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CAMPBELL COUNTY RECORDER

TOAST FOR HOPE B1 Your Community Recorder newspaper serving all of Campbell County 75¢

THURSDAY, MAY 23, 2013

MEMORIAL DAY EVENTS

Mosaic mural depicts old Newport Rolling Mill By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

Community Recorder

Campbell County

Originally known as “Decoration Day,” Memorial Day has been a U.S. federal holiday since 1971, according to the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, www.va.gov. Officially, the holiday that falls on the last Monday of May provides an opportunity to commemorate those who died fighting in the U.S. military. Throughout the nation, individual communities host their own solemn remembrance events.

Alexandria This year’s Campbell County Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3205 Memorial Day parade will begin at 2 p.m. Sunday, May 26. The parade grand marshal will be Ron Allari, who volunteers as the Veterans Service Officer for the V.F.W. Post and works out of an office in Alexandria's community center. Participants will line up in the Campbell County Middle School parking lot. The parade will travel a route south on Washington Street to Main Street, and then west on Main Street across U.S. 27 to Spillman Drive. The parade will turn south on Spillman Drive to end at the V.F.W. Post. A ceremony honoring veterans including a 21-gun salute and guest speakers will be immediately after the parade at the veterans memorial behind the V.F.W. Bellevue-Dayton Memorial Day Parade The 84th annual BellevueDayton Memorial Day parade will begin at 10:30 a.m. at the corner of Sixth and Main streets in Dayton, following short ceremonies at the Callahan Community Center at 9:30 a.m. and the Dayton monument at 10 a.m. The parade will travel down Fairfield Avenue, ending at the Bellevue Vets. Dayton resident Tom Herms is this year’s grand marshal. This year’s parade program will pay tribute to Dot Murphy, who died earlier this month. Murphy walked in the first parade as a girl scout and helped organize the parade for many years.

Boone County Walton Memorial Day Program The Walton Memorial Day Program will begin 9:30 a.m. Monday, May 27, at the Walton Cemetery on Church Street. The Walton-Verona High School band will perform. The Gold Star Mothers, an organization that supports mothers who lost sons or daughters in war, will be recognized. Then, the WaltonVerona Fire Department will decorate the graves of soldiers. The program will continue at the Walton-Verona Veterans Memorial 10 a.m. A wreath will be placed at the memorial and Walton's oldest living veterans, Virgil Bud Young and Dr. James Huey will be recognized. Retired Lt. Col. David Hincks will speak. A lunch will follow. Florence Memorial Day Celebration The City of Florence will celebrate Memorial Day by honoring their adopted troop The Renegades and all military personnel on Monday, May 27 with a parade, military display and program. Members of The Renegades will be visiting from Fort Campbell to attend the events. The parade starts at 10 a.m. at Boone County High School and travels to Ewing Boulevard to the Florence Government Center. A variety of military memorabilia and equipment will also be on display at the government center.

Camp Springs The 40th annual Memorial Day parade and services sponsored by Simon Gosney Post 219 of the American Legion will be Monday, May 27, in Camp Springs. The parade participants will assemble at St. John's Lutheran Church on Lower Tug Fork road at 10 a.m., and the parade will begin at 10:30 a.m. and travel along Four Mile Road. SerSee MEMORIAL, Page A2

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NEWPORT — A mosaic mural of the Andrews Steel Co. workers built for Cincinnati Union Terminal depicts a scene from the old Newport Rollling Mill – which is no more. It’s one of the last vestiges of proof showing Newport’s former status as a major site of the country’s steel industry. The rolling mill employed more than 2,000 people in a location off Lowell Street a couple miles upriver from the former Newport Steel plant in Wilder people can still see today. The Andrews Steel Co. once operated both the rolling mill and the Wilder steel plant. The rolling mill was in operation prior to 1900, and was expanded in1910. The rolling mill continued to operate on Lowell Street,eventually becoming part of Newport Steel in 1980, according to The Encyclopedia of Northern Kentucky. People can still see the former Newport Steel plant in operation today by IPSCO Tubulars Inc., but the rolling mill on Newport’s west side along the Licking River is now a mostly vacant lot. The mosaic mural, created by artist Winold Reiss for Cincinnati Union Terminal, is one of nine murals now located at the Cincinnati/Northern Ken-

Artist Winold Reiss' mosaic mural depicts workers at the former Andrews Steel's Newport Rolling Mill. The mural hangs in the main terminal at the Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport by the Delta ticketing area. The Rolling Mill mural was one of 17 other murals hung in the concourse of Cincinnati's Union Terminal until it was demolished in 1974. THE ENQUIRER/GLENN HARTONG

tucky International Airport. There were 14 murals moved to the airport after their original home in the terminal’s concourse was demolished in the 1970s. Now, the airport wants to demolish two of the terminal buildings – requiring a move of nine of those murals. A new home is being sought for the murals, and funds are being sought to move the mo-

By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

ALEXANDRIA — Campbell County Schools approved a tentative budget Monday, May 13, for the 2013-14’ school year with $1.7 million less in revenues than the previous year. “This is a very, very tight budget, and I think all of us are aware of that,” said Superintendent Glen Miller. The board approved an estimated $35.3 million general fund budget as part of a $46 million total budget that also includes special revenue, capital outlay, building fund and food service. The budget contains no new projects or purchasing of buses, Miller said. Approximately $725,000 in

new expenditures reflect federal, state and local regulations and policy, including the state-mandated step increase and state-mandated pension fund increases, Miller said. The budget also reflects $1.1 million in reduction of staff wages, salaries and benefits approved by the board in February, he said. A March 15 article in The Campbell County Recorder detailed how a loss of federal stimulus funding led the board to eliminate 37 positions at the March 11 meeting. The tentative budget approved May 13 includes a $207,000 increase in insurance liabilities, workers compensation, general liability and bus debt service. The board of education receives a draft budget in Janu-

See MURAL, Page A2

See page A2 for additional information

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ary, a tentative budget in May, and a working budget in September, Miller said. Miller said the board has spoken about the different types of revenue reductions including: » $1 million less in federal Edujobs and job stabilization funds. » $200,000 loss from federal sequestration. » A $100,000 decline in state preschool grants, a $285,000 drop in federal grants including Title I and IDEA B, and $155,000 in other projected tax receipt declines. Miller said despite the cuts and loss of revenue, the district has 2.02 percent of the budget in contingency or reserve, exceeding the state requirement by about $11,000.

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saic panels – which weigh eight tons each. Newport-native Mike Stull said he remembers growing up near the old Rolling Mill in the 400 block of Lindsey Street. Almost everyone in Newport either worked for the mill, the former Wiedeman

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Vol. 35 No. 15 © 2013 The Community Recorder ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


NEWS

A2 • CAMPBELL COUNTY RECORDER • MAY 23, 2013

Memorial Continued from Page A1

vices will be at 11:30 a.m. at the Camp Springs firehouse on Four Mile Road. The services will include a

presentation of a citizen of the year award and grade school essay award winners. A community reception at the firehouse will follow the services at noon. Crestview/Cold Spring The annual Crestview

CAMPBELL

COUNTY RECORDER Find news and information from your community on the Web Campbell County • nky.com/campbellcounty

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Michelle Shaw Editor ..........................578-1053, mshaw@nky.com Chris Mayhew Reporter .......................578-1051,cmayhew@nky.com Amanda Joering Reporter ....................578-1052, ajoering@nky.com Melanie Laughman Sports Editor ............513-248-7573, mlaughman@nky.com James Weber Sports Reporter ................578-1054, jweber@nky.com

Memorial Day parade will begin at 9 a.m. Monday, May 27 at Cline Elementary School in Cold Spring. The parade route will follow Dodsworth Lane through Cold Spring until turning in Crestview onto Circle Drive. The parade will then turn onto Uhl Road to end at the Crestview Memorial at the intersection of Dodsworth and Uhl. A brief ceremony will precede the serving of donuts, popsicles and light refreshments. Newport Memorial Day Parade The City of Newport is having it’s annual parade

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starting at 9 a.m., followed by a ceremony in honor of veterans, which will be held at the Newport City Buiding. The grand marshal for this year’s parade is Ken Bailey, a member of VFW post 5662 from Newport. The parade route will go south on York Street, South on Monmouth Street, ending at the city building at the corner of Tenth Street. Southgate Memorial Day Parade The Southgate Memorial Day Parade will begin at 10 a.m., with Eugene Enzweiler as the grand marshal. Enzweiler is a World War II veteran and long-time member of Southgate VFW post. Following the parade, Southgate Independent School students will be performing patriotic songs and the VFW will hold a commemorative ceremony at Memorial Park.

A solemn Memorial Day service will take place at the Kenton County Veteran’s Memorial in Freedom Park at 2 p.m. Sunday, May 26. The national anthem will be performed by a guest singer. Last year’s guest speaker was Sheriff Charles Korzenborn and emceed by John Lomax of Channel 12 WKRC. Edgewood Memorial Day Ceremony Boy Scout Troop 779 will be collecting tattered and worn American flags to be properly disposed of during the ceremony at the Kenton County Veteran’s Memorial in Freedom Park at 10a.m. Monday, May 27. If you cannot make it to the ceremony, you may drop off your flags at the city building, 385 Dudley Road, Edgewood. For more information contact Elaine Hoblik at 859-331-5910 or eh@edgewoodky.gov.

Highland Heights Memorial Day celebration The City of Highland Heights invites the community to attend it’s Memorial Day celebration at the city building, 176 Johns Hill Road.

Fort Mitchell Wall of Honor Ceremony Celebrate Memorial Day by visiting the Fort Mitchell City Building for the Wall of Honor Ceremony at 11 a.m. Monday, May 27. All are welcome. Bring your family for a day of remembrance and reflection. For more information, call Martha Allen at 859-331-1212.

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Independence Memorial Day Parade American Legion Moon Brothers Post 275 and the city of Independence present the annual parade at 10:30 a.m. Monday, May 27. Anyone is welcome to enter the parade, which will proceed north from Delaware Crossing to the Independence Courthouse. The parade will stop for salutes at Independence and St. Cecilia Church cemeteries. Lt. Chadwick Nickson will deliver a speech after the parade. Park Hills Memorial Day Parade The parade forms at 10:30 a.m. at Notre Dame Academy Monday, May 27, leaving at 11:30 to follow Dixie Highway to Arlington Road, to Old State Road across to Terrace Drive, and down Amsterdam Road to Park Drive, in preparation for the flag-raising at Trolley Park. New prizes this year will be given for “Best Dressed Dog and Owner” and “Best Decorated Bike.” The event will also include a bake sale, hosted by the Park Hills Garden Club, beginning at 10 a.m. at Trolley Park. To enter the parade or for more information, call Carey Kruer at 261-2330 or email parkhillsparade@yahoo.com.

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Brewery or for the government in the 1940s, he said. Stull, now a resident of Union, said he was a child and teen when his family lived on Lindsey Street, and other members of his family lived right next to the mill. Stull said he was related to the Whitehead family who lived in the 500 block of 9th Street and they all worked at the mill. The house was so close to the old mill that evidence of gunfire that happened during the 1921-22’ labor strike was part of the family lore. “They had bullet holes in the house,” he said.

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MAY 23, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • A3

Church parsonage renovated in expansion By Chris Mayhew

Pastor Chad Abbott of St. Paul's United Church of Christ in Alexandria inside the new youth group room of the renovated 1903 parsonage building. CHRIS

cmayhew@nky.com

ALEXANDRIA — Moving day of the pastor’s offices from St. Paul’s United Church of Christ in Alexandria to a renovated parsonage Monday, May 6, was the completion of the 1903 building’s revival. The church faces East Main Street, and the parsonage is behind the church on Jefferson Street. A formal dedication ceremony of the new office and meeting space will be after the 10:30 a.m. Sunday, June 9, worship service. “It allows us to expand our programs, and we really wanted to preserve the parsonage, which was over 100 years old,” said Fred Losey of California, president of the trustee council. Losey, a retired construction superintendent, said being able to assist with the completion of the renovation was a special project for him. “We’re keeping an older building rather than tearing it down,” he said. A leaking roof had

MAYHEW/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

caused water damage in the old parsonage, which hadn’t been used as a residence for years, said Pastor Chad Abbott. Abbott said the congregation deserves credit for the renovation, which was already planned out before he started in November 2011. The church has about 110 people attending Sunday services, he said. Membership has increased by about 20 people in the past year, Abbott said. “I think the rebuilding of this is sort of a symbol of our growth,” he said. The renovation turned an old three-bedroom house into a space for a youth group, office space for the pastor and secre-

tary, a handicap accessible bathroom and a conference room. The renovated parsonage adds space and frees up space inside the church itself for other possibilities, said church trustee Ken Racke of Alexandria. Bible study groups, yoga classes, Alcoholics Anonymous, a mother’s club and Boy Scouts of America troops all meet regularly at the church, Racke said. Trustee Rick Carr of Alexandria said it was a year ago when work began on the parsonage with design assistance from Associates & Enzweiler of Cold Spring. Steffen & Sons Construction of Alexandria and Alan Woeste

of Woeste Builders of Alexandria also performed renovation work, Carr said. The parsonage has been vacant since it was last used as class space about five years ago, but it was set up as a living space and not meeting space, Carr said. One of the interesting architectural additions was extending a front porch “portico” roof with columns by wrapping it around the side of the building, he said. The offices for the secretary and pastor will be open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday, Tuesday and Thursday each week. The intent is to make the space available at other times as

much as possible, said “One of our missions is it’s always going to be

open to the community,” said Trustee Roger VonStroh of Alexandria.

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A4 • CCF RECORDER • MAY 23, 2013

Stage needed at A.J. Jolly as 50th party planned By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

ALEXANDRIA — Party plans to put A.J. Jolly Park at center stage Aug. 17 for a 50th anniversary celebration are almost complete. The day of dawn to dusk activities will feature more than a dozen things to do including a wine festival, performances from 11

bands, tethered hot air balloon rides and tree climbing. A 5K run and walk will kick off the day at 7 a.m., and there will also be dragon boat racing from 7-11 a.m. A horse trail challenge ride will be from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., and a fishing derby will be from 8 a.m. to noon. Canoe and stand-up paddle board rides will be offered from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. There will also be ar-

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chery shooting, chainsaw carving demonstrations, pony rides, a display of antique tractors and vehicles and face painting, pet adoptions, a tent craft show and nature hikes. The only significant unknown is whether enough funds will be raised to build a new outdoor stage in time, said Kevin Hanson of Alexandria, chairperson of the nonprofit volunteer group A.J. Jolly Park Community Development Council. The stage will be about 30 feet by 40 feet, Hanson said. The idea is to have the stage available for years of music events, movies in the park, weddings and other events, he said.

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An illustration provided by the A.J. Jolly Park Community Development Council shows what a planned outdoor stage will look like near the shore of the lake at the 1,000-acre Campbell County Park. THANKS TO KEVIN HANSON

“We feel like the setting of the stage is really going to have a nice backdrop with the lake there; sunsets in the evening for late evening concerts,” said Walt Dunlevy of Cold Spring, vice chairman of the council. Raising money for the outdoor stage is still underway, and if enough money is not raised in time for Aug. 17 a temporary stage will be employed, he said. “We want to have the funds in hand before we start, so when we start we know we can complete it,” Dunlevy said. The council has firm commitments from 11 different groups including

For information about the A.J. Jolly Park Community Development council or how to donate to the effort to build and outdoor stage visit the website http://www.jollyparkcdc.com/.

the headline act Sleepin’ Dogs, a four-piece local country and rock band, Dunlevy said. Other bands will play music ranging from 1980s rock, hard rock, christian, bluegrass, country and rockabilly, he said. The volunteer council is not directly affiliated with Campbell County Fiscal Court, but does act in an ad-

visory role, and has been working to help create a new master plan recommendation for the park. The 1,000-acre park has 200-acre lake, an 18hole golf course, horse trails, camping and athletic fields. The council has taken a step back from the park master plan idea, and plans to bring concepts to the anniversary celebration to ask for some feedback, Hanson said. Expanded and improved camping, including space for recreational vehicles, and a pavilion for wedding receptions and corporate events are two ideas the council is exploring, he said.

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MAY 23, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • A5

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NEWS

A6 • CCF RECORDER • MAY 23, 2013

The pleasures of beekeeping

A beekeeper shares some tips for healthy bees By Kamellia Soenjoto Smith Recorder Contributor

EDGEWOOD — Carl Knochelmann lifts the top of his hive and honey bees soon fill the air. “It sounds like a busy airport,” he says. With a device that looks like a skinny teapot he blows white smoke on the bees to help calm them. His hive stands at the corner of his backyard in Edgewood. Those who don’t know would probably mistake it as a dresser with three drawers. Around 30,000 bees live there. “It’s a strong hive,” he says. “There can be as many as 60,000 in the summer.” A bee lands on his arm. “Look, it’s carrying pollen,” he says. The bee stands still as if it wants to show off its hard work. On one of its hind legs is a sac of yellow pollen. “It’s from a dandelion.” This bee is one of the worker bees, infertile females charged with many jobs, ranging from guarding and cleaning the hive to foraging for nectar and pollen. They also feed the queen, the mother of all the other bees in the hive. Male bees are called drones. They do nothing but eat and wait to mate with the queen, after which they immediately die. In recent years there have been reports about a strange phenomenon with honeybees known as Colony Collapse Disorder. More than half of the honeybees in the U.S. died this spring. “No one really knows why,” Knochelmann says, but he sus-

Beekeeper Carl Knochelmann blows smoke into the hive to calm the bees. KAMELLIA SMITH FOR THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Beekeeper Carl Knochelmann shows off some of his bees. KAMELLIA SMITH FOR THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

pects it might be caused by issues with pesticides. The European Commission just voted to enact a ban on a class of pesticides thought to be harming the global bee population. Knochelmann is glad that the mysterious malady didn’t hit his bees. “Knock on wood. I have not had any problems with wax moths or hive beetles either,” he continues. “If you have a strong hive, bees can take care of themselves really well.” He started beekeeping in the 1980s but then stopped for awhile. He’s been at it again for the past10 years as a member of the Northern Kentucky Bee-

keepers Association. “I like to treat them organically,” he says, sharing a tip that helps bees clean and groom each other. “Take some granulated sugar and put it in a food processor so you make your own powder sugar.” The next step is to use a shaker to pour the sugar all over the bees. “Make them look like Casper the Ghost,” he says, recalling a character from an old cartoon series. “Sometimes bees won’t check each other out unless they’ve got sugar on them,” he continues. “First, they’ll eat the sugar, which is good, and if

there are any mites growing on them, they’ll help pick those things off.” Bees play a vital role in the production of food and fruits. The U.S. Department of Agriculture states that over 80 percent of the world’s flowering plants require a pollinator to reproduce, including almonds, apples, onions and citrus fruits. And bees are the most efficient pollinator. “It’s amazing what they do,” Knochelmann explains. He enjoys the honey they produce and gives it away to family and friends. But he takes more pleasure in watching how

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Campbell Rotary connects French, informatics By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

HIGHLAND HEIGHTS —

Rotary International is about making connections, so Campbell County’s chapter plugged five French business people into Northern Kentucky University’s College of Informatics. Members of the Campbell County’s chapter, five French Rotary members and a Rotary exchange student from Brazil were given a guided tour of NKU’s Griffin Hall by faculty members. The French Rotarians are in the middle of a 30-day visit to Rotary clubs throughout the eastern half of Kentucky. Yann Chapelain de Sereville, the group’s team leader who is a banker, said he was very impressed not only by Griffin Hall as a building, but with the opportunities it provides to students. “It’s all for the good of the student,” Chapelain de Sereville said. Yann said a web designer, mechanical engineer and hair stylist were also professions represented in his group. Bellevue resident Jerry Schneider, a member of Rotary since 1981, said he has also led groups from the U.S. to visit the Australian island of Tasmania. Group study exchange is one of the best programs in Rotary,

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Schneider said. “It’s a business and a cultural exchange,” he said. For example, a banker will get to see how banking is done in another country, and there is the chance to learn about how other people live, Schneider said. “It’s a great experience for them, and while they’re here, each member will have at least five visits to their profession,” he said. Alexandria resident Arnd Rehfuss, president of the Campbell County Rotary club, said the a Rotary team from Kentucky just returned from France previously this year. “Normally one goes there and one comes here, it’s an exchange program,” Rehfuss said. Rehfuss said the group from France has gone to a Reds baseball game and also took a tour of a St. Elizabeth Healthcare hospital while in Northern Kentucky. NKU’s Griffin Hall offered a chance for Campbell County’s club to show the group something unique about higher education in the U.S., he said. “I just decided Griffin Hall with the informatics would be something that they would enjoy,” Rehfuss said. Gaut Ragsdale, associate dean of the NKU’s College of Informatics, met the group in the lobby for the tour. Ragsdale

showed them labs where students learn and practice different areas of informatics studies, including program development for mobile and web devices and news production. Ragsdale introduced the group to Sean Butts, a senior computer science major from Edgewood, as they stepped into the Innovations Lab inside the College’s Center for Applied Informatics. “What we have here it’s a mixture of web development and mobile development,” Butts said. Butts said different groups of students work to build mobile or web “apps,” which are small specialized programs for cell phones or tablet computers. One student project involves working with a veterans association to build an app to help address Diabetes awareness with the Veterans Administration hospital, he said. “There is a group of guys that wanted to have a crowd-sourcing app for Over-the-Rhine and wait times at restaurants,” Butts said. “So, that is another project that we just developed.” Students work in the Innovations Lab starting as early as their freshman year, and through the apps they develop companies with jobs know them, he said.

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A10 • CCF RECORDER • MAY 23, 2013

BRIEFLY Cold Spring shows off art at city park

COLD SPRING — Munici-

pal Park in Cold Spring will be the site of an afternoon of art performances and displays from noon to 4 p.m. Saturday, May 25. The city’s Art in the Park event will feature about 200 displays of art works. There will be student art work and performances from Cline Elementary School, Crossroads Elementary School and St. Joseph School – all schools inside the city. There will be a tent for the art work, and another tent for viewing performances. The performance

schedule includes: » At 1 p.m. Students from Crossroads will give May Pole dance performance. » From 1:45-2 p.m. Crossroads students will perform a cup stacking competition. » At 2 p.m. the St. Joseph choir will perform, and students will also perform individual performances from a school play. Afterward, Cline Elementary students will give a performance. Municipal Park is located at 5694 East Alexandria Pike.

Bellevue to host cheer camp

The Bellevue High School varsity cheerleaders are hosting a cheer camp from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. from Monday, June 10 through Friday, June 14. The camp is open to all boys and girls K-6. The cost of the camp is $50, and registration is due by Friday, May 31. For more information or to register, contact Sally Wyatt at 261-2980 or Rhonda Beatsch at rhonda.beatsch@insightbb.com.

Fort Thomas’ Jansen a candidate for Sheriff

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Mike Jansen has announced his candidacy for Campbell County Sheriff in 2014 as a Republican candidate. Jansen, 51, retired from the Fort Thomas Police Department in 2009, and now serves as the Commonwealth’s Jansen Detective for Campbell County Commonwealth Attorney Michelle Snodgrass. Jansen was named Kentucky Crime Prevention Officer of the Year in 2008, and was also a former officer for Campbell County and Newport police departments. “I truly believe that now is the time for a career law enforcement officer with a strong background in criminal justice to serve as Campbell County Sheriff,” said Jansen in a news release issued Friday, May 17. His experience working 26 years in law enforcement also includes serving as a school resource officer. Jansen’s news release also cited his experience being a youth sports coach, community volunteer and, “of course, as a husband and father.” Fort Thomas lawyer Tim Schneider will serve as Jansen’s campaign treasurer.

GED orientation sessions planned in Alexandria

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new students at the Alexandria Adult Education Center will be May 28 and May 29 and again on July 22 and July 22. Each orientation session begins at 9 a.m., and appointments are not necessary on orientation days. Only people younger than 19 need to bring anything to an orientation day. If a person is younger than 19, a withdrawal form from the last school attended is required. The center is located behind the Alexandria City Building at 8236 W. Main St. Classes to prepare for the GED are free, and it costs $60 to take the test. The cost for a GED test will double to $120 beginning in 2014. A Newport location also offers classes. For information call the Alexandria center at 859-7576836 or the Newport center at 859-292-3056. Both locations will be closed for a summer break July 1-19.

St. Joseph Camp Springs plans summer festival

CAMP SPRINGS — The summer festival for St. Joseph Parish in Camp Springs will be at the church, 6833 Four Mile Road, from 4:30 p.m. to midnight Saturday, June 8. The festival will feature live entertainment, booths, games a raffle, duck races and special activities for children. Dinners will be served from 4:30-8 p.m., and dining will be available in the new parish shelter. For information call the church at 859-635-249.

Jack Voige Memorial Veterans Picnic to be held June 1

The Fort Thomas Lodge 808 is holding the Fifth Annual Jack Voige Memorial Veterans Picnic on Saturday, June 1 for veterans and their families. Food and beverages will be provided by the Fort Thomas Lodge. Jack Voige was a Navy officer in World War II and member of the Fort Thomas Lodge 808.

Southgate celebrates Arbor Day

The Southgate Park and Tree board held their annual Arbor Day celebration Wednesday, April 24 at the Southgate Community Center. Fourth and fifth graders from Southgate Independent School at St. Therese School participated in the celebration, which included a guest speaker from the Kentucky Division of Forestry, who presented the city with its eighth annual Tree City USA award. The event included announcing the winners of the city’s annual Arbor Day poster contest. Winners from St. Therese included Maria Broering in first place, Abbie Simon in second place and Hailey Menetry in third place, with honorable mentions going to Morgan Barnes, Natalie Barth, Max Morgan and Haley Luerson. From Southgate School, Allen Zheng won first place, Bryson Dickerson won second place and Madison Gifford won third place, with honorable mentions going to Xander Warner and Beth

Meier.

Highland Avenue Baptist to host rummage sale

The Highland Avenue Baptist Tabernacle Church is hosting a rummage sale from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, June 1 at the church, 1080 Highland Avenue. All proceeds from the sale will benefit the church’s building fund. For more information, call the church at 7814510.

Campbell County sells Lakeside Terrace to NKU HIGHLAND HEIGHTS —

Campbell County Fiscal Court has agreed to sell the Lakeside Terrace senior apartments building to Northern Kentucky University. NKU is expected to purchase Lakeside Terrace for about $1.4 million, said Campbell County Judge-executive Steve Pendery in a May 15 Enquirer article. Geoff Mearns, president of NKU, has said NKU will spend about $12 million in total to renovate the building into a dorm to be available to students in August 2014.

NKU named Healthiest Employer for third year HIGHLAND HEIGHTS —

- Northern Kentucky University has been named the Healthiest Employer of Greater Cincinnati in the category of employers with 1,500 to 4,999 employees for the third year in a row. The Business Courier named five winners in various employer size categories in its 2013 Healthiest Employers of Greater Cincinnati competition. This year brought NKU’s inaugural Wellness@Work Awards, where internal departments and colleges can compete to be awarded and recognized for their efforts in promoting healthy lifestyles for employees.

Campbell County passes used property law

Campbell County Fiscal Court voted unanimously to approve a new used property sales tracking ordinance at the meeting in Newport Wednesday, May 15. The version of the ordinance approved by Fiscal Court excludes the City of Newport from the new law, which has a similar law already in place, said Campbell County Administrator Robert Horine. Campbell County Attorney Steve Franzen introduced the used property ordinance after working with representatives of police and the Independent Business Association of Northern Kentucky on a compromise. The ordinance will require pawn shops, jewelry and video game stores, and other businesses buying used property to post photos of items purchased from people at at LeadsOnline service and to only issue payments in the form of checks. The goal of the ordinance is to fight drug, and especially heroin, related thefts by taking the cash out of the transaction and giving police a way to see what is being purchased online, said Franzen.


NEWS

MAY 23, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • A11

Newport comic shop thrives with Hollywood spinoffs By Casey Bray Recorder contributor

Robin Lacy and DeZydeco will perform at the Dinsmore Homestead’s annual New Orleans-style summer concert on Saturday, June 1. FILE PHOTO

New Orleans-style concert planned at Dinsmore By Stephanie Salmons ssalmons@nky.com

BURLINGTON — Welcome the warm weather with a summer concert at Burlington’s Dinsmore Homestead – New Orleans style. Robin Lacy and DeZydeco will perform from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Saturday, June 1, at the homestead, located at 5656 Burlington Pike, 6.5 miles west of downtown Burlington. Proceeds benefit the homestead. Located in rural Boone County, Dinsmore is a his-

toric site where visitors can learn what rural life was like in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Concessions will be available for purchase, including Cajun food prepared by the Attebery family, hot dogs, snacks, desserts, soft drinks and a cash bar with wine and beer. Guests can also bring their own picnic dinner as well as blankets and chairs. “We do this every year,” said Dinsmore’s executive director Marty McDonald.

An annual event since 2005, McDonald said the Dinsmore family, though originally from the east coast, lived in about 55 miles from New Orleans during the 1830s, before purchasing the Burlington property. Cost for the concert is $10 in advance or $12 at the gate. There’s no charge for children under 12. For the advance rate, RSVP at 859-5866117 by May 29. For more information about the Dinsmore Homestead, visit dinsmorefarm.org.

Most businesses have their count-on days – those days they will be busier than normal and actually end up in the black. For bars and pubs, it is usually Friday and Saturday night, when they are filled with professionals and college students looking to unwind. Steve Struharik’s count-on day is Wednesday. Struharik doesn’t cater to the single crowd, and while his customers are also looking to unwind, these days they do so more and more through superheroes and flesh-eating zombies. Struharik is the owner of Arcadian Comics and Games in Newport, and on Wednesday nights customers of all ages and backgrounds fill his Monmouth Street shop looking for new comic books. After opening Clifton Comics and Games in 2004, Struharik had to relocate when the building he rented was sold in 2011. Within a month, he and his comics had found a new home in Newport. “It’s more the environment I wanted,” he said. While the Clifton location was near the University of Cincinnati, he said there wasn’t much foot traffic on Jefferson Avenue. “[In Newport] there are actually other businesses around. People come down here for other things and see this store and come check it out.” Struharik came up with the idea of owning a

comic book shop after he and his friends became interested in card and role playing games. “We had been going to conventions and thought it was a great community,” the 36-year-old entrepreneur said. “It was great to see the camaraderie amongst the people.” He said comics and games were always a natural fit, but after opening the store eight years ago, he began to see a shift in sales. Struharik said much of the resurgence in comics has been driven by television and Hollywood. With shows like The Walking Dead and movies like The Avengers and Spiderman, comics are cool again. “It is a pop culture consensus,” Struharik said. “Now this stuff is out in the public eye and people are asking questions. You have people who s It is easy for someone to say, ‘I’m going to go buy some comics.’ It is a big impact.” Breaking the stereotype that comics are for kids, Arcadian caters to a wide variety of customers. Visit the shop on Wednesday night – new comic night – and you will find everyone from highschoolers to men in business suits and grandmothers with their granddaughters. The walls are lined with floor-to-ceiling bookshelves filled with more than 100 titles from about a dozen publishers. Newport resident Jordan Selch, 21, visits the shop at least once a week. For him, comics have a draw that other forms of

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literature lack. “I like the more visual elements,” he said. “They are more action filled and less realistic. We could all use a little less realism these days.” While the recent Hollywood resurgence has helped Arcadian and the comic industry as a whole, Struharik is quick to point out that times are still tough. Like many small businesses, he runs what is basically a one-man operation, with some occasional help. “I have volunteers. They just work for fun or to hang out and for free comics,” he said. But, for many customers it is the volunteers and close personal atmosphere that makes Arcadian special. Sarah Versluis, 21, said she doesn’t feel like just another customer when she makes her weekly visit. “I love that they get inside my head,” she said. “Every time I go in they have pulled new stuff off the shelves for me. I have my own file of stuff they keep up behind the counter. He knows what I like, and I always love what they pick.” For Struharik, relationships with customers like Selch and Versluis are what make owning a comic store exciting. “It’s fun,” he said. “The people that come through here they like to talk about it all. They are passionate about it and I can recommend things. And then they will be like, ‘Hey that was great, do you have more of it?’”

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SCHOOLS

A12 • CCF RECORDER • MAY 23, 2013

Editor: Michelle Shaw, mshaw@nky.com, 578-1053

ACHIEVEMENTS | NEWS | ACTIVITIES | HONORS

COMMUNITY

RECORDER

CommunityPress.com

AP course additions help lead to national rank By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

ALEXANDRIA — Campbell County High School has achieved a first-ever national ranking, in part because 400 more students are taking Advanced Placement classes now than in 2011. Campbell County ranked among the top 2,000 public high schools in the 2013 America’s Best High Schools list compiled by Newsweek and The Daily Beast with a ranking of 1,928. Campbell County is one of four Northern Kentucky high schools to make the list. Beechwood High School in Fort Mitchell is ranked 247th, and Highlands High School in Fort Thomas has the 333rd

rank. Walton-Verona High School in Boone County is ranked 1,603. For the complete list visit http://tinyurl.com/ushighschoolranks. Superintendent Glen A. Miller said pursuing a national ranking is a major point of the district’s focus, and was the top point listed in printed 15-page “Success Plan 2011-2015” document. “What is very, very important about Newsweek, is that their national rankings are based on advanced placement,” Miller said. A grant through AdvanceKentucky has supported the district’s initiative to have more students taking AP classes, he said.

“And also, it’s a tribute to our staff that we have so many teachers who are on campus who can actually teach these courses,” Miller said. “They’re very, very rigorous courses. I am a former Advanced Placement calculus teacher myself.” The number of exams students take is very important toward the national ranking too, he said. The high school now offers 16 AP courses, and some students take multiple courses and exams, Miller said. The number of AP exams students have taken increased from 179 in 2009 to 221 in 2011, and to an all-time high of 806 exams in 2013. “This is historic for Camp-

bell County Schools, because this is the first time they’ve been nationally ranked,” Miller said. Principal Renee Boots said when the school started to look at the AdvanceKentucky grants initiative about twoand-a-half years ago was when enrollment in AP classes was dramatically increased. “If kids want to take AP, we’re going to get them in there and give them every opportunity for success,” Boots said. Each year the school has added new AP courses including AP studio art, music theory, and physics for the first time this school year, she said. “Next year we’ve even got AP microeconomics, which I thought ‘I’m not sure who

would be interested,’ and we’ve got a group of kids wanting to take it,” Boots said. “So, I think our kids are hungry for this.” About four years ago there were eight AP courses, and now there are 16, she said. Aubrey Franzen, a senior taking AP calculus and English literature this year, said being in the courses means extra work that’s worth the rewards. Franzen said she plans to attend Northern Kentucky University and study math and science. AP courses and dual credit college courses helps her prepare for college and career now, Franzen said. “I’m coming out with 30 credit hours, so I will be a sophomore in college next year,” Franzen said.

Bellevue High School seniors dance to their class song, "Iris" by the Goo Goo Dolls, at the Senior Blast Off event at Bellevue Beach Park Wednesday, May 15. AMANDA JOERING/COMMUNITY RECORDER

Bellevue celebrates students at Senior Blast Off Bellevue High School students, families and employees celebrated the class of 2013 at the second annual Senior Blast Off event Wednesday, May 15 at Bellevue Beach Park.

Bellevue High School teachers and administrators serve dinner to the school's seniors during the Senior Blast Off event. AMANDA JOERING/COMMUNITY RECORDER

Bellevue seniors Samantha Waller (left) and Maddie Blevins dance during the Senior Blast Off event. AMANDA JOERING/COMMUNITY RECORDER


SPORTS

MAY 23, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • A13

Editor: Melanie Laughman, mlaughman@communitypress.com, 513-248-7573

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | RECREATIONAL

NCC, BROSSART WIN TRACK TITLES

Michael Caldwell of Brossart, shown running last year, took second in the 800 and third in the 1,600 at the state meet. FILE PHOTO By James Weber jweber@nky.com

Newport Central Catholic finished second in the Class 1A girls state track meet May 18 at the University of Louisville. The Thoroughbreds celebrated two individual state champions, as senior Nikki Buller won the 300-meter hurdles and Abbie Lukens won the discus. Chandler Cain had another outstanding meet, finishing in the top three in the three sprint-

ing events and anchoring NCC’s state runner-up squad in the 4x200. NCC finished top-five in all four girls relays. Brooke Kuetemeyer, Keyaira Lankheit, Stephanie Lewis and Alli Otten also won individual medals with topeight finishes. In the boys meet, NCC’s Sam Barth won the 800 and was on two medal-winning relays. Graeham Heil won three individual medals and was on the See TRACK, Page A14

RECORDER

CommunityPress.com

STATE TRACK RESULTS Bellevue boys (1A) 4x200: 19th (1:38.66) - Blake Stephenson, Bryson Combs, Noah Placke, Nolan Rechtin 4x400: 5th (3:38.45) - Alec Hazeres, Tony Isbell, Nolan Rechtin, Noah Placke 4x800: 12th (8:48.09) - Tony Isbell, Alec Hazeres, Jordan Roberts, Noah Placke. Justin Babb: 13th in discus (119-7) Alec Hazeres: 16th in pole vault (9-6) Nolan Rechtin: 14th in 400 (53.94) Bellevue girls (1A) Courtney Schmits: 11th in 100 hurdles (17.44), 18th in 300 hurdles (52.80) Bishop Brossart boys (1A) 4x100: 14th (46.34) - Alex Schwartz, Josh Brugger, Jacob Hartig, Drew Miller 4x200: 9th (1:35.73) - Drew Berkemeyer, Josh Brugger, Jacob Hartig, Alex Schwartz 4x400: 13th (3:44.32) - Andrew Graus, Joe Donnelly, Daniel Vogel, Michael Caldwell 4x800: State champs (8:19.44) - Mark Goller, Joe Donnelly, Michael Caldwell, Chris Loos Drew Berkemeyer: 8th in 300 hurdles (42.70), 12th in triple jump (39-2.75) Michael Caldwell: 3rd in 1,600 (4:28.77), 2nd in 800 (1:59.99) Austin Frey: 10th in pole vault (11-0) Mark Goller: 11th in 800 (2:05.81), 14th in high jump (5-8) Jacob Hartig: 14th in long jump (19-7), 10th in triple jump (40-6) Chris Loos: 17th in 1,600 (5:01.22), 20th in 3,200 (10:34.94) Alex Schwartz: 12th in 100 (11.66), 15th in 200 (23.68) Robby Twehues: 12th in discus (119-8) Bishop Brossart girls (1A) 4x100: 2nd (49.81, broke old 1A record) - Elizabeth Patterson, Nicole Goderwis, Suzi Brown, Lauren Goderwis 4x200: 2nd (1:47.60) - Elizabeth Patterson, Sarah Klump, Alicia Martin, Lauren Goderwis 4x400: State champs (4:03.27) - Sarah Klump, Nicole Goderwis, Lauren Goderwis, Shelly Neiser 4x800: 2nd (9:54.85) - Sarah Klump, Madison Bertram, Kristin Klocke, Shannon Donnelly. Mackenzie Bertram: 21st in discus (69-8) Madison Bertram: 5th in 800 (2:27.02), 12th in high jump (4-8) Suzi Brown: 5th in triple jump (34-1.75), 15th in 100 hurdles (18.08) Shannon Donnelly: 9th in 1,600 (5:48.19) Lauren Goderwis: 12th in 100 (13.18). Nicole Goderwis: State champ in 400 (58.20), 5th in 100 hurdles (16.60). Kristin Klocke: 6th in 800 (2:27.53) Alicia Martin: 13th in 200 (27.69), 10th in long jump (15-6) Shelly Neiser: 9th in 400 (1:02.21) Olivia Nienaber: 7th in 1,600 (5:32.56), 3rd in 3,200 (12:09.17) Elizabeth Patterson: 15th in 200 (27.74) Emily Powell: 20th in shot put (28-3), 16th in discus (80-3) Jade Rauen: 21st in 300 hurdles (54.43), 16th in pole vault (7-0) Sarah Sandfoss: 18th in 3,200 (13:10.39) Campbell County boys (3A) 4x100: 12th (43.87) - Roosevelt Obison, Grant Mahoney, Devon Strange, Jake Zabonick 4x400: 16th (3:33.89) - Devon Strange, Tim Weimer, Mohammed Bayaari, Grant Mahoney Mohammed Bayaari: 18th in 300 hurdles (42.93) Grant Mahoney: 20th in 200 (23.47)

William Seiter: 13th in pole vault (10-6) Jake Zabonick: 22nd in 100 (11.45) Campbell County girls (3A) 4x100: 19th (4:17.52) - Brooke Buckler, Rebecca Cline, Abby Vandergriff, Alexandra Gregory 4x800: 19th (10:12.76) - McKenzie Cave, Abby Vandergriff, Jennah Flairty, Alexandra Gregory Brooke Buckler: 6th in 100 hurdles (15.90), 6th in 300 hurdles (47.23) Rebecca Cline: 7th in 100 hurdles (15.97), 4th in 300 hurdles (46.87) Jennah Flairty: 6th in 1,600 (5:19.33), 19th in 800 (2:28.54) Angela Lauer: 9th in pole vault (8-6) Kristen Spahr: 18th in pole vault (7-6) Dayton boys (1A) Ryan Meyer: 16th in 800 (2:10.36) Dayton girls (1A) 4x800: 16th (10:52.40) - Maranda Walling, Megan Downard, Priscilla Michaels, Marquelle Spencer. Newport boys (1A) 4x100: 13th (46.33) - Charles Bailey, T.J. Guilkey, Mason Whaley, Jashawn Stanley 4x200: 11th (1:36.29) - Charles Bailey, Jacob Brett, T.J. Guilkey, Mason Whaley 4x400: 15th (3:45.10) - Charles Bailey, Jacob Brett, Jashawn Stanley, Mason Whaley Andre Anderson: 11th in discus (120-1) Jacob Brett: 20th in 300 hurdles (44.46) Dominick Joseph: 5th in discus (138-7) Jashawn Stanley: 13th in triple jump (38-11.75) Newport girls (1A) Paige Wilson: 8th in long jump (16-0) NCC boys (1A) 4x200: 8th (1:35.05) - Gualt Nolan, Noah Freppon, Kyle Simon, Sam Barth 4x400: 2nd (3:28.84) - Kyle Simon, Noah Freppon, Graeham Heil, Sam Barth 4x800: 8th (8:40.47) - Grant Schwarber, Colin Walker, Brian Anderson, Nick Johnson. Sam Barth: State champ in 800 (1:58.20) Noah Freppon: 16th in 400 (54.07) Graeham Heil: 5th in 400 (51.16), 7th in triple jump (41-3), 4th in high jump (5-10) Nick Huseman: 18th in 300 hurdles (44.01) Gualt Nolan: 20th in 200 (24.49) Elliot Rust: 4th in shot put (45-3.25), 4th in discus (141-8) Kyle Simon: 11th in 300 hurdles (43.22) NCC girls (1A) 4x100: 5th (51.31) - Ashley Swope, Nikki Buller, Ansley Davenport, MiKayla Seibert 4x200: 2nd (1:45.84) - MiKayla Seibert, Nikki Buller, Ansley Davenport, Chandler Cain 4x400: 3rd (4:11.36) - Alli Otten, Ansley Davenport, MiKayla Seibert, Nikki Buller 4x800: 4th (10:15.30) - Stephanie Lewis, Chelsea Schack, Caitlyn Drohan, Imani Lankheit. Nikki Buller: State champ in 300 hurdles (46.38) Chandler Cain: 3rd in 100 (12.63), 2nd in 400 (58.84), 3rd in 200 (26.34) Caitlyn Drohan: 10th in 3,200 (12:33.37) Brooke Kuetemeyer: 13th in shot put (30-5), 7th in discus (99-0) Keyaira Lankheit: 6th in high jump (4-10) Stephanie Lewis: 8th in 800 (2:28.58) Abbie Lukens: State champ in discus (116-6), 2nd in shot put (36-10.5) Alli Otten: 8th in 100 hurdles (16.91), 17th in 300 hurdles (52.43) Chelsea Schack: 11th in 800 (2:32.41), 12th in pole vault (7-6). Olivia Schadler: 15th in triple jump (32-1.25) MiKayla Seibert: 11th in 100 (13.17). Ashley Swope: 13th in 100 hurdles (17.74).

PRESS PREPS HIGHLIGHTS

SEIBERT SIGNS WITH CCU

By James Weber jweber@nky.com

This Week’s MVP

» Bishop Brossart runner Nicole Goderwis for winning two Class 1A state titles, including being part of the 4x400 relay. » Highlands runners Ryan Greene and John Michael Griffith for winning Class 2A state track championships.

Tennis

Newport Central Catholic senior Nick Seibert signed a letter of intent April 12 to play basketball for Cincinnati Christian University. Some of his family were on hand for the ceremony and celebration. He was a key players for NCC’s 30-3 team that won the All “A” state championship this season. THANKS TO MARY CIAFARDINI

COMMUNITY

» Calvary Christian senior Preston Kohls reached the second round of the boys singles tournament May 16 in Lexington. He won his first round match in three sets before falling to a seeded player from Henry Clay in the second round. A.J. Berk, a Scott High School junior, lost in the first round to senior Brock Sigler of Paducah Tilghman, 7-6, 6-3.

Baseball

» Campbell County beat Conner 11-10 in 12 innings May

18. Rob Franzen had four hits. » Campbell beat Harrison County 2-0 May 15. Tyler Walsh had two hits and got the win on the mound while striking out 14. » Highlands beat Ryle 7-3 May 18. Mitchell Jones improved to 6-2 on the mound. Todd Ramey had three hits.

Softball

» Brossart beat Nicholas County10-4 May15. Maria Greis had four hits and twin sister Emily Greis had three hits, including a homer and three RBI. » Campbell County beat Calvary Christian 19-0 May 15. Allison Franzen had three hits and three RBI. Sarah Terhaar had a home run. » Newport beat Villa Madonna 13-0 May 15. Katlyn Hoeh had a home run and three RBI. Emily Atkins drove in four. Taylor Tyler had a homer. Hoeh recorded her 500th career strikeout May 14 against Highlands. She already has all the major school records in pitching.


SPORTS & RECREATION

A14 • CCF RECORDER • MAY 23, 2013

Alexandria athletes sign with colleges

Bishop Brossart senior Jordan Frommeyer signed with Division II Wheeling Jesuit May 15. THANKS TO RICH FROMMEYER

Community Recorder Josh Richmond reacts after scoring a run during the Florence Freedom’s home opener, Thursday, May 16. TONY TRIBBLE/FOR THE COMMUNITY RECORDER.

Freedom kicks off season Thanks to the Florence Freedom

The Florence Freedom offense exploded for seven runs in the sixth inning to roll past the River City Rascals 12-6 on Opening Night May 16 at UC Medical Center Stadium. The Rascals opened the scoring in the top of the first inning with a two-run triple by centerfielder Evan Crawford to take a 2-0 lead. The Freedom responded with two runs of their own in the bottom of the first on a two-run throwing error by River City second baseman Will Block.

The game stayed tied until the bottom of the fourth inning when Kyle Bluestein cranked a tworun home run off of River City starting pitcher Casey Barnes into the Rascals bullpen behind the left field wall to give the Freedom a 4-2 lead after four innings. But the Rascals weren’t finished scoring yet. Rascals catcher Andrew Edge led off the top of the sixth inning with a walk. Shortstop Bo Cuthbertson was hit by Freedom starter Brent Choban. It would be Choban’s last batter as he gave way to Daniel DeSi-

mone. DeSimone (W, 1-0) then gave up a two out double to Rascals DH Jason Taylor to tie the game at four. From then on out it would be all Freedom. They sent 10 men to the plate in the bottom of the sixth. DH Byron Wiley, Kyle Bluestein, first baseman Bo Folkinga and second baseman Eric Groff all had RBI hits off of Rascals right-hander Cameron Bayne (L, (0-1), but the big blow came off the bat of left fielder David Harris, who hit a 2-run home run to put the Freedom up 11-4 after six innings.

Jordan Frommeyer, a Bishop Brossart senior, signed a letter of intent to play soccer at Wheeling Jesuit University May 15. He is a midfielder/striker and was one of the captains who led the Bishop Brossart soccer team to it best ever record in program history. The team finished at 21-2-1 last year and won the 37th District Title. Wheeling Jesuit Coach James Regan said, “We are excited to have Jordan join our squad. Jordan is a fierce competitor and has the desire to succeed. We are looking forward for him to make an impact as a wide midfielder or striker.” Frommeyer led Bishop Brossart High School with 22 goals and 9 assists on the year. He was named First-Team AllState, Northern Kentucky Offensive Player of the Year, NKAC Division II, Player of the Year, Named First-Team Cincinnati/ Kentucky Enquirer, FirstTeam All -Region by the Northern Kentucky Coaches Association in 2012. He started playing soccer at 4 years old with his twin brother, Joshua. Jordan has traveled great distances in his soccer career. Jordan traveled to Pordenone, Italy, for 14 days and played for the U.S. U14 soccer team in 2009. The U.S. team fin-

Campbell County High School honored nine seniors May 16 who will play their sports in college: Rob Franzen (Georgetown College, baseball), Tyler Walsh (Kentucky Wesleyan, baseball), Joel Brune (Morehead State, football), Tyler Durham (Georgetown College, football), Mitch Kramer (Thomas More College, football), Nate McGovney (Thomas More College, basketball), Jordan Racke (Morehead State, bowling), Matt Chalk (Morehead State, bowling), Paul Longshore (Lindsay Wilson, wrestling). Sitting, from left: Walsh, Hamilton, Racke. Back row: Kramer, Franzen, Chalk, Brune, Durham, McGovney. JAMES WEBER/COMMUNITY RECORDER

ished fifth in a 32-team tournament. Locally, Jordan played for the Kings Soccer Academy for eight years. His 2012 U18 team won its first State Cup. Frommeyer currently plays for Lexington F.C. His team is currently ranked 18th in the nation. They are currently 5-0-1 in the Midwest Regional League and have already qualified for the U.S. Youth Soccer Regional Tournament in Des Moines, Iowa. Frommeyer wanted to thank his teachers at St. Mary and Bishop Brossart. On May 16, Campbell County High School honored nine seniors who will

play their sports in college: Rob Franzen (Georgetown College, Baseball), Tyler Walsh (Kentucky Wesleyan, Baseball), Joel Brune (Morehead State, Football), Tyler Durham (Georgetown College, Football), Mitch Kramer (Thomas More College, Football), Nate McGovney (Thomas More College, Basketball), Jordan Racke (Morehead State, Bowling), Matt Chalk (Morehead State, Bowling), Paul Longshore (Lindsay Wilson, Wrestling). Racke, 2012 regional champion in bowling, has had perfect attendance all 13 years in school.

Track Continued from Page A13

state runner-up 4x400 team. Elliot Rush finished fourth in both throwing events. The Recorder will have more on NewCath’s accomplishments in next week’s edition. Also in 1A, Brossart celebrated three state champions. In girls, Nicole Goderwis won the 400 and helped the 4x400 win the state title with Sarah Klump, Lauren Goderwis and Shelly Neiser. Brossart finished second in the three other relays despite breaking the old Class 1A state record in the 4x100. Also for the Mustangs, Olivia Nienaber won two solo medals. Others winning one included Madison Bertram, Suzi Brown and Kristin Klocke. Brossart senior Michael Caldwell helped the 4x800 win the 1A state title with Chris Loos, Joe Donnelly and Mark Goller. Caldwell had two other top-three finishes. Drew Berkemeyer finished eighth in the 300 hurdles.

NCC senior Nikki Buller, right, runs in last year’s state meet. FILE PHOTO

The Recorder will have more on the Mustangs next week. Newport’s Dominick Joseph and Paige Wilson won state medals for the Wildcats in the 1A meet.

In 3A, Campbell County hurdlers Rebecca Cline and Brooke Buckler won state medals in both hurdling events. Jennah Flairty was sixth in the 1,600.


VIEWPOINTS

MAY 23, 2013 • CAMBELL COUNTY RECORDER • A15

COMMUNITY

RECORDER

Editor: Michelle Shaw, mshaw@nky.com, 578-1053

EDITORIALS | LETTERS | COLUMNS | CH@TROOM

CommunityPress.com

Tough reminder: Click it or ticket

For anyone who complains about getting a ticket for not buckling up when driving or riding in a motor vehicle, here’s a crash course in reality: » 746 people were killed on Kentucky’s roadways in 2012. » Of those 746 killed, 592 were motor vehicle fatalities. » 62.5 percent of those motor vehicle fatalities were not wearing a seat belt. When worn correctly, seat belts are proven to reduce the risk of fatal injury to front-seat occupants by 45 percent and by 60 percent in pickup trucks, SUVs and minivans. While those may sound like just statistics, those of us at the

Campbell County Attorney’s Office know from personal experience that those numbers are the actual faces of mothSteven ers, fathers, Franzen brothers, sisCOMMUNITY ters, sons, RECORDER GUEST COLUMNIST daughters, aunts, uncles and friends right here in Kentucky. We tell too many families about losses that may have been prevented had a loved one only worn a seat belt. This goes to the heart of our

mission to protect the public. That is why we have joined with thousands of state and local law enforcement and other highway safety agencies nationwide to support the 2013 national Click It or Ticket seat belt enforcement mobilization running through June 2. The good news is Kentucky’s seat belt usage rate increased with the passage of the primary law from 67.2 percent in 2006 to 83.7 percent in 2012. However, that is still below the national usage rate of 86 percent. Seat belts save lives, but must be used to do so. People often ask, “Aren’t there more serious criminals

I’ve got the power May is Older Americans Month in the United States. I have put much thought into the Administration on Aging’s theme for Older Americans Month: Unleash the Power of Age. First of all, why would we only celebrate in May? At Senior Services of Northern Kentucky every Ken Rechtin month is Older COMMUNITY Americans RECORDER GUEST COLUMNIST Month. As older Americans, let’s begin celebrating our age every day and every month of the year. Now, where is that power that we are to unleash? Power of age? What power? Age means old, weak and feeble. Age means weakening eyes, knees and back. Age means aching feet and joints. Age means canes, walkers and wheelchairs. Age means hearing aids and hearing loss (especially when we are asked to mow the lawn or take out the garbage). In 1990, Snap released the catchy song: “I’ve Got the Power.” Yes, I believe that the power is both personal (I) and collective (we). And, just like Superman, our powers are super powers. Where is our power?

It is in our maturity. It is in our rich life experiences that we share. It is in our leadership skills that we teach. It is in our mentoring of others. It is in our wisdom that comes from experiences lived, learned and taught. It is in our unwavering values that we have gained by occasionally taking the wrong path and learning from it. It is in our positive attitude. It is in our easy smile and laughter that comes from not taking ourselves or others too seriously. It is in our knowing when it is time to be serious. It is in the voting booth that we will always use because we know that every vote counts. It is in the respect that we give to the decisions that come from elections. It is in our collective voice for “the never ending battle for truth, justice and the American way.” After thinking about it, we are a very powerful group of people and we should unleash and use our powers. I think that there is power in age. What do you think? Call me at 859-292-7971, or email krechtin@seniorservicesnky.org, or write to me at SSNK, 1032 Madison Ave., Covington, KY 41011. Ken Rechtin is the interim executive director of Senior Services of Northern Kentucky.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR Help hurting children

Here in Kentucky, there are children living in deplorable conditions in their own homes – victims of child abuse and neglect. Sometimes we hear their stories when it’s too late. Other times, they are rescued because a concerned family member or neighbor reports the suspected mistreatment and the children are removed from these homes. When removed, where do these children go? Is there a warm bed, a good meal and a loving family that awaits to comfort them after their ordeal? Thanks to foster parents around Kentucky, there is. May is National Foster Care Month and it’s an opportunity to show our appreciation for the wonderful people who welcome these hurting children into their homes and into their lives. Sunrise Children’s Services has been offering a refuge for hurting children since 1869, and today we have a statewide network of foster parents who provide a safe, loving environment for children

in need. Foster parents are equipped with compassion, patience and a desire to make a difference in a child’s life. Sometimes the child is in a foster home for only a short period, and other times the arrangement leads to an adoption. Regardless of how long the relationship is, foster parents have an opportunity to model loving, responsible and productive family relationships to children who may never have witnessed how families are supposed to function. Abuse and neglect show no signs of significantly decreasing in Kentucky, meaning the demand for foster parents continues to be high. As you read this, there are children in dire need of a home like yours where they can lay their head without pain, without fear, and without hunger. If you would like more information about how to become a foster parent, or support those who are, visit us at www.sunrise.org , or call us toll-free at 1-855-33icare.

CAMPBELL

COUNTY RECORDER

Dr. William Smithwick Sunrise Children’s Service A publication of

on the street other than those who simply are not buckling up? They’re not hurting anyone but themselves.” To the contrary, the people who choose to disobey the law by not wearing their seat belts are taking a chance with not only their lives, but the emotional and financial health of their families, friends and our community. Death may be the ultimate consequence for not wearing a seat belt, but even for those who escape a fatal crash, the economic costs of injuries caused by motor vehicle crashes are staggering. Every year motor vehicle crashes cost our country an estimated $230.6

billion. That equals more than $800 per person per year. Yes, this is a national problem, but law enforcement and first responders see the local faces at too many crash scenes. So, it begins right here in Kentucky. Law enforcement will be out in force to show our dedication to solving this problem. We want 100 percent of motorists to buckle up. Buckling up costs you nothing, but the costs of NOT buckling up may be a ticket, or worse — your life. Treat this as a tough and potentially life-saving reminder: click it or ticket. Steven J. Franzen the Campbell County Attorney.

The sky is still blue, not green Some of the national columns on our economy would be amusing if the policies they espoused weren’t potentially harmful to folks on Main Street. For example, in a recent column prominent author, columnist, and journalist E.J. Dionne waxed eloquently about the virtues of increased deficit Rob Hudson spending to help jobs COMMUNITY RECORDER GUEST and our COLUMNIST economy. Mr. Dionne also posited a theory that those who wish to move toward a balanced federal budget are wrong for America and their motives are not genuine. Being a national media rock star does not qualify one as an authority on our economy. Mr. Dionne, who is a great writer, has a Harvard degree in sociology, not business or economics. He is not an economist, business executive, or even an elected official. Professionally, it appears he has been spectacular at running a keyboard. Businesses across the country, who actually employ most people, sing a different tune. They see different problems with employment. Some are cutting back work hours to below 30 a week because of Obamacare. Our federal government has made smaller employers literally seek to restrain their workforces to fewer than 50 employees, at which time a host of government rules and regulations (e.g. FMLA and Obamacare) will hit them. If more employees means more liability and less efficiency, do you think this would affect hiring? No matter – they say we need more government. Trillion dollar deficits are not enough. Even at low

ABOUT LETTERS AND COLUMNS We welcome your comments on editorials, columns, stories or other topics important to you in the Community Recorder. Include your name, address and phone number(s) so we may verify your letter. Letters of 200 or fewer words and columns of 500 or fewer words have the best chance of being published. All submissions may be edited for length, accuracy and clarity. Deadline: Noon Friday E-mail: mshaw@community press.com Fax: 283-7285. U.S. mail: See box below Letters, columns and articles submitted to the Community Recorder may be published or distributed in print, electronic or other forms.

interest rates, interest on the federal debt now consumes over 11 percent of federal spending. The more we spend, the more interest we owe. Anybody who has had credit card debt understands that pretty soon the interest begins eating into the money you need to live. Eventually, it begins feeling like interest is robbing you of your freedom. It’s happening now. Our federal government spends more on interest than we do on infrastructure. We encourage our children to pay attention, read the newspapers, and to think independently. National media figures, however, seem very persuasive. They must be right – look at their fame and apparent fortune! Sadly, talking heads rarely tell you both sides of the story. Most fair-minded people would find this approach to be repugnant. For some reason, we don’t. Many of us long for truth and national unity around common sense principles. We long for an educated,

228 Grandview Drive, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017 654 Highland Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075 phone: 283-0404 email: kynews@communitypress.com web site: www.nky.com

knowledgeable electorate. But not all debate is healthy, even among media rock stars. For example, if we publicly debated at great length whether the sky is blue or green, we wouldn’t just be wasting our time. We’d really be tacitly misleading anybody who listened. What if we gave the green sky advocates the biggest stages, affording them the highest level of respect in our national media, even though they’re afflicted with color-blindness? Over a period of time, many people would become confused and others would even come to believe the sky is green. Clarity and truth can, at times, actually become victims of debate and open-mindedness. Such is the state of our public discourse today. Even though our federal government is broke, I don’t fault the people who lament reduced funding for programs they believe are needed. They’re passionate about helping others. And some government spending does spur employment. But exalted members of the national media keep telling us the sky is green. Would you trust them to manage your personal finances, to run your business, or to make public policy? I’d rather hear from a GED recipient who, in this challenging culture, managed to teach his children right from wrong. I’d rather hear from the head of a household who steered her family clear of debt and paid off a mortgage. These are the people from whom all of us can really learn a thing or two.

Rob Hudson is a partner in Frost Brown Todd LLC’s Florence office. His most recent book, “A Better Tomorrow,” became a No. 1 Amazon Hot New Release and received the National Runner-Up Award for E-Literature, recognizing the best political and economic books of 2012.

Campbell County Editor Michelle Shaw mshaw@nky.com, 578-1053 Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday See page A2 for additional contact information.


NEWS

A16 • CCF RECORDER • MAY 23, 2013

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THURSDAY, MAY 23, 2013

LIFE

COMMUNITY RECORDER

PEOPLE | IDEAS | RECIPES

Women's Crisis Center board of directors and executive director, front row: Jeanne-Marie Tapke, Christine Bochenek, Lillian Jones, Christine Warren, Jennifer R. Dusing, Deren Boswell Worrell, Donna R. Murphy, Cathy L. Silvers and Rosemary Weathers Burnham. Back row: Casey Flick, Scott Getz, Mareka Scott, Marsha Croxton (executive director), Mary P. Burns (board dhair), W. Thomas Fisher and Ashley Ballard Morris. PROVIDED

Toast for Hope benefits victim of domestic violence

Community Recorder

Friends and supporters of Women’s Crisis Center gathered at Drees Pavilion at Devou Park Memorial Overlook in Covington on April 11 and gave a toast to the agency as it continues to lead our community in the social change needed to end domestic violence, rape and sexual abuse. The fifth annual Toast for Hope wine pairings event had more than 180 guests in attendance and raised approximately $30,000. Toast for Hope was an evening of elegant fun that included fine wine paired with signature gourmet hors d’oeuvres by Jeff Thomas Catering, live music by Richard Goering and Suzanne Bona, souvenir wine glasses by Sterling Cut Glass, the Vision of Hope Award presentation, and the announcement of The Big Apple Raffle winner. Women’s Crisis Center presented its 2013 Vision of Hope Award to Vicki Hudson, manager of public education and volunteer services of the agency for 25 years, as she prepares for retirement this year. During her tenure, Hudson has educated countless children, teens and adults and has easily trained and mentored 1,200 individuals who respond to area hospitals in the role of runners. Hudson dedicated her award to WCC volunteers, who not only support WCC by staffing community displays and providing crisis line and office assistance, but who respond and provide crucial support to domestic violence and sexual assault victims at the emergency room, when,

Women's Crisis Center board chair Mary P. Burns, Vision of Hope winner Vicki Hudson and WCC executive director Marsha Croxton PROVIDED

Vision of Hope award winner Vicki Hudson, second from right in front row, and her family. PROVIDED

Women's Crisis Center counselors Angel Craddock, Laura Greiwe and Lesley DeMarcus. PROVIDED

Laura Kinney, Vicki Hudson, Bob and Jackie Zschau attend the Toast of Hope dinner on behalf of Women's Crisis Center. PROVIDED

most often, they are at their most vulnerable states. The lucky Big Apple Raffle winner will be treated to three nights in New York City including airfare for two from Ultimate Air Shuttle, accommodations at the San Carlos Boutique Hotel and dining at The Sea Fire Grill in mid-

town Manhattan. Proceeds will help Women’s Crisis Center empower victims of domestic violence, rape and sexual abuse to gain self-esteem and self-sufficiency to move beyond victimhood and become strong survivors. The agency sheltered 636

women and children last year. Presenting sponsors of the event were the Carol Ann & Ralph V. Haile, Jr. /U.S. Bank Foundation; the William Hueneke Foundation, Huntington National Bank, Trustee; and Johnson Trust Co. Additional sponsors included Graf Stiebel & Coyne

Co., LPA, Sterling Cut Glass, Bank of Kentucky, Cincinnati Bell, Rose Communications, Thomas More College, VonLehman & Company, Inc., Raines, Buechel, Conley & Dusing, P.L.L.C., Ultimate Air Travel, Mutual of America, the San Carlos Hotel and the Sea Fire Grill.


B2 • CCF RECORDER • MAY 23, 2013

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD

The RGI River Run, benefiting Kicks for Kids, is 9 a.m. Saturday, May 25, including the Special K for children with special needs. THANKS TO CARA DOWNING

FRIDAY, MAY 24

ABOUT CALENDAR

Art Exhibits Chris Felix, 11 a.m.-10 p.m., Art on the Levee Gallery, Newport on the Levee, More than 100 paintings with stories of baseball from Cincinnati native and artist. 859-261-5770; www.artonthelevee.com. Newport.

To submit calendar items, go to www.NKY.com and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to life@ communitypress.com along with event information. Items are printed on a spaceavailable basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to www.NKY.com and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page.

Drink Tastings Friday Night in the Aisles Wine Tasting, 4-8 p.m. Feature: Local Wines for Memorial Day with Baker-Bird., Party Source, 95 Riviera Drive, Flight of four wines, free of charge. Ages 21 and up. 859-291-4007; www.thepartysource.com. Bellevue.

Lectures Brunch With Brilliant Brains: Game Changing Ideas with Platform53, 10 a.m.-noon, Artisans Enterprise Center, 27 W. Seventh St., Hear from and discuss how local entrepreneurs, innovators and organizations are pursuing game-changing ideas in our region. Free. 859292-2322. Covington.

Music - Acoustic The Andreas Kapsalis and Goran Ivanovic Guitar Duo, 8 p.m., The Thompson House, 24 E. Third St., $10. 859-261-7469; www.thompsonhousenewport.com. Newport.

Music - Country The Kernal, 10 p.m. Doors open 4 p.m., The Southgate House Revival, 111 E. Sixth St., Lounge. Honky-Tonk band from Jackson, Tenn. Ages 21 and up. Free. 859-431-2201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport.

Music - Rock The Refranes, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., JerZee’s Pub and Grub, 708 Monmouth St., Free. 859-4913500. Newport. New Machines, 9 p.m. With the Tigerlillies, Black Owls, Ed Pittman of Toxic Reasons., The Southgate House Revival, 111 E. Sixth St., Jazz/rock hybrid with ‘70s punk overtones. Ages 18 and up. $8, $5 advance. 859-4312201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport.

Andrew W.K. performs at the Madison Theater, Sunday, May 26. FILE PHOTO On Stage - Comedy Midnight Swinger, 7:30 and 10 p.m., Funny Bone Comedy Club, $10-$15. 859-957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

Runs / Walks RGI River Run, 9 a.m., Purple People Bridge, Pete Rose Way, Cincinnati; Third Street, Newport, 5K run/walk bridges Newport, Covington and Cincinnati. Also features Special K for children with special needs, Children’s Fun Run and Parent/ Child Teams. Includes music, awards, door prize drawing and tickets for free food and drink at post-event party at Arnie’s on the Levee. Benefits Kicks for Kids. $16, $10 ages 7-17, free ages 6 and under. Registration required. Presented by Kicks for Kids. 859-331-8484; www.kicksforkids.org. Newport.

On Stage - Comedy

SUNDAY, MAY 26

Midnight Swinger, 8 and 10:30 p.m., Funny Bone Comedy Club, Newport on the Levee, $10-$15. Through May 26. 859-957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

Antiques Shows

SATURDAY, MAY 25 Art Exhibits Chris Felix, 11 a.m.-10 p.m., Art on the Levee Gallery, 859-2615770; www.artonthelevee.com. Newport.

Business Seminars Encycle with Cincinnati Computer Cooperative, 8 a.m.noon, Artisans Enterprise Center, 27 W. Seventh St., Goal is to help make attendees’ businesses as efficient and profitable as possible. Free. 859-292-2322. Covington.

Music - Rock Face Full of Chicken, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., JerZee’s Pub and Grub, 708 Monmouth St., Free. 859-4913500. Newport.

The Village Vintage and Arts Bazaar, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., MainStrasse Village, Main Street, Antiques and collectibles available for sale along MainStrasse’s Promenade. Free admission. Presented by MainStrasse Village Association. 859-468-4820; www.mainstrasse.org. Covington.

Art Exhibits Chris Felix, noon-6 p.m., Art on the Levee Gallery, 859-261-5770; www.artonthelevee.com. Newport.

Music - Rock Hawk and Dove, 8:30 p.m., The Southgate House Revival, 111 E. Sixth St., $8 ages 18-20; $5 ages 21 and up. 859-431-2201; www.maydaynorthside.com. Newport.

On Stage - Comedy Midnight Swinger, 7:30 p.m., Funny Bone Comedy Club, $10-$15. 859-957-2000;

www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

MONDAY, MAY 27 Art Exhibits Chris Felix, 11 a.m.-9 p.m., Art on the Levee Gallery, 859-2615770; www.artonthelevee.com. Newport.

Holiday - Memorial Day Newport Memorial Day Parade, 9 a.m., Campbell County Courthouse, 24 W. Fourth St., The city’s annual parade travels south on York Street to Sixth Street, turn east on Monmouth Street, go south on Monmouth Street to Tenth Street ending at Newport City Building. A ceremony honoring veterans follows. With continental breakfast on first floor of multi-purpose room of city building. Dress for weather. Free. Presented by City of Newport. 859-292-3838; www.cityofnewportky.org. Newport.

Karaoke and Open Mic Open Mic, 9 p.m.-2 a.m., The Southgate House Revival, 111 E. Sixth St., The Lounge. Awardwinning open mic features singer-songwriters, comedians, marimba players, storytellers and more. Ages 21 and up. 859-431-2201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport.

Music - DJ Cincinnati DJ Battles, 9 p.m.-2 a.m., Toro on the Levee, 1 Levee Way, Drink specials. Open to all DJs. DJs must register. Ages 21 and up. Free. 859-652-7260; www.torolevee.com. Newport.

Music - Rock Snow White’s Poison Bite Tour, 7:30-11:30 p.m. Featuring Chomp Chomp Attack, Kissing Candice and Blood on the Martyrs., The Southgate House Revival, 111 E. Sixth St., $10, $8 advance. 859-431-2201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport.

TUESDAY, MAY 28 Art Exhibits Chris Felix, 11 a.m.-9 p.m., Art on the Levee Gallery, 859-2615770; www.artonthelevee.com. Newport.

Education New Student Enrollment, 9 a.m., Alexandria Community Center, 8236 W. Main St., Blue trailer in back parking lot. Adults can sign up for free GED or other adult education classes. For ages 16 and up. Presented by Alexandria Adult Learning Center. 859-757-6836. Alexandria. New Student Enrollment, 9 a.m., Newport Adult Learning Center, 30 W. Eighth St., Adults can sign up for free GED or other adult education classes. 859-292-3056; www.myged.org. Newport.

Exercise Classes Cardio Dance Party!, 7:30-8:30 p.m., Locomotion on the Levee, 1 Levee Way, $10 drop-in. Presented by Cardio Dance Party. 513-617-9498; www.cardiodanceparty.com. Newport.

Music - DJ Devout Wax, 8 p.m.-1:30 a.m., The Southgate House Revival, 111 E. Sixth St., The Lounge. Vinyl night. Margaret and Jonathan spin eclectic wax. Including an all spin-by-request set, bring your own records. Also, local/regional-only set. Ages 21 and up. Free. 859-4312201; www.facebook.com/ DevoutWax. Newport.

Music - Rock Anderson Ferry Band, 7-11:30 p.m. With the Reflectives, Rio and the Ramblers, Hot For Alice and Good Night Noises., The Southgate House Revival, 111 E. Sixth St., $8 ages 18-20, $5 ages 21 and up. 859-431-2201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport.

The Tolling of the Bells Ceremony is 11:30 a.m. Sunday, May 26, at the World Peace Bell, 425 York Street, Newport. The event, sponsored by Cincinnati Base Submarine Veterans, honors all submarines and submariners lost since the beginning of the United States Submarine Force with a ceremonial ringing of the bells. Admission is free, and the public is welcome. Call 513-874-7655, ext. 126 or visit www.cincysubvets.com for more information. THANKS TO GREGG DUNN

WEDNESDAY, MAY 29 Art Exhibits Chris Felix, 11 a.m.-9 p.m., Art on the Levee Gallery, 859-2615770; www.artonthelevee.com. Newport.

Drink Tastings Keg Tapping Celebration, 7 p.m. Tapping June selection, German Pilsner. Much like Bohemian Pilsner, this beer is crisp and refreshing., Hofbrauhaus, 200 E. Third St., German entertainment, jugglers, magic and parade. Free. 859-491-7200; www.hofbrauhausnewport.com. Newport.

Music - Hip-Hop Nappy Roots, 7-11:30 p.m. With Oreo Jones., The Southgate House Revival, 111 E. Sixth St., $15, $12 advance. 859-431-2201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport.

THURSDAY, MAY 30 Art Exhibits Chris Felix, 11 a.m.-9 p.m., Art on the Levee Gallery, 859-2615770; www.artonthelevee.com. Newport.

Exercise Classes Cardio Dance Party!, 7:30-8:30 p.m., Locomotion on the Levee, $10 drop-in. 513-617-9498; www.cardiodanceparty.com. Newport.

Music - Acoustic The Chuck Brisbin Duo, 6-10 p.m., Buckhead Mountain Grill, 35 Fairfield Ave., Free. 859-4917333; www.thetunaproject.com. Bellevue.

Music - Cabaret

Don Fangman, 6:30-9 p.m., Knotty Pine On The Bayou, 6302 Licking Pike, Don Fangman sings Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, Tony Bennett, Neil Diamond, Michael Buble and Andrea Bocelli. Free. 859-781-2200. Cold Spring.

Music - Concerts Live at the Levee, 7-10 p.m. Music by Naked Karate Girls., Newport on the Levee, 1 Levee Way, Riverwalk Plaza. Summer concert series. Free. 859-8151389; www.newportonthelevee.com. Newport.

Music - Country Original Hillbilly Thursdays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m., The Southgate House Revival, 111 E. Sixth St., The Lounge. Country, bluegrass, Americana and old fashioned hillbilly music. Different artist each week. Includes 50 cents off Jack Daniels. Ages 21 and up. Free. 859-431-2201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport. Holly Williams, 8-11:30 p.m., The Southgate House Revival, 111 E. Sixth St., Singer-songwriter and daughter/granddaughter of Hank Williams Jr./Sr. $12, $10 advance. 859-431-2201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport.

Music - World Alpen Echos, 7:30-11 p.m., Hofbrauhaus, 200 E. Third St., Free. 859-491-7200; www.hofbrauhausnewport.com. Newport.

On Stage - Comedy Loni Love, 8 p.m., Funny Bone Comedy Club, Newport on the Levee, Stand-up comic after quitting her job as an electrical engineer in 2003. $17-$20. 859-957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

Recreation Aerial Fitness, 6-7 p.m., Locomotion on the Levee, 1 Levee Way, Work on core body strength and endurance and use aerial equipment for workout. Rigorous course suitable for all fitness levels. Ages 18 and up. $15. Presented by Cincinnati Circus Company. Through July 31. 513-921-5454; www.cincinnaticircus.com. Newport.

Senior Citizens Bingo, 12:30-2:30 p.m., Walton Multipurpose Senior and Community Center, 859-485-7611. Walton.


LIFE

MAY 23, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • B3

‘Restaurant’ column with two cloned recipes Talk about multi-tasking. I was writing this column when my husband, Frank, called out from the garden to inspect the rows of corn. “It’s coming up spotty,” he said, and blamed the robins for plucking Rita seedlings Heikenfeld out of the RITA’S KITCHEN ground. While I was out, I decided to pot up some of Mom’s peppermint to plant around her and my Dad’s graves for Memorial Day. Then I went back in to finish my column. Ten minutes later I got called out again, this time to plant another row of potatoes. So it has been one busy morning. I’m not complaining because I know the little bit of planting we’re doing now will morph into an abundant harvest. Today’s column could be called “the restaurant issue,” since the recipes shared are from famous eateries.

Opera cream cake “like” Knotty Pine on the Bayou A few years ago, a Western Hills reader shared her version for this customer favorite from Knotty Pine Restau-

rant in Kentucky. “So close you won’t be able to tell the difference,” she said. Christine V. is just the latest of readers who continue to request the recipe, so I finally made it myself. After tasting it, I wondered why I waited so long! I made a few changes dependent upon what ingredients I had. Those are in parentheses. You choose which ingredients appeal to you. Don’t be put off by the list of instructions, the cake comes together easily and would be perfect to tote to that Memorial Day picnic. Because it’s baked in a jelly roll pan, it isn’t a real high riser, and is very moist. The browned butter icing elevates it into the kind of cake that begs for “one more bite.” How many does it serve? I got 16 servings and could have gotten more. Cake Whisk together and set aside: 2 cups sugar 2 cups all-purpose flour 1 ⁄2 teaspoon salt

Bring to boil: 2 sticks margarine (I used unsalted butter) 1 cup water 4 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder

Cool, then add sugar, flour and salt mixture, and blend well.

This reader-submitted recipe for opera cream cake tastes just like the cake at Knotty Pine on the Bayou. THANKS TO RITA HEIKENFELD.

Then beat in: 2 large eggs ⁄2 cup sour cream (plus 1 teaspoon vanilla) 1 teaspoon baking soda 1

Batter will be thin. Pour into sprayed jellyroll pan and bake in preheated 400 degree oven 20 minutes. Icing: Boil until golden: 11⁄2 sticks butter (I used unsalted)

This is what I call browned butter: Cook in pan over medium heat until butter boils and begins to turn golden. It will foam up a bit. Be careful as it can burn easily. It’s done when butter turns tan color and you see specks of light golden brown on bottom.

This takes a few minutes. Remove from heat right away, stir browned bits in and pour into bowl to cool. To cooled browned butter, add and beat until fluffy (it will look lumpy at first): 1 pound powdered sugar 2 teaspoons vanilla 6-8 tablespoons whipping cream (I used evaporated milk)

Spread on cooled cake right in pan. Store in refrigerator.

Tip from Rita’s Kitchen

A jelly roll pan (about 10 inches by 15 inches) is bigger than a cookie sheet and has sides.

Kayla Dunlap’s Carrabba’s dipping oil/sauce Kayla, a Fort Thomas reader, shares a good recipe for this dipping oil. She said: “Bonnie asked for help finding a recipe similar to Carrabba’s. Here’s one I have used.” 1 tablespoon minced basil 1 tablespoon chopped parsley (Italian is best) 1 tablespoon minced garlic 1 teaspoon dried thyme 1 teaspoon dried oregano 1 teaspoon ground black pepper 1 ⁄2 teaspoon kosher salt or 1⁄2 teaspoon ground sea salt 1 ⁄2 teaspoon chopped rosemary 1 ⁄4 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes

⁄2 teaspoon olive oil (Plus additional 3-4 tablespoons) 1 ⁄8 teaspoon fresh lemon juice 1

Combine all of the ingredients, except oil and lemon. Put in a small food processor. Chop briefly until all ingredients are about the same. Stir in oil and lemon juice. To serve: Combine about 11⁄2 teaspoons spice blend to 3 to 4 tablespoons additional olive oil on a small dish. Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator and author. Find her blog online at Cincinnati.Com/blogs. Email her at columns@communitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-248-7130, ext. 356.

Worry-Free Pricing. Carefree living.

Defy expectations.

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LIFE

B4 • CCF RECORDER • MAY 23, 2013

Look out for fake debt collectors It can be scary getting calls from bill collectors. But it can be even scarier if the calls are coming from fake bill collectors. Many make it sound as if you’re going to be arrested unless you pay them now. But if you know what to expect, you

can handle it without a problem. Larry Brondhaver of Anderson Township said he received such a call recently. “I was told there’s going to be papers delivered to me by the sheriff. They tried twice to deliv-

er the papers and nobody was here they said. ‘Will there be someone there in the next 48 hours to receive these papers? I’ve got to deliver them.’ He said we have to make an appearance if we don’t. I said, ‘An appearance? Where?’ He said,

‘In court’,” Brondhaver said. Then Brondaver was told he could call Martin and Associates in California for more specifics on the debt, which is allegedly owed by his son. “They want me to make a payment, and they want it for him. It’s for a bill he supposedly owes to U.S. Bank,” he said. Brondhaver then did something everyone should do. He asked for proof of the debt, allegedly owed by his son. Soon, he received a letter in the mail. “It says they want to settle with you for less than what you owe, of course. For my son they want $352 processing fee now, right now. That fee will carry over for another month,” he said. Brondhaver talked with his son about this and said, “What really got my son was they knew the last four numbers of his Social Securi-

ty number. They knew the last four numbers, and they have his U.S. Bank account numHoward ber.” Ain A close HEY HOWARD! look at that letter shows it’s not from a real debt collector. Under federal law debt collectors must use specific language in these letters saying, “This is an attempt to collect a debt.” In addition, they must state you have 30 days to send a written statement disputing the debt. That language wasn’t in the letter send to Brondhaver. “Luckily there was no money sent, but my concerns are people that will. These guys are very, very dramatic. Everybody in the office is very dramatic. They say, ‘You’ve got to do this now, or else’,” Brondha-

ver said. A U.S. Bank spokeswoman tells me the bank doesn’t know anything about Martin and Associates, adding this firm was not hired by the bank to collect its debts. So I called Martin and Associates and asked who they are working for, but they wouldn’t answer that. There are lots of complaints about this company on the Internet. All say the company claims to be collecting on behalf of U.S. Bank. The Federal Trade Commission says you should never confirm or give a caller your personal or financial information. Brondhaver has reported this incident to the Ohio Attorney General. Howard Ain answers consumer complaints weekdays on WKRC-TV Local 12. Write to him at 12 WKRC-TV, 1906 Highland Ave., Cincinnati 45219.

BUSINESS UPDATE Farris earns promotion

degree in biology from Northern Kentucky University. He lives in Alexandria with his wife and three children.

The Fifth Third Bancorp Board of Directors recently promoted Brad Farris to Vice President. Farris is an off-site ATM program manager. He joined the bank in 1999 and earned his bachelor’s

Furlong welcomes Cold Spring resident

Furlong Building Enterprises, LLC, a commer-

t and Him Crucified Jesus Chris We believe there are people who:

1. Want plain Bible teaching only 2. Want their children in real classes where the Bible is taught 3. Want to worship to glorify God and not to be entertained.

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We pray that you are one of those people. Visit with us at The Northern Ky. Church of Christ 18 Scott Dr. • Florence, KY (859) 371-2095 Sunday: Morning Worship - 9:45am Evening Worship - 6:00pm Wednesday evening Bible Study - 7:30 www.nkcofc.com We have electronic Bible Study tools available for your use.

cial and industrial construction firm, recently welcomed Chris Kroger to the company as a senior superintendent. Kroger has 26 years experience in construction, and is responsible for projects in the field and working with clients. He previously worked at Dugan & Meyers Construction Company and Don Salyers Masonry Inc. “Chris Kroger’s broad range of experience will make him a great fit for any of our client’s projects,” said Furlong President Jude Hehman. “Chris knows his profession and has the track record and list of satisfied clients to prove it. We are proud to welcome him to Furlong.” Kroger also is a former Marine. He lives in Cold Spring with his family and enjoys spending time on their family farm in Bracken County.

Certified nurse midwives are advanced practice nurses who have obtained additional certification from the American Midwifery Certification Board.

Robin Centner, APRN, CNM

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TheChristHospital.com/Ob&Gyn I


LIFE

MAY 23, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • B5

The winter solstice may bring the “official” longest night of the year, but the longest night of my life was when our cocker spaniel, Nipper, was a puppy and we were training him to stay in his own bed and sleep through the night. We’d had him for about a week and the routine was: the last thing at night, we took him outside to go potty, then put him in his crate which was kept in the corner of our bedroom. Things had been going fairly well, but on this particular night, he decided that he wanted out. It began with a gentle whimpering, but quickly escalated to crying, barking and howling. No amount of shushing Marsie Hall him Newbold worked. MARSIE’S There was MENAGERIE nothing wrong, he wasn’t twisted up in a blanket, nobody was poking at him with a sharp stick and the Kardashian sisters weren’t on the TV. No, Nipper wanted to sleep in bed with his Mommy and Daddy and if it took screaming like a banshee for hours on end, he was going to do it. After about an hour of this, I was ready to give in. But, my normally mildmannered professor husband went into “AlphaTom” mode. He jumped out of bed, picked up Nipper’s crate and carried it (complete with the very vocal puppy inside) into the living room. Returning to the bedroom, he closed the door behind him and declared: “It is either him or us.” And Tom was right. If it had been left up to me, Nipper would not have turned out to be the welltrained companion that he grew up to be. Ultimately, all the extra time, effort and consistency on our parts throughout his puppy hood paid off in a much happier life for us all later on. Our saying throughout that time (and later, throughout Nosey’s puppy days) was, “We are investing in our future happiness.” Dr. Jodi Heekin, DVM, of Heekin Animal Hospital agrees wholeheartedly. So much so, she is sponsoring a free series of talks in May called, “Successful Puppy Parenting: A Headstart to Happy Pups and People.” The purpose of the series is to give dog owners information they can use as they transition a new pup or dog into their household. Local dog trainer Dae Grodin of Dog-Abilities will present topics of interest to owners of new puppies and recently adopted rescue dogs. Dae uses sound, scientific methods that are recommended by the leading veterinary behaviorists. Her gentle, force-free approach promotes relationshipbuilding between dog and owner. Topics for the talks include house train-

ing, crate training, puppy social development, and problem behaviors such as play-biting and jumping. Dr. Heekin will also present a segment on acclimating puppies to veterinary visits. “Behavior problems are a leading cause of relinquishment to shelters,” Dr. Heekin explains. “In order for dogs to find a “forever” home, it is vital that they have proper socialization and training. A knowledgeable dog owner can better help their new pup successfully integrate as a member of the family and with the world around him.” Dr. Heekin, who is the owner of Corey, a 2-anda-half year old Sheltie mix, strongly advises her clients to micromanage their puppies behavior “on the front end” saying, “You get out of it what you put into it.” She is frustrated by what she sees as punitive training methods, believing that positive relationship centered training works much better. “Even in the early weeks before they enter a training class,“ she said. “Puppies are already learning every minute of every day. If the dog is misbehaving and the person does not have the tools to deal with it, it will ultimately limit the dog’s horizons. I’d like to see owners focus on proper behavior and good discipline from the get go. If they build a relationship with their pet built on trust, boundaries and praise it will open up horizons for everyone.”

Dr. Heekin’s ‘Headstart Tips for Puppy Owners » Use a crate. Putting a puppy in a crate is no different than putting a baby in a crib. They need a safe, comfortable place

to rest and nap. » Start early. Puppies start learning at birth. Every experience they have helps them learn about the world around them. Provide exposure to new experiences, people and other pets in a controlled and safe manner. » Plan on spending extra time with your pup. They need plenty of love, learning, exercise and fun. Time you invest now is time well spent in developing a happy, wellbalanced and mannerly puppy that will be with you for its lifetime. » Accentuate the positive. Notice and reward the puppy for all the little things he does right. He will want to do “good” things more often! » Address problems early. Puppies bite, jump, bark and chew. Learn how to correct these problems as they emerge, to prevent bigger problems later. » Plan on continuing your puppy’s education with a reputable dog trainer. The next “Successful Puppy Parenting: A Headstart to Happy Pups and People” session is 7 p.m. Wednesday, June 5, at Heekin Animal Hospital, 5052 Old Taylor Mill Road, in Taylor Mill, discussing “Solving and Managing Problem Behaviors.” The program is free, and designed for owners of new dogs, either puppies or adultrescue dogs (peopletraining only; no dogs). For more information, go online at www.facebook.com/HeekinAnimalHospital, or call Dae Grodin at 859-533-1340.

CROSSROADS

Newport Central Catholic senior students and members of the Breds for Life/Pro Life Organization put up crosses on campus calling attention to the number of surgical abortions performed daily in the United States. THANKS TO MARY CIAFARDINI

Newport garden walk springs up June 1-2 The 17th annual East Row Garden Walk is 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 1 and 2 in Newport’s East Row Historic District. The walk features eight private gardens, including six never open to the public and another honored by the Cincinnati Horticultural Society. This year, a portion of the proceeds will go to the Newport Urban Tree Replacement Program and several community beautification projects. Tickets are $15 per person; children younger-than-12 may enter free of charge when accompanied by an adult. Advanced tickets sold online at www.eastrowgardenclub.org. Tickets also sold both days at the exhibitor

area at the Watertower Square parking lot, located at Sixth and Washington streets. For more information, call 859-750-8252, or visit www.eastrow-

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Marsie Hall Newbold is a resident of Highland Heights. For more pet care stories and tips, visit www.marsiesmenagerie.com. If you have any ideas for future columns, email Marsie Hall Newbold at marsolete@insightbb.com.

Do You Have Ulcerative Colitis?

Is it hard to control your symptoms using your current medication?

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What

This study will evaluate whether the study medication, budesonide MMX®, is safe and effective in people with ulcerative colitis that is not well controlled using anti-inflammatory medications known as 5-aminosalicylic acids (5ASAs). Budesonide MMX®, is approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA). This study is looking to see whether budesonide MMX® (given by mouth as tablet) and 5-ASA medication used together can better control the symptoms of ulcerative colitis.

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Who

Adults 18-75 years old who have been diagnosed with mild or moderate ulcerative colitis (UC) and continue to have symptoms even when taking a 5-ASA medication (such as Asacol® and Lialda®) to treat UC.

Pay

Participants will be compensated for time and travel. All medication will be provided at no cost to participants.

Details

For more information, contact Lauren Plageman at 513-558-5529 or lauren.plageman@uchealth.com

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LIFE

B6 • CCF RECORDER • MAY 23, 2013

Boost your older home’s energy efficiency Over the years, improved technology has made many new homes more energy efficient, but you shouldn’t shy

away or move from an older home just for better energy efficiency. You can upgrade your older home to make it

CITY OF WILDER, KENTUCKY ORDINANCE NO. 13-0302 AN ORDINANCE ENACTING AND ADOPTING A SUPPLEMENT TO THE CODE OF ORDINANCES OF THE CITY OF WILDER, KENTUCKY WHEREAS, American Legal Publishing Corporation of Cincinnati, Ohio has completed the 2012 S-33 supplement to the Code of Ordinances of the City of Wilder, Kentucky, which supplement contains all ordinances of a general nature enacted since the prior supplement to the Code of Ordinances of this municipality; and WHEREAS; American Legal Publishing Corporation has recommended the revision or addition of certain sections of the Code of Ordinances which are based on or make reference to sections of the Kentucky Revised Statues; and WHEREAS, it is the intent of Council to accept these updated sections on accordance with the changes of the law of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

energy efficient. Prior to the mid-20th century, fully automated, controlled and mechanized heating, cooling and ventilation systems did not exist. Instead, older homes had passive and manual features incorporated into their design to meet heating, cooling and ventilation needs. Older homes, though, have many environmentally friendly features, including thick walls, operable windows, wide roof overhangs and porches. In the past, these houses might have had window awnings to shade the windows. Vents and shutters would let air

How’s Your

circulate while keeping out the sun and high ceilings allowed hot air to rise. Diane To make Mason an older EXTENSION home, or NOTES any home, more energy efficient, you should use a wholehouse approach. You probably know if air is coming in around your windows and doors. If you can see daylight around the top and sides of your exterior doors when they are closed it lets you know there is room for improvement.

Among other things, the whole-house approach can reveal whether your home has large air leaks. Older homes that have undergone mechanical system retrofits or remodeling are particularly prone to having major air leaks that are not easily seen. Look to see what style of heating and air conditioning ducts you have. Are they plain metal or are they insulated? Are the joints in the ducts all connected? If you have questions about your home’s systems consider having a home energy audit or assessment done. The money you save by making recommended

changes may pay for the cost of the analysis. Regardless of your home’s age, you should make sure your home is air sealed. An easy place to start is to maintain the caulk and weather stripping of doors and windows. It is easy to see these places in a house, and sealing doors and windows will eliminate air leaks at these points. Making our homes more energy efficient is important for year-round savings and comfort. Diane Mason is county extension agent for family and consumer sciences at the Boone County Cooperative Extension Service.

Bath Tub? E... BEFOR

NOW THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY WILDER, CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY AS FOLLOWS; SECTION ONE

& AFTER!

That the 2012 supplement to the Code of Ordinance of the City of Wilder, Kentucky, as submitted by American Legal Publishing Corporation of Cincinnati, and as attached hereto, be and the same is hereby adopted by reference as if set out in its entirety. SECTION TWO That this Ordinance be read on two separate occasions, shall be signed by the Mayor, attested by the City Clerk published in accordance with law and made a part of the records of the City of Wilder. Same shall be in effect at the earliest time provided by law.

Expires 6-30-13

Bath Tub & Tile Reglazing Tile Regrouting & Sealing LIFE TIME WARRANTY CE-0000551436

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PRESENTED AT FIRST READING this 18th day of March 2013. PASSED AT SECOND READING this 1st day of April 2013.

$275.00 Lifetime Warranty Available

513-507-1951 859-341-6754

The Kentucky State Police are raffling off a 2013 Chevrolet Camaro 1SS Coupe. THANKS TO LES WILLIAMS

State police raffle off Camaro The Kentucky State Police are raffling off a 2013 Chevrolet Camaro 1SS Coupe to help support their annual summer camp for underprivileged youth.

Tickets cost $10 each and are available from any Kentucky state trooper, commercial vehicle enforcement officer or any of the 16 state police posts located throughout

the state. Only 20,000 tickets will be sold. The winning ticket will be drawn on Aug. 25, at the Kentucky State Fair.

Relive Tri-State history at the new

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• Beautiful photo galleries • Compelling stories • Interesting facts and quizzes The Enquirer has been telling the stories of our area for over 170 years. RetroCincinnati.com brings back those stories to highlight the people, places and events that shaped our area, and links our history to topics of today to help you better understand our community.

Feeling nostalgic? Visit now.


LIFE

MAY 23, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • B7

EdenPURE Heater closeout and super sale

©2013 Media Services S-9680 OF26940R-1 PAID

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Today readers of this paper have the opportunity to receive the largest discounts ever on new 2013 EdenPURE® Portable Infrared Heaters. During this 2013 EdenPURE ® closeout sale, you can receive discounts of up to 59% on brand new EdenPURE ® s. Due to the unseasonably warm months of November and December, we discovered we had excess inventory. Now we are drastically discounting the inventory to make way for our new 2014 models. So everything must go! EdenPURE ® is one of the all-time best selling portable heaters in North America with millions of satisfied customers who have saved big on their heating bills. Plus millions now swear by EdenPURE®’s “bonewarming” infrared heat. Completely safe around children and pets, EdenPURE ®’s unique inf r a r e d h e a t w a r m s a room evenly from floor to ceiling. You can take advantage of $302 savings on our top models like the Signature with a built-in humidifier and air purifier, or the GEN4 and USA1000 that are made right here in North Canton, Ohio. Our biggest savings exists on the Signature. You’ll save $302 or an amazing 50% and receive a new Signature for only $297. If you have a smaller area, EdenPURE® has the right model for your heating needs. Our best seller for 2012, the Model 750 is powerful for its small size and heats up to 750 square feet. While our Personal Heater is for a more intimate area up to 500 square feet. Finally, we are discounting our 12 pound GEN2 heater which uses a new super-smart heating element to heat 1,000 square feet. The excitement surrounding this announcement leads me to believe that our entire inventory will be liquidated in 72 hours. We are unable to hold or reserve any models as our entire sales staff is ready to move units on a moment’s notice. Plus, during this closeout offer we will offer FREE delivery anywhere in the U.S. Also, because of the anticipated heavy demand we are limiting each customer to a maximum of 5 units. All orders are protected by EdenPURE®’s famous 60-day money-back guarantee, warranty and our National Service Network. How to Order You can take advantage of these amazing savings by returning the Closeout Claim Form to the right.

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SIGNATURE

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GEN4

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$202

USA 1000

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$202

GEN3

$499

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MODEL 750

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PERSONAL

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$147

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GEN2

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Signature Heater Heats 1,000 sq. ft.

GEN4 Heater Heats 1,000 sq. ft.

USA1000 Heater Heats 1,000 sq. ft.

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Model 750 Heater Heats 750 sq. ft.

Personal Heater Heats 500 sq. ft.

Closeout Claim Form CLOSEOUT PRICE

NUMBER YOU WANT

SIGNATURE

$297

______

GEN4

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USA1000

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GEN3

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MODEL 750

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Offer Code EHS8175 7800 Whipple Ave. N.W. Canton, OH 44767


LIFE

B8 • CCF RECORDER • MAY 23, 2013

Ash, maple, sycamore leaves dropping? Question: Why are the leaves dropping from my ash, maple and sycamore trees? The fallen leaves have blackened areas on them. Will my tree die

Per KRS 424.250, the Fort Thomas Independent Schools financial information, which includes budgets, tax rates, and audit reports are available on the Fort Thomas Independent Schools web site at http://www.fortthomas .kyschools.us/ . Click on Departments, then Finance and the reports are listed on the right. The information is also available for viewing at the FTIS office at 28 North Fort Thomas Ave, Fort Thomas, KY. 1762565 LEGAL NOTICE The Bellevue Board of Adjustment will hold a public hearing on Thursday, June 6, 2013, at 6:30 p.m. in the Callahan Community Center, 322 Van Voast Avenue, Bellevue, Kentucky. The meeting will be held for all interested parties to hear and present evidence relative to the following agenda items: •Application 13-001 submitted by Jesse Aaron Pastor for Dayton Nazarene Church, requesting a Conditional Use permit for the property located at 713-715 Fairfield Avenue Bellevue, KY 41073. For more information please contact John M. Yung, Zoning Administrator, at (859) 431-8866. 2735

from this? Answer: The symptoms you describe are referred to as “anthracnose disease,” which is caused by an airborne fungus during rainy days of spring. The more rainfall, especially at night, the worse the disease will become. The good news is that anthracnose diseases usually look worse than they really are, and the tree is not usually killed by the disease. Sprays are not usually even needed. Anthracnose diseases occur on many landscape trees in Kentucky. They tend to be most severe on ash, maple, dogwood, oak,

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and sycamore. They are typically foliar diseases but twigs, branches, and buds may also Mike be affectKlahr ed. HORTICULTURE Twigs CONCERNS and branches may develop cankers or dead areas that girdle the stem, causing death of some branch tips, especially with dogwoods and sycamores. Premature leaf drop commonly occurs on infected trees. Anthracnose is not fatal (except for dogwoods in some circumstances), however, severe defoliation from anthracnose year after year can seriously weaken trees. Dogwood anthracnose or lower -ranch dieback is one of the most serious types of anthracnose, requiring fungicide sprays in early spring. The symptoms of anthracnose on ash trees include small, brown circular spots on leaves,

COMING UP “Local ‘Proven Flower Winners’”: 10 a.m. to noon Tuesday, June 4, Concessions Bldg., Boone Co. Arboretum, 9190 Camp Ernst Road, Union. “Vegetable Gardening 101”: 1-2 p.m. Tuesday, June 4, Boone Co. Arboretum, 9190 Camp Ernst Road, Union (meet at vegetable garden behind the children’s playground near front entrance). “Tree and Shrub Insects, Diseases and Other Problems”: 1:30-3:30 p.m. Tuesday, June 4, Boone Co. Extension Office, Burlington. Approved for ISA Arborist CEUs. Also, KY. Comm. Pesticide Applicator CEUs have been requested. Free, but call 859-586-6101 to register, or enroll online at www.ca.uky.edu/boone.

plus larger, irregular brown blotches (often along leaf margins) and distortion of leaflets. Infected leaflets frequently drop from the tree. Anthracnose on maple trees results in irregular, brown to black dead areas on the leaf that vary in size and shape. At least two different anthracnose fungi may be involved. On Norway maple, lesions are purple to brown and follow the veins. Leaves of Japanese maple blacken and shrivel up. Brown to reddish brown lesions form along or between veins of sugar maple.

In order to control the spread and severity of anthracnose, follow these steps: » Prune out and destroy all infected twigs and branches. » Gather and destroy fallen leaves and twigs now and again in the fall. » Fungicide sprays are generally not needed. However, if the tree is a valuable one or if it has been attacked year after year, a fungicide spray program may be justified. Three sprays should be applied in the spring: at bud break, when leaves are half-expanded, and when leaves are fully

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expanded. Use fungicides containing active ingredients such as chlorothalonil, mancozeb, thiophanate-methyl, propiconazole, maneb, fixed copper, or Bordeaux mixture. These chemicals are protectants and therefore must be applied before infection occurs. Once symptoms develop, it is too late to apply fungicides for controlling anthracnose. Mike Klahr is the Boone County extension agent for horticulture.

Levee announces summer concert lineup Newport on the Levee’s Thursday night free concert series runs May 23 through Sept. 5. Shows begin at 7 p.m. » May 23: Sponge, The Infinity Ball » May 30: Naked Karate Girls » June 6: Sunburners » June 13: Soul Pocket » June 20: Newbees » June 27: The Menus » July 11: 500 Miles to Memphis » July 18: Randy McAllister » July 25: The Cincy Brass » Aug. 1: Naked Karate Girls » Aug. 8: DV8 » Aug. 15: Jared Mahone » Aug. 22: Soul Pocket » Aug. 29: The Whammies » Sept. 5: The Menus


LIFE

MAY 23, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • B9

NARI offers remodel tips Community Recorder

In honor of National Home Improvement Month this May, the National Association of the Remodeling Industry advises homeowners of important steps to take before the remodeling project starts. » Research your project. Taking time to research projects will provide a good sense of what is involved such as price, scope of work, return on investment and new product/material options. » Plan your project around the long-term. How long do you plan to

stay in your home? How might your family structure change over time? Life can change quickly—these questions should be answered early on to ensure your project will fit your lifestyle long after it’s complete. » Set your budget. This number needs to include everything—the project, products, contingencies, etc. Don’t be afraid to share this with your remodeler; professionals are respectful of a client’s budget and will create a plan around it, not over it. » Use advanced search for professionals. The online world makes it

easy to gather information about strangers. Ask friends, family and neighbors for referrals and then spend time researching that person online. » Verify your remodeler. Don’t take their word for it. Check the information given to you such as references, license numbers, insurance information and certifications by calling providers to verify. Request a visit to an active client’s job site. » Review contracts word-by-word. A remodeling contract protects you and your remodeler. Homeowners should review this carefully. Pro-

fessional remodelers have done this before, and know what should go in a contract. Homeowners are not as familiar with remodeling and should ask about terms if they don’t understand. Pay at-

tention to details about change orders, payment, additional fees, timeline and responsibilities. If it’s not in the contract, it doesn’t exist. » Keep design in mind. Your design guides the entire project. Think about what you dislike about your current space and the intended use of the new space. Make sure you

can articulate specifically what you like about that design when talking to your designer. » Make your selections. Deciding on products and materials is a larger process than most imagine. Include selections in the contract to lock down pricing and keep your budget intact.

Budget of Campbell County Fire Protection District # 6 July 1, 2013 June 30, 2014 General Fund Budget Summary Revenues Taxes (all categories)

$97,700

Permits and Licenses

$0

Payments in Lieu of Taxes

$0

Intergovernmental Revenues

$0

Charges for Services

$0

Other Revenues

$0

Interest Earned

$3,700

Total Revenues

$101,400 Receipts and cash

Carryover from Prior Fiscal Year

$289,000

Bonded Debt, Public Corporation & G.O.

$0

Transfers to Other Funds

($0)

Transfers from Other Funds

$0

Borrowed Money (all short term/single year)

$0

Governmental Leasing Act

$0

All Other Borrowed Money

$0

Total Receipts and Cash

$289,000

Total Available (sum of Total Receipts, Cash & Total Revenues)

$390,400

Appropriations Personnel

$20,000

Operations

$52,300

Administration & Reserves

$100

CE-0000551304

Capital Outlay

$0

Debt Service

$0

Total Appropriations

$72,400

$'*)&&)!"(!#%*&)

5815 DIXIE HWY (RT 4), FAIRFIELD

399

$

1

MO

XTS FWD SEDAN

39 MO LEASE $1995 DUE AT SIGNING

Premium Care Maintenance Standard on all 2011 and newer Cadillac vehicles, Premium Care Maintenance is a fully transferable maintenance program that covers select required maintenance services during the first 4 years or 50,000 miles.[1] Warranty Protection Cadillac Powertrain Warranty[2] is 30K miles more than Lexus and 50K more than BMW and Mercedes-Benz. The 4-year/50,000mile[1] Bumper-To-Bumper Limited Warranty covers repairs on your entire vehicle, including parts and labor, to correct problems in materials or workmanship.

10 AT THIS PRICE

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OFF MSRP

32

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RONALD REAGAN HWY

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4

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TOLL FREE

FAIRFIELD 27

CTS

AWD LUXURY SEDAN $44,765 MSRP WYLER DISCOUNT -$9,000 SALE PRICE $35,765

Diagnostics by OnStar With best-in-class diagnostics from OnStar[3], maintaining your Cadillac can be as simple as checking your email or your OnStar MyLink mobile app. Every month you can receive an email with the status of key operating systems. All Cadillac models come with 1 year of OnStar service. STK# M42588

New 2013 Cadillac LEASE FOR

ATS

299

$

2

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2.5L SEDAN

2013 NORTH AMERICAN CAR OF THE YEAR!

39 MO LEASE $995 DUE AT SIGNING

Connections by OnStar Hands Free Calling capability from OnStar[3] allows you to safely make and receive calls from your Cadillac. With MyCadillac and OnStar MyLink[4] mobile apps, you can access and control your Cadillac from anywhere you have cell phone service. All Cadillac models come with 1 year of OnStar service. Emergency by OnStar In a crash, built-in sensors can automatically alert an OnStar[3] Advisor who is immediately connected into your Cadillac to see if you need help sent to your exact location. Other OnStar emergency services include Injury Severity Predictor and First Assist. All Cadillac models come with 1 year of OnStar service. Security by OnStar If you’ve reported your Cadillac stolen, OnStar[3] can use GPS technology to help authorities quickly locate and recover it. On most Cadillac models, an Advisor can send a Stolen Vehicle Slowdown® or Remote Ignition Block signal to help authorities safely recover it. All Cadillac models come with 1 year of OnStar service.

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Navigation by OnStar Just push the OnStar[3] button and ask the Advisor to download directions to your Cadillac, and a voice will call out every turn. You can also plan routes from Google Maps™ or MapQuest.com® to your Cadillac. All Cadillac models come with 1 year of OnStar service. STK# M42595 (1) XTS closed end lease 39 months/10k per year lease $399 mo. $1,995 due at signing. Total of payments $16,524. (2) ATS closed end lease 39 months/10k per year lease $299 mo. $995 due at signing. Total of payments $10,764. (3) SRX closed end lease 39 months/10k per year lease $399 mo. $2,995 due at signing. Total of payments $13,284. All leases require credit approval and have $.25 per mile penalty for excess miles. Purchase option at termination. All offers are plus tax license and fees. See dealer for details. Vehicle / equipment may vary from photo. In stock units only, while supplies last. Expires 5/28/2013

Roadside Assistance Among leading automotive luxury brands, Cadillac is the only brand to offer standard 5-year Roadside Assistance that provides lock-out service, a tow, fuel, Dealer Technician Roadside Service and more. Courtesy Transportation During the warranty coverage period, this Cadillac program provides alternate transportation and/or reimbursement of certain transportation expenses if your Cadillac requires warranty repairs.

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39 MO LEASE $2,995 DUE AT SIGNING


LIFE

B10 • CCF RECORDER • MAY 23, 2013

‘How can I help you?’

“How can I help you?” As a wife, parent, daughter, and a woman, I find myself asking this question at least a dozen times a day. With so many different ages and issues to deal with in and around our home, I am constantly navigating through moods and situations (not just mine) that I want badly to fix. To the newly moody pre-teen: “What can I do to put you in a better mood?”

To the 9-yearold bored out of his mind: “What can we Julie House play so COMMUNITY that RECORDER GUEST COLUMNIST you’ll stop moping around the house?” To the husband overwhelmed in a new career: “What can I do to quiet the kids, lessen

INVITATION TO BID Date: May 23, 2013 PROJECT:

Sanders Drive Water Main Replacement City of Elsmere, Kenton County, Kentucky

SEALED BIDS WILL BE RECEIVED AT: Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) 2835 Crescent Springs Road P.O. Box 18640 Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 UNTIL:

Date: June 7, 2013 Time: 11:00 AM (Local Time)

At said place and time, and promptly thereafter, all Bids that have been duly received will be publicly opened and read aloud. The proposed Work is generally described as follows: Construction of approximately 2,545 linear feet of 8" PVC water main and 545 linear feet of 8" ductile iron water main together with the appurtenances and related work along Sanders Drive from house #29 to Eastern Avenue in the City of Elsmere, Kenton County, Kentucky. All Bids must be in accordance with the Instructions to Bidders and Contract Documents on file, and available for examination at: Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) 2835 Crescent Springs Road Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 Or ECE, Inc. 4205 Dixie Highway Elsmere, Kentucky 41018 Copies of the Bidding Documents may be obtained from the office of ECE, Inc. at the address indicated herein. Charges for all documents obtained will be made on the following basis: Charge Complete set of Bidding Documents $45.00 Mailing and Handling (U.S. Mail) (if requested) $15.00 Charges for Bidding Documents and mailing and handling, if applicable, will not be refunded. Bids will be received on a unit price and/or lump sum basis as described in the Contract Documents. Bid security, in the form of a certified check or a Bid Bond (insuring/bonding company shall be rated "A" by AM Best) in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the maximum total bid price, must accompany each Bid. The Successful Bidder will be required to furnish a Construction Payment Bond and a Construction Performance Bond (insuring/bonding company shall be rated "A" by AM Best) as security for the faithful performance of the contract and the payment of all bills and obligations arising from the performance of the Contract. Contractor and all Subcontractors will be required to conform to the labor standards set forth in the Contract Documents. This project falls under the provisions of KRS 337.505 to 337.550 for prevailing wage rates. Evaluation of Bids and the awarding of a final contract are subject to the reciprocal preference for Kentucky resident bidders pursuant to KRS 45A490 to 45A.494 and (KAR 200 5:400). Owner reserves the right to reject any or all Bids, including without limitation the right to reject any or all nonconforming, non-responsive, incomplete, unbalanced, or conditional Bids, to waive informalities, and to reject the Bid of any Bidder if Owner believes that it would not be in the best interest of Owner to make an award to that Bidder. Owner also reserves the right to negotiate with the apparent qualified Bidder to such an extent as may be determined by Owner. Minority Bidders are encouraged to bid. Bids shall remain subject to acceptance for 90 days after the day of bid opening or for such longer period of time to which a Bidder may agree in writing upon request of the Owner. If a Contract is to be awarded, the Owner will give the successful Bidder a Notice of Award during the period of time during which the successful Bidder’s bid remains subject to acceptance. Richard Harrison, Vice President of Engineering, Water Quality, & Production Northern Kentucky Water District 2817

your stress and lighten your load?” And to the loving parents who gave all they could for me as I was growing up, I feel the desire to ask: “How can I give back to you?” It is a heavy burden to carry for sure, and one I have not been successful lugging around lately. I’m not sure if you’ve noticed, but getting an 11-yearold to smile when she doesn’t want to is virtually impossible. Recently, I came

across an article titled, “Prayer That Works,” by Ann Graham Lotz. In the article, Lotz makes it clear that the prayers of the Apostle Paul worked. They were answered by God. Interestingly, the prayers offered up by Paul, weren’t for himself, but for his church. In other words, they were prayers for his family. As I continued to read, I realized that Paul had a very specific strategy for praying for his church. He also had a keen realization that he alone could not fix

INVITATION TO BID Date: May 23, 2013 PROJECT: Old State Road Water Main Replacement City of Park Hills, Kenton County, Kentucky

(nor was it his job) the problems of the church, but God could. If you read any of Paul’s letters to his churches in Corinth, Colosse, Philippi, you see a clear pattern that holds three keys to successful prayer: » Begin with praise. “Every time I think of you, I give thanks to my God.” (Philippians 1:3) Paul never forgot one of the most important aspects of prayer; thanksgiving. » Offer requests. In Ephesians 1:17-18, Paul asked God to bless the church with spiritual wisdom, insight, and hearts flooded with light, so they could better understand the confident hope they have in Jesus. » Reliance on God’s power. In 2 Samuel 22:18, 20, we are re-

minded of God’s power: “He rescued me from my powerful enemies, from those who hated me and were too strong for me. He led me to a place of safety; he rescued me because He delights in me.” As you work to help your family with their struggles this week, follow Paul’s example. How much more of a help would we be to our parents, husband and children, if they were to truly know how thankful we are for them, prayed for their spiritual insight, and simply relied on God to take care of them. Julie House is a resident of Independence, and founder of Equipped Ministries, a Christian-based health and wellness program with a focus on weight loss. She can be reached at 802-8965.

SEALED BIDS WILL BE RECEIVED AT: Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) 2835 Crescent Springs Road P.O. Box 18640 Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 UNTIL:

Date: June 5, 2013 Time: 11:00 AM (Local Time)

At said place and time, and promptly thereafter, all Bids that have been duly received will be publicly opened and read aloud. The proposed Work is generally described as follows: Construction of approximately 1,580 linear feet of 8" PVC water main together with the appurtenances and related work along Old State Road from Terrace Drive to Arlington Road in the City of Park Hills, Kenton County, Kentucky. All Bids must be in accordance with the Instructions to Bidders and Contract Documents on file, and available for examination at: Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) 2835 Crescent Springs Road Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 Or Bayer Becker, Inc. 209 Grandview Drive Fort Mitchell, Kentucky 41017 Copies of the Bidding Documents may be obtained from the office of Bayer Becker, Inc. at the address indicated herein. Charges for all documents obtained will be made on the following basis: Charge Complete set of Bidding Documents $ 35.00 Mailing and Handling (U.S. Mail) (if requested) $ 15.00 Charges for Bidding Documents and mailing and handling, if applicable, will not be refunded. Bids will be received on a unit price and/or lump sum basis as described in the Contract Documents. Bid security, in the form of a certified check or a Bid Bond (insuring/bonding company shall be rated "A" by AM Best) in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the maximum total bid price, must accompany each Bid. The Successful Bidder will be required to furnish a Construction Payment Bond and a Construction Performance Bond (insuring/bonding company shall be rated "A" by AM Best) as security for the faithful performance of the contract and the payment of all bills and obligations arising from the performance of the Contract. Contractor and all Subcontractors will be required to conform to the labor standards set forth in the Contract Documents. This project does not fall under the provisions of KRS 337.505 to 337.550 for prevailing wage rates. Evaluation of Bids and the awarding of a final contract are subject to the reciprocal preference for Kentucky resident bidders pursuant to KRS 45A490 to 45A.494 and (KAR 200 5:400). Owner reserves the right to reject any or all Bids, including without limitation the right to reject any or all nonconforming, non-responsive, incomplete, unbalanced, or conditional Bids, to waive informalities, and to reject the Bid of any Bidder if Owner believes that it would not be in the best interest of Owner to make an award to that Bidder. Owner also reserves the right to negotiate with the apparent qualified Bidder to such an extent as may be determined by Owner. Minority Bidders are encouraged to bid. Bids shall remain subject to acceptance for 60 days after the day of bid opening or for such longer period of time to which a Bidder may agree in writing upon request of the Owner. If a Contract is to be awarded, the Owner will give the successful Bidder a Notice of Award during the period of time during which the successful Bidder’s bid remains subject to acceptance. Richard Harrison, Vice President of Engineering, Water Quality, & Production Northern Kentucky Water District

2805

LEGAL NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION: ARC/BEACON STORAGE SATURDAY JUNE 1, 2013 - 11:00 a.m. The following persons are hereby notified that their goods stored at Arc/Beacon Storage under self Storage rental agreements will be sold at Public Auction, termsAbsolute/No Reserve, at Arc/Beacon Storage, located at 7 Beacon Drive, Wilder, KY 41076. The items to be sold are described as household goods, boxes, bags, applian ces, bedding, mattresses, equipment, bikes, luggage, furniture, clothing, toys, trunks, and personal goods. Scott Herbstreit 44 & Ben Thoerner 8. Contact Preston (859) 441-7161 for additional information. 1760362

LEGAL NOTICE Alexandria Fire District will hold the election for Fire Fighter Representative on the Fire District Board on Saturday, June 22, 2013. The election will begin at 11:00AM and end at 2:00PM. The election will be held at the Alexandria Fire District, Main Fire Station, 7951 Alexandria Pike, alexandria, KY 41001. Fire Fighter for a four year office: Steven A. Minshall 3 Maple Valley Lane Alexandria, Kentucky 41001 Mason E. Muench 3547 Providence Trace Drive Melbourne, Kentucky 41059 Phillip Tarvin 3581 Douglas Drive Alexandria, Kentucky 41001 Only Fire Fighters who are members of the Alexandria Fire District Fire Department and who are in good standing on June 22, 2013, may vote for the Fire Fighter representative on the Fire District Board. BOARD OF TRUSTEES ALEXANDRIA FIRE DISTRICT 7951 Alexandria Pike Alexandria, Kentucky 41001

1762571

LEGAL NOTICE The Campbell County Fiscal Court, at a regular meeting to be held on Wednesday, June 5, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. at the Campbell County Courthouse, 8352 E. Main Street, Alexan dria, Kentucky, will call for second reading and consideration of passage the following ordinance, said ordinance having been read by title and a summary given for the first time at the May 15, 2013 regular meeting of the Court. CAMPBELL COUNTY FISCAL COURT CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY ORDINANCE O-04-13 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CAMPBELL COUNTY FISCAL COURT ESTABLISHING A SERVICE FEE FOR ENHANCED 911 EMERGENCY DISPATCH SERVICES TO OWNERS OF REAL PROPERTY IN CAMP BELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY The full text of Ordinance O-04-13 will be on file in the Office of the County Clerk, Newport, Kentucky, and is on file in the Office of the Fiscal Court Clerk, Newport, Kentucky, and same is available for inspection and use by the public during regular business hours. I, Paula K. Spicer, Clerk of the Campbell County Fiscal Court, hereby certify that this summary was prepared by me at the direction of the Campbell County Fiscal Court and that said summary is a true and accurate summary of the contents of Ordinance O-0413. Paula K. Spicer Fiscal Court Clerk

1001762548


LIFE

MAY 23, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • B11

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Public gets Free TV with no monthly bills

Federal law makes TV network giants broadcast Free TV signals regionally in crystal clear digital picture in all 50 states allowing U.S. households to pull in Free TV with a sleek $49 micro antenna device engineered to pull in nothing but Free TV channels with no cable, satellite or internet connection and no monthly bills

Who Gets Free TV: Listed below are the Cincinnati area zip codes that can get Free over the air TV channels. If you find the first two digits of your zip code immediately call: 1-888-752-7147 OHIO - Today’s announcement by CompTek has the Free TV Hotlines ringing off the hook. That’s because Cincinnati area residents who find their zip code listed in today’s publication are getting Free TV channels thanks to an amazing razor-thin invention called Clear-Cast™. Cincinnati area residents who call the Toll Free Hotlines before the 48-hour order deadline to get Clear-Cast can pull in Free TV channels with crystal clear digital picture and no monthly bills. This announcement is being so widely advertised because a U.S. Federal law makes TV broadcasters transmit their signals in digital format, which allows everyone to receive these over-theair digital signals for free with no monthly bills. Here’s how it works. Clear-Cast, the sleek micro antenna device with advanced technology links up directly to pull in the Free TV signals being broadcast in your area with crystal clear digital picture and no monthly bills. Clear-Cast was invented by a renowned NASA Space Technology Hall of Fame scientist who currently holds 23 U.S. Gov’t issued patents. For the past 20 years, he has specialized in developing antenna systems for NASA, Motorola, XM Satellite Radio and companies around the world. His latest patent-pending invention, ClearCast, is a sleek micro antenna device engineered to pull in the Free TV signals through advanced technology with no cable, satellite or internet connection and no monthly bills. “Clear-Cast is being released to the general public because we just don’t think people should keep paying for TV when they can get it for free,” said Conrad Miller, Manager of Operations at CompTek. “There’s never a monthly bill to pay and all the channels you get with Clear-Cast are absolutely free. So you see, Clear-Cast is not like cable or satellite. It was engineered to access solely the over-the-air signals that include all the top rated national and regional networks, like ABC, NBC, CBS, FOX, PBS, CW and about 90% of the most watched TV shows like America’s Got Talent, NCIS, 60 Minutes, American Idol, The Big Bang Theory, The Bachelorette, Person of Interest, CSI, The Mentalist, Two and a Half Men, Sunday Night Football plus news, weather and more all for free with no monthly bills,” Miller said. “That’s why Clear-Cast is such a great alternative for everyone who is sick and tired of paying expensive cable and satellite bills every month,” he said. “People who get Clear-Cast will say it feels like getting an extra paycheck every month. You see, with Clear-Cast you’ll receive free over-the-air broadcast channels with crystal clear digital picture, not the cable or satellite only channels. So being able to eliminate those channels puts all the money you were spending back in your pocket every month,” Miller said. And here’s the best part. The sleek micro antenna device called Clear-Cast is so technically advanced it pulls in even more of the channels being broadcast in your area for Free with no monthly bills. That way you can channel surf through the favorite TV shows. The number of shows and channels you’ll get depends on where you live. People living in large metropolitan areas may get up to 53 static-free channels, while people in outlying areas will get less. That means even if you’re in a rural area that just pulls in NBC, ABC, CBS, FOX and PBS broadcasts there’s hundreds of shows each year to watch for free. Consumers report that the crystal clear picture quality with Clear-Cast is the best they’ve ever seen. That’s because you get virtually all pure uncompressed signals direct from the broadcasters for free. Clear-Cast was engineered to link up directly like a huge outdoor directional antenna but in a lightweight, slim-line package. Its sturdy copper alloy and polymer construction will most likely far outlast your TV. It just couldn’t be any easier to get Free overthe-air digital TV shows with Clear-Cast. Simply plug it into your TV, place Clear-Cast on a window pane and run autoscan. It works on virtually any model TV and is easily hidden out of sight behind a curtain or window treatment. Thousands of Cincinnati area residents are expected to call to get Clear-Cast because it just doesn’t make any sense to keep paying for TV when you can get hundreds of shows absolutely free. So, Cincinnati area residents lucky enough to find their zip code listed in today’s publication need to immediately call the Free TV Hotline before the 48-hour deadline to get Clear-Cast that pulls in Free TV with crystal clear digital picture. If lines are busy keep trying, all calls will be answered. !

How to get Free TV: Listed below are the Cincinnati area zip codes that can get Free TV channels with no monthly bills. If you find the first two digits of your zip code immediately call 1-888-752-7147 beginning at precisely 8:30am this morning. Today’s announcement photo above shows just a handful of the major over-the-air broadcast networks you can receive with Clear-Cast for free. It saves a ton of money by not picking up expensive cable only channels like ESPN so there’s never a monthly bill. This is all possible because a U.S. Federal Law makes TV broadcasters transmit their signals in digital format, which allows everyone to use Clear-Cast to pull in Free TV channels with no monthly bills. CompTek is giving every U.S. household a 50% off discount to help cover the cost of Clear-Cast. Clear-Cast, the sleek micro antenna device is a one-time purchase that plugs in to your TV to pull in Free TV channels in crystal clear digital picture with no monthly bills. Each Clear-Cast normally costs $98, but U.S. households who beat the 48-hour deadline are authorized to get a 50% off discount for each ClearCast and cover just $ 49 and shipping as long as they call the Free TV Hotline at 1-888-752-7147 before the deadline ends or online at www.clear-cast.com. Trademarks and programs are the property of their respective owners and are not affiliated with or endorsing Clear-Cast.

SXS156

Alabama 35, 36

Colorado 80, 81

Hawaii 96

Kansas 66, 67

Massachusetts 01, 02, 05

Alaska 99

Connecticut 06

Idaho 83

Kentucky 40, 41, 42

Michigan 48, 49

Arizona 85, 86

Delaware 19

Illinois 60, 61, 62

Louisiana 70, 71

Minnesota 55, 56

Arkansas 71, 72

Florida 32, 33, 34

Indiana 46, 47

Maine 03, 04

Mississippi 38, 39

California 90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96

Georgia 30, 31, 39

Iowa 50, 51, 52

Maryland 20, 21

Missouri 63, 64, 65

Virginia Oklahoma South Dakota New Mexico 20, 22, 23, 24 73, 74 57 87, 88 Washington New York Oregon Tennessee Nebraska 98, 99 10, 11, 12 00, 97 38 37, 68, 69 13, 14 West Virginia Pennsylvania Texas Nevada 24, 25, 26 North Carolina 15, 16, 17, 75, 76, 77 88, 89 Wisconsin 27, 28 18, 19 78, 79, 88 53, 54 New Hampshire North Dakota Rhode Island Utah Wyoming 03 58 02 84 82, 83 Ohio New Jersey Vermont South Carolina Washington DC 41, 43, 44, 45 07, 08 05 29 20 Montana 59

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SXS156 CE-0000556867


LIFE

B12 • CCF RECORDER • MAY 23, 2013

Southgate hosts Africanthemed Fine Arts Night Southgate Independent School hosted its annual Fine Arts Night Thursday, May 2. The theme of this year’s event was “A Journey to West Africa.” Eighth-graders Sam Dietz (left) and Skylar Mullins check out the book fair during Southgate's Fine Arts Night. AMANDA JOERING/COMMUNITY RECORDER

Volunteer Samantha Routzan teaches third-graders Deja Joseph and Will Strong how to play the djembe during the school's Fine Arts Night. AMANDA JOERING/COMMUNITY RECORDER LEGAL NOTICE Shortnecks, Inc., mailing address 830 Monmouth St., Newport, KY 41071 hereby declares intentions to apply for Liquor By The Drink, Retail Beer and Special Sunday Drink The licenses no later than May 30, 2013. business to be licensed will be located at 830 Monmouth St, Newport, KY 41071, doing business as Shortneck’s Bar & Grill. The owners, principal officers and directors, limited partners or members are as follows: President, Johnna Janson, of 23 Meadowhill Drive, Covington, KY 41017. Any person, association, corporation, or body politic may protest the granting of the license(s) by writing the Dept. of Alcoholic Beverage Control, 1003 Twilight Trail, Frankfort, KY 406018400, within 30 days of the date of this legal publication. 1001762814 LEGAL NOTICE The Campbell County Fiscal Court, at a regular meeting of the court on Wednesday, May 15, 2013 at 5:30 p.m., at the Campbell CounAdministration Building, Fiscal Court ty Chambers, 1098 Monmouth Street, Newport, Kentucky, adopted the following ordinance upon the second reading, said ordinance having been read by title and summary given for the first time at the May 1, 2013 regular meeting of the Court. CAMPBELL COUNTY FISCAL COURT CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY ORDINANCE O-03-13 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CAMPBELL COUNTY FISCAL COURT ENACTING AND ADOPTING THE 2013 S-26 SUPPLEMENT TO THE CODE OF ORDINANCES OF THE COUNTY OF CAMPBELL, KENTUCKY (JULY 1, 2012 THROUGH DECEMBER 31, 2012) The full text of Ordinance O-03-13 will be on file in the Office of the County Clerk, Newport, Kentucky and is on file in the Office of the Fiscal Court Clerk, Newport, Kentucky, and same is available for inspection and use by the public during regular business hours. I, Paula K. Spicer, Clerk of the Campbell County Fiscal Court, hereby certify that this summary was prepared by me at the direction of the Campbell County Fiscal Court and that said summary is a true and accurate summary of the contents of Ordinance O-0313. Paula K. Spicer Fiscal Court Clerk

1001762543

LEGAL NOTICE Notice is hereby given that the Cold Spring Board of Adjustment will hold a public hearing at the city building located at 5694 East Alexandria Pike, Cold Spring, KY on Thursday, June 6, 2013 at 7:00 PM, for the purpose of reviewing and hearing testimony on the following: CASE NUMBER: BA-03-13 APPLICANT: Thomas Beringer L O C A T I O N : 5228 Winters Lane, Cold Spring, KY REQUEST: Appeal of Zoning Administra tor’s decision denying a fence permit. Proposed fence location is in conflict with zoning regulations. Persons interested in this case are invited to be present. Information concerning this case is available for public inspection at the Campbell County & Municipal Planning & Zoning Office, 1098 Monmouth Street, Suite 343, Newport, Ky. Monday-Friday during normal business hours. Peter Klear /s/ Peter Klear, AICP Director of Planning & Zoning Date: May 16, 2013 Published May 23, 2013 Campbell County Recorder

LEGAL NOTICE CITY OF HIGHLAND HEIGHTS PUBLIC HEARING The City of Highland Heights City Council will conduct a Public Hearing on Tuesday, June 4, 2013 at 7:00pm at the City of Highland Heights City Building, 176 Johns HIll Road. The specific purpose of the Public Hearing is to discuss changing the name of Old Alexandria Pike to a new name. If there is a need for the City to be aware of a specific disability, you are encouraged to contact the City Building at 859-4418575, so that suitable arrangements can be considered prior to the date of the meetMondaying. The City Office is open Friday 9:00am-5:00pm. The City will make every reasonable accommodation to assist a qualified disabled person in obtaining access to the meeting. Jean A Rauf, Treasurer PUBLISH: CCR 5-23-2013 1762223 MINIMUM REQUIRED PUBLIC NOTICEPUBLIC HEARING MUNICIPAL ROAD AID FUNDS FISCAL YEAR 2013-2014 A public hearing will be held at the City of Crestview City Building, 14 Circle Drive, Crestview, KY 41076 on June 4, 2013 at 7:15 p.m. for the purpose of obtaining written and oral comments regarding the proposed use of Municipal Road Aid Fund and Local Government Economic Assistance Program for the fiscal year of 20132014. The current balance in the Street Fund is $00.00. Anticipated income for fiscal 2013-14 from the Municipal Road Aid Fund will be $11,000.00 and from the Local Government Economic Assistance Program will be $10.00. the spend to proposes City The $11,000.00 from the Municipal Road Aid Program for the general maintenance /repair of City streets. The $10.00 from the LGEA Program will be deposited in the City’s General Fund. PUBLIC INSPECTION: The City’s proposed budget and proposed uses of Municipal Road Aid Fund and Local Government Economic Assistance Program are available for public inspection by contacting the City Clerk at 441-4620. Interested persons and organizations in the City of Crestview are invited to the public hearing to present oral or written comments on the proposed uses of Local Government Assistance funds as they relate to the City’s entire budget. Any person(s) (especially senior citizens) who cannot submit written comments or attend the public hearing but wish to submit comments should contact the City Clerk at 441-4620. -------------------------------------------------------PROPOSED BUDGET HEARING FOR FISCAL YEAR 2009/2010 A public hearing will be held by the City of Crestview City Building, 14 Circle Drive, Crestview, KY 41076 on June 4, 2013 at 7:20 p.m. for the purpose of obtaining written or oral comments from citizens regarding the proposed annual budget including Local Government Economic Assistance Funds for fiscal year 2013-14. The proposed budget and proposed uses of Municipal Aid & LGEA Program funds are available for inspection at the residence of the City Clerk, 14 Circle Drive (or by appointment at the Crestview City Building, 14 Circle Drive), phone 441-4620 1762258

From left: Tabitha Allender, Elanie Biggerstaff, Aurora Allender and Nicole Malton make bearded cone dolls during Southgate's Fine Arts Night. AMANDA JOERING/COMMUNITY RECORDER

LEGAL NOTICE Newport Fraternal Order of Police, Lodge 2, mailing address PO Box 72071, Newport, KY 41071 hereby declares intentions to apply for Private Club License Alcoholic Beverage license(s) no later than May 25, 2013. The business to be licensed will be located at 1110 Waterworks Rd., Woodlawn, KY 41071, doing business as Newport Fraternal Order of Police, Lodge 2. The owners, principal officers and directors, limited partners or members are as follows: President, John Dunn, of 11617 Mary Ingles Hwy, California, KY 41007 Any person, association, corporation, or body politic may protest the granting of the license(s) by writing the Dept. of Alcoholic Beverage Control, 1003 Twilight Trail, Frankfort, KY 40601-8400, within 30 days of the date of this legal publication. 62080 LEGAL NOTICE The Campbell County Fiscal Court, at a regular meeting of the court on Wednesday, May 15, 2013 at 5:30 p.m., at the Campbell County Administration Building, Fiscal Court Chambers, 1098 Monmouth Street, Newport, Kentucky, adopted the following ordinance upon the second reading, said ordinance having been read by title and summary given for the first time at the May 1, 2013 regular meeting of the Court. CAMPBELL COUNTY FISCAL COURT CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY ORDINANCE O-05-13 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CAMPBELL COUNTY FISCAL COURT ESTABLISHING REGULATIONS FOR THE OPERATION OF USED PROPERTY BUSINESSES IN CAMP BELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY. The full text of Ordinance O-05-13 will be on file in the Office of the County Clerk, Newport, Kentucky and is on file in the Office of the Fiscal Court Clerk, Newport, Kentucky, and same is available for inspection and use by the public during regular business hours. I, Paula K. Spicer, Clerk of the Campbell County Fiscal Court, hereby certify that this summary was prepared by me at the direction of the Campbell County Fiscal Court and that said summary is a true and accurate summary of the contents of Ordinance O-0513. Paula K. Spicer Fiscal Court Clerk

1001762546


LIFE

MAY 23, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • B13

Motorcycle safety stressed in May Community Recorder

In recognition of May as Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month, the Kentucky Office of Highway Safety reminds motorists and motorcyclists to “share the road” conscientiously and courteously to help prevent motorcycle crashes, which remain one of the most prevalent causes of death and injury on Kentucky roadways. “Safety is a mutual responsibility for motorists and motorcyclists alike,” KOHS Director Bill Bell said. “Motorcyclists are 30 times more likely to die in a crash than passenger vehicle occupants, so whether you are driving the family sedan, an SUV, a school bus, a delivery van or an 18-wheeler, drivers should always be on the lookout for motorcyclists. Drivers must be aware that a motorcycle, as one of the smallest vehicles on the road, can be ‘hiding’ in your vehicle’s blind spots. Always check blind spots, use mirrors and signal be-

fore changing lanes or making turns. “Motorcyclists have responsibilities too,” Bell said. “Riders should obey all traffic laws and be properly licensed, alert to other drivers, conspicuous at all times, never ride impaired or distracted, and always wear a Department of Transportation-compliant helmet and other protective gear.” This safety advice is particularly timely as motorcycle fatalities nationwide in 2011showed a continued increase to 4,612. Motorcycle fatalities accounted for 14 percent of total highway deaths for the year despite motorcycle registrations representing only about 3 percent of vehicles in the nation. The KOHS offers the following tips for drivers to help keep motorcyclists safe on our roadways: » A motorcycle is a vehicle with all of the rights and privileges of any other motor vehicle. The person under that helmet could be a mother, brother, doctor or

friend; » Always allow a motorcyclist the full lane width – never try to share a lane; » Perform a regular visual check for motorcycles by checking mirrors and blind spots before entering or exiting a lane of traffic, and at intersections; » Always signal your intentions before changing lanes or merging with traffic; » Don’t be fooled by a flashing turn signal on a motorcycle – motorcycle signals are often not selfcanceling and riders sometimes forget to turn them off. Wait to be sure the motorcycle is going to turn before you proceed; » Allow more following distance – three or four seconds – when behind a motorcycle to give the motorcyclist time to maneuver around obstacles in the roadway, or stop in an emergency; » Pay attention.

LEGAL NOTICE

INVITATION TO BID May 23, 2013 PROJECT: Ohio River Pump #3 Repair SEALED BIDS WILL BE RECEIVED AT: Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) At the Fort Thomas Treatment Plant 700 Alexandria Pike Fort Thomas, Kentucky 41075 UNTIL: Date: June 11, 2013 Time: 10:00 a.m., local time At said place and time, and promptly thereafter, all Bids that have been duly received will be publicly opened and read aloud. The proposed work is generally described as follows: Completion of the following repairs on a Goulds 20EHC 6-stage oil-lubricated raw water pump: •Replace top line shaft, 2-3/16" x 48-7/16", 416 stainless steel •Replace two (2) lip seals •Replace bore and bush tension bearing •Replace ten (10) rubber oil rings •Replace three (3) enclosing tube stabilizers •Patch holes in underground discharge column piece (to be completed in place) •Replace six (6) bowl wear rings, bronze •Replace one impeller, standard bronze •One lot, miscellaneous materials (gaskets, o-rings, stainless steel bolting, etc.) Work shall include the retrieval of the pump from its current location in Louisville, Kentucky as well as its reinstallation and start up at the Owner’s Ohio River Pumping Station #2 in Fort Thomas, Kentucky. The pump will be made available to Bidders for inspection at: Date:Tuesday, June 4th, 2013 Time: 9:00 a.m. Eastern Time Place:Layne Christensen Company 1301 East Main Street Louisville, KY 40206 All Bids must be in accordance with the Bidding Documents on file, and available for examination at: Northern Kentucky Water District, at the Fort Thomas Treatment Plant, 700 Alexandria Pike, Fort Thomas, Kentucky 41075. Copies of the Bidding Documents may be obtained from the office at the address indicat ed herein by contacting Joan Verax, at (859) 547-3258. There is no charge for these documents. All questions concerning the Work should be directed to Dave Enzweiler at (859) 547-3265. Bids will be received and awarded on a Lump Sum Basis as described in the Contract Documents. This project does not fall under the provisions of KRS 337.505 to 337.550 for prevailing wage rates. Owner reserves the right to reject any or all Bids, including without limitation the right to nonnonconforming, all or any reject responsive, incomplete, unbalanced, or conditional Bids, to waive informalities, and to reject the Bid of any Bidder if Owner believes that it would not be in the best interest of Owner to make an award to that Bidder. Owner also reserves the right to negotiate with the selected Bidder to such an extent as may be determined by Owner. Evaluation of Bids and the awarding of a final contract are subject to the reciprocal preference for Kentucky resident bidders pursuant to KRS 45A.490 to 45A.494 and (KAR 200 5:400) Minority Bidders are encouraged to bid. Bids shall remain subject to acceptance for 60 days after the day of bid opening. Richard Harrison, V.P. Engineering/ Water Quality & Plant Production Northern Kentucky Water District 2755

A Public Hearing will be held by the City of Bellevue at the Callahan Community Center 322 Van Voast Avenue on June 5, 2013 at 6:30 p.m. The purpose of this hearing will be to obtain written and oral comthe ments regarding use of Municipal Road Aid and LGEA Funds. The City of Bellevue anticipates receiving in Road Aid Municipal $140,000.00 during the fiscal year 2014. Anticipated revenue from LGEA Funds total $30.00. All interested persons and organizations in the City of Bellevue are invited to the Public Hearing to submit oral and written comments for the possible use of these These funds funds. will be used for the reconconstruction, struction, maintenance or repair of city streets. that person(s) Any comsubmit cannot ments should call City Hall at 859-431-8888 so that arrangements can be made to secure their comments. 1001762069

NOTICE Board of Ethics Annual Meeting The City of Fort Thomas, Kentucky, will hold a Public Meeting on W e d n e s d a y , June 12, 2013 at p.m. in the 4:30 Clerk’s Office of the City Building at 130 N. Ft. Thomas Avenue, Ft. Thomas, KY for the following: Annual Meeting of the Board of Ethics The City of Fort Thomas will make every accomreasonable assist to modation disabled qualified persons in obtaining access to available services or in attending City activities. If there is a need for the City to be aware of a specific disability, you are encouraged to contact the City Building at (859) 4411055 so that suitable arrangements can be considered prior to the delivery of the service or the date of the meeting. Signed: Melissa K. Kelly City Clerk 1762202

Illegal burning unhealthy, dangerous Community Recorder

Spring-cleaning season has arrived, and for many Kentuckians that means burning unwanted debris. The Kentucky Division for Air Quality reminds residents to learn before you burn. Illegal burning could result in fines of as much as $25,000 per day per violation. Many people may not realize that burning trash is illegal in Kentucky. State law prohibits the burning of many materials including plastic, tires, cans, coated wire, carpeting and food waste. In addition, the burning of trailers, buildings, and construction and demolition debris such as shingles, drywall and insulation is prohibited. Painted, stained or treated wood products like fence posts, pallets, and furniture are illegal to burn, because they release dangerous toxins into the air. Items that can’t be recycled should be taken to a state-permitted landfill. Open burning isn’t just unhealthy, it’s also dangerous. A small fire can

LEGAL NOTICE Rebecca Herald 701 Chateaugay Ln. AlexKy. 41001, andria, business owner, declares intention to apply for an entertain permit on ment the 06/05/2013 for business Boondocks Bar & Grill LLC. At 796 W Miller Rd. Alexan dria, Ky. 41001, Any person may protest this permit by writing Campbell Co. the 761529 clerks office. LEGAL NOTICE A Public Hearing will be held by the City of Bellevue at the Callahan Community Cen322 Van Voast ter Ave. June 5, 2013 at 6:45 p.m. for the purpose of obtaining writcomoral and ten ments from citizens regarding possible use of General City Funds for fiscal year 2014. All interested persons in and organizations the City of Bellevue are invited to the Public Hearing to submit oral and written comments. The proposed use of these funds will be identified at this hearing. 1762066

PUBLIC NOTICE The Campbell County Fire District One announces the voting for Fire Fighter Trustee on June 22, 2013 from 11a.m. until 2p.m. at the Fire House located at 6844 Four Mile Road, Melbourne, Ky. 41059. Two candidates running for one trustee position are of Ballinger Larry Mentor, KY and Jeff Lang of Alexandria, KY. Voting is for current Full time, part time or active volunteers on CCFD1. For contact questions 859-635-9255 1001762801 PUBLIC NOTICE Campbell County Fire Protection District #6 will hold an election for the positions of property owner and depart ment representative, on June 22nd between the hours of 11:00 AM & 2:00 PM. Candidate for property Owner is for Parker, Charles representative from the Melbourne for representative from the Melbourne Volunteer is Department Fire Jerry Tiemeier. Poling place is the Firehouse 912 Mary Ingles Highway, Melbourne, KY. 1762777

quickly spread, especially during windy weather, resulting in widespread damage. From April 5-7, for example, the Kentucky Division of Forestry reported 110 separate wildfires burning a total of 2,765 acres. Some open burning is legal with restrictions. Campfires, fires for cooking, and fires to dispose of tree limbs are permitted in most counties, except when a countywide burn ban has been declared, or when prohibited by local ordinance. During fire hazard season it is illegal to burn

anything within 150 feet of any woodland or brushland area between 6 a.m. and 6 p.m. Restrictions may also apply during summer months for certain counties whose current pollution levels exceed air quality standards. Use common sense before burning anything: » Never burn within 50 feet of any structure » Never burn near streams or sinkholes » Never burn near landfills or under utility lines

INVITATION TO BID Date: May 23, 2013 PROJECT:

Patterson St., Isabella and 8th St. Water Main Replacement City of Newport, Campbell County, Kentucky

St.,

SEALED BIDS WILL BE RECEIVED AT: Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) 2835 Crescent Springs Road P.O. Box 18640 Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 UNTIL:

Date:June 6, 2013 Time: 11:00 AM (Local Time)

At said place and time, and promptly thereafter, all Bids that have been duly received will be publicly opened and read aloud. The proposed Work is generally described as follows: Construction of approximately 4,160 linear feet of 8" PVC water main together with the appurtenances and related work along Patterson Street {Chestnut Way to 8th Street}, Isabella Street {6th Street to 9th Street}, and 8th Street {Brighton Street to Central Avenue} in the City of Newport, Campbell County, Kentucky. All Bids must be in accordance with the Instructions to Bidders and Contract Documents on file, and available for examination at: Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) 2835 Crescent Springs Road Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 Or James W. Berling Engineering 1671 Park Road, Suite One Fort Wright, Kentucky 41011 Copies of the Bidding Documents may be obtained from the office of James W. Berling Engineering at the address indicated herein. Charges for all documents obtained will be made on the following basis: Charge Complete set of Bidding Documents $45.00 Mailing and Handling (U.S. Mail) (if requested) $ 15.00 Charges for Bidding Documents and mailing and handling, if applicable, will not be refunded. Bids will be received on a unit price and/or lump sum basis as described in the Contract Documents. Bid security, in the form of a certified check or a Bid Bond (insuring/bonding company shall be rated "A" by AM Best) in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the maximum total bid price, must accompany each Bid. The Successful Bidder will be required to furnish a Construction Payment Bond and a Construction Performance Bond (insuring/bonding company shall be rated "A" by AM Best) as security for the faithful performance of the contract and the payment of all bills and obligations arising from the performance of the Contract. Contractor and all Subcontractors will be required to conform to the labor standards set forth in the Contract Documents. This project falls under the provisions of KRS 337.505 to 337.550 for prevailing wage rates. Evaluation of Bids and the awarding of a final contract are subject to the reciprocal preference for Kentucky resident bidders pursuant to KRS 45A490 to 45A.494 and (KAR 200 5:400). Owner reserves the right to reject any or all Bids, including without limitation the right to reject any or all nonconforming, non-responsive, incomplete, unbalanced, or conditional Bids, to waive informalities, and to reject the Bid of any Bidder if Owner believes that it would not be in the best interest of Owner to make an award to that Bidder. Owner also reserves the right to negotiate with the apparent qualified Bidder to such an extent as may be determined by Owner. Minority Bidders are encouraged to bid. Bids shall remain subject to acceptance for 90 days after the day of bid opening or for such longer period of time to which a Bidder may agree in writing upon request of the Owner. If a Contract is to be awarded, the Owner will give the successful Bidder a Notice of Award during the period of time during which the successful Bidder’s bid remains subject to acceptance. Richard Harrison, Vice President of Engineering, Water Quality, & Production Northern Kentucky Water District 2811


LIFE

B14 • CCF RECORDER • MAY 23, 2013

POLICE REPORTS BELLEVUE Arrests/citations Anita Oliphant, 34, 509 Seventh Ave., first-degree possession of a controlled substance at Van Voast Avenue, May 2. David Slater Jr., 20, 7 Mesh Court, second-degree robbery at Taylor Avenue, May 2. Andrew Tallon, 31, 704 Center St., second-degree burglary at 600 Center St. no. 1, May 7. Robert Brewster, 37, 712 Roberts St., trafficking marijuana at Donnermeyer Drive, May 1. Anthony Michaelis, 24, 227 West Eighth St., alcohol intoxication in a public place, second-degree disorderly conduct, resisting arrest, warrant at Donnermeyer Drive, May 1. Donna Allen, 50, 104 Ward Ave., fourth-degree assault at 100 block of Ward Ave., May 6. Thomas McCormick, 43, 1044 York St. No. 19, alcohol intoxication in a public place, theft by unlawful taking at 53 Donnermeyer Drive, May 10. Richard Gillespie, 32, 4564 Ashley Jo Drive, careless driving, DUI at Sixth Avenue, May 11. Angela Wood, 48, 5080 Mary Ingles Highway, warrant at 10 Donnermeyer Drive, May 3. Joshua Rebholz, 24, 6219 Ancient Oak Drive Apt. 132, warrant at Dave Cowens Drive, May 9. Matthew Allan White, 29, 412 Hazen Alley, warrant at Hazen Alley, May 8. Nicholas Carr, 26, 233 Washington Ave. No. 2, warrant at 225 Prospect St., May 13.

FORT THOMAS Arrests/citations Harold Shouse, 46, 35 Southview, warrant at 1109 South Fort Thomas Ave., May 10. Charles Colston, 43, 922 Ann

ABOUT POLICE REPORTS The Community Recorder publishes the names of all adults charged with offenses. The information is a matter of public record and does not imply guilt or innocence. St., DUI at Alexandria Pike, May 12. Adam Ahrens, 32, 4611 Shephard Road, warrant at Alexandria Pike at Bonnie Lane, May 8. Timothy Curnutt, 30, 312 Dayton Ave., warrant at 267 Sergeant Ave., May 9. Jason Bose, 26, 4425 Floral Ave., DUI at Alexandria Pike, May 5.

Incidents/ nvestigations First-degree criminal mischief At 700 South Fort Thomas Ave., May 12. Second-degree burglary At Covert Place, May 11. Theft by unlawful taking At 11 Southview Ave., May 8.

NEWPORT Arrests/citations Amy Griffith, 29, 1097 Hickory Court, possession of drug paraphernalia, first-degree possession of a controlled substance at 106 Pavilion Parkway, May 13. Nicole Walls, 20, 6933 Gracely Drive No. 2, theft by unlawful taking at 1 Levee Way, May 13. Antwan Edwards, 25, 202 West 11th St. 3B, fourthdegree assault at 202 West 11th St., May 9. Lamont Golightly, 34, 449 West Fifth St., violation of EPO/DVO at 300 West Sixth St., May 9.

DEATHS Betty Anderson Betty “Annie Boles” Anderson, 69, of Dayton, died May 10, 2013, in Cincinnati. She was a homemaker, and loved to play bingo, the Cincinnati Reds and Bengals. Her husband, Melvin Lee Anderson; daughter, Mary Ann Mason; stepdaughter, Marleen Carnes; and brothers, Red and Bill Boles, died previously. Survivors include her daughter, Judy Statton of Dayton; sons, Harrison Lawson of Melbourne, Ray Lawson of Dayton, and Scott Lawson of Cincinnati; stepsons, Everett and Ricky Anderson; stepdaughters, Jane Turner and Cathy McComes; sisters, Thelma Hayes, Dora Dishman and Jean Graham; brothers, Pete and George Boles; 14 grandchildren, 10 great-grandchildren and several step-grandchildren. Memorials: Hospice of Cincinnati, care of Western Office, 4310 Cooper Road, Cincinnati, OH 45242.

Tina Cooper Tina Reilman Cooper, 52, of Cold Spring, died May 14, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. She worked in IT support with ATOS in Mason, Ohio, was a member of the Alexandria United Methodist Church, attended St. Francis Elementary School, and was a graduate of both Campbell County High School and Northern Kentucky University. Her parents, Ronald G. and Myrna Young Reilman, died previously. Survivors include her husband, Damon; sister, Angie McGraw of Batavia, Ohio; stepdaughter, Carol Ann Belden of Wichita Falls, Texas; and stepson, Lucas Cooper of Silver Grove. Burial was at St. Stephen Cemetery in Fort Thomas. Memorials: St. Elizabeth Hospice, 483 S. Loop Road, Edgewood, KY 41017; or Brighton Center, 741 Central Ave., Newport, KY 41071.

Cindy Cox Cindy Ann Cox, 70, of Alexan-

dria, formerly of Dayton, died May 12, 2013, at her residence. She was a homemaker. Her husband, Jerry, died previously. Survivors include her daughters, Debbie Roberts of Alexandria, and Shaunna Green of Covington; brother, Charles Baxter Jr.; sisters, Francis Dickerson, Wilma Peelman, Joyce Riley, Sandra Cunningham, and Anna Legge; and two granddaughters. Burial was at Evergreen Cemetery in Southgate. Memorials: St. Elizabeth Hospice, 483 S. Loop Road, Edgewood, KY 41017.

Alexandria, died May 15, 2013, at her home. She was retired from DAV in Cold Spring. Her husband, A.G. Fugate, died previously. Survivors include her son, Ricky Fugate; daughter, Patricia Camarca; sisters, Wanda Faye Watts, Freida Watkins and Cassie Rink; brothers, Earl, James Kenneth, Estill, Larry and Charles Ray Noble; two grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Interment was at the Alexandria Cemetery. Memorials: Hospice of the Bluegrass, 7388 Turfway Road, Florence, KY 41042.

Cindy Dunham

John Grimm

Cindy Marie Dunham, 49, of Fort Thomas, died May 12, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. She was a graduate of Miami University and received her MBA from the University of Cincinnati. She worked in information technology, financial services and marketing with Procter & Gamble, Hewlett-Packard, Fidelity Investments and Merrell Dow, was an officer of the PTO at Johnson School in Fort Thomas, volunteered her time and talents with Highlands Middle and High schools, as well as the Northern Kentucky Foster Care Review Board, was a writer for Fort Thomas Living magazine, and was a lifelong member of Christ Church United Church of Christ in Fort Thomas. Her father, Robert F. “Bob” Dunham, died previously. Survivors include her sons, Bobby Dunham, Donnie Adams, and Jonathan Adams; daughter, Abbey Dunham; mother, Marie Mertes Dunham; sister, Christie Dunham; and brothers, Terry Dunham and Randy Dunham. Burial was at Highland Cemetery in Fort Mitchell. Memorials: Women’s Crisis Center, 835 Madison Ave., Covington, KY 41011; or St. Elizabeth Hospice, 483 South Loop Drive, Edgewood, KY 41017.

John R. Grimm , 74, of Bellevue, died May 15, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. He was an Army veteran, worked in maintenance for the Mariemont Inn, and was a member of the Masonic Newport Lodge No. 358. Survivors include his wife, Sandra Grimm of Bellevue; daughters, Tammy Caldwell of Milford, Ohio, Christine Leopold of Highland Heights, and Becky Schweinefus of Alexandria; and five grandchildren. Interment was at the Floral Hills Memorial Gardens in Taylor Mill. Memorials: St. Elizabeth Hospice, 483 South Loop Drive, Edgewood, KY 41017.

Bobbi Fugate Bobbie Jean Fugate, 73, of

Dorothy Kappesser Dorothy E. Kappesser, 91, of Fort Thomas, formerly of Bellevue, died May 9, 2013, at Carmel Manor Nursing Home in Fort Thomas. She worked as a bookkeeper,

and was a member of the former St. Anthony Church in Bellevue, where she participated in many church activities. Her husband, Stanley T. Kappesser, died previously. Survivors include her son, Robert Kappesser of Cold Spring; daughter, Janice Egan of Cold Spring; sister, Joann Youtsey of Alexandria; four grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. Burial was at St. Stephen Cemetery in Fort Thomas. Memorials: Carmel Manor Nursing Home, 100 Carmel Manor Road, Fort Thomas, KY 41075.

John Land John “Jack” Land, 73, of Independence, died May 13, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He was a retired print sales executive, member of Christ Church UCC in Fort Thomas, and enjoyed spending time with his family and singing in the church choir. Survivors include his wife, Judith Rohmiller Land; daughters, Sharon Srygler, Peggy Wahn and Cathy Meyers; six grandchildren and three great grandchildren. Memorials: Christ Church UCC Music Program; St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, P.O. Box 1000, Dept. 142, Memphis, TN 38148-0142.

Fred Marksberry Fred Marksberry, 58, of Taylor Mill, died May 14, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He was retired from Castellini Produce Company. His father, James Marksberry, and mother, Peggy Sassin, died previously.

ABOUT OBITUARIES Basic obituary information and a color photograph of your loved one is published without charge by The Community Press. Please call us at 283-0404 for more information. To publish a larger memorial tribute, call 513-2424000 for pricing details. For the most up-to-date Northern Kentucky obituaries, click on the “Obituaries” link at NKY.com.

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LIFE

MAY 23, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • B15

DEATHS Survivors include his wife, Lucie Marksberry; son, Fred Marksberry of Morning View; daughter, Lori Martin of Taylor Mill; sister, Diane Kmit of Alexandria; stepfather, Charles Sassin of Taylor Mill; five grandchildren, one stepbrother and three stepsisters. Interment was at Floral Hills Memorial Gardens. Memorials: St. Elizabeth Hospice, 483 S. Loop Drive, Edgewood, KY 41017.

Wilma McDonald Wilma J. McDonald, 74, of Silver Grove, died May 13, 2013, at Hospice of Cincinnati East. She worked as a qualitycontrol employee with Johnson Control, and was a member of the First Baptist Church of Silver Grove. Her husband, Ralph McDonald, died previously. Survivors include her sons, David E. McDonald and Timothy D. McDonald; daughter, Angela M. Jump; six grandchildren and one great-grandson. Burial was at Alexandria Cemetery. Memorials: Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation Greater Cincinnati, 522 Cincinnati Mills Road, Suite B248, Cincinnati, OH 45240.

Lori Owens Lori Roll Owens, 53, of Jeffersonville, Ind., formerly of Newport, died May 12, 2013. She was a 1977 graduate of LaSallette Academy and received her bachelor’s degree in communications from the University of Kentucky, and enjoyed rooting on the UK Wildcats, gardening, landscaping and cooking. Survivors include her parents, Donald Roll and Ann Price Roll; children, Nicholas Owens, Katelyn Owens and Alexandra “Allie” Owens; long-time companion, Arthur Ayers, and his daughters, Nicole and Meghan; brothers, Michael Roll, Patrick Roll and Jeffrey Roll; sisters, Donna Roll and Christy Embs; and three grandchildren. Burial was at St. Stephen Cemetery in Fort Thomas. Memorials: St. Elizabeth Alcohol and Drug Treatment Center, 512 Maple Ave., Falmouth, KY 41040.

Dayton, Ohio, formerly of Fort Thomas, died May 12, 2013, at Hospice of Dayton. She was a homemaker, and was a member of Christ Church United Church of Christ of Fort Thomas, and the Order of the Eastern Star. Her husband, Galvin Sheanshang, died previously. Survivors include her son, Gary Sheanshang of Dayton, Ohio; three grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. Burial was at Evergreen Cemetery in Southgate. Memorials: Hospice of Dayton, 324 Wilmington Ave., Dayton, OH 45420.

Dolores Wesselman Dolores Wesselman, 74, of Villa Hills, died May 8, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. Her husband, Robert Wesselman, died previously. Survivors include her children, Debbie Monce of Raleigh, N.C., Robert Wesselman of West Palm Beach, Fla., Jan Rieder of Florence, and Lynn Voskuhl of Elsmere; siblings, Jeannine Holtz of Cold Spring, Fred Popp of Erlanger, and Phil Popp of Indiana; 11 grandchildren and three greatgrandchildren. Memorials: American Cancer Society, P.O. Box 22718, Oklahoma City, OK 73123-1718; or St. Elizabeth Hospice Facility, 483 South Loop Drive, Edgewood, KY 41017.

Marshall York Marshall York, 81, of Cold Spring, died May 9, 2013, at the Baptist Convalescent in Newport. He was retired from the Armor Metal Company in Cincinnati as a punch press operator, was a member of Highland Heights Baptist Church, and was a member of the Robert Burns Masonic Lodge No. 163 in Newport. Survivors include his wife, Lucille York; sons, Ronnie Lee York and Avery Paul York; daughter, Patricia Ann Harvey; brother, James York; sister, Goldie Lower; seven grandchildren and five great-grandchildren.

Employer provided insurance declines Community Recorder

Having health insurance is an important factor in being able to get needed health care. According to the 2012 Kentucky Health Issues Poll, nearly three in 10 Kentucky working age adults (28 percent) are uninsured, similar to previous surveys. In Northern Kentucky, more than three in 10 (35 percent) of adults are uninsured. In general, as age, education level and income increased, the percentage of Kentuckians who were uninsured

Geraldine Prince Geraldine Marie “Jerry” Prince, 81, of Fort Thomas, died May 7, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. She was the owner and operator of the Wayside Inn of Fort Thomas. Survivors include her daughter, Lisa Prince of Fort Thomas; sisters, Susan Schmidt of Cold Spring, and Kathleen Stumpf of Fort Myers, Fla.; brothers, Richard Prince of Cold Spring, and Jerry Finnegan of Chambersburg, Penn. Burial was at St. Stephen Cemetery in Fort Thomas. Memorials: Hospice of the Bluegrass, 7388 Turfway Road, Florence, KY 41042; American Cancer Society, 297 Buttermilk Pike, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017; or American Diabetes Association, 4555 Lake Forest Drive, Suite 396, Cincinnati, OH 45242-3732.

Ruth Sheanshang Ruth Sheanshang, 88, of

MARRIAGE LICENSES Kayley Provow, 23, of Naperville and Joseph Peak, 29, of Cincinnati, issued May 6. Cassie Burke, 28, and Christopher Egan, 29, both of Fort Thomas, issued May 6. Kendra Kremer, 33, and Jason Passafiume, 29, both of Louisville, issued May 6.

Like most states, Kentucky has seen a shift in whether its residents have health insurance and if so, where they obtain that insurance. Nationally, there has been a noticeable reduction in employer-provided insurance and an accompanying shift to public insurance. Kentucky has also experienced this trend. In 2008, more than five in 10 Kentucky adults (55 percent) got health insurance from their employer or their spouse’s employer. In 2012, fewer than four in 10 Kentucky adults (37 per-

cent) got health insurance from an employer. More working-age adults are receiving public insurance from medicare, medicaid, military insurance or some combination of the three. Currently, nearly three in 10 Kentucky adults ages 18-64 (27 percent) are covered by some form of public insurance. That’s more than twice the percentage of adults ages 18-64 (10 percent) who were covered by public insurance in 2008. More information is available online at http://bit.ly/159dyuy.

Kentucky poll reveals surprising HIV data Although the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends routine HIV screenings for most patients, just three in 10 (32 percent) Kentucky adults ages 1864 report that their medical provider has discussed HIV testing with them. The Kentucky Health Issues Poll also reveals that providers are more likely to discuss HIV testing with younger, lowerincome, and AfricanAmerican adults. Other KHIP highlights include: Four in 10 (40 percent) adults report they have never been tested for HIV. Four in 10 (41 percent) African-American respondents said a medical provider has discussed HIV testing with them compared to three in 10 (30 percent) white Kentucky adults. Less than one in four (23 percent) adults between the ages of 46 and

64 reported their medical provider ever discussing HIV testing. The rate is considerably higher (42 percent) for younger adults, ages 18 to 29. It’s estimated that 4,500 Kentuckians are living with HIV infection. Na-

tional statistics indicate about one in five people are HIV positive do not know they are infected. The KHIP was funded by the Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky and the Health Foundation of Greater Cincinnati. The

poll was conducted from Sept. 20 through Oct. 14, 2012, by the Institute for Policy Research at the University of Cincinnati. A random sample of 1,680 adults from throughout Kentucky was interviewed by telephone.

Campbell County Fire Protection District #6 District Board Membership Designated Meeting Date, Time, & Place President/Chair:

The third Wednesday of every month at 7:30 P.M. at Firehouse

Term Expires (Mo/Day/Yr):

Thomas Hater

06/30/2014

P. O. Box/Street

First Full Term X

3572 Eight Mile Road

Second Full Term

City:

Third or more Full Term

Melbourne, KY

Filling Unexpired Term

X

Zip Code: 41059 Telephone: (859) 448-0907 Vice President:

Term Expires (Mo/Day/Yr):

Earl Greis

06/30/2015

P. O. Box/Street

First Fvull Term

7314 Mary Ingles Highway

Second Full Term

City:

Third or more Full Term X

Melbourne, KY

Filling Unexpired Term

X

Zip Code: 41059

Judith Perkins Judith Ann Perkins, 68, of California, died May 15, 2013. She was a teacher for the Campbell County Schools for 27 years, and member of the Fairlane Baptist Church where she was a preschool teacher for 10 years. Survivors include her husband, Carrol Perkins; daughter, Melanie Swinford; sons, Danny Perkins and Jason Perkins; sisters, Claudia Meeks, Sharon Hilliard and Laura Ratcliff; and six grandchildren. Interment was at Oakland Cemetery in Grants Lick.

decreased. The poll is funded by The Health Foundation of Greater Cincinnati and the Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky. More than one in 10 Kentuckians ages 18-64 (13 percent) who were insured at the time of KHIP had been uninsured at some point in the past 12 months. This means that four in 10 Kentucky adults ages18-64 had been uninsured at some point in the last 12 months, a number that has increased 10 percentage points in the past five years.

Telephone: (859) 635-4363 Secretary/Treasurer/Fireman: NOTICE Fort Thomas Planning Commission Special Public Meeting The Planning Commission of the City of Fort Thomas, Kentucky, will hold a Special Public Meeting on Wednesday, May 29, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. in the Centennial Room of the City Building at 130 N. Ft. Thomas Avenue, Ft. Thomas, KY for the following agenda items: Convenience Plat: 12 Daisy Lane - Robert McCargar, Applicant, Jane Ebberskotte, Owner Final Plat: Villa Grande of Ft. Thomas (Section 5) Grand Communities, LTD, Owner

-

A copy of the proposed plats may be examined by interested parties at the General Services Department during normal business hours. The City of Fort Thomas will make every reasonable accommodation to assist qualified disabled persons in obtaining access to available services or in attending City activities. If there is a need for the City to be aware of a specific disability, you are encouraged to contact the City Building at (859) 572-1210 so that suitable arrangements can be consid ered prior to the delivery of the service or the date of the meeting. General Services Department

1762712

Request for Proposals The Housing Authority of Newport (HAN) for Physical Proposals is Requesting Needs Assessment/Energy Audit Services. RFP’s are due no later than 3:00 p.m., local time, June 20, 2013, at the offices of the Housing Authority of Newport, located at 30 East 8th. St. Newport, KY 41071. Submission requirements may be obtained by contacting Randy Schweinzger at (859) 581-2533, ext. 217, or by e-mail at rschweinzger@neighborhoodfoundations.c om The hearing and/or speech-impaired may call our TDD line at (859) 581-3181. The Housing Authority of Newport reserves the right to waive any informality, irregularity, or defect in any proposal, and to reject any/or all proposals should it be deemed in the best interest of The Housing Authority of Newport to do so. It is the intent of The Housing Authority of Newport to award a contract to the lowest responsible and responsive bidder. The Housing Authority of Newport, Kentucky is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

Term Expires (Mo/Day/Yr):

Ervin Messmer

06/30/2013

P. O. Box/Street

First Full Term

5930 Mary Ingles Highway

Second Full Term

City:

Third or more Full Term X

Melbourne, KY

Filling Unexpired Term

X

Zip Code: 41059 Telephone: (859) 441-3339 Court Appointee:

Term Expires (Mo/Day/Yr):

Maurice P. Hehman II

06/30/2014

P. O. Box/Street

First Full Term X

1102 Mary Ingles Highway

Second Full Term

City:

Third or more Full Term

Melbourne, KY

Filling Unexpired Term

X

Zip Code: 41059 Telephone: (859) 781-3541 Member/Property Owner:

Term Expires (Mo/Day/Yr):

Martin Meyer

06/30/2014

P. O. Box/Street

First Full Term X

7218 Mary Ingles Highway

Second Full Term

City:

Third or more Full Term

Melbourne, KY

Filling Unexpired Term

X

Zip Code: 41059 Telephone: (859) 635-1901 Member/Property Owner:

Term Expires (Mo/Day/Yr):

Charles Parker

06/30/2013

P. O. Box/Street

First Full Term

6212 Mary Ingles Highway

Second Full Term X

City:

Third or more Full Term

Melbourne, KY

Filling Unexpired Term

X

Zip Code: 41059 Telephone: (859) 781-6011 Member/Court Appointee

Term Expires (Mo/Day/Yr):

Edward B. Schroeder

06/30/3013

P. O. Box/Street

First Full Term X

3887 Nine Mile Road

Second Full Term

City:

Third or more Full Term

Melbourne, KY

Filling Unexpired Term

Zip Code: 41059 Telephone: (859) 441-4721 %'*)&&)"#("$!*&)

X


LIFE

B16 • CCF RECORDER • MAY 23, 2013

MITSUBISHI

GRAND OPENING

SALES EVENT

BRANDNEW2013OUTLANDERSPORTS ANDOUTLANDER TAKE YOUR PICK!

3,000OFF

$

2013OUTLANDER SPORTES 5 SPEED, A/C, PW, PL, 18” ALUMINUM WHEELS

MSRP $19,995 DISC. $2,000 REBATE $1,000

SALE PRICE

BRANDNEW2013LANCERES, GTANDSPORTBACK

3,000OFF

$

2 FLORENCE FREEDOM TICKETS WITH TEST DRIVE

16,995

$

SALE PRICE

MSRP $18,285 DISC. $2,000 REBATE $1,000

15,285

$

2013 LANCERES 5 SPEED, A/C, PW, PL, CD

#D1013

#D4501

NEW ARRIVALS! FRESH VEHICLES ARRIVING DAILY! AMERICA’S#1SELLING VEHICLESONSALENOW!

2010 TOYOTA CAMRY LE CHOOSE FROM 7, LOW MILES LOADED WITH EQUIPMENT, 30+ MPG

15,885

$

2010 HONDA ACCORD BURG., AUTO AC, PW, PL

14,985

$

2011 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY GOLD, V6, ALUM

WHEELS, PW, PL, REAR BACKUP CAMERA, CD

18,775

$

SALES HOURS: Mon-Thu 9-8:30 Fri 9-6 • Sat 9-5:30

www.joekiddauto.com

2012 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN V6, STOWING, PW, PC, CD #C8132 ...................... WAS $22,995 NOW

$20,985 2012 CHRYSLER 200 SEDAN BLACK, 4 CYL, AUTO, A/C, PW #C8148 .................... WAS $15,988 NOW $15,285 2012 MITSUBISHI ECLIPSE CHOOSE FROM 2, AUTO, A/C, PW #C8149................... WAS $16,488 NOW $15,885 2011 DODGE CARAVAN CREW V6, AUTO, A/C, PW, PL............................................. WAS $20,988 NOW $19,985 2011 TOYOTA CAMRY LE RED, AUTO, A/C, PW, PL, CD, CLEAN ................................ WAS $16,988 NOW $15,985 2011 CHEVROLET HHR LT RED, AUTO, A/C, PW, CD ................................................. WAS $13,988 NOW $13,485 2011 JEEP COMPASS AUTO, A/C, PW, PL, CD, LOW MILES #C8169 ........................ WAS $16,988 NOW $16,285 2010 DODGE RAM 1500 V8, REG CAB, BEDLINE, AUTO........................................... WAS $15,988 NOW $15,285 2010 MAZDA 6i GRAND TOURING, RED, LEATHER, SUNROOF, LOADED, 29K MILES........... WAS $17,488 NOW $16,885 2010 FORD FOCUS SES BLACK, AUTO, A/C, SUNROOF, 11K MILES #D8085 .................... WAS $15,295 NOW $14,882 2010 CHEVROLET COBALT SILVER, AUTO, A/C, PS, PB #C8092 ............................... WAS $11,988 NOW $11,685 2010 FORD FUSION 4 CYL, AUTO, A/C, LEATHER, NICE #C8139............................... WAS $16,988 NOW $16,285 2010 FORD ESCAPE XLT 4X4, V6, AUTO, A/C, CLEAN............................................... WAS $18,988 NOW $17,972 2009 CHRY. TOWN & COUNTRY TOURING BLACK, V6, AUTO, PW, PC #C8080 ........ WAS $17,988 NOW $16,985 2009 MAZDA CX7 AUTO, A/C, LEATHER, SUNROOF, 57K MILES ............................... WAS $17,988 NOW $17,285 2006 SUBARU LEGACY BLACK, AWD,SUNROOF, LEATHER #D80321 ....................... WAS $11,988 NOW $11,485 1998 CHEVROLET CORVETTE RED, REMOVABLE GLASS TOP, 5.7V8, 6 SPEED #C80572........................................WAS $14,995 NOW

BUDGET BUYS!

$13,988

2008 NISSAN SENTRA AUTO, A/C,PW,PL .............................................................................................$9,985

2007 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY HAUL THE FAMILY, V6, AUTO, A/C ..........................................$9,985

2001 CHEVY BLAZER 2 DR, AUTO,PS,PB.............................................................................. ONLY

$3,885 2002 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN V6, AUTO, A/C, PS ............................................................ ONLY $4,675 2003 LAND ROVER DISCOVERY AUTO, A/C, PW, PL, 4X4............................... WAS $9,995 NOW $8,952 1992 FORD TEMPO COUPE ONE OF A KIND, 42K MILES, COLD A/C .................................................$4,485

513-752-1804

1065 OHIO PIKE JUST 3 MILES EAST OF I275, EXIT #65

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