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May 27, 2010

CCF Recorder

A3

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Maynard B. Futscher, 86, stands outside his home near Cold Spring May 19, with his framed medals and memorabilia from his time spent in the U.S. Army during World War II where he was among the soldiers on the front lines during the failed-Nazi counter-offensive known as the Battle of the Bulge. Futscher is the grand marshal of this year’s annual Campbell County Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3205 Memorial Day parade in Alexandria Sunday, May 30.

Battle of the Bulge vet tells story By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

Before the bullets started flying at the Battle of the Bulge, Maynard B. Futscher, 86, downplayed a hip and knee injury and hid a subsequent infection so he could join the fight. Because of Futscher’s injuries, officers offered him a chance to go home. He turned it down. “We had two boys at that time in Camp Springs who were fatalities, and I couldn’t have gone home with a complaint like that,” Futscher said. His decision landed him on the front lines of one of World War II’s most decisive and brutal battles as the Germans counter-attacked in the Ardennes Forest of Belgium and Luxembourg in December 1944 in kneehigh snow and zero-degree temperatures. Futscher, grand marshal of this year’s annual Memorial Day parade sponsored by Campbell County Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3205 in Alexandria, said he doesn’t want anyone to think his story is only about himself, but is about all the men he fought with. Until 2009 had never shared his story of combat service with anyone, not even his family, until he told his brother on a road trip. “My wife didn’t know it,” he said. Futscher said when he came back from the war his father asked what the war was like for him after his family noticed he was more serious and less jovial than he had been. “I said, ‘Dad it was tough,’” Futscher said. For decades that was the end of the discussion. Futscher was inducted into the U.S. Army in January 1943 at the age 19. While in England, Futscher seriously injured his knee and hip when he missed a plank walkway and fell while carrying a 90 pound box of ammunition from a ship while on a security detail to guard the ship’s cargo. Despite his injured hip bothering him, Futscher went into combat in France and then Belgium after the D-Day invasion, signing a waiver because his commanders wanted to send him home. Wading across a canal on a mission with his unit his wound became infected. Later, he and about 200 other soldiers were ordered to get on two-ton trucks and were taken to the front lines of what would later be known as the Battle of the

Bulge where temperatures hovered around zero degrees. He was never able to change his socks or other clothing once in position, Futscher said. “I went 68 days from start to finish without as much as a piece of paper on my head for shelter, me and all the rest of us,” he said. The Germans shot and killed them, and they shot at and killed Germans, Futscher said. “It wasn’t just I, it was we,” he said. Christmas passed by as just another day, and a heavy fog rolled in and no air cover was available for them, he said. Extra ammunition was brought up, and they were told to shoot at anything they thought moved, he said. For two days, they fired guns so frequently the barrels would heat up and have to be cooled off in the snow or they would bend, Futscher said. “The valley was so full of the gun smoke you couldn’t hardly breathe,” he said. Previously he had memorized the “Memoria” from the prayer book he protected in his helmet as he waded across the canal. Now mortar shells were falling around him. “Things got so bad that I stood up in all that...I stood up and recited that prayer,” he said. Everyone around him yelled at him to get down, Futscher said. “I told the Lord take me or spare me,” he said. After a mortar round hit nearby, he looked back and where he had been there was a hunk of mortar shell, Futscher said. Futscher said he and the other men in his unit heard almost no news in this time, there were even rumors that the U.S. had been invaded by Japan. Their only connection to the world was to watch for the “Flag” flying at the command post tent nearby. The officers told them if it wasn’t flying, they were on their own, he said. “Capitalize ‘Flag’ every time I say it,” Futscher says. When they did see the ‘Flag,’ it boosted their morale, he said. Futscher said he can’t stand seeing the flag desecrated in any way because of what he and his comrades in arms went through to protect the it and what it represented. “What we went through to protect that Flag, nobody will know except us,” he said. Feb. 8, 1945 came and

Futscher’s unit was signaled to advance. His walked into a mine field, not realizing it until a soldier Futscher knew well stepped on a mine. Futscher said he rushed to his friends side despite the risk. Two medics appeared, and started to treat Futscher’s friend while he applied the pressure points when a sniper’s bullet split open Futscher’s helmet. “The shot, it opened up my helmet, but it didn’t touch me,” he said. The force of the bullet did cause Futscher’s helmet chin strap to cut up deeply up into his chin, leaving a scar he still has today. He kept holding on as the medics finished on his friend. Medics then gave him a shot to sedate him. “One corpsman said ‘Silver Star,’ and the other one said ‘Yes, Silver Star’,” he said. Futscher said at the time the silver star didn’t seem as important as helping his friend. Now bandaged, Futscher said he rejoined his unit in time to escort some German prisoners. He heard mortar shells falling, ducked for cover, and wound up on a hillside. Three mortar shells landed close enough to Futscher that he received powder burns on his face before shrapnel from another shell struck him causing him to pass out. “When I woke up that night I was maybe 30 yards down the hill from where I initially was,” he said. Futscher was alone. He had received shrapnel on the left side of his face and on his hands. “I couldn’t open my eyes,” he said. Doctors at a field hospital told him he wouldn’t see again out of his left eye, but he recovered his sight. They also told him they needed to take his left leg off because of his infection, and his right foot off because of frostbite, and he emphatically said no. “They said my legs were purple with white spots all around, but I pulled out of it,” he said. Upon recovering, he said a major and another officer presented him with a purple heart. “They told me that there would be a bronze star and a silver star presentation later when supplies came in,” Futscher said. Futscher received a bronze star, but never did receive an actual silver star, although he said it’s in his record.

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CCF Recorder

News

May 27, 2010

Toastmasters helping refine job skills By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

The words used to form the website of the Triangle Toastmasters – www.speak 2lead.org – say it all about why many people join. For years Toastmasters has been known as an organization where people refine their speaking skills, and in a tight job market new members are realizing how

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being in the not-for-profit group can make themselves more marketable. Refining job skills including being comfortable and confident in an interview is something people can practice through Toastmasters, said Dave Capano, 33, of Fort Thomas. “That’s a big part of the draw to Toastmasters, especially right now the way things are in the economy,” Capano said. Capano said for him, joining Triangle Toastmasters two months ago was more about refining leadership skills. Capano said he works as a life skills coach and was

already confident about his speaking skills having served as a public speaker before a friend encouraged him to join anyway. Officer roles in a club are a good way to practice leadership by taking on responsibility, he said. He’s already been elected as the vice president of the chapter’s education committee. Not only that, but during each meeting there are chances to do things like emcee the evening where it’s as much about practicing facilitation skills as it is about practicing communication, Capano said. A different person emcee’s each Triangle Toastmasters meeting.

Part of the vice president of education’s job is talking with members to make them comfortable enough at meetings to not just sit in the back, but get involved in the speaking and other activities, said John Humpert, 47, of Alexandria, chapter treasurer and a long-time member. “So, Dave is kind of a cheerleader for people to make progress,” Humpert said. The group is currently seeking new members because people often find more success in their life and move on, Humpert said. “People are wanting to raise their level of professionalism,” he said. Amy Barhorst, 31, of

Open house

Ludlow, is chapter president, and joined two years ago to overcome her “pure stage fright.” Barhorst said she has to give a presentation in either a small or large group setting every day where she works at Landor, a design agency in Cincinnati. She credits in part Toastmasters for helping her to a recent promotion as a client services manager. At Toastmasters, people provided constructive, but honest feedback on speaking skills, Barhorst said. “So you really are improving instead of listening to your mom say, ‘Ah, it’s OK,’” she said. People practice for things

For the curious and prospective members the Triangle Toastmasters, Campbell County’s oldest chapter founded in 1953, is having an open house at the Campbell County Cooperative Extension Service office, 3500 Alexandria Pike, Highland Heights Tuesday, June 1. The event will start with free pizza at 6:30 p.m. and the open house will begin at 7 p.m. “Don’t worry, they won’t ask you to speak, you can just observe,” said Amy Barhorst, chapter president. like basketball, so why not practice your presentation skills, Barhorst said. “It’s a safe place to practice for a big event,” Barhorst said.

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Sunday, May 30:

• The 50th annual Alexandria Memorial Day Parade sponsored by Campbell County V.F.W. Post 3205 will begin at 2 p.m. in the parking lot of Campbell County Middle School. The parade will continue south along Washington Street, west along Main Street, across U.S. 27 to Spillman Drive to the V.F.W. Post, 8261 Alexandria Pike, Alexandria. Camp Springs native Maynard B. Futscher, a U.S. Army veteran of World War II and the Battle of the Bulge, will be the

grand marshal. There will be services at the veteran’s monument and refreshments will be served afterward inside the V.F.W. post.

Memorial Day ( May 31):

• The 81st annual Bellevue/Dayton Memorial Day Parade will begin at 10:30 a.m. at Sixth Avenue and Main Street in Dayton. The parade will end at the Bellevue Vets. Bellevue Police Department Officer Travis Nunn, a U.S. Army Desert Storm veteran, will be the grand marshal. There will be ceremonies at the Veterans Monument in Dayton at the Kersten O’Day V.F.W. Post 2899 near the parade starting point at 9:30 a.m. There will also be a service at Bellevue’s city building, 616 Poplar St., at 10 a.m. A third ceremony will be at the Bellevue Vets, 24 Fairfield Ave., at the parades’ conclusion. • The 37th annual Camp

Springs Memorial Day Parade and Services sponsored by American Legion Simon Gosney Post 219 will begin at 10:30 a.m. at St. John’s Lutheran Church, Lower Tug Fork Road, taking a route along Four Mile Road to the Campbell County Fire District No. 1 Camp Springs station. Services will be held outside the firehouse at 11:30 a.m. including a presentation of a Citizen of the Year award and grade school essay awards. A noon community reception at the firehouse will immediately follow the service. • Crestview’s annual Memorial Day parade will begin at 9 a.m. in the Cline Elementary School parking lot in Cold Spring. The parade will travel along East Alexandria Pike to Dodsworth Lane, and circle through the streets of Crestview to finish at the Crestview Veterans Memorial. The city, with a population just under 500, was originally

founded by veterans of World War II as “Vet Village” in 1948. • Highland Heights’ mayor and council will have a Memorial Day Ceremony at 8:30 a.m. at Veterans Park on U.S. 27 near the I-275 overpass. The event will conclude with the city’s recreation committee serving donuts and juice. • The Newport Memorial Day Parade will begin at 9 a.m. in the parking lot across from the Campbell County Courthouse and last approximately 45 minutes. The route will be south on York Street to Sixth Street, east on Sixth to Monmouth Street, south on Monmouth to 10th Street, ending at the city building. A ceremony to honor veterans from Newport will be on the 10th street side of the Newport City Building following the parade with a continental breakfast to follow in the first floor multi-purpose room.

Chaplain of the Year

At the Knights of Columbus State Convention held in Louisville May 15, Fr. Bob Rottgers of Ft. Thomas was awarded the Chaplain of the Year for the Diocese of Covington for 2009-2010. L to R: State Chaplain, Fr. Roy Dentinger of Louisville, Fr. Bob, and the Archbishop of Louisville, Most Reverend Joseph E. Kurtz.

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News

CCF Recorder

May 27, 2010

A5

Summer reading kicks off at library By Amanda Joering Alley

ajoering@nky.com

Even though school is almost out for the summer, the learning isn’t stopping at the Campbell County Public Library. The library is once again holding its summer reading program for children, teens and adults beginning Saturday, June 5. “We offer interesting programs every week and prize incentives to encourage

people to visit the library frequently throughout the summer,” said Kiki Dreyer Burke, the library’s public relations manager. “Children and teens need to read over the summer to keep their skills sharp.” In the program, the more someone reads, the more chances they have to win various prizes, depending on age-group, ranging from a laptop to a $100 gift certificate. Dreyer Burke said the

library offers the adult program because it’s important for children to see adults reading. Laura Stanfield, children’s services librarian at the Fort Thomas branch, said the program helps children and teens perform better in school the following year. “Kids who don’t read over the summer experience greater knowledge loss and start the next school year behind their classmates who

did read,” Stanfield said. “And for the reluctant readers, the best way to get them to read is to let them choose what they want to read, and during the summer reading program at the library they can read whatever interests them.” Dreyer Burke said the summer reading program is always very popular. Last year 2,347 children and 513 teens registered for summer reading. Adults, who don’t regis-

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How to win: Sunday, August 1, 2010 all entrants will appear in The Enquirer and the first of three voting rounds will begin. We ask that all votes be accompanied by a donation to the Newspapers In Education program, however a donation is not necessary to vote or to win the Baby Idol 2010 contest. This contest is just one of the many fun and innovative programs we use to raise money to promote literacy in our local schools. Prizes: There will be one (1) First Place Winner, one (1) Runner-Up Winner and one (1) Randomly Selected Winner. First Place Winner will receive a $1,000.00 American Express gift card and a Gold Level Cincinnati Zoo family membership for the 2011 season. Runner-Up Winner and Randomly Selected Winner will each receive a $500 American Express gift card. Rules: All photographs must be of a baby or infant born on or after July 12, 2007. Baby’s name, Parent’s name and phone number should be written on the back of the photo. You must be the parent or legal guardian of the baby in the photograph in order to enter the contest. Professional photographs are allowed, with faxed copyright release from the photographer. We reserve the right to refuse a photograph submission that the staff defines as unacceptable or inappropriate.

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How to enter: You can enter your baby into the contest through mail or online. To mail in an entry complete the form and include a clear, color or black/white photo of your baby along with a suggested $5 entry donation to Newspapers In Education. NO PHOTOS WILL BE RETURNED. To enter online visit our Web site at Cincinnati.Com/babyidol and complete the entry form. All photos must be received by 5:00pm Monday, July 12, 2010. PHOTOS WILL BE PUBLISHED IN THE ENQUIRER.

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City/State/Zip _____________________________________________________________________ Phone ( _______ ) ________________________ Baby’s Birth Day _____________________________ Baby’s Name: _________________________________ Baby’s First Initial of Last Name: ___________ Email: ____________________________________________________________________________

(We will email updated voting results for Baby Idol 2010 only.)

Yes! Enter my baby in the

contest and accept my donation of $5 to benefit Newspapers In Education. (Check box on the right.)

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Photo Release — I hereby grant The Enquirer Publishing and all its entities permission to use the images of my child ________________________, solely for the purposes of Enquirer Lend-A-Hand, Inc.’s Baby Idol promotional material and publications, and waive any rights of compensation or ownership there to. Parent Signature ________________________________________ Date __________

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“We intentionally placed some of the tanks at a lower level, so that they’re at just the right height for a child to make a discovery, even before his parents or caregivers do,” Pierson said. The centerpiece of the exhibit is the giant Pacific octopus display. Essentially two tanks, the display allows the octopus to travel through tubes to change its location. Visitors will have views of the amazing creature and be able to see every detail, including the more than 1,800 suction cups on its tentacles. The octopus display greets visitors as they enter from the Shore Gallery, just past the Virtual Shark Cage. On the wall to the right as visitors enter is the display of spiny lobsters. Giant spider crabs are located behind the octopus tank in the center of the gallery. The seahorses are dis-

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A fish that walks. Creatures with electrified mouths. A fish with horns. Crabs that can grow legs up to 10 feet long. They all have two things in common. They’re weird and they’re going on display at Newport Aquarium. Some of the strangest and the most magnificent marine animals are paired together in the brand new Bizarre and Beautiful Gallery, opening Friday, May 28, at Newport Aquarium. The “Bizarre and Beautiful Gallery” was one of the original exhibit areas when the aquarium opened in 1999. With new technology, new display cases and new animals available, biologists at Newport Aquarium completely reconstructed and expanded the gallery to be bigger and more bizarre than ever. It’s filled with over 20 species of the world’s most weird and wonderful aquatic animals. One of the most popular features of the old gallery is back and displayed better than ever. A giant Pacific octopus is on display in a new multidimensional, 360 degree, see-through aquarium where it can demonstrate its amazing ability to squeeze into exceptionally small areas. The gallery also features seahorses, frogfish and yellow boxfish, among many other species, in nearly 12,000 gallons of water. Visitors will also view the Japanese spider crabs that usually dwell in the dark cold waters of Asia and are rarely seen. These are just a few of the weird creatures that are showcased with some of the most exotic and beautiful fish in the world, including stunning discus and cardinal tetras. “We set out to create an underwater world of weirdness that we think the whole family will enjoy,” said Chris Pierson, husbandry director for the aquarium. “Each animal you meet is stranger or more beautiful than the one before it.” Pierson said that every detail, down to the eye-level of the new tanks, was considered in the complete gallery renovation.

gram. For more information about summer reading, visit any branch of the library or visit www.cc-pl.org.

ter for summer reading, filled out 7,600 entry forms, which they get for reading a book, magazine or newspaper, listening to an audiobook or attending a pro-

Sunday School 9:45-10:45 a.m. Traditional Service Sunday 8:30-9:30 a.m.

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Mail to: The Enquirer 2010 Baby Idol, 312 Elm Street, Cincinnati, OH 45202. Photo deadline: 7/12/2010 NO PURCHASE OR DONATION REQUIRED TO ENTER. ALL FEDERAL, STATE, LOCAL AND MUNICIPAL LAWS AND REGULATIONS APPLY. VOID WHERE PROHIBITED. The Enquirer Lend-A-Hand Baby Idol 2010 Contest is open to Ohio, Indiana and Kentucky residents who are 18 years or older and a parent or legal guardian of a child at the time of entry. Employees of The Enquirer Lend-A-Hand, The Cincinnati Enquirer, Gannett Co., Inc., and each of their respective affiliated companies, and advertising and promotional agencies, and the immediate family members of, and any persons domiciled with, any such employees, are not eligible to enter or to win. Contest begins at 12:01 a.m. (EST) 5/23/10 and ends at 11:59 p.m. (EST) 9/8/10. Beginning at 12:01 a.m. (EST) 5/23/10 and ending at 11:59 p.m. (EST) 7/12/10, Enter by submitting a photo of your baby and a completed entry form. Entries must be submitted by a parent or legal guardian, 18 years or older. Children must have been born on or after 07/12/07 and Sponsor reserves the right to verify proof of age. Entries with incomplete or incorrect information will not be accepted. Only one (1) entry per child. Multiple births can be submitted as 1 entry with 1 photo. Enter online at Cincinnati.Com/babyidol. Enter by mail or in-person: complete an Official Entry Form available in The Cincinnati Enquirer, The Kentucky Enquirer, The Community Press and Recorder and at The Enquirer Customer Service Center, 312 Elm Street, Cincinnati, OH 45202. All entries must be received by 5:00 p.m. (EST) 7/12/10. Odds of winning depend on the number of eligible entries and votes received. Winners will be notified by telephone or email on or about 9/13/10. Participants agree to be bound by the complete Official Rules and Sponsor’s decisions. For a copy of the prize winners list (available after 9/18/10) and/or the complete Official Rules send a SASE to Baby Idol 2010 c/o The Enquirer, 312 Elm Street, Cincinnati, OH 45202 or contact Kristin Garrison at 513.768.8135 or at kgarrison@enquirer.com.

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CCF Recorder

May 27, 2010

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SCHOOLS

CCF Recorder

May 27, 2010

ACHIEVEMENTS

Editor Michelle Shaw | smhaw@nky.com | 578-1053

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Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

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A7

RECORDER

Relay For Life taps schools’ support

By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

From a mini-relay event to fundraisers including penny wars, students in several public schools across Campbell County participated in the American Cancer Society’s Relay For Life fundraiser and awareness event. This year’s Relay For Life event, 12 hours of teams walking in shifts non-stop around the track behind Newport High School, was from 6 p.m. to 6 a.m. May 21-22. Students and teachers at Crossroads Elementary also had the first ever mini-relay at a school this year, walking for four hours in the school parking lot May 20 after weeks of fundraising. Like many other places, Crossroads has already been affected by cancer, said Principal Kim Visse. “We have a kindergartner here who is a cancer survivor, she has brain tumor that is inoperable,” Visse said. There are also at least three members of staff who are cancer survivors, she said. “We, we wanted to participate

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Chuck Ford, in front, leads a group of fourth-grade students at Crossroads Elementary School in Cold Spring under a balloon finish line during a minirelay Thursday, May 20 in support of the American Cancer Society’s Relay for Life event in Newport May 21-22. in the big Relay For Life,” Visse said. The mini-relay was in honor of the students’ efforts to raise funds, she said. Students had penny wars, Tshirts were designed and sold to staff and students, and a memori-

al was put up in the school where students could buy memorials to add to it, Visse said. “We raised about $1,050 just through our students here,” she said. At Campbell County Middle School, students presented a

check in the amount of $2,266.62 to the American Cancer Society May 19. From Campbell County High School the entire football team went to the May 21-22 Relay For Life event as three different walking/fundraising teams.

Other teams from schools participating in this year’s event included Newport Middle School, Reiley Elementary School in Alexandria, and Cline Elementary School in Cold Spring. The school had a four-week penny war with the winning home room raising $425. As part of a national effort from the American Cancer Society, it was decided to move Campbell County’s annual Relay For Life event from June to May to encourage more school involvement, said Ashley Clos, a community representative for the American Cancer Society. Previously, there’s been very little school involvement, she said. The point is to teach the importance of the cause to children starting at a young age, Clos said. Funding is always needed for patient treatment and research, she said. Relay For Life typically starts in late September and early October with teams having their own fundraisers all the way up until the final walk, Clos said. “It’s not just a one night event,” she said.

One to One connects students and volunteers By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

PHOTO SUBMITTED

Highlands High junior Carly Weaver and her cousin Jesse Carpenter perform at Youth Fest in India.

Singing sends Highlands student to India By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

A chance meeting at church gave one Highlands High School junior the chance of a lifetime. When a pastor visiting from India heard Fort Thomas resident Carly Weaver singing in the choir at her church, The Bridge in Wilder, she was offered the chance to provide music for 2,000 teenagers at Youth Fest, an outreach event in India. “I’ve always been interested in other cultures and I love to travel, so I thought it sounded like a great opportunity,” Carly said. After talking it over with her family, Carly, her father and her cousin Jesse Carpenter, a guitarist, took the trip to India the first week of May along with two other members of her church. “At first I thought it would be terrifying to perform in front of all those people, but everyone was so nice it was impossible to be nervous,” Carly said. After spending the week with the teens and getting to know about their culture, Carly said she

really connected with the people and their way of life. “So many places are so westernized, but over there the culture is so traditional,” Carly said. “The hardest part of the trip was saying goodbye.” Carly’s mother Jannie Weaver said she thought the experience would benefit her daughter by showing her what life is like in other countries. “It really resulted in a change in her,” Jannie said. “By the end of the trip she was calling asking if she could stay longer.” Since returning from India, Carly said she has been working on figuring out a way to go back, which she hopes to do as soon as possible. Along with providing music at Youth Fest, Carly also got the chance to meet a group of widows who were about to lose their home. In response to their need, which Carly presented to her church, church members raised more than $4,000 for the widows. The funds, which were wired to India, secured their housing permanently.

Newport Independent Schools are hoping to increase participation in its One to One reading program. The program, which is offered by the NewCities Institute, trains volunteers to serve as one-on-one reading tutors for students in kindergarten through third grade. “Volunteers get training on how to teach reading skills and meet with a child once a week throughout the school year,” said Janet Stewart, a One to One consultant. “We’ve found that the one-onone interaction really helps the students.” Michelle Beagle, the One to One liaison at A.D. Owens Elementary School, said the second year of the program at the school went great. “It was wonderful to have three of our volunteers from last year come back to continue their work with the students,” Beagle said. “We’re hoping to get more volunteers for the next school year and double or even triple the amount of students that receive mentoring.” Through the program, which is offered at other schools in the greater Cincinnati area, volunteers receive six hours of training, then spend 35 minutes a week with a student. “The students and volunteers really do build close relationships throughout the year,” Stewart said. “It’s a very rewarding program for everyone.” Volunteer Doug Williams came back this year to work with thirdgrader Cameron Sumner, who he worked with last year. “It’s really fun for me because I have a love of reading, and I like to share that with others,” said Williams, who works for the Campbell County Public Library. “I wanted to come back because Cameron and I had a good connection last year and we really made good progress.” Anyone interested in volunteering or learning more about the program can visit www.newcities.org/onetoone.

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Fourth-graders Autumn Dreyer (left) and Cheyenne Doyen help out at the One to One celebration at A.D. Owens Friday, May 21.

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

A.D. Owens kindergartner Michael Deaton gives a gift to Nancy Stadghill, his reading tutor in the One to One reading program, at the program’s end-of-the-year celebration Friday, May 21.

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Second-grader Katie Tipton and her tutor Elaine Harden enjoy some refreshments at the One to One celebration.


A8

CCF Recorder

Schools

May 27, 2010

Students share their ‘Attitude’ toward people with disabilities Students share their “Attitude” toward people with disabilities United Cerebral Palsy of Greater Cincinnati encouraged area elementary and middle-school aged students to write an essay based on the attitudes they encounter toward people with disabilities. Students had three option for participation: Interview a child or adult with a disability and describe his/her experience with the attitudes of others, read a book about people with disabilities and describe the impact the attitudes of others had on their lives, or write about their own observations or feelings toward people with disabilities. A total of 232 students from across the tri-state submitted essays for “Atti-

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PROVIDED

From left to right: Kay Vermeil, seventh grade winner, Highlands Middle School, Ft. Thomas; Khendra Lochard, fourth grade winner, Morgan Elementary, Hamilton; Nicole Robertson, eighth grade and Overall winner, St. Mary's School, Alexandria; Cammy Dierking, Local 12 Evening News Anchor; Kristen Schack, sixth grade winner, St. Joseph School; Lillie Katherine Rideout, third grade winner, Winton Woods Elementary School; Kirsten Hausmann, fifth grade winner, St. Susanna; Jacob Kahmann, third grade winner, Morgan Elementary; Lina Olivier, fifth grade winner, St. Susanna. Kings Island for her essay titled, “Inspiring Swimmer’s with Amazing Attitudes.”

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Five Campbell County residents and Transylvania University students have been named to the Dean’s List for the 2010 winter term. Campbell County High School graduate: • Sophomore Robin Kunkel is the daughter of Steve and Cynthia Kunkel of Alexandria. Highlands High School graduates: • Sophomore Gregory McGraw is the son of Michael and Melissa McGraw of Fort Thomas. • Sophomore Victoria Poindexter is the daughter of Mary Poindexter of Fort Thomas. • Senior Jessica Tepe, a biology major, is the daughter of Marc and Sharon Tepe of Fort Thomas. Newport Central Catholic High School graduate: • Sophomore Wade McGrath is the son of Julia Kostecka of Newport. To be named to the Dean’s List, a student must achieve at least a 3.5 grade point average during the term. Transylvania, founded in 1780, is the nation’s sixteenth oldest institution of higher learning and is consistently ranked in national publications as one of the top liberal arts colleges in the country.


SPORTS BRIEFLY

This week in softball

• Bishop Brossart beat Newport 13-1, May 17. Brossart’s Alicia Miller pitched 10 strikeouts, and Marissa Bezold was 3-4, hit three doubles and had three RBI. • Bellevue beat Heritage 16-6, May 17. Bellevue’s winning pitcher is Jennifer Sexton, and Cassie Glancy was 2-4 with four RBI. • Ludlow beat Bellevue 97, May 18. Ludlow’s Miranda Ladanyi was the winning pitcher, and Sydnay Stuart was 2-4 with two RBI. Bellevue’s Taylor McIntyre was 3-4 with a double. • Bellevue beat Dayton 87, May 19. Bellevue’s Maddie Blevins pitched nine strikeouts, and was 2-5 at bat with four RBI and two doubles. Dayton’s Sammy Powell was 3-5 with two RBI. • Dayton beat Heritage 122 in six innings, May 19. Dayton’s Aubrey Donelan was the winning pitcher, and C.C. Centers was 2-3 with a double and a homerun. • Newport Central Catholic beat Villa Madonna 6-0, May 20. New Cath’s Danielle Hausfeld pitched 11 strikeouts, and Hannah Thiem had two RBI. • St. Henry beat Highlands 3-0, May 20. Highlands’ Allie Conner was 3-3. • Bishop Brossart beat Newport Central Catholi 1-0, May 22. Brossart’s Alicia Miller pitched 12 strikeouts, and Lindsay Griffith was 2-4 with a double and an RBI. • Conner beat Bishop Brossart 2-1, May 22. Brossart’s Lindsey Griffith hit a double.

CCF Recorder

May 27, 2010

HIGH SCHOOL | Editor Melanie Laughman | mlaughman@nky.com | 513-248-7118

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Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

N K Y. c o m

A9

RECORDER

Camels prep for regional track meet

By James Weber jweber@nky.com

Campbell County swept a regional tune-up track meet at Dixie Heights May 22. Both the boys’ and girls’ teams won the team titles of the meet, which had most teams in Northern Kentucky. Track teams will compete in the regional meets Saturday, May 29. Class 1A is at Walton-Verona, 2A at Harrison County and 3A at Ryle. The Camels set several track records at Dixie. The 4x800 girls’ team of Carolynn Dreyer, Faith Roaden, Taylor Robinson and Anne Marie Dumaine ran a 9:48.31 to win. The 4x200 girls’ team set a record (1:45.07) with Paige Yenter, Molly Kitchen, Christina Heilman and Anna Carrigan. The 4x400 team ran 4:04.61 to set a record behind Dreyer, Dumaine, Heilman and Carrigan. Carrigan set the 400

record (57.47). Heilman set the new record in the 300 hurdles (46.68). The Camels won seven events overall. The Campbell boys’ team set four records. Alexx Bernard ran 4:24.83 to win the 1,600. Robbie Scharold ran 1:53.67 to win the 800. The 4x800 relay won in 8:02.08 with Bernard, Scharold, Ben Rawe and Doug Strange. Doug Long won the pole vault in 11-6. NewCath was second in the girls’ team standings. The 4x100 team set a new record (51.99) with Aubrey Muench, Hannah Kelly, Alexa Hlebiczki and Kiley Bartels).

Girls

Team: Campbell County 125, NCC 95, Lloyd 90. 4x800: Campbell County (Dreyer, Roaden, Robinson, Dumaine) 9:48.31, NCC (Niemer, Hlebiczki, Schwarber, Suedkamp) 10:05.70, Cooper (Kane, Phillips, Patton, Gregory) 10:12.17. 100 hurdles: Jessica Crabtree (Lloyd) 16.08, McKenna Edgett (Dixie) 16.91, Nicole Ridder (Brossart) 16.93.

100: Michelle Canterna (Cooper) 12.80, Allison Ponzer (SK) 12.92, Tati Jouett (Lloyd) 12.95. 4x200: Campbell (Yenter, Kitchen, Heilman, Carrigan) 1:45.07, NCC (Kelly, Dubuc, Bartels, Muench) 1:49.77, Ryle (Stephens, Hearn, Pennington, Elkins) 1:50.77. 1,600: Elisha Overpeck (Lloyd) 5:32.73, Taylor Robinson (Campbell) 5:36.22, MacKenzie Hester (SK) 5:36.77. 4x100: NCC (Muench, Kelly, Hlebiczki, Bartels) 51.99, Lloyd (Wood, Crabtree, Jouett, Vance) 52.59, Dixie (Edgett, Ochs, Perdue, Jamison) 52.63. 400: Anna Carrigan (Campbell) 57.47, Christina Cook (SK) 58.56, Sarah Klump (Brossart) 1:00.06. 300 hurdles: Christina Heilman (Campbell) 46.68, Aubrey Muench (NCC) 49.46, Abby Hills (Highlands) 50.05. 800: Carolynn Dreyer (Campbell) 2:24.28 Mary List (NDA) 2:27.69, Sarah Suedkamp (NCC) 2:29.11. 200: Anna Carrigan (Campbell) 25.56, Tati Jouett (Lloyd) 26.49, Christina Cook (SK) 26.62. 3,200: Elisha Overpeck (Lloyd) 12:12.07, Gabrielle Bergman (HC) 12:36.56, Taylor Robinson (Campbell) 12:43.84. 4x400: Campbell (Dreyer, Dumaine, Heilman, Carrigan) 4:04.61, NCC (Dubuc, Bartels, Suedkamp, Muench) 4:10.50, Dixie (Ochs, Walz Wehage, Jamison) 4:13.36. Shot put: Frannie Schultz (NCC) 35-0, Jenna Lehkamp (Scott) 34-10, Lashawn Ford (34-2.5).

Discus: Brianna McCarthy (Beechwood) 113-5, Frannie Schultz (NCC) 111-4, Shelly Morgan (Boone) 94-5. Long jump: Michelle Canterna (Cooper) 17-6.5, Allison Ponzer (SK) 17-2.5, Katie Bell (Scott) 16-7.5. Triple jump: Allison Ponzer (SK) 35-9.25, Lauren Wetenkamp (Ryle) 33-3.75, Carly Wood (Lloyd) 33-0. High jump: Hillary Jamison (Dixie), Kelsi Pickens (VMA) 4-10, Emma Heil (NCC) 4-10. Pole vault: Paige Turner (Dixie) 80, Jessica Crabtree (Lloyd) 8-0, Kyra Hickman (BB) 7-6.

Boys

Team: Campbell County 111.5, Covington Catholic 99 Ryle 70. 4x800: Campbell (Bernard, Rawe, Strange, Scharold) 8:02.08, Dixie (M. Menkhaus, B. Menkhaus, Reekers, Schuchter) 8:38.03, Ryle (Galan, Fueta, Edwards, Culbertson) 8:40.22. 110 hurdles: Erik Pederson (Ryle) 16.13, Paul Cusick (CCH) 16.14, Aaron Lyon (Campbell) 16.47. 100: Jeff Tetteh (Boone) 11.37, Brayson Smith (HC) 11.49, Ryann Reynolds (Lloyd) 11.69. 4x200: Dixie (Hocker, Sikra, Meyer, McKinney) 1:31.74, Campbell (Johnson, Boehm, Mahoney, Neyman) 1:35.06, Boone (Tetteh, McGarr LeRoy, Howell) 1:35.16. 1,600: Alexx Bernard (Campbell) 4:24.83, Joseph Landrum (Lloyd) 4:27.99, Cameron Rohmann (St. Henry) 4:33.78. 4x100: Cov Cath (Batts, Hudepohl, Bowdy Maschinot) 43.69, Holy

Cross (Smith, Piccirillo, Norris, Walker) 45.76, Lloyd (Chappie, Johnson, Walker, Reynolds) 46.00. 400: Nathan McKinney (Dixie) 50.51, Mason Hutchinson (Cooper) 51.07, Austin Johnson (Campbell) 51.91. 300 hurdles: Paul Cusick (CCH) 41.66, Aaron Lyon (Campbell) 43.42, Taylor Bergman (HC) 43.66. 800: Robbie Scharold (Campbell) 1:53.67, Alexx Bernard (Campbell) 2:01.65, Joey Landrum (Lloyd) 2:04.19. 200: Kyle Hocker (Dixie) 23.30, Mason Hutchinson (Cooper) 23.47, Austin Hudepohl (CCH) 23.54. 3200: Laureano (Lex. Cath), Pete Miller (VMA) 10:30.46, Michael Menkhaus (Dixie) 10:32.76. 4x400: Cooper (Ballinger, Replogle, Blevins, Hutchinson) 3:34.44, Ryle (Eubank, Nutter, Boggs, Culbertson) 3:39.92. Shot put: Jordon Hansel (SK) 4410, Andy Deglow (CCH) 42-9.25, Ryan Arey (Boone) 42-9. Discus: Jordon Hansel (SK) 13410, Brayden Erpenbeck (CCH) 132-7, Derek Piccirillo (SK) 127-4. Long jump: Michael Bowdy (CCH) 21-10.75, Sage Powell (SK) 21-3, Jon McGarr (Boone) 20-2.75. Triple jump: Sage Powell (SK) 432.5, Zhock Mason (Ryle) 42-2.5, Ryan Cahill (CCH) 40-3. High jump: Ben Bessler (St. Henry) 6-6, Alex Connelly (CCH) 6-4, Jeff Huntley (Ryle) 5-10. Pole vault: Doug Long (Campbell) 11-6, Chris Sikra (Dixie) 11-6, Sam Schaefer (NCC) 11-6.

This week in baseball

• Holy Cross beat Highlands 10-1, May 18. Highlands’ Kevin Mason was 2-3 with a double. • Highlands beat Simon Kenton 5-2, May 19. Highlands’ Corey Dill was the winning pitcher, and Sam Liggett was 3-4 with a double. • Newport beat Dayton 84, May 19. Newport’s Plank was the winning pitcher, and Travis Jones was 3-4 with a double. • Beechwood beat Campbell County 8-2, May 19. Campbell’s Mike Kremer was 2-3. • Covington Catholic beat Highlands 2-0, May 20. • Holmes beat Dayton 100 in five innings, then 5-3 in a double-header May 20. • Bishop Brossart beat Grant County 2-0, May 22. Brossart’s Tanner Norton was the winning pitcher, and Dylan Embs hit a double. • Ryle beat Highlands 5-2, May 22. Highlands’ Chris Rizzo hit a double. • Holy Cross beat Newport Central Catholic 8-7, May 22. New Cath’s Brady Hightchew was 2-4 with a double and two RBI.

This week in tennis

• Highlands girls placed first in the 10th Region Tournament quarterfinals. Campbell County placed fifth. Highlands’ Hannah Laskey and Herman beat George Rogers’ Rush and Powell 6-1, 6-1. On May 20, Meredith Laskey beat Paris’ Withrow 6-0, 6-0; then Meredith Laskey beat Highlands’ Carrie Laskey 6-2, 5-7, 6-2.

Coach wanted

Josh Grooms has resigned as head girls’ basketball coach at Bishop Brossart High School. The school will accept resumes and applications over the next two weeks. Send resumes and applications to Mel Webster at mwebster@bishopbrossart.org or mail to the school. Webster can be reached at 609-6937 The Lady 'Stangs finished 1411 last year and won the 37th District Championship.

PROVIDED

The Highlands High School tennis teams pose with their 10th Region championship trophies at Georgetown College. Front row, from left: Becca Scott (12th), Abby Herman (8th), Meredith Laskey (7th), Lexi Herman (6th), Carrie Laskey (11th), Mallory Martz (9th), Hannah Laskey (9th) Back row: Shelby Jones (girls’ coach), Max Levine (12th), John Drennen (12th), Drew Freyberger (10th), Atlee Mitchell (10th), Carter Botto (12th), Aran Coughlin (10th), Rhett Barbour (boys’ coach).

Highlands sweeps team tennis titles

By James Weber jweber@nky.com

The Laskey name is creating an indelible stamp on the 10th Region girls’ tennis tournament. Highlands seventh-grader Meredith Laskey beat junior sister Carrie in a three-set marathon for the 10th Region singles title May 20 at Georgetown College. It is the third straight year they have met in the final, with Meredith winning the last two. The sisterly battle highlighted a memorable week for the Highlands tennis program, as both the boys’ and girls’ teams won the overall regional title for the first time in several years. Because of that, their entire starting postseason lineups – two singles players and doubles teams each – will play in this week’s state tournament May 27-29 in Lexington. “It was a really successful season,” said boys’ head coach Rhett Barbour. “It was a really special time for our teams.” With Meredith’s win, Highlands has won a regional girls’ singles title seven straight years by four different players. That includes all six years the team has been in the 10th Region. A third Laskey, freshman

PROVIDED

Meredith Laskey of Highlands hits a shot during the 10th Region Tournament en route to her second regional singles title. Hannah, teamed with eighth-grader Abby Herman to reach the semifinals. Freshman Mallory Martz and senior Becca Scott reached the quarterfinals. Girls’ head coach Shelby Jones said doubles was a big key to the win amidst tough competition. He said several schools placed their best singles players in doubles because of the Laskeys. “I had to put together almost a completely new doubles team,” girls’ head coach Shelby Jones said. “I felt like we were strong there.” The boys’ team triumphed after several near-misses in recent years, including a playoff match to decide last year’s team title. Seniors John Drennen and Max Levine easily repeated as regional champs with a 62, 6-0 win over Montgomery County in the finals, aveng-

ing a regular season loss. They lost just eight games in the tourney. Sophomore Aran Coughlan and senior Carter Botto made the semifinals. Drew Freyberger finished as singles runner-up. Rejoining the team in midseason after major back surgery, Freyberger forfeited the regional final because of illness after losing the first set, 6-0. “He played really well. He’s looking really good,” Barbour said. “He kept improving every match he played.” Sophomore Atlee Mitchell reached the quarterfinals. Barbour said the Highlands seniors were determined to grab the title. “(Seniors) Max, John and Carter made it clear to the team that they wouldn’t settle for anything less than a regional championship this year,” Barbour said. “The seniors had key wins, and I think the expectations they set helped our underclassmen push through difficult matches as well.” The state tourney begins May 27 in Lexington. The girls’ will play that day at the Sayre High School Athletic Complex, the boys at the University of Kentucky. All survivors will play at UK May 28-29.

GREG LORING/CONTRIBUTOR

Mustangs fall in finale

Bishop Brossart High School baserunner Lindsay Griffith cheers as she reaches home plate to score a run during Brossart’s 2-1 loss at Conner to end the regular season May 22.

GREG LORING/CONTRIBUTOR

Brossart players and coach meet at the mound late in the game during Brossart’s 2-1 loss at Conner May 22.


A10

CCF Recorder

Sports & recreation

May 27, 2010

FREEDOM TRAIL The Florence Freedom were swept in a three-game series at Gateway to start the season.

Upcoming schedule

May 25-27: at home vs. South Illinois May 28-30: at home vs. Evansville June 2-3: at home vs. Oakland County June 4-6: at Traverse City All games are broadcast on WKNR 106.7 FM and over the Internet at www.florencefreedom.com. For ticket and promotion information, visit the Freedom website or call 594-4487 (HITS).

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Wrestlers go on to college

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Campbell County senior Korey Shotwell signs to wrestle for The Citadel May 14.

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Campbell County senior Nathan Ilg signs to wrestle for Lindsey Wilson May 14.

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Bluebirds to play hoops in college By James Weber jweber@nky.com CE-0000401054

While he only coached them for one year, Mike

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Highlands head boys’ basketball coach Mike Flynn (right) talks about his senior signees May 20, from left: Stephen Kowolonek, Garrett Smith-Keller and Ben Watson. Three of those Bluebirds signed to play hoops in college May 20. Stephen Kowolonek will play for NCAA Division III Transylvania in Lexington, Ky., and major in computer science. Ben Watson will play for NCAA Division III Centre College in Danville, Ky. and is undecided on a major. Garrett Smith-Keller will play for NAIA Morningside

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in Iowa and major in business/finance. “When I was here before, you always admired the Highlands kids from afar,” said Flynn, a former Holmes head coach. “Having the opportunity to work with them on a very close basis really just reinforces what I thought before about how good kids they are. They’re very mature. Conditioning in September is not easy. When you’re doing something that’s not enjoyable, you really see their character when they go through it.” Kowolonek and Watson joked about having to play against each other in the future. Centre and Transy played each other this season. All three seniors had different answers for their favorite game as a Bluebird. Kowolonek, who reached 1,000 career points this season, remembers hitting the winning basket against Covington Catholic in a one-point win his sophomore year. He also enjoyed playing with former Bluebird standouts Nic Simpson and Greg McGraw. Smith-Keller enjoyed beating Oak Hills last December in the BluegrassBuckeye charity showcase at the Bank of Kentucky Center. Watson remembers the 36th District title in 2008, when the Bluebirds beat Bellevue in the final.


Sports & recreation

CCF Recorder

May 27, 2010

A11

Peters to Wilmington

Campbell County High School senior Brianna Peters committed to play basketball for Wilmington College and was honored by the school May 3. She will major in animal science. Peters was a two-year starter who had 812 points and 621 rebounds. She was first team all-region in the 10th last season.

Dierig to MSJ

Highlands High School senior defensive lineman Cam Dierig committed to play football for the College of Mount St. Joseph April 29 in Cincinnati. Dierig was a starter for the state champion Bluebirds last December and the 2009 Anthony Munoz Kentucky Defensive Lineman of the Year. Standing, from left, is Whitley Dierig (sister) and parents, Jackie and Jim.

PROVIDED

PROVIDED

Campbell boys win middle school meet Dixie Heights had a major middle-school track and field May 6. Notre Dame won the girls’ title and Campbell County won boys. The top three in each event:

Girls

Team: Notre Dame 83, Campbell County 79.5, Dixie Heights 74, Beechwood 66. 4x800: Beechwood (Morgan Fritz, Brooke Dosker, Mackenzie Rylee, Maddy Schwarz), Campbell (Jennah Flairty, Morgan Becker, Hannah Nelson, Brandi Rice), Notre Dame (Sara Borchers, Alexa Colvin, Grace Restle, Emma Folzenlogen). 100 hurdles: Brittney Turner (Dixie), Katie Jennings (Dixie), Marie Burns (Beechwood). 100: Raven Rice (Newport), Morgan Feldman (St. Mary), Chelsea Perdue (Dixie). 4x200: Campbell (Brooke Buckler, Taylor Carnes, Katelyn Helton, MacKenzie See), Dixie (Mary Conti, Chelsea Perdue, Sara Edgett, Brittney Turner), Beechwood (Morgan Fritz, Mackenzie Fessler, Alex Keller, Mallory Suchanek). 1,600: Lauren Ossege (Highlands), Abby Vandergriff (St. Mary), Alexa Colvin (NDA). 4x100: Dixie (Brittney Turner, Chelsea Perdue, Sara Edgett, Randi

McIntosh), Campbell, Beechwood (Sophie Colosimo, Mackenzie Fessler, Alex Keller, Addy Fessler). 400: Alex Keller (Beechwood), Mary Conti (Dixie), Abby Vandergriff (St. Mary). 800: Abby Vandergriff (St. Mary), Brandi Rice (Campbell), Jennah Flairty (Campbell). 200: Chelsea Perdue (Dixie), Mandy Arnzen (NDA), Katelyn Helton (Campbell). 4x400: Campbell (Brooke Buckler, Taylor Carnes, Katelyn Helton, Brandi Rice), Beechwood (Morgan Fritz, Alex Keller, Mackenzie Rylee, Maddy Schwarz), Dixie Randi McIntosh, Mary Conti, Darcy Whitehead, Sara Edgett). Shot put: Molly Diamon (Holmes), Zoe Luebbe (W-V), Avery Henderson (NDA). Discus: Molly Diamon (Holmes), Olivia Scaringi (NDA), Morgan Trusty (Villa Madonna). Long jump: Mandy Arnzen (Notre Dame), Raven Rice (Newport), Mackenzie Fessler (Beechwood). High jump: Carol Ray (Tichenor),

Boys

Team: Campbell County 103.5, Newport 62, Holmes 57, St. Mary 55. 4x800: Campbell (Kevin Lackey, Aaron Orth, Kyle Edgley, Sean Fausz), W-V (Matt Harper, Ben Gruber, Joe Rider, Colton Francis), Tichenor (Zack Clark, Zach Niceley, Tyler Hughes, Jakob Schulkers). 100 hurdles: Trey Simmons (Dixie), JaShawn Stanley (Newport), Jonathan Jones (W-V). 100: Jonathon Scruggs (Holmes), Jamanti Wilson (Holmes), Jake Zabonick (Campbell). 4x200: Campbell (Kyle Edgley, Daniel Schiller, Matt Mayer, Dylan Rich), Twenhofel (Daniel Cully, Nathan Staley, Thomas Swift, Elijeh Tauai), Newport (Tyler Farmer, Charles Bailey, Mason Whaley, Brian Burton). 1,600: Michael Caldwell (St. Mary), Keegan Hanrahan (Scott), Sean Fausz (Campbell). 4x100: Dixie (Jackson Stanek,

Miles Payne, Joe Radenhausen, Trey Simmons), Newport (Andre Anderson, Charles Bailey, JaShawn Stanley, Mason Whaley), Campbell (Daniel Schiller, Stewart Knaley, Kyle Edgley, Jake Zabonick). 400: Jamanti Wilson (Holmes), Stewart Knaley (Campbell), Aaron Orth (Campbell). 800: Michael Caldwell (St. Mary), Keegan Hanrahan (Scott), Aaron Orth (Campbell). 200: Jake Zabonick (Campbell), Jonathon Scruggs (Holmes), Jonathon Jones (W-V). 4x400: Dixie (Jackson Stanek, Joe Radenhausen, Trey Simmons, Miles Payne), Campbell (Stewart Knaley, Aaron Orth, Matt Mayer, Kevin Lackey), Newport (Charles Bailey, Brian Burton, Mason Whaley, Chaz Ware). Shot put: Cameron Hansel (Twenhofel), Nick True (Highlands), Dominick Joseph (Tichenor). Discus: Cameron Hansel (Twenhofel), Dominick Joseph (Tichenor), Nick True (Highlands). Long jump: Jake Zabonick (Campbell), Drew Berkemeyer (St. Mary),

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Vote for 2010 Sportsman, Sportswoman of the Year Our readers created the ballot and now it’s time to vote for the 2010 Campbell County Sportsman and Sportswoman of the Year. Go online the afternoon of May 13 to www.nky.com/preps and find the yellow and green Community Recorder Sportsman of the Year icon on the right-hand side of the page. Find your ballot by newspaper and vote as often as you like through June 10. Last year’s winners, in the inaugural year, were Tyler Watson of Dayton and Brittany Hall of Dayton. On the ballot for the Sportsman of the Year: Ricky Buckler, Bellevue; Cody Collins, Newport; Austin Collinsworth, Highlands; DeMarkco Foster , Newport; Ryan Hahn, Highlands; Grant Pangallo, Newport Central Catholic; Jacob Rieger , Bishop Brossart; Robbie Scharold, Campbell County Sportswoman of the Year candidates are: Megan Arnzen, Bellevue; C.C. Cen ters, Dayton; Allison Dilts, Anne Marie Dayton; Dumaine, Campbell County; Lindsay Griffith, Bishop Brossart; Natalie Penrod , Campbell County; Sammy Powell, Dayton; Casey Reinhardt, Campbell County; Courtney Sandfoss , Newport Central Catholic

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May 27, 2010

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Your Community Recorder newspaper serving all of Campbell County

COUNTY RECORDER

E-mail: kynews@communitypress.com T h u r s d a y, J u n e

3, 2010

Web site: NKY.com

B E C A U S E C O M M U N I T Y M AT T E R S

Veteran rides in ‘Rolling’ rally

Volume 32, Number 17 © 2010 The Community Recorder ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Mildred Dean Elementary closes

Hugs and teary eyes filled the halls of Mildred Dean Elementary School as faculty and staff prepared to close the building’s doors to students for the last time. Following a decision earlier this year by the Newport School Board, the school is closing for good after this school year, which ended Thursday, May 27. SCHOOLS, A6

Find your online community

By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

Reason to laugh

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Husband and wife Dan and Sandy Keller of Newport share a laugh after Dan hit a beach ball out of bounds during a game of chair volleyball for Senior Health and Fitness Day activities Wednesday, May 26, at the Campbell County Senior Center in Highland Heights.

Visit NKY.com/community to find news, sports, photos, events and more from your community. You’ll find content from The Community Recorder, The Kentucky Enquirer and your neighbors.

Long-time parade volunteer retires

Share your news

By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

Have a great photo from your kid’s latest field trip? Trying to drum up publicity for your group’s event? Visit NKY.com/Share to submit your photos, news and events.

Taking the reins

For many Campbell County families, a passion for horses is a family tradition that is renewed each summer when family members as young as 7 take the reins for the first time in the 4-H Saddle Up Club. The club members learn to care for and train horses in addition to riding or showing horses in competitions. This year’s camp will be June 13-18 with Sunday shows June 27, July 18, Aug. 1 and Aug. 22. LIFE, B1 For the Postmaster

Published weekly every Thursday. Periodical postage paid at Newport, KY 41071 USPS 450130 Postmaster: Send address change to The Campbell County Recorder 654 Highland Suite 27, Fort Thomas, KY 41075 Annual Subscription: Weekly Recorder & Sunday Enquirer In-County $18.02; weekly Recorder only all other in-state $23.32 Out-of - state $27.56; Kentucky Sales Tax Included

To place an ad, call 283-7290.

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Since the Bellevue/Dayton Memorial Day Parade began 81 years ago, Bellevue resident Dot Murphy has been a part of it. Murphy, who walked in the first parade with the Girl Scouts when she was 7, spent the rest of her life involved in the parade in some way, ranging from walking with various Scout groups with her children to serving on the parade’s committee. “I always wanted to be a part of it every year,” Murphy said. “I’ve really enjoyed my experiences over the years and all the people I’ve met.” Since 1993, Murphy has been helping to organize the parade and working as its secretary, treasurer and publicity chair, but this year has let the rest of the committee know she’s stepping down after the parade. Murphy said her dedication to the parade has a lot to do with a deal she made with God years ago.

“When my son and brother were in Vietnam, I used to go to the cathedral on my lunch hour and pray to the Lord to bring them home safely, and if he did, I would give back to my community,” Murphy said. “I feel like since then, I have done my share.” While her son, Mike Murphy, made it home from Vietnam, he suffered from being exposed to Agent Orange, a contaminated herbicide used in warfare in Vietnam by the United States military. This exposure eventually led to his death the day before this year’s parade. “The good Lord meant for that to happen the day it happened,” Murphy said. “As a veteran, this parade is a chance to remember him.” Murphy’s daughter Sheila Murphy said even though the family is mourning, her mother still insisted on doing her duties for the parade. “She’s always been so dedicated and involved in everything,” Sheila Murphy said.

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Sen. Katie Stine takes a break during the Bellevue/Dayton Memorial Day Parade to talk to Dot Murphy, long-time parade volunteer, about her son, a Vietnam veteran, who passed away the day before this year’s parade.

Student headed to FBI leadership camp By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com Fort Thomas resident Megan Daly has been chosen as the only Kentucky resident to attend this year’s FBI National Academy Associates (FBINAA) 2010 Youth Leadership Program. The program accepts incoming high school sophomores and juniors with above average academic standards and good citizenship. Only one teen is chosen from each state and some foreign countries. “It is a huge honor,” Daly said. “I am looking forward to learning

new ideas on leadership and getting to meet people from all around the United States and other countries.” Daly, a sophomore at Highlands High School, is part of the school’s leadership group and is always very involved in projects, said teacher Ed Long. “Megan has certainly taken the lead in getting projects organized,” said Long, who filled out a recommendation for Daly to attend the FBI camp. Daly said she has been interested in the FBI’s National Academy since her father, Fort Thomas Police Chief Mike Daly, went there

for 10 weeks in 2007. “I went up for his graduation and I toured the FBINAA headquarters in Quantico, Va. on the Marine base,” Daly said. “It was neat to see all the classrooms and training facilities.” During the program, which lasts for a week in June, Daly will learn about everything from goal setting to accountability and will participate in physical training. “It is a great opportunity for me to meet new people and develop myself for my future,” Daly said. “It will provide me with an experience that I will learn from and never forget.”

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Though he has spent years sharing his war stories and encouraging children to be civically responsible, Fort Thomas resident and substitute teacher “Chief” Hunter Pinney found “Chief” Hunter himself nearly Pinney at a loss for words the participated in morning of the Rolling T h u r s d a y, Thunder May 27. It was then motorcycle rally, that the comwhere he joined munity came together for a 400,000 other motorcyclists for send-off event as Pinney left the annual ride the city to participate in the around Rolling ThunWashington, der motorcycle D.C., in honor of rally, where he j o i n e d Memorial Day. 400,000 other motorcyclists for the annual ride around Washington, D.C., in honor of Memorial Day. “It’s pretty overwhelming, it’s like the first time I saw the Grand Canyon,” Pinney said. “I just had to stop taking pictures and look at it because it was so awesome it was beyond description.” Pinney, a veteran of the Vietnam and Gulf wars who has been working as a substitute teacher in Fort Thomas since 2005, has meant a lot to many students in the city, said Woodfill teacher Donna Hicks. “The Chief is probably one of the most loved subs we have,” Hicks said. “He’s good at what he does, and he is very passionate.” One of Pinney’s students, Highlands High School freshman Eric Hempleman, organized the send-off event for him. “I really just wanted to do something to thank him for everything he does,” Hempleman said. “He’s a really cool guy and everybody loves him.” Hempleman also started a collection of donations from all the Fort Thomas schools to raise money for Pinney’s trip. Teachers at Woodfill also took up a collection for Pinney. As he left on his trip, Pinney was escorted by members of the Fort Thomas Police Department and the Blue Knights, a police officer motorcycle club. Besides riding through the capital, Pinney said he had something else planned for his trip. “I’m going to go over and say hi to some of my friends in Arlington,” Pinney said. “Those are some real heroes.”


A2

Campbell County Recorder

June 3, 2010

News

Hand recount of votes requested by Sell By Chris Mayhew

Votes by geography

cmayhew@nky.com

River rowers

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Members of the Cincinnati Junior Rowing Club paddle against the current up the Licking River past Frederick’s Landing in Wilder Wednesday, May 26 during a practice.

Kevin Sell has filed a petition in court for a recount by hand of votes in the May 18 primary election for the Campbell County Judge-executive race. Incumbent Judge-executive Steve Pendery defeated Sell in the May 18 Republican primary by a difference of 169 votes. Sell filed the recount in Campbell Circuit Court before noon Friday, May 28, a day after a public recanvass of the votes at the county administration building in Newport resulted in no change in tally of votes. In Boone County, a recount has also been requested by Commissioner Cathy Flaig in the Boone County judge-executive race where

A Picture of My Heart. In a Heartbeat.

Campbell County incumbent Judge-executive Steve Pendery received 4,099 votes to challenger candidate Kevin Sell’s vote tally of 3,930 in the May 18 Republican primary. Despite some narrow margins by precinct, Pendery did not lose any precincts in Fort Thomas, where he lives, nor did he lose any precicts in Bellevue, Dayton, Newport or Wilder. Conversely, Sell did not lose any of the precincts in Alexandria, where he lives, or anywhere else in the southermost reaches of the she lost by 74 votes to incumbent Judge-executive Gary Moore. A recanvass adds up the vote totals from printed receipts from each machine used to record votes in the election. Sell met with Campbell Circuit Judge Julie Reinhardt Ward, who was assigned to the case, to discuss the recount June 1. Sell said he doesn’t expect a recount to change the outcome of the election, but questions the accuracy of the paper ballots and scanning machines used. “I don’t think it has anything to do with the outcome, I think it has everything to do with the process,” he said. Sell said he’s received reports from voters and poll challengers of poll workers in some locations telling people it was acceptable to check a box on a paper ballot. “The instructions clearly say the box has to be colored in,” Sell said. Sell said he’s not certain the scanning machines always record a vote if the box is checked or only partially filled-in. “I’m not so sure that the machine is 100 percent if you didn’t fill in the box completely all the way,” he said. Sell said there was an undervote in his race of about 250 votes. Sell said while he understands some people come and only vote for one or two races, and it’s their right to do so, the undervote makes pursuing a recount worthwhile. Sell said he thinks although he’s the only person pushing for a recount, everyone should have an interest in making sure the system being used works. “I don’t see anybody out there saying that the process is 100 percent valid,” he said. Sell said the Hart InterCivic eScan machines used to

county including precincts of Camp Springs, Grant’s Lick, California, Claryville, Melbourne, Mentor, Ross, Sun Valley and Silver Grove. In Cold Spring the two candidates each won three of the city’s six precincts. Of the six Highland Heights area precincts (including Johns Hill), Pendery won three precincts, Sell won two, and they tied with 32 votes each in Highland Heights precinct B. In Southgate, Pendery beat Sell in three of the four precincts. scan the ballots haven’t been used in Northern Kentucky, and at least a partial recount of the ballots needs to be performed to ensure the accuracy of the system. Sell said he was concerned about the paper balloting before the election, and if a recount validates the results of the paper ballot system that still shows something, he said. “If it doesn’t find anything then everybody in Campbell County, and for that matter statewide, can be assured that the eScan machines from the Hart company work,” Sell said. In Kenton, Boone and Campbell counties, there’s no memory of a recount every happening, said Campbell County Clerk Jack Snodgrass during the May 27 recanvass. “Only five counties have ever claimed to have had a recount,” Snodgrass said. The most recent recount was in 1994 in Jefferson County. While only estimates, Snodgrass said there will probably be a minimum cost of $1,000 to pay for the judge’s choice of a secure location, and $1,200 a day each for a minimum of two technicians for operating the voting machines. If the judge orders a recount of all the ballots by hand it would require four or five people working at $25 an hour to work anywhere between eight to 11 hours in total, he said. Ultimately, how much a recount will cost is dictated by the judge’s decision of how the recount will be handled, Snodgrass said. Snodgrass said his estimation of the cost of a recount will be between $4,000 and $6,000. Sell will have to pay 100 percent of the cost of a recount. Sell said he provided a $2,000 deposit when filing the recount petition in court.

Index Calendar ...................................B2 Classifieds ..................................C Life............................................B1 Police reports .........................B10

Schools.....................................A6 Sports .......................................A9 Viewpoints..............................A12

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Your Community Recorder newspaper serving all of Campbell County

COUNTY RECORDER

Find news and information from your community on the Web Campbell County – nky.com/campbellcounty News Michelle Shaw | Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1053 | mshaw@nky.com Chris Mayhew | Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1051 | cmayhew@nky.com Amanda Joering | Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1052 | ajoering@nky.com Melanie Laughman | Sports Editor . . . . . . . . 513-248-7118 | mlaughman@nky.com James Weber | Sports Reporter . . . . . . . . . 578-1054 | jweber@nky.com Advertising Debbie Maggard | Advertising Manager. . . . . . 578-5501 | dmaggard@nky.com Michelle Schlosser | Account Rep . . . . . . . . 578-5521 | mschlosser@nky.com Delivery For customer service. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 781-4421 Sharon Schachleiter | Circulation Manager. . 442-3464 | sschachleiter@nky.com Judy Hollenkamp | Circulation Clerk . . . . . . . . 441-5537 | jhollenkamp@NKY.com Classified To place a Classified ad. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283-7290 | www.communityclassified.com To place an ad in Community Classified, call 283-7290.


News

CCF Recorder

June 3, 2010

A3

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

In memory

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

A group of parade participants hold a large flag while walking in the parade Monday, May 31.

Bellevue resident Ethan Enslen waves his flag as he waits for the parade to begin.

Cold Spring resident Ada Crossman shows her American pride during the Bellevue/Dayton Memorial Day Parade Monday, May 31.

School ends in summer – reading assignments don’t By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

Summer fun for Campbell County High School students also includes some reading. The school’s English teachers want to impress on students how reading can be relaxing, but it’s also required with tests on the material when students return to classes in the fall. Books assigned to students are a mix of what teachers thought students might find interesting and also books on the Advanced Placement list determined by the college board, said Melissa Con-

way, department English chair. There are three reasons for requiring reading for all students over the summer, Conway said. • To instill the idea reading can be a leisurely activity. • To further prepare students for AP classes and post-secondary education. • And reading is assigned as a response to research on the best practices of high-scoring schools. Assignments are sorted out by grade assignments vary by level. For example, students entering ninth grade and taking regular and not AP English are required to read one of three books, “The

Hunger Games” by Suzanne Collins, “The Chocolate War” by Robert Cormier or “A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier” by Ishmael Beah. Freshman taking advanced English are required to read both “A Separate Peace” by John Knowles and “The Picture of Dorian Gray” by Oscar Wilde. Conway said a few examples of books included on the summer reading lists because they are on the AP tests include “A Separate Peace,” “For Whom the Bell Tolls” by Ernest Hemingway and “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings” by Maya Angelou.

Other books that are on the summer reading lists for fun include “Romiette and Julio,” an interesting spin on William Shakespeare’s classic, Conway said. The book’s author, Cincinnati native Sharon Draper, has a great way of connecting with a young adult audience, Conway said. Another book on the list for fun is “In Cold Blood” by Truman Capote. “With the NCIS and CSI shows being such a hit out there, it’s really not a mystery why this book, told about a true story, is of interest,” she said. “It hooked me.”

Students in AP classes have had summer reading assignments at CCHS for years, but it’s only been in the last three or four years that every student has had to read over the summer, Conway said. “Summer reading is becoming a popular thing to do, and not just for high school English,” she said. The school has other classes in the social studies department, and possibly some science classes that require summer reading and work, Conway said. “Also, many colleges/universities require pre-class work/readings,” she said.

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A4

CCF Recorder

News

June 3, 2010

Artists sought for event Bellevue Renaissance’s Art in the Park committee is seeking artists and crafts people to exhibit and sell their work at the ninth annual Art in the Park. The event will be Saturday, Sept. 11, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Bellevue Beach Park located along the Ohio River. Art in the Park celebrates

the arts while making art accessible, which exemplifies Bellevue Renaissance’s tag line: Where people and creativity mix. Applications to exhibit original work at Art in the Park will be accepted through Aug. 7. The non-refundable application fee is $35 for artists bringing their own

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canopy and $50 for artists requesting a canopy to be provided for them. Two judges will evaluate the work of each artist to select winners in the fields of fine arts and fine crafts. Over $1,200 will be awarded to eight artists and an additional award will be selected by the visitors to the event as the “Peoples Choice Award.” The event will be marketed throughout the region including electronic and print advertising. The Art in the Park Call to Artists application is available at www.shopbellevueky.com/whats_new.htm or by contacting Jody Robinson at 859-4318866, ext. 22, or jody.robinson@bellevueky.o rg.

Holocaust survivor visits Dayton MS

Bringing first-hand historical accounts to students can be challenging, but thanks to Holocaust survivor Henry Blumenstein, who visited Dayton Middle School May 11, students were able to gain a greater understanding of the struggle faced during this time. Recently, students have been learning about the Holocaust by reading the books “The Diary of Anne Frank” and “The Boy in the Striped Pajamas.”

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Norma Rashid elected to CABVI’s Board

Ft. Thomas resident Norma Rashid was recently elected to the board of trustees of the Cincinnati Association for the Blind and Visually Impaired. Rashid spent more than 25 years as a broadcast news journalist covering stories ranging from prison riots to natural disasters. Much of that time was as a coanchor for Cincinnati’s W L W T- T V. Currently she is a professor Rashid of broadcast journalism at the University of Cincinnati. As a volunteer she has worked with numerous charities including serving on CABVI’s marketing committee for the last six years. The Cincinnati Association for the Blind and Visually Impaired provides counseling, rehabilitation, information and employment services to people of all ages in a nine county

area. Through all of its programs and services, it strives to help those who are blind, visually or print impaired lead independent lives. CABVI provided services to more than 4,100 people in 2009.

Rummage sale

Bishop Brossart High School’s annual rummage sale will be held from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, June 12. Proceeds from the sale will benefit the Colts and Mustang football program.

Golf outing

The 22nd annual Bishop Brossart Ladies Golf Outing will be held Thursday, June 10, at A.J. Jolly golf course. Price is $70 per person and includes continental breakfast, lunch, dinner and refreshments, 18 holes of golf with cart and door prizes. Hole-in-one contest for a 2010 Buick sponsored by Jeff Wyler Buck of Florence. For more information contact Sharon Geiger at 859-7814337.

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Throwing the first pitch Attending batting practice Four tickets to the Reds vs. Dodgers game on June 15

1.866.327.1709 by June 8, 2010.

One lucky winner will receive four tickets to the Reds game on Tuesday, June 15, attend batting practice before the game and throw the ceremonial first pitch! Winner will be selected in a random drawing on Thursday, June 10, 2010.

A Northern Kentucky University marketing class will present the results of its eighth annual Cincinnati Entertainment Survey June 3 at 6 p.m. at the Metropolitan Club. The survey, which measures the popularity, satisfaction and perceived value of local entertainment attractions, was conducted April 12-14. It also includes data on perceived quality of life around the region. “It’s always fun to conduct this survey and see the results,” said Dr. Aron Levin, associate professor of marketing and director of the NKU Marketing Research Partnership Program. “We’ve added a few new features this year, such as the best kept secret in town and the unofficial Face of Cincinnati. I think a lot of people will be surprised to learn who Cincinnatians feel is the face of our city.” The June 3 event is free and open to the public. It will include appetizers and an open bar.

Homer Baker, Dennis White, and Billy Rose of Alexandria with Bobby Mackey of Highland Heights at the Knights of Columbus Bluegrass night.

PROVIDED

Learn about diabetes at free class in June If you have diabetes or pre-diabetes, the Northern Kentucky Health Department’s diabetes program is holding free classes for you to learn more about the dis-

order. A series of three classes will be held: 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. on Tuesday, June 15; Tuesday, June 22; and Tuesday, June 29; at the Walton

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Brought to you by: NO PURCHASE NECESSARY TO ENTER OR TO WIN. A PURCHASE WILL NOT INCREASE YOUR ODDS OF WINNING. SUBJECT TO FEDERAL, STATE, LOCAL AND MUNICIPAL LAWS AND REGULATIONS. VOID WHERE PROHIBITED. The Enquirer’s Reds Experience Sweepstakes (the “Sweepstakes”) is open to legal residents of Ohio, Indiana, and Kentucky who are 18 years or older at the time of entry. Employees of The Enquirer (“Sponsor”), Gannett Co., Inc., Telereach, Inc., and each of their respective affiliated companies, and advertising and promotional agencies, and the immediate family members of, and any persons domiciled with, any such employees, are not eligible to enter or to win. The “Sweepstakes” will begin at 8:00 a.m. (E.T.) on May 29, 2010 and all entries must be received by 9:00 p.m. (E.T.) on June 8, 2010. Phone Entry: Enter by calling one of the “Sweepstakes” official entry lines (1.866.327.1708, 1.866.327.1709, 1.866.327.1712) between the hours of 8:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. (E.T.) Monday – Friday and 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. (E.T.) Saturday – Sunday and completing all of the required information and following all instructions. All call-ins will receive a promotional offer from The Enquirer, no purchase necessary to win. In-Person Entry: Enter in person by completing an Official Entry Form available at The Cincinnati Enquirer, 312 Elm Street, Cincinnati, OH 45202 during regular business hours and depositing your entry form in the entry box. One (1) entry per household. One (1) Grand Prize Winner will be selected in a random drawing from among all eligible entries to be held on or about June 10, 2010. Grand Prize Winner will receive a Reds Experience including four (4) Cincinnati Reds tickets for Tuesday, June 15, 2010 at 7:10 p.m. (E.T.), four (4) passes to watch batting practice prior to the game, and four (4) passes to go onfield for the ceremonial first pitch (one (1)to pitch, one (1) to catch, two (2) to watch from warning track).. (ARV: $2,000.00) Odds of winning depend on the number of eligible entries received. Winner will be notified by telephone on or about June 10, 2010. By participating, entrants agree to be bound by the complete Official Rules and the decisions of the judges. For a copy of the prize winners list (available after June 10, 2010) or the complete Official Rules, send a SASE to “Winners List/Official Rules” (as applicable), The Enquirer’s Reds Experience Sweepstakes, The Enquirer 312 Elm Street, Cincinnati, Ohio 45202. By entering the Sweepstakes, entrants release The Enquirer (“Sponsor”), Gannett Co., Inc., TeleReach, Inc. and any other promotional sponsors from any claims, demands losses or liabilities arising in connection with the Sweepstakes, or the receipt or use of any prize awarded. 83953.2

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Branch of the Boone County Public Library, 201 S. Main St., Walton. Registration for the classes is not required, but preferred. Those who attend all sessions will receive a diabetes toolkit at the end of the third class. Topics will include: what is diabetes, healthy eating, complications and more. Each class covers a different topic. The classes will be led by a registered nurse and a registered dietitian from the Health Department. To register for the classes, or for more information about the classes or the Health Department’s diabetes control program, please call Jan Lazarus at 859-363-2116 or Joan Geohegan at 859-363-2115 or visit http://www.nkyhealth.org.


June 3, 2010

CCF Recorder

TM

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SCHOOLS A6

CCF Recorder

June 3, 2010

ACHIEVEMENTS

Editor Michelle Shaw | smhaw@nky.com | 578-1053

|

NEWS

|

ACTIVITIES

|

HONORS

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

N K Y. c o m

RECORDER

Emotions run high as Mildred Dean closes By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

Hugs and teary eyes filled the halls of Mildred Dean Elementary School as faculty and staff prepared to close the building’s doors to students for the last time. Following a decision earlier this year by the Newport School Board, the school is closing for good after this school year, which ended Thursday, May 27. “This is the greatest group of

teachers ever, and it’s really more like a big family here,” said an emotional Gwen Powell as she waited to pick children up from school the last day. “I think the district is making a big mistake.” Principal Steve McCafferty said he also doesn’t agree with the district closing the school. “This is a very special setting, and it makes this school special in a way that nothing else could,” McCafferty said. “There is no traffic, lots of green space and trees

and no interruptions, which makes it more of a campus setting.” When word got around last year that the board was considering closing one of the schools because of low attendance and budget issues in the district, several parents from Mildred Dean spoke out saying they would take their children out Newport if Mildred Dean closed. McCafferty said the school has already seen the effects of those

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Third-graders Garrett Adams (left) and Charles Michael Colston carry all of their belongings out of the school.

Second-grader Tony Saap cries as he waits for his ride after Mildred Dean's last day of school ever.

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Fourth-grade teacher Angela Beiting emotionally says goodbye to student Alyssa Sebastian on Mildred Dean’s last day.

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Mildred Dean Elementary School fourth-grader Kayla Hubbard cries as she waits for her ride after the last day of school Thursday, May 27. The Newport School Board decided earlier this year to close the school after the school year was finished.

threats and watched as its enrollment went from 270 at the beginning of this school year to 220 at the end. Powell said the children she cares for will be switching to a school out of the district over the summer along with several other families she knows. “I went to Newport schools, and I really do want to see the schools and city prosper, but I feel this is a big step in the wrong direction,” Powell said. McCafferty said several of Mildred Dean’s faculty and staff, including himself, are leaving the district as well. “Newport is losing a lot a really great teachers because of this,” McCafferty said. “I know I’m ready to move on to the next thing.” Mildred Dean students who are staying in the district will be placed at one of the reconfigured schools throughout the city.

Seniors receive pre-graduation awards By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

Senior Awards Night at Campbell County High School, a plethora of awards and scholarship announcements, probably lasts a little bit longer than graduation ceremonies says Principal Renee Boots. Boots said she isn’t unhappy with the program being longer than graduation. “A long program means you’ve accomplished many great things, and we’re proud of you,” said Boots to the seniors at the close of a Monday, May 24 program that lasted almost 2.5 hours. Without the cover-pages, the program 8 x 11 inch cover pages for the awards night program contained 16 pages of names of students being honored for various achievements. From awards for the top students in each subject to community scholarship announcements and significant college and university announcements it’s a night

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Ronald Wayne Elkins, left, accepts the Jimmy Geiman Jr. Memorial Scholarship from Jim and Rose Geiman, the parents of Jimmy Geiman Jr., during Campbell County High School’s Senior Awards Night at the school. for everyone, Boots said. Like several of the other scholarships, the Jimmy Geiman, Jr. Memorial Scholarship was presented as a remembrance. Jimmy Geiman, Jr. died Nov. 26, 2000 at age 16 in a car acci-

dent less than a mile from his home in Cold Spring while still a junior at CCHS. “He wasn’t wearing his seat belt,” said his mother Rose Geiman before presenting the scholarship and announcing a

separate athletics award along with her husband Jim. The scholarship fund was set up the same year he died as a reminder to buckle up and for people to not forget their son, she said. Rose Geiman said her son, a football player, always struck a pose as a Heisman Trophy winner and kept a copy of the trophy in his wallet. Five days prior to the accident, he had received the junior football player of the year award, she said. Eventually, the school renamed an award for the student most involved in the team picked by the coaches as the Jimmy Geiman, Jr. Heisman Award. Rose Geiman announced Kyle Hunt as the winner of the Jimmy Geiman, Jr. Heisman Award, but he couldn’t be present because he had accepted the award at a previous athletics awards night and was being honored May 24 as a 2010 YMCA Character Awards program winner. Afterward, Ronald Wayne

Elkins accepted the scholarship award from Jim and Rose Geiman. Rose Geiman said Elkins reminded her of her son because he did things like stopping a fellow student from being bullied and then riding on a bus with them to make sure the bullying didn’t start back up during the ride. “That was so like Jimmy,” said his mother Rose Geiman. In the past 10 years, the scholarship fund has awarded over $40,000 in awards and an additional $20,000 to hardship cases, she said. The scholarships are paid for by proceeds from an annual golf outing. This year’s 10th annual Jimmy Geiman, Jr. Scholarship Fund golf outing will be at A.J. Jolly Golf Course Friday, June 18. The registration deadline to play at a cost of $85 per participant, has deadline of May 31. For information call Andy Geiman at 859363-8167 or e-mail aj.geiman@gmail.com.

New group assists Highlands’ theater program By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com A new booster organization at Highlands High School has its sights set on helping the school’s theater programs. The group Standing Room Only, made up of district parents and interested parties, was recently formed to provide assistance

with services and funds for the theater. “Our hope is to be able to help out wherever we can,” said Jean Farley, president of the group. “We’re already working on fundraisers for the summer and fall.” Farley said the group came about after some parents noticed that director Jason Burgess was taking care of almost everything

in the theater programs by himself. “It’s really too much for one person,” Farley said. “We thought if we helped and made it more organized, he would have more time to add more things to the program.” Farley said with the group helping, the children will be able to benefit from having more opportunities, like having various

artists come to the school and lead workshops. The group recently elected a board and is moving forward with increasing its membership and developing plans. “We’re all just really excited,” Farley said. “I think this is going to make such a difference for the students.” The group is holding meetings at 7 p.m. the second Tuesday of

the month in the school’s black box theatre. Membership levels vary from a Friend, which is $15 to a Producer, which is $250. For more information, contact Jean Farley at jeanfarley@fuse.net, Vickie Pelgen at vickiepelgen@fuse.net or Jason Burgess at jason.burgess@fortthomas.kyschools.us.


Schools

June 3, 2010

CCF Recorder

A7

Rekow & Stull Orthodontics awards scholarships Local Orthodontist Dr. Jeri Stull announced this year’s recipients of the Rekow & Stull Orthodontics Scholarship to three area high school seniors. Stull would like to thank all 107 students who took the time to complete the scholarship application requirements from the fifth annual Rekow & Stull Orthodontics Scholarship Program. Each year Stull offers three $1,000 scholarships to graduating seniors from the local area. This opportunity is available to any student in Boone, Kenton, Campbell, Pendleton, and Bracken counties as well as all orthodontic patients of Stull in Kentucky, Ohio, and Indiana. Information on the annual scholarship program can be obtained through the practice website, www.OrthoSmileTeam.com. More applicants submitted entries this year than in any of the previous years since the scholarship program began in 2005. “With so many qualified candidates, it was difficult to choose only three,” Stull said. “The accomplishments that these young people

Orthodontist Dr. Jeri Stull with scholarship recipient Anne Marie Dumaine of Campbell County High School. have achieved are extraordinary. All 107 of these stu-

dents displayed amazing ambition and determination

PROVIDED

both in and out of the classroom.”

Catherine Butts: Newport Central Catholic High School Butts has achieved much success in her high school career with a strong focus on creative writing. Butts maintained exemplary grades in all of her accelerated classes and received honors in many of her classes. Her extensive list of volunteer activities made her a well-rounded candidate. She is also a member of the National Honor Society. Butts plans to attend Northern Kentucky University and her goal is to become a high school history teacher. Anne Marie Dumaine: Campbell County High School Dumaine’s impressive list of activities includes numerous athletic accomplishments as well as many scholastic awards for outstanding achievement throughout her high school career. While maintaining a remarkable schedule of accelerated classes in her senior year, she also excelled in varsity soccer and varsity basketball. Dumaine has exhibited strong leadership throughout high school while dedi-

cating much of her time to a number of community service volunteer projects. Dumaine plans to attend Xavier University in the fall and pursue a career in medicine. Karlie Smith: Bracken County High School Smith has not only maintained an outstanding GPA in her demanding schedule of accelerated classes, she has found time to be a strong leader at her school and in her community. She has been a Varsity Cheerleader and Varsity Volleyball player for four years. She has been a member of the Academic Team and an enthusiastic member of the Future Business Leaders of America, winning many awards in both activities. Smith also has an impressive background in working as a Youth Group Leader at her church. Among her many accomplishments, Smith participated in a 10day mission trip to Haiti in 2009. Smith plans to attend Thomas More College and her goal is to become an educator. Her dream is to establish a Christian school in her community.

and players. If interested plan to attend the meeting or contact Coach Jeff Brauley at 513-3694131 or at 859-572-0203.

Scholarships provided by the company's A-Peeling Foundation, Inc. Trevor is the son of Mark and Theresa Bezold of California, Kentucky and a member of Sts. Peter & Paul Parish. Justin is the son of Bruce and Joyce Bezold of Alexandria, Kentucky and a member of St. Mary Parish.

SCHOOL NOTES

Science, technology, summer camps

The Center for Integrative Natural Science and Mathematics (CINSAM) at Northern Kentucky University released its summer camp offerings for June and July. Enrollment in the camps is now open. These camps provide for fun and educational experiences that extend what has been offered in science and mathematics classrooms for grades six through 11 in public and private schools. The camps cover a wide range of topics from “Fun with Science” to “Women in Engineering” or “Emerging Technologies.” Other camps offer experiences in mathematics and statistics, JAVA, network security and computers, and astronomy. A description of each camp is available at http://www.nku.edu/~cinsam/p12community/camp.ph p. Applications can be down-

Governor’s Scholars

Three juniors from Newport Central Catholic High School have been selected to represent NCC in the Governor’s Scholar Program this summer. They are as follows: • Natalie Buller – daughter of Jim and Ann of St. Thomas Parish • Courtney Stone – daughter of John and Brenda of St. Mary Parish • Randall Vennemann – son of Richard and Linda of St. Mary Parish This prestigious five-week study program provides academic and personal growth in a non-traditional experience at Bellarmine University, Centre College, or Morehead State University. Students were selected on the basis of test scores from the PSAT, SAT or ACT. Their unweighted GPA and difficulty of course load was also taken into consideration. Students submitted a writing entry and demonstrated what they have done in the areas of extracurricular activities and service.

National Honor Society

The Newport Central Catholic High School chapter of the National Honor Society (NHS) is pleased to announce that new members were inducted May 6. Membership is based on the four pillars of the NHS: Character, Service, Leadership, and Scholarship. Sophomores Andrew Miller, Kaitlyn Owens, Madeline Brown, Dominique Wade, Katie Enzweiler, Michael Stegner, Korrinne Holtz, Lila Garner, Allison Steffen, Seth Connoll, Kevin Goldstein, Erica Zapp, Taylor Snyder, Eric Schwarbere, Abigail Schwarber, Matthew Broering, Justin Romito, Robert Gearding, Austin Juniet, Hannah Jones, Kelsey Feeback, Margaret O’Day, Zach Ryan, Becky Vonhandorf, Anne Hosty, Matt Dettmer, Austen Davenport, Aubrey Muench, Alexandra

Schalk, Jamie Kohls, Daniel Vennemann, Olivia Huber, Evan Trauth, Emily Hogle, Danny Ulbricht, Maria Kues, Jamie Kruer, Jacob Cohn, Adam Hoffmann, Katrina Hlebiczki. Juniors Clayton Bhola, Andrew Merrill, Evan Neises, Joseph Humbert, Madison Freeman. Officers for the 2009-10 school year include: • President Joe Lohr • Vice President Randy Vennamann • Secretary Rebecca Schilling • Historian Allison Buchanan

enth, and eighth-graders to play on its Junior High Football Team. If interested visit the school website, www.ncchs.com, navigate to the football page, fill out the Junior High Player Info form and send it to the high school: NCC Football, 13 Carothers Rd. Newport, KY 41071. An informational meeting and sign-ups is scheduled for Thursday, July 22, for parents

Drury to attend Art Institute of Chicago

Fort Thomas resident Kathryn Drury has been accepted into the Master of Fine Arts program at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, where she will study printmaking beginning in Fall 2010. She attended both Highlands Middle School and the School of the Creative and Performing Arts in Cincinnati prior to earning a Bachelor of Fine Arts at the State University of New York College of Ceramics, Alfred University. Kathryn is the daughter of Fort Thomas glass artist Joe Drury and Dr. Roxanne KentDrury, NKU English professor and Director of NKU’s English Graduate Program.

Newport junior high football sign-ups

Newport Central Catholic High School invites sixth, sev-

CE-0000404262

This summer, Northern Kentucky University will offer a weeklong program for high school students that combines hands-on media experience, a mini-introduction into the world of higher education and a few surprising adventures. NKU’s College of Informatics will host its third annual Journalism in the Digital Age Workshop June 14-18. The workshop will focus on teaching students how to create credible, multimedia news in the constantly evolving information age. Because of the extremely hands-on nature of the workshop, only 20 high school journalists can participate. Those who do will find the experience appealing on several levels. The workshop costs $175 and will run from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 14-18. The price includes lunch on campus each day. The event is open to all area high school students, but space is limited. Information and a link for online registration is available at the Journalism in the Digital Age Summer Workshop website at http://journalism.nku.edu/work shop. Parents, students and teachers should direct e-mails with questions to Michele Day at daymi@nku.edu.

loaded from the site, completed and returned to: Heather Howard, Academic Assistant, 519 Founders Hall, Nunn Drive, Highland Heights, KY 41099. For more information, contact Betty Stephens at 859-572-1308 or stephensb@nku.edu.

CE-0000404139

NKU journalism workshop

LaRosa’s scholarships

Bishop Brossart High School Sophomore Trevor Bezold and Junior Justin Bezold were selected to receive $400 LaRosa's Youth


A8

CCF Recorder

Schools

June 3, 2010

Carrell receives award The Northern Kentucky University Haile/US Bank College of Business at announced that management professor and former dean Dr. Michael Carrell has been selected as the recipient of the 2010 Labor-Management Lifetime Achievement Award. Each year the NKU Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service’s Labor-Management Conference recognizes an

individual who has made major contributions to labor relations, collective bargaining and improving relationships among unions and management in the Greater Cincinnati area. Carrell is the founding director of the Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) Center. The ADR Center provides negotiation, mediation and arbitration services in the Greater Cincinnati region.

The Annual Labor-Management Conference takes place the third Wednesday of May on NKU’s Highland Heights campus. The conference is targeted to those involved in collective bargaining, employment law, human resources, labormanagement relations, labor unions, local/state/federal government, management or personnel management. More information about the conference is available at http://labormgmtconf.nku.ed u.

SCHOOL NOTES Enrolling now for July! Online – anytime, anywhere Degree completion or full degree programs available

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Quarter Horse scholarship

Jordan Neltner of Camp Springs, a student at Newport Central Catholic, was named an American Quarter Horse Scholarship recipient. Neltner, 17, is the daughter of Missy Jo Hollingsworth of Camp Springs and will be attending the University of Louisville this fall. Neltner received the Guy Stoops Professional Horsemans Family Scholarship.

‘Wings for a King’

PROVIDED

The fifth-grade students at St. Joseph, Cold Spring unleashed their imaginations when they re-enacted the play “Wings for a King.” Kathleen Rice plays the part of the King, with Meg Whalen as reigning Queen, while Erica Huston and Sam Hildreth (in background) try to follow Grant Perkins as he serves as a page.

COLLEGE CORNER Hensley receives UK medical degree

Allison Kathleen Hensley of Campbell County received a doctor of medicine degree from the University of Kentucky College of Medicine May 15. Hensley will continue her education in residency at the Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis, Ind., specializing in obstetrics and gynecology. For information about UK’s College of Medicine, visit www.mc.uky.edu/medicine.

Holleian Society member

Highlands High School graduate and Transylvania University senior Jessica Tepe was recognized for being inducted into the Holleian Society during the University's recent awards program. The Holleian Society was established in 1960 for the encouragement of liberal art studies. Students are selected by faculty on the basis of academic achievement and must place in the top 10 percent of the class to even be considered for the honor. The society

is named for Horace Holley, president of Transylvania from 1818-27. Tepe, a biology major, is the daughter of Marc and Sharon Tepe of Fort Thomas.

Dean’s list

Campbellsville University Vice President for Academic Affairs Dr. Frank Cheatham has announced the academic honors’ list for the spring 2010 semester. The academic honors’ list recognizes students who achieve a grade point average of 3.50 or above for the semester with a course load of at least 12 hours. The spring 2010 academic honors’ list includes a total of 409 students, with 160 achieving a 4.0 grade point average and having been named to the President’s List. Others who have achieved a grade point average of 3.5-3.99 are named to the Dean’s List; there are 249 named to that list. Brittany Marie Spicer, a senior from Highland Heights, has been named to Campbellsville University’s Dean’s List for the spring 2010 semester.

Rice University grad

Keith Michel of Newport graduated May 15 from Rice University. Michel received a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering. This year Rice awarded

1,582 degrees, including 797 undergraduate and undergraduate professional degrees and 785 graduate degrees (master's and Ph.D.). The Class of 2010 is the 97th graduating class in Rice's history.

High Point University

Elizabeth Walburg of Fort Thomas has made the Dean’s List at High Point University in High Point, N.C. To be placed on the Dean’s List a student must attain a 3.5 GPA for the previous semester based on a 4.0 scale.

Baldwin-Wallace grads

The following students participated in the 160th commencement ceremonies at Baldwin-Wallace College: • Jessica Federle of Fort Thomas • Nicholas Smith of Fort Thomas

IWU grads

The following Campbell County students were among the 2,050 students who received degrees during graduation ceremonies May 1 at Indiana Wesleyan University’s main campus: • Darcy Albers of Alexandria • Alisha Schweitzer of Alexandria • Heath Webber of Bellevue

Local students, Xavier scholarships

Catherine Butts of Newport, Thomas Hizer of Cold Spring and Jake Litmer of Cold Spring have been awarded scholarships from Xavier University. Butts has accepted a Presidential Scholarship from Xavier University. She will graduate from Newport Central Catholic High School, where she is active in National Honor Society, mock trial and is a reporter for the school newspaper. Butts plans to major in history at Xavier. She is the daughter of Rhonda and Raymond Butts. Hizer has accepted a Schawe Award from Xavier University in Cincinnati. He will graduate from Saint Xavier High School, where he is active in theater, Cappies and is the editor of the school newspaper. Hizer plans to major in psychology at Xavier. He is the son of Joni and Greg Hizer. Litmer has accepted an Honor Award from Xavier University. He will graduate from Covington Catholic High School, where he is active in National Honor Society, tennis and community service. Litmer plans to major in either English or business at Xavier. He is the son of Laurie and John Litmer. For information about Xavier and its scholarships, visit www.xavier.edu.

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SPORTS

CCF Recorder

June 3, 2010

HIGH SCHOOL | Editor Melanie Laughman | mlaughman@nky.com | 513-248-7118

YOUTH

|

RECREATIONAL

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

N K Y. c o m

A9

RECORDER

Mustangs honor coach with 10-inning title

By James Weber jweber@nky.com

While literally showing their hearts on their sleeves, the Bishop Brossart High School baseball team showed the heart of a champion May 27. The Mustangs defeated Campbell County 7-6 in a 10-inning marathon to win the 37th District championship at Morscher Park. Both teams advanced to the 10th Region tourney. Brossart, who trailed 5-0 early, honored former assistant coach Edwin Schultz, 65, who died of cancer May 24. The team had his initials “EFS” stitched on their right sleeves. “He means everything to this program,” Brossart head coach Matt Grosser said. “He has been a crucial part of building it to where it is today. I was fortunate to take over a program that was in really good shape. He and (former head coach) Bob Rowe have done a fantastic job of building it from a team that struggled against bigger schools to now where we expect to beat bigger schools like Campbell.” Several members of Schultz’s family addressed the team after the game. It was a game with several twists ended in the top of the 10th, when senior David Greis led off with a single and was later brought in on a squeeze bunt from junior Ian Hehman. Hehman, named the tourney’s most valuable player, got the win in relief after pitching five innings of one-hit ball. He stranded a

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

Bishop Brossart senior Anthony Steffen and the rest of the Mustangs have the initials of former Brossart coach Edwin Schultz on their right sleeve. Schultz passed away earlier in the week. Brossart won the 37th District championship after the Mustangs beat Campbell County, 7-6 in 10 innings May 27 at Morscher Park.

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

The Bishop Brossart baseball team celebrates its 37th District championship after the Mustangs beat Campbell County, 7-6 in 10 innings May 27 at Morscher Park.

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

Campbell County senior Ryan Steffen swings at a pitch against Bishop Brossart.

Camel runner at third base to end the game. “After the first couple of innings, we got more focused,” Hehman said. “Once we scored (in extra innings) I got a little bit nervous, but I was fine.” Said Grosser: “We continued to put the ball in play and we got the big squeeze there. For a guy that doesn’t get a whole lot of at-bats, for him to execute it in a clutch situation like that is pretty impressive.” Senior Ryan Steffen gave Campbell a 1-0 lead, plating junior Nate Losey with a sacrifice fly in the first inning. Losey and senior Damon Carrier had RBI singles in the second to lift Campbell to a 4-0 lead. A single by senior Austin Vann in the third made it 5-0. Brossart junior Travis Norton led off the fourth

with a home run to make it 5-1, and Greis added a sacfly later in the inning. Brossart tied the game in the sixth when an error by junior right fielder Jake Rebholz allowed three runs to score. In the eighth, Brossart sophomore Jared Hahn drew

a bases-loaded walk to give Brossart the lead. Campbell responded when Rebholz hit a one-out triple and scored on a sac-fly by Coy Shepard. Vann and Losey made the all-tourney team for Campbell. Steffen and Norton did for Brossart. The Mustangs, who pelted Grosser with a Gatorade shower after the win, hope they have more wins in the regional to honor Coach Schultz. “You’re not going to find a better person,” Grosser said. “I think we had a 10th person on the field.”

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

Bishop Brossart junior Nick Hamberg (left) beats Campbell County senior Justin Iles to the bag.

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

Bishop Brossart junior Luke Dischar is congratulated by teammates after scoring in the eighth inning against Campbell County.

BRIEFLY New Cath Hoops Camp

Newport Central Catholic coaches and players are conducting a hoops camp this summer. Girls’ sessions: • 9 a.m. to noon, June 710, for fifth through eighth grades. • 1-4 p.m., June 7-10, for first through fourth grades. Boys’ sessions: • 9 a.m. to noon, June 1417, for fifth through eighth grades. • 1-4 p.m., June 14-17, for first through fourth grades. Cost is $55 if registered by May 15, and $65 after that date. Family discount is $10 for two campers, $30 for three campers.

Camp features T-shirt, snack and soft drinks daily, door prizes, contests, guest speaker and emphasis on fundamentals.

NKU players honored

Northern Kentucky University baseball players Kevin Jordan and Jason Cisper have been selected as NCAA Division II All-Americans by the National Collegiate Baseball Writers Association. Both NKU standouts were selected to the third team by the NCBWA. Earlier this month, Jordan and Cisper also earned Daktronics AllAmerica honors. Jordan, a senior pitcher from Louisville, Ky., finished

the season with an 8-3 record and a team-best 2.33 earned run average. Jordan broke his own record with 36 pitching appearances this spring and set an NKU single-season mark with 108 1/3 innings pitched. Jordan also struck out a team-leading 87 batters. Cisper, a senior outfielder from Cincinnati, Ohio, earned Daktronics Midwest Region and Great Lakes Valley Conference Player of the Year honors after leading the team with a .442 batting average and setting single-season school records for hits (102), runs scored (75), doubles (26) and total bases (144). Cisper also drove in 47 runs and led the team with 39 stolen bases.

Bishop Brossart senior pitcher David Greis throws out a Campbell County batter May 27. Brossart won the 37th District championship after the Mustangs beat Campbell County, 7-6 in 10 innings May 27 at Morscher Park.

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

The Bishop Brossart baseball team celebrates with its 37th District trophy. Brossart won the 37th District championship after the Mustangs beat Campbell County, 7-6 in 10 innings May 27 at Morscher Park.

Russell takes over CCHS hoops After taking Newport to the boys’ basketball Sweet 16, Aric Russell is returning home. Russell of Alexandria has accepted the position as head varsity boys’ basketball coach at Campbell County High School. Russell comes to Campbell County after spending the last nine years working as a teacher and the head basketball coach for Newport High School. Last season he led the Newport team to win the Ninth region All “A” championship and the postseason Ninth Region title. The latter

was Newport’s first such title in 48 years. “I’m excited to have the opportunity to come to Campbell County and I hope we can do well as a team,” said Russell, who will teach social studies in addition to coaching. Russell is no stranger to Campbell County Schools. A 1989 Campbell County graduate, he has coached several basketball teams in the CCS youth basketball program in which his children played. “I’m excited to bring Coach Russell back to Campbell County schools. I

remember watching him play and I’ve watched him coach. He’s going to bring an incredible will to win to CCHS,” Campbell County High School Principal Renée Boots said. “He’s a quality teacher, coach and individual. He will be an enhancement to our classroom and our athletics.” Russell was selected as the new coach by a committee made up of parents, teachers and administrators, many of whom with coaching backgrounds. He was scheduled for his first meeting with his players on Tuesday, June 1.


A10

CCF Recorder

Sports & recreation

June 3, 2010

Camels, Bluebirds win team track titles By James Weber jweber@nky.com

Track and field teams are set for the state meets this week at the University of Louisville. The Class 2A meet begins 4:30 p.m. Thursday, June 3, at the U of L track facility. Class 1A is 9:30 a.m. Saturday, June 5; and 3A is 4:30 Saturday, June 5. In each meet, the throws begin 90 minutes earlier at a separate facility a few blocks from the track. The 2A meet is on Thursday to accommodate several schools around the state who have graduations on June 4. Campbell County won the boys and girls Region 5 titles in Class 3A in dominating fashion. The boys’ team had 150 points to 92 for Simon Kenton. The Camel girls’ team scored 160 to 91 for Dixie. Highlands won the girls’ team title in 2A with 202

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points to 133 for Lloyd. The two-time defending state champs will try to repeat on Thursday. Covington Catholic won the Class 2A, Region 4 title with 177 points to 109 for Western Hills. The 2009 state champion Colonels will try to repeat Thursday. Here is a list of individual regional champs and state qualifiers for each team:

Danielle Swope: 100 hurdles. Megan Arnzen: 100 hurdles. Brittany Bohn: 300 hurdles, high jump.

400 (51.94). Rob Washington won the 110 hurdles (15.74). DaMarkco Foster claimed the regional title in the long jump (20-3) and triple jump (41-4.5). Jordan Hatfield won the discus (126-0). 4x100. Branden Carter: 200, 400. Jordan Hatfield: Shot put, Discus, high jump. Rob Washington: 110 hurdles. DaMarkco Foster: Long jump, triple jump. Robert Engram: Long jump.

Brossart boys

Newport girls

Aubrey Muench: 300 hurdles. Jamie Kohls: 300 hurdles, high jump. Amy Schwarber: 800. Sarah Suedkamp: 800.

Bellevue boys 4x100.

Bellevue girls

Sam Schaefer won the pole vault (10-6). 4x800, 4x200, 4x400. Nolan Johnson: 800. John Paolucci: Discus. Adam Meyer: Long jump. Graeham Heil: High jump. Sam Schaefer: Pole vault.

Zach Holtkamp claimed the regional title in the 800 (2:02.74). 4x800, 4x200, 4x100, 4x400. Clay Elam: 110 hurdles, 300 hurdles. Matt Stover: 100, 200, long jump. Zach Holtkamp: 1,600, 800. Jack Foster: 1,600, 800. Corey Hartig: High jump.

NCC girls

Brossart girls

NCC boys

Aubrey Muench won the 300 hurdles (49.14). NewCath won all four relays. The 4x400 (4:14.44) and 4x800 (10:10.74) are top seeds at state. Brittany Fryer won the triple jump (31-11.25). Frannie Schultz won the shot put (35-9.25) and is the top seed at state. 4x800, 4x200, 4x100, 4x400. Frannie Schultz: Shot put, discus. Liz Gruenschlaeger: Shot put. Kim Bihl: 100 hurdles. Kiley Bartels: 100, long jump. Emma Heil: High jump. Brittany Fryer: Long jump, triple jump, pole vault. Jamie Kruer: Pole vault. Morgan Dubuc: 400. Madison Little: 400.

Freshman Sarah Klump won the regional title in the 400 and is the top seed in the state with her regional time of 1:01.14. The seeds are based on regional performance. Nicole Ridder won the 100 hurdles (16.64). 4x800, 4x200, 4x100, 4x400. Nicole Ridder: 100 hurdles Melanie Fleissner: 100 hurdles Sarah Klump: 400 (top seed). Shannon Donnelly: 3,200. Kyra Hickman: Pole vault. Felicity Britt: Shot put, discus.

Dayton boys

Jay Nellis: Shot put, discus.

Newport boys

Junior Branden Carter won the

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Raven Rice, just an eighth-grader, won the 100 meters with 13.04 in a photo-finish over NCC’s Kiley Bartels. Rice won the 200 as well in 27.34. 4x200 4x100 Raven Rice: 100, 200.

MATTHEW BECK/CONTRIBUTOR

Runners Carolynn Dreyer, center, Anne Marie Dumaine, left, and Lyndsay Wehage run in the 800M race during the AAA region 5 track meet. They would finish in that order, Dryer, Dumaine, Wehage.

Highlands boys

jump, triple jump, high jump. Lisa Patterson: Triple jump, high jump.

Highlands girls

Campbell boys

John Michael Griffith: 3,200.

Ashley Collinsworth won the 100 (12.54) and is the top seed based on regional times. She also won the 300 hurdles (47.72). Highlands won three relays and finished second in the 4x800. Taylor Rosenhagen won the triple jump (33-2), high jump (4-11) and long jump (16-5). Laura Geiman won the pole vault (9-0). 4x800, 4x200, 4x100, 4x400. Ashley Collinsworth: 100 hurdles, 100 (top seed), 300 hurdles, 200. Maria Weyer: 100, 200. Abby Hills: 100 hurdles, 300 hurdles. Sonja Thams: 400. Jennifer Camm: 800. Alyssa Farley: 3,200. Laura Geiman: Pole vault. Lindsey Scaggs: Pole vault. Taylor Rosenhagen: Shot put, long

Robbie Scharold edged teammate Alexx Bernard to win the 800 (1:58.81) and 1,600 (4:31.83). Aaron Lyon won the 300 hurdles (42.64). The Camels won the 4x400 (3:24.96) and 4x800 (8:14.81). Nathan McGovney won the high jump (5-10). 4x800, 4x200, 4x400 Aaron Lyon: 110 hurdles, 300 hurdles. Jeff Pflum: 300 hurdles. Robbie Scharold: 1,600, 800. Alexx Bernard: 1,600, 800. Austin Johnson: 400. Ben Rawe: 3,200. Nathan McGovney: High jump. Doug Long: Pole vault (top seed). Josh Presley: Pole vault.

Campbell girls

Anna Carrigan won the 200

(25.63) and 400 (57.75). The state champ in 2009 in the 400 is the top seed in that event. Carolynn Dreyer won the 800 (2:24.44). Taylor Robinson won the 1,600 (5:25.05). Christina Heilman won the 300 hurdles (47.40). Campbell won the 4x200, 4x400 and 4x800. The Camels are the top seed in the 4x800. 4x800, 4x200, 4x100, 4x400 Kennedy Berkley: 100 hurdles, triple jump, high jump. Christina Heilman: 100 hurdles, 300 hurdles. Molly Kitchen: 100, 200. Taylor Robinson: 1,600, 3,200. Imke Lorenz: 1,600. Anna Carrigan: 400 (top seed), 200. Faith Roaden: 400. Carolynn Dreyer: 800. Anne Marie Dumaine: 800. Kristen Rice: Shot put. Brianna Schraer: Discus.

Brossart softball falls to Clark It was a battle between the top-ranked team in Northern Kentucky and the top-ranked team in the 10th region this year. Clark County was 29-9 and Bishop Brossart 28-8. Something had to give and the winner would be an early favorite to win it all in the 10th Region Tourney at Harrison County.

In the second inning senior third baseman Kayle Jones drilled a low pitch over the centerfield fence to give Clark a 2-0 lead, but Brossart battled back in the third when Paige Baynum drilled a base hit and then moved to second on a Krista Kennedy infield hit. A rocket by Lindsay Griffith off the glove of Jones at third made

it 2-1 as Baynum scored. Clark bounced back with two unearned runs in the fourth to take a 4-1 lead but back came Brossart. Maria Gries had an infield hit in the fifth and eventually scored on a Kennedy single. That made it 4-2 and what would be the final score.

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For more information on Kohl’s community giving, visit www.kohlscorporation.com. Kohl’s Cares for Kids® merchandise is not eligible for discounts or other promotional incentives. Styles may vary by store. While quantities last; sorry, no rain checks. Copyright © 2010 Disney Enterprises, Inc./Pixar. Original Toy Story elements © Disney Enterprises, Inc. Copyright © Todd Wilbur, 1997. All rights reserved. Top Secret Recipes is a registered trademark of Todd Wilbur. CD ‫ ۔‬2010 Manufactured by Sony Music Entertainment.

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Sports & recreation

June 3, 2010

CCF Recorder

A11

Newport, Bellevue fall in 9th baseball By James Weber

Schwierjohann and Brandon Thornton. Calvary lost to Campbell County 12-6 in the 37th District tourney. Seniors are Zak Duty, Mitch Davenport, Pierce Kohls, Aaron Hatfield, Ryan Grinstead, and Sam Thompson. Silver Grove lost 7-1 to Calvary in the 37th District Tournament. Seniors are Quinten Gindale, Ian Doyle, Justen Denham and Ryan Vogel.

jweber@nky.com

Grady Brown wouldn’t have wanted to go out any other way. Brown’s last game as head baseball coach at Newport High School was a 12-0 loss to Dixie Heights in the Ninth Region quarterfinals May 31 at Champion Window Field. Brown is retiring from coaching and teaching at Newport but will stay as energy manager at the school. “They’re a nice bunch of kids,” Brown said. “They played hard the whole year. Most of these kids, I coached their parents.” Brown and deceased brother Ray Brown coached the Wildcats to the regional tourney in 29 of the previous 36 years. Dixie used its ace pitching Brice Smallwood to earn the win Monday. Brown and Dixie head coach Chris Maxwell have been coaching Northern Kentucky baseball for decades. “I told (Maxwell) the other day he needed to throw Smallwood,” Brown said. “Dixie has a great team. Max and I have been buddies for a long time. If I have to go out, I’d rather lose to him.” Brown said he would take more time to fish and spend time with his daughter Maggie, who is in med school in Washington, D.C. Newport seniors are Derrick Dieters, Elijah Hammonds, Michael Kroth, Ian Plank, James Raleigh, Adam Reynolds, Brandon Sizemore, Kenny Trimble and Brandon Brown. Bellevue lost to Covington Catholic 11-1 in the quarterfinals Monday. The Tigers were in the regional after a thrilling walkoff win over Highlands in the district semifinals. Bellevue scored two runs with two outs to win the game. Bellevue then beat Newport in the 36th District final. The season unraveled in the first inning against CovCath. Bellevue had three

Softball districts

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

Highlands shortstop Brooke Hollingsworth reacts after colliding with Newport junior Sara Nashbinder as Hollingsworth tagged her out at second base May 25 at NKU. The players’ legs collided on the play but both were fine. Highlands won 12-1 in the 36th District Tournament. pened. Some mistakes early, we lost our confidence. As a result, we were never able to recover.” Senior Ricky Buckler provided Bellevue with its lone run with a solo home run, his team-high fifth of the year. Other seniors are Joe Fessler, Tony Piper, Chad Thompson, Mike Young and Alex Hegge. Brossart is set to play Bourbon County in a 10th Region semifinal Wednesday at Clark County. Brossart beat Nicholas County 10-0 Monday. Campbell County fell 4-3 to Clark County. Barring rain, the 10th Region final is 6 p.m. Thursday, June 3, at Clark County.

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

Highlands junior catcher Allie Conner bunts for a base hit May 25 at NKU. Highlands won 12-1 in the 36th District Tournament.

Region quarterfinals (separate story).

Baseball districts

Newport Central Catholic lost 6-5 to Highlands in the 36th District Tournament. Seniors are Phil Wagner, Tyler Lampe, Shaun Meyer, Nate Seibert, Larry Dettmer, and T.J. Schowalter. Highlands lost to Bellevue 6-5 in the 36th semifinals. Seniors are Chris Rizzo, Troy Hebel, Sam Liggett and Corey Dill. Dayton lost to Newport 6-1 in the 36th District semifinals. Seniors are Rob Collins, James Jones, Greg Kraft, Tim Massey, Patrick

Softball regionals

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

Highlands senior Alex Sorrell throws out a Newport batter as pitcher Sydney Groneck ducks May 25 at NKU. Highlands won 12-1 in the 36th District Tournament. errors, which led to six Colonel runs. CovCath had just one hit en route to scoring those six runs. “When you’re young,

you’re up and down,” Bellevue head coach Rob Sanders said. “The worst possible thing that could have happened to us hap-

The Ninth Region tourney started Tuesday, June 1, after deadline. The semifinals are 5 and 6:30 p.m. Thursday, June 3, at Northern Kentucky University. The first semi will be the winners of Conner/Newport Central Catholic and St. Henry/Holmes. The second game feature the Dixie Heights/Holy Cross and Ryle/Highlands winners. The final is 5 p.m. Friday, June 4. Bishop Brossart fell to Clark County in the 10th

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Camel senior to play football at Pikeville By James Weber jweber@nky.com

Zak Koeninger’s senior football season was cut short after just three games because of a knee injury. He will get a chance for more football as the Campbell County High School senior signed to play for Pikeville College May 26. The linebacker/offensive lineman will start out on the defensive line at Pikeville. Pikeville, an NAIA school,

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

Campbell County senior Zak Koeninger (middle) signs to play football for Pikeville College May 26. With him are parents, Sheri and Mark. went 3-8 last season. “They were a little bit hesitant about recruiting

me, but they were impressed with what they saw in my swimming and

my rehab,” he said. Koeninger was part of the Camel swimming team this past season. He plans to major in exercise science. “It was tough (not playing),” he said. “I didn’t think I would have the chance to play again.” Koeninger said he would miss his friends at the school.

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Dayton lost to Newport Central Catholic 2-1 in the 36th District tournament. Seniors are Jennifer Ackerson, CC Centers, and Sammy Powell. Bellevue lost to Newport Central Catholic 10-1 in the 36th District Tournament. Seniors are Cassie Glancy, and Catherine Kessen. Newport lost to Highlands 12-1 in the 36th District tourney. Seniors were Annessa Stamper, Taylor Tyler, Salem Thompson and Anna Miller. Silver Grove forfeited in the 37th District Tournametn. Krista Govan is the lone senior. Campbell County lost to Scott, 11-6 in the 37th District tourney. Jenna Brooks and Brielle Byrne were the seniors. Calvary lost to Bishop Brossart 15-0 in the 37th District Tournament. Kara Heineman is the lone senior.

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VIEWPOINTS

A12

Campbell County Recorder

June 3, 2010

EDITORIALS

I would like to thank everyone who supported and helped me in any way with my campaign for Family Court Judge. Your help in big and small ways really made a difference.

I hope to see you over the summer months, and I want you to know that I really appreciate your continued support. Sincerely, Rick Woeste Candidate for Campbell County Family Court Judge

Lack of leadership costs taxpayers plenty to happen The Kentucky Senate Julie Smith- allowed three times in the adjourned early on the last day of Morrow last decade, but I the legislative session in April without doing their No. 1 job, Community do know that in passing a budget. Northern KenRecorder the real world, I work and tucky is home to a member of guest where live, if you don’t Senate leadership, Katie Stine, and columnist do your job, as when we looked to her as a leader, Donald Trump she’s turned away, and has failed says, “You’re fired!” Voters in us once again. A spending plan for Kentucky’s Northern Kentucky will have a citizens is necessary and required choice this fall whether or not to return the same by law per the individuals to Kentucky constiFrankfort who tution. Gov. Steve I hope that the voters will time and time Beshear was look closely at the record of again dig their forced to call the those who have been in heels in and General Assembly refuse to do their back into special office and make a decision constitutional session to finish based upon accountability. duty to serve the the job. citizens of this At the tune of $63,000 a day, the Senate was great Commonwealth. I hope that back in Frankfort last week to see the voters will look closely at the if this time they could work in a record of those who have been in bi-partisan fashion to pass a office and make a decision based budget. Finishing in one week, the upon accountability. cost would be $315,000. That Julie Smith-Morrow of Newport is a could cover the salaries of about candidate for Kentucky Senate, District eight Kentucky teachers who 24. Currently Smith-Morrow is a have lost their jobs due school member of the Newport Independent cuts. School Board. I don’t know how this has been

CH@TROOM Does the Reds’ early-season success make it more likely that you will go to a game, or more games, this season? Why or why not? “It doesn’t influence my decision to go or not to go. I love going to the Reds games and try to catch a game (at least) once a year. It’s always fun and the stadium is (still) so beautiful with a great view. If they don’t win the night I’m there, no big deal – you win some and you lose some. I’m a Reds fan through the highs and lows.” J.K. “My son and I were making plans for going to at least one Reds game this summer. It would be our third since The Great American Ball Park opened a few years ago. Obviously we’re glad the Reds are doing so well. We might go to more than one game due to that.” R.V. “I hate to weigh in with such a boring answer, but I have to be honest. I’ve reached the age where I’m not terribly interested in watching baseball, either on TV or in person. But there was a time ...” B.B. “I really don’t care where the Reds are in the standings. I like to go anytime the Cubs are in town. Was born and raised in Wrigley and am sticking with them till they win. “However, Great American Ballpark, while not Wrigley Field, is a great venue for baseball, especially compared to that stadium monstrosity called Riverfront. Went just a week ago to see St.

LETTERS

|

COLUMNS

|

CH@TROOM

Next question What was the best advice your father gave you, and did you follow it? What happened? Send your answer to “mshaw@nky.com” with Chatroom in the subject line. Louis and really enjoyed the atmosphere. So support your team, the facilities, the city, even if they are the Reds.” J.Z. “It has been years since I enjoyed a Reds game. I was there when Pete hit 4,192 and I also went to a World Series game years ago. “I enjoyed the Big Red Machine of the 1970s. The Reds of the last 25 years have not impressed me very much. However, if they continue to perform I could take in a day game.” J.S.D. “It really doesn’t matter, I am not a baseball fan. I follow the scores and the standings only. I find the game is too slow. I prefer the NFL and the NHL.” M.A.M. “We are fortunate to have weekday season tickets; some we use and some we pass on to others. We’ll be going to as many games as we always do because we love to watch the Reds play. However, having a contending team makes each game more important and more fun to watch. I’m happy to say we’ve seen two walk-off home runs, several come from behind wins, and only one loss!” M.K.T.

COUNTY RECORDER

RECORDER

Carbon capture is wrong path Kentucky officials are betting our future on an unproven technology known as carbon capture and storage (CCS) or carbon sequestration. It’s a misguided gamble that takes us down an expensive path when there are clearly better options. No doubt there is a problem. Kentucky coal burning power plants produce about 100 million tons of carbon dioxide a year. And though there are modest efforts to reduce this amount, Kentucky’s electricity use is expected to grow which adds to the problem unless we turn down a different path. Politicians and utilities are betting on geological sequestration – using porous rock, and a lot of it, deep under our land as the place to dispose of this waste. But after years of experiments, we still have no proof that carbon capture and sequestration will work on the scale necessary, and at a cost that’s affordable. It’s the wrong solution. The sheer volume of carbon dioxide that we produce in Kentucky requires a scale that goes way beyond any feasible options. To dispose of this much waste would result in the creation of the largest toxic waste distribution and disposal system ever conceived. It will take, literally, the whole state to provide storage capacity that even then might not be enough, and then only for a limited number of years. But state officials have crafted a program that, either through outright seizure or condemnation, gives the coal industry access to almost all deep rock strata under the state. The speculation until recently was that it would take a 359square-mile area to store carbon waste from a 500-mega-watt (MW) power plant. But that formu-

Doug Doerrfeld Community Recorder guest columnist

la was shattered with research from a recent peerreviewed article in the Journal of the Society of Petroleum Engineers. Professors Michael and Christine Ehlig-Economides concluded that geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide is “a profoundly non-feasible option for the management of carbon dioxide emissions.” “Published reports on the potential for sequestration fail to address the necessity of storing carbon dioxide in a closed system,” wrote Professors Ehlig-Economides. “Our calculations suggest that the volume of liquid or supercritical carbon dioxide to be disposed cannot exceed more than about 1 percent of pore space. This will require from five to 20 times more underground reservoir volume than has been envisioned by many, including federal government laboratories.” By their projections, a small 500 MW plant’s underground carbon dioxide reservoir would need to be the size of the state of Vermont to work. Kentucky has about 16,510 MW of coal-burning capacity and officials want to add more. That’s just one of the problems with the sequestering side of the plan. Carbon capture technologies built into a new power plant would increase the fuel needs of such plants by 25-40 percent. In other words, it would take a third more coal to produce the same amount of electricity. The overall energy costs of new coal-burning plants equipped with CCS will jump 30-90 percent. Applying CCS to existing plants or plants far from a storage location will be even more expensive, elevating costs by 50-300

percent. A 2008 federal Government Accountability Office report concluded that the sheer energy cost of CCS outweighs any potential benefit. Rodney Andrews, executive director at University of Kentucky’s Center for Applied Energy Research, predicts CCS electricity cost increases of 60-200 percent. The only way utilities will find CCS to be affordable is to get taxpayers, and eventually their customers, to foot the bill. The Kentucky General Assembly has been more than willing to go along with this scheme, introducing several proposals to provide subsidies for sequestration experiments – and exempting corporations from any permanent liability for their wastes. We need to stop our obsession with coal and move toward energy efficient power such as solar, wind, biomass and the wide variety of available and developing non-fossil fuel energy options. This is where our future economy needs to be headed. But in Kentucky, some officials don’t see beyond coal. “For many of us who realize only too plainly the very real dangers and difficulties associated with sequestration, over-inflated claims for CCS have become the last refuge of the energy scoundrel. There is no need to research this subject any longer,” the EhligEconomides concluded. “Let’s try something else.” I agree. It’s past time to get started. Doug Doerrfeld is a member of the executive committee of Kentuckians For The Commonwealth.

Reasons for not buckling up don’t add up Excuses, excuses. Those who drive or ride without using seat belts often have excuses. But how do excuses stack up Nancy Wood against statistics Community that show seat Recorder belts save lives? guest As Kentuckians columnist prepared to travel this Memorial Day weekend, the Kentucky Office of Highway Safety (KOHS) wants all motorists to forget the excuses and listen to the facts. “Thousands of lives could be saved and critical injuries could be prevented if occupants would just buckle up,” said KOHS Executive Director Chuck Geveden. Statistics for 2009 indicate 398 (61.3 percent) of the 649 people who were killed in motor vehicles last year in Kentucky were not wearing a seat belt. When worn correctly, seat belts are proven to reduce the risk of fatal injury to front-seat occupants by 45 percent – and by 60 percent in pickup trucks, SUVs, and minivans. Despite a wealth of data showing that seat belts save lives – and also despite implementation of a primary seat belt law – Kentucky’s 80 percent seat belt usage rate lags behind the national rate of 84 percent. What reasons do people give for not using a seat belt? • Seat belts can cause injuries, such as a broken collar bone. Seat belts reduce the risk of fatal injury to front-seat passenger car occupants by 45 percent and the risk of moderate to critical injury by 50 percent. • I don’t need a seat belt when driving at slow speeds or on short trips.

About letters & columns

We welcome your comments on editorials, columns, stories or other topics important to you in The Community Recorder. Include your name, address and phone number(s) so we may verify your letter. Letters of 200 or fewer words and columns of 500 or fewer words have the best chance of being published. All submissions may be edited for length, accuracy and clarity. Deadline: Noon Monday E-mail: mshaw@communitypress.com Fax: 283-7285. U.S. mail: See box below Letters, columns and articles submitted to The Community Recorder may be published or distributed in print, electronic or other forms.

Most crash deaths occur within 25 miles of home and at speeds less than 40 mph. • I might be trapped if my car catches fire or becomes submerged. Crashes involving fire or water amount to one-half of 1 percent of all crashes. • I don’t need to wear a seat belt because my vehicle has air bags. Air bags are designed to work in combination with seat belts, providing supplemental protection during certain types of crashes. • It makes me feel restrained. That’s the function of a seat belt! All seat belts allow free movement of the occupant until a crash occurs or until you slam the brakes. Nationwide, 75 percent of people ejected from a motor vehicle are killed. • It irritates the skin on my neck or chest. Most vehicles have adjustable shoulder belts that can be raised or lowered for comfort. • I am too big to wear a seat belt; it doesn’t fit. Purchasing a seat belt extender may solve this issue. • This is just government trying to control individuals. Every state has traffic laws that set limits on individual behavior. For instance, it is illegal to drink

A publication of Your Community Recorder newspaper serving all of Campbell County

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

N K Y. c o m

Editor Michelle Shaw | smhaw@nky.com | 578-1053

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

A big thank you

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Campbell County Editor . . . . . .Michelle Shaw smhaw@nky.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .578-1053

and drive or to speed. It also is illegal to drive or ride without a seat belt. Driving is a privilege, not a right. • I can’t reach my children if they should need attention. If you’re trying to feed, calm or play with your baby in the backseat, attention is not focused on the road and both lives are at risk. Please pull over to a safe location if you need to tend to your child. • I have a medical condition, I can’t wear it. This can be a valid excuse but only if a doctor provides you with a written medical note. The KOHS is coordinating the annual Click It or Ticket campaign in partnership with over 260 law enforcement agencies, including Kentucky State Police. Traffic safety checkpoints and saturation patrols began Monday, May 24, and will run through June 6. “Although the title of the campaign emphasizes the law – that if you don’t wear a seat belt you will be ticketed – the goal of the campaign is to educate the public about the importance of wearing a seat belt and, most importantly, save lives” Geveden said. Nancy Wood is the Public Information Officer for the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet District 6 Office.

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A WORLD OF DIFFERENT VOICES

Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Friday | See page A2 for additional contact information. 283-7285 | 228 Grandview Drive, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017 | 654 Highland Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075 | e-mail kynews@NKY.com | Web site: www.NKY.com


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T h u r s d a y, M a y 2 7 , 2 0 1 0

SMALL BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT

PEOPLE

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IDEAS

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RECIPES

Local marine shares his story from the Pacific

By Adam Kiefaber akiefaber@nky.com

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Mark Babin, lead technician at SBcomp, works on a computer in the shop.

SBcomp celebrates 15 years in business

What started as fixing computers for friends and relatives has led to a 15 year business for one Bellevue resident. Steve Brun, president of SBcomp, has been running the growing business since he started it out of his house in 1995. “People started asking me to work on their computers, so I had to start ordering parts, so I needed a vendor’s license,” Brun said. “That’s how this all got started.” After moving to various locations throughout the city, SBcomp finally settled in its current location next to Sav-A-Lot in 2008. The business offers new and used computer sales, service for individuals and

businesses and also provides set-ups, configurations, network monitoring and off-site back-up. Brun said while the store will continue to cater to retail needs, the business is progressing more into government, education and security needs. In the next two years, if business continues in the positive direction it’s going, Brun said he hopes to open two more locations in the area to be able to serve more people so they won’t have to go elsewhere. “Our motto is ‘Why get a geek when you can hire a professional,’” Brun said. For more information or to sign up for an e-mail list of monthly specials, visit www.sbcomponline.com.

THINGS TO DO Memorial Day Parade

There will be a Memorial Day Parade in Elsmere from 8 a.m. to 11 a.m. May 31. The parade will begin at the VFW Post 6423 and end at the Forest Lawn Memorial Park Cemetery. There will be a small service for fallen commands from the Korean and Vietnam wars given at the intersection of Dixie Highway and Stevenson Road at the Vietnam and Korean Memorials. For more information, call 859-816-7433. The VFW Post 6423 is located at 4435 Dixie Highway.

Taste of Kentucky

The Kentucky Haus Artisan Center in Newport will host a Taste of Kentucky event from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. May 29. The event will be for bourbon, coffee and tea lovers. The products featured will be Kentucky Proud Food Products. For more information, call 859-261-4287. The Kentucky Haus Artisan Center is located at 411 E. 10th St.

Weekend of Freedom

The Florence Freedom will be at Champion Window Field

for its first weekend home series of the season May 2830. The series will be against the Evansville Otters. Friday will feature postgame fireworks, Saturday will feature a band after the game and Sunday is Family Fun Sunday at the ballpark. The games begin at 6:05 p.m. May 29-30 and at 7:05 p.m. May 28. For tickets and more information, visit www.florencefreedom.com or call 859-594HITS. Champion Window Field is located at 7950 Freedom Way in Florence.

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After spending the night at the foot of Mount Suribachi on the island of Iwo Jima during World War II, Newport resident Lou Smith and his fellow Marines were ordered to march across an airfield. Waiting for them was intense gunfire from the Japanese. “We went up and across the airfield and there was all kinds of hell breaking loose at that time,” said Smith, who now resides in Bellevue. “You hit the deck and they say that you can’t go forward on your stomach, so you get up and go. You hear machine guns going off and you don’t know if your name will be on one of those bullets or not.” Smith made it across that airfield, but many of his fellow Marines did not including his platoon and squad leaders. This Memorial Day, Smith will be thinking of those who died during that battle and in other battles of American warfare. “What people don’t realize is that Memorial Day is not for us (veterans). Memorial Day is for the guys that didn’t make it, and I had a lot of guys like that,” Smith said. Smith almost became one of those “guys” the following day after crossing the airfield. During the second day of fighting, Smith hurried to position himself behind a knoll amid the crossfire. As soon he got down, an enemy grenade landed next to his head. He could see the smoke spill from out of the grenade, he thought to himself, “this is it.” Smith grabbed the grenade and heaved it towards the enemy. It went off. Nothing. Soon after, a second grenade landed between him and another marine. It exploded injuring the other marine. The injured marine retreated to Smith’s knoll when a third grenade landed behind him. Smith couldn’t reach it in time. “It went off and I got what went through him. It hit me on my hand, arm, my side and my leg,” Smith said. “He (other marine) was completely gone. There was nothing left to him at all.” Smith, who was “stunned,” fell back with the rest of Marines to where they started that morning. The next morning, his left hand stiffened to the point that it would make a clanking sound when he would tap it on a rifle. “Hey Smitty, I heard you were hit,” the assistant squad leader said. “You are going back.” “What do you mean?” “We need medical supplies. I am going to give you a list. Take it back to the medical unit and make sure that they get them back up here,” he ordered.

PROVIDED

For the first time since he fought there in World War II, Lou Smith returned to Iwo Jima this spring. This time Smith brought his wife, Mary, for the 65th anniversary of the battle of Iwo Jima. They are pictured from the top of Mount Suribachi. Smith took the list and headed back. Before doing so, he gave his up his water and his rifle to a marine whose rifle was jammed due to the black sand that covered Iwo Jima. There was a problem, however, Smith couldn’t find the medical unit. “I was walking around Iwo with a rifle that only shoots once and I am just thinking, ‘This is crazy,’” Smith recalled. Eventually, he ran into a chaplain who was pulling dog tags from deceased Marines. The chaplain filled Smith’s pack with medical supplies, but didn’t know where his front lines were. Smith would have to head back. With the front lines in sight, Smith finally found the medical unit. They told him that they would take the supplies up to the front lines and put Smith in a stretcher on a jeep that was returning to base. Below him, another marine laid in a stretcher. Smith held onto his fellow marine’s plasma. While lying in that stretcher, Smith smoked a cigarette, held the plasma and that jammed rifle. Then the marine below him asked for a cigarette. “Do you want me to drop the plasma?” Joking kept many the Marines sane. Before being shipped to a hospital on Saipan, Smith saw a couple of Marines go haywire and start digging in the sand while screaming after explosions went off nearby. Smith swore that he wouldn’t ever become shellshocked, but it didn’t appear as if was a choice. Other veterans also had trouble adjusting back to the American way of life after the war. “Sometimes at night, you wonder where you are. I fussed around a few times in bed,” said Smith, who admitted that he didn’t have much trouble re-adjusting to American life. Despite not having trouble adjusting, Smith would still have a reoccurring nightmare from that grenade in Iwo Jima. In his dream, the smoking grenade that he picked up and threw away blows up in his hand. Prior to Iwo Jima, Smith served in Guam. By the time he was shipped there the U.S. had control of the

LOU SMITH/CONTRIBUTOR

World War II veteran Lou Smith took this picture when he visited the U.S. Marine Memorial in Washington, D.C. The statue commemorates raising the flag on top of Mount Suribachi during the Battle of Iwo Jima in WWII. Smith was involved in the battle and would leave after being hit by a grenade.

PROVIDED

Lou Smith (left) is congratulated as he received a Purple Heart after serving in the Marines in World War II. Smith’s service came to an end when he was hit by a grenade during battle in Iwo Jima. island, Smith served as scout looking for any remaining Japanese troops. “If we ran into any Japs then there would be a little firefight and that would be it,” Smith said. After Iwo Jima, Smith spent rest of his duty in Hawaii working at an officer’s mess where he served food and eventually got word that he wouldn’t be returning to combat. Like Smith, other veter-

ans can tell similar stories of battle. Many others would rather not relive it. However, there are many others that didn’t have that choice. Many never returned home, leaving families and friends behind. This Memorial Day, it is time to remember who have fallen and to do so by taking part in honoring those brave men and women with those who are still here today.


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CCF Recorder

May 27, 2010

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD F R I D A Y, M A Y 2 8

FOOD & DRINK

Wine Tasting, 4 p.m.-8 p.m. Palm Bay Imports Weekend. Today, sample Old World selections from France, Italy and more. D.E.P.’s Fine Wine & Spirits Covington, 670 W. Third St. Free. 291-2550; www.depsfinewine.com. Covington. Wine Tasting, 4 p.m.-8 p.m. Palm Bay Imports Weekend. Today, sample Chilean and Argentinean wines. D.E.P.’s Fine Wine & Spirits Fort Thomas, 90 W. Alexandria Pike, Free. 781-8105; www.depsfinewine.com. Fort Thomas. Wine Tasting, 5 p.m.-9 p.m. StoneBrook Winery, 6570 Vineyard Lane, $5. 635-0111; www.stonebrookwinery.com. Camp Springs. Wine Tasting, 5 p.m.-9 p.m. Camp Springs Vineyard, 6685 Four Mile Road, $1. 4480253. Camp Springs.

MUSIC - ACOUSTIC

Jamie Combs, 5 p.m.-8 p.m. J.B. Fin’s, 301 Riverboat Row, Solo acoustic happy hour. 291-4133. Newport.

MUSIC - BLUEGRASS

Bluegrass Jam, 6 p.m.-9 p.m. Willis Music Store Performance Hall, 7567 Mall Road, All ages and skill levels welcome. Family friendly. Free. Presented by Willis Music. 5256050. Florence.

MUSIC - BLUES

Chuck Brisbin & the Tuna Project, 10 p.m. Mansion Hill Tavern, 502 Washington Ave. $4. 581-0100. Newport.

MUSIC - CLASSIC ROCK

BlueStone Ivory, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Guys ‘n’ Dolls Restaurant and Nightclub, 4210 Alexandria Pike, $5. 441-4888; www.guysndollsllc.com. Cold Spring.

MUSIC - CONCERTS

Jessica Lea Mayfield, 8:30 p.m. Southgate House, 24 E. Third St. Ballroom. With Among the Oak & Ash and No No Knots. Ages 18 and up. $12. Presented by JBM Promotions Inc. 431-2201. Newport. The Freak Show Exploded: Featuring Mystique Summers, 8 p.m. With Shafreaka Jane, Tyese Rainz, Brooklyn Steele-Tate, Christina Lustra and Queen B. Leapin Lizard Gallery, 726 Main St. $20, $15 advance. 581-2728; www.cincyticket.com. Covington. Lou Gramm, 7:30 p.m. Doors open 6 p.m. Newport Syndicate, 18 E. Fifth St. Lead singer of Foreigner. Dinner buffet 6 p.m. Part of Syndicate concert series. $70, $60, $50, $40. 491-8000; www.rwatickets.com. Newport.

MUSIC - COUNTRY

Matt Woods, 9 p.m. Southgate House, 24 E. Third St. Free. 431-2201. Newport.

MUSIC - JAZZ

New Sleepcat Band, 7:30 p.m. Dee Felice Cafe, 529 Main St. Directed by Bill Gemmer and features John Von Ohlen. 261-2365; www.deefelice.com. Covington.

MUSIC - ROCK

Jimmy’s New Adventure, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Riverside Marina Bar and Grill, 145 Mary Ingles Highway (Ky. 8), Presented by Riverside Marina. 442-811. Dayton, Ky. The Whammies, 10 p.m. Jefferson Hall, 1 Levee Way, Suite 2118, 491-6200. Newport. Sloppy Seconds, 7 p.m. Mad Hatter, 620 Scott St. $12, $10 advance. 291-2233; www.cincyticket.com. Covington. Noise by Numbers, 9:30 p.m. Doors open 8:30 p.m. Southgate House, 24 E. Third St. Parlour. With Till Plains and Army Coach. $8 ages 18-20, $5 ages 21 and up. 431-2201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport.

MUSIC - WORLD

The Tillers, 7 p.m. Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Free. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 342-2665; www.bcpl.org. Burlington.

ON STAGE - COMEDY

For more about Greater Cincinnati’s dining, music, events, movies and more, go to Metromix.com.

ON STAGE - THEATER

MUSIC - CLASSIC ROCK

Darren Carter, 8 p.m. $14. Funny Bone Comedy Club, Newport on the Levee, Ages 21 and up. 957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport. Spring Fling, 7:30 p.m. Shadowbox Cabaret, Newport on the Levee, Fresh sketch comedy and vibrant rock ‘n’ roll celebrate life, love and laughter. $20-$30. Through June 12. 957-7625; www.shadowboxcabaret.com. Newport.

RECREATION

Parents’ Night Out, 5 p.m.-11 p.m. “Take Me Out to the Ballgame.” Baseball toss and hot dog grill out. Wear red for free meal. Skidaddles Inc. 8660 Bankers St. Drop-in anytime child care. Family friendly. One child: $8 per hour. Two children: $12 per hour. Additional children: $3 per hour. 647-7529. Florence.

SPECIAL EVENTS

Old Fashioned Memorial Day Party Weekend, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Popsicle Party on party patios 1-2:30 p.m. Totter’s Otterville, 4314 Boron Drive, Old fashioned priced brats, metts, hot dogs and medium fountain drinks for $0.50. Stars & Stripes Express (trolley) to U.S.A Station available to children, $1. Includes patriotic crafts held in art studio. $7.95. Through May 31. 491-1441; www.johnnystoys.com. Latonia.

SPORTS

Florence Freedom Baseball, 7:05 p.m. vs. Evansville Otters. I Love the 90s! And postgame fireworks show. Champion Window Field, 7950 Freedom Way, VIP includes wait service. Lawn available on game day only. Fans must show a lawn chair or blanket at time of purchase. $10-$12 VIP, $9, $7 lawn. Presented by Florence Freedom Professional Baseball. Through Aug. 29. 594-4487; www.florencefreedom.com. Florence. S A T U R D A Y, M A Y 2 9

ART CENTERS & ART MUSEUMS

Impressions, noon-3 p.m. Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, Exhibit is free. 9571940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

COOKING CLASSES

Cork and Fork Cooking Class, 2 p.m. Argentine Bean Bistro and Wine Bar, 2875 Town Center Blvd. Cooking demonstrations with wine pairings. Family friendly. $20. Reservations required. 426-1042. Crestview Hills.

LITERARY - SIGNINGS

Don McNay, 1 p.m.-3 p.m. Borders Books, Music and Cafe Crestview Hills, 2785 Dixie Highway, Edgewood native author discusses and signs “Son of a Son of a Gambler: Winners, Losers and What to Do When You Win the Lottery.”. Free. 333-0295. Crestview Hills.

MUSEUMS

History Unearthed: Archaeology Speaks, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Behringer-Crawford Museum, Included with admission: $7, $6 ages 60 and up, $4 ages 3-17, free for members and ages 2 and under. 491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

MUSIC - BLUES

Surf & Blues Winterfest, 6 p.m.-1 a.m. Mahogany’s Coffee House and Bar, 3715 Winston Ave. Music by the Maladroits, the AmpFibians, the Surfer Tiki Bandits and the Southgate Boys. Includes beach drink specials. Dinner available 6 p.m. Family friendly. 261-1029. Latonia.

Strange Brew, 8 p.m.-11 p.m. Gil Lynn Park, Third Street and Greendevil Lane, Free. Presented by City of Dayton. 431-4355. Dayton, Ky.

MUSIC - R&B

The Groove, 6 p.m.-10 p.m. Newport on the Levee, 1 Levee Way, 291-0550. Newport.

MUSIC - ROCK

Chili Dogs, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Riverside Marina Bar and Grill, 145 Mary Ingles Highway (Ky. 8), Presented by Riverside Marina. 442-8111. Dayton, Ky. The Mudpies, 9 p.m. Southgate House, 24 E. Third St. Free. 431-2201. Newport. Swimsuit Models, 10 p.m. Jefferson Hall, 1 Levee Way, Suite 2118, 491-6200. Newport. Pentagram, 9 p.m. Doors open 8 p.m. Southgate House, 24 E. Third St. Ballroom. With Black Tusk. Ages 18 and up. $20, $17 advance. 431-2201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport. Holy Mountains, 9 p.m. Doors open 8:30 p.m. Southgate House, 24 E. Third St. With Old One, Highgate, Sabre and Black Frost Fallout. $8 ages 18-20, $5 ages 21 and up. 431-2201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport.

ON STAGE - COMEDY

Darren Carter, 7:30 p.m. $14. Funny Bone Comedy Club, 957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

ON STAGE - THEATER Spring Fling, 7:30 p.m. Shadowbox Cabaret, $20-$30. 957-7625; www.shadowboxcabaret.com. Newport. RECREATION

The Amazing Portable Circus, 1 p.m.-4 p.m. AMC Newport On The Levee 20, One Levee Way, Suite 4100, In front of Cold Stone Creamery. Strolling entertainment. Free. Presented by The Amazing Portable Circus. 513-921-5454; http://amazingportablecircus.com/. Newport.

SHOPPING

Taste of Kentucky for Bourbon, Coffee and Tea Lovers, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Kentucky Haus Artisan Center, 411 E. 10th St. Featuring Kentucky Proud Food Products. Free. 261-4287. Newport.

SPECIAL EVENTS

Old Fashioned Memorial Day Party Weekend, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Popsicle Party on party patios 1-2:30 p.m. Totter’s Otterville, $7.95. 491-1441; www.johnnystoys.com. Latonia.

FILE PHOTO

The 2010 RGI River Run will take place Saturday, May 29, at 9:15 a.m. in Newport. Registration will begin at 8 a.m. The 5K run/walk benefits Kicks for Kids. The cost is $17, $14 in advance for adults, $10 for ages 12 to 17, and $8 for ages 6 to 11. For more information, visit www.kicksforkids.org or call 331-8484.

ON STAGE - COMEDY

Darren Carter, 7:30 p.m. $12. Funny Bone Comedy Club, 957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

RECREATION

Texas Hold ‘Em Poker Night, 5 p.m. Shimmers, 1939 Dixie Highway, Includes Shimmers gift certificate prizes. Free. 426-0490. Fort Wright. The Amazing Portable Circus, 1 p.m.-4 p.m. AMC Newport On The Levee 20, Free. 513-921-5454; http://amazingportablecircus.com/. Newport. Northern Kentucky Amputee Support Inc. Quarter Auction, 3 p.m. John R. Little VFW Post, 3186 Electric Ave. Benefits amputees by purchasing new prothesis, daily living needs and ramp building. Presented by Northern Kentucky Amputee Group. 6350162. Southgate.

SPORTS

Florence Freedom Baseball, 6:05 p.m. vs. Evansville Otters. Bellies and Baseball: All about the pregnant fans with fun activities planned for all. Family Fun Sunday: Autographs, running the bases and a pre-game parade for kids. Champion Window Field, $10-$12 VIP, $9, $7 lawn. 594-4487; www.florencefreedom.com. Florence. M O N D A Y, M A Y 3 1

HOLIDAY - MEMORIAL DAY

SPORTS

Florence Freedom Baseball, 6:05 p.m. vs. Evansville Otters. Post Game Band-Velvet Soul. Champion Window Field, $10-$12 VIP, $9, $7 lawn. 594-4487; www.florencefreedom.com. Florence. S U N D A Y, M A Y 3 0

FOOD & DRINK

Wine Tasting, 1 p.m.-6 p.m. StoneBrook Winery, $5. 635-0111; www.stonebrookwinery.com. Camp Springs. Wine Tasting, 1 p.m.-6 p.m. Camp Springs Vineyard, $1. 448-0253. Camp Springs.

Memorial Day Parade, 8 a.m.-11 a.m. VFW Post 6423, 4435 Dixie Highway, Ends at Forest Lawn Memorial Park Cemetery. Small service for fallen commands from Korean War and Vietnam war given at intersection of Dixie Highway and Stevenson Road at Vietnam/Korean Memorials. Free. 816-7433. Elsmere.

OPEN MIC

Open Mic Night, 9 p.m. Hosted by Mike Kuntz. Southgate House, 24 E. Third St. Free. Through June 28. 431-2201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport.

About calendar

To submit calendar items, go to “www.NKY.com” and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to “life@communitypress.com” along with event information. Items are printed on a space-available basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to “www.NKY.com” and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page. W E D N E S D A Y, J U N E 2

LITERARY - CRAFTS

Play Art, 4 p.m. Newport Branch Library, 901 E. Sixth St. 572-5035. Newport.

LITERARY - STORY TIMES

Toddler Story Time, 11 a.m. Fort ThomasCarrico Branch Library, Free. Registration required. 572-5033. Fort Thomas. Baby Time, 10 a.m. Cold Spring Branch Library, 3920 Alexandria Pike, Clap, sing and bounce with your child. Free. Registration required. 781-6166. Cold Spring.

RECREATION

Children’s Flying Trapeze School, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Newport on the Levee, 1 Levee Way, Learn to fly circus-style. Must be in reasonable physical condition and able to hold your body weight while hanging from the bar. Dress: Wear stretchable comfortable clothing appropriate for hanging upside. Rain reschedules. Ages 6-12. Must be accompanied by adult. $7. Registration required. 513-921-5454; www.amazingportablecircus.com. Newport.

SPORTS-TRYOUTS Kings Soccer Academy Tryouts, 4 p.m.-9 p.m. Town and Country Sports and Health Club, $10. Online registration required. 442-5800; www.kingssa.com. Wilder.

T H U R S D A Y, J U N E 3

EXERCISE CLASSES Zumba Fitness Class, 7 p.m.-8 p.m. Dance Express, 725 Alexandria Pike, Fuses hypnotic Latin rhythms and easy-to-follow moves to create one-of-a-kind fitness program. Ages 16 and up. $8. 581-4062. Fort Thomas. LITERARY - STORY TIMES

Pajama Story Time, 6:30 p.m. Cold Spring Branch Library, 3920 Alexandria Pike, Ages 3 and up. Free. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 781-6166. Cold Spring. Baby Time, 10 a.m. Fort Thomas-Carrico Branch Library, 1000 Highland Ave. Clap, sing and bounce with your child. Walkers to age 2. Free. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 572-5033. Fort Thomas.

ON STAGE - COMEDY

Shane Mauss, 8 p.m. $12. Funny Bone Comedy Club, Newport on the Levee, Ages 21 and up. 957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Spring Fling, 7:30 p.m. Shadowbox Cabaret, $20-$30. 957-7625; www.shadowboxcabaret.com. Newport. Death Defying Acts, 8 p.m. Monmouth Theatre, 636 Monmouth St. Three one-act plays, “An Interview,” “Hotline” and “Central Park West.” Mature themes and strong language. $12, $10 students. Through June 5. 513-588-4910. Newport.

SPECIAL EVENTS

Old Fashioned Memorial Day Party Weekend, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Popsicle Party on party patios 1-2:30 p.m. Totter’s Otterville, $7.95. 491-1441; www.johnnystoys.com. Latonia. T U E S D A Y, J U N E 1

LITERARY - STORY TIMES Toddler Story Time, 10 a.m. Fort ThomasCarrico Branch Library, 1000 Highland Ave. Stories, songs, finger plays and craft. Ages 2-3. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 5725033. Fort Thomas. Preschool Story Time, 1:30 p.m. Cold Spring Branch Library, 3920 Alexandria Pike, Ages 4-5. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 7816166. Cold Spring.

SPORTS-TRYOUTS

Kings Soccer Academy Tryouts, 4 p.m.-9 p.m. Town and Country Sports and Health Club, 1018 Town Drive, Turf Soccer Field. For boys and girls ages 8-18. Arrive 30 minutes prior to try-out to receive T-shirt and sign in. $10. Online registration required. Presented by Kings Soccer Academy. 442-5800; www.kingssa.com. Wilder. PROVIDED

The newly renovated Bizarre and Beautiful Gallery at the Newport Aquarium will show off some of the strangest marine animals there are, such as a fish that walks and crabs with 10-feet-long legs. Pictured is a Giant Pacific octopus that will be on display in a new multi-dimensional, 360 degree, see-through aquarium. The aquarium begins extended summer hours Friday, May 28, which are 9 a.m. to 7 p.m., and last until Sept. 4. Current hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily. Admission is $22, $15 for ages 2-12, and free for 2 and under. Visit www.newportaquarium.com.

SUPPORT GROUPS

Survivors of Suicide, 7 p.m.-9 p.m. Christ Church, United Church of Christ, 15 S. Ft. Thomas Ave. For anyone who has lost a loved one to suicide. Free. Presented by Survivors of Suicide. 441-1958. Ft. Thomas.

PROVIDED

The ASA Action Sports World Tour comes to Kings Island from Saturday, May 29, through Monday, May 31, with five of the top pro skateboarders and BMX stars from the X Games showcasing their talents with performances each day. Skateboarders Anthony Furlong and Josh Stafford and BMX riders Jay Eggleston, Koji Kraft and Jimmy Walker (pictured) will perform. The shows are free with park admission or a season pass. Visit www.visitkingsisland.com.


Life

CCF Recorder

May 27, 2010

B3

Some thoughts on going or not going to church We don’t go to church for God’s sake, we go for ours. Some think when we worship we’re doing God a favor. There’s also the impression we’re gaining points with God or using our attendance as a bargaining chip – “I do this for you, God, now you do something good for me!” Worshipping with those attitudes proves one thing – our spiritual life is in the childish category. God doesn’t need favors, doesn’t keep count, and doesn’t enter into quid pro quo deals, i.e. you scratch my divine back and I’ll scratch yours. God just loves us intensely. Worshipping is just one of many ways that we say with our lives, “And I love you, too!” More than clergy encourage developing the spiritual dimension of a person’s life. Psychiatrist Carl Jung reached the conclusion that besides sexuality and aggression,

there was in us a religious function of the utmost importance which we neglect at our peril. In “Modern Man In Search Father Lou of a Soul,” Jung Guntzelman wrote: “Among all my patients Perspectives in the second half of life, that is to say over 35, there has not been one whose problem in the past resort was not that of finding a religious outlook on life. “It is safe to say that every one of them fell ill because he had lost that which the living religions of every age have given to their followers, and none of them has really healed who did not regain this religious outlook.”

True spiritual health programs psychological health, and vice versa. “True” is italicized because not all organized religions are healthy. Religion is, ironically, the safest place to hide from God and become spiritually malformed. But in its healthy forms, religion is also one of the best places to find God. So, caveat emptor! Let the buyer (believer) beware. Humans are social beings. Gathering together for a common purpose in a church or temple, listening to the words of scripture, hymns, preaching and prayers gradually forms us. God’s grace is subtly present. If we’re open to it we gain personal insights into the meaning of life itself as well as our own individual lives and relationships. All this engenders understanding, serenity and a courage amidst the storms that often rage outside or inside us.

When the spiritual dimension of life is undeveloped, we lack this invisible means of support. Lacking faith, the weight of our struggles and sufferings can intensify or overwhelm us. A minister, preaching on the need to grow spiritually, entitled his sermon it: “Faith: you can’t wait ’til you need it.” Some excuses for not attending church are the following. 1. “Look at the news, there’s just a bunch of hypocrites there.” That’s correct. A church or temple is not a museum for saints but a hospital for sinners. 2. “Organized religion is just a crutch to try and handle life.” Response? “And what makes you think you don’t limp?” 3. “I pray better to God by myself in nature.” That’s wonderful. But we still benefit much from the communal nature of worship.

4. “I don’t get anything out of the religious service, so who go?” Granted, some places of worship are not in touch with people’s needs today. They offer ill-prepared services, mediocre music and inadequate preaching. If that’s so, try somewhere else. Your spiritual life is too important to abandon. 5. “I’m too busy to attend church services.” Guess whose priorities are out of whack? Yes, life is too busy. But the question Jesus Christ once asked still holds true: “What does it profit you to gain the whole world and lose yourself in the process?” Father Lou Guntzelman is a Catholic priest of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati. Contact him at columns@ communitypress.com or P.O. Box 428541, Cincinnati, OH 45242.

Selling home might reveal true property value You could be paying too much in property taxes if the value of your house has dropped significantly. Unfortunately, you may not realize just how much of a drop there’s been until you go to sell it. That’s what an area woman says she’s learned. Mary McGee said she was fine with the county auditor’s value of her Loveland house, which had gone up in value over the six years she’s owned and made improvements to it. McGee says, “When I went to sell the house my expectation was I would be able to sell it for at least

what it w a s appraised for.” T h e a u d i t o r ’s website set the value at Howard Ain $630,000. “There Hey Howard! was no problem with the buyer, it’s just that when his appraiser came back, (hired by) his mortgage company, the appraisal was so low it just devastated us, devastated everyone,” said McGee. The house was appraised at $530,000, which is

$100,000 lower than the value given by the county auditor in his 2008 appraisal. In fact, at that time, the auditor said her home had actually increased in value. “I didn’t do anything but pay more taxes, and then I really didn’t feel the effect of this until I sold my home. I’m wondering about other people, (I’m speaking up) for other people,” she said. McGee said some of the homes in her neighborhood and surrounding area have actually sold for next to nothing recently and she believes its those sales that have adversely affected her home’s value.

“We’re definitely finding that values can be lower than the auditor’s assessed value because that value was done a few years ago,” said Guy Wesselkamper, a certified residential appraiser. Wesselkamper, who was not involved in McGee’s appraisal, said one local survey done by another appraiser found area home values have lost about 10 year’s worth of appreciation. “The median value in 2000 was $129,000. It went up to $133,000, then $138,400, and it kept going up. Then it started going down, and right now we’re

at $129,000 again,” he said. McGee said, “I just feel like there are other people out there that aren’t aware of what’s going on and they need to find out. They may be planning on selling their house expecting to get one amount, and they’re not going to get it.” Fortunately, those buying McGee’s house really wanted it, even though a second appraisal also put the value at $530,000. As a result, they paid additional money to make the deal work – but McGee said she still lost money. Hamilton County Auditor Dusty Rhodes said he’s not

surprised by the drop in the home’s value. He said some prior appraisals had been greatly inflated and now appraisers may actually be deflating values in order to protect the banks. In addition, the county’s last mass appraisal was in 2008 – just before many values dropped. Rhodes said new county appraisals will be done next year and will take effect in January, 2012. Howard Ain answers consumer complaints weekdays on WKRC-TV Local 12. Write to him at 12 WKRC-TV, 1906 Highland Ave., Cincinnati 45219.

Cincinnati Rare Coin Galleries is happy to introduce our newest location and staff member. Florence Rare Coin will bring to Nothern Kentucky the same dedication to numismatic excellence our Ohio stores have for many, many years. Taylor Fraley, our newest partner, has over 20 years experience in the numismatic hobby. What began as a pastime with his Grandfather has evolved into a full-time profession today. Taylor is a graduate of the University of Cincinnati with a Bachelor’s Degree in Business Asministration, and his personal goal is to provide friendly, knowledgeable service to the Nothern Kentucky Community.

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B4

CCF Recorder

Life

May 27, 2010

The ‘berry’ thing you were craving

We finally got most of the garden in, except for pickling cucumbers, more summer squash a n d pumpkins. O u r corn is up a couple of inches, and the Rita b a c h e l o r Heikenfeld b u t t o n s I Rita’s kitchen that t r a n s planted from volunteer seeds (they overwintered in the garden) have turned into a 20-foot row of bobbing pink and blue flowers. They make a nice border next to the early greens. And if Mother Nature cooperates, we’ll soon be picking strawberries and gathering in my kitchen to make homemade jams. We like the cooked jam and the recipe is always included in the box of pectin that you buy.

Sugar-free strawberry jam

Try this with other berries and gelatin, as well. 2 cups strawberries 1 cup cold water 1 (3 ounce) package strawberry flavored gelatin, sugar free Crush berries in saucepan. Add water and gelatin and mix well. Over medium heat, bring mixture to boiling, stirring constantly. Reduce heat to low and simmer a few minutes. Pour into jars, let set until cool, and then cover. Store in the refrigerator for a week or frozen up to a month or so.

Homemade gourmet strawberry syrup

Try this over ice cream, pancakes or even as a flavoring for sodas and shakes. Pour some into some carbonated water or

Cook over medium heat, stirring constantly, until sugar is dissolved and syrup comes to a boil. Boil two minutes. Remove from heat, skim off foam and put a few drops of coloring in if you want. Pour into clean jars and cool. Cover and refrigerate up to two months or freeze up to a year. Recipe can be doubled or tripled.

lemon soda and crushed ice for an impromptu spritzer. Again, any type of good, ripe berry can be used. Minimum cooking time is the key to freshness. You’ll get about 3 cups.

4 generous cups ripe strawberries, caps removed 1 cup water Sugar Red food coloring (optional) Line colander or strainer with double layer of damp cheesecloth. Set over bowl. Combine berries and water and bring slowly to boiling point. Reduce heat and cook very slowly for 10 minutes. Pour into lined colander/strainer and let stand, without squeezing, until juice has dripped into bowl. Then gently squeeze pulp to get remaining juice. Measure juice into saucepan. For every cup of juice, add 1 cup sugar.

Speed scratch strawberry crisp

Or should I call it strawberry “dump” cake? This uses the same technique for the popular “dump” cakes, where you just “dump” ingredients in a pan, layering as you go. Make this with 2 pounds frozen, unsweetened berries if you can’t get fresh. Try raspberries in here, too. 7-8 cups strawberries, caps removed 1 box, 18.25 oz, plain

yellow cake mix 2 sticks butter or margarine, cut into little pieces Whipped cream for garnish Toasted slivered almonds for garnish (optional but good) Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Put berries in bottom of sprayed 13-by-9 baking pan. Cover with half of dry cake mix. Sprinkle half of butter over mix. Cover with rest of mix and sprinkle rest of butter pieces of top. Bake 1 hour or so until golden and crisp on top. Serve with whipped cream or ice cream and a sprinkling of the toasted nuts.

Can you help?

Like Frisch’s tartar sauce: For Eileen Coon, an Erlanger reader. “I’d like a homemade recipe with no preservatives,” she said.

Tips from readers

Cottage cheese pie: This is one popular pie. Most readers, including Joan Daugherty, who baked “Pie No. 3,” said it took a lot longer to bake, up to 11⁄2 hours, though it was delicious. Some of you wanted to know what kind of canned milk is in Mrs. Bauer’s recipe. My thinking is it is evaporated, not condensed. Darker sauerbraten gravy: I’m still getting tips about this, and most, including Marge Thomas of Western Hills, said to either brown it in a dry skillet on top of the stove, or put it in an ovenproof skillet and brown slowly in the oven, stirring occasionally. Rita Nader Heikenfeld is a herbalist, educator and author. E-mail columns@community press.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-2487130, ext. 356.

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Community

CCF Recorder

May 27, 2010

B5

RELIGION NOTES Amazing Grace Lutheran Church will have its Vacation Bible School for children, ages 4 through 13, June 29July 1 from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. The VBS will be themed as a wild west adventure. For more information, call 859283-9009. Amazing Grace Lutheran Church is at 7804 Pleasant Valley Road in Florence.

First Baptist

First Baptist Church of Highland Heights will host its Real Men’s Conference 7 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. June 4 and 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. June 5. The conference is being held to encourage men of all ages in their spiritual growth through teaching, fellowship and worship. Featured speakers and topics include “It’s Time To

Step Up” by Mark Webb of FBC Highland Heights, “Winning With The Word” by Pete Coleman of I Won Today Ministries, “No More Dis-Connected” by Ronny Raines of FBC Cold Spring, and “A Call To Purity” by Bill Clark of Hickory Grove Baptist Church. Worship leader is Chris Daniels and his band from Hickory Grove Baptist. To register for the event,

call 859-441-7274 or e-mail fbchh@fuse.net. The church is at 2315 Alexandria Pike.

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to 8 and are from 9 a.m. to noon Monday through Friday. Call 859-647-1105. Hopeful Lutheran Church is located at 6430 Hopeful Church Rd.

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Dressman Benzinger LaVelle attorney Emily Kirtley Hanna of Newport was recently elected Chair of the Board of Directors for Welcome House of Northern Kentucky. Hanna has served on the Board for omore than five years, and during this time also served as the secretary for their Executive Committee. Welcome House provides a continuum of quality services for individuals and families who are either homeless or at risk of becoming homeless. Hanna is an associate in DBL Law’s litigation practice group with an emphasis in commercial, banking, collections and creditor rights litigation. She obtained her law

degree from the Salmon P. Chase College of Law in 2003 and has a bachelor's degree in political sciHanna ence from Northern Kentucky University. Hanna is based in DBL Law’s Crestview Hills office. Dressman Benzinger LaVelle is a full-service law firm with 38 attorneys in its Crestview Hills and Cincinnati offices. The firm serves private individuals and companies in many industries including banking, computer and information technology, construction, health care, labor and employment relations, and real estate.

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Hopeful Lutheran Church in Florence is offering four summer camps in June and July. Each camp is a week long. The camps will take place June 14-18, June 21-25, July 12-16 and July 19-23. The camps are for ages 3

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B6

CCF Recorder

Community

May 27, 2010

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large number of local artists selected is a reflection of the incredible talent we have in our area,” she said. Summerfair 2010, which will be held 13 miles from downtown Cincinnati at historic Coney Island (just off I275 at Kellogg Avenue), draws more than 20,000 people each year, with proceeds benefiting local visual and performing arts and arts organizations. Tickets can be purchased for $10 at the gate or in advance, online (children 12 and under are free). Advance one day or multi-day tickets are available online at www.summerfair.org. Hours for the fair are 2 to 8 p.m. Friday; 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday; and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. Parking is free, courtesy of Summerfair Cincinnati. The fair will be held rain or shine. For more information, visit Summerfair online at www.summerfair.org.


Community

CCF Recorder

May 27, 2010

B7

It’s time to put all your taters in a basket den food, Osmocote, and or Miracle Gro. (Feeding your containers can be done by Ron Wilson mixing a In the general garden food in garden with the potting mix at the beginning and as added to the growing potato plants, or use Osmocote for a slow-release season-long feeding, supplemented with occasional Miracle Gro when watering (maybe tow to three times during the summer), or using all natural fertilizers from start to finish will work as well.) 3.) Seed potatoes – These aren’t the ones you buy from the grocery store. These are found at the garden stores (or feed stores) and are used specifically for growing potatoes. Any variety will work. We don’t recommend using potatoes from the produce department at the grocery. Many have been treated with a growth inhibitor to keep them from sprouting. But organically grown spuds should work if needed. Fill the bottom of your pot with 6 to 8 inches of the soil-less mix (or compost).

Take a large seed potato, or a couple medium sized, cut up into pieces that contain the eyes, and evenly distribute those in the top of the soil-less mix. I usually plant around 6 to 8 to 10 pieces with eyes per basket. If you’re not sure about the “eyes,” you can plant whole potatoes, or cut them in half and plant the halves. Plant a bit heavier than usual when planting in containers. Cover over with another 2 to 3 inches of soil-less mix, water in thoroughly, and sit your container in the sun. Water as needed, thoroughly moistening the soil, then letting it dry and then watering it again. Once your potatoes start to grow, water as needed. Again, do not over water. Now that your potatoes are growing, you have a couple options:

1.) As the potatoes grow, keep adding your soil-less mix (or compost) to the container, always keeping about 4 inches of foliage showing. Continue this process until the container is filled to within a couple inches of the top of the basket. Or 2.) Let the foliage grow until it’s approximately 3 to 4 inches above the top of the basket, and then fill in around the foliage with your soil-less mix (or compost) until the basket is full of soil. Now you’re all set for growing potatoes! Let your potatoes grow all summer – remember water when needed, especially during the heat of the summer (again, don’t overwater). Come late summer or fall when the foliage starts to yellow, cut it off, dump out your soil, and you’ll have a

basket full of taters! It’s that easy. (New potatoes are simply harvested earlier in the season) Good luck! Ron Wilson is marketing manager for Natorp’s Inc. Garden Stores and is the garden expert for 55KRC-AM and Local 12. Reach him at columns@communitypress.com .

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Have you ever tried growing potatoes in tough old clay soil? The results are usually less than bad. But here’s the perfect solution for growing great potatoes. Grow them in a pot. Now, whether you’ve got clay soil, live in an apartment, or don’t have a garden at all, you can grow potatoes the ole yardboy way. And that’s in a container. Here’s what you’ll need: 1.) The container – I like to use bushel baskets. They breathe well, allow for good drainage, and they look good! But any container, plastic, wood or clay, laundry baskets, trash cans, potato planter bags, etc. will work, as long as it has good drainage, and is at least 12 to 18 inches wide and at least 10 to 12 inches deep. You can even use chicken wire fencing and create a potato tube to grow them in, or try stacking tires and growing inside them. 2.) Top grade potting mix – Use the good stuff for better results. If you have a compost pile, good compost will work too. Finely shredded is best. Folks have even used straw and ground leaves. Also, an all purpose gar-

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YMCA seeks nominations

Gary & Irene Doering

St. Luke Lutheran Church ELCA 4800 Alexandria Pk, Cold Spring, KY 859-441-2848 M Worship Sun 8:30 &10:30am Sunday School 9:30am All Are Welcome www.stlukecoldspring.org

On May 28, 2010, Gary and Irene Doering of Melbourne, Kentucky will celebrate their 50th Wedding Anniversary. They are the proud parents of four daughters; Brenda Seastrom, Trish Nortmann, Debbie Niemer, and Theresa Studer. Brenda is married to Chris Seastrom and has one son, Brandon Holland and reside in Fern Park, FL. Trish is married to John Nortmann and they have three sons, Jonathan, Eric, and Adam and reside in Erlanger, KY. Debbie is married to John Niemer and they have a daughter, Stephanie and a son, Michael and reside in Erlanger, KY. Theresa is married to Gary Studer and they have two sons, Austin and Ryan and reside in Alexandria, KY.

NON-DENOMINATIONAL Light, Life, & Peace Ministry

20 Bustetter Drive, Florence, KY 859-575-2479 / 513-482-1731 Home-based Bible Study Small Group

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Gary and Irene have provided a loving home for their daughters and a great example of wonderful parents and dedicated husband and wife.

720 York St., Newport KY 41071 859-581-4244 Pastor: Gordon Milburn Sunday School: 9:30 am Sunday Morning Worship: 10:30 am Sun. & Wed. Eve Service: 6:00 pm

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For the 32nd year, the YMCA of Greater Cincinnati will be recognizing local professionals who are accomplished, caring and civic minded as 2010 YMCA Achievers. Honorees will be recognized at the 2010 Salute to YMCA Black & Latino Achievers Gala Nov. 5. Unique to this event, all honorees will also commit to a year of volunteer service toward the YMCA’s Teen Achievers college readiness program that inspires young people to pursue dreams. The YMCA Black & Latino Achievers (teen) Program has mentored more than 5,000 teens, awarded more than $175,000 in scholarships, assisted with access to $3 million in college scholarships, and engaged more than 4,000 adult volunteers through a network of corporate and community partners. The program includes college prep and leadership development activities focusing on study skills/time management, interviewing techniques, financial management, team-building, field trips, community servicelearning projects, career assessment and more. It strongly incorporates the Abundant Assets – 40 critical factors for the successful growth and development of young people – and centers around the relationships of adult professional mentors and teens. The 2010 to 2011 goal is to serve over 600 students in the Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky communities. Nomination sponsorships are being accepted through June 1. For nomination, sponsorship or gala information, the public should call Toni Miles, YMCA Black & Latino Achievers executive director, at 513-362-YMCA (9622) or e-mail her at tmiles@cincinnatiymca.org; or visit www.myy.org. The featured artist for the Gala will be world-renown Puerto Rican pianist, composer, and producer Adlan Cruz.

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B8

CCF Recorder ADVERTISEMENT

May 27, 2010 ADVERTISEMENT

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Roadshow Comes to Florence Next Week! By Jason Delong

Treasure Hunters Roadshow STAFF WRITER Clean out your attics, closets and lock boxes, because the Roadshow is coming to Florence. Roadshow experts are in town examining antiques, collectibles, gold and silver. While the Roadshow will accept anything thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s old, they will be focusing on gold and silver coins made before 1964, military items, toys and trains, musical instruments, pocket and wrist watches. Scrap gold is expected to be a popular category this week due to soaring gold prices.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;U.S. coins made before 1964 are most sought after by collectors. Coins made before 1964 are 90% silver and valuable because of the silver content or could be worth even more if one happens to be a rare date.â&#x20AC;? Expert buyers for the Roadshow have noticed a tremendous increase in the amount of gold coming to the Roadshow and for good reason. Record gold prices have Roadshow guests cashing in on broken jewelry or jewelry they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t wear anymore with our â&#x20AC;&#x153;fair and honestâ&#x20AC;? purchase offers.

Got Gold? Next week, visitors can cash in on antiques, collectibles, gold, silver, coins or just about anything that is old.

The Roadshow encourages anyone planning a visit to take a minute and examine their jewelry box or their lock box at the bank and gather anything thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gold. If a guest is not sure if something is gold, bring it anyway and the Roadshow staff will test it for free. Other gold items of interest include gold coins, gold ounces, gold proof sets and dental gold. Other types of items Roadshow experts hope to see include old toys and train sets. Archie Davis, roadshow toy expert spoke about some of the top toys getting great offers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Old tin windup toys from the late 1800â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s through the 1960â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s are in great demand now.â&#x20AC;? said Davis, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Especially those that are character related. Mickey Mouse, Donald Duck, the Flintstones or any character toys are sought. Old Buddy L toys from the 1920â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s to 1960â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

are in demand.â&#x20AC;? Basically any toys made before 1965 are wanted. Train sets made by Lionel, American Flyer, Marklin and others have the potential to fetch high prices. Davis also stressed, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Toys with boxes and in mint condition bring sensational

prices. Most of the toys that come to the Roadshow are not in perfect shape but can still bring good prices from collectors.â&#x20AC;? When expert Tom Fuller was asked what he enjoyed most about working at the Roadshow, he was quick to answer â&#x20AC;&#x153;Old

â&#x20AC;&#x153;If you go to the Roadshow, you can cash-in your items for top dollar. Roadshow representatives will be available to assess and purchase your items at the Springhill Suites, next Tuesday through Saturday, in Florence.â&#x20AC;?

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The Roadshow is featured next week at the:

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Show Info: (866) 306-6655

Gold and Coin Prices High, Cash In Now â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a modern day gold rush,â&#x20AC;? said Roadshow President, Jeff Parsons.

Is your family attic Ă&#x20AC;OOHG ZLWK ROG DQG forgotten memories? Most pre-1964 bisque, china, paper mâchĂŠ, wood, and wax dolls are considered desirable by collectors. If your doll has original clothing, wigs, shoes and undergarments, that increases its value. Many toy cars, robots, Tonka and trains made before 1964 are wanted by International Collectors Association members as well.

:H %X\ :DWHUPDQÂśV $XWRJUDSK $OEXPV

Â&#x2021; *DWKHU LWHPV RI LQWHUHVW DV H[SODLQHG EHORZ IURP your attic, garage, basement, etc. There is no limit to the amount of items you can bring Â&#x2021; 1R DSSRLQWPHQW QHFHVVDU\ Â&#x2021; ,I LQWHUHVWHG LQ VHOOLQJ ZH ZLOO FRQVXOW RXU collector â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s database to see if a buyer exists. 90% of all items have offers in our database Â&#x2021; 7KH RIIHU LV PDGH RQ WKH VSRW RQ EHKDOI RI RXU collectors making the offer Â&#x2021; ,I \RX GHFLGH WR DFFHSW WKH RIIHU ZH ZLOO SD\ \RX on the spot and ship the item to the collector. The collector pays all shipping and handling charges. Â&#x2021; <RX JHW  RI WKH RIIHU ZLWK QR KLGGHQ IHHV

Gold is now trading near 40 year highs, and you can cash in at the Treasure Hunters Roadshow. All types of gold are wanted, including gold coins, Krugerrands, Maple

All sports memorabilia is in high demand including: 3UH ÂśV EDVHEDOO FDUGV DXWRJUDSKHG EDVHEDOOV IRRWEDOOV EDVNHWEDOOV MHUVH\V VLJQHG SKRWRV HWF

WE BUY 10¢ & 12¢ COMIC BOOKS!

The Treasure Hunterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Roadshow event runs next Tuesday through Saturday in Florence.

because of the silver content or could be worth even more if one happens to be a rare date. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We help people sort through their coins for unique dates. We buy all types of coins at the Roadshow from wheat pennies to buffalo nickels, which are valuable from one coin to an entire truckload. See you at the Roadshow.â&#x20AC;? said Fuller.

Cash in with the power of the International Collectors Association. Members are looking for the following types of items! Any and all coins made before 1964. This includes all silver and gold coins, dollars, half dollars, quarters, dimes, nickels and pennies. All conditions wanted! PRICES AT 40 YEAR HIGH! for platinum, gold and silver during this event. Broken jewelry, dental gold, old coins, pocket watches, Kruggerands, Gold bars Canadian Maple Leafs, etc. Gold, Silver, Platinum, diamonds, rubies, sapphires and all types of stones, metals, etc. Rings, bracelets, necklaces, all others including broken jewelry. Early costume jewelry wanted. Rolex, Tiffany, Hublot, Omega, Chopard, Cartier, Philippe, Ebel, Waltham, Swatch, Chopard, Elgin, Bunn Special, Railroad, Illinois, Hamilton, all others.

Leafs, and other gold bars, etc. All gold jewelry, including broken jewelry is accepted. Anything gold and silver is wanted.

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coins and paper currency. For as long as I can remember I have been fascinated with collecting coins. I would go through the change in my parents grocery store looking for rare dates and errors. Once, I found a silver quarter that I sold for $300.00. Not bad for an 8 year old.â&#x20AC;? Fuller went on to explain that any U.S. coins made before 1964 are most sought after by collectors. Coins made before 1964 are 90% silver and valuable

We represent many of the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s top numismatic coin collectors. We have been directly involved in millions of dollars worth of rare cash and coin sales over the past 15 years.

Our private collectors are seeking all types of rare coins and currency. We have the resources available to pay you top prices for all types of rare coins or entire collections. We can arrange a private discreet meeting with you at your bank or in one of our private suites. Whether you are ready to sell your life long collection or you are settling an estate we are at your service. We are professional, honest and discreet.

All types of toys made before 1965 including: Hot Wheels, Tonka, Buddy L, Smith Miller, Nylint, Robots, battery toys, Mickey Mouse, train sets, all gauges, accessories, individual cars, Marklin, American Flyer, Lionel, Hafner, all other trains, Barbie Dolls, GI Joe, Shirley Temple, Characters, German, all makers accepted. Civil War, Revolutionary War, WWI, WWII, etc. Items of interest include swords, badges, clothes, photos, medals, knives, gear, letters, The older the swords, the better. All types wanted. Metal and Porcelain signs, gas companies, beer and liquor makers, automobile, implements, etc.


Community

CCF Recorder

May 27, 2010

The Barrington of Ft. Thomas kicks off collection for troops The Barrington of Fort Thomas kicked off a campaign to collect essential items for American troops in Iraq. Residents organized the collection and packaged the

first shipment of supplies. “The residents of the Barrington of Fort Thomas are a vital and engaging group,” said Barry Bortz, CEO, Carespring Health Care Management.

“It’s wonderful to see them so committed to aiding our troops. Their commitment is very meaningful,” he said. The Barrington of Fort Thomas Independent &

Residents of the Barrington of Fort Thomas as they prepare items to send to U.S troops.

PROVIDED

Assisted Living opened its doors in mid-1999. It is located adjacent to Highlandspring of Fort Thomas Health Care Center & Rehabilitation. Offering studio, one-and two-bedroom apartments, Barrington of Fort Thomas provides active lifestyle choices. All apartments are equipped with washer and dryer, kitchen area, cable TV, Elcombe Security Link System (a state-of-the-art phone system that provides a “link” with our Resident Care Coordinators), weekly housekeeping, and balconies/patios with most apartments. Barrington of Fort Thomas amenities include a formal dining room, with our own master chef, a beauty/barber shop, a 24hour attendant on duty, plus many other features. The Barrington of Fort Thomas is located at 940 Highland Avenue, Fort

Thomas. For a personal consultation and tour, call 859-6093307.

at the World Peace Bell, 421 Monmouth St., Newport. The ceremony begins at 11:30 a.m.

This ceremony honors all our lost submarines and men since the beginning of the Navy’s submarine history.

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Peace Bell to toll for lost Navy men, subs On Sunday, May 30, the Cincinnati Base Submarine Veterans will host the annual Tolling of the Bell Ceremony

B9

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B10

ON

RECORD

CCF Recorder

THE

Irene Baker

Irene Baker, 76, Fort Thomas, a homemaker, died May 20, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. Her husband, Carl Baker, died in 2009. Survivors include her daughter, Karen Wilkes of Greenwood, Ind.; brothers, Garfield and Garland Turner, both of Fort Thomas; sisters, Ollie Williams and Beulah Raleigh, both of Southgate, Susie Sebastian and Helen Turner, both of Fort Thomas, Wilma Harper and Lena Bruce, both of Detroit; two grand-

May 27, 2010

| DEATHS | Editor Michelle Shaw | smhaw@nky.com | 578-1053 BIRTHS

children; and one great-grandchild. Burial was in Kentucky Veterans Cemetery North, Williamstown.

Daniel Epperson

Daniel L. Epperson, 55, Newport, died May 22, 2010, at Franklin Ridge Nursing Home in Franklin, Ohio. He worked at the Drawbridge Inn in Fort Mitchell. Survivors include his mother, Dottie Botkin of Newport; father, William Botkin of Florence; brothers, Ron

Botkin of Florence and Greg Thomas of Southgate; sisters, Darlene Thomas of Southgate and Georgia Botkin of Florence; an aunt, Joy Henry of Dry Ridge; and five nieces. Burial was in Forest Lawn Cemetery, Erlanger.

Roger Adam Joering, 32, Melbourne, died May 19, 2010, at Hospice of St. Elizabeth Healthcare, Edgewood. He was a licensed med-

We conducted our audit in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United States of America and the standards applicable to financial audits contained in Government Auditing Standards, issued by the Comptroller General of the United States. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the general purpose financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion. In our opinion, the financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the respective financial position of the governmental activities and the aggregate remaining fund information of the City of Highland Heights, Kentucky, as of June 30, 2009, and the respective changes in financial position thereof for the year then ended in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. The managements’s discussion and analysis and budgetary comparison information on pages 1 through 7 and 21 through 24 are not a required part of the basic financial statements but are supplementary information required by accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. We have applied certain limited procedures, which consisted principally of inquires of management regarding methods of measurement and presentation of the supplementary information. However, we did not audit the information and express no opinion on it. In accordance with Government Auditing Standards, we have also issued a report dated February 5, 2010 on our consideration of the City of Highland Heights, Kentucky’s internal control over financial reporting and on our tests of its compliance with certain provisions of laws, regulations, contracts and grant agreements and other matters. The purpose of that report is to describe the scope of our testing of internal control over financial reporting and compliance and the results of that testing and not to provide an opinion on the internal control over financial reporting or on compliance. That report is an integral part of an audit performed in accordance with Government Auditing Standards and should be considered in conjunction with this report in considering the results of our audit. Ray, Foley, Hensley & Company, PLLC February 5, 2010 CITY OF HIGHLAND HEIGHTS, KENTUCKY STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCES GOVERNMENTAL FUNDS for the year ended June 30, 2009

2008 Totals

- (1,846,208) (444,127) 45,077 (1,535,733) (1,377,946) 117,411 1,173 -

(334,618) (210,362) 22,280 32,616 (149,769) (138,687) (36,497) (25,879) (84,402) (67,372) (118,436)

Total Governmental Activities

4,472,795

236,087

163,661 (4,073,047) (2,242,093)

Total Primary Government

4,472,795

236,087

163,661 (4,073,047) (2,242,093)

General revenues Taxes: Property taxes, levied for general purposes

527,595

531,372

1,462,297 93,791 598,939 392,262

628,605 90,591 530,151 320,207

3,425 4,260

4,273 10,990

110

185

56,072

34,065

120,019 77,753

141,461 54,730

Total general revenues

3,336,523

2,346,630

Transfer of assets to police authority

(216,823)

-

Change in Net Assets

(953,347)

104,537

Net Assets - beginning

4,970,126

4,865,589

License fees: Payroll tax Franchise tax Insurance premiums Occupational Permits: Building Other permits Fines and forfeitures Grants and contributions not restricted to specific programs Investment earnings Miscellaneous

NET ASSETS-ENDING

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

N K Y. c o m

Thomas R. Keller, 77, Camp

ws@

unit

$4,016,779 $4,970,126

Springs, died May 20, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. He was a material specialist for Cinergy, member of St. Joseph Catholic Church in Camp Springs, Father DeJaco Knights of Columbus in Alexandria, Catholic Order of Foresters, an Army veteran and Chaplain of American Legion Post 219. Survivors include his wife, Dorothy Keller; sons, David and Don Keller; daughters, Debra and Cindy Keller, all of Camp Springs; sisters, Margie Martin of Highland Heights,

CITY OF HIGHLAND HEIGHTS, KENTUCKY STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCES GOVERNMENTAL FUNDS for the year ended June 30, 2009

RECORDER

MAP Fund

$527,595 2,554,974 102,322 110 236,087 195,831

$117,411 1,942

$527,595 2,554,974 219,733 110 236,087 197,773

$531,372 1,584,817 325,241 185 225,791 196,191

3,616,919

119,353

3,736,272

2,863,597

1,804,824 1,545,191 352,505 203,471 105,440 28,627 84,404 1,638,865 254,162

18,292 221,796 -

1,804,824 1,545,191 370,797 203,471 105,440 28,627 84,404 1,860,661 254,162

404,421 1,361,681 362,849 203,511 113,957 16,836 67,372 222,599 8,122

6,017,489

240,088

6,257,577

2,761,348

Excess (deficiency) of revenues over expenditures (2,400,570) (120,735)

(2,521,305)

102,249 -

-

1,230.045 6,405,000 (52,345)

7,522,700

60,000

7,582,700

-

Net charge in fund balances

5,122,130

(60,735)

5,061,395

102,249

Fund balances-beginning

2,050,443

111,556

2,161,999

2,059,750

$7,172,573

$50,821

$7,223,394

$2,161,999

Reconciliation to government-wide change in net assets: Net change in fund balances

$5,061,395

$102,249

less: bond proceeds (6,405,000) less: loan proceeds (1,230,045) 254,162 add: debt service expenditures 52,345 less issuance of debt (2,893) less: amortization on bond discount and deferred charges 1,860,661 add: capital outlay expenditures capitalized (208,714) less: depreciation on governmental activities assets (569,375) less: cost of assets transferred 352,552 add: accumulated depreciation on assets transferred (118,435) less: interest on long term debt

8,122 222,599 (228,433) (30,802) 30,802 -

$(953,347)

$104,537

REVENUES Taxes Licenses, permits, billings Intergovernmental revenue Fines and forfeitures Charges for service Other revenues Total revenues EXPENDITURES Current Administration Police Maintenance and public works Waste collection Buildings and grounds Recreations Planning and zoning Capital outlay Debt service Total expenditures

General

OTHER FINANCING SOURCES (USES) Transfers in (out) (60,000) Loan proceeds 1,230,045 Bond proceeds 6,405,000 (52,345) Discount on bond issuance Total other financing sources and uses

60,000

Charge in net assets Governmental Activities

ASSETS Cash and cash equivalents Investments Receivables, net (note 1) Grant receivable Prepaids Due from other funds Total Assets

2008 Totals

-

MAP Fund

2009 Total Gov’t Funds

$17,262 136,938

$5,374,746 1,605,367 544,125 20,000 239,385

$177,971 1,600,809 322,126 2,802 97,548 239,385

$7,629,423 $154,200

$7,783,623

$2,440,641

General $5,357,484 1,605,367 544,125 20,000 102,447

2008 Totals

LIABILITIES AND FUND BALANCES Liabilities $189,527 Accounts payable Construction payable 80,105 34,383 Accrued liabilities Other payables 15,897 Due to other funds 136,938

$931 102,448

$190,458 80,105 34,383 15,897 239,386

$23,360 15,897 239,385

456,850

103,379

560,229

278,642

Total Liabilities Fund Balances Reserved Unreserved, reported in: General fund Special revenue funds

5,030,882

-

5,030,882

-

2,141,691 -

50,821

2,141,691 7,223,394

2,050,443 2,161,999

Total Fund balances

7,172,573

50,821

7,223,394

2,161,999

$7,783,623

$2,440,641

Total Liabilities and fund balances$7,629,423$154,200

Amount reported for governmental activities in the statement of net assets are different because: $7,223,394 Total fund balances Capital assets used in governmental activities are not financial resources and therefore are not reported in the funds. 4,251,374 Long-term liabilities, including bonds payable, are not due and payable in the current period and therefore are not (7,628,679) Discounts and deferred charges on bond obligations 170,690 $4,016,779

Mary Ryan of Chillicothe, Ohio, Dolores Shields of Bull Shoals, Ark.; brother, John Keller of Alexandria and four grandchildren. Burial was St. Joseph Cemetery, Camp Springs. Fares J. Radel Funeral Home handled the arrangements. Memorials: St. Joseph Church or St. Joseph School, 6833 Four Mile Road, Camp Springs, KY 41059.

Deaths continued B11

LEGAL NOTICE

2009 Total Gov’t Funds

Net assets of governmental activities CE-1001560224-01

ESTATE

E-mail: k

Thomas Keller

Fund balances-ending

Revenue & Changes in Program Revenues Net Assets Charges Operating 2009 Gov’t Grants & for Activities Services Contributions

236,087 -

REAL

ical assistant. Survivors include his mother Debbie Born Joering; father, John Joering; sisters, Carrie Guthier of Melbourne, Cory Joering of Bellevue and Brandi Joering of Silver Grove; and grandfather, Buddy Born of Melbourne. Memorials: Hospice of St. Elizabeth Healthcare, 483 S. Loop Road, Edgewood, Kentucky 41017.

Roger Joering

We have audited the accompanying financial statements of the governmental activities and the aggregate remaining fund information of the City of Highland Heights, Kentucky, as of June 30, 2009, and for the year then ended, which collectively comprise the City’s basic financial statements as listed in the table of contents. These financial statements are the responsibility of the City of Highland Heights, Kentucky’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audit.

-

|

DEATHS

TO THE MAYOR AND THE CITY COUNCIL OF CITY OF HIGHLAND HEIGHTS HIGHLAND HEIGHTS KENTUCKY

Expenses Functions/Programs Primary government Governmental activities $1,846,208 Administration 1,580,810 Police Maintenance & 452,029 Public Works Waste Collection 203,471 149,769 Building & Grounds 37,670 Recreation Planning & Zoning 84,402 118,436 Interest on long-term debt

POLICE

$2,161,999 2,816,249 (8,122) $4,970,126

The Campbell County Fiscal Court, at a regular meeting of the court on Wednesday, May 19, 2010 at 5:30 p.m., at the Campbell County Administration Building, Fiscal Court Chambers, 1098 Monmouth Street, Newport, Kentucky, adopted the following ordinance upon the second reading, said ordinance having been read by title and summary given for the first time at the May 5, 2010 regular meeting of the Court. CAMPBELL COUNTY FISCAL COURT CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY ORDINANCE O-06-10 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CAMPBELL COUNTY FISCAL COURT AMENDING CAMPBELL COUNTY ORDINANCE O19-87 AMENDED AND LAST AMENDED BY ORDINANCE O-04-09 RELATING TO THE CAMPBELL COUNTY DETENTION CENTER POLICY AND PROCEDURE MANUAL, CHAPTER TWO, PERSONNEL, TO DELETE SAID CHAPTER FROM THE CURRENT POLICY AND PROCEDURE MANUAL, AND ADOPTING A NEW SEPARATE PERSONNEL MANUAL FOR CAMPBELL COUNTY DETENTION CENTER EMPLOYEES. The full text of Ordinance O-06-10 will be on file in the Office of the County Clerk, Newport, Kentucky and is on file in the Office of the Fiscal Court Clerk, Newport, Kentucky, and same is available for inspection and use by the public during regular business hours. I, Paula K. Spicer, Clerk of the Campbell County Fiscal Court, hereby certify that this summary was prepared by me at the direction of the Campbell County Fiscal Court and that said summary is a true and accurate summary of the contents of Ordinance O-06-10. Paula K. Spicer Fiscal Court Clerk 1001562287 NOTICE OF ADOPTION AND SUMMARY OF ORDINANCE The undersigned City Clerk of the City of Bellevue, Kentucky, hereby states that on the 12th day of May, 2010, the City of Bellevue, Kentucky, adopted Ordinance No. 2010-04-01 titled AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF BELLEVUE ESTABLISH ING PROCEDURES AND REQUIREMENTS FOR THE ISSUANCE OF ADMINISTRATIVE SEARCH WARRANTS . In summary this is an ordinance authorizing the administrative officers of the City to obtain administrative search warrants if certain specified conditions exist and required procedures are followed, including but not limited to judicial approval. After issuance of a court approved administrative search warrant administrative officers are authorized to inspect premises to investigate the conditions of real property and structures and to verify violations or compliance with health, safety, building codes and other ordinances of the city when violations thereof are reasonably suspected. The City Clerk of the City of Bellevue hereby certifies that the above summary is true and correct and written in a way to inform the public of its contents. Full text of the above Ordinance is available in the Office of the Clerk-Treasurer, 616 Poplar Street, Bellevue, Kentucky. Mary H. Scott City Clerk / Treasurer The undersigned, an attorney licensed to practice law in the Commonwealth of Kentucky, hereby certifies that he prepared the summary of ordinance referred to above and that the summary represents an accurate depiction of the contents of the ordinance adopted by the City of Bellevue, Kentucky, on the 12thth day of May, 2010. Paul Alley City Attorney 2631787.1 1001562008

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Deaths From B10

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Pearl Kinlaw

Pearl Kinlaw, 87, of Cincinnati, formerly of Covington, died May 17, 2010, at Christ Hospital, Cincinnati. She was a laborer for RCA Manufacturing, Pleasant Ridge, and a volunteer at the Clifton Senior Center, Cincinnati and a member of Baptist Faith Church. Her husband, Lloyd Kinlaw, died previously. Survivors include her son, Robert Kinlaw of Alexandria; four grandchildren and eight greatgrandchildren. Burial was in St. Mary’s Cemetery, Fort Mitchell.

Salvatore Manzi Jr.

Salvatore Charles “Rocco” Manzi Jr., 88, of Covington, formerly of Newport, died May 15, 2010, at Rosedale Manor, Latonia. He was a printer with The Cincinnati Enquirer, a former orchestra leader, piano and accordion teacher and a World War II Army Air Corps veteran. His wife, Elizabeth Clark Manzi, died previously. Survivors include his daughter, Diana Muehlenkamp of Covington; son, Michael Manzi of Alexandria; four grandchildren and six greatgrandchildren. Entombment was in St. Stephen Cemetery Mausoleum, Fort Thomas. Muehlenkamp-Erschell Funeral Home, Fort Thomas, handled the arrangements. Memorials: Children’s Music Program at St. Thomas Church, 26 E. Villa Place, Fort Thomas, KY 41075.

Eloise McCormick

Eloise Painter McCormick, 87, California, died May 19, 2010, at Hospice of the Bluegrass, Fort Thomas. She was a homemaker, member of Carthage Church of the Nazarene, Sun Valley Seniors and Valley Homemakers. Her husband, Charles McCormick, died in 1996. Survivors include her sons, Ron, Ken and Gary McCormick, all of California; sisters, Alberta Auchter of Falmouth, Neva Eshman of Foster, Charlotte Deaton of Hamilton, Ohio and Carleen Kees of Alexandria; brother, A.J. Painter of Alexandria; eight grandchildren and 11 great-grandchildren. Burial was in Mount Gilead Cemetery, Carthage. Memorials: Carthage Church of the Nazarene, 9535 Washington Trace Road, California, KY 41007; or Hospice of The Bluegrass Northern Kentucky, 7388 Turfway Road, Florence, KY 41042.

Terrence McNally

Terrence James McNally, 73, Edgewood, died May 20, 2010, at his home. He was a professor of literature at Northern Kentucky University and a published author. Survivors include his wife, Joan McNally of Edgewood; daughters, Aileen Adams of Florence and Carolyn Rosenstiel of Fort Thomas; son, Tim McNally of Erlanger; brother, Robert McNally of Withamsville, Ohio and four grandchildren. Burial was in St. Mary Cemetery, Fort Mitchell. Memorials: Priests for Life, P.O. Box 141172, Staten Island, NY 10314.

Lillian Murphy

Lillian L. Johns Murphy, 102, Fort Thomas, died May 20, 2010, at Hospice of the Bluegrass Care Center, Fort Thomas. She was a homemaker, member of First Presbyterian Church of Fort Thomas, Fort Thomas Seniors; Belles and Beaus of Melbourne and Highland Heights Seniors. Her husband, Carl T. Murphy, died in 1986. Lillian is survived by her daughter, Janet Boehmer of Fort Thomas; son, Larry Murphy of Grand Rapids, Michigan; six grand-

Basic obituary information and a color photograph of your loved one is published without charge by The Community Press. Please call us at 2830404 for more information. To publish a larger memorial tribute, call 513242-4000 for pricing details. For the most up-to-date Northern Kentucky obituaries, click on the “Obituaries” link at NKY.com. children; 14 great-grandchildren; and four great-great-grandchildren. Burial was in Evergreen Cemetery, Southgate. Memorials: First Presbyterian Church of Fort Thomas, 220 S. Fort Thomas Ave., Fort Thomas, Kentucky 41075; or Hospice of the Bluegrass Northern Kentucky, 7388 Turfway Road, Florence, Kentucky 41042.

Leona Musk

Leona M. Ruschman Musk, 93, Newport, died May 20, 2010, at Baptist Village Care Center, Erlanger. She was a social worker with the state of Kentucky, a homemaker, member of Holy Spirit Church, Altar Society and Small Christian Community. Her husband, Frank Musk and daughter, Marilyn McCulley, died previously. Survivors include her sons, Frank Musk of Fort Wright, Thomas Musk of Newport, Richard Musk of Highland Heights and Roger Musk of Erlanger; daughters, Kathleen Oberer of Newport, Phyllis Pollard of Florence and Patricia Musk, Bellevue; brother, Paul Ruschman of Fort Thomas; 16 grandchildren and 20 great-grandchildren. Burial was in St. Joseph Cemetery, Cold Spring. Memorials: Wood Hudson Cancer Research Lab, 931 Isabella St., Newport, KY 41071.

Morris Parsons Jr.

Morris Parsons Jr., 53, Newport, died May 20, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. He was a retired first sergeant of the U.S. Army. Survivors include his wife, Susan Faye Parsons of Newport; sons, Moe Parsons Jr. of Atlanta and Johnathan Parsons and Eathan Parsons, both of Paducah, Ky.; daughter, Patricia Parsons, of Paducah; step-son, Michael Lee Harvey II of Jonesboro, Ark.; step-daughters, Hali Nicole Harvey of Jonesboro and Christy Joyce Brooks and Heather Brooks-Hodges, both of Milledgeville, Ga.; brothers, Eddie Parsons of Clarksville, Tenn., Terry Parsons of Hot Springs, Ark., and John Parsons of Newport; and nine grandchildren. Fares J. Radel Funeral Home and Crematory of Newport handled the arrangements.

Margaret Precht

Margaret “Margie” Busher Precht, 88, Bellevue, died May 19, 2010, at Baptist Convalescent Center, Newport. She was a homemaker and member of Divine Mercy Parish in Bellevue. Her husband, Harry Precht and son, Ronnie Precht, died previously. Survivors include her daughter, Pam Precht of Bellevue; sons, Ray Precht of Newport, George and Greg Precht of Bellevue; and one grandson. Dobbling, Muehlenkamp-Erschell Funeral Home, Bellevue, handled the arrangements. Memorials: Baptist Convalescent Center, 120 Main St., Newport, KY 41071; or Hospice of St. Elizabeth Healthcare, 483 S. Loop Road, Edgewood, KY 41017.

Deaths continued B12

May 27, 2010 SECTION 001100 - INVITATION TO BID LEGAL NOTICE Newport Millennium Housing Corporation III will be accepting sealed bids for a General Contract for the construction, including mechanical, plumbing and electrical work, of TWO single family style building located at 606 Liberty Street and 408 Thornton Street in the City of Newport, Kentucky. Bids are due no later than 3 p.m., local time, Tuesday, June 8, 2010, at the offices of the Housing Authority of Newport, located at 30 East 8th. St., Newport, KY 41071 at which time and place all bids will be publicly opened and read aloud. Bids are to be marked “Neighborhood Stabilization Program Construction Project #10-13”. General Contractors submitting a bid for general construction may obtain a maximum of two (2) complete sets of Contract Documents from Hub + Weber Architects, 542 Greenup Street, Covington, Kentucky, (859) 491-3844 - for a deposit of $100. Checks shall be made out to Newport Millennium Housing Corporation III. Deposit will be refunded with the return of the two sets in good condition. Contract Documents may also be purchased from Queen City Reprographics, 434 Scott Avenue, Covington, Kentucky (513) 326-2300. Copies of the Contract Documents are open to the public inspection and may be examined at the following offices: FW Dodge Corporation 7265 Kenwood Road Suite 200 Cincinnati, Ohio 45236

Allied Construction Industries 3 Kovach Drive Cincinnati, Ohio 45215

Newport Millennium Housing Corporation III will conduct a pre-bid informational meeting at 2pm local time, Thursday, May 27, 2010 at the offices of the Housing Authority of Newport. Construction would begin within ninety (90) days of execution of contract. A certified check or bank draft, payable to the Newport Millennium Housing Corporation III, U.S. Government Bonds, or a satisfactory bid bond executed by the Bidder and acceptable sureties in amount equal to five (5) percent of the bid shall be submitted with each bid. The successful Bidder will be required to furnish and pay for satisfactory performance and payment bonds. All Bidders shall include with their bid a statement from an acceptable surety that if their bid is accepted the surety will furnish to the Bidder the required performance and payment bond or bonds required by the contract documents. Attention of Bidders is particularly called to the requirements as to conditions of employment to be observed and minimum wage rates to be paid under the contract, Section 3, Segregated Facility, Section 109 and E.O. 11246 and Title VI. MBE/WBE firms are encouraged to bid. No bidder may withdraw their bid within 60 days after the actual date of opening thereof. Newport Millennium Housing Corporation III reserves the right to waive any informality, irregularity, or defect in any proposal, and to reject any/or all proposals should it be deemed in the best interest of Newport Millennium Housing Corporation III to do so. It is the intent of Newport Millennium Housing Corporation III to award a contract to the lowest responsible and responsive bidder. Newport Millennium Housing Corporation III is an Equal Opportunity Employer. 15049181001561357

LEGAL NOTICE The Campbell County & Municipal Planning & Zoning Commission will hold a public hearing on Tuesday, June 8, 2010, 7:00 P.M. at the Campbell County Courthouse, 8352 E. Main Street, Alexandria, Ky for the purpose of hearing testimony for the following: FILE NUMBER: 73-10TXA-01Text amendment for Section 10.6 HC Highway Commercial Zone of the City of Silver Grove Zoning Ordinance. APPLICANT: Campbell County Planning & Zoning Department on behalf of the City of Silver Grove . REQUEST: Proposed text amendment to the City of Silver Grove Zoning Ordinance Article X, Section 10.6 HC Highway Commercial Zone, adding new use in item A. Permitted Uses 13. Variety Store. Persons interested in this case are invited to be present. Information concerning this case is available for public inspection at the Campbel County & Municipal Planning & Zoning Office, 1098 Monmouth Street, Suite 343, Newport, KY. Monday-Friday during normal business hours. /s/ Peter J. Klear,AICP Director of Planning & Zoning 1001562303

LEGAL NOTICE HIGHLAND HEIGHTS PLANNING & ZONING PUBLIC HEARING The City of Highland Heights Planning and Zoning Commission will conduct a Public Hearing on Tuesday, June 8, 2008 at 7:00pm, at 515 Main Avenue. The meeting will be held for all interested parties to hear and present evidence relative to the following application:

LEGAL NOTICE Notice is hereby given by the Campbell County Fiscal Court that it will hold a public hearing on Wednesday June 16, 2010 at 5:15PM at the Campbell County Administration Building located at 1098 Monmouth Street, Newport, KY 41071 to review the following matter: DISCONTINUING COUNTY ROAD 1246, BOB HUBER DRIVE, INCLUDING RIGHT OF WAY LOCATED ON PARCELS 1,2, & 3 OWNED BY THE CAMPBELL COUNTY ECONOMIC PROGRESS AUTHORITY and identified in PIDN: 99999-35-473.00. Bob Huber Drive, CR 1246, was relocated with the reconstruction of US 27; All interested parties are invited to be present to hear or give testimony relating to the above referenced matter. Further information concerning this matter is available for public inspection at the Campbell County Administration Building, Newport, KY 41071 from 8:30AM to 4:30PM MondayFriday. Kenneth Schultz, Road Supervisor Campbell County Road Department

P&Z CASE #02-2010: An application for a possible text amendment to the General Commercial Zone, Section B, paragraphs 16 and 17 pertaining to drive thru and drive in restaurants in the General Commercial zone. If there is a need for the City to be aware of a specific disability, you are encouraged to contact the City Building at 859-4418575 so that suitable Arrangement can be considered prior to the date of the meeting. The City Office is open MondayFriday 9:00am to 5:00pm. The City will make every reasonable accommodation to assist a qualified disabled person in obtaining access to the meeting. Immediately following the Public Hearing, the regularly scheduled Planning and Zoning meeting will begin. Jean A. Rauf, Clerk/Treasurer CMC Secretary to Planning and Zoning PUBLISH CCR: 05-27-2010 10015607882

LEGAL NOTICE Jazzman, Inc., a Kentucky Corporation, 18 Grandview Ave. Fort Thomas, KY 41075, hereby declares intention to apply for a Transitional; Restaurant Wine by the Drink; Malt Beverage Retail Beer and Special Sunday Retail license(s) no later than May 27, 2010. The business to be licensed will be located at 1109 S. Fort Thomas Ave., Fort Thomas, Kentucky 41075, doing business as Fort Thomas Pizza. The Principal Officers of Jazzman, Inc. are as follows: President, Peter Casey of 18 Grandview Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075 Secretary, Joumana Feghali of 18 Grandview Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075. Any person, association, corporation, or body politic may protest the granting of the license(s) by writing the Dept. of Alcoholic Beverage Control, 1003 Twilight Trail, Frankfort, KY 406018400, within 30 days of the date of this legal publication. 1515014/1561739

To Place Legal Advertising Call 513.242.4000

Deadline: Friday at 5p.m.

CCF Recorder

B11

ORDINANCE NO. O-06-2010 AN ORDINANCE PROVIDING FOR AND ORDERING THE STREET IMPROVEMENT OF ARNO AVENUE FROM ITS INTERSECTION WITH ROSSFORD AVENUE TO ITS TERMINUS; CRESCENT COURT FROM ITS INTERSECTION WITH CRESCENT AVENUE TO ITS TERMINUS; DESHLER LANE FROM ITS INTERSECTION WITH HIGHLAND AVENUE TO ITS TERMINUS; HUNTEMANN LANE FROM ITS INTERSECTION WITH NEWMAN AVENUE TO ITS TERMINUS; ROB ROY AVENUE FROM ITS INTERSECTION WITH N. FORT THOMAS AVENUE TO ITS INTERSECTION WITH BURNET RIDGE; AND STERLING AVENUE FROM ITS INTERSECTION WITH N. FORT THOMAS AVENUE TO ITS TERMINUS; ALL IN THE CITY OF FORT THOMAS, CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY, AND ALL IN ACCORD-ANCE WITH THE PLANS AND SPECIFICATIONS THEREOF AS SUBMITTED BY THE CITY ENGINEER, AND AS APPROVED BY THE BOARD OF COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF FORT THOMAS; AND FURTHER, PROVIDING THAT THE ACTUAL COST OF THE CONSTRUCTION OF SAID STREET IMPROVEMENTS ARE TO BE BORNE BY THE CITY FIFTY PERCENT (50%) AND THE PROPERTY OWNER FIFTY PERCENT (50%), AND PROVIDING FOR THE PAYMENT OF AN IMPROVEMENT ASSESSMENT. BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY OF FORT THOMAS, CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY: SECTION I That Arno Avenue from its intersection with Rossford Avenue to its terminus be improved by performing spot curb repair for areas that have deteriorated, mudjacking as required to fill any voids or cavities underneath the pavement, full depth pavement repair as necessary, excavate and grading at end of street for 20’ extension, subgrade compaction, asphalt base course installation and 6” vertical concrete curb, bituminous asphalt pavement surface milling, removing asphalt overlay to concrete base pavement, asphalt leveling course of variable thickness (3/4" to 1-1/4") asphalt leveling to reconstruct the crown on the street as necessary, asphalt resurfacing: 1-1/2" asphalt to be applied on top of the leveling course, raise manholes, and adjust downspouts that lead to the curb as necessary. The total preliminary cost estimate for this improvement is $7,450.00 with costs being shared on a 50/50% basis between the City and property owner for those costs equivalent to standard street resurfacing with bituminous asphalt. All additional costs associated with reconstruction shall be borne by the City. Using the front foot basis as the fair basis of assessment, the preliminary estimated cost to the City and to the property owner is $8.03 per front foot (f.f.). Please see the attached schedule listing property description, frontages, and anticipated costs. SECTION II That Crescent Court from its intersection with Crescent Avenue to its terminus be improved by performing mudjacking as required to fill any voids or cavities underneath the pavement, full depth pavement repair as necessary, sawcut and remove existing curb and construct new 4” vertical concrete curb, depressed at driveways and fill behind new curb with topsoil, bituminous asphalt pavement surface milling, removing asphalt patches to original gutter line or concrete base, asphalt leveling course of variable thickness (3/4" to 1-1/4") asphalt leveling to reconstruct the crown on the street as necessary, asphalt resurfacing: 1-1/2" asphalt to be applied on top of the leveling course, raise manholes, and adjust downspouts that lead to the curb as necessary. The total preliminary cost estimate for this improvement is $9,125.00 with costs being shared on a 50/50% basis between the City and property owner for those costs equivalent to standard street resurfacing with bituminous asphalt. All additional costs associated with reconstruction shall be borne by the City. Using the front foot basis as the fair basis of assessment, the preliminary estimated cost to the City and to the property owner is $7.81 per front foot (f.f.). Please see the attached schedule listing property description, frontages, and anticipated costs. SECTION III That Deshler Lane from its intersection with Highland Avenue to its terminus be improved by mudjacking as required to fill any voids or cavities underneath the pavement, full depth pavement repair as necessary, bituminous asphalt pavement surface milling, removing asphalt patches to original gutter line and concrete base including removal of existing concrete curb, partial cul-de-sac island removal, subgrade compaction and asphalt base course installation, asphalt leveling course of variable thickness (3/4" to 1-1/4") asphalt leveling to reconstruct the crown on the street as necessary, construct new 4” vertical concrete curb, depressed at driveways and fill behind new curb with topsoil, pavement fabric, asphalt resurfacing: 1-1/4" asphalt to be applied on top of the leveling course, raise manholes, driveway alignment, and adjust downspouts that lead to the curb as necessary. The total preliminary cost estimate for this improvement is $35,025.00 with costs being shared on a 50/50% basis between the City and property owner for those costs equivalent to standard street resurfacing with bituminous asphalt. All additional costs associated with reconstruction shall be borne by the City. Using the front foot basis as the fair basis of assessment, the preliminary estimated cost to the City and to the property owner is $9.09 per front foot (f.f.). Please see the attached schedule listing property description, frontages, and anticipated costs. SECTION IV That Huntemann Lane from its intersection with Newman Avenue to its terminus be improved by performing spot curb repair for areas that have deteriorated, mudjacking as required to fill any voids or cavities underneath the pavement, full depth pavement repair as necessary, bituminous asphalt pavement surface milling of variable depth of 3” at gutter line to 1-1/2” at centerline, removing asphalt patches to original gutter line, asphalt leveling course of variable thickness (1-1/2" to 2-1/2") asphalt leveling to reconstruct the crown on the street as necessary, asphalt resurfacing: 1-1/2" asphalt to be applied on top of the leveling course, raise manholes, and adjust downspouts that lead to the curb as necessary. The total preliminary cost estimate for this improvement is $63,210.00 with costs being shared on a 50/50% basis between the City and property owner for those costs equivalent to standard street resurfacing with bituminous asphalt. All additional costs associated with reconstruction shall be borne by the City. Using the front foot basis as the fair basis of assessment, the preliminary estimated cost to the City and to the property owner is $9.86 per front foot (f.f.). Please see the attached schedule listing property description, frontages, and anticipated costs. SECTION V That Rob Roy Avenue from its intersection with N. Fort Thomas Avenue to its intersection with Burnet Ridge be improved by performing spot curb repair for areas that have deteriorated, mudjacking as required to fill any voids or cavities underneath the pavement, full depth pavement repair as necessary, bituminous asphalt pavement surface milling, removing asphalt overlay to original gutter line, asphalt leveling course of variable thickness (3/4" to 1-1/4") asphalt leveling to reconstruct the crown on the street as necessary, pavement fabric, asphalt resurfacing: 1-1/2" asphalt to be applied on top of the leveling course, raise manholes, and adjust downspouts that lead to the curb as necessary. The total preliminary cost estimate for this improvement is $24,390.00 with costs being shared on a 50/50% basis between the City and property owner for those costs equivalent to standard street resurfacing with bituminous asphalt. All additional costs associated with reconstruction shall be borne by the City. Using the front foot basis as the fair basis of assessment, the preliminary estimated cost to the City and to the property owner is $10.28 per front foot (f.f.). Please see the attached schedule listing property description, frontages, and anticipated costs. SECTION VI That Sterling Avenue from its intersection with N. Fort Thomas Avenue to its terminus be improved by performing spot curb repair for areas that have deteriorated, mudjacking as required to fill any voids or cavities underneath the pavement, full depth pavement repair as necessary, bituminous asphalt pavement surface milling, removing asphalt overlay to original gutter line, asphalt leveling course of variable thickness (3/4" to 1-1/4") asphalt leveling to reconstruct the crown on the street as necessary, pavement fabric, asphalt resurfacing: 1-1/2" asphalt to be applied on top of the leveling course, raise manholes, and adjust downspouts that lead to the curb as necessary. The total preliminary cost estimate for this improvement is $35,450.00 with costs being shared on a 50/50% basis between the City and property owner for those costs equivalent to standard street resurfacing with bituminous asphalt. All additional costs associated with reconstruction shall be borne by the City. Using the front foot basis as the fair basis of assessment, the preliminary estimated cost to the City and to the property owner is $9.57 per front foot (f.f.). Please see the attached schedule listing property description, frontages, and anticipated costs. SECTION VII That consistent with City policy regarding improvements, costs for street improvements shall be shared by the City and property owner on a fifty percent (50%) to the City and fifty percent (50%) to the property owner basis for those costs equivalent to standard resurfacing with bituminous asphalt. All additional costs associated with reconstruction shall be borne by the City. SECTION VIII That the Board of Council shall advertise for bids in a newspaper of general bona fide circulation in the City of Fort Thomas prior to the day set for opening the bids for doing said work, said bids to be received by the City Administrative Officer at his office. Said publication shall occur not less than seven (7) days nor more than twenty-one (21) days before said date for opening bids. After said proposals are opened, they shall be transmitted to the Board of Council at their next regular meeting after proposals are received, and all proposals shall be made as required by the specifications thereof. A contract for the work shall be let to the lowest and best bidder; however, the Board of Council may reject all bids and readvertise. SECTION IX Upon completion and acceptance of the work under the contract, the cost and expense of same shall be ascertained, levied, assessed and apportioned to and against the said lots or parts of lots and the owners thereof, according to the number of front feet of the number of abutting feet of ground owned by each of them. SECTION X This ordinance shall be in full force and effect from and after its passage, approval, and publication as required by law. APPROVED: _____________________________ Mary H. Brown, Mayor 1st Reading: May 3, 2010 ADOPTED: May 17, 2010 ATTEST: _________________________ Melissa K. Kelly, City Clerk 1562001


B12

CCF Recorder

On the record

May 27, 2010

DEATHS From B11

George Rains

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George “Bill” Rains, 78, Alexandria, died May 21, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He was an assembly worker for General Motors, member of the Alexandria Church of God and the Seniors Center. Survivors include his wife, Wanda Williams Rains; sons, William Rains of Alexandria and David A. Rains of Covington; stepsons, Clark Williams of Covington, Jeremiah Williams of Arkansas, and Matthew M. Williams of Florence; daughters, Marlene Alford of Bethel, Ohio; stepdaughters, Terri Daugherty of Ludlow, Ruth McCullah of Burlington, Mary M Harris of Coupins, South Carolina, Tabitha Hughes of Gaffney S.C.; brother, Ronald Rains of Williamsburg; sister, Karen Anderson of Cincinnati;19 grandchildren; and eight greatgrandchildren. Burial was in Evergreen Cemetery, Southgate. Memorials: Church of God, 5 Washington St., Alexandria, Kentucky 41001.

Nancy Ross

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Nancy J. Ross, 62, of Bellevue, formerly of Newport, died May 22, 2010, at her home. She was a nurse’s aide at the Baptist Convalescent Center of Newport. Survivors include her husband, George Ross of Bellevue; son, Rick Ross of Bromley; daughters, Betty

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Stidham of Covington and Bobbie Stafford of Newport; brother, Ray Miller of Warsaw, Ky.; sister, Vera Walker of Alexandria; 15 grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren. Burial was in Peach Grove Cemetery.

Hannah Rucker

Hannah Drew Rucker, 57, Newport, died May 17, 2010, at Hospice of the Bluegrass - Northern Kentucky Care Center in Fort Thomas. She was a cashier for System Parking Company, Cincinnati. Survivors include her husband, Daniel E. “Joe” Rucker; sons, Daniel Rucker Jr. of Highland Heights and James Rucker of Cincinnati, brothers, Harrison Ward of Williamstown, Martin Ward of Cincinnati and Eddie Marlow of Michigan; sisters, Laura Baker of Baldwin, N.C., Marie Simpson of Dry Ridge and Linda Walls of Cincinnati and six grandchildren. Burial was in Williamstown Cemetery.

Lawrence Schulkens

Lawrence J. Schulkens, 89, of Fort Thomas, formerly of Cold Spring, died May 20, 2010, at Carmel Manor Nursing Home, Fort Thomas. He was a HVAC engineer with B & B Heating & Cooling, an Army Veteran, member of St. Vincent DePaul Society, American Legion, Veterans of Foreign Wars, Catholic Order of Foresters, Knights of Columbus Father DeJaco Council

5220, St. Joseph Seniors and Campbell County Seniors. His wife, Luella B. Futscher Schulkens, and granddaughter, Holly Schulkens, died previously. Survivors include his sons, Michael L. Schulkens of Cold Spring, Richard L. and Gary J. Schulkens of Alexandria; daughter, Barbara A. Heider of Cold Spring; 10 grandchildren; and 10 greatgrandchildren. Burial was in St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas. Memorials: St. Joseph Golden Anniversary Campaign, 4011 Alexandria Pike, Cold Spring, Kentucky 41076.

Tina Slater

Tina Rae Slater, 50, Falmouth, died May 18, 2010, at her home. She was a manager for Hardy Mart in Falmouth and member of Chapel of Praise Assembly of God in Falmouth. Survivors include her son, Jamie Slater of Alexandria; daughters, Jennifer Cochran of Corinth and Samantha Slater of Falmouth; mother and step-father, Betty and Sam Hodge of Falmouth; sisters, Lisa Florence of Cynthiana and Sheila Justice of Falmouth and seven grandchildren. Burial was in Riverside Cemetery, Falmouth. Memorials: Memorial and Honor Donation Program - American Diabetes Association, P. O. Box 11454, Alexandria, VA 22312.

Alberta Soard

Alberta Lee Compton Soard, 58, of Somerset, formerly of Newport, died May 20, 2010, at Lake Cumberland Regional Hospital in Somerset, Ky. Survivors include her husband, Victor Raymond Soard of Somerset; daughters, Shelly Brann of Somerset and Tillie Messmer of Newport; sons, Gary Guffy of Somerset and Phillip Guffy of Sandy-

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DESTIN. Local owner, 1 or 2 luxury condos. 2 BR, 2 BA overlooking gulf, sugar white beaches. Heated pool, hot tubs & more. 937-767-8449,or visit www.majesticsunindestin.com

DESTIN. Luxury 2 BR, 2 BA oceanfront condos. Heated pool, spas, kids pool & tennis. Sleeps 6. Local owner. www.us-foam.com/destin. D 513-528-9800, E 513-752-1735

DESTIN . Maravilla & Majestic Sun Resorts. Local owner has gorgeous 2 BR condo with breathtaking views, 2 pools & tennis. Only 20 steps to the beach! Close to everything. Specials for weeks of 5/29, 6/5 & 6/12. Visit online at www.vrbo.com/31437 or call the Burkes at 513-582-4649.

Virginia Bauer Stein, 80, Bellevue, died May 15, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. She was a retired bakery clerk with Remke Markets, a member of John R. Little V.F.W. Post No. 3186 Ladies Auxiliary, Bellevue & Southgate Super Seniors and Kentucky Bell Red Hats of Alexandria. Her husband, Leroy J. Stein, died previously. Survivors include her daughters, Judith Mulroney of Fort Thomas and Susan Neltner of Alexandria; sons, Joseph Stein of Bellevue and Charles Stein of Villa Hills; five grandchildren and three greatgrandchildren. Burial was in Evergreen Cemetery, Southgate. Memorials: Breast Cancer Society Chicks & Chucks Charities, 136 Ridge Hill Drive, Highland Heights, KY 41076.

Margaret Wesselman

Margaret Ann Wesselman, 80, Erlanger, a homemaker, died May 16, 2010, at her home. Her daughter, Paula Bessler, died previously. Survivors include her husband, Paul Wesselman of Erlanger; sons, David Wesselman of Villa Hills and Michael Wesselman of Union; daughter, Patricia Boesing of Wilder; sister, Joan Rao of Farmington Hills, Mich.; brothers, Eugene Burns of Fort Mitchell and Gerald Burns of Arizona; 13 grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. Burial was at St. John Cemetery, Fort Mitchell. Middendorf Funeral Home, Fort Wright, is handling arrangements. Memorials: American Cancer Society, 297 Buttermilk Pike, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017; or Hospice of the Bluegrass Northern Kentucky, 7388 Turfway Road, Florence, KY 41042.

Darlene Patsy Wimsatt, 65, Latonia, died May 18, 2010, at Hospice of St. Elizabeth Healthcare in Edgewood. She was a retired nurse’s aide and a member of Calvary Baptist Church in Latonia. Her husband, Dick Wimsatt, died in 2006. Survivors include her son, Don Wimsatt of Alexandria; daughters, Tina Richardson and Gina Wimsatt, both of Latonia; six grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Connley Brothers Funeral Home, Latonia, handled the arrangements.

SEABROOK EXCLUSIVES Villas & Private Homes. Ocean, golf, tennis, equestrian. Pet friendly rentals. Free brochure. Book online! 888-718-7949. www.seabrookexclusives.com

1-7 Affordable, Deluxe Chalets & Cabin Rentals. Pigeon Forge in the Smokies. Vacation/Dollywood Specials. Free brochure. Call 1-800-833-9987. www.firesidechalets.com

Kenneth Whittaker

A Beautiful Cabin Getaway Gatlinburg/Pigeon Forge. Hot tub, jacuzzi, fireplace, gas grill. $85/nt, 5 nt special $375. 800-793-8699. smokymtncrossrdrentals.com

Kenneth E. “Whitt” Whittaker, 63, Bellevue, died May 17, 2010, in Fort Thomas. He worked for United Parcel Service. Survivors include his brothers, Roy and Bill Whittaker, both of Newport; and sister, Barbara Ross of Dayton. Burial was in Evergreen Cemetery, Southgate. Memorials: Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, 600 E. Main St., Louisville, KY 40202; or Hospice of the Bluegrass Northern Kentucky, 7388 Turfway Road, Florence, KY 41042.

GATLINBURG. Affordable rates. Fully furnished. 1-8 bdrms. Chalets, Cabins, Privacy, Views, Hot Tubs, Jacuzzis, Fireplaces. 1-800-235-2661 www.alpinechaletrentals.com

MARRIAGE LICENSES

GATLINBURG. Choose a 2 or 3 BR chalet, conveniently located, richly appointed and meticulously main tained. Pet friendly. 877-215-3335 or visit www.marysescape.com

Connie Lauer, 29, of Covington and Michael Ruprich, 29, of Cincinnati, issued April 24. Janis Reiman, 62, of Cold Spring and James Dill, 63, of North Carolina, issued May 1. Diana Miller, 24, and Jared Chase, 29, both of Southgate, issued May 7. Kara Dickerson, 22, of Fort Thomas and Timothy Ohearn, 25, of Cincinnati, issued May 8. Dana Ng, 24, of Newport and Ercan Kaynakck, 23, of Turkey, issued May 8. Alisha Mailberger, 23, of Maysville and Wilson Cardwell, 25, of Sandusky, issued May 10. Megan Simpson, 25, and Jonathan Grainger, 26, both of Fort Thomas, issued May 12. Kristina Warner, 28, of Fort Thomas and Heath Rushing, 32, of Atlanta, issued May 13. Heather Googe, 31, of Louisville and Anthony Ferrara, 22, of Edgewood, issued May 13.

NORRIS LAKE. Located at Powell Valley Resort. 2 BR/1BA, fully furnished priv. home. Covered porch, deck. Lake access. $95/nt. 423-5628353, www.norrislakehse.com

EAST COAST, NEW SMYRNA BEACH Luxurious oceanfront condos & vacation homes. Closest & best beach to Disney. Ocean Properties Vacation Rentals 800-728-0513 www.oceanprops.com

PANAMA CITY BEACH The Summerhouse 2B/2B Family Condos. Beach side pools, tennis, WiFi & More. r 800/354-1122 THE BEST BEACH VACATION VALUE! www.SummerhousePC.com

Virginia Stein

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TENNESSEE

DESTIN. 2 great condos , 2 br, 2 ba golf, pools, dazzling Gulf view . Check our website for availability & rates. Local owner, 513-561-4683 Visit arieldunes.us or twcondo.us

hook, Ky.; sisters, Maxine Compton, Tina Compton, Roxie Hall and Brenda Smith; brothers, Dennis Compton, Kenny Compton and Almond Compton Jr.; and 10 grandchildren.

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Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

T h u r s d a y, J u n e

RECORDER

3, 2010

PEOPLE

BEST FRIENDS FOREVER

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IDEAS

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RECIPES

4-H horse club a tradition for youth By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

The girls, all best friends, in Michelle Beagle’s fourth-grade class at A. D. Owens Elementary School pose for a picture. Pictured: Cheyenne Doyen, Nikki Miller, Alexandra Franco, Kaitlyn Kelley, Lanisha Thompson, Ramey Garland, Breanna Robey, Mackenzie Dolwick, Autumn Dreyer and Nikyta Martinez. Savanna Davidson is not pictured.

A.D. Owens girls developed class bond through the years Since kindergarten, a group of fourth-grade girls at A.D. Owens Elementary School in Newport have been developing a friendship that they hope will last forever. Through members of their group moving away and coming back, and trials and hardships of growing up, the group of 11 girls has been through a lot together, said teacher Michelle Beagle, who has been working with the girls in some form or another since kindergarten. “We’ve been together for so long that we’ve really gotten close,” said student Cheyenne Doyen. “All

throughout the years, Mrs. Beagle has been encouraging us to be friends and apologize when we make mistakes.” Student Autumn Dreyer said in the very beginning she and some of the other girls made a pack not to fight, and they’ve all become good friends. “Sometimes we have hard times and we have someone to count on to help us,” Dreyer said. Student Nikki Miller said throughout the years, the girls have really learned what the others do and don’t like and have learned to get along well.

THINGS TO DO Rivertown Breakdown

The annual Rivertown Breakdown concert series will take place Saturday, June 5, at 8 p.m. at the Southgate House in Newport. A total of 17 bands, including Frontier Folk Nebraska (picture), will perform on two different stages. The doors will open at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $12 to $15. Rivertown Breakdown is held in conjunction with River Sweep and will benefit the P.A. Denny Riverboat Education Center. For tickets or more information, call 859-431-2201 or visit www.rivertownbreakdown.com. The Southgate House is located at 24 E. Third St.

Social Media training

Learn how social media can help your business during a special training session from 8 a.m. to 11 a.m. Thurs-

day, June 10, at Prism Consulting in Fort Mitchell. The session will include an introduction to Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn for your business. The cost to attend is $69 and registration is required. For more information, call 859-344-2746. Prism Consulting is located at 809 Wrights Summit Parkway.

Meet fellow artists

There will be a Tri-State Artists meeting from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Thursday, June 10 at the Barnes & Noble in Florence. Barnes & Noble is located at 7663 Mall Road.

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CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Alex Hermes, 13, leads her miniature horse “Taco” in a practice jump over a post in the family’s yard in Cold Spring. “He loves to jump,” she said. Hermes is involved in both the Saddle Up club’s horse drill team and in showing miniature horses.

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Gus Hermes, 12, an alternate on the 4H Saddle Up Club’s “Mustangs” drill team, sits in the saddle on “Arrow” before a ride around his family’s yard in Cold spring. Hermes, a parent volunteer for the club. The club also keeps her children, Elle, Erin, Alex and Gus, busy, Hermes said. “You don’t have to have a horse to be in our club, you just have to have an interest

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LIFE

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David F. Dougherty is off to a fast start as chair of the 2010 United Way of Greater Cincinnati annual fundraising campaign. Dougherty has already assembled his Campaign Cabinet and is in the midst of developing strategies and making calls on chief executives of companies to gather support. “United Way is grateful to have Dave Dougherty spearheading this year’s efforts,” said Robert C. Reifsnyder, United Way president. “Dave is committed to strategies that make Cincinnati stronger, and he is passionate about the work United Way is doing to help make that happen.” Dougherty is a strong proponent for several of the region’s growth initiatives, including Agenda 360, Vision 2015, HYPE (Harnessing Young Professional

BUSINESS

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Energy), and the region’s educational partnership, Strive, and sees United Way as an Dougherty essential leader and partner in these efforts. “United Way aligns with these initiatives in that it is working to make change in the areas of education, income and health in our region. I am honored to champion such a worthy mission through the 2010 campaign. Preparing children for kindergarten and helping families achieve financial stability is key to improving the quality of life for every single person in our community,” Dougherty said. Thanks to Dougherty’s leadership, this year’s campaign will include several

A MEMBER SERVICE

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Henley’s mother, Kim, was also involved in the 4-H horse club as a youth. Kim said her own mother wanted her to be involved in 4-H so she would learn something, and although there’s a lot of expense with purchasing trailers and saddles, it was worth it. Kim said she has always had a passion for horses, and her daughter has followed her lead in taking it up as an interest. “It’s just something that gets in your blood, you just get attached to them,” she said. The entire family often gets involved in 4-H, volunteering at horse camp, and towing trailers of horses to the shows, Kim said. “So, it’s something that kind of gets the whole family involved whether they want to or not,” Kim said.

KENTUCKY FARM BUREAU

strategies to grow contributions. One key strategy involves focusing on volunteer engagement. Dougherty has a dedicated cabinet member, Kevin Lobo of Ethicon Endo-Surgery, who is focused on increasing the number of companies participating in volunteer projects through United Way’s The Volunteer Connection. This year’s campaign will use digital channels to connect with more people and engage new donors. Dougherty, former president and CEO of Convergys Corp., started his career at The Procter & Gamble Co. in brand management, working with household names including Puffs Plus, Charmin Bathroom Tissue and Citrus Hill orange juice. He has held various positions at LensCrafters and MATRIXX Marketing, which eventually became

Convergys. He is an active volunteer, serving on the boards of directors at Cincinnati Country Day School, University of Cincinnati Medical Center Fund, Queen City Club, and Cincinnati Art Museum. He is a former member of the Business Roundtable and G100. The 2010 campaign officially kicks off Aug. 25. The 2009 campaign raised $62,025,000. The annual campaign includes Hamilton, Clermont and Brown counties and the Middletown area in Ohio; Boone, Campbell, Grant and Kenton counties in Northern Kentucky; and Dearborn and Ohio counties in Southeastern Indiana. To learn more about United Way’s work in education, income and health, visit www.uwgc.org.

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in horses,” Hermes said. Gus, 12, said he likes riding the best when it comes to horses. “It’s fast,” he said of riding. Erin, 16, said she enjoys being around horses even when she is doing the work of cleaning out their stalls, feeding them hay, grain and water, and grooming them. “It’s just fun,” Erin said. Jaime Henley, 13, of Cold Spring, shows in the Western Pleasure and English Pleasure divisions where she directs the horses she’s riding to walk, trot and canter. Henley said her favorite part about showing is having a good time with her horse and demonstrating how she’s improved her handling and control skills that people in the club help with in practice. “It’s kind of like a fellowship in 4-H because everybody is just there to help each other,” she said.

Dougherty chairs 2010 United Way campaign

Go to nky.com and click on Share! to get your event into The Recorder.

AUTO

For many Campbell County families, a passion for horses is a family tradition that is renewed each summer when family members as young as 7 take the reins for the first time in the 4-H Saddle Up Club. The club members learn to care for and train horses in addition to riding or showing horses in competitions. Each summer the club has a week-long camp for children ages 9-18 and hosts five local open horse shows a year. Divisions for the shows include miniatures, contest, Western and English. This year’s camp will be June 13-18 with Sunday shows June 27, July 18, Aug. 1 and Aug. 22. Helen Curless of Grant’s Lick has been involved in the club as one of the leaders since her own daughter was 12 about 28 years ago. “I like watching and working with the children and watching them enjoy their animals and learning how to be responsible,” Curless said. The other two leaders of the club are Gary Henderson, who has a son in the club, and Gene Barbian, who has a daughter in the club, Curless said. Curless said the strength of the club is its member families. That’s why when it’s camp time they allow children as young as 6 to be “Clover Buds.” The “Clover Buds” get to dress up in Western or other costumes and ride around on broomstick ponies. “Many of those little ones end up coming to camp when they get old enough,” Curless said. The club is a chance for the children to learn how to ride together, said Missy

B I G O N C O M M I T M E N T. ®

Bob Woeste

Agency Manager

Teresa Kool Agent

Andrew Schultz Agent

107 Washington St. Alexandria, KY 41001

859-635-2101


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June 3, 2010

THINGS TO DO THE NEIGHBORHOOD F R I D A Y, J U N E 4

ART & CRAFT CLASSES

The Great American Aran Afghan Knit Along, 6:30 p.m.-8:30 p.m. Knit On, 735 Monmouth St. Squares feature variety of stitches from basic cables to more challenging designs. For advanced beginner to advanced knitters. Family friendly. $210 for 21 sessions in advance; $12 per session, plus materials. Registration required. 291-5648. Newport.

ATTRACTIONS

Bizarre and Beautiful Gallery, 9 a.m.-7 p.m. Newport Aquarium, Newport on the Levee, More than 20 species of the world’s most weird and wonderful aquatic creatures. With new technology, new display cases and expanded gallery. Free kids during summer family hours with every adult paying full price 4-7 p.m. until Sept. 3. Included with admission: $22, $15 ages 2-12. 261-7444; http://www.newportaquarium.com. Newport. Free Kids Admission During Summer Family Hours, 4 p.m.-7 p.m. Newport Aquarium, Newport on the Levee, Free ages 12 and under with every adult paying full price. View the new Bizarre and Beautiful Gallery, new displays, interactive activities or meet the penguins. $22. 261-7444; www.newportaquarium.com. Newport.

MUSEUMS

History Unearthed: Archaeology Speaks, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Behringer-Crawford Museum, 1600 Montague Road, Exhibit explores world of archaeology through photography, dig-site information and hands-on activities including actual staged indoor dig for all ages. Included with admission: $7, $6 ages 60 and up, $4 ages 3-17, free for members and ages 2 and under. 491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

Death Defying Acts, 8 p.m. Monmouth Theatre, 636 Monmouth St. Three one-act plays, “An Interview,” “Hotline” and “Central Park West.” Mature themes and strong language. $12, $10 students. Presented by Wyoming Players. Through June 5. 513588-4910. Newport.

RECREATION

Children’s Flying Trapeze School, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Newport on the Levee, 1 Levee Way, Learn to fly circus-style. Must be in reasonable physical condition and able to hold your body weight while hanging from the bar. Dress: Wear stretchable comfortable clothing appropriate for hanging upside. Rain reschedules. Ages 6-12. Must be accompanied by adult. $7. Registration required. Presented by The Amazing Portable Circus. 513-921-5454; www.amazingportablecircus.com. Newport. S A T U R D A Y, J U N E 5

ART CENTERS & ART MUSEUMS

Impressions, noon-3 p.m. Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, Exhibit is free. 9571940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

AUDITIONS

Forever Plaid, 2 p.m.-4 p.m. Village Players, 8 N. Fort Thomas Ave. Four men. Prepare one song that best represents voice. Accompanist provided. Cold readings from script. Bring resume and scheduling conflicts. Production dates: Sept. 17-25. Through June 7. actone64@aol.com. Fort Thomas.

MUSEUMS

History Unearthed: Archaeology Speaks, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Behringer-Crawford Museum, Included with admission: $7, $6 ages 60 and up, $4 ages 3-17, free for members and ages 2 and under. 491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

MUSIC - CONCERTS

Flobots, 6 p.m. With K-OS, Trouble Andrew and Champagne Champagne. Mad Hatter, 620 Scott St. $15. 291-2233; www.madhatterclub.com. Covington.

MUSIC - COUNTRY

Cross-Tie, 10 p.m. Peecox II, 12200 Madison Pike, 356-1440. Independence. The Derek Alan Band, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Riverside Marina Bar and Grill, 145 Mary Ingles Highway (Ky. 8), Presented by Riverside Marina. 442-8111; www.tiversidemarinaky.com. Dayton, Ky.

MUSIC - JAZZ

New Sleepcat Band, 7:30 p.m. Dee Felice Cafe, 529 Main St. Directed by Bill Gemmer and features John Von Ohlen. 261-2365; www.deefelice.com. Covington.

MUSIC - POP

The Mistics, 6 p.m.-10 p.m. Newport on the Levee, 1 Levee Way, 291-0550; www.newportonthelevee.com. Newport.

MUSIC - ROCK

Saving Stimpy, 10 p.m. Peecox, 635 Donaldson Highway, 342-7000. Erlanger. Flaw, 7 p.m. Radiodown, 620 Scott Blvd. With Calloused, One Day Alive and 8Kount. $10. 513-291-2233; www.cincyticket.com. Covington.

ON STAGE - COMEDY

Shane Mauss, 8 p.m. $14. 10:15 p.m. $14. Funny Bone Comedy Club, Newport on the Levee, Ages 21 and up. 957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Spring Fling, 7:30 p.m. 10:30 p.m. Shadowbox Cabaret, Newport on the Levee, Fresh sketch comedy and vibrant rock ‘n’ roll celebrate life, love and laughter. $20-$30. Through June 12. 957-7625; www.shadowboxcabaret.com. Newport.

For more about Greater Cincinnati’s dining, music, events, movies and more, go to Metromix.com.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Spring Fling, 7:30 p.m. 10:30 p.m. Shadowbox Cabaret, $20-$30. 957-7625; www.shadowboxcabaret.com. Newport. Death Defying Acts, 8 p.m. Monmouth Theatre, $12, $10 students. 513-588-4910. Newport.

RECREATION

Flying Trapeze School, 2 p.m.-10 p.m. Newport on the Levee, $35-$55. Registration required. 513-921-5454; www.amazingportablecircus.com. Newport. 1200 Club Car Show, 10 a.m. Furniture Fair, 3710 Alexandria Pike, Judging at noon awards at 4 p.m. Includes K-9 demonstration, 12:30 p.m., door prizes, split-the-pot, silent auction and music by DJs Gary and Dave. Food available. Proceeds benefit the Shriners Burn Hospital and the Scottish Rite Rite Aid for children. $29, $15 for participants. Presented by Covington Kentucky Scottish Rite. 572-6800. Cold Spring.

M O N D A Y, J U N E 7

TOURS

Newport Gangster Walking Tour, 1 p.m. 5 p.m. Gangsters Dueling Piano Bar, 18 E. 5th St. Explore Newport’s connection to wellknown crime figures, including gangsters, gamblers and ladies of the night. See buildings that housed casinos, brothels and speakeasies. $15. 491-8000. Newport.

SPECIAL EVENTS Lagniappe

MUSIC - BENEFITS

Rivertown Breakdown: A Taste of American Roots Music, 8 p.m. Doors open 7:30 p.m. Southgate House, 24 E. Third St. Whole House. With Frontier Folk Nebraska, Katie Laur Band, Jake Speed and the Freddies, the Sidecars, Lagniappe, Rumpke Mountain Boys and others. Benefits PA Denny Riverboat Education Center. $15 ages 18-20; $12 ages 21 and up. Presented by WNKU. 431-2201; www.rivertownbreakdown.com. Newport.

MUSIC - JAZZ

New Sleepcat Band, 7 p.m. Dee Felice Cafe, 261-2365; www.deefelice.com. Covington.

MUSIC - ROCK

Saving Stimpy, 10 p.m. Peecox, 342-7000. Erlanger. 24-7, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Riverside Marina Bar and Grill, 145 Mary Ingles Highway (Ky. 8), Presented by Riverside Marina. 442-8111. Dayton, Ky. The Upset Victory, 8 p.m. With Rosemary Device, Watson Park, Static Vessels, Bottom Line and Starboard Mine. Mad Hatter, 620 Scott St. $7. 291-2233; www.madhatterclub.com. Covington.

ON STAGE - COMEDY

Shane Mauss, 7:30 p.m. $14. 10 p.m. $14. Funny Bone Comedy Club, 957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport. Comedy Show, 8 p.m.-10 p.m. Comedians Kim Sherwood, Ray Mills, Yvette Weems and headliner “the Scottish Hammer” Landon Faulkner. Dickmann’s Kentucky Sports Cafe, 479 Orphanage Road, Drink specials available. Free. 240-2621; www.dickmannscafe.com. Fort Wright.

FILE PHOTO

A young model watches the fashion show from the backstage curtain during a previous bridal show at the Northern Kentucky Convention Center. This year’s show, Your Bridal Show, will take place at the same venue Sunday, June 6, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Fashion shows are at 12:30 and 3:30 p.m. Cost is $8. Benefits the Susan G. Komen Foundation. For more information, visit www.yourbridalshow.com or call 513-231-3052.

Tyler Nelson Graduation Showcase, 8 p.m. Doors open 7 p.m. Madison Theater, 730 Madison Ave. Performances by students and music by DJ Clockwork. Hosted by Tyler Nelson. $10. 491-2444; www.madisontheateronline.com. Covington. S U N D A Y, J U N E 6

ATTRACTIONS

Bizarre and Beautiful Gallery, 9 a.m.-7 p.m. Newport Aquarium, Included with admission: $22, $15 ages 2-12. 261-7444; http://www.newportaquarium.com. Newport. Free Kids Admission During Summer Family Hours, 4 p.m.-7 p.m. Newport Aquarium, $22. 261-7444; www.newportaquarium.com. Newport.

AUDITIONS

Forever Plaid, 7 p.m.-9 p.m. Village Players, actone64@aol.com. Fort Thomas.

LITERARY - STORY TIMES

Preschool Story Time, 10 a.m. Newport Branch Library, 901 E. Sixth St. Stories, songs and crafts. Ages 4-5. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 572-5035. Newport. Toddler Story Time, 10 a.m. Cold Spring Branch Library, 3920 Alexandria Pike, Stories, songs and activities. Ages 2-3. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 781-6166. Cold Spring. Pajama Story Time, 7 p.m. Fort Thomas-Carrico Branch Library, 1000 Highland Ave. Stories, songs and activities. Ages 3 and up. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 572-5033. Fort Thomas. Tot Time, 11 a.m. Cold Spring Branch Library, 3920 Alexandria Pike, Short stories, games, dancing and baby signing. Ages 18 months2 1/2 years. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 781-6166. Cold Spring.

MUSEUMS

History Unearthed: Archaeology Speaks, 1 p.m.-5 p.m. Behringer-Crawford Museum, Included with admission: $7, $6 ages 60 and up, $4 ages 3-17, free for members and ages 2 and under. 491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

ON STAGE - COMEDY

Shane Mauss, 7:30 p.m. $12. Funny Bone Comedy Club, 957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

RECREATION

Texas Hold ‘Em Poker Night, 5 p.m. Shimmers, 1939 Dixie Highway, Includes Shimmers gift certificate prizes. Free. 426-0490. Fort Wright. Flying Trapeze School, 1 p.m.-8:30 p.m. Newport on the Levee, $35-$55. Registration required. 513-921-5454; www.amazingportablecircus.com. Newport. Children’s Flying Trapeze School, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Newport on the Levee, $7. Registration required. 513-921-5454; www.amazingportablecircus.com. Newport.

SPORTS-REGISTRATIONS & TRYOUTS

Kings Soccer Academy Tryouts, 4 p.m.-9 p.m. Town and Country Sports and Health Club, $10. Online registration required. 4425800; www.kingssa.com. Wilder. T U E S D A Y, J U N E 8

KARAOKE AND OPEN MIC

About calendar

To submit calendar items, go to “www.NKY.com” and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to “life@communitypress.com” along with event information. Items are printed on a space-available basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to “www.NKY.com” and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page. W E D N E S D A Y, J U N E 9

LITERARY - CRAFTS

Play Art, 4 p.m. Newport Branch Library, 901 E. Sixth St. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 572-5035. Newport.

LITERARY - STORY TIMES

Toddler Story Time, 11 a.m. Fort ThomasCarrico Branch Library, Free. Registration required. 572-5033. Fort Thomas. Toddler Story Time, 11 a.m. Cold Spring Branch Library, Free. Registration required. 781-6166. Cold Spring. Preschool Story Time, 1:30 p.m. Fort Thomas-Carrico Branch Library, Free. Registration required. 572-5033. Fort Thomas. Baby Time, 10 a.m. Cold Spring Branch Library, 3920 Alexandria Pike, Clap, sing and bounce with your child. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 781-6166. Cold Spring. Lap Time, 9:30 a.m. Fort Thomas-Carrico Branch Library, 1000 Highland Ave. Quiet rhymes, bounces, lullabies and books with your baby. Ages birth to walkers. Free. Registration required. 572-5033. Fort Thomas.

ON STAGE - THEATER

The Taffetas, 8 p.m. Stauss Theatre, 101 Fine Arts Center, Northern Kentucky University, A musical homage to the girl groups of the 1950s. Dinner served in the Corbett Theatre Lobby one and a half hours prior to performance. $55 two shows, $30; show only $15 available beginning April 15. Registration required. Presented by Commonwealth Theatre Company. Through June 27. 572-5464; www.nku.edu/~theatre. Highland Heights.

T H U R S D A Y, J U N E 1 0

CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS

Tri-State Artist’s Meeting, 7 p.m.-9 p.m. Barnes & Noble Florence, 7663 Mall Road, Non-profit organization for education and promotion of fine art in the community. Ages 18 and up. Free. Presented by Boone County Visual Arts Association. 9921857; www.bcvaa.org. Florence.

EDUCATION

Hollywood Showcase, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Daily through June 12. Five Seasons Country Club Crestview Hills, 345 Thomas More Parkway, Training in commercial, TV and film, showcase performances in acting and singing for leading Hollywood industry agent Wendy Green, talent manager Lori Knight and casting director Brandi Brice. Question-andanswer session with industry professionals. Includes certificate of participation. Ages 628. $540. Registration required. Presented by Knight Light Entertainment. 818-7601795; www.knightlightentertainment.com. Crestview Hills.

ON STAGE - THEATER

The Taffetas, 8 p.m. Stauss Theatre, $55 two shows, $30; show only $15 available beginning April 15. Registration required. 5725464; www.nku.edu/~theatre. Highland Heights.

Karaoke, 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Arnie’s on the Levee, 120 E. Third St. $3 Red Stag cocktails. 4314340. Newport. Karaoke Vocal Social, 9 p.m. Southgate House, 24 E. Third St. Juney’s Lounge. With DJ Swirl. Ages 21 and up. Free. 431-2201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport.

LITERARY - SIGNINGS

Susan Coventry, 5 p.m.-6 p.m. Blue Marble Children’s Bookstore, 1356 S. Fort Thomas Ave. Great Green Room. New young adult author discusses and signs “Queen’s Daughter.”. Ages 9-12. Free. 781-0602. Fort Thomas.

LITERARY - STORY TIMES

PROVIDED

The Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park ends its 50th anniversary season with the longest-running musical in history, “The Fantasticks,” through June 20. The musical tells the story of a young man and the girl next door, whose parents have built a wall to keep them apart. For tickets, call 513-421-3888 or visit www.cincyplay.com.

Toddler Story Time, 10 a.m. Fort ThomasCarrico Branch Library, 1000 Highland Ave. Stories, songs, finger plays and craft. Ages 2-3. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 5725033. Fort Thomas. Preschool Story Time, 1:30 p.m. Cold Spring Branch Library, 3920 Alexandria Pike, Ages 4-5. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 7816166. Cold Spring. Preschool Story Time, 11 a.m. Fort ThomasCarrico Branch Library, 1000 Highland Ave. Stories, songs, finger plays and craft. Ages 4-5. Free. Registration required. 572-5033. Fort Thomas. Pajama Story Time, 7 p.m. Newport Branch Library, 901 E. Sixth St. Ages 3 and up. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 572-5035. Newport.

PROVIDED

Summerfair, a fine arts and crafts fair, with four different entertainment stages featuring bands, dance and theater troupes and acoustic music, will be FridaySunday, June 4-6, at Coney Island. Hours are: 2-8 p.m. Friday; 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday; and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. Admission is $10; ages 12 and under admitted for free. Advance tickets available at www.summerfair.org.


Life

June 3, 2010

CCF Recorder

B3

How well do we handle the uncertainties of life?

guage. Don’t dig for learn to a person. Life contains many rich answers that can’t be given recognize We come to see we are imperfect humans and hold experiences as well as para- you yet: you cannot live the ten- dox and challenging mys- them now. For everything living in am imperfect world, yet struggling for must be lived. Live the s i o n s teries. wholeness as a person. In the midst of living our questions now, perhaps between opposites questions, which are often then, someday, you will such as enveloped in anxiety, ambi- gradually, without noticing, a n x i e t i e s painful contradictions. Even of life, but at a tender age we experi- love/hate, dark side/good guity and ambivalence, poet live into the answer.” Father Lou Guntzelman is a Father Lou we are ence both gratification and side, vindictiveness/forgive- Rainer Maria Rilke offers Catholic priest of the Guntzelman more able frustrations from the same ness, and choose to practical advice: “Bear with acknowledge but discipline patience all that is unreArchdiocese of Cincinnati. to tolerate parents. Perspectives them as solved in your heart, and Contact him at At first we attempt to the undesirable. We come to see we are try to love the questions columns@community part of life. manage our ambiguity and Our experiences and ambivalence with various imperfect humans living in themselves, as if they were press.com or P.O. Box 428541, Cincinnati, OH 45242. maturation render us more strategies, many of them am imperfect world, yet rooms yet to enter or books humble, understanding of unhealthy. We may blunt struggling for wholeness as written in a foreign lanthe human condition, and our feelings, repress, distract ourselves, dissociate, familiar with mysteries. Ambivalence is experi- deny, and later on develop encing contradictory feel- addictions or personality ings or attitudes toward the traits. Eventually we’re meant same person, object, event to learn healthier ways. We or situation. :,1'2:6 ‡ 6,',1* ‡ 522),1* Conflicting feelings are often strong toward parents since they are agents of both discipline and affecNow’s the time to replace your old, drafty windows with more energy-efficient windows tion. Spouses may also notice sporadic love/hate sentiments toward the other. The polarity of such feelings can be temporarily disturbing when they occur. Off on Preservation Windows Some find them so troublesome to admit that they often repress one of the poles of the tension. There are other kinds of ambivalence besides relaAsk for our Eco-Friendly tional ones – such as uncer4 Hour Cure Coating! With Whole House of Siding and Trim tainty or indecisiveness *Minimum 8 squares. about a certain course of action, ambivalence about a $1500 Energy job, religion, sibling, etc. Savings Tax Exclusive Children at first need Credit Preservation Dealer unequivocal messages as they begin to grow. Before FREE In-Home Consultation! maturity we are not in possession of capacities for dealing with the ambiguities 513-771-8827 Cannot be combined with Promotional Home Discount. Offer Expires 5/30/10. 6/11/10. Must present coupon at time of demonstration. and ambivalences of life. Prior sales excluded. Not to be used in conjunction with other offers. AMERICAN WEATHERTECHS must install. Discount off We encounter them as Uglytub.com retail prices. *Interest accrues at 24.99% APR if balance not paid in full by 6 or 12 month end. Available to qualified buyers.

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How grown up are we? At old-time county fairs young men sought to demonstrate their physical strength by swinging a huge mallet and striking a mat. It propelled a weight upward. If it hit and rang the bell, it was evidence they were macho. What are some ways to measure how developed we are inside? “The test of a psychologically mature person, and therefore spiritually mature, will be found in his or her capacity to handle what one might call the Triple As: anxiety, ambiguity and ambivalence,” writes Dr. James Hollis in “Creating A Life.” Anxiety, as we well know, is the agitation and stress we feel when we anticipate impending risk, danger, catastrophe or misfortune. The future threat may be real or imagined, internal or external, but always uncomfortable. Recall how we feel when called upon to speak to a crowd. Ambiguity is a confusing grayness. It flows from our ego’s desire for clarity and security. Yogi Berra creates ambiguity when he advises, “If you come to a fork in the road – take it!” We want life, God, and the world to be in a permanently knowable condition. The younger or less mature we are the more we become frustrated by the absence of clarity. The older and more mature we become doesn’t banish the ambiguities and

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B4

CCF Recorder

Life

June 3, 2010

Traditional tabbouleh for son’s birthday dinner It will be a Lebanese dinner this Sunday for my s o n , Shane, to celebrate Rita his birthHeikenfeld day. I have Rita’s kitchen to ask what he wants, but I’m pretty sure tabbouleh and fried kibbee will be requested. I’ll be making stuffed grape vine leaves, too, since the wild grape leaves are the perfect size right now. I wish I had some of Joe and Mary Lou Zarig’s homemade Lebanese flatbread to serve with it – Joe and Mary Lou are great Lebanese cooks and bakers. I’ll also make some baklava. I love preparing my family’s Lebanese recipes and I can never get enough. That’s why you’ll find

me at the St. Anthony of Padua’s Lebanese festival Sunday, June 6, from noon to 8 p.m. The church is on Victory Parkway. This festival is fun, with rides, Lebanese dancing and authentic Lebanese food. I love everything they prepare! Get details at 513961-0120.

My mom’s tabbouleh

Traditionally, this is served with wild grapevine leaves to act as a scoop, or leaf lettuce, or flatbread. This is a real “go to taste” recipe, wonderful as a main meal, stuffed into pita pockets for lunch, or as a versatile, healthy side dish. Tabbouleh is a healthy salad using bulgur wheat (great for lowering cholesterol and contains vitamin E) and an abundance of summer vegetables. It’s all the rage in local delis, and is expensive to buy.

1 cup bulgur wheat 4-6 tomatoes, chopped 1 bunch green onions, chopped 1 bunch parsley, chopped 1 bunch radishes, chopped (optional but good) 1-2 regular cucumbers, peeled and chopped, or 1 English cucumber, chopped 1 bell pepper, chopped 2-3 teaspoons cumin, or to taste Several sprigs mint leaves, chopped (opt.) Several sprigs basil leaves, chopped (opt.) Salt and pepper to taste 1 ⁄4 cup canola oil, or to taste Place wheat in bowl and rinse under cool water three times. Leave about 1⁄4 inch of water after the third rinse on top of the wheat to soften it. Let sit for 15 minutes or until water is absorbed. Squeeze to drain any remaining liquid out. Meanwhile, mix your vegetables:

Add all vegetables in large bowl, mixing gently. Add cumin, mint, basil and salt and pepper. Add wheat, and mix well. Add oil, a little at a time, and mix. Taste for seasonings. Add lemon juice if desired. Serves six to eight as a main meal, 10 as a first course.

Tips from Rita’s Kitchen

Bulgur wheat is sometimes called cracked wheat. It looks a little bit like cous cous and is creamy to tan in color. It comes in several grinds. I like the fine or medium grind. Some folks like to put a squeeze of lemon juice in the salad.

Jim Grassinger’s mom’s mock turtle soup

Jim and Gerri Grassinger live in Anderson; our kids went to high school with theirs.

We have many fond memories of Jim filming the kids during track races for McNicholas High. Jim shared his Mom’s mock turtle soup and it looks delicious. No wonder Jim said it’s a family favorite. I hope he invites me over for a bowl. 1 pound ground beef 1 pound ground veal 1 32-ounce bottle ketchup * 4 cups water 1 large onion, diced 1 rib celery, diced 1 lemon, sliced 1 teaspoon allspice 2 hard boiled eggs, chopped 2 tablespoon vinegar 1 ⁄4 cup browned flour Crumble uncooked beef and veal into water, add ketchup, water, onion and celery in large pot. Add lemon and allspice and cook for about 45 minutes. Add vinegar and chopped eggs. Cook about 15 minutes.

Rita on YouTube

See Rita’s 3 seconds of fame on the “Today Show.” One of her videos was shown in a montage of videos on YouTube of “ordinary people who made a success with YouTube.” Link is http://tinyurl. com/24gtoq3. Brown flour in a dry skillet, stirring frequently until medium brown, then add browned flour slowly. Cook a few minutes longer. If soup is too thick add a little more water. Remove lemon slices before serving. * Fill ketchup bottle with water, shake and add to pot also. Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator and author. E-mail columns@community press.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-2487130, ext. 356.

Rice to be Independence Day parade grand marshal The Campbell County YMCA and City of Fort Thomas have just named their 2010 Independence Day Parade Grand Marshal – legendary sports champion, coach and Athletic Director Homer Rice. His father, a Methodist minister, moved his family to Fort Thomas in 1942, where he became an allstate quarterback, all conference basketball guard

and a track sprint champion at Highlands High School. As a junior the following year, his football team claimed the state and conference championship. And by his senior year, he was captain of the team that again was named conference champion. Rice left Northern Kentucky to excel as an all-American quarterback at Centre College. Throughout his profes-

sional career he has been regarded as a respected leader, character builder and master motivator. As a high school coach he was named the 1961 ‘Winningest football coach in America. As a college coach, his development of the triple-option attack revolutionized offensive football. As director of athletics at North Carolina and Georgia Tech, he built programs that became mod-

How to enter: You can enter your baby into the contest through mail or online. To mail in an entry complete the form and include a clear, color or black/white photo of your baby along with a suggested $5 entry donation to Newspapers In Education. NO PHOTOS WILL BE RETURNED. To enter online visit our Web site at Cincinnati.Com/babyidol and complete the entry form. All photos must be received by 5:00pm Monday, July 12, 2010. PHOTOS WILL BE PUBLISHED IN THE ENQUIRER. How to win: Sunday, August 1, 2010 all entrants will appear in The Enquirer and the first of three voting rounds will begin. We ask that all votes be accompanied by a donation to the Newspapers In Education program, however a donation is not necessary to vote or to win the Baby Idol 2010 contest. This contest is just one of the many fun and innovative programs we use to raise money to promote literacy in our local schools.

els of achievement on and off the field. He also was athletics director at Rice University before being lured back to his home town as the head coach of the Cincinnati Bengals. In 1980, he was named athletic director at Georgia Tech, where he was soon acclaimed as "the man who saved Georgia Tech athletics." He was the first president of the NCAA Division 1A Directors of Athletics Association and was the recipient of the James Corbett Award, the highest award given in the field of athletics administration. He retired from Georgia Tech in 1997 and became an adjunct professor. During that time, Rice has moved to Fort Thomas

Homer Rice four times – first as a high school student, then as the Highlands High School foot-

ball coach, then as the head football coach for the University of Cincinnati, and finally as the head coach for the Cincinnati Bengals. Rice is also one of the founding members of the Fort Thomas Junior Football league that will celebrate 80 years of youth football this year. The Campbell County YMCA 2010 Independence Day Parade will begin at 10:30 a.m. Saturday, July 3. The parade committee includes: Mike Jansen, Linda Stapleton, Fred Otto, Scott Johnson, Jim Trauth, Shane Ruffin. For more information contact Elizabeth McDougal or Mike Jansen at the Campbell County YMCA 859781-1814.

STARTING THIS SUNDAY Your chance to win a $100 Kroger gift card each week!

Prizes: There will be one (1) First Place Winner, one (1) Runner-Up Winner and one (1) Randomly Selected Winner. First Place Winner will receive a $1,000.00 American Express gift card and a Gold Level Cincinnati Zoo family membership for the 2011 season. Runner-Up Winner and Randomly Selected Winner will each receive a $500 American Express gift card. Rules: All photographs must be of a baby or infant born on or after July 12, 2007. Baby’s name, Parent’s name and phone number should be written on the back of the photo. You must be the parent or legal guardian of the baby in the photograph in order to enter the contest. Professional photographs are allowed, with faxed copyright release from the photographer. We reserve the right to refuse a photograph submission that the staff defines as unacceptable or inappropriate.

Baby Idol 2010 Entry Form My Name__________________________________________________________________________ Address___________________________________________________________________________ City/State/Zip _____________________________________________________________________ Phone ( _______ ) ________________________ Baby’s Birth Day _____________________________ Baby’s Name: _________________________________ Baby’s First Initial of Last Name: ___________ Email: ____________________________________________________________________________

(We will email updated voting results for Baby Idol 2010 only.)

Yes! Enter my baby in the

contest and accept my donation of $5 to benefit Newspapers In Education. (Check box on the right.)

I am enclosing a check.

I am enclosing a money order.

I am paying with a credit card:

Visa

MasterCard

Discover

AmEx

# _________________________________ Exp. Date ____________

Look for the official entry form in Sunday’s Enquirer for your chance to win a $100 Kroger gift card or the grand prize of a $100 Kroger gift card per week for the rest of the year — a value of $2,300!

Signature ___________________________

Photo Release — I hereby grant The Enquirer Publishing and all its entities permission to use the images of my child ________________________, solely for the purposes of Enquirer Lend-A-Hand, Inc.’s Baby Idol promotional material and publications, and waive any rights of compensation or ownership there to. Parent Signature ________________________________________ Date __________

Mail to: The Enquirer 2010 Baby Idol, 312 Elm Street, Cincinnati, OH 45202. Photo deadline: 7/12/2010 NO PURCHASE OR DONATION REQUIRED TO ENTER. ALL FEDERAL, STATE, LOCAL AND MUNICIPAL LAWS AND REGULATIONS APPLY. VOID WHERE PROHIBITED. The Enquirer Lend-A-Hand Baby Idol 2010 Contest is open to Ohio, Indiana and Kentucky residents who are 18 years or older and a parent or legal guardian of a child at the time of entry. Employees of The Enquirer Lend-A-Hand, The Cincinnati Enquirer, Gannett Co., Inc., and each of their respective affiliated companies, and advertising and promotional agencies, and the immediate family members of, and any persons domiciled with, any such employees, are not eligible to enter or to win. Contest begins at 12:01 a.m. (EST) 5/23/10 and ends at 11:59 p.m. (EST) 9/8/10. Beginning at 12:01 a.m. (EST) 5/23/10 and ending at 11:59 p.m. (EST) 7/12/10, Enter by submitting a photo of your baby and a completed entry form. Entries must be submitted by a parent or legal guardian, 18 years or older. Children must have been born on or after 07/12/07 and Sponsor reserves the right to verify proof of age. Entries with incomplete or incorrect information will not be accepted. Only one (1) entry per child. Multiple births can be submitted as 1 entry with 1 photo. Enter online at Cincinnati.Com/babyidol. Enter by mail or in-person: complete an Official Entry Form available in The Cincinnati Enquirer, The Kentucky Enquirer, The Community Press and Recorder and at The Enquirer Customer Service Center, 312 Elm Street, Cincinnati, OH 45202. All entries must be received by 5:00 p.m. (EST) 7/12/10. Odds of winning depend on the number of eligible entries and votes received. Winners will be notified by telephone or email on or about 9/13/10. Participants agree to be bound by the complete Official Rules and Sponsor’s decisions. For a copy of the prize winners list (available after 9/18/10) and/or the complete Official Rules send a SASE to Baby Idol 2010 c/o The Enquirer, 312 Elm Street, Cincinnati, OH 45202 or contact Kristin Garrison at 513.768.8135 or at kgarrison@enquirer.com. CE-0000399660

June 6 – July 4

(Make checks payable to Newspapers In Education.)

Enter as many times as you want each week with The Enquirer’s official entry form. No copies or reproductions. No purchase necessary. For complete rules visit Cincinnati.Com/grocerygiveaway.

Pick up The Enquirer at your local retailer or subscribe today. To subscribe, visit Cincinnati.Com, search: subscribe or call 1.800.876.4500. CE-0000402330


Community RELIGION NOTES Amazing Grace Lutheran Church will have its Vacation Bible School for children, ages 4-13, June 29-July 1 from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. The VBS will be themed as a Wild West adventure. Crafts, snacks and activities will reflect the Western theme. The program is free. For more information, contact the church by calling 859283-9009. Amazing Grace Lutheran Church is located at 7804 Pleasant Valley Road in Florence.

Hopeful Lutheran

Hopeful Lutheran Church in Florence is offering four summer camps in June and July. Each camp is a week long. The camps will take place June 14-18, June 21-25, July 12-16 and July 19-23. The camps are for ages 38 and are from 9 a.m. to noon Monday through Friday. For more information, call 859-647-1105. Hopeful Lutheran Church is located at 6430 Hopeful Church Road.

First Baptist

First Baptist Church of Highland Heights will host its Real Men’s Conference June 4 from 7 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. and June 5 from 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. The conference will encourage men of all ages in their spiritual growth through teaching, fellowship and worship. Featured speakers and topics include “It’s Time To Step Up” by Mark Webb of FBC Highland Heights, “Winning With The Word” by Pete Coleman of I Won Today Ministries, “No More Dis-Con-

nected” by Ronny Raines of FBC Cold Spring, and “A Call To Purity” by Bill Clark of Hickory Grove Baptist Church. Worship leader is Chris Daniels and his band from Hickory Grove Baptist. For more information or to register for the event, call 859441-7274 or e-mail fbchh@fuse.net. The church is located at 2315 Alexandria Pike.

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Have an event at your church? Please send your information to akiefaber@nky.com.

Readers on vacation

Patty and Bill Weisenberger, Harold and Margy VogelCoomer, and Jeff and Taffy Wellman vacationing in Riviera Maya, Mexico.

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June 3, 2010

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Hundreds of People Cash In at the Florence Roadshow Yesterday

By Jason Delong

Treasure Hunters Roadshow STAFF WRITER

Gold and Silver pour into yesterdays Roadshow due to highest prices in 40 years.

is buying. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gold and silver markets are soaring.â&#x20AC;? says Archie Davis, a Roadshow representative. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Broken jewelry and gold or silver coins add up YHU\ TXLFNO\ , MXVW ÂżQLVKHG ZRUNLQJ with a gentleman that had an old class ring, two bracelets, and handful of

Yesterday at the Springhill Suites, hundreds lined up to cash antiques, collectibles, gold and jewelry in at the Roadshow. The free event is in Florence all week buying gold, silver antiques and collectibles. One visitor I spoke with yesterday said

â&#x20AC;&#x153;If you go to the Roadshow, you can cash-in your items for top dollar. Roadshow representatives will be available to assess and purchase your items at the 6SULQJKLOO 6XLWHV through Saturday in )ORUHQFH.â&#x20AC;?

â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is unbelievable, I brought in some old coins that had been in a little cigar box for years and some old herringbone necklaces and in less than fifteen minutes I left with a check for $712.37.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s unbelievable, I brought in some old coins that had been in a little cigar box for years and some old herringbone necklaces and in less WKDQ ÂżIWHHQ PLQXWHV , OHIW ZLWK D FKHFN for $712.37. That stuff has been in my jewelry box and dresser for at least 20 years.â&#x20AC;? Another gentlemen brought an old Fender guitar his father bought \HDUV DJR Âł'DG KDG OHVV WKDQ ÂżIW\ bucks in that guitar.â&#x20AC;? The Roadshow expert that assisted him, made a few phone calls and a Veterinarian in Seattle, Washington bought the guitar for $5700.00. The seller continued, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I got another $150.00 for a broken necklace and an old class ring, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not everyday someone brings six

$ERYH Â&#x2021; $ FRXSOH ZDLWV ZLWK DQWLFLSDWLRQ ZKLOH 5RDGVKRZ H[SHUW H[DPLQHV WKHLU DQWLTXHV DQG JROG LWHPV 7KH 5RDGVKRZ LV DW WKH Springhill Suites WKLV ZHHN thousand dollars to town with your name on it.â&#x20AC;? Jeff Parsons, President of the Treasure Hunters Roadshow commented, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lots of people have items that they know are valuable but just donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know where to sell them. Old toys, trains, swords, guitars,

Collectors desire vintage military items, Items from both U.S. and foreign origins from the Civil War, World War I, World War II, Spanish-American War, Revolutionary War and Calvary times have great value. Items such as swords, daggers, medals, hardware bayonets, etc.

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www.treasurehuntersroadshow.com The Roadshow is featured this week:

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Roadshow Coin and gold expert Paul Dichraff examines a large presentation of coins, gold and collectibles.

silver dollars,â&#x20AC;Ś his check was for over $650.00. I would say that there were well over 100 people in here yesterday that sold their scrap gold.â&#x20AC;? One gentleman holding his check for over $1250.00 in the lobby of the event yesterday had this comment, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am so happy I decided to come to the Roadshow. I saw the newspaper ad for the event and brought in an old German sword I brought back from World War II and some old coins and here is my check. What a great thing for our community. I am heading home now to see what else I have they might be interested in.â&#x20AC;? The Roadshow continues today starting at 9am. The event is free and no appointment is needed.

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Cash in with the power of the International Collectors Association Treasure Hunters Roadshow represents over 5000 members worldwide who are paying TOP DOLLAR the following types of items. Any and all coins made before 1964. This includes all silver and gold coins, dollars, half dollars, quarters, dimes, nickels and pennies. All conditions wanted! PRICES AT 40 YEAR HIGH! for platinum, gold and silver during this event. Broken jewelry, dental gold, old coins, pocket watches, Kruggerands, Gold bars Canadian Maple Leafs, etc. Gold, Silver, Platinum, diamonds, rubies, sapphires and all types of stones, metals, etc. Rings, bracelets, necklaces, all others including broken jewelry. Early costume jewelry wanted.

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The entire process only takes a few minutes The Treasure Hunterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Roadshow event continues through Saturday in Florence.

All types of toys made before 1965 including: Hot Wheels, Tonka, Buddy L, Smith Miller, Nylint, Robots, battery toys, Mickey Mouse, train sets, all gauges, accessories, individual cars, Marklin, American Flyer, Lionel, Hafner, all other trains, Barbie Dolls, GI Joe, Shirley Temple, Characters, German, all makers accepted. Civil War, Revolutionary War, WWI, WWII, etc. Items of interest include swords, badges, clothes, photos, medals, knives, gear, letters, The older the swords, the better. All types wanted. Metal and Porcelain signs, gas companies, beer and liquor makers, automobile, implements, etc.

Silver and Gold Coin Prices Up During Poor Economy.

Collectors and Enthusiasts in Florence with $200,000 to Purchase Yours!

Got Coin? It might be just the time to cash in. This week starting Tuesday and continuing through Saturday, the International Collectors Association in conjunction with Treasure Hunters Roadshow will be purchasing all types of silver and gold coins direct from the public. All are welcome and the event is free.

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CCF Recorder

June 3, 2010

B7

A case of Sea Monkey mania

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underneath it with my name on it? “We‘d take it under consideration,” she replied, diplomatically, barely stifling her laughter. It was obvious that to her, my little pals would never be more than some fishy’s din-din. That was several years ago and last time I checked, they still weren’t on display. Hey, I can take a hint. That just means more SeaMonkeys for me and they’re

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Marsie and her cocker spaniel, Nipper, pay a proper farewell to their Sea Monkeys.

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Jill Isaacs, former Public Relations Manager for the Newport Aquarium was the one who broke the bad news when I called to ask if they had any Sea-Monkeys on display. “No,” she replied, “Not at this time. We did once, though. It was not as a long-term exhibit but part of our Jelly Fish Gallery as an example of what our jelly fish eat.” “They‘re actually brine shrimp,” she explained. “We use them to feed our jellyfish and sea horses.“ Well, obviously, I thought, fingers tightening around the telephone receiver, Sea-Monkeys, Artemia or whatever they are called are suffering from bad publicity. Maybe it was up to me to help raise awareness. It was time for someone to give them a little push. Be their “wingman,” so to speak. Feeling philanthropic, I asked if I could donate a Sea-Monkey kit to the Newport Aquarium. Maybe as a thank you gesture, they could put a little plaque

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PATRICK MONOHAN

the wonderful world of amazing live Sea-Monkeys!” they crowed. “Just add Sea-Monkey eggs to prepared water, look in the bowl and see LIVE BABY SEA-MONKEYS (Artemia) swimming around! Now simply grow and enjoy the most adorable, entertaining pets you’ve ever owned!” What kid could resist? Certainly not me. I’ve always been easily manipulated by the media. So I clearly remember cutting that little coupon out from the back of my Superman comic book and mailing it and $1.25 of my allowance money to an address on Fifth Avenue in New York City. That was when I was nine years old. Who knew that 40 years later I’d still be reconstituting those darned “instant life” eggs and waiting with bated breath for them to hatch? There had to be something pretty special about them. Right? No. It turns out that the darned things aren’t much more than bait.

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s e c t i o n where the last set came from. T o m knows that I would prefer receiving SeaMonkeys over roses any day of the week. They are much more romantic. That’s one of the advantages of being married to a “nerdy professor type.“ They love to experiment! It’s something we can do as a couple. And mixing powder with water to create pin-prick sized pseudo-primates certainly qualifies in my book. (Even though he has to lay out all of the ingredients and tools first, then read the directions twice before we can proceed, it is kind of cute to watch him in action.) How did I end up at this point? Where did this Sea Monkey mania begin? Well, pull up a chair, dear reader because I’m going to tell you. When I was a child, there were colorful ads in the back of comic books advertising Sea Monkeys. “Enter

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Marsie Hall Newbold Marsie’s Menagerie

“National Sea-Monkey Day” was a couple of weeks ago. May 15th to be exact. That sounded like a good excuse for a party because I adore Sea-Monkeys. So, I went out to the kitchen to check on mine. Problem is, they were gone. Well, not exactly gone. They were probably still technically there, lying beneath the silt, but their teeny-tiny little souls had gone to that big “Ocean Zoo” up in the sky. I held the plastic tank up to the light, peering through the built-in magnifying portholes, searching for signs of life. Finding none, I carried them to the bathroom for a fitting “burial at sea.” Our cocker spaniel, Nipper, supervised, tail wagging the entire time. Being the jealous sort, he’d never much cared for them anyway. My husband Tom, who knows me better than anyone, knew I wouldn’t be satisfied until I had another batch; so that very afternoon he took me to JosephBeth Booksellers’ children’s

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B8

CCF Recorder

June 3, 2010

Community

United Way honors Kentucky volunteers United Way of Greater Cincinnati - Northern Kentucky has recognized a

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LUTHERAN St. Luke Lutheran Church ELCA 4800 Alexandria Pk, Cold Spring, KY 859-441-2848 M Worship Sun 8:30 &10:30am Sunday School 9:30am All Are Welcome www.stlukecoldspring.org

NON-DENOMINATIONAL Light, Life, & Peace Ministry

20 Bustetter Drive, Florence, KY 859-575-2479 / 513-482-1731 Home-based Bible Study Small Group

Meet 3rd Sat of every month at 7:00pm www.lightlifepeace.org

LOVE & FAITH FELLOWSHIP CHURCH

720 York St., Newport KY 41071 859-581-4244 Pastor: Gordon Milburn Sunday School: 9:30 am Sunday Morning Worship: 10:30 am Sun. & Wed. Eve Service: 6:00 pm

number of local volunteers and organizations for their work to improve people's lives throughout 2009. Judy Gibbons, community volunteer, was given the Gary R. Bricking Community Leadership Award in recognition of outstanding citizenship and dedication to numerous human service and civic groups, including United Way of Greater Cincinnati - Northern Kentucky, Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce, Vision 2015 and Northern Kentucky University. The Corporate Circle of Excellence Award was presented to Northern Kentucky University for their commitment to United Way, including creating the Institute for Nonprofit Capacity Building, which helps Greater Cincinnati's nonprofits by offering them best-practice capacity building services, and the Scripps Howard Center, which strives to engage students and faculty in organized community service. United Way presented its first ever Outstanding Education Partner Award, recognizing Superintendent Tim Hanner and Kenton County Schools for their efforts with the Born Learning Academy and commitment to kindergarten readiness. The awards were presented May 21 at the annu-

PROVIDED

Northern Kentucky University was awarded United Way’s Corporate Circle Award for their commitment to the organization and community. From left to right: Don Gorbandt, Shanna Osborne, NKU president Dr. James Votruba, Kimberly Luse and Joseph Wind. al awards luncheon. Tom Moore, director of Von Lehman & Company and retiring chair of the Northern Kentucky Action Council, shared results from 2009, including: • Raising over $3.6 million for the 2009 Campaign in Northern Kentucky under the leadership of chair Mark Reitzes, President of Huntington Bank. • The enrollment of more than 3,200 Northern Ken-

In Loving Memory

Gibson said nearly 50 Northern Kentucky child care centers have made improvements in the quality of care they provide, and 10 of those centers have achieved a STAR rating for the first time in the state's quality rating system. Moore also recognized retiring Northern Kentucky Action Council members, as well as new action council members. The retirees are: Jeff Koening, Automotive

Service Parts; Pam Mullins, Cincinnati Public Schools; Renee Gibbs, Cummins Filtration. New members of the Northern Kentucky Action Council are: Adam Rohrer, Cabinet for Families and Children Karen Zengel, Nielsen; Kristie Courtney, The Bank of Kentucky; Coco Taliaferro, General Cable; David Bailey, St. Elizabeth Healthcare.

Free Program for moon and sun watchers The Northern Kentucky University Haile Digital Planetarium is partnering with the Cold Spring branch of the Campbell County Public Library to present a program titled Moon & Sun Watchers: Big Telescopes & Free Tickets. Join NKU’s astronomy faculty and planetarium staff at the library from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, June 12, for

CE-0000403962

tucky children in the state health insurance program, K-CHIP. Incoming chair Crystal Gibson, vice president of communications and public affairs, Citi, shared information about Northern Kentucky's early childhood efforts, recognizing 92 percent proficiency in language development for children 3 to 5 years of age participating in home visitation in Newport and Boone County.

Dylan Edwards

activities and presentations; then at NKU’s planetarium for free viewings of “Earth, Moon, Sun” beginning at 1 p.m., 2 p.m. and 3 p.m. The program offers an opportunity to learn about telescopes, the sun, the summer solstice, the universe and more. Telescopes will be set up outside the front entrance of the library. Participants will be able to safely observe the sun, see sunspots and flares, and find out how different parts of the sun’s structure are visible at different colors or wavelengths of light. They will learn how telescopes work and how to select the right one to purchase for personal use. At times the sun puts on shows that change over a period of hours, so guests might consider spending enough time to see something unexpected.

If it is cloudy, there will still be plenty of things to see and to do. For bad weather, the program will move into the library’s meeting room and telescopes will be set up inside. The planetarium shows will run regardless of weather conditions. The event is free and will be enjoyable for the entire family. Those participating in the activities at the library will receive tickets for “Earth, Moon, Sun.” To see only the planetarium show at NKU, contact NKU Community Connections at 859572-5600 or connect@nku.edu to reserve seats. “Earth, Moon, Sun” is a production of NKU and was voted best full-dome presentation at the 2009 conference of the Digistar planetariums. The show is a look at the earth, moon and sun

system and how it has influenced life on Earth. Viewers will watch as the moon forms, visit places that could be the origin of life, learn about the phases of the moon and seasons, and see eclipses. NKU’s Haile Digital Planetarium opened in 2007 and is the home of the world’s first laser projection planetarium for classroom use. It is used by the Department of Physics and Geology for astronomy classes and is dedicated to outreach programs for local schools and community organizations. The planetarium, in conjunction with Community Connections, has hosted thousands of P-12 students and adults. For more information about the planetarium, visit http://planetarium.nku.edu.

JOIN THE MOMVERSATION. Keith A

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Five years ago you left us, Yet it seems like just yesterday. Each day we yearn to hug you, Without you it’ll never be the same.

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You were a better man than you thought, You could’ve reached out to us for help. It’s so empty now without you, Sadly! …your pain we never felt. But Knowing you’re in God’s arms Brings comfort to our souls. He’s using your talents and loving heart to accomplish important heavenly goals. Write a tribute to Keith @ wwwkeith-a-lohbeck.memory-of.com

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‘Ducks’ swim back into business the Duck drives right into the river for the giant “splashdown.” It’s a one-of-a-kind tour and designed to be fun for the whole family. Tickets for adults are $15 and $11 for children. Tour times vary by day. Call or v i s i t www.newportducks.com for up-to-date information. Discounts are available for groups of ten or more. Winter conditions prevent

the Ducks from operating year-round. However, the attraction will stay open as long as weather conditions are favorable and safe. Tickets can be obtained by calling 859-815-1439 or by visiting the Ride the Ducks welcome center located on the Newport on the Levee plaza outside the main entrance to Newport Aquarium. Information is available online at www.newportducks.com.

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At the Kentucky State Council Knights of Columbus Convention held in Louisville May 15, John “Larry” Sendelbach of Cold Spring received the highest award in the state of Kentucky for his many years of untiring efforts promoting the Pro-Life movement. Sendelbach, a member of St. Joseph Church in Cold Spring and Fr. Louis DeJaco Knights of Columbus Council No. 5220 in Alexandria was presented this prestigious award by the State Council’s Pro-Life Chairs Michael and Jane Peak. Shown are: Michael T. Peak, PSD, FSW; Rev. Joseph E. Kurtz, Archbishop of Louisville; Kay Sendelbach, Larry’s wife; Larry Sendelbach, the award recipient and Jane Peak.

The Ducks from Newport are back in the water. Ride the Ducks Newport utilizes customized amphibious vehicles crafted from models used during World War II to travel on the Ohio River and city streets in and around Downtown Cincinnati and Newport telling the history of the region. Sites on the tour include Great American Ballpark, Paul Brown Stadium, the World Peace

CCF Recorder

June 3, 2010


B10

ON

RECORD

CCF Recorder

THE

June 3, 2010

| DEATHS | Editor Michelle Shaw | smhaw@nky.com | 578-1053

POLICE

|

REAL

ESTATE

Arrest

John E. Hofstetter, 34, 9879 Man O War Circle, fourth degree assault at 25 Trapp Court, May 14. Benita Renay R. Hofstetter, 40, 9879 Man O War Circle, fourth degree assault at 25 Trapp Court, May 14. Troy R. True, 42, 8686 Stonehouse Road, warrant at Ky. 1997, May 14. Trey Evans, 18, 137 Edgewood Road, possession of a controlled substance - first offense at Ky. 9 at Rockyview, May 15. Mohamed S. Al Mubalegh, 29, 975

Elmwood St., menacing, second degree disorderly conduct, alcohol intoxication in a public place - first and second offense at 1 Levee Way, May 15. Ronny D. Morgan, 39, 127 6th St., warrant at 127 6th Ave., May 15. Jeffrey A. Smith, 33, 1032 Bristro, speeding, DUI - aggravated circumstances - first offense, reckless driving, first degree possession of controlled substance cocaine, first degree wanton endangerment at Ky. 9 at Ky. 915, May 16. Travis Hawkey, 24, 9319 Remington Road, second degree disorderly conduct at 1 Levee Way, May 15.

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Jeremy D. Fair, 24, 132 Blossom, DUI - first offense at 525 Alexandria Pike, May 17. Troy Florence, 38, 3242 Ky. 159 N, warrant at U.S. 27 and Lickert Road, May 16. Mary M. Thornberry, 30, 2519 High St., speeding, operating on suspended or revoked operator's license, giving officer false name or address at Ky. 9 at Rockyview, May 19. Danny E. McNew, 38, 9677 Barrs Branch, second degree possession of a controlled substance drug unspecified, third degree possession of controlled substance - drug unspecified at 7930 Alexandria Pike, May 20. Jonathan R. Thomas, 21, 106 Creekstone, warrant at U.S. 27 and Constable Drive, May 20. Kristen J. Martin, 31, 12 Eastern Ave., warrant at I-471, May 23. Alan M. Mains, 20, 9828 Riva Ridge Court, warrant at Riva Ridge Court, May 24. Dylan L. Hicks, 18, 2602 Todd Court, disregarding stop sign, no operators - moped license at Man O War at Alysheba, May 25. Richard D. McDaniel, 47, 3008 Trailridge Way, warrant at Ky. 9 at Pooles Creek, May 24. Doninique D. Smith, 20, 859 Patterson St., warrant at 850 Patterson St., May 25.

N K Y. c o m

Incidents/reports Civil property dispute

Reported at suburban auto sales garage at Bihl Road, May 14.

Fight

Reported at 1041 Davjo Drive, May 19.

Second degree burglary - no forced entry

Report of security lock boxes taken at 9594 Indian Trace Road, May 24.

Suspicious activity

Report of air let out of all four tires of vehicle at 1075 Wellington Drive, apartment 9, May 26.

Theft by unlawful taking

Report of garbage can taken from end of driveway at 10548 Mary Ingles Hwy., May 17. Report of utility trailer taken from driveway at 7043 Stonehouse Road, May 19. Report of gas drive-off without paying at 3501 Short Cut Road, May 20. Report of grill taken off porch at 9938 Man O War Circle, May 21. Report of landscape equipment taken at 12881 Wesley Chapel Road, May 25.

Theft by unlawful taking - farm equipment

Report of quad runner taken from yard at 2604 Ten Mile Road, May 18.

Theft of mail matter

Reported at 1123 Parkside, May 24.

Third degree burglary

Report of ATV taken from barn at 5991 Murnan Road, May 23.

Third degree criminal mischief

Report of car egged overnight at 11313 Pleasant Ridge Road, May 16. Report of brake line cut under hood of vehicle at Eastern Campbell Fire Department, May 17. Report of unknown person broke back door window of residence at 9577 Echo Hills Road, May 21.

Third degree criminal trespass

David Kumpf, 28, 6408 Timberhill Court, DUI at South I-471, May 16. Darrell Noel, 49, 1407 South Fort Thomas Ave., fourth degree assault, possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia at 1407 South Fort Thomas Ave., May 16. Matthew Gallicchio, 22, 939 Patterson, DUI at I-275 west, May 17. Carl Dearing, 22, 8021 Orangeburg Road, fourth degree assault, warrant at 75 Carmel Manor Drive, May 17. Gregory Ross, 47, 5569 Alexandria Pike, DUI at 1505 Alexandria Pike, May 17. Linda Downey, 37, 85 Gettysburg Square Road No. 265, warrant at Chesapeake Street, May 17. Leslie Simpson, 23, 53 College St., first degree possession of a controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia at 640 Alexandria Pike , May 18. Michael Akison, 40, 3610 Tytus Ave., warrant, DUI, open alcohol container in a motor vehicle, failure to produce insurance card at Dave Cowens Drive, May 18. Randy Whitley, 32, 2024 Alexandria Pike Apt. 1, second degree possession of a controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia at Alexandria Pike at Blossom, May 19. Leslie King Jr., 46, 323 East Seventh St., warrant at 6 North Crescent Ave., May 19. David Abney, 28, 303 Divison St., warrant at 100 block of Chesapeake, May 19.

Incidents/reports Fourth degree assault

Reported at 130 North Fort Thomas Ave., May 19.

Arrest

Stanley Ruff, 44, 3817 Zinsle St., receiving stolen property at Dixie Place at Hartweg, May 14.

Reported at 3810 Regal Ridge Apt. 1, May 17. Reported at 2820 Alexandria Pike, May 15. Reported at 3861 Canyon Court Apt. 3B, May 14. Reported at 2369 Alexandria Pike, May 11.

Theft by unlawful taking from auto, third degree criminal mischief

Reported at 54 Woodland Hills Drive Apt. 7, May 13.

Third degree criminal mischief

Reported at 107 Bon Jan Lane, May 8.

Newport

Arrest

Gary Yeager, 24, 130 East 13th St., DVO violation at 402 Overton, May 18. Sharon Lucas, 39, 18 West 10th St., second degree possession of drug paraphernalia at 18 West 10th St., May 18. Paul Powell, 44, 333 Thornton, fourth degree assault at 1033 Brighton, May 18. Isaac Chandler, 45, 1037 Hamlet St., fourth degree assault at 1037 Hamlet, May 17.

Incidents/reports First degree rape

Reported at 1000 block of Ann St., May 14.

Fourth degree assault

Reported at 1012 Ann St., May 16.

Second degree burglary

Reported at 7 Court St., May 19. Reported at 18 East Fifth St., May 18. Reported at 100 Riverboat Row, May 18. Reported at 947 Washington Ave., May 18. Reported at 648 Monmouth St., May 17. Reported at 1771 B Monmouth St., May 17. Reported at 600 block of Dayton St., May 16.

Highland Heights/Southgate

Fort Thomas

Incidents/reports Theft by unlawful taking

Theft by unlawful taking

Reported at 303 Keeneland Drive, May 17.

Report of threats made over phone to kill person at 1919 Poplar Ridge Road, May 21.

Reported at Smith-Hiteman Road, May 19.

possession of drug paraphernalia, trafficking marijuana at Alexandria Pike and Bramble, May 12.

Reported at 907 Washington Ave., May 16.

Reported at 21 Hartweg Ave., May 14.

Verbal domestic

RECORDER

Fraudulent use of a credit card

Report of unwanted person at residence at 5316 Mary Ingles Hwy., May 16. Found intoxicated persons on boat ramp after report of vehicles on boat ramp after dark at A.J. Jolly Park, May 18.

Third degree terroristic threatening

unit

The Community Recorder publishes the names of all adults charged with offenses. The information is a matter of public record and does not imply guilt or innocence.

Reported at Davjo Drive, May 23.

Report of intoxicated woman received ride in vehicle from bar, but did not want to stay with them and was transported to Wilder where her husband picked her up at 11212 Lees Road, May 17.

ws@

About police reports

Fourth degree assault - child abuse Intoxicated subject

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County E-mail: k

POLICE REPORTS

Campbell County

CE-0000394563

BIRTHS

Reported at 716 South Fort Thomas Ave., May 14.

Theft by unlawful taking, receiving stolen property

Arrest

Robert Zion, 33, 22 Joyce Ave., DUI at 2507 Alexandria Pike, May 17. Samantha Skabdahl, 20, 887 Riverwatch Drive, DUI, resisting arrest at I-471, May 15. Charles William Stratton, 28, 845 Monroe St. Apt. 1, theft by unlawful taking at I-471 north, May 14. Justin Cooper, 22, 7 Renshaw Road No. 4, possession of marijuana,

Theft by unlawful taking

Theft by unlawful taking, third degree criminal mischief Reported at Purple People Bridge, May 15.

Theft of property lost or mislaid

Reported at 1001 Monmouth St., May 14.

Wanton endangerment

Reported at 1032 Patterson, May 18.

DEATHS David Boehnke

Dr. David Neal Boehnke, 70, formerly of Dayton, died May 9, 2010 in Jacksonville, Fla. He was born in Dayton and was a chemistry professor for 39 years at Jacksonville University. Neal graduated from Georgetown College and received his master’s degree from the University of Kentucky. He also

attended MIT and then received his Ph.D. from the University of Cincinnati. Survivors include his wife, Cheryl; sons, David and Mark; daughter, Sarah; grandchild, Kieran Boehnke; brothers, Elmore and Virgil Boehnke; sister Iris Lewis.

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$2950 IN REBATES AND CREDITS.

• Receive up to $1200 in Manufacturers Rebates! • Receive up to a $1500 Federal Tax Credit! • Receive up to $250 Kentucky Tax Credit!

Ruby M. Brown

Ruby M. Brown, 83, Taylor Mill, died May 25, 2010, at her home. She was a homemaker and member of the Pentecostal Church of God in Newport. Her son, Christopher Moore, died in 2003. Survivors include her daughters, Carolyn Osbourn of Erlanger, Connie Schnitzler of Alexandria, Pauline Bullock of Taylor Mill and Sheila Jones of Cold Spring; sons, Harold Moore of Taylor Mill, Paul Moore of Irvine and Jeff Moore of Falmouth; numerous grandchildren and greatgrandchildren. Burial was in Alexandria Cemetery.

Delmer Combs

Delmer Combs, 86, Alexandria, died May 22, 2010, at Hospice of the Bluegrass Care Center, Fort Thomas. He worked for General Electric Corp. was a World War II veteran and member of Veterans of Foreign Wars. Survivors include his wife, Zedra Combs; daughters, Barbara Nelson of Williamstown, Judy Rose of Cincinnati and Pamela Gentry of Goshen, Ohio; sons, Raymond Stafford of Grants Lick, David, Gary and Stephen Combs of Alexandria; and sisters, Geneva Herald of Texas and Pearl Dikes of Newport; 11 grandchildren; and 21 great-grandchildren. Burial was in Evergreen Cemetery, Southgate.

Mark Guidugli SERVING GREATER CINCINNATI FOR OVER 40 YEARS.

261-8269 CE-0000403577

www.tomrechtin.com

CE-0000404263

KY Master HVAC M00135

Mark E. Guidugli, 47, Bellevue, died May 23, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. He was an electrician for Eagle Realty/Western Southern Life Insurance Co.

Deaths continued B11


On the record

CCF Recorder

June 3, 2010

B11

MARRIAGE LICENSES Amanda Dunn, 24, and Adam Rauch, 26, both of Fort Thomas, issued May 3. Colleen Forte, 43, of Fort Thomas and John Vires, 40, of Mariemont, issued May 14. Tonya Geiman, 33, and Gary Gerding, 40, both of Fort Thomas, issued May 15. Sarah Henry, 28, of Newport and

Michael Whitman, of Canada, issued May 17. Han Porn, 28, of Cambodia and Lawrence Diesel, 61, of Dayton, issued May 17. Angela Castle, 26, of Prestonburg and Nathan Gregory, 23, of Fort Thomas, issued May 17. Megan Beck, 22, of Canada and Justin Bonar-Birdges, 22, of

Crestview Hills, issued May 17. Jerry York, 32, of Fort Thomas and Glenn Morgan, 34, of Covington, issued May 17. Rachel Scudder, 36, of Fort Thomas and Robert Wilhoit, 34, of Cincinnati, issued May 19. Mindi Herald, 23, and Jeremy Doolin, 26, both of Highland Heights, issued May 19.

DEATHS From B10 Survivors include his wife, Renee Guidugli; daughters, Jessica and Melissa Guidugli, both of Bellevue; stepson, Adam Isaacs of Bellevue; stepdaughter, Teresa Isaacs of Dayton; parents, Joe and Loretta Guidugli of Bellevue; brothers, Steve and Jeff Guidugli, both of Bellevue and Jim Guidugli of Covington; sisters, Joanne Graham of Burlington, Mary Kay Kinney of Harrison, Ohio and Barb Moore of Alexandria; and four grandsons. Burial was in St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas. Memorials: Wood Hudson Cancer Research Lab, 931 Isabella St., Newport, KY 41071; or St. Jude’s Children’s Research Hospital, 501 St. Jude Place, Memphis, TN 38105-1942.

Ruth Marie Hauger

Ruth Marie Hauger, 85, of Venice, Fla., formerly of Dayton, died May 9, 2010, in Tampa, Fla. She worked for Shillito’s Department Store in Cincinnati. Her husband, Herbert Hauger, died previously. Survivors include her daughters, Janet Francis of Venice, Fla., Joyce Durbin of Tampa, Fla. and Sharyn Hoffman of Wilder; sister, Julia Immegart of Venice, Fla.; brother, Donald Gammon of Cold Spring and two grandchildren. Entombment is in Gulf Pines Memorial Park, Englewood, Fla. Kays-Ponger & Uselton Funeral Home Venice Chapel handled arrangements.

Gladys Naomi Moore

Gladys Naomi Moore, 88, Alexandria, died May 26, 2010, at her home. She was a homemaker and member of the Cold Spring Church of God. Her husband, Everette Moore, died in 1995.

About obituaries

Basic obituary information and a color photograph of your loved one is published without charge by The Community Press. Please call us at 283-0404 for more information. To publish a larger memorial tribute, call 513-242-4000 for pricing details. For the most up-to-date Northern Kentucky obituaries, click on the “Obituaries” link at NKY.com. Survivors include her sons, Donald Moore of Taylor Mill, Everett D. Moore of Cold Spring and Douglas Moore of Alexandria; daughters, Loraine Jones of Nevel, Ohio, Evelyn Bickel of Fredricksburg, Va., and Violet Caudill of Alexandria; 14 grandchildren; 21 great-grandchildren; and five great-great-grandchildren. Burial was in St. John Lutheran Cemetery, Melbourne. Memorials: Hospice of the Bluegrass-Northern Kentucky, 7388 Turfway Road, Florence, KY 41042 or Church of God, 1 Orchard Terrace, Cold Spring, KY 41076.

Lillian Ruth Schneider

Lillian Ruth Feiler Schneider, 88, Bellevue, died May 25, 2010, at Baptist Convalescent Center Newport. She was co-owner, with her husband, of Schneider’s Sweet Shop for 47 years and a member of Divine Mercy Parish, both in Bellevue. Her husband, Robert A. Schneider Sr., died in 1999. Survivors include her daughters, Carol Alford of Cincinnati, Mary Day of Georgetown, Ohio, Nancy Fricke of Townsend, Tenn., and Kim Wagner of Alexandria; sons, Robert A. Schneider Jr. of Fort Thomas, James Schneider of Cincinnati and Jack Schneider of Cold Spring; sister, Alice Lowry of Covington; 23 grandchildren; 17 great-grandchildren; and one great-great-grandson.

Burial was in St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas. Memorials: Alzheimer’s Association, 644 Linn St., Suite 1026, Cincinnati, OH 45203; Northern Kentucky Right to Life, P.O. Box 1202, Covington, KY 41012 or Divine Mercy Parish, 318 Division St. Bellevue, KY 41073.

Edwin Schultz

Edwin Findley Schultz, 67, California, died May 24, 2010, at his home. He was a farmer and member of St. Joseph Church, Camp Springs, and an assistant baseball coach for Bishop Brossart High School in Alexandria. Survivors include his wife, Therese Enzweiler Schultz; daughters, Lisa Brune, Angie Schultz and Diana Zeigler, all of California; sons, Eddie Schultz of Cold Spring, Steve, Ron , Joe and Brad Schultz, all of California; sisters, Mary Straman of Fort Thomas, Joyce Studer of Highland Heights, Pat Nelson of California, Kathy Baxter of Alexandria, and Brenda Baker of Florence; brothers, Larry Schultz of Piqua, Ohio, and Jerry Schultz of Aurora, Ind.; 21 grandchildren; and one great-grandchild. Burial was in St. Joseph Cemetery. Memorials: Bishop Brossart Boys Baseball, 4 Grove St., Alexandria, KY 41001; or Hospice of the Bluegrass-Northern Kentucky, 7388 Turfway Road, Florence, KY 41042.

LEGAL NOTICE Notice is hereby given by the Campbell County Fiscal Court that it will hold a public hearing on Wednesday June 16, 2010 at 5:15PM at the Campbell County Administration Building located at 1098 Monmouth Street, Newport, KY 41071 to review the following matter: DISCONTINUING COUNTY ROAD 1246, BOB HUBER DRIVE, INCLUDING RIGHT OF WAY LOCATED ON PARCELS 1,2, & 3 OWNED BY THE CAMPBELL COUNTY ECONOMIC PROGRESS AUTHORITY and identified in PIDN: 99999-35-473.00. Bob Huber Drive, CR 1246, was relocated with the reconstruction of US 27; All interested parties are invited to be present to hear or give testimony relating to the above referenced matter. Further information concerning this matter is available for public inspection at the Campbell County Administration Building, Newport, KY 41071 from 8:30AM to 4:30PM MondayFriday. Kenneth Schultz, Road Supervisor Campbell County Road Department NOTICE Fort Thomas Planning Commission Public Hearing The Planning Commission of the City of Fort Thomas, Kentucky, will hold a Public Hearing on Wednesday, June 16, 2010 in the Council Chambers of the City Building at 130 N. Ft. Thomas Avenue, Ft. Thomas, KY for the following agenda item: 7:00 PUBLIC HEARING: A hearing for a Zone Change request (R-1AA to R-1A) for property located at 40 Walden Lane, James and Candace Doepker, Owners, Thomas Breidenstein, Applicant. A copy of the proposed amendments may be examined by interested parties at the General Services Department during normal business hours. The City of Fort Thomas will make every reasonable accommodation to assist qualified disabled persons in obtaining access to available services or in attending City activities. If there is a need for the City to be aware of a specific disability, you are encouraged to contact the City Building at (859) 572-1210 so that suitable arrangements can be considered prior to the delivery of the service or the date of the meeting. General Services Department (Publication Date: 06/03/2010) 1001563749

CITY OF FORT THOMAS CAMPBELL COUNTY LEGAL NOTICE Sealed proposals will be received at the Office of the City Administrative Officer, City Building, 130 North Fort Thomas Avenue, Fort Thomas, Kentucky, 41075, until 11:00 A.M. local time on JUNE 25, 2010 for furnishing all labor, materials, and equipment necessary to complete the project known as the ROSSFORD PARK IMPROVE MENTS and, at the same time and place, publicly opened and read aloud. Contract documents, bid sheets, plans and specifications can be obtained at CDS Associates, Inc., 7000 Dixie Highway, Florence, Kentucky, 41042 after THURSDAY, JUNE 3, 2010 at a cost of $75.00 per set (non-refundable). Plans requested to be mailed will be an additional $15.00 per set. Checks to be made payable CDS Associates, Inc. Specifications will also be on file in the plan room of the F. W. Dodge Corporation, Allied Construction Industries (ACI), and CDS Associates, Inc., 7000 Dixie Highway, Florence, Kentucky 41042.

Enjoy a free First Watch breakfast after the race in the Library’s parking lot for all participants. Participants receive a performance running T-shirt with registration, while supplies last. Family-friendly with a kids’ fun run, a special team competition and a stroller division. Raffle prizes!

AN ORDINANCE OF THE BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS OF THE CITY OF NEWPORT, KENTUCKY DESIGNATING THE CHARLES WIEDEMANN HOUSE AS A HISTORIC LANDMARK IN THE CITY OF NEWPORT, KY. WHEREAS, a public hearing was held before the City of Newport Historic Preservation Commission on November 18, 2009; and, WHEREAS, evidence and testimony was presented to the Board of Commissioners at a public hearing held on May 10, 2010; and, WHEREAS, based upon said evidence and testimony presented thereat and the evidence and testimony presented to the Historic Preservation Commission, this Board believes that the Charles Wiedemann House at 1102 Park Avenue, Newport, Kentucky should be designated as a historic landmark; NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY OF NEWPORT, KENTUCKY: SECTION I That the Board of Commissioners accepts the recommendations of the Historic Preservation Commission and based upon same, the Charles Wiedemann House at 1102 Park Avenue, Newport, Kentucky is hereby designated as a historic landmark in the City of Newport, Kentucky. SECTION II That this Ordinance shall be signed by the Mayor and attested to by the City Clerk, recorded, published and effective upon publication. PASSED: First reading 5/10/2010 PASSED: Second reading 5/24/2010 MAYOR JERRY PELUSO ATTEST: Q. EVONE BRADLEY, CKMC CITY CLERK PUBLISHED: By summary in the Campbell County Recorder the 3rd day of June, 2010. 1001563547

COMMISSIONERS ORDINANCE NO. 0-2010-009 AN ORDINANCE OF THE BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS OF THE CITY OF NEWPORT, KENTUCKY DESIGNATING THE SOUTHGATE STREET SCHOOL AS A HISTORIC LANDMARK IN THE CITY OF NEWPORT, KY. WHEREAS, a public hearing was held before the City of Newport Historic Preservation Commission on November 18, 2009; and, WHEREAS, evidence and testimony was presented to the Board of Commissioners at a public hearing held on May 10, 2010; and, WHEREAS, based upon said evidence and testimony presented thereat and the evidence and testimony presented to the Historic Preservation Commission, this Board believes that the Southgate Street School at 215 Southgate Street, Newport, Kentucky should be designated as a historic landmark; NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY OF NEWPORT, KENTUCKY:

Each bidder is required to submit with his proposal a bid bond or certified check equal in amount to five percent (5%) of the base bid. The bidder to whom the contract is awarded will be required to furnish a surety bond in an amount equal to onehundred percent (100%) of the contract amount.

SECTION I That the Board of Commissioners accepts the recommendations of the Historic Preservation Commission and based upon same, the Southgate Street School at 215 Southgate Street, Newport, Kentucky is hereby designated as a historic landmark in the City of Newport, Kentucky.

The successful bidder will be required to have a current occupational license in the City of Fort Thomas before the Contract will be awarded.

SECTION II That this Ordinance shall be signed by the Mayor and attested to by the City Clerk, recorded, published and effective upon publication.

Bidders must comply with the Prevailing Wage Rates on Public Improvements in Campbell County and the City of Fort Thomas, as ascertained and determined by the Kentucky Revised Statute as provided in Section 337.505 through 337.550 of the Commonwealth of Kentucky. Proposals must contain the full name of the party or parties submitting the same and all persons interested therein. It is the intent and requirements of the City that this project be completed no later than OCTOBER 30, 2011. The Board of Council of the City of Fort Thomas, Kentucky, reserves the right to waive irregularities and to reject any or all bids. By the order of the Council of the City of Fort Thomas, Kentucky. Don Martin City Administrative Officer

CE-0000397020

COMMISSIONERS ORDINANCE NO. 0-2010-010

Publishing Date: THURSDAY, JUNE 3, 2010 Campbell County Recorder 1001563575

PASSED: First reading 5/10/2010 PASSED: Second reading 5/24/2010 MAYOR JERRY PELUSO ATTEST: Q. EVONE BRADLEY, CKMC CITY CLERK PUBLISHED: By summary in the Campbell County Recorder the 3rd day of June, 2010. 1001563534

To place your

BINGO ad call 513.242.4000 or 859.283.7290


B12

CCF Recorder

June 3, 2010

Community

Carespring’s John Muller receives leadership award John Muller, executive vice president of Carespring, has been recognized as a national long-term care leader by the American College of Health Care Administrators (ACHCA). The ACHCA established the award to honor leadership excellence in the longterm care industry and showcase the best performing skilled nursing facilities in the United States. Muller received the award at the ACHCA’s 44th Annual Convocation and Exposition on May 17 in Philadelphia. He is one of

18 recipients of the award this year and is the only recipient of the award in Ohio, Kentucky and Muller Indiana. “This is an outstanding honor for John and is a true testament to his dedication to our Carespring community,” said Barry Bortz, chief executive officer, Carespring. “Recognition from one’s peers as a leader in your industry indicates the caliber of respect John has

in this field.” Muller said the award is a tremendous honor but credited the Carespring community at-large for the recognition. “I am very appreciative of this award from the ACHCA. Indeed, I would be remiss by not pointing out the outstanding leadership throughout the Carespring organization that makes these type of honors attainable,” said Muller. “The consistent care and leadership that are provided to us to serve our Residents, Families, and Team Mem-

bers is at the core of Carespring’s excellence of service.” Carespring is one of Greater Cincinnati’s largest independent, locally-run assisted and independent living organizations with 11 facilities throughout the southwest Ohio and Northern Kentucky region. Its services include nursing care, rehabilitation, respite care, assisted and independent living, hospice and alzheimer’s care. For more information, contact www.carespring.com.

United Way recruiting volunteers for Day of Action It’s the longest day of the year and your opportunity to help advance the common good as a volunteer for United Way’s third annual national Day of Action. On June 21, United Ways across the country will mobilize thousands of people around the building blocks for a better life for all - Education, Income and Health - through projects focused on the Live United calls to action: Give, Advocate and Volunteer. Locally, United Way of Greater Cincinnati is recruiting 100 volunteers

for the Day of Action. They’ll help kick off Go Vibrant - a not-for-profit private/civic partnership across 15-plus organizations designed around the mission of making healthy living easier in Cincinnati - at a health fair on Fountain Square, 11 a.m. -to 2 p.m. “This is an opportunity to send a clear message about United Way’s focus on health as one of the building blocks to a good quality of life for all in our community, and a chance to engage more champions in the work,” says Rob Reifsnyder, UWGC president.

Attendees at the Square on June 21 will find groups providing information on a variety of health issues, providing simple health screenings, nutrition information, and more. Participants can also sign a health commitment pledge card and win United Way gear. With more daylight hours than any other, June 21 is the perfect day to let your actions speak louder than words. It’s the perfect way to show, by example, what it means to LIVE UNITED. Sign up today to volunteer at www.uwgc.org/dayofaction.

ShopLocal has great deals on everything from chairs to tires. Your one-stop-shop for the best deals on millions of products, from hundreds of online retailers and your favorite local stores.

Being nosy

PROVIDED

Bishop Brossart AP Biology student Jenna Bezold at the Butterfly Show Friday, May 14. Photo taken by Bishop Brossart High School biology teacher Ray Kues for the Butterfly Show photography contest.

Furniture

BED AND BREAKFAST THE DOOLIN HOUSE INN. Premier Inn. Gourmet breakfast. Minutes from Lake Cumberland. Join us for a romantic weekend/women’s retreat. 606-678-9494 doolinhouse.com

FLORIDA

ANNA MARIA ISLAND HUGE SALE! $499/wk, 1BR 1 & 2 BR units. Charming beach cottage. Call now for best selection! 513-236-5091, beachesndreams.net

FLORIDA

EAST COAST, NEW SMYRNA BEACH Luxurious oceanfront condos & vacation homes. Closest & best beach to Disney. Ocean Properties Vacation Rentals 800-728-0513 www.oceanprops.com

PANAMA CITY BEACH The Summerhouse 2B/2B Family Condos. Beach side pools, tennis, WiFi & More. r 800/354-1122 THE BEST BEACH VACATION VALUE! www.SummerhousePC.com

Beautiful Seagrove Beach Rent & Relax. Nr Destin, between famous Seaside & Rosemary Beach. Cozy Cottages to Gulf Front Condos. Web Specials. 1-800-537-5387 www.garrettbeachrentals.com SIESTA KEY. Gulf front condo, directly on Crescent Beach. All ammenities, nicely appointed, bright & airy decor. Special weekly rentals now through October. 513-232-4854

CLEARWATER TO ST. PETE BEACHES Gulf front & bay side condos. All prices & sizes! Florida Lifestyle VAC. 1-800-487-8953. Jan. 2011, Monthly Discounts • www.ourcondo.com

MANHATTAN--NYC HOTEL $129/2 persons. Singles $124. Suites $139-$159. Lincoln Ctr area, Hudson River views, 18 flrs, kitchenette, 5 mins to midtown, safe, quiet, luxury area. RIVERSIDE TOWER, Riverside & 80th St. Call 1-800-724-3136 or visit: www.riversidetowerhotel.com

HILTON HEAD. Beautiful 1BR condo on beach, near Coligny. Sleeps six. Many amenities, great rates: June-Aug. $800/wk., Sept-Oct, $600/wk. Local owner, 513-829-5099 Hilton Head Island, SC

DESTIN. Luxury 2 BR, 2 BA oceanfront condos. Heated pool, spas, kids pool & tennis. Sleeps 6. Local owner. www.us-foam.com/destin. D 513-528-9800, E 513-752-1735

SEABROOK EXCLUSIVES Villas & Private Homes. Ocean, golf, tennis, equestrian. Pet friendly rentals. Free brochure. Book online! 888-718-7949. www.seabrookexclusives.com

TENNESSEE

1-7 Affordable, Deluxe Chalets & Cabin Rentals. Pigeon Forge in the Smokies. Vacation/Dollywood Specials. Free brochure. Call 1-800-833-9987. www.firesidechalets.com

A Beautiful Cabin Getaway Gatlinburg/Pigeon Forge. Hot tub, jacuzzi, fireplace, gas grill. $85/nt, 5 nt special $375. 800-793-8699. smokymtncrossrdrentals.com

GATLINBURG . Affordable rates. Fully furnished. 1-8 bdrms. Chalets, Cabins, Privacy, Views, Hot Tubs, Jacuzzis, Fireplaces. 1-800-235-2661 www.alpinechaletrentals.com

EMERALD ISLE. Ocean Front luxury vacation homes with community pool. Call for free brochure. 1-252-354-5555 Spinnaker’s Reach Realty www.SpinnakersReach.com

SOUTH CAROLINA

DESTIN. Local owner, 1 or 2 luxury condos. 2 BR, 2 BA overlooking gulf, sugar white beaches. Heated pool, hot tubs & more. 937-767-8449,or visit www.majesticsunindestin.com

NORTH MYRTLE BEACH. Oceanfront condos. 1, 2 & 3 bedroom units with pools, spas & tennis. Hi-speed Internet, kiddie waterslide. 800-345-5617 www.oceancreek.net

NEW YORK

NORTH CAROLINA DESTIN. 2 great condos , 2 br, 2 ba golf, pools, dazzling Gulf view . Check our website for availability & rates. Local owner, 513-561-4683 Visit arieldunes.us or twcondo.us

SOUTH CAROLINA

Visit www.hhisland.info and plan a getaway with Seashore Vacations. Our beach is free. Specials available for golf, tennis, dining, more. Visit our

site or call toll free: 800-845-0077.

NORRIS LAKE. Located at Powell Valley Resort. 2 BR/1BA, fully furnished priv. home. Covered porch, deck. Lake access. $95/nt. 423-5628353, www.norrislakehse.com

LEGAL NOTICE The Newport Board of Adjustments will hold a public hearing on Thursday, June 17, 2010 at 4:30 p.m. in the Newport Municipal Complex, 998 Monmouth Street, Newport, Kentucky. The hearing will be held for interested parties to hear and present evidence relative to the following agenda items:

PUBLIC NOTICE CITY OF FORT THOMAS, KY Application has been received from Jazzman, Inc., 18 Grandview Avenue, Fort Thomas, KY 41075 dba Fort Thomas Pizza, 1109 South Fort Thomas Avenue, Fort Thomas, KY 41075, for a Malt Beverage Retailer, Restaurant Wine by the Drink, and Special Sunday Retail Drink. The application is on file in the office of the City Purchasing Agent and will be finally considered at a Public Hearing which will be conducted on Monday, June 21, 2010, at 4:30 p.m., at the Fort Thomas City Building Council Chambers, Jennifer Machesney, ABC Administrator, presiding. Any person having good cause or reason to object to BA-10-13 the granting of these licenses may appear 324 Park Avenue, before the ABC Administrator and be Newport, Kentucky heard or may submit written comments priThe applicant is re- or to the meeting. questing a conditional use to allow a Bed Signed: Jennifer L. Machesney, and Breakfast ABC Administrator Requested by: David Lofland Jr. Published:Campbell County Recorder, June 3, 2010 BA-10-14 1001563622 606 Liberty Street, Newport, Kentucky ADVERTISEMENT LEGAL AD The applicant is re- The City of Mel- OF ELECTION OF questing a front and bourne will hold a FIREFIGHTER rear yard variance as Public Hearing at TRUSTEE TO THE well as a parking var- 6:45 p.m. on Mon- CENTRAL CAMP iance for new con- day, June 14th 2010 BELL COUNTY struction FIRE DISTRICT at the City Building, Requested by: New- 502 Garfield Avenue, BOARD OF port Millennium Melbourne, KY. The TRUSTEES Housing purpose of the meet- The Central Camping is to obtain written bell County Fire ProBA-10-15 and oral comments of tection District, pur719 Maple Avenue, citizens regarding the suant to KRS 75.031 Newport, Kentucky advertises use of Municipal hereby The applicant is re- Road Aid Funds and that an election will questing a rear and LGEA Funds. The be conducted to elect side yard variance to City of Melbourne will one (1) Firefighter construct a garage be receiving approxi- Trustee to the Board Requested by: mately $7,000.00 of Trustees. The Randy Underhill during fiscal year election will be held Inquiries regarding 2010/2011. All inter- on Saturday, June this public hearing ested persons and 26, 2010, between should be addressed organizations in the the hours of 11:00 to: City of Melbourne are am and 2:00 pm at J. Gregory Tulley invited to the Public the Fire District’s adAICP Hearing to submit or- ministrative offices loPlanning and al and written com- cated at 4113 AlexDevelopment ments for the possi- andria Pike, Cold Director Kentucky. ble use of these Spring, City of Newport funds. These funds The name and ad998 Monmouth Street will be used for the dress of the candiNewport, Kentucky construction, recon- date: 41071 Joe Krebs struction, mainte859-292-3637 nance or repair of city 302 Main Avenue 1535479/1563070 streets.Any person(s) Highland Heights, KY 41076 especially senior citizens that cannot sub- Voters for FirefightTrustee: Purmit comments should er call City Hall at 781- suant to KRS 75.031, active 6664 so that arrange- only ments can be made firefighters of the Campbell to secure their com- Central County Fire Protecments. tion District that are Sell it quicker Angela Ross City Clerk/Treasurer at least eighteen (18) by selling it years of age are eligi1001563566 closer to home. ble to vote in this election of a firefighter trustee. 2976

Community Classified

513.242.4000

Children can visit fish for free Newport Aquarium and Bob Evans Restaurants again are teaming up to offer affordable family fun this summer. During the special Summer Family Hours, two kids (ages 12 and under) get in free with every adult paying full price from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m., Sunday through Friday. There are no coupons to clip or codes to remember. Just buy tickets at the aquarium ticket windows during those times to take advantage of the great deal, May 31 through Sept. 3. Note: Strollers are welcome during Summer Family Hours. All kids will receive a coupon for a free kid’s meal for use at participating Bob Evans restaurants. And there’s plenty to see and do this summer at Newport Aquarium. The Bizarre and Beautiful Gallery is back and weirder than ever. With new technology, new display cases and new animals available, biologists at Newport Aquarium completely reconstructed and expanded the gallery. It's filled with more than 20 species of the world's most weird and wonderful aquatic animals, including a giant Pacific octopus, sea horses, spider crabs, frogfish and yellow boxfish, among many other species. Newport Aquarium also celebrates summer by opening earlier and closing later than usual. The Newport Aquarium extended summer hours are from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. daily, now through Sept. 4.

Movies, dining, events and more Metromix.com


campbell-county-recorder-060310