢ BECAUSE COMMUNITY MATTERS

River cities feud with Campbell Co. over money By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

NEWPORT — A battle over state money for “riverfront development” overflowed into the chambers of Campbell County Fiscal Court at the June19 meeting. The president of Southbank Partners and the mayors of Dayton and Newport challenged the fiscal court, saying $75,000 in state funding was meant only for Ohio River development and not projects along the Licking River. South-

bank represents businesses, residents and six cities bordering the Ohio River: Ludlow, Covington, Newport, Bellevue, Dayton and Fort Thomas. The fiscal court voted 2-1 in favor of splitting the $75,000 from the Kentucky Economic Development Cabinet two ways. Campbell County dedicated $25,825 to Southbank, and the remaining $49,175 to Vision 2015 for the Licking River Greenway trails project. Kenton County Fiscal Court approved giving $75,000 from the same exact state fund appli-

Wood Hudson hosts open house

cation to Southbank under a joint agreement with Campbell County. Commissioner Ken Rechtin voted against the splitting of Campbell County’s money, and Commissioners Pete Garrett and Brian Painter voted in favor of the split. Rechtin said he voted no because the county was going in a different direction with the money than originally was intended. Southbank President Jack Moreland said the money is needed for riverfront stabilization projects along the Ohio River in Newport and Bellevue.

Southbank is working with U.S. Army Corps of Engineers on a feasibility study to get the area in line for federal money to stabilize the riverbanks that’s five or eight years away, Moreland said. “There are things that are going to have be done to both the Newport riverfront and also the Bellevue riverfront that will be temporary measures that will stop that erosion, or we’re going to lose them before we can access the federal dollars,” Moreland said. Moreland said Southbank is

also supportive of the Licking River Greenway project, and only against taking the money away from a fund originally intended for use along the Ohio River. Garrett said the county funded Southbank to the level it would cost to start a project to build a boat ramp in Fort Thomas. Neither Southbank or Fort Thomas were interested in pursuing the boat ramp with a system of trails, Garrett said. There were plenty of other See RIVER, Page A2

RELAY WALKERS FIGHT CANCER ONE STEP AT A TIME

By Amanda Joering ajoering@nky.com

NEWPORT — The area’s only independent, nonprofit cancer research facility is opening its doors for an open house and art show. The Wood Hudson Cancer Research Laboratory, located at 931 Isabella St. in Newport, is hosting the event from 1-6 p.m. Saturday, June 29, and Sunday, June 30. Wood Hudson representative Georgia Kinman said the event is meant to serve two purposes, raising money for the facility through the art show and giving the public a chance to tour the facility, including its newest addition, a Biospecimen Repository Center. Tours will be led by students participating in Wood Hudson’s Undergraduate Research Education Program. The repository center, which the center broke ground on in 2007 and completed last year, was constructed to house specimens collected from more than 59,000 local cancer patients that are used in the facility’s research of the disease. Kinman said since the facility’s building is so old and didn’t have proper cooling and sprinkler systems, they wanted to safer place to house the specimens. “The thought of having that space wiped out was quite concerning,” Kinman said. “It made sense to build the addition.” Wood Hudson president Dr. Julia Carter said they held an open house last year for volunteers, but haven’t had a full open house for the public in 10-15 years. Along with the open house, Carter said the facility will be holding an art show featuring works including paintings,

See LAB, Page A2

TOO MANY TOMATOES? Rita shares her Aunt Margaret's recipe for classic tomato preserves. B3

Cancer survivors walk beneath a semicircle of balloons to lead the first lap around the track during the American Cancer Society's Campbell County Relay for Life in Alexandria Friday, June 21. At far right is Josh Williams, 34, of Fort Thomas, who had a malignant tumor removed from his chest area when he was 10 years old. Others in the front row, from right to left, are Leigh Ann Chamberlin of Cold Spring, Tim Rachford of Alexandria, Kerrie Kaiser of Alexandria. CHRIS MAYHEW/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER Trent Honaker, 11, of Cold Spring, pulls his 13-year-old sister Autumn along in a wagon on the track at Campbell County Middle School prior to the start of the American Cancer Society's Campbell County Relay for Life Friday, June 21. CHRIS MAYHEW/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

EATING FRESH June is Fresh Fruits and Vegetables Month. Diane shares the health benefits of eating fresh. B6

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Vol. 35 No. 20 © 2013 The Community Recorder ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


NEWS

A2 • CAMPBELL COUNTY RECORDER • JUNE 27, 2013

Art academy shows love for student By Amanda Joering ajoering@nky.com

FORT THOMAS — The Children’s Art Academy recently showed support

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for one of their own by throwing a party for student Logan Morse. Morse, 9, was born with complex congenital heart disease, requiring several heart surgeries starting when he was 3 days old. About a month ago, Morse’s great-aunt Mary Jo Watkins, who is in the process of adopting him, said doctors found a blockage underneath his aortic artery, which

means Morse is now preparing to have his fifth heart surgery. Cyndi Mendell, owner of the academy, said in the past year-and-a-half that Morse has been coming to the school, he’s touched the hearts of everyone there, so when they heard he had to have another surgery, they wanted to do something for him. “He’s just such a great kid and everyone loves him,” Mendell said. “We

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really wanted to get everyone together and throw him a party.” As soon as she heard about the party, Shaunna Prince, parent of a student at the school, jumped at the chance to help make it a special occasion. From providing snacks to planning decorations and games, Mendell said Prince helped make the event great. Prince said Morse is a sweet boy who is always happy, full of energy and life, and goes out of his way to make people laugh. “Even with everything he goes through, he never

complains,” Prince said. “He really brings this place to life, so we wanted to do something to give back to him.” Students, parents and special guest Bob Eubanks, the drummer from the band Strange Brew, attended the party. Eubanks, who had given Morse a signed pair of drum sticks a few weeks ago after hearing about his condition and his love of art and music, said he came to the party because he couldn’t pass up the chance to meet such an inspirational boy. “His story really

touched me,” Eubanks said. “This has been a kick for both of us.” Watkins said she was touched that everyone put so much into the party. Through everything, Watkins said Morse has been very brave and strong, but it’s nice to see such an outpouring of support. Morse, a student at St. Joseph School in Cold Spring, said he loves art and the art academy is his favorite place. “I have a lot a friends here,” Morse said. “It’s really neat that they had the party for me.”

River

for giving them them $25,000, they scolded us for not giving them another $50,000,” he said. Newport Mayor Jerry Peluso said the six member cities of Southbank and the Fiscal Courts of Kenton and Campbell counties signed an agreement in 2012 coming together to seek the funds in question as a group for the Ohio River. “From my perspective, the best thing you can do with this money is shore up that riverbank,” he said. “And if you don’t, we’re going to lose it. We’re going to lose it down by Joe’s Crab Shack where Taylor Creek deposits into the Ohio River.” And at Bellevue’s Beach Park, the erosion is almost up to the sidewalk, Peluso said. Judge-executive Steve Pendery said he wished the wording of the direction of the state law was more conclusive, but us-

ing only the term riverfront left it up for interpretation. “I agree with your interpretation that the money was intended for Southbank,” Pendery said. The county was at a point where if a vote wasn’t taken on something that could be agreed upon, then the money from the state was going to be forfeit, he said. “I’ll just be blunt about it, it’s been difficult to come to an agreement on how to spend the money,” Pendery said. Dayton Mayor Ken Rankle said he had conversations with state legislators outside of Northern Kentucky impressed six cities and two county governments came together and agreed on a plan to work together for the Ohio riverfront. “So, the first time they fund it, we have already screwed it up,” said.

Thomas resident, this is her second show benefiting the facility, where one of the laboratories is named after her mother, who died of breast cancer and was a supporter of Wood Hudson. Hamel, whose father also died of cancer, said she is happy to support Wood Hudson by doing another art show. “I feel like the facility

is very valuable,” Hamel said. “They are taking young people from the colleges and getting them interested in this type of research.” All proceeds from the event, which also includes a silent auction featured a piece by Mary Bunning, will benefit Wood Hudson. For more information about Wood Hudson or the event, call 581-7249.

Continued from Page A1

projects to consider, including giving the money to the Licking River Greenway trail idea in Wilder, he said. “So, we’re the Campbell County Fiscal Court, and this is not just the Southbank fiscal court,” he said. “This not the Dayton, Bellevue, Newport, Fort Thomas fiscal court.” Garrett said the state legislature changed language in the legislation, HB 265, to take out wording explicitly referring to Southbank and instead referencing the money for “riverfront” use. Garrett said he disagreed with the position held by the mayors and Moreland that the money was originally intended only for Ohio River use. “Instead of thanking us

Lab Continued from Page A1

prints and photographs donated by local artists including Sara Hamel and Nancy Pendery. “We are honored to have all of these items donated to help support our research,” Carter said. For Hamel, a Fort

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NEWS

JUNE 27, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • A3

Nurse midwives start new practice in Crestview Hills ascalf@nky.com

CRESTVIEW HILLS —

The Christ Hospital Physicians Obstetrics and Gynecology is moving into Crestview Hills with some familiar faces. The practice is expected to open mid-July at 330 Thomas More Parkway, Suite 201, featuring certified nurse midwives who relocated from another Crestview Hills practice in May to The Christ Hospital Outpatient Center in Anderson until the new location is ready. Certified Nurse Midwife Robin Centner said she is excited about the new practice, along with her partners and fellow certified nurse midwives Elisabeth Erdman, Shauna Zerhusen and Amanda Dalhover. They are accepting new patients and can be reached at 859-2924885. She said many people don’t know what a certified nurse midwife does. “When people think of an obstetrician, they know what an obstetrician does. As certified nurse midwives only attend 10 percent of all births, not all people know what certified nurse midwives do,” she said. “We provide care for women from their teens through meno-

pause. We’re there for routine gynecological care as well as during pregnancy, labor and delivery.” Centner said several members of this group have been together since 2004. She and Erdman obtained their bachelor’s degrees in nursing from Northern Kentucky University and Master of Nursing from the University of Cincinnati, College of Nursing. Zerhusen achieved her Bchelors of Nursing from Wright State University and her Masters of Nursing from Case Western Reserve in Cleveland and further education in nurse midwifery from Frontier School of Midwifery in Hyden, Ky. Dalhover, who joined the practice this month, earned a Bachelor of Arts in biology and a Bachelor of Nursing from NKU and her Master of Nursing from UC.

Want to continue the conversation? Tweet at @AmyScalfNky

By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

NEWPORT — Campbell County's $34.51 million budget for the fiscal year starting July 1 was approved at the June 19 fiscal court meeting. The budget's expenses are $851,407 less with the primary reason being a change where the county no longer processes payroll for the county attorney and child support offices, according to a presentation from Finance Director Matt Elberfeld. Revenue for the 2014 fiscal year is projected to be $1.25 million less than the previous year. The projected decrease is also caused by not receiving the "pass through" revenue for payroll from the county attorney and child support offices for payroll, according to the presentation. Property tax revenue for the county is budgeted to increase by 4 percent from the previous year to collect $277,600 more. There is no budgeted increase for payroll and business license taxes. The county is also expect-

ing an $125,000 increase in state road aid funding. While the county is projecting an almost $120,000 operating deficit, there are no plans for a shortfall. County budgets in previous years have also started out listing an operating deficit. "Our hope is that this budget will be balanced, all the previous budgets have been,” said Judge-executive Steve Pendery. There are some contingencies that can develop over the course of the year that throw a budget out of balance, Pendery said. Major snowfalls can cause a need for more salt and overtime, and state

legislation gets passed sometimes directing the county to spend money or the state to not give the county money, he said. Commissioner Ken Rechtin was the only member of fiscal court to vote no on the budget. Rechtin said he has explained his reasons for voting no to Pendery. One of the biggest sticking points is a $200,000 expenditure in the budget to create new tax collection software tailored for county, he said. Rechtin said he disagrees with the argument that the fragmentation of various county accounts

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means there is a need for a new system. The county could use it's existing system, or even take steps to change the system, he said. "The problem isn't collecting taxes,” Rechtin said. “The problem is the fragmentation of the various numbers and systems." The fragmentation of the tax collection system is something the business community has voices displeasure about government operations sometimes, he said. "What we're doing is not fixing it, we're spending $200,000 to accommodate it," Rechtin said.

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NEWS

A4 • CCF RECORDER • JUNE 27, 2013

Alexandria teen publishes fiction book By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

ALEXANDRIA — Hannah Nelson was paid to publish her fictional book “Just One Day” this spring while a junior at Campbell County High School. A Governor’s Scholar

student and tennis and varsity soccer player, Nelson said she never considered writing a book until she turned 15 years old. At age 16, she’s been published. “I got a laptop for Christmas and thought, why not write a book,” said Nelson, an Alexan-

dria area resident. The book took shape after about six months, and after a dozen drafts and revisions, Nelson said she found a publisher willing to pay her to publish the book. Not finishing the book was never an option, she said.

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the process of writing it, along with seven other books,” she said. Campbell County Middle School language arts and social studies teacher Kathy Trimbur said when she heard about her former student publishing a book she invited her to talk to eighth-grade students in her classes May 23. Trimbur said Nelson admitted to her students that she did not like to read or write until she read the book “The Outsiders” for class. From there, Nelson enjoyed, and kept reading, she said. “When I had her in seventh grade she was a very conscientious student, but this was just a wonderful surprise,” Trimbur said.

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thrill ride set in the middle of a war. The main character, 15-year-old Hayden Kolter, is kidnapped along with a group of friends and taken to an uninhabited island where she “comes to learn the hardships of war and survival,” according to a news release for the book from the publisher Xlibris. The book is available for purchase online through Xlibris, and will be available in Barnes and Noble stores. Nelson said she came up with the plot and theme of the book by observing the people around her and was inspired by many types of different music as well. Nelson said she’s continuing to write. “’Just One Day’ has to have a sequel, and I’m in

1-812-539-BANG (2264)

Campbell County High School student Hannah Nelson, of Alexandria, holds a copy of her first book "Just One Day" published by Xlibris, while meeting with middle school students in Alexandria. CHRIS MAYHEW/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

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NEWS

JUNE 27, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • A5

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NEWS

A6 • CCF RECORDER • JUNE 27, 2013

Garden tour-goers look at plants in a garden on Dumfries Avenue. AMANDA JOERING/COMMUNITY RECORDER

Liz Joseph of Bellevue and Christy Harrison of Fort Mitchell check out a garden on Lester Lane during the Fort Thomas Forest Conservancy's fourth annual Ft. Thomas Garden Tour Saturday, June 22. AMANDA JOERING/COMMUNITY RECORDER

FORT THOMAS — The Fort Thomas Forest Conservancy

The garden on Lester Lane features a view of the Ohio River. AMANDA

hosted its fourth annual Ft. Thomas Garden Tour Saturday, June 22, and Sunday, June 23. The tour featured six gardens throughout the city, as well as a garden market and plant swap. Proceeds from the tour benefit the conservancy.

JOERING/COMMUNITY RECORDER

NEW 2013

NEW 2013

BUICK ENCORE $169/mo

IN-TRANSIT, RESERVE TODAY!

LEASE

BUICK VERANO ONLY $154/mo 1499

$

DOWN

1

$1,000 SMART LEAST REBATE • $3995 DUE AT SIGNING 24 MONTHS • NO SECURITY DEPOSIT

$2,795 DUE AT SIGNING • 24 MONTHS NO SECURITY DEPOSIT • 20K MILE LEASE

2 YEARS OF SCHEDULED MAINTENANCE 2 YEARS ONSTAR • 2 YEARS SIRIUS/XM RADIO

NEW 2012

BUICK REGAL GM REBATE................................ -$2,000 SALE PRICE AFTER REBATE....$25,530

WYLER DISCOUNT...................... -$3,133

COURTESY VEHICLE STK# XR323 • 1 AT THIS PRICE MSRP $27,530

CONQUEST REBATE .........................-$1,000

AS LOW AS

21,397

STK# X11240

GMC SIERRA 1500 REG CAB

BUICK VERANO GM REBATE................................-$2,000 SALE PRICE AFTER REBATE ....$24,160 WYLER DISCOUNT...................... -$4,161 CONQUEST REBATE .................... -$1,000

STK# XR397 • 1 AT THIS PRICE MSRP $26,160

AS LOW AS

18,999

$

SALE

23,995

$

AFTER $750 GM REBATE, $500 BONUS CASH & $3,426 WYLER DISCOUNT STK# XR416 1 AT THIS PRICE

For More Information, Scan This QR Code with your Smartphone GM rebates deducted to achieve sale prices or savings. In stock units only, subject to prior sale. Vehicle / equipment may vary from photo. 1) $169 mo. Buick Encore Closed end lease, $3995 Due at signing, No security deposit. Total of payments $4056. 1) $109 mo. Buick Verano Closed end lease, $2795 Due at signing, No security deposit. Total of payments $2616.Leases are with approved credit. $.15 cents per mile penalty. Customer responsible for excess wear and tear. Plus tax license and fees, subject to credit approval. Prices plus tax, license, fees. Expires 7/1/2013

16,999

BUICK LACROSSE GM REBATE................................. -$1,500 WYLER DISCOUNT.......................-$3,246 SALE PRICE AFTER REBATE.... $29,999 CONQUEST REBATE .........................-$2,000

STK# XR416 1 AT THIS PRICE MSRP $34,745

LEATHER PACKAGE, FOG LIGHTS

27,999

$

1-855-449-6663

JeffWylerFlorenceBuickGMC.com 1154 BURLINGTON PK (RT. 18) FLORENCE, KY

NEW 2013

GMC SAVANA 2500

23,555

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AS LOW AS

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MSRP $25,245

$ NEW 2013

GMC TERRAIN SLE-1

GM REBATE.................................. -$2,500 WYLER DISCOUNT.........................-$2,746 SALE PRICE AFTER REBATE .....$20,502 LOYALTY REBATE ........................... -$1,500 TRADE-IN BONUS ........................ -$1,500

AS LOW AS

$ NEW 2013

2 YEARS OF SCHEDULED MAINTENANCE 2 YEARS ONSTAR • 2 YEARS SIRIUS/XM RADIO

NEW 2013

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LAST ONE AT THIS PRICE

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2

STK# X20012 MSRP $28,965

AFTER $1000 GM REBATE AND BONUS CASH

OPEN SUNDAY 12-5

MON-THUR 9AM-8PM FRI-SAT 9AM-7:30PM SUN 12PM-5PM

CE-0000559454

FOREST CONSERVANCY HOSTS GARDEN TOUR


NEWS

JUNE 27, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • A7

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NEWS

A8 • CCF RECORDER • JUNE 27, 2013

Dayton looks to boost One to One reading program Reaches out to community for volunteer reading coaches By Amanda Joering ajoering@nky.com

DAYTON — Recognizing that early childhood literacy is an important factor in a student’s future academic success, Dayton Independent School officials are working to expand the district’s participation in the One to One reading program. The program, which was introduced at Lincoln Elementary School last year, helps schools recruit, train and support volunteers who serve as reading coaches for struggling readers in first through third grades. Last year at Lincoln, the program brought in six adults and 18 high school students who participated in the sixhour training session to learn reading strategies, then worked at the school once a week for 30 minutes with a student. “It is imperative that our young kids con-

tinue to become readers who no longer worry about saying the words correctly, but instead focus on the messages and ideas being stated,” said Principal Greg Duty. The program saw success last year, Duty said, with participating students seeing an increase in reading scores and a high increase in their fluency scores. Assistant Principal Heather Dragan said along with increasing their scores, the students also had fun through the program. “They really enjoyed meeting with their coaches every week,” Dragan said. “Some of the students even told me it was their favorite thing about second grade.” Along with the benefit to the elementary school students, Superintendent Jay Brewer said the high school students who served as coaches also got a lot from the experience, gaining knowledge about the importance of reading that will come into play if they become parents later in life. For the upcoming

school year, the school is hoping to double the number of reading coaches, Brewer said, allowing even more students to benefit from the experience. Brewer said in particular, they’d like have more male volunteers since only three of last year’s 24 volunteers were male. The district covers the cost of the training, materials and background checks required for all volunteers. Brewer said while he is encouraging more of the district’s staff members to volunteer as coaches, he is also reaching out to the city’s fire and police departments as well as the community to recruit more volunteers. For more information about the One to One reading program, visit www.nkypartners.org/one-to-onereading. For information about volunteering at Lincoln Elementary School, contact Heather Dragan at heather.dragan@dayton.kyschools.us or 292-7492.

BRIEFLY A Car, truck and tractor show for Grants Lick

GRANTS LICK — A classic car, truck and tractor show will roll into Grants Lick Saturday, Aug. 3. Grant’s Lick Baptist Church will host the show at the church, 941 Clay Ridge Road, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. There will be live music, free hot dogs, hamburgers, soft drinks and water. A dash plaque will be given to first 100 show entries. Trophies will be awarded to entries in the following categories: Best Chrysler; Best General Motors (GM), Best Ford, Best in Show, Best Truck; Pastor’s Choice; and Top (three) tractors. There will be no entry fee, and admission to the show is also free. A rain date of Saturday, Aug.10 has also been scheduled if necessary. For information call the church office at 859635-2444 .

Newport Farmers’ Market to open June 29

NEWPORT — The Newport Farmers’ Market will open for the season Saturday, June 29. The market, which will be open every Saturday through October 26, is held from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the parking lot adjacent to the Pepper Rod Restaurant on Monmouth Street. The market provides a variety of vegetables, fruits, flowers and more.

Gun safety education day comes to Cold Spring

COLD SPRING — A “Gun Safety Day” public education event will be offered in Cold Spring at from noon to 4 p.m. Saturday, June 22. The event will be at the Kroger, 70 Martha Layne Collins Blvd., Cold Spring, and was organized by the Campbell County Sheriff’s Office and Project ChildSafe in partnership with Kroger, according to a news release from Sheriff Jeff Kidwell. The event will include discussions with citizens and distributing brochures about gun safety and responsibility in the home, and free gun locks according to the news release There will be free Project ChildSafe bookmarks for children, and certificates for children to sign and present to their parents pledging to follow basic gun safety rules. For information about Project ChildSafe and gun safety and home gun safety kits provided through local law enforcement organizations through the organization visit www.projectchildsafe.org.

Cold Spring storm sewer subcommittee meets

COLD SPRING — A meeting of the Cold Spring storm water ad hoc council subcommittee has

been scheduled at the city building for 8 p.m. Thursday, June 20. The subcommittee met for the first time Monday, June 17 for a discussion about setting up a framework for taking over management of the public storm sewer infrastructure in the city. Mayor Mark Stoeber set up the council subcommittee during a special June 10 council meeting, and on June 11 the city announced a settlement agreement of a lawsuit the city had filed against Sanitation District No. 1 of Northern Kentucky in October 2011. Under the settlement agreement, the city will take over responsibility for public storm sewers in the city, but not sanitary sewers, from SD1.

Company seeks extreme roof makeover entries

AnyWeather Roofing Experts in Covington is planning to give away four free roofs to families in need through an Extreme Roof Makeover program in the Greater Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky area. The company is seeking nominations for families in need of a new roof by July 3 when the applications will be selected for the program. To nominate someone, or for information email anyweatherroofingexperts@gmail.com or check out the AnyWeather Roofing Experts Facebook page.

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NEWS

JUNE 27, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • A9

PetFest benefits Friends of the Shelter

GRAND WRITER

By Stephanie Salmons ssalmons@nky.com

BURLINGTON — An annual fundraiser that welcomes pets – and their humans, of course – helps raise money for an organization that aims to help local animal shelters. Friends of the Shelter will host its biggest fundraiser, PetFest, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, June 30, at Boone Woods Park, 6000 Veterans Way, Burlington. PetFest offers information about animal life saving activities and ways to connect with animal welfare and rescue organizations as well as local related businesses. There will be contests, a pet psychic, a silent auction, pet information, dog trainers and more. The event also features animals up for adoption. Those attending are encouraged to bring their leashed pet. Bonnie Ravenscraft, president of the friends group, said the organization uses money to help the animal shelters in Boone, Kenton, Campbell, Pendleton, Grant and Gallatin counties “for equipment and things their budget doesn’t afford.” “Usually, the biggest money maker we have for the year is PetFest,” she said. According to Ravenscraft, of Florence, group members are very animal-oriented.

Jeff Minks visited the Friends of the Shelter’s ninth annual PetFest in 2011 along with his dog, Nikita. This year’s PetFest is June 30 at Boone Woods Park. FILE PHOTO

“Our main thing is to help these animals to get out of the shelter – to find a good home and be adopt-

able,” she said. For more information about Friends of the Shelter, visit

http://bit.ly/nkypets.

Want to continue the conversation? Tweet at @SSalmonsNKY

Grant’s Lick Elementary School fifth-grade student Elizabeth Nadeau was selected as the Campbell County winner in the 2012-2013 Grandparent of the Year essay contest, sponsored by AARP Kentucky and the Kentucky Retired Teachers’ Association. As the county winner, Nadeau receives a framed certificate for her efforts, and the essay will be submitted for the district competition. THANKS TO CONNIE POHLGEERS

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NEWS

A10 • CCF RECORDER • JUNE 27, 2013

Shop owner shares the art of gifting art of gifting. Through her shop, located at 3 North Fort Thomas Ave., Thomas hopes to offer the community a one-stop gift connection where they can pick out that special gift for every occasion. With an inventory of

By Amanda Joering ajoering@nky.com

FORT THOMAS — When Fort Thomas Central opens its doors later this month, owner Barb Thomas will begin doing what she set out to do, teaching others about the

unique, ever-changing items from more than 50 vendors including Khall Designs all-natural bath and beauty products, Fishs Eddy home wear and accessories and Embellish Jewelry, Thomas plans to take shoppers through the experience of gifting. “The whole foundation behind my concept for this store is the art of gifting,” Thomas said. “The art of gifting isn’t just about the person you’re buying a gift for, it’s also about the experience for the person buying that perfect gift.” Regardless of occasion, budget or the recipients likes, Thomas said she is confident that she can help any shopper who walks through her door. Even with a budget of $10 and only a little information, Thomas said she can put together a great gift. But, it doesn’t end there. Thomas said the art of gifting is a process, which goes beyond picking out the gift. The presentation of the gift with creative, attractive wrapping, offered complimentary at the shop, is also important,

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Barb Thomas organizes a display in her new gift shop, Fort Thomas Central, opening later this month. AMANDA JOERING/COMMUNITY RECORDER

Thomas said. “People love when someone really spends the time and effort on their gift,” Thomas said. “It means so much more than a gift card and at the end of the day, a special gift goes a long way and creates a lot of smiles.” And gifts don’t always have to be for someone else, Thomas said, so shoppers can also count on Fort Thomas Central to find a gift for themselves or decorative items for their home. For Thomas, the art of gifting also includes giving back to the community, which she hopes to do through the services she will provide and the lounge area in the store where the community can come relax and enjoy gourmet pastries. Fort Thomas renaissance manager Debbie Buckley said the store will add something to the city’s cultural arts district in Towne Center. “Barb’s choice of merchandise is exciting, diverse and different than anything we have elsewhere,” Buckley said. “It’s going to be a place to find wonderful gifts, that special decorating item for your own home, fun jewelry items or just spend time with friends over pastry and tea.” Fort Thomas Central is having its grand opening Thursday, June 27.

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Some of the shop's baby items. AMANDA JOERING/COMMUNITY RECORDER

A display shows some of the decorative housewares and jewelry Fort Thomas Central has to offer. AMANDA JOERING/COMMUNITY RECORDER


SCHOOLS

JUNE 27, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • A11

COMMUNITY

RECORDER

Editor: Michelle Shaw, mshaw@nky.com, 578-1053

ACHIEVEMENTS | NEWS | ACTIVITIES | HONORS

CommunityPress.com

COLLEGE CORNER Awosika earns degree at Union

Maryann Awosika, of Cold Spring, was among the students who received degrees from Union University during the 188th annual spring commencement ceremony on the university’s Great Lawn in Jackson, Tenn. Awosika received a Doctor of Pharmacy degree.

Gateway pair honored

Brenda Campbell and Kay Hon were among three Gateway Community and Technical College employees who recently were recognized for outstanding performance at the Kentucky Community and Technical College System’s annual New Horizons conference. Campbell is manager of external education programs in the college’s workforce solutions division, a resident of Alexandria and is known by colleagues and clients as a detail-oriented, hands-on manager that provides exemplary service. Hon is an administrative assistant at the Edgewood Campus, lives in Southgate and serves Gateway students on a daily basis in the college’s Student Services Center and is often the first contact for students visiting the Advising Center, veterans or disability services.

Klocke earns college scholarship

Kristin Klocke, of Alexandria, was awarded a $5,000 four-year college scholarship from Catholic Order of Foresters headquartered in Naperville, Ill. A COF St. Joseph Court 2094 member and Bishop Brossart High School graduate, Klocke was co-valedictorian, a National Merit Scholar, a Kentucky Governor’s Scholar and National Honor Society secretary. She also participated in Spanish Honor Society, track and field, cross country, senior class play, cheerleading and academic team. She is the daughter of Dennis and Vicki Klocke, and plans to study premedicine (biology) at Thomas More College.

Local grad earns scholarship

Chelsea Weckbach, of Alexandria, was awarded a $5,000 four-year college scholarship from Catholic Order of Foresters headquartered in Naperville, Ill. A COF St. Mary Court 1967 member and Campbell County High School graduate, Weckbach was student council president, National Honor Society treasurer and spirit committee president. She is the daughter of Jeff and Brenda Weckbach, and plans to study occupational therapy at Eastern Kentucky University.

Gray named to dean’s list

Chandler Brooke Gray, of Alexandria, recently was named to the Spring 2013 dean’s list at Union College. The dean’s list at Union is comprised of undergraduates who have completed at least 15 hours of graded work with a 3.33 grade-point average, no grades of incomplete for the semester and no grades of C or below for the semester. Gray was one of 89 students who made the dean’s list at Union for the spring 2013 semester.

Wolfzorn named to ONU dean’s list

Brent M. Wolfzorn was named to the Ohio Northern University dean’s list for the Spring 2013 semester. He is the son of Tim and Linda Wolfzorn of Alexandria, and is a senior majoring in accounting. The dean’s list includes students who attain a grade-point average of 3.5 or better on a 4.0 grading system.

UK honors local students

The following students from Campbell County made the University of Kentucky dean’s list for the Fall 2012 semester: Aubrey Bankemper, Jacob Bartlett, Joshua Beckerich, Emily Beirne, Kelly Bergmann, Sarah Boden, Carter

Botto, David Braun, Grace Bree, David Broering, Allison Buchanan, Andrew Buchanan, Tyler Butsch, Anthony Cadle, Lydia Clark, David Corr, Cara Croley, Megan Daly, Dylan Dierig, Carmen Enzweiler, Eric Enzweiler, Jacob Ewing, Camille Farrell, Alyssa Federle, Alexandra Feiertag, Tyler Fennell, Chelsea Fischer, Emily Fischer, Derek Fox, Megan Freeman, James Frilling, Brian Gall, Robert Gearding, Anna Goetz, Megan Goetz, Nathaniel Goetz, David Greis, Chelsea Haas, Christina Heilman, Madison Held, Austin Hinkel, Gretchen Hinkel, Emily Hurtt, Taylor Infante, Morgan Jones, Benjamin Kinsella, Rachel Kintner, James Knochelmann II, Mallory Koehler, Kaelin Kovacik, Andrew Krebs, Tyler Lampe, Sarah Landwehr, Ryan Lauer, Natalie Laycock, Kara Lester, Maxwell Levine, Brett Lockman, Joseph Lohr, Andrew Long, Robert Louis, Emily Ludwig, Mary Martin, Margaret McMahon, Atlee Mitchell, Rachel Molique, Amanda Neal, Jessica Neiser, Ian Neises, Leah Neises, Brian Neltner, Rebecca Pangallo, Lisa Patterson, Emma Ploucha, Elisabeth Pomeroy, Andrew Poos, Anna Poston, Michael Rebholz, Maria Ritter, Maggie Rixson, Brandon Roller, Jenna Sapsford, Alexandra Schalk, David Schuler, Courtney Schultz, Jacob Schultz, Devon Shock, Alexandra Simons, Tyler Smith, Katharine Snyder, Laura Sparks, Ryan Stadtmiller, Ashley Stamper, Erica Steffen, Courtney Stone, Sarah Suedkamp, Rebekah Towles, Kimberly Trauth, Mary Turner, Christian Vara, Randall Vennemann, Chelsea Verst, Dominique Wade, Hailey Walters, Adam Weinel, Amanda Wharfield, Madalyn Wiedeman, Tyler Wilson, Jennifer Winbigler, Alex Wolfe, Nicole Wood, and Dana Youtsey. To qualify, a student must earn a grade-point average of 3.6 or higher and must have earned 12 credits or more in that semester, excluding credits earned in pass-fail classes.

Alexandria student honored

Hannah Mackensie DeJarnette, a junior from Alexandria, was named to the Campbellsville University dean’s academic honors list. The academic honors list recognizes students who achieve a grade point average of 3.5 or above for the semester with a course load of at least 12 hours.

Former Bellevue valedictorian graduates

Chelsea Webb Fischer recently graduated from the University of Kentucky, Magna Cum Laude with a Bachelor of Arts degree in secondary English education with a minor in English. Fischer also was a founding member of Alpha Phi Sorority at UK. She will attend the University of Kentucky’s MIC Program for secondary English education, with plans to graduate with a master’s degree in the spring of 2014. Fischer was the class of 2009 valedictorian of Bellevue High School. She is the daughter of Julie Webb Fischer and the granddaughter of Virgil and Dottie Webb.

Alexandria resident Jordan Racke, left, accepts a perfect attendance award on senior honors night at Campbell County High School Thursday, May 16. Racke will graduate as a member of the Class of 2013 with perfect attendance through all 13 years of his schooling since kindergarten. THANKS TO CONNIE POHLGEERS

Campbell Co. graduate never missed a minute ALEXANDRIA — Jordan Racke, of Alexandria, will graduate from Campbell County High School May 31 having never missed a day of class in 13 years. Wednesday, May 22, marked the last day of classes for Racke, and he sealed his perfect record by showing up. Racke said he didn’t set out to have perfect attendance, and was just lucky he was never sick in grade school. “When it got toward the end of middle school and beginning of high school and I hadn’t missed a day or been late, I thought why not go for it,” he said. Racke said scheduling dentist and doctor appointments outside of school hours kept him from missing class time. He said being on time to class was a priority, and he got where needed to be early, and was never late. “They say you’re supposed to be there, so I figured I’ve got to be there,” he said. Racke said he thinks perfect attendance for 13 years will be good to put on a resume, and shows he is responsible. It’s also a fun personal achievement, and it’s something Racke said he’s never heard of anyone else doing. “I figured I could be one of the few that’s done it,” he said. Racke will study sports management, and play on the bowling team at Morehead State University this fall.

Michael Florimonte, business and marketing teacher at the high school, said there are many special students walking the halls, but Racke is extraordinary. “He’s just a very special person,” Florimonte said. “His work ethic is just unmatched.” Racke also gives extra outside of class, and was one of the students leading the donation drive for art teacher Nick Schoening, who is battling leukemia. Florimonte said he also oversees the school’s Camel Store, where Racke has been very involved. Between 70 to 90 students apply to be one of 16 students picked to work in the store, he said. The store sells prom tickets, spirit wear, and other merchandise, and proceeds benefit programs for all students, Florimonte said. Racke never missed an opportunity to volunteer or help with any club he was involved in unless it might cause a conflict. When a fundraiser for the student group (Distribution Education Clubs of America) happened during the day, Racke had only one request, Florimonte said. “The first thing he said was ‘Hey, make sure this is excused,’” Florimonte said. “He was really committed.”

DISTRICT OF DISTINCTION

Cold Spring student earns honors

Demetria Michael, of Cold Spring, made the dean’s list at Bellarmine University for the spring semester. The summer she is doing an internship at the University of Kentucky in molecular biology, which is her major. Michael is a Campbell County High School graduate.

Locals make dean’s list

Several local students were named to the Western Kentucky University dean’s list for the spring semester. Alexandria: Rachael Fusting, Kyra Hichman and Gretchen Walch Fort Thomas: Elizabeth Geiman, Benjamin Conniff, Alexandra Beckmeyer, Marlee Barton and Taylor Leighty Students making the dean’s list have a grade-point average of 3.4 to 3.79 on a 4.0 scale.

Fort Thomas Independent School District was recognized as a District of Distinction during the Kentucky Board of Education meeting in Frankfort. Pictured are board chairman David Karem, Fort Thomas Board of Education chairwoman Karen Allen, superintendent Gene Kirchner and commissioner of education Terry Holliday. THANKS TO AMY WALLOT


SPORTS

A12 • CCF RECORDER • JUNE 27, 2013

Editor: Melanie Laughman, mlaughman@communitypress.com, 513-248-7573

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | RECREATIONAL

COMMUNITY

RECORDER

CommunityPress.com

The 2013 Campbell County/Campbell Community Recorder Sportswoman of the Year is Maddie Blevins. THANKS TO THE BLEVINS FAMILY

Bellevue’s belle excels at all By Adam Turer presspreps@gmail.com

Not many high school athletes have an award named after them before they graduate. Then again, not many student-athletes do as much for their school as Maddie Blevins did for Bellevue High School. She was the school’s valedictorian, prom queen, captain of the softball team, and the entire girls cross country team. Maddie Blevins represented Bellevue to the fullest. That’s why Blevins is the 2013 Campbell County/ Campbell Community Recorder Sportswoman of the Year. She received a pair of Cincinnati Reds tickets courtesy of the team. Blevins played varsity softball since seventh grade and set many school records. She ran cross country from 10th to 12th grade and as a senior, was the Tigers’ only female runner. She was also the secretary of the student council, class president her junior and senior year, National Honor Society member catch your breath - Student Tech Leadership Program president, student liaison to the board of education, academic team and member of the Fellowship of Christian Athletes. “Maddie Blevins has excelled at every endeavor she has taken on. She is what every parent envisions their child growing up to be,” Bellevue assistant principal Dave Pelgen said. “Maddie’s desire to achieve in and out of the classroom has placed her head and shoulders above her peers.” In addition to her many contributions within the school, Blevins also contributes in the Bellevue and Greater Cincinnati community. She volunteers at the Cincinnati Zoo, the Hoxworth Blood Drive, the Flying Pig marathon, and with Redbird Missions. She is known and respected throughout the community. “With Bellevue being such a small school, you get to know everybody and you get to know the community more,” said Blevins. “(Volunteering) is infectious.” Maddie has always been a leader and took advantage of the many leadership opportunities presented during her time at Bellevue. She made sure that she did everything she could to raise the bar for her classmates and community. “The ability to try to help made me want to get into leadership positions,” she said. “I wanted to have not just my voice, but the voices of my peers heard.” She was the only senior on the softball team this year. The program announced at its end of season awards banquet that the Tigers MVP award would henceforth be known as the Maddie Blevins MVP award. Maddie will return to the awards ceremony each year to present future winners with the award. She will forever be a Bellevue Tiger, and the school could not be more proud to welcome her back each year with open arms. “Maddie will be dearly missed at Bellevue High School,” said Pergen. “Not only is she the model student, but she is genuinely a well-rounded person. Maddie will be missed most for her friendly personality and contagious

The 2013 Campbell County and Campbell Community Recorder Sportsman of the Year is Colin Dupont of Newport Central Catholic. THANKS TO WAYNE LITTMER AND THE DUPONT FAMILY

Sportsman DuPont rolls with the changes By Adam Turer

presspreps@gmail.com

The 2013 Campbell County/Campbell Community Recorder Sportswoman of the Year Maddie Blevins receives a hug from her mom, Elizabeth. THANKS TO THE BLEVINS FAMILY

THE BLEVINS FILE Favorite food - Crab Cakes Favorite song - Invincible by Muse Favorite book - The Kite Runner by Khlaed Hosseini Favorite movie - A Christmas Story Favorite school subject - Environmental Science Favorite pro athlete - Clay Matthews Favorite TV show - The Nanny Best concert you’ve seen - Any Muse concert Favorite vacation destination Gatlinburg, Tenn., and Blue Mountain Beach, Fla. Best advice you received - “Good integrity is marked by what you do when no one is watching.”

smile that were well known throughout the school.” Coaches, teachers, administrators, and even her own parents are in awe of Maddie and her many accomplishments. Blevins, who will study ecology at Northern Kentucky University, overachieved in high school. But, you wouldn’t know that by asking her. “I am impressed by her,” said her mother, Elizabeth Blevins. “When she puts her mind to something, she does it. A lot of people look up to her.” If you know Maddie Blevins, you can count on Maddie Blevins. She built relationships with her peers, with her young teammates, with her coaches, and with school and district administrators. She was able to lead many distinctly different groups. She was the star athlete, the top class representative, a leader of religious and technology groups. What enabled Maddie to achieve so much and impact so many lives was her pure enjoyment of what she was doing. “Her contributions to the community go beyond being an example for other students,” said Pergen. “She has participated in various volunteer opportunities not for the accolades but for the enjoyment it brings to others.” While many are quick to heap praise and show gratitude toward Maddie for all of her selfless endeavors, Maddie feels that she is the one who benefited from maximizing her high school experience. For the many underclassmen who look up to her, she offers these words of wisdom: “Push yourself. You will always surprise yourself and leave a lasting impact on those around you.”

Colin DuPont doesn’t just accept big changes in his life. He has shown time and again that he does more than adapt — he thrives in uncharted territory. Whether it is changing schools, changing sports, or suddenly becoming a big brother to six children, Colin DuPont has handled change with grace, and is the 2013 Campbell County/Campbell Community Recorder Sportsman of the Year. He received a pair of Cincinnati Reds tickets courtesy of the club. DuPont played three varsity sports at Newport Central Catholic, excelling in golf and providing valuable contributions in basketball and baseball. In addition to his year-round athletic success, DuPont also excelled in the classroom and the community. He was on the honor roll all four years of high school. “He’s the type of kid that really loves sports and has a passion for the game,” said Jeff Schulkens, NewCath’s golf and baseball coach. “Colin is a pretty quiet kid, but he leads by example.” He wasn’t always destined to be a three-sport athlete and star golfer. In fact, it wasn’t until ninth grade that DuPont began to take golf seriously. Colin grew up in the Highlands school district, and was in line to follow in his father’s footsteps at Highlands High School. He played football and was an excellent middle school quarterback. Many thought he would follow in the long line of successful Bluebirds quarterbacks. But he had a change of heart. Prior to his freshman year of high school, DuPont wrote a letter to his father, letting him know that his heart just wasn’t committed to football and that he instead wanted to try varsity golf. He also talked to his parents about enrolling at NewCath, rather than at Highlands. Colin felt that his personality better fit the small school environment. It was possibly the best decision he made. “At the end of the day, that was the best thing that could have happened to him,” said his mother, Julie DuPont. “He wanted to be a small school kid and play three sports.” Despite all of his accomplishments, DuPont remains humble. He won the Thoroughbred award at the end of the basketball season. He earned golfer of the year honors in the Eighth Region from the Kentucky Golf Coaches Association. He was named the winner of the prestigious Walter J. McGaff award, presented to NewCath’s outstanding male student athlete. Most of his awards came as a surprise to his parents; Colin was never one to boast. “He has always been a quiet, eventempered kid,” said Julie. “He’s competitive when it comes to sports, but he has always been a subtle leader.” Colin will play golf next year for Marian University in Indianapolis, on an athletic and academic scholarship.

The DuPont family includes mom Julie, dad Chris, Colin and sister Cecily. Colin DuPont is the 2013 Campbell County/Campbell Community Sportsman of the Year. THANKS TO THE DUPONT FAMILY

THE DUPONT FILE What's your favorite food - Tacos Favorite song - “Now it’s over” by Chief Keef Favorite book - The Outsiders Favorite movie - Tommy Boy Favorite school subject - Math Favorite pro athlete - Brandon Phillips Favorite TV show - Fresh Prince of Belair Best concert you've seen - Wiz Khalifa Favorite vacation destination Punta Cana, Dominican Republic Best advice you ever received “Shoot for the moon because if you fail you'll still land in the stars”

Four years ago, he did not dream of becoming a collegiate golfer. He put in the extra work to take his game to the next level. At the same time, he did not compromise his efforts in his other sports. He did not play summer baseball prior to his senior year in order to focus on improving his golf game. “That helped his golf, but it didn’t hurt his baseball,” said Schulkens. “I saw his maturity grow from his junior year to his senior year. You really could see his improvement in how to handle adversity.” Colin also handled adversity at home. His family adopted six children from a family friend prior to Colin’s senior year. He went from being the only child at home (his older sister is in college) to being a role model and big brother to six kids, including four boys. “Those young boys worship the ground Colin walks on,” said Julie. “Colin really showed his character (around his new siblings). He’s just a good kid who has a really good heart.” DuPont also made an impact outside of school. The summer before his senior year, the family went on a 10-day mission trip to Belize, and Colin helped build a kitchen for a local school, build houses, and teach Vacation Bible School. The trip was a life-changing event for him, Julie said. “It was all a fun, enjoyable ride,” said Colin. “You have to live up every minute. It goes by pretty fast.”


VIEWPOINTS

JUNE 27, 2013 • CAMBELL COUNTY RECORDER • A13

COMMUNITY

RECORDER

Editor: Michelle Shaw, mshaw@nky.com, 578-1053

EDITORIALS | LETTERS | COLUMNS | CH@TROOM

CommunityPress.com

Confessions of a reluctant runner

I don’t know if anyone has ever told you this before, but running is awful. I have never been tempted to go running because, well, have you ever seen someone mid-sprint? They never look like they’re having fun, no matter what great results they seem to achieve. At least, that’s what I used to think. Over the Memorial Day weekend, as I was contentedly sleeping in and wallowing in sloth, my boyfriend Quincy suggested that maybe, hey, you know, we should go for a run. And I thought, Becky Halter COMMUNITY PRESS “Hm. It seems possible. MayGUEST COLUMNIST be we should go for a run.” Because I am naturally averse to exertion, I didn’t have any official exercise garb. I put on what can only be described as the World’s Homeliest Sneakers, purchased at a discount outlet some years ago, and the sartorial equivalent of plastic foot alligators. Because I apparently have never bothered to procure white gym socks, they were topped off by pink-lavender knee socks, alluringly scrunched down my ankles à la a Hooter’s waitress. I didn’t want to perspire on my cellphone, so I strapped on a plastic wristwatch. Jane Fonda would have been proud. Quincy rewarded me with an almost-convincing, “Oh. Wow. Um, you look fine, doll.” For me, the only thing worse than sore muscles is wounded pride. I was about to

have both. We arrived at a bucolic walking trail and started with some demoralizing warm-up stretches. Because Quincy has an athletic past, he showed me the ropes. My abs got a great workout laughing at ridiculous-looking lunges, teetering hamstring stretches and torso contortions. Touching my toes in my yoga clothes in public with an enthusiastic man and plethora of ‘80s accessories, I learned my first and possibly most important lesson about running: You can’t be afraid to look stupid. Running is like singing karaoke: You don’t have to do it well to have a good experience. After an appropriate amount of sidewalk silliness, Quincy and I walked for maybe a half a mile, finally amping up to a slowish run-jog. I immediately wanted to die. I had full-on heart-pounding, snot-flowing, head-throbbing misery, down to the horrific gasping sounds and flailing limbs. After what seemed like seven hours (probably closer to two minutes), we decelerated back to a walk. Quincy grinned and said, “Good job!” That moment was my second epiphany: Running is only possible for me with an enthusiastic cheerleader/taskmaster. For the entire five-mile loop, Quincy took me to task with equal measures discipline and adoration, pushing me to run more than I ever thought possible (or desirable) and then following up with lavish praise. I survived an hour of in-

I learned my first and possibly most important lesson about running: You can’t be afraid to look stupid. Running is like singing karaoke: You don’t have to do it well to have a good experience. THANKS TO BECKY HALTERMON

termittent running and walking and while I would never characterize it as “fun,” I noticed an unsettling trend: It seemed to get easier and less death-inducing with each sprint. Yes, I was pooped at the end but I was also in a somewhat delirious state. Just moments prior I had assumed that I would have to be buried beside a trail in unbecoming clothing, and I ended up skipping to the car in a haze of achievement. Epiphany No. 3: Running can be awesome. So if you see someone slogging along through Union looking like an escapee from Sweatin’ to the Oldies, I may not look like I’m having fun, but I’m on my way to feeling awesome. Becky Haltermon is a nonprofit communication professional and fashion blogger at thefrump.com.

Without any official exercise garb, the author put on what can only be described as the World’s Homeliest Sneakers, purchased at a discount outlet some years ago. THANKS TO BECKY HALTERMON

LETTER TO THE EDITOR Community service needed

As a member and officer in two of the service organizations in Campbell County, I’m concerned about the demise of such clubs. A few years ago there were Lions clubs in Bellevue, Dayton, Newport and Cold Spring. Currently, there are two in Fort Thomas and Alexandria. These attempt to serve about 90 percent of the county. Rotary also was much stronger, have clubs in Fort Thomas, Newport, Bellevue and Southgate. Currently, there is one - Campbell County Rotary and it will probably turn its charter into the international organization within weeks. Organizations such as these need to attract members. They cannot thrive on 12 or 13, with only five or six taking active roles. They provide needed roles in the community. Lions is known for its help with eye sight. Rotary is active with several community service func-

Members of the KY Krushers Fastpitch team participated in Campbell County’s Trash for Cash program. THANKS TO LAURA BIHL

tions, many times helping other organizations. Being small, these organizations when approaching prospective members they hear, “You are too small.” Do only numbers mean something? But if that person and the next join, the clubs are larger. They can only expand when someone gets

CAMPBELL

COUNTY RECORDER

A publication of

active. They can only conduct fund-raising functions, which are a necessity, by having individuals to carry them out. Another argument heard was, “We only go for the big bang.” Think about it. The big bang is one major project in a community, such as a park in the inner city. It gets great news

coverage for a couple days. What happens when that business works with the local food service organizations? Children get backpacks, shoes, food, clothing, etc. Food banks are filled. Homeless are fed. Potential customers are getting the help they need. And, for a business, a person from that business is seen out in the community. Each organization’s members help determine what is needed. Therefore, more members, more community vision. Campbell County Rotary is in need of immediate growth. It will meet on Wednesday, July 17, for lunch at noon at Highland Country Club, which could be its final meeting. Rotary normally attracts local business and professional men and women, but anyone is welcome to join. Alexandria Lions would also like new faces. It meets the fourth Tuesday of each month at Cold Spring Barleycorns at 6:30 p.m. Look into these and other organizations - K of C, Kiwanis, VETS, etc. All will welcome

228 Grandview Drive, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017 654 Highland Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075 phone: 283-0404 email: kynews@communitypress.com web site: www.nky.com

you.

Arnd Rehfuss President of the Campbell County Rotary

Krushers collect trash

The experience we gained in participating in the Trash for Cash litter program was very rewarding for our team. The group covered 10 miles which included a total of 16 participants. We grouped the participants together with about five to a group and spread them out covering the 10 miles on both sides of the roadway. We found many beer bottles and beer cans and also a storage container that had fruits and vegetables in it. One of our participants even found a one dollar bill! We would like to tell our neighbors to please respect our community and dispose of trash properly in cans or bins. Thanks again for the experience!

Laura Bihl Newport, KY Krushers Fastpitch

Campbell County Editor Michelle Shaw mshaw@nky.com, 578-1053 Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday See page A2 for additional contact information.


NEWS

A14 • CCF RECORDER • JUNE 27, 2013

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THURSDAY, JUNE 27, 2013

LIFE

COMMUNITY RECORDER

PEOPLE | IDEAS | RECIPES

Brighton Center volunteer Tracy Rouse, left, of Independence, stacks a crate of freshly-picked onions onto a cart as Madison Smith, far right, carries in more onions during a harvest day at The Giving Fields in Melbourne. CHRIS MAYHEW/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Freestore harvests Giving Fields to meet local needs VIDEO: Watch video of some of the crops being harvested for local food pantries at The Giving Fields in Melbourne at www.Nky.com.

By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

MELBOURNE — People seeking food assistance through the Brighton Center in Newport will soon taste the bounty of some of the fresh produce hand picked June 20 at The Giving Fields in Melbourne. The Giving Fields, in its third year of operation, is a program of The Freestore Foodbank. Teams of Brighton Center and Liberty Mutual employees volunteered to pick the latest crops including kale, Swiss chard and broccoli. Most of the fresh produce picked June 20 is going to Northern Kentucky partner agencies including Brighton Center, said Freestore Foodbank President and CEO Kurt L. Reiber. The Freestore is preparing to harvest 200,000 pounds of fresh fruits and vegetables at the fields this year. In the first year of the fields, 65,000 pounds of produce was harvested, and it was a learning process about the farming program and volunteers, Reiber said. “Last year we were able to generate and harvest 175,000 pounds of fresh produce, and that supported 12 food pantries right here in Northern Kentucky,” he said. Impressive, because volunteers, the community and corporate support all came out,

From left, members of the Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber's Leadership Cincinnati Class for 2013 kneel next to a fresh harvest of produce at the The Giving Fields in Melbourne June 20. The Giving Fields is one of the leadership classes' projects for 2013. From left are Roger Newport, vice president chief financial officer for AK Steel; Meghan Glynn, director of government relations and public affairs for Calfee Strategic Solutions LLC;Freestore Foodbank President and CEO Kurt L. Reiber, and Matt Davis, vice president of government affairs for the regional chamber and Jamie Smith, Cincinnati Business Courier publisher. CHRIS MAYHEW/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Reiber said. “Everyone really rallied around bringing fresh produce into the homes of our hungry neighbors in need,” he said. Molly Woods, the Freestore’s farm manager, said this year’s crops also include onions, green beans, peppers, eggplant, tomatoes and cucumbers. New crops planted this year include sweet potatoes and grapes, Woods said. Raised herb

garden boxes will also provide people with limited mobility who are interested in volunteering a way to help, she said. Among the nine people volunteering with the June 20 harvest from the Brighton Center were Lauren Copeland, family center coordinator, and Beth Hodge, manager of volunteer donations. Brighton Center volunteers come the first and third Tues-

day and Thursday during the growing season to work on the farm, Copeland said. People receiving the produce know Brighton Center helped pick it and it’s coming from Campbell County, she said. The produce offers a wider variety than is available in canned goods given to them, Copeland said. “And it also teaches families how to provide healthier meals,” she said. “It’s a lot about education to our families who don’t always have access to fresh fruit or fresh vegetables.” Some people don’t know how to prepare the fresh produce, and Brighton Center offers instruction and ideas of how to add it in meals, Copeland said. It’s a wonderful experience for staff or volunteers from Brighton Center to harvest the food themselves, Hodge said. “And it’s literally going from the fields straight to the center and ultimately to people’s tables,” Hodge said. “And you can’t get much fresher than that, so it’s pretty neat.” For information about the Freestore Foodbank and how to donate to or volunteer at The Giving Fields visit http://fsfbmedia.org/.

Freestore Foodbank President and CEO Kurt L. Reiber was joined by fellow members of the Leadership Cincinnati Class of 2013 at The Giving Fields in Melbourne. “Our class chose this as a class project to try to take us to the next level,” said Roger Newport, vice president and chief financial officer for the AK Steel Corporation. Newport is one of the chairs of the 11-member team working on the Class’ Development, Expansion and Sustainability project to expand the Giving Fields concept and make it sustainable long-term. A 12-page overview of the goals and progress on the project talks about how this year’s Class helped develop a formal business modelto help create a successful model. The plan is available online at http://bit.ly/givefieldsplan. The goal for a future Leadership Cincinnati class is creating another Giving Fields in the Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky region. “Our team believed it made sense to help Kurt and the Freestore Foodbank team to fill a basic need - nourishment,” Newport said. “People in the communities where we live can’t learn if they are hungry and can’t be productive at work if they haven’t eaten. The Giving Fields helps to address this great need in our region and in a sustainable and healthy manner.”


B2 • CCF RECORDER • JUNE 27, 2013

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD FRIDAY, JUNE 28 Attractions Summer Family Discount Hours, 4-7 p.m., Newport Aquarium, Newport on the Levee, Free admission for up to two children ages 12 and under with each full-paying adult. Strollers welcome. Included with admission: $18.95, $11.95 ages 2-12. Through Aug. 30. 859-2617444; www.newportaquarium.com. Newport.

Benefits Red Pink and Blue with Cincy Chic, 7-10 p.m., Purple People Bridge, Pete Rose Way, Cincinnati; Third Street, Newport, Women’s awareness event for heart, breast and diabetes health. Includes access into event, front row seat along runway and swag bag. Benefits American Heart Association, Pink Ribbon Girls and the American Diabetes Association. $10. Registration required. Presented by Cincy Chic. 513-675-3586; 2013rpb.eventbrite.com. Newport.

Cruises Pirates of the Ohio Cruise, 3 p.m.-4:30 p.m., BB Riverboats Newport Landing, 101 Riverboat Row, Afternoon cruise with games for entire family. Children receive free pirate hat, eye patch and treasure map. $16. Reservations required. Presented by BB Riverboats. 859-2618500; www.bbriverboats.com. Newport.

Fireworks will be a big part of many Fourth of July celebrations this week, including the Union Celebrates America Parade and Fireworks, 7-10:30 p.m., Friday, June 28., at the Union Community Building, 10087 Old Union Road. FILE PHOTO

Dining Events Christian Moerlein Beer and BBQ Cruise, 7:30-10 p.m., BB Riverboats Newport Landing, 101 Riverboat Row, Tasting of Christian Moerlein beer samples and buffet featuring brisket, chicken and pulled pork. Music by local band. Member of Christian Moerlein team directing tasting and talking about history of brewery. Ages 21 and up. $55. Reservations required. Presented by BB Riverboats. 859-261-8500; www.bbriverboats.com. Newport.

Drink Tastings Friday Night in the Aisles Wine Tasting, 4-8 p.m., Party Source, 95 Riviera Drive, Flight of four wines, free of charge. Ages 21 and up. 859-291-4007; www.thepartysource.com. Bellevue.

Exhibits Northern Kentucky Music Legends, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, 1600 Montague Road, Highlights performers, bands, DJs, composers, lyricists and other musical artists from Northern Kentucky who have spent 20-plus years sharing love of music with the public. Included with admission. 859-491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

Music - Rock Spin Cycle, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., JerZee’s Pub and Grub, 708 Monmouth St., Free. 859-491-3500. Newport.

SATURDAY, JUNE 29 Art Events Art Show and Open House, 1-6 p.m., Wood Hudson Cancer Research Laboratory, 931 Isabella St., Artists Sara Hamel and Nancy Pendery, among others, have paintings on display and available for purchase. Other prints and photographs also on display and available for purchase. Silent auction held for Mary Bunning piece. Tours of laboratory. Free admission. 859-581-7249. Newport.

Attractions Summer Family Discount Hours, 4-7 p.m., Newport Aquarium, Included with admission: $18.95, $11.95 ages 2-12. 859-261-7444; www.newportaquarium.com. Newport.

Farmers Market Newport Farmers’ Market, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., Historic Newport Business District, Monmouth Street, Held at 709 Monmouth St. in city parking lot adjacent to Pepper Pod Restaurant. Homegrown fruits, vegetables and annual and perennial flowers. Presented by City of Newport. 859-292-3666. Newport.

ABOUT CALENDAR

The Suits That Rock, Swimsuits: Songs of Summer concert is 8 p.m. Saturday, June 29, at the Carnegie, 1028 Scott Blvd. in Covington. THANKS TO SARA JACKSON view blooms, horses and historic barn. Bring camera. Choose from hundreds of varieties of daylilies to take home and plant in your own garden. Free admission. 859-635-7845; arrasmithfarm.com. Melbourne.

Holiday - Independence Day Fort Thomas Cornhole Tournament and Independence Celebration, 4-7 p.m., Tower Park, 950 S. Fort Thomas Ave., Holeplay (Round Robin): teams play 3-4 games in holeplay based on participation. Random placement in holeplay groupings. Teams with two or more wins in holeplay advance to single elimination bracket. Other activities: Fort Thomas Car Show, music and fireworks show. Cornhole: $50, $30 advance per team of two. Presented by American Cornhole, LLC. 513-965-8687; www.americancornhole.com. Fort Thomas.

Music - Benefits Suits That Rock, 8 p.m. SwimSuits: The Songs of Summer. Doors open 7 p.m., The Carnegie, 1028 Scott Blvd., More than 40 professionals and executives perform. Dinner by-thebite, cash bar and dancing encouraged. Post-show unplugged with commemorative mug in the Ohio National Financial Services Gallery. Benefits Carnegie’s Eva G. Farris Education Center. $75 orchestra, $50 mezzanine. Reservations required. 859-957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

Music - Concerts Fort Thomas Summer Series, 7 p.m. Soul Pocket., Tower Park, 950 S. Fort Thomas Ave., Amphitheater. Bring seating. Rain moves concert to community center. Free. Presented by Fort Thomas Recreation Department. 859-781-1700; www.ftthomas.org. Fort Thomas.

Music - Pop HoneyCombs, 7 p.m.-2 a.m., The Thompson House, 24 E. Third St., $8. 859-261-7469; www.thompsonhousenewport.com. Newport.

Garden Shows

Music - Rock

Daylily Sale, 8 a.m.-5 p.m., Arrasmith Farm, 3595 Fender Road, Stroll through gardens to

Cherry On Top, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., JerZee’s Pub and Grub, 708 Monmouth St., Free. 859-4913500. Newport.

Crown Me King, 7 p.m.-2 a.m., The Thompson House, 24 E. Third St., $8. 859-261-7469; www.thompsonhousenewport.com. Newport. Hardcore Ritual, 7 p.m.-2 a.m., The Thompson House, 24 E. Third St., $8. 859-261-7469; www.thompsonhousenewport.com. Newport. Emula, 7 p.m.-2 a.m., The Thompson House, 24 E. Third St., $8. 859-261-7469; www.thompsonhousenewport.com. Newport. Ley Lines, 7 p.m.-2 a.m., The Thompson House, 24 E. Third St., $8. 859-261-7469; www.thompsonhousenewport.com. Newport. Public Chapman, 7 p.m.-2 a.m., The Thompson House, 24 E. Third St., $8. 859-261-7469; www.thompsonhousenewport.com. Newport. Soulsik, 7 p.m.-2 a.m., The Thompson House, 24 E. Third St., $8. 859-261-7469; www.thompsonhousenewport.com. Newport.

Shopping Carmel Manor Flea Market, 8 a.m.-4 p.m., Carmel Manor, 100 Carmel Manor Road, Furniture, crafting supplies, clothes, plastic canvas, electronics, housewares, collectibles, paintings, bedding supplies, knick-knacks, books and more. Hot dog, chips and drink: $2. Bake sale. Rain or shine. Benefits Carmel Manor Nursing Home. Free admission. 859-781-5111, ext. 231. Fort Thomas.

Sports-Registrations & Tryouts Campbell County Pee Wee Open Registration, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Highland Heights Civic Center, 175 Johns Hill Road, Last chance to pre-register for Campbell County Pee Wee Football and Cheer before season starts July 15. Presented by Campbell County Pee Wee Football and Cheer. 859-957-3335; www.ccpeewee.com. Highland Heights.

SUNDAY, JUNE 30 Art Events Art Show and Open House, 1-6 p.m., Wood Hudson Cancer Research Laboratory, Free admission. 859-581-7249. Newport.

Madcap Puppets in the Park perform 7 p.m. Saturday, June 29, at the Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, in Burlington. FILE PHOTO Attractions Summer Family Discount Hours, 4-7 p.m., Newport Aquarium, Included with admission: $18.95, $11.95 ages 2-12. 859-261-7444; www.newportaquarium.com. Newport.

Karaoke and Open Mic DJ-led Karaoke, 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m., Miller’s Fill Inn, 52 Donnermeyer Drive, All domestic beers: $2. Special prices on well liquors. Ages 21 and up. Free. 859-4313455; www.facebook.com/ millers.fillin. Bellevue.

MONDAY, JULY 1 Attractions Summer Family Discount Hours, 4-7 p.m., Newport Aquarium, Included with admission: $18.95, $11.95 ages 2-12. 859-261-7444; www.newportaquarium.com. Newport.

Civic Campbell County Conservation District Meeting, 9-10:30 a.m., Campbell County Conservation District, 8351 E. Main St., Suite 104, Suite 104. Public encouraged to attend. 859-6359587; http://home.fuse.net/ campbellcd. Alexandria.

Films AMC Summer Nights, 10 p.m. “Django Unchained.”, AMC Newport On The Levee 20, One Levee Way, Suite 4100, Eightweek program to view blockbuster movies and benefit several charities. Benefits Will Rogers Institute, Autism Society of America and Autism Speaks. $3. 859-261-6795; www.amctheatres.com/summermovienights. Newport.

Karaoke and Open Mic Open Mic, 9 p.m.-2 a.m., The Southgate House Revival, 111 E. Sixth St., The Lounge. Awardwinning open mic features singer-songwriters, comedians, marimba players, storytellers and more. Ages 21 and up. 859-431-2201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport.

TUESDAY, JULY 2 Attractions Summer Family Discount Hours, 4-7 p.m., Newport Aquarium, Included with admis-

To submit calendar items, go to www.NKY.com and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to life@ communitypress.com along with event information. Items are printed on a spaceavailable basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to www.NKY.com and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page.

theatres.com/summermovienights. Newport.

Holiday - Independence Day Cruise to Coney Island, 6:3011:30 p.m., BB Riverboats Newport Landing, 101 Riverboat Row, Celebrate nation’s birthday with all-American picnic on cruise to Coney Island. Upon arrival, host of holiday festivities await at Larosa’s Balloon Glow featuring more than 30 hot and cold air balloons, entertainment and grand finale fireworks display. $55. Reservations required. Presented by BB Riverboats. 859-261-8500; www.bbriverboats.com. Newport.

Karaoke and Open Mic sion: $18.95, $11.95 ages 2-12. 859-261-7444; www.newportaquarium.com. Newport.

Clubs & Organizations Triangle Toastmasters Meeting, 7-8:30 p.m., Campbell County Fiscal Court, 1098 Monmouth St., Become a confident, more effective speaker. Free. Presented by Triangle Toastmasters. 859-652-3348; triangle.toastmastersclubs.org. Newport.

Exercise Classes Cardio Dance Party!, 7:30-8:30 p.m., Locomotion on the Levee, 1 Levee Way, $10 drop-in. Presented by Cardio Dance Party. 513-617-9498; www.cardiodanceparty.com. Newport.

Films AMC Summer Nights, 10 p.m. “Django Unchained.”, AMC Newport On The Levee 20, $3. 859-261-6795; www.amctheatres.com/summermovienights. Newport.

Music - DJ Devout Wax, 8 p.m.-1:30 a.m., The Southgate House Revival, 111 E. Sixth St., The Lounge. Vinyl night. Margaret and Jonathan spin eclectic wax. Including an all spin-by-request set, bring your own records. Also, local/regional-only set. Ages 21 and up. Free. 859-4312201; www.facebook.com/ DevoutWax. Newport.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 3 Attractions Summer Family Discount Hours, 4-7 p.m., Newport Aquarium, Included with admission: $18.95, $11.95 ages 2-12. 859-261-7444; www.newportaquarium.com. Newport.

DJ-led Karaoke, 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m., Miller’s Fill Inn, Free. 859-431-3455; www.facebook.com/millers.fillin. Bellevue.

Music - Rock Face Full of Chicken, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., JerZee’s Pub and Grub, 708 Monmouth St., Free. 859-4913500. Newport.

THURSDAY, JULY 4 Attractions Summer Family Discount Hours, 4-7 p.m., Newport Aquarium, Included with admission: $18.95, $11.95 ages 2-12. 859-261-7444; www.newportaquarium.com. Newport.

Exercise Classes Cardio Dance Party!, 7:30-8:30 p.m., Locomotion on the Levee, $10 drop-in. 513-617-9498; www.cardiodanceparty.com. Newport.

Music - Blues Live Blues Jam, 7:30-11:30 p.m., Miller’s Fill Inn, 52 Donnermeyer Drive, Free. 859-431-3455; www.facebook.com/millers.fillin. Bellevue.

Music - Country Original Hillbilly Thursdays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m., The Southgate House Revival, 111 E. Sixth St., The Lounge. Country, bluegrass, Americana and old fashioned hillbilly music. Different artist each week. Includes 50 cents off Jack Daniels. Ages 21 and up. Free. 859-431-2201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport.

Music - World Alpen Echos, 7:30-11 p.m., Hofbrauhaus, 200 E. Third St., Free. 859-491-7200; www.hofbrauhausnewport.com. Newport.

Exhibits

Recreation

Northern Kentucky Music Legends, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, Included with admission. 859491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

Aerial Fitness, 6-7 p.m., Locomotion on the Levee, 1 Levee Way, Work on core body strength and endurance and use aerial equipment for workout. Rigorous course suitable for all fitness levels. Ages 18 and up. $15. Presented by Cincinnati Circus Company. 513-921-5454; www.cincinnaticircus.com. Newport.

Films AMC Summer Nights, 10 p.m. “Django Unchained.”, AMC Newport On The Levee 20, $3. 859-261-6795; www.amc-


LIFE

JUNE 27, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • B3

Celebrate summer with tomato appetizer, preserves I opened my freezer yesterday and had to laugh. Nestled among the organic mango slices, edamame, homemade baby food and hibiscus mint syrup were a giant box Rita of storeHeikenfeld bought Popsicles RITA’S KITCHEN in every shade of the rainbow, three Kit Kat candy bars and five Baby Ruths. Well, I guess that’s called balance.

16 oz. refrigerated crescent rolls 16 oz. cream cheese, softened Zest of 1 lemon 2 eggs 1 clove garlic, minced 14 oz. can artichoke hearts in water, drained and finely chopped 1 cup Parmesan cheese, divided 2 plum tomatoes, sliced 2 tablespoons fresh parsley 1 ⁄2 teaspoon coarsely ground black pepper

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Unroll crescent rolls, press the seams to fit 9-inch by 13-inch or jellyroll pan, and press the rolls up the sides just a bit if you can. Bake 10-12 min or until light golden brown. Remove from oven, let cool. Mix cream cheese, zest lemon, eggs, garlic, artichokes and 1⁄2 cup Parmesan cheese. Spread over crust, and then arrange tomato slices over filling. Combine 1⁄2 cup cheese, parsley and black pepper in small bowl and sprinkle evenly over filling. Bake 25-30 min or until light golden brown and set. Cool 10 minutes, cut into 12 squares and cut each square in half diagonally. Makes about 24 appetizers.

Aunt Margaret’s classic tomato preserves I may have hit upon something unique here. After I published the classic strawberry jam recipe, I received several inquiries about other classic/put-up preserves and jams, so I will be sharing those heirloom recipes as we go into summer. One request was from Lana, a Florence reader who said “My grandma made tomato preserves with a lemon wedge in every jar. There was no cinnamon, just sugar, lemon and tomatoes. No one seems to have a recipe for it.” Well, guess what, Lana. I do and it’s from

If you like, add 1 tablespoon mixed pickling spices and 1⁄2-inch piece fresh gingerroot tied in cheesecloth or in a tea ball and add with the sugar, lemon and water. Remove after you let the preserves stand in cool place. Or add a piece of cinnamon stick to each jar before sealing. You can use green tomatoes if you like. Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator and author. Find her blog online at Cincinnati.Com/blogs. Email her at columns@communitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-248-7130, ext. 356.

Rita shares her Aunt Margaret’s recipe for tomato preserves with a touch of lemon. THANKS TO RITA HEIKENFELD.

my sweet Aunt Margaret, who we call our second mom. Aunt Margaret makes tomato preserves like Lana’s grandmom. Aunt Margaret goes to taste on most things, but I did nail down this recipe with her last year when she gifted me with a jar. 11⁄2 quarts peeled, small yellow or red tomatoes (about 2 pounds or so) 4 cups sugar 1 thinly sliced lemon 3 ⁄4 cup water

To peel tomatoes: Cut an “x” into the bottom end, plunge into boiling water for a minute or so, then when you see the “x” curling at the edges, take the tomatoes out and, when cool enough to handle, pull the skin off with a knife, using the “x” as a tag. Combine sugar, lemon and water and simmer gently for 10 minutes. Add tomatoes and cook gently until tomatoes become transparent, stirring frequently to prevent sticking. Remove from heat.

Cover and let stand 12-18 hours in a cool place. Remove tomatoes and lemon from syrup. Boil syrup 2-3 minutes or longer to thicken. Return tomatoes and lemon to syrup; boil one minute. Remove from heat. Skim foam if necessary. Ladle hot preserves into hot jars, leaving 1⁄4 inch head space. Wipe rims with clean wet cloth. Adjust caps. Process 20

Community Recorder

Senior Services of Northern Kentucky’s March For Meals campaign was nationally recognized by the Meals On Wheels Association of America. SSNK received an award of $650 for their efforts to engage local officials and community leaders in the fight to end senior hunger. March For Meals is an annual cam-

paign to raise awareness and generate community support around the importance of a nutritious meal and social connection to keeping home-bound and hungry seniors more healthy and independent in their own homes. For more information on services, to make a donation or to volunteer, call 859-491-0522 or visit www.seniorservicesnky.org.

VVA schedules two summer meeting Community Recorder

The Vietnam Veterans of America Chapter 88 meets 7:30 p.m. the third Tuesday of each month at the Elsmere Senior Citizens Center, 179 Dell Ave., in Elsmere. Summer

meeting dates include July 16 and Aug. 20. The public is invited to attend, and the chapter always is seeking new members. For more information, email President Drew Vargo at jsvargo@fuse.net.

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From Maggie Hoerst, who our grandchildren fondly call “Dez.” Maggie brought this to grandson Luke’s birthday party, and everyone kept coming back for seconds and thirds. It was delicious even at room temperature, so would be great appetizer to tote to that Fourth of July picnic. Yes, that holiday will be here before you know it!

Tip from Aunt Margaret’s kitchen

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LIFE

B4 • CCF RECORDER • JUNE 27, 2013

Veterans Outreach Division moves to Cincinnati in July Community Recorder

The Cincinnati Veterans Affairs Medical Center’s Healthcare for Homeless Veterans Community Outreach Division will relocate from the Fort Thomas Division, to 907 Vine Street, Cincinnati in late July 2013. The program’s mission of community outreach to homeless veterans moves them in a location with close access to resources, community partners and programs. “While we are a highly mobile division, having a low-access, storefront office strategically located on Vine Street will increase our effectiveness in winning the war on Vet-

eran homelessness,” said Chris Chatfield, director of the Community Outreach Division. “Veterans will be able to easily access our services, and we are also located in close proximity to other agencies which serve homeless and lowincome persons. Community partners helped us locate this space, and we have also been welcomed by Downtown Cincinnati, Inc. We look forward to being a good neighbor while also helping homeless veterans, currently clustered downtown, get the help they deserve in locating and maintaining permanent housing in Hamilton County.” Three Homeless Veteran Supportive Employment Program staff will remain at the Fort Thomas Division.

When white specks show up on shrubs Question: I just noticed that my evergreen Euonymus shrubs and Pachysandra ground cover plants have a lot of white specks on the stems and under the leaves, which are turning yellow and dropping off. What are the white specks? How can I save my plants? Answer: This is a common insect problem known as “Euonymus Scale.” If you look closely, you’ll probably also see many tiny gray or brown specks, but these are more difficult to see against the stems. Euonymus scale females are dark brown or gray, about 1/16 inches long, usually found on the stems, while the male scales are smaller, nar-

t and Him Crucified Jesus Chris

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Visit with us at The Northern Ky. Church of Christ 18 Scott Dr. • Florence, KY (859) 371-2095 Sunday: Morning Worship - 9:45am Evening Worship - 6:00pm Wednesday evening Bible Study - 7:30 www.nkcofc.com We have electronic Bible Study tools available for your use.

row, white, and more abundant. Euonymus, pachysandra and bittersweet are Mike hosts. Klahr Eggs hatch in HORTICULTURE CONCERNS May, with crawlers, as small as tiny specks of dust, active through September. Control starts with removal of heavily infested and sickly branches. Insecticidal soaps are very effective against both active and settled crawlers. Summer horticultural oils, which kill by smothering, and insecticidal soaps are safe to use and are especially good choices for sensitive areas, such as where people are present soon after treatment. Because of their short residual, they also help to conserve beneficial species. When using summer oil sprays, always refer to the product label for guidelines on specific plant sensitivity and any temperature restrictions. Horticultural oil products labeled as summer oil, superior oil or Volck Oil may be used on tolerant plants during either the growing season or the dormant season, but at different

COMING UP Wednesday Walks: 10-11 a.m. July 3, Boone County Arboretum, 9190 Camp Ernst Road, Union, Shelter No. 2. Come learn your trees and shrubs and get your home landscaping questions answered on this fun walk through the arboretum. No registration required. Summer Tree ID Walk: 9:30-11:30 a.m. Thursday, July 11, Boone County Arboretum, 9190 Camp Ernst Road, Union, Shelter No. 2. Free, but please register by calling 859-586-6101, or enroll online at www.ca.uky.edu/boone Starting the Fall Vegetable Garden: 9:30-11:30 a.m. Tuesday, July 16, Boone County Extension Office, Burlington. Free, but please register by calling 859-586-6101, or enroll online at www.ca.uky.edu/boone

spray concentrations. A quick-kill alternative to oil sprays is contact insecticides applied during the growing season when the crawler stages of the scales are present (especially in May and June). Look for crawlers by sharply tapping an infested twig or branch over a white paper. Crawlers are often orange, brown or purple and appear as tiny, moving specks of dust. Because of their waxy protective covering, other stages of scales are not readily controlled by contact insecticides. Sprays will not reach crawlers that have settled under old scales. A good alternative is offered by the easilyapplied soil drench or granular systemic insecticide, Imidacloprid (see “active ingredients” on label), offered in

products such as the Bayer Advanced Tree & Shrub Insect Control or Bayer Advanced Protect and Feed. This product takes a few days to start working, but provides season-long pest control for many plants. Other insecticides registered for scale crawler control on outdoor plants include: Cygon (dimethoate), Malathion, Orthene (acephate) and Sevin (carbaryl). Although resistance to insecticides may occur in some cases, failure of contact sprays is more often the result of not timing the applications to coincide with crawler activity. Multiple sprays and thorough coverage may be needed for complete control. Mike Klahr is the Boone County extension agent for horticulture.

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LIFE

JUNE 27, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • B5

When she’s struggling to accomplish one of life’s little tasks, 3-year-old Lily Morgan has a special weapon. “I can do it,” she sings easily to a simple melody she knows by heart. “I put my heart and my mind into it ... I can do it.” Lily’s motivational song is from the “I Can” song series – and one of the more than 200 children’s songs Covingtonbased nonprofit Children Inc. has released through its social venture, Growing Sound. Founded in 2007, Growing Sound produces research-based songs and accompanying products that aim to build social and emotional skills in young children. Written and performed by Children Inc.’s music director, composer David Kisor, the products are tested in the organization’s earlychildhood classrooms in Northern Kentucky and Cincinnati. They are sold online to educators, child care centers and parents across the globe. “Kids love the songs, and they have such positive, useful messages,” said Lily’s mother, Rachel Morgan of Cheviot, whose two children are enrolled at Children Inc.’s Montessori Early Learning Academy. “They’re unique and fun, and easy for small children to remember. “That’s a great tool, especially during those frustrating and teachable moments.”

Growing Sound develops songs that resonate with both children and their caretakers, and teach important lessons in resilience, positive psychology, mindfulness and executive brain function, according to Tom Lottman, Children Inc.’s deputy executive director. They use key insights from child development and neuroscience research from renowned sources, such as the Devereux Foundation, a nonprofit behavioral health organization based in Pennsylvania. “Very early in life, children develop internal dialogue about themselves and the world – and we want that to be positive,” said Lottman, who also serves as Growing Sound’s research director. Introducing children to songs during that critical time that help facilitate the internalization of success and self-esteem, such as Kisor’s “I Can Do It,” and “Big, Strong, Smart, Wonderful Me,” he said. Growing Sound’s songs are designed for children from birth to early elementary school and tackle a wide range of topics from forming attachments and friendships to potty-training and dealing with “boo-boos.” There’s also a whole series for toddlers on “settling down” and managing one’s own behavior. A new anti-bullying series is designed for both young and older children. Kisor said he usually

Ahmed Alshoaibi, 2, at Children Inc. Montessori Early Learning Academy, Covington, which uses Growing Sound music in his classroom.

gets ideas for songs by observing children in Children Inc.’s classrooms, and new topics from research findings in child development. “My office is also a recording studio,” said Kisor. “Every subject calls for something a little different, but all of our songs have one thing in common: they promote positive social and emotional development in children.” Growing Sound’s songs also help support Children Inc. Proceeds from the sale of the CDs and downloads go right back into the organization. Aside from its Growing Sound venture, Children Inc. serves more than 3,500 children every day at more than 90 local sites and employs more than 250 educators. Through the agency’s nationally-accredited early education and child care centers; school-age care centers at nearly 50 local schools and family child care network; and various community programs, including a home visitation program for

first-time, low-income mothers, a service-learning program for school children of all ages and training programs for parents, educators and early childhood professionals across the country, the nonprofit keeps its focus on positive child development. Music is a big part of encouraging that positive development in children, according to Kisor.

(859) 904-4640 www.bryanthvac.com

Community Recorder

Ervin and Carol Perry of Union are hosting the reunion of Torrejon Air Force Base, Spain. The reunion, which takes place every two years, will be held Aug. 1 to Sept. 1, 2014, in Florence. Anyone stationed at Torrejon Air Force Base is welcome to attend. The base opened officially on June 1, 1957, and the U.S. Air Force withdrew forces on May 21, 1992. If you served during these dates and would like to attend, contact Erv or Carol Perry at 859-3843966 or 859-512-5656.

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June 30th • 11am - 4pm

13

Boone Woods Park • Burlington Pet Contests Pet Psychic Dog Walk Booths On-site Pet Adoptions Silent Auction Food Free Admission & Parking

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FALL REGISTRATION & OPEN HOUSE Monday, August 6th, 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM Monday, August 21st, 6:30 PM - 8:30 PM

Classes fill quickly, best to register at first registration to ensure placement.

★ Offering classes for ages 3 to adults in ballet, tap, jazz, Zumba, bar stretch, tumbling, barre stretch & more! ★ Classes for ages 3-5 features special monthly spotlight activities — such as a Princess Parade with crowns & wands, Mermaid Mania with our bubble machine, Cheerleaders Rock with a fun pom-pom routine, just to name a few! ★ Featuring award-winning recreational and elite competitive dance teams for all ages! ★ Certified through Dance Educators of America

859•441•4588 www.ledancestudio.com

Our program has enabled our dancers to pursue in theatre opportunities, middle, high school and collegiate dance teams and also recipients of college scholarships.

LEGAL NOTICE The Campbell County & Municipal Planning & Zoning Commission will hold a public hearing on July 9, 2013, 7:00 P.M. at the Campbell County Courthouse, 8352 E. Main Street, Alexandria, Ky. for the purpose of hearing testimony for the following: FILE NUMBER: 122-13-ZMA-01 APPLICANT: Gary & Amanda Walters LOCATION: A 4.0119 acre lot located along the east side of Licking Pike, one mile from the AA highway in Unincorporat ed Campbell County KY. REQUEST: Approval of a zone map amendment proposing a change in zoning from R-CO to R-RE. Persons interested in this case are invited to be present. Information concerning this case is available for public inspection at the Campbell County & Municipal Planning & Zoning Office, 1098 Monmouth Street, Suite 343, Newport, KY Monday-Friday during normal business hours. Peter Klear /s/___________ Peter Klear, AICP Director of Planning & Zoning Date: June 20, 2013 Published: June 27, 2013 Campbell County Recorder 1768043

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national accolades and recognition. He recently attended National Head Start Association’s annual conference to share research in the field and play his music. There weren’t any children in the audience, but his songs resonated with the group nonetheless, according to Lottman. “(Growing Sound) songs have a powerful impact on adults as well,” Lottman said. “We could all use a little more positive motivation in our life.”

CE-0000551442

Growing sound

“Songs are very powerful. ... Words and music together enter the brain differently,” Kisor said. “They’re processed together in a way that involves several regions in both hemispheres of the brain. We’re having fun through music, but we’re also using research to help to get children prepared for school and future success.” Kisor shares his music with children enrolled in Children Inc. programs each week and performs at a variety of venues, including free concerts at public libraries. He’s also traveled as far as South Africa to perform for children, and advocate for the importance of social and emotional learning in young children and how it can be accomplished through music. His work through Growing Sound has received numerous

CITY OF BELLEVUE, KENTUCKY ORDINANCE 2013-06-04 ORDINANCE LEVYING AND ASSESS ING AD VALOREM TAXES FOR GENERAL FUND AND MUNICIPAL PURPOSES FOR THE CITY OF BELLEVUE, CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY, FOR FISCAL YEAR JULY 1, 2013 THROUGH JUNE 30, 2014, OF ALL MOTOR VEHICLES ASSESSED WITHIN THE CITY AND SETTING THE TAX RATE AT .385 PER $100.00 VALUATION. WHEREAS, pursuant to the pertinent section of the constitution of the Commonwealth of Kentucky, the general laws thereof and KRS 132.487 the Board of Council is required to pass an ordinance, annually, levying and providing for the collection of ad valorem taxes of the assessed valuation of motor vehicles registered within the city at a rate not to exceed that which could have been levied on the January 1, 1983 assessments, and WHEREAS, after due consideration and deliberation, the Board of Council has determined the required tax rate for the fiscal year. NOW, THEREFORE, be it ordained by the Board of Council of the City of Bellevue, Campbell County, Kentucky: SECTION 1 There shall be levied against all motor vehicles registered in the City, on each $100.00 of assessed valuation, duly assessed in accordance with KRS 132.487 an ad valorem tax at the rate of $.385. SECTION 2 This ordinance shall become effective on January 1,2014, after its adoption and publication according to law. Edward Riehl, MAYOR, ATTEST: CITY CLERK, Mary H. Scott 1st Reading: 2nd Reading: Publication: 6/27/2013 1001768064


LIFE

B6 • CCF RECORDER • JUNE 27, 2013

Fruits, vegetables help manage weight

Wood Hudson hosts open house and art show Community Recorder

Wood Hudson Cancer Research Laboratory is hosting an art show and open house,1-6 p.m. Saturday, June 29 and Sunday, June 30, at 931 Isabella St. in Newport. Sara Hamel and Nancy

June is Fresh Fruit and Vegetables Month. We would all benefit from eating more of these natural sources of many nutrients. Eating vegetables has many health benefits. Research shows those who eat vegetables have a lower risk for heart disease and stroke. Vegetables help with diabetes management and may protect us against mouth, stomach and other cancers. Those who eat vegetables that are naturally low in fat and high in fiber are better able to manage their weight. The health of our eyes is related to our

Pendery are among the local artists who have donated paintings that will be on display and available for purchase. The open house includes a tour of the Laboratory and Biospecimen Repository Center.

NOTICE OF ADOPTION, TITLES AND SUMMARIES OF ALEXANDRIA ORDINANCES 2013-08 and 2013-09 I hereby certify that the following are the Titles and Summaries of Ordinances 2013-08 and 2013-09 of the City of Alexandria, in Campbell County, Kentucky, adopted by City Council on June 20, 2013: ORDINANCE NO. 2013-08: AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF ALEXANDRIA, IN CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY, ADOPTING THE ANNUAL BUDGET FOR THE FISCAL YEAR JULY 1, 2013 THROUGH JUNE 30, 2014, BY ESTIMATING REVENUES AND RESOURCES, AND APPROPRIATING FUNDS FOR THE OPERATION OF CITY GOVERNMENT. This Ordinance adopts the City’s budget for the 2013/2014 fiscal year. This Budget anticipates $4,076,893 in revenues for the General Fund Budget; and appropriates $4,076,893 for General Fund expenses.

help reduce inflammation in the body and help rid the body of free radicals – those substances that can cause cancer or other damage to cells. It is generally recommended that we fill half our plates with vegetables and fruits. We are also encouraged to eat a variety of fruits and vegetables that include all the colors of the rainbow. The actual amount of vegetables and fruits needed every day depends on your age, sex, and level of physical activity. Visiting ChooseMyPlate.gov can show you the recom-

2013 ANNUAL MEETING FRIDAY JUNE 28

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ORDINANCE NO. 2013-09: AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF ALEXANDRIA, KENTUCKY ESTABLISHING REGULATIONS FOR THE OPERATION OF USED PROPERTY BUSINESSES IN ALEXANDRIA, CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY; AND REPEALING ALEXANDRIA ORDINANCE #2009-02. This Ordinance adopts regulations for the treatment of used property similar to those in the Ordinance adopted by Campbell County Fiscal Court, and repeals Alexandria’s previous Ordinance on the same subject. This Ordinance contains the following Section containing penalties for violations: SECTION 2: PENALTY (A) Criminal Penalties, Company or Corporation - Each separate violation of any section of this Chapter committed by a business, company, or corporation, shall be a Class B Misdemeanor for which the criminal fine shall not exceed the maximum amount of $5,000.00. (B) Criminal Penalties, Individual - Each separate violation of any section of this Chapter, committed by an individual shall be a Class B Misdemeanor for which the criminal fine shall not exceed the maximum amount of $250.00, and/or imprisonment not to exceed ninety (90) days. *************************************** I, Michael A. Duncan, an attorney licensed to practice law in the Commonwealth of Kentucky, for Ziegler & Schneider, P.S.C., City Attorneys for the City of Alexandria, in Campbell County, Kentucky, do hereby certify that this Notice of Adoption, Titles and Summaries of Ordinances 2013-08 and 2013-09 was prepared by me, and that it represents an accurate description of the summaries of the contents of the Ordinances. The full text of the Ordinances, exhibits, and other information relative to the Ordinances, are on file at the office of the City Clerk, 8236 West Main Street, Alexandria, Kentucky 41001. /s/ Michael A. Duncan For Ziegler & Schneider, P.S.C. City Attorneys 1001768235

nutrient intake. Those who eat a diet rich in dark green, leafy vegetables Diane such as Mason spinach EXTENSION and kale NOTES may reduce their chances of developing cataracts. Finally, because most vegetables are a good source of fiber, they help prevent constipation and diverticulosis. Fruits and vegetables naturally contain phytochemicals which

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mendations to you. Remember that fresh vegetables and fruits are a good choice, but canned, and frozen may also be used to meet the daily intake recommendations. The following tips may help as you work to eat more vegetables and fruits: » Keep them handy and in reach for snacks. » Try them raw or cooked. You may find you prefer one way over the other. » Buy fresh vegetables and fruits in season to save money. » Plant a vegetable or two in you landscape or in a container. » Add vegetables to sandwiches and scrambled eggs. » Enjoy a bowl of vegetable soup. » Add vegetables to most foods you prepare at home when possible. Top your pizza, add them to rice, or enjoy a salad. » When eating out, always include a vegetable side dish with your order. Explore the world of vegetables and fruits by choosing a new one to try the next time you are shopping. There are so many colors, shapes, and sizes to choose from it really can be a fun adventure. Diane Mason is county extension agent for family and consumer sciences at the Boone County Cooperative Extension Service.

Relive Tri-State history at the new

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• Beautiful photo galleries • Compelling stories • Interesting facts and quizzes The Enquirer has been telling the stories of our area for over 170 years. RetroCincinnati.com brings back those stories to highlight the people, places and events that shaped our area, and links our history to topics of today to help you better understand our community.

Feeling nostalgic? Visit now.


LIFE

JUNE 27, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • B7

Nosey’s antics gaining fame “Pardon me, but is this Nosey?” The woman asked breathlessly, running up to me. “I mean, the Nosey I read about in the newspaper all the time?” “Yes, this is Nosey,” I replied, a bit surprised. “You are sure this is the Nosey, the one who got locked in the car?” she asked, turning to wave at a friend and calling her over. “Come over here, this is her, this is the Nosey dog I keep telling you about.” My husband Tom and I had taken our Basset Marsie Hall Hound, Newbold Nosey to MARSIE’S the annual MENAGERIE It’s a Pet Affair fundraiser in Dayton. It turns out that the woman who stopped us was a regular reader of the Community Press and a big fan of my “Marsie’s Menagerie” column. We spent a long time visiting and as she and her friend lavished attention on Nosey, scratching her ears, patting her belly and taking her photo, they proceeded to tell us which columns they liked the best and chortle over what they called, “Nosey’s Antics.” Needless to say, they made my day, my week, my month and my year! I get a great deal of pleasure out of writing about pets and sharing snippets from Nosey’s life. Tom and I laughed on the way home about how popular Nosey is. We’ve had dogs in the past and our family, friends and neighbors have always liked them, but, we’ve

Nosey the Bassett Hound looks for some lunch. THANKS TO MARSIE HALL NEWBOLD

never seen anything like the reaction that people have when they see Nosey. It has been that way since she was a tiny puppy. Admittedly, she is beautiful, traditional “Hush Puppy” Basset Hound with a pedigree that doesn’t stop. Walking down the street with her we are guaranteed to be stopped by nearly everyone we see. Grown men have crossed the street to come over and see her. It doesn’t hurt that Nosey is the friendliest dog I’ve ever known. She greets everyone as though they are long lost friends whom she has been waiting to see. Her tail wags so much that I’m surprised it isn’t super skinny from all of the exercise! Nosey is the star of my Facebook page and I share one or more pho-

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tos of her every day. If I miss a day, I get messages asking what is up with Nosey, why haven’t I posted anything, is something wrong? It sometimes feels as though I write a daily comic strip. For example, this photo of my husband and Nosey outside of Dixie Chili in Newport garnered: Four “Love you, Noseys,” three “Precious” comments, two “Awwwws”, two “Adorables,” two variations on “Cute” and one “What a sweetheart!” And, that’s just the way I like it. Marsie Hall Newbold is a resident of Highland Heights. For more pet care stories and tips, visit www.marsiesmenagerie.com.

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CITY OF WILDER, KENTUCKY Ordinance No. 13-0601 AN ORDINANCE ADOPTING THE CITY IF WILDER, KENTUCKY’S ANNUAL BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 07/01/13 THROUGH 6/30/14 BY ESTIMATING REVENUES AND APPROPRIATING FUNDS FOR THE OPERATION OF THE CITY GOVERNMENT. Whereas, an annual budget proposal and message has been prepared and delivered to the City Council, and Whereas, the City Council has reviewed each budget proposal and made necessary modifications: Now, Therefore be it ordained by the City of Wilder, Kentucky. SECTION 1 General Frederick’s Municipal Construction RESOURCES AVAILABLE: Fund Landing Road Aid Fund Fund Balance Forward 900,000 Merged into 228,000 1,195,970 Estimated Revenues General Fund Taxes 1,572,000 Licenses & Permits 1,939,800 Intergovern. Revenue 101,500 58,800 Fees and Fines 12,160 Charges and Service 75,000 Other 0 300 5,000 Total Est. Revenues 3,700,460 59,100 5,000 Total Est. Revenues for Appropriation 4,600,460 287,100 1,200,970 APPROPRIATION: General Government Police Fire Public Works Streets Parks and Recreation Total Appropriations

1,337,799 1,087,957 1,251,842 785,803

Merged into General Fund

4,600,460

Excess Resources/Appropriations

0

0

261,467

135,059 0

261,467

0

0

25,633

1,200,970

That this ordinance shall be signed by the Mayor, attested by the City Clerk, recorded and published. Same shall be in effect July 1, 2013

ATTEST: ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Tracy Herald, City Clerk %(#"))"$&'!!!#)"

AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF BELLEVUE, KENTUCKY, ADOPTING THE ANNUAL BUDGET FOR THE FISCAL YEAR JULY 1, 2013 THROUGH JUNE 30, 2014. BY ESTIMATING REVENUES AND APPROPRIATING FUNDS FOR THE OPERATION OF CITY GOVERNMENT. WHEREAS, an annual budget proposal and message has been prepared and delivered City Council, and WHEREAS, the City Council has reviewed such budget proposal and made necessary modification, NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY OF BELLEVUE, KENTUCKY, that: SECTION 1 - That the budget of the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2013 and ending June 30, 2014 is hereby adopted as detailed in Attachment One and summarized as follows: General Fund

Municipal Road Aid

Capital Improve.

Lincoln Road

Parks & Recreation

Police Forfieture

Total Resources $5,505,970 Total Appropriations $4,071,400 Total Fund Balance $1,434,570

$ 214,630 $172,750 $41,880

$197,550 $111,870 $85,680

$910,000 $910,000 $ -

$108,390 $67,900 $40,490

$5,000 $5,000 $ -

Flexible Spending

Port Bellevue

Fairfield TEA-21

Harbor Greene

COPP Program

Rental Licensing

$32,070 $29,000 $3,070

$289,100 $252,400 $36,700

$72,650 $72,650 $ -

$241,040 $81,720 $159,320

$5,000 $5,000 $ -

$36,000 $36,000 $ -

Total Resources Total Appropriation Total Fund Balance

SECTION 2 - This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage, approval and publication. ATTEST: BY: Mary H. Scott, City Clerk / Treasurer Edward Riehl, Mayor

$4,000 Guaranteed 513-931-4441 • 513-931-0259

CITY OF BELLEVUE, KENTUCKY ORDINANCE 2013-06-03

––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Stanley Turner, Mayor PASSED: June 3, 2013 at first reading PASSED: June 24, 2013 at second reading PUBLISHED: CC Recorder June 27, 2013

1st Reading: 2nd Reading: Publication: Ordinance 2013-06-03: Attachment One General Municipal Capital Lincoln Fund Road Aid Improve. Road Resources Available: BAL. CARRIED 7/1/2013 $1,434,570 $64,620 $135,500 $850,000 Estimated Revenues: Property Taxes $1,195,200 Lic. & Permits $2,234,200 Fines & Forfeit. $21,500 Inter. Govt. Rev $127,500 $150,000 $60,000 Service Charges $445,000 Other $23,000 $10 $2,050 $ Interfund Trans. $25,000 $ - $60,000 $ Total Est. Rev. $4,071,400 $150,010 $62,050 $60,000 Total Resources $5,505,970 $214,630 $197,550 $910,000 Ordinance 2013-06-03: Attachment One General Municipal Capital Lincoln Fund Road Aid Improve. Road Appropriations: Exec. & Legislative $24,650 Gen. Government $789,050 Police $1,412,300 Fire $773,000 Public Services $746,200 SpecialAppropriations $326,200 Streets $172,750 $910,000 Sewers $ Capital $111,870 UDAG Parks Safe Routes L.E.B.G. Port Bellevue Harbor Greene Miscellaneous TotalAppropriations $4,071,400 $172,750 $111,870 $910,000 Total Resource $1,434,570 $41,880 $85,680 $ Under/Over Appropriations Interfund Transfer Est. TotalFundBalance $1,434,570 $41,880 $85,680 $ -

APPROVED AS TO FORM:

Paul Alley, City Attorney

Parks & Police COPP Port Fairfield Harbor Flexible Rental Rec Forfieture Program Bellevue TEA-21 Greene SpendingLicensing $57,290

$1,100 $50,000 $51,100 $108,390

$ -

$ - $64,100 $72,650 $96,540

$3,670

$ -

$5,000 $5,000 $225,000 $ - $134,500 $21,800 $36,000 $ $ - $10,000 $6,600 $5,000 $5,000 $225,000 $ - $144,500 $28,400 $36,000 $5,000 $5,000 $289,100 $72,650 $241,040 $32,070 $36,000

Parks & Police COPP Port Fairfield Harbor Flexible Rental Rec. Forfieture Program Bellevue TEA-21 Greene SpendingLicensing $36,000

$5,000

$72,650 $67,900 $5,000

$67,900 $40,490 $40,490

$252,400

$81,720

$29,000 $5,000 $5,000 $252,400 $72,650 $81,720 $29,000 $36,000 $ $ - $36,700 $ - $159,320 $3,070 $ $ -

$ - $36,700

$ - $159,320

$3,070

$ -

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CITY OF SOUTHGATE CAMPBELL COUNTY, KY ORDINANCE 13-02 ORDINANCE 13-02 ADOPTING THE ANNUAL BUDGET FOR THE CITY OF SOUTHGATE, KENTUCKY, FOR THE FISCAL YEAR JULY 1, 2013 THOUGH JUNE 30, 2014, BY ESTIMATING REVENUES AND RESOURCES AND APPROPRIATING FUNDS FOR THE OPERATIONS OF THE GOVERNMENT OF THE CITY. WHEREAS, an annual budget proposal and message have been prepared and delivered to the City Council; and WHEREAS, The annual budget for the fiscal year beginning on July 1 2013, and ending on June 30, 2014 is hereby adopted as follows: Memo Southgate Community Municipal General Fund Road Aid Center, Inc Totals Fund Bal. Forward $105,237 $84,858 $775 $190,870 $2,494,971 $78,500 $47,500 $2,368,971 Estimated Revenues Transfer of Funds $46,500 -$46,500 $0 Total Resources Available for Appropriation $2,520,708 $163,358 $1,775 $2,685,841 Anticipated Expenses Administration $250,854 $250,854 $847,530 $847,530 Police $456,082 $35,000 $421,082 Streets $31,208 $31,208 Sewers $191,152 $191,152 Waste Collection $360,732 360732 Fire Community Center $117,588 $1,500 $119,088 Parks $73,300 $73,300 $118,396 $118,396 Garage #2 Total Anticipated $2,448,342 $1,500 $35,000 Appropriations $2,411,842 Excess Res. Available $237,499 $275 $128,358 $108,866 over/under Appropriations Est. Fund Balance $237,499 $275 $128.358. $108,866 End of Fiscal Year This ordinance will become effective and in force from and after its adoption and publication as provided by law. Enacted on this 19th day of June 2013. James G. Hamberg, Mayor City of Southgate Attest: Jody Anderson, City Clerk 6/05/2013 First Reading: Second Reading: 6/19/2013 Published: 6/27/2013

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LIFE

B8 • CCF RECORDER • JUNE 27, 2013

HIV Testing Days offer free tests for the free testing events are listed below:

Community Recorder

Approximately 50,000 Americans are infected with HIV each year, and one out of five people living with HIV in the U.S. is unaware of their infection. That dangerous combination is one of many reasons that the Northern Kentucky Health Department coordinates testing events on and around National HIV Testing Day, held June 27 each year. Locations and times

Thursday, June 27

» 1-4 p.m. at the Boone County Health Center, 7505 Burlington Pike, Florence » 1-4 p.m. at the Campbell County Health Center, 1098 Monmouth St., Newport » 1-4 p.m. at the Kenton County Health Center, 2002 Madison Ave., Covington

CITY OF SOUTHGATE NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The City of Southgate, Kentucky, in the Council Chambers at 122 Electric Avenue, Southgate, KY, will hold a public hearing on Wednes day July 3, 2013, at 6:30 p.m., to obtain citizen comments regarding the possible uses of Municipal Road Aid funds The City anticipates approximately $78,500 in MRA for Fiscal year 13/14. All interested persons in the City of Southgate is invited to submit oral or written comments on possible use of the MRA Funds. Any person(s) who cannot attend may submit written comments to 122 Electric Avenue, Southgate, KY 41051 or should call the Office of the City Clerk at 441-0075 so that arrangements can be made to secure their comments. You may also e-mail your comments to Clerk@ outhgateky.org, Subject: MRA Hearing. 1001766754

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timothy rackley 103 dove drive erlanger ky 41018 room# 0081unknown goods. shaun heffernan 206 clark rd cincinnati, oh 45215 room# 0144 unknown goods. donald wanek 711 fairfield ave apt 207 bellevue, ky 41073 room# 0150 unknown goods. donald wanek 711 fairfield ave apt 207 bellevue, ky 41073 room# 0153 unknown goods. timothy rane 1515 madison ave covington, ky 41011 room# 0156 unknown goods. tyesha rice 990 emery drive covington, ky 41011 room# 0161 unknown goods. brian collins 13 east 29th st latonia, ky 41015 room# 0203 unknown goods. christina schmitz 16 alan ct 231 florence, ky 41042 room# 022734 unknown goods. The above are hereby notified that their goods stored at UHaul, located at 4425 dixie highway elsmere, ky 41018, will be sold at public auction on July 9th, 2013 at or after 9am. 6738

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Friday, June 28 » 11a.m. to 2 p.m. at the City Heights Health Fair, 2400 Todd St., Covington Testing will be done using the OraQuick test, which utilizes a mouth swab; no needles are used. Results are available in about 20 minutes. Each individual tested will receive education on HIV/ AIDS, discover what his/ her risk factors are, and learn how to prevent transmission of HIV. Counseling and assistance with treatment will be made available through the Health Department’s HIV/AIDS Case Management Program, should an individual test positive. For more information about National HIV Testing Day or HIV testing times/locations, call the Health Department at 859-341-4264, or visit http://www.nkyhealth.org.

Get ready for success

“God will never place you in a situation until you are ready to be successful in that situation.” It’s not scripture, but it is a message that was provided for me at a time when I really needed it. And it was proof that I was where I was supposed to be, and proof that God would ensure my success in the situation. And more importantly, it is backed by scripture. “Furthermore, because we are united with Christ, we have received an inheritance from God, for he chose us in advance, and he makes everything work out according to His plan.” (Ephesians 1:11)

Where Home Town Charm Meets the Art of Gifting Opening June 27, 2013 Never Ordinary but Affordable… Jewelry, Baby, All Occasion Gifts, Home Accents and more! Enjoy Tastings and Register to Win a $100 Shopping Spree June 27 - July 4, 2013 *Winner Announced on July 4th

Open MON – FRI 10 am - 6 pm SAT 10 am - 5 pm 3 N Fort Thomas Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075 CE-0000560247

859-609-6427

Do you need this message today? An assurance Julie House COMMUNITY PRESS that God is GUEST COLUMNIST working out the messy situation you are in according to his plan. Maybe you need the comfort and peace of knowing you are on the right path. Let me assure you that sometimes it does not happen overnight. Yet if you will be relentless in your quest, God will provide the answers. Here are some lessons I’ve learned along the way about God’s plan for working out the unclear situations in life. Fear and worry are not part of his plan. Constantly worrying about how the situation will work out and exploring the “what-ifs” are contrary to trusting God to impact the outcome. God wants us put our full faith and trust in him, even when the way seems unclear. I must choose trust. It doesn’t come naturally. We live in a cynical world, and we are born with a seeing-is-believing attitude. Every day on our journey to live an

obedient life, we must choose trust. “How do I choose to trust?” One of the ways we make the conscious choice to choose trust is with an open Bible. Struggling with some decisions recently, my mother suggested I watch a preacher she is very fond of, Charles Stanley. Among the many lessons I learned in the 50-minute sermon, I will never forget this one: “You cannot live an obedient life with a closed Bible.” If you feel as though you’ve no idea where God is taking you, or why he has allowed the path you’re on to continue, remember what he says: “Study this book of instruction continually. Meditate on it day and night so you will be sure to obey everything that is written in it. Only then will you prosper and succeed in all you do. This is my command – be strong and courageous. Do not be afraid or discouraged. For the Lord your God is with you wherever you go.” (Joshua 1:8-9) Julie House is a resident of Independence, and founder of Equipped Ministries, a Christian-based health and wellness program with a focus on weight loss. She can be reached at 802-8965.

LIFE

JUNE 27, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • B9

Smoking laws still a debate Community Recorder

A little more than 34 percent of Kentuckians are covered by local smoke-free laws that ban smoking in workplaces and enclosed public places or buildings open to the public, state tobacco prevention and cessation officials told state lawmakers today. Those Kentuckians live or work in 23 municipalities with comprehensive smoke-free ordinances that ban smoking in all workplaces and public areas or facilities, Kentucky Tobacco Prevention and Cessation Program official Angela Criswell told the Tobacco Settlement Agreement Fund Oversight Committee. The municipalities are among 37 local governments statewide, including Louisville Metro and the Lexington-Fayette Urban County government, covered by either a comprehensive smoke-free ordinance or some degree of smoke-free regulation, according to the Kentucky Tobacco Policy Research Program.

Smoke-free ordinances limit exposure to secondhand smoke, which Criswell said can trigger asthma attacks, cause lung disease, and decrease the heart’s ability to pump blood leading to heart disease or heart attack. “There is no safe amount of secondhand smoke,” she said. Criswell’s 13-year-old program is funded in part with Kentucky’s share of the 1998 Master Settlement Agreement, a multibillion-dollar settlement reached between 46 states, including Kentucky, and the nation’s cigarette companies. The program received $2.12 million in tobacco settlement dollars in fiscal year 2013 and is budgeted to receive $2.09 million in tobacco settlement funds in fiscal year 2014 which begins July 1, Criswell said. About 80 percent of the program’s tobacco settlement funding is allocated to local health departments for tobacco cessation and prevention programming and to cover tobacco coordinator costs,

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she said. In response to a question from Rep. Jonathan Shell, R-Lancaster, state Health Programs Branch manager and former Tobacco Prevention and Cessation Program manager Irene Centers said the state’s smoking rate dropped from 32 to 25 percent between 2000 (when the Tobacco Prevention and Cessation Program was established) and 2010. Some of the credit for the decrease is owed to Kentucky’s “quit line”—1-800QUIT-NOW—which smokers can call to receive counseling on how to kick the habit, although Criswell said additional funding for NRT (nicotine replacement therapy) for smokers could improve the state’s “quit success rate” significantly. With additional NRT

funding, Criswell indicated that Kentucky’s current quit success rate of 26 percent—which she said is above the national average—could reach 40 percent. NRT is now being offered through the program for a limited time with funding assistance from the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), she said. “We see that (additional funding) as a very real need,” she said. Committee co-chair Sen. Paul Hornback, RShelbyville, praised the program’s work. “You are to be commended for the recognition you’re getting because of how well your programs are doing,” he said.

CITY OF BELLEVUE, KENTUCKY ORDINANCE 2013-06-02 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF BELLEVUE, KENTUCKY, AMENDING THE ANNUAL BUDGET FOR THE FISCAL YEAR JULY 1, 2012 THROUGH JUNE 30, 2013. BY ESTIMATING REVENUES AND APPROPRIATING FUNDS FOR THE OPERATION OF CITY GOVERNMENT WHEREAS, the City Council has reviewed the proposed amendments to the budget, WHEREAS, the City Council has reviewed the proposed amendments to the budget, NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY OF BELLEVUE, KENTUCKY, that: SECTION 1 - That the budget of the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2012 and ending June 30, 2013 is hereby amended as follows: General Municipal Capital Lincoln Fund Road Aid Improve. Road

$ 5,457,790 $ 704,140 $ 298,440 $ 230,000 $117,280 $ 5,270 Total Resources $ 5,420,500 $ 338,710 $218,510 $ 730,000 $ 65,350 $ 5,000 $ 4,203,400 $ 659,520 $ 181,880 $ 230,000 $ 62,740 $ 5,000 Total Appropriations $ 4,157,690 $ 325,250 $163,560 $ 730,000 $ 57,800 $ 5,000 ___________________________________________________ $ 1,254,390 $ 44,620 Total Fund Balance$ 1,262,810 $ 13,460 Flexible Port Spending Bellevue

CITY OF HIGHLAND HEIGHTS, KENTUCKY SUMMARY OF PUBLICATION OF ORDINANCE #08-2013 I hereby that the following is the title and a summary of Ordinance #08-2013 of the City of Highland Heights, Kentucky as adopted on 6-18-2013. Said ordinance adopts the Goals and Objec tives of the new Comprehensive Plan created by the Highland Heights Planning and Zoning Commission. I, Steven J. Franzen an attorney licensed to practice law in the Commonwealth of Kentucky, acting as an attorney for the City of Highland Heights, Kentucky, do hereby certify that this summary was prepared by me at the direction of the Highland Heights City Council and is a true and accurate summary of the contents of Ordinance #08-2013. _______/s/ Steven J. Franzen STEVEN J. FRANZEN ATTORNEY FOR CITY OF HIGHLAND HEIGHTS, KENTUCKY 1768293

$ 31,900 Total Resources $ 39,460

$ 2,800 Total Fund Balance $ 16,360

Fairfield TEA-21

COPP Rental Program Licensing

$ 48,060 $ 43,400

Harbor Greene

$ 270 $-

$ 7,000 $-

$$-

$ 10,650 $ 67,830

$ 340 $-

$$-

SECTION 2 - This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage, approval and publication. ATTEST: __________________________ Mary H. Scott, City Clerk / Treasurer

BY: __________________ Edward Riehl, Mayor

1st Reading:____________________ 2nd Reading:___________________ Publication:____________________ APPROVED AS TO FORM:___________________ Paul Alley, City Attorney

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CE-0000559155

$ 54,540 $ 7,550

$ 29,100 $ 244,720 $ 72,570 $ 175,950 $ 1,100 $ 7,000 Total Appropriation $ 23,100 $244,720 $ 50,180 $ 168,330 $ 5,000 $___________________________________________________

For everyone who’s been waiting for affordable healthcare coverage

Visit kynect.ky.gov to learn more.

$ 116,560 $ $ 54,950 $ -

$ 292,780 $ 72,570 $ 186,600 $ 1,440 $ 288,120 $ 50,180 $ 236,160 $ 5,000

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Parks & Police Rec. Forfeiture


LIFE

B10 • CCF RECORDER • JUNE 27, 2013

Chamber earns national recognition

SPECIAL DAY

Community Recorder

In a world where social media rules, it is important that organizations desiring to make an impact create a user-friendly Internet outlet where clients can access news, event calendars and other similar information. The Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce understands this and has developed a webpage that has recently been given the title of “No. 25 Most Social-Media Friendly Norma Strasinger, of Fort Thomas, celebrated her 90th birthday May 29. A party was held in her honor with 125 guests in attendance, including her four children, 11 grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. An avid greeting-card sender, she received more than 150 birthday greetings from family and friends. This May she also reached her goal of seeing all 11 grandchildren graduate. Her new goal is to see all of her great-grandchildren graduate. THANKS TO DEBBIE STAHLHUT

INVITATION TO BID Date: June 27, 2013 PROJECT: Hulbert Avenue 8" water main replacement and water service transfer project in Erlanger, Ky. SEALED BIDS WILL BE RECEIVED AT: Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) 2835 Crescent Springs Road P.O. Box 18640 Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 UNTIL:

Date: July 9, 2013 Time:10:00 AM Local Time

At said place and time, and promptly thereafter, all Bids that have been duly received will be publicly opened and read aloud. The proposed Work is generally described as follows: Construction of approximate ly 1,088 of 8" C-900 water main and services to be switched over from the existing 6" water main to the existing 12" water main and along Hulbert Avenue in the City of Erlanger, Ky. There will also be street restoration for this project. All Bids must be in accordance with the Instructions to Bidders and Contract Documents on file, and available for examination at: Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) 2835 Crescent Springs Road Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 Or Viox and Viox Engineering 466 Erlanger Road Erlanger, Ky. 41018 Copies of the Bidding Documents may be obtained from the office of Viox and Viox at the address indicated herein. Charges for all documents obtained will be made on the following basis: Charge Complete set of Bidding Documents $ 40.00 Mailing and Handling (U.S. Mail) (if requested) $ 15.00 Charges for Bidding Documents and mailing and handling, if applicable, will not be refunded. Bids will be received on a unit price and/or lump sum basis as described in the Contract Documents. Bid security, in the form of a certified check or a Bid Bond (insuring/bonding company shall be rated "A" by AM Best) in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the maximum total bid price, must accompany each Bid. The Successful Bidder will be required to furnish a Construction Payment Bond and a Construction Performance Bond (insuring/bonding company shall be rated "A" by AM Best) as security for the faithful performance of the contract and the payment of all bills and obligations arising from the performance of the Contract. Contractor and all Subcontractors will be required to conform to the labor standards set forth in the Contract Documents. This project falls under the provisions of KRS 337.505 to 337.550 for prevailing wage rates. Evaluation of Bids and the awarding of a final contract are subject to the reciprocal preference for Kentucky resident bidders pursuant to KRS 45A490 to 45A.494 and (KAR 200 5:400). Owner reserves the right to reject any or all Bids, including without limitation the right to reject any or all nonconforming, non-responsive, incomplete, unbalanced, or conditional Bids, to waive informalities, and to reject the Bid of any Bidder if Owner believes that it would not be in the best interest of Owner to make an award to that Bidder. Owner also reserves the right to negotiate with the apparent qualified Bidder to such an extent as may be determined by Owner. Minority Bidders are encouraged to bid. Bids shall remain subject to acceptance for 90 days after the day of bid opening or for such longer period of time to which a Bidder may agree in writing upon request of the Owner. If a Contract is to be awarded, the Owner will give the successful Bidder a Notice of Award during the period of time during which the successful Bidder’s bid remains subject to acceptance. Richard Harrison, Vice President of Engineering, Water Quality, & Production Northern Kentucky Water District 8239

lineMBApage.com did not simply analyze the content of the messages each chamber of commerce was sending out, but rather, which webpages and messages were receiving the most subscribers, likes and followers on popular social media websites. The NKY Chamber of Commerce received 82.5 points out of a possible100, with 23.2 points for Facebook, 23.4 points for Twitter, 16.3 points for YouTube and 19.6 points for LinkedIn.

Beating the heat this summer Community Recorder

The Kentucky Labor Cabinet this summer is reminding workers about the dangers of working in

CITY OF BELLEVUE, KENTUCKY ORDINANCE 2013-06-01 AN ORDINANCE ENACTING AND ADOPT ING A SUPPLEMENT TO THE CODE OF ORDINANCES OF THE CITY OF BELLE VUE, KENTUCKY. WHEREAS, American Legal Publishing Corporation of Cincinnati, Ohio has completed the 2013 S-24 supplement to the Code of Ordinances of the City of Bellevue, which supplement contains all ordinances of a general nature enacted since the prior supplement to the Code of Ordinances of this municipality; and WHEREAS, American Legal Publishing Corporation has recommended the revision or addition of certain sections of the Code of Ordinances which are based or make reference to section of the Kentucky Revised Statutes; WHEREAS, it is the intent of Council to accept these updated sections in accordance with the changes of the law of the Common wealth of Kentucky; NOW, THEREFORE the City of Bellevue

Chamber of Commerce” by OnlineMBAPage.com. “The chamber’s social media efforts must be primarily about the members, not about the chamber itself. This makes members feel valued, and shows that the organization cares about their success,” said Frank J. Kenny, a social-media expert who often speaks to chambers, as well as their members. When determining the most social-media friendly chambers of commerce in the U.S., the staff at On-

BE IT ORDAINED by

SECTION 1. That the 2013 S-24 supple ment to the Code of Ordinances of the City of Bellevue, Kentucky, as submitted by American Legal Publishing Corporation of Cincin nati, and as attached hereto, be and the same is hereby adopted by reference as if set out in its entirety. SECTION 2. That this ordinance shall take effect and be in force from and after its date of passage, approval and publication as required by law. Mayor Edward Riehl ATTEST: Mary H. Scott, City Clerk Date of First Reading: Date of Second Reading: Publication: 6/27/2013 1001768037

The undersigned, an attorney licensed to practice law in the Commonwealth of Kentucky, has certified the preparation of this summary as an accurate depiction of the contents of the Ordinance. - Daniel R. Braun, City Attorney. COMMISSIONERS ORDINANCE O-2013-003 AN ORDINANCE OF THE BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS OF THE CITY OF NEWPORT, KENTUCKY AMENDING SECTION 33.023(A)(1) OF THE CODE OF ORDINANCES CONCERNING THE QUALIFICATIONS FOR FIRE/EMS CHIEF. COMMISSIONERS ORDINANCE O-2013-004 AN ORDINANCE OF THE BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS OF THE CITY OF NEWPORT, KENTUCKY AMENDING SECTION 34.18(B) OF THE CODE OF ORDINANCES CONCERNING THE RESTRICTION OF ACTIVITIES DURING A STATE OF EMERGENCY CURFEW TO REMOVE THE CLOSING OF BUSINESS ESTABLISHMENTS SELLING FIREARMS THEREFROM. (A PORTION OF THE CITY ORDINANCE RESTRICTING THE SALE OF FIREARMS IS BEING REPEALED TO COME INTO COMPLIANCE WITH STATE LAW.) COMMISSIONERS ORDINANCE O-2013-005 AN ORDINANCE OF THE BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS OF THE CITY OF NEWPORT, KENTUCKY AMENDING SECTION 92.27(G) OF THE CODE OF ORDINANCES CONCERNING THE RULES AND REGULATIONS OF THE RIVERFRONT AREA TO REMOVE THE PROHIBITION OF CARRYING FIREARMS THEREFROM. (A PORTION THE CITY ORDINANCE REGARDING POSSESSION OF FIREARMS IS BEING REPEALED TO COME INTO COMPLIANCE WITH STATE LAW.) The above three ordinances were adopted June 17, 2013. Signed by: Jerry Peluso, Mayor. Attested to by: Amy B. Able, City Clerk. The City Clerk hereby certifies that the summary is true and correct and the full text of these ordinances is available for review at the office of the City Clerk, 998 Monmouth Street. - Amy Able, City Clerk.

hot and humid environments. Many employees suffer heat-related illnesses, and tragically, some can even perish due to extreme conditions. In order to minimize the adverse effects of exposure to extreme heat, cabinet employees will be providing information related to the prevention of heat-related illness. Employees and employers also will receive instruction on how to recognize the signs and symptoms and how to handle heat-related health emergencies. One important fact to remember, according to Labor Cabinet Secretary Larry Roberts, is that heat illnesses and deaths are preventable. “Co-workers should routinely check on each other during extreme con-

ditions. Remember three words: water, rest and shade,” Roberts said. To protect workers, employers should: » Learn the signs and symptoms of heat-induced illnesses and what to do to help the worker » Train the workforce about heat-induced illnesses » Perform the heaviest work in the coolest part of the day » Slowly build up tolerance to the heat » Work in pairs » Drink plenty of cool water » Ask employees to wear light, loose-fitting, breathable clothing » Take frequent breaks Additional information is available at http:// www.osha.gov/SLTC/heatillness/index.html

CITY OF HIGHLAND HEIGHTS, KENTUCKY ORDINANCE NO. 09-2013 AN ORDINANCE ADOPTING THE CITY OF HIGHLAND HEIGHTS, KENTUCKY ANNUAL BUDGET FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 7/1/2013 THROUGH 6/30/14, BY ESTIMATING REVENUES AND RESOURCES AND APPROPRlATING FUNDS FOR THE OPERATION OF CITY GOVERNMENT. WHEREAS, a budget proposal and message has been prepared and delivered to the Mayor and City Council; and WHEREAS, Mayor and City Council have reviewed such budget proposal and made necessary modifications; and NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY OF HIGHLAND HEIGHTS, KENTUCKY: Section I That the budget for the fiscal year beginning 7/1/2013 and ending 6/30/2014 is hereby adopted as follows: General Fund FY 13-14

Municipal Road Fund FY 13-14

RESOURCES AVAILABLE: Fund balance carried forward

$2,143,000.00

$69,000.00

Estimated Revenues: Property Tax Licenses & permits Intergovernment Fines & Forfeits Charges for Services Other

$ 455,000.00 $2,840,100.00 $ 45,000.00 $ -0$ 180,000.00 $ 41,900.00

Total Estimated Revenue

Appropriations: Administration Dept. Police Dept. Maintenance Dept. P&Z Expenses Streets Capital Outlay Debt Service Transfers Bond Expenditures

$ $

Transfer from General Fund Total Resources Available for Appropriation

$155,000.00

$3,562,000.00

$155,000.00

$5,705,000.00

$224,000.00

$ 697,950.00 $1,493,950.00 $ 409,000.00 $ 84,600.00 $ 58,000.00 $ 878,450.00 $ -0$ 149,000.00

$155,000.00

Total Appropriations

$3,770,950.00

$155,000.00

Excess of Resources Over/Under Appropriations

$< 208,950.00>

-0-

Estimated Fund Balance End of Fiscal Year

$1,934,050.00

$69,000.00

See attached summary of finances. Section II That this Ordinance shall be signed by the Mayor, attested by the City Clerk/Treasurer, recorded and published. Same shall be in effect at the earliest time provided by law. First reading this 4 day of June, 2013. Second reading this 18 day of June, 2013.

CE-1001768161-01


LIFE

JUNE 27, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • B11

DEATHS Elizabeth Bachman Elizabeth Bachman, 83, of Newport, died June 13, 2013, at the Baptist Convalescent Home. Survivors include her husband, George F. Bachman; sons, Daniel, David and Michael Bachman; daughters, Dawn Frazier, JoAnn Bachman and Jennifer Tomlinson; 16 grandchildren and 14 great-grand-

children. Burial was at Oakland Cemetery in Grants Lick.

Patricia Cope Patricia L. Cope, 80, of Newport, died June 16, 2013, at her home. Her daughters, Karen Jean Riley and Barbara Ann Thomas, died previously. Survivors include her hus-

band, Joe Cope; son, Clarence Earl Thomas; daughters, Sharon Stevens and Earla Mae Roberts; brother, Samuel Flack; seven grandchildren, seven greatgrandchildren, and two greatgreat-grandchildren. Memorials: American Heart Association, 240 Whittington Pkwy., Louisville, KY 40222.

Earl Dietz

Earl Dietz, 58, of Walton, died June 14, 2013, at the St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He was a member of the New Hope Tabernacle Church of God in Walton. Survivors include his wife, Linda G. Oditt; son, Carl Dietz of California; daughter, Olympia Dietz of Burlington; brothers, Richard Dietz of Crittenden, Ray Dietz of Covington, John Dietz

of Burlington, and Rodney Dietz of Corinth; sisters, Alma Dietz of Crittenden, Evelyn Tomlin of Gallatin County, Carol Dietz of Hebron, Judy Brown of Loveland, Ohio, Brenda Whitson of Gallatin County and Mary Ann Perkins of Erlanger; and one grandson. Burial was at Walton Cemetery. Memorials: Sevierville Home

for Children care of New Hope Tabernacle, 1404 Walton-Nicholson Road, Walton, KY 41094.

Ruth Egan Ruth Wood Egan, 89, of Crestview, died June 19, 2013, at Highlandsprings of Fort Thomas. She was a homemaker, former commissioner for the city of

See DEATHS, Page B12

POLICE REPORTS ALEXANDRIA Arrests/citations Andrew T. Guenther, 21, 8742 Heritage Drive, speeding, DUI first offense at Alexandria Pike, May 25. Harvey Eubanks III, 59, 1625 Sycamore St., probation violation for felony offense at 7203 Alexandria Pike, May 20.

Incidents/investigations Careless driving Report of vehicle spinning tires and causing smoke cloud at 8000 Alexandria Pike, May 22. Fourth-degree assault Report of female juvenile began punching another female juvenile at 8000 Alexandria Pike, May 21. Second-degree burglary Report of garage door found open and person seen running from home at 7 Saddle Ridge Trail, May 25. Theft by unlawful taking-gasoline Report of gas drive-off at 9274 Alexandria Pike, May 24. Third-degree criminal mischief Report of motion detector lights for residence broken and thrown to ground at 7109 Alexandria Pike, May 22. Unlawful possession of a weapon on school property Report of juvenile found with lock-blade knife at 8000 Alexandria Pike, May 24.

FORT THOMAS Arrests/citations Decarla Davis, 28, 70 18th St. Apt. 102, DUI at 18th Street, June 19. Brandy Polick, 34, 11 Southview Ave., warrant at 11 Southview Ave., June 15. Anthony Jackson, 27, 11 Southview Ave., warrant at 11 Southview Ave., June 15. Ronnie Cox, 57, 818 Eustice Ave.,

ABOUT POLICE REPORTS The Community Recorder publishes the names of all adults charged with offenses. The information is a matter of public record and does not imply guilt or innocence. warrant at 90 Alexandria Pike, June 14. Aubrey Wilson, 26, 401 Madison Ave. No. 4, DUI at Grand Avenue at Carothers, June 12. Mandy Seifert, 23, 236 Highland Ave. No. 2, warrant at 236 Highland Ave., June 16. Jason Owens, 37, 1061 Nantucket Way, DUI at I-471, June 11. Andrew Krogman, 23, firstdegree disorderly conduct at 85 North Grand Ave., June 8. Bennie McCloud, 39, 400 West Ninth St., warrant at I-471, June 8. Amy McCloud, 33, 4655 Hamilton Ave., warrant at I-471, June 8. Michael Ritchie, 38, 427 Heywood Ave., second-degree fleeing or evading, thirddegree criminal trespassing, warrant at 40 Gaddis Drive, June 9. Sally Langenbahn, 62, 622 Watchcove Court, DUI at South Fort Thomas Ave., June 8. Ryan Brueggen, 23, 29 Arcadia, DUI at I-471 north, June 6. Michelle Mercer, 27, 946 Surfridge Drive, DUI at I-471 south, June 7.

Incidents/investigations Theft by deception, theft of identity At 92 Eagle View Lane, June 18. Theft by unlawful taking At 64 Villa Grande, June 15. At 11 Dumfries, June 7. At 40 Hollywoods Drive No. 204,

ORDINANCE NO. O-08-2013 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF FORT THOMAS, CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY, AMENDING SECTION 93.11 OF THE “CITY OF FORT THOMAS CODE OF ORDINANCES” RELATING TO THE FEES FOR USERS OF THE CITY’S EMERGENCY MEDICAL AND LIFE SQUAD SERVICES. WHEREAS, the City of Fort Thomas has traditionally based its billing fees for emergency medical and life squad services on the average regional industry standards; and WHEREAS, the industry standards for emergency medical and life squad services increases annually; and WHEREAS, the City of Fort Thomas last increased the fee for emergency medical and life squad services in 2006 and 2007; and WHEREAS, the City of Fort Thomas fees for emergency medical and life squad services are approximately 12% below the average regional industry standards; and WHEREAS, the Board of Council of the City of Fort Thomas has determined that the fees for emergency medical and life squad services should be adjusted to reflect the average insurance industry standards. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED BY THE BOARD OF COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF FORT THOMAS, CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY, AS FOLLOWS: SECTION I That the § 93.11 of the “City of Fort Thomas Code of Ordinances,” relating to the fees for users of the city’s emergency medical services, be and the same is hereby amended as follows: § 93.11 FEE SCHEDULE. (B) The city hereby establishes the following schedule of fees of for users of the city’s emergency medical services: FEE SERVICE $700 Advanced Life Support Response $760 Advanced Life Support 1 $810 Advanced Life Support 2 $500 $570 Basic Life Support – EM Response $20 Oxygen $11.00 $12.00 per mile Mileage (Per transport mile) $750 Automobile Extrication SECTION II The provisions of this ordinance are severable. If any provision, section, paragraph, or part thereof is subsequently held invalid, such decision shall not affect or impair the validity of the remainder of this ordinance. SECTION III This ordinance shall be in full force and effect from and after the date of its approval, adoption and publication as provided by law. APPROVED: _________________________________________ Mary H. Brown, Mayor 1st Reading: June 3, 2013 June 17, 2013 Adopted: June 27, 2013 Published: ATTEST: _________________________________ Melissa K. Kelly, City Clerk CE-1001767655-01

May 29.

HIGHLAND HEIGHTS Arrests/citations Paul Foley, 32, 2211 Gribble Drive, second-degree possession of a controlled substance at I-275 west, June 9.

Incidents/investigations Second degree burglary At 41 Rose Ave., June 7. Theft by unlawful taking At 2527 Wilson Ave., June 12.

NEWPORT Arrests/citations Katie Coslett, 34, 712 St. Joseph Lane, theft by unlawful taking at 160 Pavilion Parkway, June 16. David Memering, 48, 906 Central Ave., fourth-degree assault at 906 Central Ave., June 15. Natasha Herald, 34, 316 West 10th St. No. 1, theft by unlawful taking at 130 Pavilion Parkway, June 15. Mark Saunders, 46, 439 West 11th St., first-degree possession of a controlled substance, third-degree possession of a controlled substance at 800 Saratoga St., June 15. Lisa Faye Allen, 49, 123 Harvard

Place, theft by unlawful taking, possession of drug paraphernalia at 82 Carothers Road, June 11. Roy Cunningham IV, 20, 824 Saratoga St., Apt. 2, theft by unlawful taking at 82 Carothers Road, June 10. Antonio Furlow, 19, 2043 Garrard St., theft by unlawful taking at 82 Carothers Road, June 10. Rico Fields, 36, 3115 Cavanaugh Ave., second-degree disorderly conduct, possession of marijuana, first-degree possession of a controlled substance at 401 Central Ave., June 10. Kenneth Kilgore, 42, 118 Idelwood Drive, careless driving, second-degree fleeing or evading, carrying a concealed deadly weapon at 900 block of York St., June 8. Carl Kirkendal, 31, 429 Hodge St., first-degree wanton endangerment, possession of firearm by a convicted felon at 829 Ann St., June 7. Mina Copley, 25, 625 Monroe St., fourth-degree assault at 625 Monroe St., June 6. Bryan Plummer, 32, 5232 West State Route 63, possession of drug paraphernalia, firstdegree possession of a controlled substance at 130 Pavilion

Parkway, June 6. Joseph Gumbert, 28, 1206 Soneman Lane, first-degree possession of a controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia at 130 Pavilion Parkway, June 6. Christopher Cooper, 35, 520 Central Ave. No. 303, fourthdegree assault at 520 Central Ave., June 6. Jeff Gamble, 32, 412 Dalewood Drive, theft by unlawful taking at 82 Carothers Road, June 6. Richard Woods, 43, 2519 Augus-

Estimated Carry-Over Balance

I hereby certify that the following are the Titles and Summaries of Ordinances 2013-08 and 2013-09 of the City of Alexandria, in Campbell County, Kentucky, adopted by City Council on June 20, 2013: ORDINANCE NO. 2013-08: AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF ALEXANDRIA, IN CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY, ADOPTING THE ANNUAL BUDGET FOR THE FISCAL YEAR JULY 1, 2013 THROUGH JUNE 30, 2014, BY ESTIMATING REVENUES AND RESOURCES, AND APPROPRIATING FUNDS FOR THE OPERATION OF CITY GOVERNMENT. This Ordinance adopts the City’s budget for the 2013/2014 fiscal year. This Budget anticipates $4,076,893 in revenues for the General Fund Budget; and appropriates $4,076,893 for General Fund expenses. ORDINANCE NO. 2013-09: AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF ALEXANDRIA, KENTUCKY ESTABLISHING REGULATIONS FOR THE OPERATION OF USED PROPERTY BUSINESSES IN ALEXANDRIA, CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY; AND REPEALING ALEXANDRIA ORDINANCE #2009-02. This Ordinance adopts regulations for the treatment of used property similar to those in the Ordinance adopted by Campbell County Fiscal Court, and repeals Alexandria’s previous Ordinance on the same subject. This Ordinance contains the following Section containing penalties for violations: SECTION 2: PENALTY (A) Criminal Penalties, Company or Corporation - Each separate violation of any section of this Chapter committed by a business, company, or corporation, shall be a Class B Misdemeanor for which the criminal fine shall not exceed the maximum amount of $5,000.00. (B) Criminal Penalties, Individual - Each separate violation of any section of this Chapter, committed by an individual shall be a Class B Misdemeanor for which the criminal fine shall not exceed the maximum amount of $250.00, and/or imprisonment not to exceed ninety (90) days. *************************************** I, Michael A. Duncan, an attorney licensed to practice law in the Commonwealth of Kentucky, for Ziegler & Schneider, P.S.C., City Attorneys for the City of Alexandria, in Campbell County, Kentucky, do hereby certify that this Notice of Adoption, Titles and Summaries of Ordinances 2013-08 and 2013-09 was prepared by me, and that it represents an accurate description of the summaries of the contents of the Ordinances. The full text of the Ordinances, exhibits, and other information relative to the Ordinances, are on file at the office of the City Clerk, 8236 West Main Street, Alexandria, Kentucky 41001. /s/ Michael A. Duncan For Ziegler & Schneider, P.S.C. City Attorneys 1001768235

Incidents/investigations Fourth degree assault At 925 Columbia St., June 16. At 920 Washington Ave., June 10. Second degree criminal mischief At 925 Isabella St., June 13. Theft by unlawful taking At 800 Central Ave., June 14.

ORDINANCE NO. O-09-2013 AN ORDINANCE AMENDING A GENERAL FUND BUDGET, MUNICIPAL ROAD AID FUND BUDGET, DEBT SERVICE FUND BUDGET, TOWER PARK ENTERPRISE FUND BUDGET, FOR THE CITY OF FORT THOMAS, CAMPBELL COUNTY,KY,FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 7/1/2012 – 6/30/2013, BY ESTIMATING REVENUES AND RESOURCES AND APPROPRIATING FUNDS FOR THE OPERATION OF CITY GOVERNMENT. WHEREAS, an annual budget proposal and message have been prepared and copies delivered to the Board of Council; and WHEREAS, a Public Hearing has been conducted and the Board of Council has reviewed the proposed budget for FY 2012 – 2013 and made any necessary modifications; NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY OF FORT THOMAS, CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY: SECTION I That the annual budget for the Fiscal Year beginning 7/1/2012 and ending 6/30/2013 for the following funds is hereby amended: RESOURCES AVAILABLE

NOTICE OF ADOPTION, TITLES AND SUMMARIES OF ALEXANDRIA ORDINANCES 2013-08 and 2013-09

ta Berlin, warrant, third-degree burglary at 1031 Isabella St., June 6.

GENERAL FUND $

2,824,590

MUNICIPAL ROAD AID FUND $ 599,599

TOWER PARK FUND $

567,107

REVENUES Taxes Licenses/ Permits Fines/Penalties Investment Income State/Fed/ Reimb Rev Current Services Projected Assessments Miscellaneous Transfer Funds Franchise Tax

4,638,900 4,527,500 81,655 233,327

500

244,368 294,658

280,000

561,628

77,664

82,181 108,181

5,000

500

5,000

75,200

TOTAL REVENUES

10,369,559 10,445,849

438,364

5,500

TOTAL AVAILABLE FUNDS

13,194,149 13,270,439

1,037,963

572,607

GENERAL FUND

MUNICIPAL ROAD AID FUND

TOWER PARK FUND

EXPENDITURES

General Administration Police Department Fire Department Recreation Department General Services Dept. Grants and Subsidies Capital Improvements Transfer Funds Current Services

1,109,526 1,135,526 3,186,396 2,712,414 2,762,704 555,205 2,136,234

474,920 364,920

0 14,000 12,301 15,800

654,176

TOTAL EXPENDITURES

10,353,951 10,430,241

364,920 474,920

28,101 42,101

ESTIMATED SURPLUS

2,840,198

673,043 563,043

544,506 530,506

This Ordinance shall be signed by the Mayor, attested by the City Clerk, published according to KRS Chapter 424, and shall be in effect at the earliest date provided by law. APPROVED: ____________________ 1st Reading: June 3, 2013

Mary H. Brown, Mayor

ADOPTED: June 17, 2013 Published: June 27, 2013 ATTEST: ________________________ Melissa K. Kelly, City Clerk

$&"!''!#%#%%'"'!


LIFE

B12 • CCF RECORDER • JUNE 27, 2013

DEATHS Continued from Page B11 Crestview, and a member of St. Joseph Church in Cold Spring. Her husband, Larry Egan; son, Thomas Egan; and brother, Donald Wood, died previously. Survivors include her daughter, Cherie Teismann; sons, Terry Egan and Tim Egan; six grandchildren and five great-grandchildren. Burial was at Evergreen Cemetery in Southgate. Memorials: Hospice of the Bluegrass, 7388 Turfway Road, Florence, KY 41042; or St. Joseph Church, 4011 Alexandria Pike, Cold Spring, KY 41076.

Wanda Firth Wanda Rose Firth, 88, of Newport, died June 17, 2013, at the Baptist Convalescent Center. She was a retired secretary with the DAV, and member of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in

Newport. Her husband, Frank S. Firth, died previously. Survivors include her daughters, Joan Boeddeker of Fort Thomas, Cheryl S. Peeno of Davenport, Fla., and Lisa Hill of Anderson Twp., Ohio; sons, Frank E. Firth of Camp Springs, and John T. Firth of Edgewood; brother, Charles Bridewell of Cold Spring; 15 grandchildren and 17 great-grandchildren. Burial was at Evergreen Cemetery in Southgate. Memorials: the Alzheimer’s Association, 644 Linn St., Suite 1026, Cincinnati, OH 45203.

Cynthia Kissee Cynthia K. Kissee, 62, of Alexandria, died June 19, 2013, at Christ Hospital. Her brothers, Khym and Steven Berwanger, died previously. Survivors include her hus-

band, Gary Kissee; children, Scott Winkler, Gary Kissee, Kyle Kissee, Sean Kissee, Tonya Sper and Tracey Maher; sisters, Bonnie Nichols and Laure Stillings; and 14 grandchildren. Memorials: Cleveland Clinic, Lung Transplant Center, PO Box 931517, Cleveland, OH 44193.

Barbara Meyers Barbara Jean Meyers, 65, of Fort Thomas, died June 17, 2013, at her residence. She was a computer programmer with Watson Pools. Her parents, Louis and Mary Meyers; brother, Donald Meyers; and sister, Lois Weller, died previously. Survivors include many nieces, nephews, grandnieces and grandnephews. Interment was at St. Stephen Cemetery in Fort Thomas. Memorials: American Heart Association, 5211 Madison Road, Cincinnati, OH 45227.

June Murray

ABOUT OBITUARIES Basic obituary information and a color photograph of your loved one is published without charge by The Community Press. Please call us at 283-0404 for more information. To publish a larger memorial tribute, call 513-2424000 for pricing details. For the most up-to-date Northern Kentucky obituaries, click on the “Obituaries” link at NKY.com.

June E. Murray, 85, of Newport, died June 19, 2013, at Indianspring of Oakley, Ohio. She was a homemaker, retired from the IRS in Covington, member of the First Baptist Church in Newport, a Kentucky Colonel, volunteer at the election polls, and graduate of Newport High School. Her husband, Eugene Murray, and brother, James Huber, died

previously. Survivors include her sons, Mike Murray of Newport, and William Murray of Covington; sister, Joyce Huber of Erlanger; four grandchildren and several great-grandchildren. Burial was at Highland Cemetery in Fort Mitchell. Memorials: First Baptist Church of Newport, East 8th & York St., Newport, KY 41071.

Robert Nutter Robert Nutter, 86, of Fort Thomas, died June 11, 2013, at the Emeritus of Edgewood. He was a retired iron worker with Union Local 44, and was a World War II Marine veteran. His wife, Gloria Martin Nutter, and sister, Phyllis Fields, died previously. Survivors include his daughter, Gloria McDaniel of California, Ky.; son, Barry Gray of Exeter, Calif.; sister, Janet Likes of South California; 11 grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Burial was at Spring Grove Cemetery. Memorials: Hospice of the Bluegrass, 7388 Turfway Road, Florence, KY, 41042.

Charles Prebble Charles Wilbert “Webb” Prebble, 91, of Grants Lick, died June 17, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. He was a member of the

Advertisement for Bids The Campbell County Extension Service, 3500 Alexandria Pike, Highland Heights, KY 41076 will accept sealed bids for Garden Grounds with Landscaping and Snow Remov al (separate bids for each). Bids will be accepted until July 16, 2013 4:00 p.m. Sealed bids must be marked "Garden Grounds with Landscaping" and "Snow Removal". Specifi cations for bids can be picked up any time afat said address. Walk ter July 1, 2013 throughs are scheduled for July 10, 9:00 am and July 11, 5:00 pm. Bidders are required to attend one of the scheduled walk throughs before submitting bids. The Campbell County Extension District Board reserves the right to waive any informalities or to reject any and all bids. No bidder may withdraw his bid within 30 days after the actual date of opening thereof. 1001767079

LEGAL NOTICE Notice is hereby given that IPSCO Tubulars (KY) Inc. located at 100 Steel Plant Road, Wilder, Kentucky 41071, has filed an applica tion with the Kentucky Energy and Environ ment Cabinet to temporarily place fill materi als in the northern portion of the facility within the limits of the 100-year floodplain as part of ongoing facility expansion activities. The IPSCO facility is located at 100 Steel Plant Road, in Wilder, Kentucky between Route 9 and the Licking River. Any comments or objections concerning this application shall be directed to: Kentucky Division of Water, Surface Water Permit Branch, Flood Plain Management Section, 200 Fair Oaks Lane, Frankfort, Kentucky 40601. Phone: (502) 5643410. 1001768027

CITY OF FORT THOMAS, KENTUCKY CAMPBELL COUNTY LEGAL NOTICE Sealed proposals will be received at the office of the City Clerk, Municipal Building, City of Fort Thomas, 130 N. Ft. Thomas Avenue, Campbell County, Kentucky, until 11:15 A.M. local time on JULY 12, 2013, for furnishing all labor, materials, and equipment necessary to complete project known as FORT THOMAS WINKLER BALLFIELD GRADING AND SEEDING PROGRAM , and, at said time and place, publicly opened and read aloud. Contract documents, bid sheets, plans and specifications can be obtained at the General Services Department, City of Fort Thomas, 130 N. Ft. Thomas Avenue, Fort Thomas, Kentucky, 41075, for $25.00 per set, (non-refundable). Plans requested by mail will be an additional $1 5 . 0 0 per set. Checks shall be made payable to the City of Fort Thomas. Specifications will also be on file in the plan room of the Allied Construction Industries, (ACI). Each bidder is required to submit with his proposal a bid bond in the amount of one hundred percent (100%) of the base bid or certified check equal in amount to ten percent (10%) of the base bid. The bidder to whom the contract is awarded will be required to furnish a surety bond in an amount equal to one-hundred percent (100%) of the contract amount. Bid security furnished in Bond form shall be issued by a Surety Company or Corporation licensed in the State of Kentucky to provide said surety. Proposals must contain the full name of the party or parties submitting the same and all persons interested therein. It is the intent and requirements of the City of Fort Thomas that this project be completed no later than OCTOBER 1, 2013. When the total overall project exceeds $250,000, all bidders must comply with the prevailing wage rates in the State of Kentucky. It is anticipated that the Prevailing Wage Law will not apply to this project. The successful bidder will be required to have a current occupational license in the City of Fort Thomas before the Contract will be awarded. The Council of the City of Fort Thomas reserves the right to waive irregularities and to reject any or all bids. The Council of the City of Fort Thomas shall authorize acceptance of the bid made by the responsible bidder who, in Council’s judgment, offers the best and most responsive proposal to the City, considering quality, service, performance record, and price; or Council may direct the rejection of all bids. The City may award based on "functional equivalence" concerning specified work or products. By the order of the Council of the City of Fort Thomas Mayor, City of Fort Thomas Publishing Date: Campbell County Recorder- JUNE 27, 2013 1768047

CITY OF FORT THOMAS, KENTUCKY CAMPBELL COUNTY LEGAL NOTICE Sealed proposals will be received at the office of the City Clerk, Municipal Building, City of Fort Thomas, 130 N. Ft. Thomas Avenue, Campbell County, Kentucky, until 11:00 A.M. local time on JULY 12, 2013, for furnishing all labor, materials, and equipment necessary to complete project known as FORT THOMAS WINKLER BALLFIELD FENCING PROGRAM , and, at said time and place, publicly opened and read aloud. Contract documents, bid sheets, plans and specifications can be obtained at the General Services Department, City of Fort Thomas, 130 N. Ft. Thomas Avenue, Fort Thomas, Kentucky, 41075, for $25.00 per set, (non-refundable). Plans requested by mail will be an additional $1 5 . 0 0 per set. Checks shall be made payable to the City of Fort Thomas. Specifications will also be on file in the plan room of the Allied Construction Industries, (ACI). Each bidder is required to submit with his proposal a bid bond in the amount of one hundred percent (100%) of the base bid or certified check equal in amount to ten percent (10%) of the base bid. The bidder to whom the contract is awarded will be required to furnish a surety bond in an amount equal to one-hundred percent (100%) of the contract amount. Bid security furnished in Bond form shall be issued by a Surety Company or Corporation licensed in the State of Kentucky to provide said surety. Proposals must contain the full name of the party or parties submitting the same and all persons interested therein. It is the intent and requirements of the City of Fort Thomas that this project be completed no later than DECEMBER 1, 2013. When the total overall project exceeds $250,000, all bidders must comply with the prevailing wage rates in the State of Kentucky. It is anticipated that the Prevailing Wage Law will not apply to this project. The successful bidder will be required to have a current occupational license in the City of Fort Thomas before the Contract will be awarded. The Council of the City of Fort Thomas reserves the right to waive irregularities and to reject any or all bids. The Council of the City of Fort Thomas shall authorize acceptance of the bid made by the responsible bidder who, in Council’s judgment, offers the best and most responsive proposal to the City, considering quality, service, performance record, and price; or Council may direct the rejection of all bids. The City may award based on "functional equivalence" concerning specified work or products. By the order of the Council of the City of Fort Thomas Mayor, City of Fort Thomas Publishing Date: Campbell County Recorder - JUNE 27, 2013 1768040

Grants Lick Baptist Church, Army veteran of World War II, and a TANK bus driver for 32 years. His wife, Bernice Baker Prebble, and sister, Kathryn Windgassen, died previously. Survivors include his sons, Charles Stephen “Steve” Prebble of Alexandria, and Milford “Dale” Prebble of Grants Lick; two grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. Burial was at Oakland Cemetery in Grants Lick. Memorials: Grants Lick Baptist Church, 941 Clayridge Road, Alexandria, KY 41001.

Ronald Rachford Ronald T. Rachford, 67, of Loveland, Ohio, formerly of Highland Heights, died June 12, 2013, at Hospice of Cincinnati in Blue Ash. He was a Vietnam War Marine veteran, attended Campbell County High School, was a painter and paper hanger for Viox Services in Cincinnati, member of the American Legion and the Eagles in St. Bernard, and an avid Reds fan. His sister, Denice Rachford, died previously. His daughter, Carmen Buck of Loveland, Ohio; stepdaughters, Deanna McCreanor of St. Bernard, Ohio, Brenda Keppel of St. Bernard, and Mindy Schildmeyer of St. Bernard; sisters, Theresa Arnold of Alexandria, and Connie Roll of Melbourne; brothers, William Rachford Jr. of Alexandria, Mark Rachford of Crittenden, Steve Rachford of Highland Heights, and Tim Rachford of Alexandria; four grandchildren and three greatgrandchildren. Memorials: Wounded Warrior

Project, P.O. Box 758517, Topeka, KS 66675.

Phil Schmidt Phil H. Schmidt, 72, of Wilder, died June 16, 2013, at Select Specialty Hospital of Northern Kentucky. He was a retired office manager with Roger Schweitzer & Sons, member of Christ Church United Church of Christ in Fort Thomas and Fort Thomas Retired Men’s Club, and past master of Alexandria Lodge No. 152 (F&AM). Survivors include his wife, Celia Schmidt of Wilder; daughters, Billie C. Johnson of Highland Heights, and Claudia N. Johnson of Fort Thomas; sons, Phil Richard Schmidt of Livermore, Calif., and Steven Brent Schmidt of Alexandria; brothers, Earl C. and Donald Schmidt, both of Alexandria; sisters, Rosemary Clark of Maineville, Ohio, and Henrietta Elzey of Hilliard, Ohio; and three grandchildren. Memorials: Christ Church United Church of Christ, 15 S. Fort Thomas Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075; or Oakland United Methodist Church Building Fund, P.O. Box 368, Alexandria, KY 41001.

Edgar Smith Edgar H. Smith, 88, of Cold Spring, died June 17, 2013, at Highlandspring of Fort Thomas. He was a World War II Army veteran, and a long-time member of the Kings and Queens. His brother, Walter Smith, and sister, Uvonna “Bonnie”

See DEATHS, Page B13

CITY OF HIGHLAND HEIGHTS, KENTUCKY ORDINANCE NO. 10-2013 AN ORDINANCE AMENDING THE CITY OF HIGHLAND HEIGHTS, KENTUCKY ANNUAL BUDGET FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 7/1/2012 THROUGH 6/30/13, BY ESTIMATING REVENUES AND RESOURCES AND APPROPRIATING FUNDS FOR THE OPERATION OF CITY GOVERNMENT. WHEREAS, a budget amendment has been prepared and delivered to the Mayor and City Council; and WHEREAS, Mayor and City Council have reviewed such budget amendment and made necessary modifications; and NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY OF HIGHLAND HEIGHTS, KENTUCKY: Section I That the annual budget for the fiscal year beginning 7/1/2012 and ending 6/30/2013 is amended as follows: Municipal Road Fund FY 12-13

General Fund FY 12-13 RESOURCES AVAILABLE: Fund balance carried forward$2,000,000.00 2,085,067.00

$125,000.00 69,000.00

Estimated Revenues: $ 453,000.00 458,000.00 Property Tax $ 2,775,800.00 2,824,000.00 Licenses & permits $ 37,212.00 45,000.00 Intergovernment $ -0Fines & Forfeits $ 183,000.00 185,000.00 Charges for Services $ 69,200.00 108,700.00 Other Public Works Bldg Bond/School - 0- 1,581,222.00

$140,000.00 155,000.00

$0

Transfer from General Fund $ 3,518,212.00 5,201,922.00

$140,000.00 155,000.00

Total Resources Available for $ 5,518,212.00 7,286,989.00 Appropriation

$265,000.00 224,000.00

Appropriations: Administration Dept. Police Dept. Maintenance Dept. P&Z Expenses Streets

$ 701,345.00 702,950.00 $ 1,496,300.00 1,617.200.00 $ 421,000.00 391,400.00 $ 81,100.00 86,800.00

$140,000.00 $155,000.00

Capital Outlay Debt Service Transfers Bond Expenditures

$ 60,000.00 $ 86500.00 $ 815,125.00 $ 824,139.00 $ -0$ -0- 1,435,000.00

Total Appropriations

$3,574,870.00 $5,143,989.00

Total Estimated Revenue

$144,000.00 $ 155,000.00

Excess of Resources Over/Under Appropriations $<56,658.00> $ 57,933.00

$0 $0

Estimated Fund Balance End of Fiscal Year

$125,000.00 $69,000.00

$1,943,342.00 $2,143,000.00

See attached summary of finances. Section II That this Ordinance shall be signed by the Mayor, attested by the City Clerk/Treasurer, recorded and published. Same shall be in effect at the earliest time provided by law. First reading this 4 day of June, 2013. Second reading this 18 day of June, 2013. MAYOR GREGORY V. MEYERS ATTESTED: JEAN A. RAUF CITY CLERK/TREASURER ORD13.10 CE-1001768160-01


LIFE

JUNE 27, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • B13

DEATHS Continued from Page B12

Rose Tomlinson

Purnell, died previously. Survivors include his wife, Wilma Lampe Smith; daughters, Karen Puckett, Patti Hillebrand and Vickie Schneider; son, Michael Smith; sister, Frances Peluso; and eight grandchildren. Interment was at the Alexandria Cemetery. Memorials: Campbell County Animal Shelter, 1989 Poplar Ridge Road, Melbourne, KY 41059; or Hospice of the Bluegrass, 7388 Turfway Road, Florence, KY 41042.

Rose Franklin Tomlinson, 78, of Newport, died June 15, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. Survivors include her husband, Bobby Tomlinson; sons, Gary Franklin and Paul McMillin; daughters, Shawn Haynes, Mary Janser and Allora Ransom; six grandchildren, seven great-grandchildren and three great-great-grandchildren. Burial was at Floral Hills Cemetery. Memorials: Newport First Church of the Nazarene, 820 York St., Newport, KY 41071.

MARRIAGE LICENSES Michele Haun, 35, of Cincinnati and Jeremy Muller, 33, of Denville, issued June 6. Jill Liebisch, 23, of Cincinnati and David Spicer, 24, of Colchester, issued June 6. Silvia Paredes, 40, of Santiago and Mario Morales, 37, of Ecuador, issued June 7. Nicole Cartade, 25, of Cincinnati and Andrew Barde, 29, of Bellevue, issued June 7. Pamela Doyle, 58, of Covington and Robert White, 57, of Langley, issued June 10. Kacey Gibbs, 29, of Louisville and Nathan Diesman, 23, of Fort Thomas, issued June 10. Ciara Evans, 28, of Cincinnati and Kwasi Asante, 42, of Accra, issued June 10. Meredith Siegman, 28, and Drew Tilow, 28, both of Cincinnati, issued June 11.

Carole Farris, 47, of Cincinnati and Brand Karrick, 52, of Bowling Green, issued June 12. Jennifer Sullivan, 32, of Cincinnati and Andrew Ritter, 26, of Edgewood, issued June 11. Beverly Pitchford, 59, of Cincinnati and Russell Barrowcliff, 60, of Springdale, issued June 11. Lois Clifton, 52, of Fort Thomas and Edward Frisa, 60, of Buffalo, issued June 11. Sharon Ackerman, 45, of Springdale and Jeffrey Baynum, 48, of Fort Thomas, issued June 11. Marjorie Zilz, 29, of Munster and Brian Beckman, 27, of Cincinnati, issued June 12. Krista Barnett, 27, of Louisville and Bradley Dunlevy, 39, of Covington, issued June 12.

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LEGAL NOTICE is hereby given that IPSCO Notice Tubulars (KY) Inc. located at 100 Steel Plant Road, Wilder, Kentucky 41071, has filed an application with the Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet to temporarily place fill materials in the southern portion of the facility within the limits of the 100year floodplain as part of ongoing facility expansion activities. The IPSCO facility is located at 100 Steel Plant Road, in Wilder, Kentucky between Route 9 and the Licking River. Any comments or objections concerning this application shall be directed to: Kentucky Division of Water, Surface Water Permit Branch, Flood Plain Management Section, 200 Fair Oaks Lane, Frankfort, Kentucky 40601. Phone: (502) 5641001768030 3410. CITY OF BELLEVUE ORDINANCE 2013-06-05 AN ORDINANCE UPDATING THE ANNUAL CLASSIFICATION AND COMPENSA TION PLAN OF THE CITY OF BELLEVUE. WHEREAS, the City Council and the Administration of the City of Bellevue recognize that a classification and compensation system which is designed to recruit and retain a quality, motivated workforce is indispensable to effective city government; and WHEREAS, it is essential to have equalpay-for-equal-work provisions for all city employees; NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED by the Board of Council of the City of Bellevue, Campbell County, Kentucky, that: SECTION 1 The classification and compensation plan attached hereto shall be the plan for administering the classification and compensa tion functions of the City of Bellevue. The classification and compensation plan may be waived, altered or suspended only by a change of ordinance. SECTION 2 This Ordinance shall become effective upon its approval, adoption and publication according to law. Edward Riehl, Mayor ATTEST: Mary H. Scott, City Clerk First Reading: Second Reading: Publication: 6/27/2013

1001768038

Energy Alliance lends helping hand with loans Community Recorder

The Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance recently surpassed a milestone, having lent out more than $1 million to local homeowners through its Greater Cincinnati Home Energy Loan Program (GCHELP). GC-HELP finances whole-home energy efficiency upgrades for homeowners who participate in the Energy Alliance’s nationally recognized Home Performance with Energy Star Program, which was developed through the organization’s participation in the Department of Energy’s Better Buildings Neighborhood Program. GC-HELP was created in 2011 with support from the Greater Cincinnati Foundation and in partnership with AFC First Financial Corporation. GC-

HELP is available to residents of Hamilton County in Ohio and Boone, Kenton, and Campbell counties in Kentucky. By removing the barrier to investment in energy efficiency with a low-interest loan and a quick and painless application process for homeowners, GC-HELP makes energy efficiency projects more manageable and encourages deeper home energy improvements. When a homeowner chooses to improve their home through the wholehome approach to energy efficiency, they are improving the way the home works as a system. Homeowners start saving money from the day a project is completed. On average, every dollar invested in energy efficiency generates three dollars in savings.

CITY OF SOUTHGATE, KENTUCKY CAMPBELL COUNTY LEGAL NOTICE Sealed proposals will be received at the office of the City Clerk, Municipal Building, City of Southgate, 122 Electric Avenue, Southgate, Campbell County, Kentucky, until 2:00:00 P.M. local time on July 23, 2013, for furnishing all labor, materials, and equipment necessary to complete project known as U.S. 27 AND MOOCK ROAD SIDEWALK PROJECT PHASE I, and, at said time and place, publicly opened and read aloud. Contract documents, bid sheets, plans and specifications can be obtained at CDS Associates, Inc., 7000 Dixie Highway, Florence, Kentucky 41042 for $50.00 per set, (non-refundable). Plans requested by mail will be an additional $ 1 5 . 0 0 per set. Checks shall be made payable to CDS Associates, Inc. Specifications will also be on file in the plan room of the Allied Construction Industries, (ACI). Each bidder is required to submit with his proposal a bid bond, certified check or cashier’s check in the amount of five percent (5 %) of the base bid. The bidder to whom the contract is awarded will be required to furnish a surety bond in an amount equal to onehundred percent (100%) of the contract amount. Bid security furnished in Bond form shall be issued by a Surety Company or Corporation licensed in the State of Kentucky to provide said surety. Proposals must contain the full name of the party or parties submitting the same and all persons interested therein. It is the intent and requirements of the owner that this project be completed within 120 calendar days of execution of contract. The project is being funded through the "Safe Routes to School" program, which is a federally funded program and the Contractor shall meet all federal, state and local requirements of said program. Contractors bidding on the project must be prequalified with KYTC and possess a Certificate of Eligibility at the time of the bid opening. All bidders must comply with the Davis Bacon Act and the requirements for FederalAid Construction projects and prevailing wage rates in the State of Kentucky. This project does fall under the provisions of KRS 337.505 and 337.550 for prevailing wage rates. A current wage rate determination is provided in the bid documents. The project shall comply with the Federal Buy American requirements as per 23CFR635.410. Each bidder must consider Disadvantaged Business Enterprises (DBE) in solicitation for subcontractors and shall comply with 23CFR635 Subpart A and Section 1101 (b) of SAFETEA-LU. The DBE Goal for this project will be 5%. The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) requirements will apply to this project. The successful bidder will be required to have a current occupational license in the City of Southgate before the Contract will be awarded. The Council of the City of Southgate, reserves the right to waive irregularities and to reject any or all bids. The Council of the City of Southgate shall authorize acceptance of the bid made by the lowest responsible bidder who, in Council’s judgment, offers the best and most responsive proposal to the City, considering quality, service, performance record, and price; or Council may direct the rejection of all bids. The City may award based on "functional equivalence" concerning specified work or products. By the order of the Council of the City of Southgate.

Published 6/27/13

Mayor Jim Hamberg, City of Southgate 1768174

ORDINANCE NO. O-10-2013 AN ORDINANCE ADOPTING A GENERAL FUND BUDGET, MUNICIPAL ROAD AID FUND BUDGET, DEBT SERVICE FUND BUDGET, TOWER PARK ENTERPRISE FUND BUDGET, CAPITAL PROJECTS CBD FUND, AND WASTE DISPOSAL FUND BUDGET FOR THE CITY OF FORT THOMAS, CAMPBELL COUNTY, KY, FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 7/1/2013 – 6/30/2014, BY ESTIMATING REVENUES AND RESOURCES AND APPROPRIATING FUNDS FOR THE OPERATION OF CITY GOVERNMENT. WHEREAS, an annual budget proposal and message have been prepared and copies delivered to the Board of Council; and WHEREAS, a Public Hearing has been conducted and the Board of Council has reviewed the proposed budget for FY 2013 – 2014; NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY OF FORT THOMAS, CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY: SECTION I That the annual budget for the Fiscal Year beginning 7/1/2013 and ending 6/30/2014 for the following funds is hereby adopted: RESOURCES GENERAL MUNICIPAL TOWER PARK AVAILABLE FUND ROAD AID FUND FUND Estimated Carry-Over $2,857,831 $1,459,926 $503,146 Balance REVENUES 4,815,640 Taxes 4,647,750 Licenses/Permits 81,655 Fines/Penalties Investment Income 233,327 State/Fed/Reimb Rev 244,368 Current Services 561,628 Projected Assessments Miscellaneous 82,181 Transfer Funds Franchise Tax

2,000 388,000 97,886 75,000

500

5,000

95,000

TOTAL REVENUES

10,666,549

657,886

5,500

TOTAL AVAILABLE FUNDS

13,524,380

2,117,812

508,646

EXPENDITURES

GENERAL MUNICIPAL TOWER PARK FUND ROAD AID FUND FUND General Administration1,244,848 Police Department 3,175,641 2,721,144 Fire Department Recreation Department 506,677 General Services Dept.2,210,039 Grants and Subsidies Capital Improvements 497,000 20,000 Transfer Funds 750,154 Current Services 15,800 TOTAL EXPENDITURES

10,608,503

ESTIMATED SURPLUS2,915,877

497,000

35,800

1,620,812

472,846

SECTION II That the annual budget for the fiscal year beginning 7/1/2013 and ending 6/30/2014 for the following funds is adopted as follows: RESOURCES AVAILABLE Estimated Carry-Over Bal.

DEBT SERVICE FUND $-0-

REVENUES Interest Income Subscriber Fees Transfer Funds

744,564

TOTAL REVENUES

744,564

TOTAL AVAILABLE REVENUES

744,564

EXPENDITURES Debt Principal Payments Debt Interest Payments Program Fees Transfer Funds Capital Expense TOTAL EXPENDITURES ESTIMATED SURPLUS

419,250 325,314

744,564 -0SECTION III

That the annual budget for the fiscal year beginning 7/1/2013 and ending 6/30/2014 for the following funds is adopted as follows: RESOURCES AVAILABLE

CAPITAL PROJECTS FUND CBD Estimated Carry-Over Bal. -0Current Services Transfer Funds 631,000 Lease Revenue Interest Income 500 Miscellaneous 55,450

WASTE FUND $1,675 818,938

TOTAL REVENUES

686,950

818,938

TOTAL AVAIL. FUNDS

686,950

820,613

EXPENDITURES Midway Project Expense Transfer to Debt Service 584,631 Transfer to General Fund Personnel Professional Services 17,500 Waste Collection Expenses Misc. Operation Funds 55,450 Parks Project TOTAL EXPENDITURES 657,581 ESTIMATED SURPLUS

29,369

813,938 813,938 6,675

This Ordinance shall be signed by the Mayor, attested by the City Clerk, published according to KRS Chapter 424, and shall be in effect at the earliest date provided by law. APPROVED: 1st Reading: June 3, 2013 ADOPTED: June 17, 2013 Published: June 27, 2013 ATTEST:. Melissa K. Kelly, City Clerk

Mary H. Brown, Mayor

CE-1001767667-01


LIFE

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Campbell county recorder 062713