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BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT B1

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving all of Campbell County

COUNTY RECORDER

E-mail: kynews@communitypress.com Martin Lucero, manager of Jalapeno’s Mex-Mex in Cold Spring

Volume 32, Number 7 © 2010 The Community Recorder ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Your online community

Visit NKY.com/community to find news, sports, photos, events and more from your community. You’ll find content from The Recorder, The Kentucky Enquirer and your neighbors. While you’re there, check out Share, and submit stories and photos of your own.

Ready to run

Whether they’re beginners or seasoned runners, Bob Roncker’s Running Spot’s training groups have something to offer everyone. Roncker’s offers training groups for everything from the Flying Pig Marathon to the Heart MiniMarathon, helping runners and walkers achieve a higher fitness level and prepare mentally through a month-bymonth training schedule they design. LIFE, B1

E-mails sent to candidates

If you are a candidate in a contested race in the May 18 primary election, you should have received an e-mail invitation to participate in NKY.com’s online election guide. If you haven’t gotten an invitation, we might not have your correct e-mail address. To be included, send your campaign e-mail address to Mary Lu Strange at mstrange@ nky.com or call her at 578-5574. The election guide will be accessible to voters through NKY.com later this month and will include biographical information on candidates and answers to questions posed by NKY.com editors.

T h u r s d a y, M a r c h 2 5 , 2 0 1 0

Web site: NKY.com

B E C A U S E C O M M U N I T Y M AT T E R S

Keene pushes for Senate to pass DUI bill By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

State Rep. Dennis Keene is calling on Senator Katie Stine and the rest on the Senate to pass House Bill 58, mandating ignition interlock devices in all DUI cases. The bill, which passed 95-0 in the House of Representatives in February, has not been voted on by the Senate, which is nearing the end of its current legislative session. “We have a tremendous problem with drunk driving in Kentucky,” said Keene, citing more than 36,000 DUIs in the state last year. “House Bill 58 is going to put an end to that.” In a press conference Thursday, March 18, Keene said drunk driving is a state-wide issue that needs to be addressed and that passing the bill would be a step in the right direction. So far 12 states, including Ohio, require mandatory ignition interlock devices for drunk driving offenders. New Mexico, which made the devices mandatory in 2006, has seen a reduction of 35 percent in alcohol related fatalities. Doug Scoles, a representative from Mother’s Against Drunk Driving (MADD) said in Kentucky drunk driving causes at least 15 deaths a month, a number that would be lower if the bill is passed. “This new technology can stop these deaths,” Scoles said. Scoles said the technology can help reverse the trend that shows that those with DUIs are likely to drive drunk again. “If we do what we’ve always done we’re going to get what we’ve always gotten,” Scoles said. In Fort Thomas, the police department has been trying to ensure the safety of its citizens by stepping up its DUI enforcement in the city. Lt. Rich Whitford said the department isn’t familiar enough with the ignition interlock devices or House Bill 58 to pass judgment

on it, but that they are in favor of any program that will save lives. “We’re in favor of anything that will make Kentucky’s roads safer and decrease the amount of DUI offenders,” Whitford said. Wilder resident Sheri Callahan Gearding, a victim of drunk driving, spoke at the conference and shared her emotional story of being hit by a drunk driver 15 years ago. “May 10 is the 15th anniversary of the day I was killed by a drunk driver,” Gearding said. While heading back to work from lunch one day, Gearding was hit by a drunk driver, causing her numerous injuries, including a hole in her right atrium. Though she was pronounced clinically dead at the hospital, doctors were able to revive her and she has overcome the odds and is doing well today. But, the memories and scars from her accident are still there, Gearding said. “My scars are a lifelong reminder of one individual’s decision to drink and drive,” Gearding said. Gearding said she hopes her story will urge others to call their senators in favor of House Bill 58. The bill also holds personal importance to Keene, whose daughter survived being hit headon by a drunk driver. “Drunk driving has affected families all across the commonwealth,” Keene said. In a letter to Stine, Keene asked her help in getting the bill through Senate, saying “the future of Kentucky now rests in your hands.” Lourdes Baez-Schrader, the communications director for the senate majority, said Sen. Tom Jensen, who is the committee chair and has the ultimate decision-making authority, doesn’t plan to hold hearings on the bill this legislative session and plans to instead wait until the summer. Baez-Schrader said Stine plans to continue focusing her efforts on the budget and the road plan.

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

State Rep. Dennis Keene calls on Senator Katie Stine to help push House Bill 58 through the senate during a press conference Thursday, March 18.

By Amanda Joering Alley

April is National Child Abuse Prevention Month, and local organizations are teaming up to get the word out all month. Throughout the month, blue ribbons will be hung all over schools, businesses and government buildings to raise awareness. The month kicks off with a ceremony at noon Thursday, April 1, at Tom Gill Chevrolet in Florence that will feature community, business, school and government leaders. NEWS, A3

ajoering@nky.com

For the Postmaster

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Paula the Penguin

Ric Urban, curator of birds and mammals at the Newport Aquarium, introduces Paula the penguin to students at Johnson Elementary School. The visit marks the first time the aquarium has brought a penguin into a school. To place an ad, call 283-7290.

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Wilder resident Shari Callahan Gearding, a victim of drunk driving, shows a picture of her car after it was hit by a drunk driver 15 years ago.

Partnership ‘grows’ community

Stopping abuse

Published weekly every Thursday. Periodical postage paid at Newport, KY 41071 USPS 450130 Postmaster: Send address change to The Campbell County Recorder 654 Highland Suite 27, Fort Thomas, KY 41075 Annual Subscription: Weekly Recorder & Sunday Enquirer In-County $18.02; weekly Recorder only all other in-state $23.32 Out-of - state $27.56; Kentucky Sales Tax Included

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Various groups are coming together to bring community gardens to Highland Heights this spring. Northern Kentucky University, the City of Highland Heights and Asbury United Methodist Church are partnering to offer the Northern Kentucky Community Gardens, three sites that are open to the public for gardening. Courtney Mims from the Kentucky Campus Compact Coalition said the gardens are meant to increase civic engagement and community service while also producing healthy foods. “The gardens really promote health and wellness,” Mims said. “Some NKU students will be getting some plots and growing vegetables to donate to local charities.” Mims said the gardens will create a sense of community and help bring NKU and the residents of Highland Heights together. “Both groups have quality

Northern Kentucky University, the City of Highland Heights and Asbury United Methodist Church are partnering to offer the Northern Kentucky Community Gardens, three sites that are open to the public for gardening. knowledge they can share with each other,” Mims said. The hope is that other local schools will also take advantage of the gardens as hands-on “learning laboratories,” Mims said. The Campbell County Cooperative Extension office is offering classes for those not familiar with gardening that are interested. The gardens, which are located at the old Highland Heights Elementary School, Asbury United Methodist Church and NKU’s Callahan Hall, have at least 20 plots each. The application fee is $20 with $10 refunded at the end of the growing season. For more information visit http://wellness.nku.edu/garden/n kycommunitygarden.php. or call Maggie Gough at 572-6668.


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Campbell County Recorder

News

March 25, 2010

Bowling reunion rolls a strike for charities By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

An annual charity bowl organized by college friends CJ Peters of Crestview and Sarah Siegrist of Villa Hills is rolling into its 10th year. This year’s “The Great Bowling Event of 2010” benefiting the Henry Hosea House in Newport is from 1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Saturday, April 10 at SuperBowl (formerly Bellewood Lanes), 1211 Water Works Road, Bellevue. Peters said the event started out as a way to keep a group of Thomas More College friends together after they all graduated. “Back in school we’d always like to go to midnight bowling,” Peters said.

“After graduation we thought hey, we should keep this up somehow.” The annual bowling event is open to anyone with room for adults and even 4-year-olds to roll a ball down a lane, Peters said. It’s all for a good cause, he said. “We get the knowledge that we’ve done a little bit of good, we’ve helped make it a better place so it’s better for us and all our future generations,” Peters said. The bowling fundraisers started out raising about $200 for a charity, and now as attendance has grown, usually raises about $1,000, he said. Siegrist said she and Peters start pulling the event together each Christ-

mas. They look for charities that serve children and families, that people may not have as much awareness about, she said. This year’s planned recipient, the Henry Hosea House in Newport, houses the ECHO (IntErCHurch Organization) soup kitchen, which according to the Web site www.henryhoseahouse. com, serves about 150 meals each evening. Previous recipients of the group’s efforts include the Women’s Crisis Center, a garden at the Greenup Haus Apartments in Covington, Be Concerned and an educational program at the Family Nurturing Center. Last year the Madonna House benefited from the bowling fundraiser.

This year’s planned recipient, the Henry Hosea House, houses the ECHO soup kitchen. The “Great Bowling Event” is still often the only time Peters and Siegrist both say they get to see many of their old college friends. “I think while it started off as a social thing, over the years it’s become more of a fundraiser and a way to raise awareness for the charity,” Siegrist said. The cost to attend the April 10 “Great Bowling Event of 2010” is a $20 donation per bowler or $10 per child younger than 10. The price includes “all-youcan-bowl” and shoes. Pre-registration isn’t required to attend, but is suggested. For information and to pre-register e-mail TheGreatBowlingEvent@gmail. com.

Faster Recovery Time? Very Hip.

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Tuning up

Mary Bryant, left, of Newport, helps tie a string for the homemade "Canjo" musical instrument she's making with her granddaughter Adrianna Denney, right, 8, of Newport out of string, a coffee can and yard stick during the Campbell County Public Library Newport Branch's Adventure Club meeting Tuesday, March 9.

BRIEFLY Dinner at VFW

The ladies auxiliary of Campbell County Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3205 in Alexandria is having a spaghetti dinner from 4:30 to 7 p.m. Friday, March 26. Costs for the dinner of spaghetti, homemade sauce (meatless), meatballs, salad, drinks and dessert are $6 for adults and $4 for children. The VFW hall is at 8261 Alexandria Pike, quarter mile south of the intersection of East Main Street and Alexandria Pike. Proceeds will benefit troops overseas, patriotic essay contests and donation of flags to many schools. For more information call 859394-3068.

Students help with tax returns

Garrett Davidson of Fort Mitchell, a senior double majoring in accounting and economics at Xavier; Matt

Index

Calendar ......................................B2 Classifieds.....................................C Life...............................................B1 Police reports............................B10 Schools........................................A6 Sports ..........................................A9 Viewpoints ................................A12

Schuler of Edgewood, a junior double majoring in accounting and economics at Xavier; and Abbey Leibel of Cold Spring, a senior accounting major at Xavier are three of 24 Xavier University accounting students helping prepare tax returns for low income, elderly and student taxpayers on Monday evenings through April 12. The students are offering free basic Federal and State income tax assistance through the IRS-sponsored Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Program (VITA). They will help March 29, and April 12 from 5:30 to 8 p.m. at Cintas Center by appointment only at 513-745-2828.

Dressman to retire

Pat Von Lehman Dressman has become the second Kenton County candidate to quit her government job, after federal authorities said that her candidacy violates the Hatch Act, a New Deal-era law designed to prevent political favoritism in the administration of federal grants. Dressman said Wednesday that she's retiring as Campbell County's human services director on March 30 so that she can continue her campaign for Kenton County commissioner. She had been in the job for 11 years. -Gannett News Service

L E A R N M O R E AT S T E L I Z A B E T H . C O M I wasn’t looking forward to my hip replacement or months of recovery. The good news? I don’t have to. Commonwealth Orthopaedics has been working closely with St. Elizabeth Healthcare to deliver better, faster joint replacement using a new surgery table that allows them to be more precise than ever, to minimize surgical trauma so I can be up and about the same day. It’s just one of the things that makes St. Elizabeth #1 for orthopaedics in Greater Cincinnati*. Better surgeries. Faster recovery time. Commonwealth Orthopaedics and St. Elizabeth are Better Together.

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Your Community Recorder newspaper serving all of Campbell County

COUNTY RECORDER

Find news and information from your community on the Web Campbell County – nky.com/campbellcounty News Michelle Shaw | Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1053 | mshaw@nky.com Chris Mayhew | Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1051 | cmayhew@nky.com Amanda Joering | Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1052 | ajoering@nky.com Melanie Laughman | Sports Editor . . . . . . . . 513-248-7118 | mlaughman@nky.com James Weber | Sports Reporter . . . . . . . . . 578-1054 | jweber@nky.com Advertising Debbie Maggard | Advertising Manager. . . . . . 578-5501 | dmaggard@nky.com Michelle Schlosser | Account Rep . . . . . . . . 578-5521 | mschlosser@nky.com Delivery For customer service. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 781-4421 Sharon Schachleiter | Circulation Manager. . 442-3464 | sschachleiter@nky.com Judy Hollenkamp | Circulation Clerk . . . . . . . . 441-5537 | jhollenkamp@NKY.com Classified To place a Classified ad. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283-7290 | www.communityclassified.com To place an ad in Community Classified, call 283-7290.


News

CCF Recorder

March 25, 2010

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Ribbons symbol for child-abuse prevention By Justin B. Duke jbduke@nky.com

The community is gathering together to protect children. April is National Child Abuse Prevention Month, and local organizations are teaming up to get the word out all month. The Florence-based Family Nurturing Center is taking the lead at letting the community know child abuse is completely preventable, said Tracy Fuchs, director of development. Child abuse rates in

Northern Kentucky are higher than the rest of the state and nation, Fuchs said. Throughout the month, blue ribbons will be hung all over schools, businesses and government buildings. The blue ribbon campaign has gotten a lot of attention over the last few years, Fuchs said. “When people see the blue ribbons, they don’t wonder what color that ribbon goes with,” she said. The month kicks off with a ceremony at noon Thursday, April 1, at Tom Gill

Chevrolet in Florence that will feature community, business, school and government leaders. “This is exactly what we need to do with issues in our community,” Gill said. Government shouldn’t be the only one tackling child abuse, but the whole community needs to be involved, he said. “We need to battle these things together,” Gill said. A new addition to the month’s activities is the Blue Ribbon 5K Race and Family Fun Walk at 9 a.m. Saturday, April 24, at Northern

JUSTIN B. DUKE/STAFF

Blue ribbons line the fence near Champion Window Field during last year's Child Abuse Prevention Month. Kentucky University. “We’re very excited about that. We’ve never hosted a 5K,” Fuchs said.

Funding for rural road fixes announced By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

The annual summer fix for selected Campbell County’s rural secondary roads is on the way. The only question remaining is which roads will be repaired with the $600,082 allotted to Campbell County rural and secondary roads by the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet. Campbell County Fiscal Court received a list of recommended road fixes at the March 17 meeting from Rob Hans, chief district engineer of the cabinet’s District Six Department of Highways. The state maintains 50.3 miles of rural secondary roads in Campbell County,

Hans said. The total amount of money available includes $354,818 for recommended projects, $120,016 for use by the county, and also covers the cost of maintenance and traffic projects. The county will probably keep the $120,000 allocated as “flex funds” for use by the county to use for the about 200 miles of county maintained roads, said Robert Horine, Campbell County Administrator. Hans presented the cabinet’s top four road project recommendations at the March 17 meeting for statemaintained rural secondary roads: • An estimated $119,512 to resurface a 2.2 mile section of Tollgate Road (Ky.

2294) from Breckenridge Drive to Licking Pike (Ky. 915). • An estimated $57,524 to resurface a mile of Clay Ridge Road (Ky. 1936) from Visalia Road to Ky. 536. • An estimated $154,545 to resurface Clay Ridge road (Ky. 1936) from Wolf Road to Visalia Road. • An estimated $33,377 for a slide repair on Race Track Road (Ky. 824) at mile post 7 near Persimmon Grove Pike. The total cost of the four estimates is more than the recommended amount money, but the estimates are on the high side, he said. “We’re hoping the bids come in slightly under the

estimates,” Hans said. Hans said other projects that could also be considered include two slide repair projects, one for an estimated $80,251 on Race Track Road at mile post 2.6, and another at an estimated cost of $19,675 for a slide repair on Persimmon Grove Pike (Ky. 1121) at mile post 6.3. Hans said also under consideration is a slide repair for Winters Lane (Ky. 2926) at an estimated $81,305 cost. Commissioner Mark Hayden, R-Wilder, said he wanted to know how the state prioritizes what road projects receive funding. “How do you decide slide repairs, you know Winters Lane needs repairs,” Hay-

Student groups from NKU are lining up to volunteer for the 5K, she said. To register for the 5K or

see a full list of Child Abuse Prevention Month activities and sponsors visit www. familynurture.org.

I-275 ramp fix

Traffic backing up onto I-275 eastbound during rush hour times became a topic of discussion at the March 17 Campbell County Fiscal Court meeting. Commissioner Ken Rechtin, D-Newport, said he’s seen vehicles taking the exit from I-275 onto the AA Highway backing up onto the interstate bridge over the Licking River and creating a hazard for drivers coming from Kenton County. Rechtin’s remarks were directed to Rob Hans, chief district engineer of the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet’s District Six Department of Highways. Hans said a reconstruction of the intersection and ramp to the AA Highway from I-275 was included in the 2010 state Six Year Highway Plan. There have been some changes to the timing of the lights, but traffic backing up onto I-275 since the changes was news to him and it would be examined, Hans said. Hans said the off-ramp is two narrow to turn into two lanes before merging with the AA Highway the way it’s currently designed. “I-275 at rush hour, we do have back-ups almost onto the interstate, which is a concern,” Hans said. den said. Hans said some slides can be handled with temporary fixes without or before more permanently correc-

tive action like driving pilings to stabilize a hillside. “A lot of it is based on how much the slide is moving,” Hans said.

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A4

CCF Recorder

News

March 25, 2010

Bubble wrap dreams pop with smiles By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

Ally Bruener couldn’t help but pop a smile as she rolled her power wheelchair across a gym floor covered in bubble wrap. Bruener, 21, a native of Grant’s Lick, and a student at the University of Louisville, said she’s always had a dream of rolling over a floor of bubble wrap. The dream was made a reality by Forest Thomer, 22, of Cold Spring, a former grade school classmate of Bruener’s. They reconnected through Facebook recently,

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Ally Bruener, a native of Grant’s Lick, snaps, crackles and pops her way across a bubble wrap covered gym floor inside Main Street Baptist Church March 19. come true because he also is seeking help making his own dream a reality. Thomer said created the Web site www.humanpuppet.com more than a year ago after an acquaintance was being a “hater” and told him his dream to dance with Ellen DeGeneres was silly. Thomer allows visitors to his Web site to vote on video projects they want him to do. One of his projects was a visit to Fountain Square in Cincinnati where he tried to get people to kiss his “angry cat” puppet and to give him a hug. “People have a right to

pursue their dreams now matter how wild and crazy they are,” he said. Thomer said it looked like Bruener was having fun, and that made it worth it. “We’re looking for more random acts of kindness to do,” Thomer said. Ally’s father Ron Bruener said many people wouldn’t try and fill a gym with bubble wrap for fear of embarrassment or what others might think. “Most people wouldn’t go ahead and do something like this,” Bruener said. “It kind of takes guts to go ahead and set it up and do it.”

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Forest Thomer hitches a ride with Ally Bruener as her dream of riding her wheelchair across a floor covered in bubble wrap becomes reality at Main Street Baptist Church Friday, March 19.

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Bruener said. Thomer asked Bruener if she could make one dream come true what it would be with the answer being a gym full of bubble wrap. “Wow,” said Bruener after criss-crossing the bubble wrap covered floor at Main Street Baptist Church Friday, March 19. Bruener said she liked the sound the bubble wrap made the most, and that she’s always been fascinated with popping the plastic bubbles used in packaging. “Oh yeah, who hasn’t,” Bruener said. “That’s part of being American.” Bruener gave Thomer and her father Ron rides on the back of her wheelchair across the bubble wrap. “He made it happen,” she said of Thomer. Thomer said he wants to help make peoples dreams

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News

March 25, 2010

CCF Recorder

Volunteers to help plant trees By Patricia A. Scheyer Community Recorder Contributor

Residents of Northern Kentucky who want to see more trees planted can put their shovel to good use on Saturday, March 27, as the Northern Kentucky Urban and Community Forestry Council hosts the fourth annual Reforest Northern Kentucky. Scheduled from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., the event will take place on the Ryle High School campus, behind Gray Middle School. “The Urban and Community Forestry Council serves Boone, Kenton and Campbell counties,” said Kris Stone, director of the Boone County Arboretum. “In 2007 we held the tree plantings in Big Bone Lick State Park. The following year, it took place at A.J. Jolly, and last year it was held at Middleton-Mills Park. We try to move it

around so that trees will be planted all over Northern Kentucky.” With each location, attention is paid to what kind of trees will grow the best. The trees are obtained from the Kentucky Division of Forestry. “We have 2,200 tiny saplings to plant on that Saturday, and each person who comes to help will get to take one home,” Stone said. “We have sugar maples, oaks and black walnut trees and a few other varieties.” Variety is the key to reforestation, according to Mike Klahr, Boone County Extension agent for horticulture. “This is a wonderful program, because it allows us to expand the diversity of trees in our woods,” Klahr said. “That is important because of the pests that prey on trees. The more diversity we have, the less likely a single pest can wipe out great expanses of trees.”

Everyone is invited to come. Although tools will be available, Stone recommends people bring their own because they will be more familiar with their own shovels. “This is an excellent family event,” Stone said. “It is a great lesson to get across to children that we have to help nature put the trees back, because trees are a vital resource for our country.” The first 200 people to register by calling 859-586-6101 will receive a Tshirt. Stone said up to 300 people have come in past years. People can also register at www.ca.uky.edu/boone. “This is an event that will be held rain or shine or even snow,” Stone said. “We will also have breakfast refreshments like coffee, muffins and doughnuts and of course water. So sign up and come help us plant trees.”

TMC professor publishes book on elder abuse Thomas More College Assistant Professor, Dr. John D. Rudnick, Jr., published a book titled, “Elder Abuse and Neglect: Strategies for Awareness, Knowledge, Prevention and Intervention.” In addition to teaching in the Department of Business Administration at Thomas More College, Dr. Rudnick serves as the Administrator of Holy Fam-

ily Nursing Home in Melbourne, Kentucky. “The book is based on research from my doctorate in community counseling and leadership as well as my experiences working in the healthcare field for 35 years. This book topic is important because of the public’s general lack of awareness and knowledge of appropriate intervention

options concerning the magnitude of this emerging global health and social issue. Only an estimated 18 percent of elder abuse and neglect cases in the United States are reported. Elder abuse awareness is where child and spouse abuses were 20 years ago,” noted Rudnick. The book is available on amazon.com.

BRIEFLY Upcoming board of health meeting

The District Director of Health Search Committee of the Northern Kentucky District Board of Health will meet at 6 p.m. Monday, March 29, in the Executive Conference Room, at the Health Department’s District Office, 610 Medical Village Drive, Edgewood, Ky.

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Abigail Geiman, of Cold Spring, a fifth-grade student, holds up her “Solar Surfers” team sign to let teachers know her team has an answer in a game of gym floor “Jeopardy” as part of “Energy Challenge” events at St. Joseph School in Cold Spring Friday, March 19. Third- and fifth-grade students studied renewable and nonrenewable energy including coal, petroleum, wind and solar and representative from Duke Energy also visited the school earlier in the week to give a demonstration about safety around electricity and power lines.

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Campbell County Recorder

March 25, 2010

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Editor Michelle Shaw | smhaw@nky.com | 578-1053

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Dinner fuels tuition assistance fund By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Newport Central Catholic senior Joe Collopy plays his role of Chad during rehearsal for the school’s upcoming musical “All Shook Up.”

NCC students to sing Elvis tunes

By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com Some students at Newport Central Catholic are all shook up, preparing for their upcoming spring musical. Rehearsals are well under way for the school’s performance of “All Shook Up,” a musical with Elvis Presley music and a story based on William Shakespeare’s “Twelfth Night.” “This is a show you just don’t see a lot, but it is a lot of fun,” said Director Kevan Brown. “It’s really unlike anything we’ve done before.” Brown said even though the school lost some great performers in last year’s graduating class, the current group is one of the best he’s ever had. Senior Joe Collopy, who is playing Chad, one of the lead roles, said he has enjoyed working on the musical and thinks it will be a good show. “The best part about it is that nobody really knows what it’s about, so people are going to be surprised,” Collopy said. Senior Tyler Tackett said he loves the show choice, partly because he’s a fan of Elvis an partly because the show is energetic. “This is the highest energy performance we’ve ever done,” said Tackett, whose been in the musicals for three years. For senior Shae Brennan, her last year in high school is her first in the spring musical. “I’m a little nervous, but everyone else is well prepared and has

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Junior Courtney Stone (left) and Shae Brennan dance during a scene of “All Shook Up.”

Drama event

The Newport Central Catholic drama program is hosting a night of live music from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Tuesday, March 30 at Guys and Dolls. The night will feature Gary Devoto and the Lunch Buddies, NCC student musicians, NCC drama alumni, cast members from “All Shook Up” and Steve Chuke. The cover is $5, with proceeds going towards the production of “All Shook Up.” done this before, so I think it will go great,” Brennan said. Senior Matt Krieg, whose musical theater experience began when he was a sophomore in “Beauty and the Beast,” said the hardest part of this show for him is all the

dancing. “I’m not a very good dancer, so I’ve had to practice a lot,” Krieg said. Krieg plans to attend Northern Kentucky University next fall and major in theater. The Gala performance of the show, which raises money for tuition assistance, is at 6 p.m. Friday, April 16 and cost $45 per person. Last year, the gala raised $74,000, a number Brown said they hope to beat this year. The show also runs at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, April 17; Sunday, April 18; Friday, April 23; Saturday, April 24 and Sunday, April 25. For ticket information contact the school at 292-0001 ext. 18.

Highlands leads area in National Merit Scholarship finalists By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

In the Fort Thomas Independent Schools, college readiness is of the highest importance. This concentration on preparing students for college may be a factor in Highlands High School leading all Northern Kentucky high schools in the number of National Merit Scholarship Program finalists. Recently five Highlands students; Clare Coughlan, Clare Healy, Rian Austin, Maxwell Payne and Chase Pendery, were named as finalists, a classification that allows them to be considered for a variety of National Merit scholarships. To become a finalist, the stu-

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Highlands High School seniors (from left) Maxwell Payne, Chase Pendrey, Rian Austin, Clare Healy and Clare Coughlan, National Merit Scholarship finalists, pose for a picture. dents had to score high on the Preliminary SAT, have a good record throughout high school, be endorsed by the principal and earn SAT scores that confirm the PSAT scores. Healy said she is excited to be a finalist and hopes it will help her with college, where she plans to study biology or anthropology. “It’s mainly just about the prestige for me,” Healy said. Pendery said his support network at home and school helped him become a finalist.

RECORDER

“I’m really happy to be a finalist and be offered such a great opportunity,” Pendery said. Pendery said he plans to go to Ohio State in the Air Force ROTC program and study aviation and Mandarin Chinese. Counselor Ann Meyer said the school is proud of the finalists. “All of these talented seniors are leaders at Highlands as well as in the community and we feel confident that they will accomplish great things in college and in life,” Meyer said.

The March 28 spaghetti dinner at St. Philip Parish Hall in Melbourne isn’t just about dining, it’s about giving families a helping hand with tuition. The dinner, benefiting the Norbert Frilling Education Fund, will be in the parish hall, 1400 Mary Ingles Hwy., from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Sunday, March 28. The cost is $6 for adults and $3 for children. Proceeds from the spaghetti dinner go into a fund to help parents applying for tuition assistance, said Sr. Dolores Gohs, C.D.P., principal of St. Joseph School in Melbourne. “Last year, we gave away about $14,000, and it’s about the same each year,” Gohs said. “That helped 10 families with tuition assistance.” The fund is supported with donations, grants, and with the Breakfast with Santa and the Spaghetti Supper fundraisers, Gohs said. The dinner is profitable because seventh- and eighthgrade students help out at the spaghetti dinner by acting as servers, and parents donate two liter drinks and desserts, she said. Jack’s Catering in Melbourne donates all the food. Theresa Frilling of Melbourne

The enrollment at St. Philip School is 85 students from about 53 families this year, Gohs said. Of those families, about 10 received tuition assistance. set up the fund in 1991 to honor her son Norbert. Norbert was a second-grade student at St. Philip and 7 years old when he died of a brain aneurysm in October 1991, Frilling said. The initial donation made in Norbert’s name have been added to by other donations and fundraisers like the spaghetti dinner over the years, she said. “It’s there to help everybody,” Frilling said of the fund. The enrollment at St. Philip School is 85 students from about 53 families this year, Gohs said. Of those families, about 10 received tuition assistance, she said. Some parents are offered assistance and they refuse it, Gohs said. But it’s there for people who need it, she said. Each year the school’s board reviews the applications submitted, Gohs said. “It sure helps with tuition, and really there are parents who can’t quite afford tuition and just need a little help here and there,” Gohs said.

School brings in local vendors for prom By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

Lunch will be a prom preview April 6 at Campbell County High School. The school is bringing in local businesses catering to a diverse range of students’ prom needs for a day so students can see what’s available locally, said Ashley Himes, a teacher, and the sponsor of the underclassman student council planning this year’s April 30 prom. Other area high schools have had prom fairs for their students, but this is the first year for Campbell County, Himes said. The hope is it will become an annual event, she said. The prom fair will be during lunch to give every student a chance to see it, Himes said. Vendors and businesses already confirmed they will attend include: Schrader’s Cleaners and Tuxedo Rentals of Fort Thomas, Four Seasons Florist & Gift Basket Boutique in Alexandria, David’s Bridal of Florence, Susan’s Salon & Spa of Alexandria, OCharley’s in Cold Spring, and Studio 27 Salon in Cold Spring. “We’re trying to stick with all local businesses,” Himes said. Several other businesses, including other hair salons, nail salons and more restaurants have yet to commit to having a booth at the prom fair, but have been invited, she said. Schrader’s is offering a special service for tuxedos, Himes said.

Orders and fittings will be taken at the prom fair, and the tuxedos will be dropped off to the students at school, she said. “The kids don’t have to do anything extra other than what they do at school,” Himes said. Most businesses will be offering some kind of coupons or special deals if students make an appointment or order flowers at the prom fair, she said. For students needing financial assistance obtaining a dress for prom, the school’s Youth Service Center staff is meeting with students separately and referring them to Cinderella’s Closet http://cinderellasclosetusa.org, Himes said. Conversations of many students have turned to asking each other what they’re doing from prom, where they’re going to eat and what their after prom plans are, she said. Last year’s prom was at the Newport Aquarium. This year’s prom is the Great American Ball Park to give students who were juniors last year a different prom venue to experience, Himes said. Campbell County’s 2010 Junior/Senior Prom “Under the City Lights” with the theme colors of navy and silver will be from 8 p.m. to midnight Friday, April 30 at Great American Ball Park’s Fox Sports Ohio Champions Club. Tickets are on sale from March 22 through April 2, and no tickets will be sold after April 2. For information call the school at 635-4161.

SCHOOL NOTES New band Web site

Campbell County Schools’ bands have a new Web site www.campbellcountybands.org. The site includes videos of concerts, a calendar and news about upcoming events. There are separate sections for the symphonic and concert bands,

percussion ensemble, marching band, Jazz ensemble, middle school bands, the Campbell County Band Parents Association, staff, and people available to provide private lessons. There is also a section for volunteers to sign up and get on a volunteer schedule.


Schools

CCF Recorder

March 25, 2010

A7

SCHOOL NOTES Finalist for scholarship

NCC Senior Adam Meyer has been selected as a finalist for the 2010 Anthony Munoz Foundation Straight “A” Student Program presented by PNC. With moe than 190 schools in the Tri-State area and hundreds of applicants, he was selected as one of 18 finalists. He will receive a $2,000 college scholarship and has the opportunity to be selected to win one of two $5,000 scholarships to further his education. The criteria is based on academic excellence, athletic

Night out

Grandview Elementary School students pose for a picture during the Bellevue Youth Basketball Outing at Northern Kentucky University Saturday, Feb. 20.

Work ethic scholarship offered The Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce, along with the Education Alliance of Northern Kentucky, invites qualifying seniors to apply for the 2010 Northern Kentucky Work Ethic Scholarship. This scholarship was created in 2009 to recognize and honor outstanding students from the region who have earned the Work Ethic Diploma. Each year, two $1,000 scholarships are awarded to students from across the region that attend public or private high schools currently implementing the Work Ethic program. Students must be a resident of Boone, Campbell, Kenton, Gallatin, Grant or Pendleton counties and successfully meet established

criteria for earning the Work Ethic Diploma, as determined by their school’s representative for the program. Additionally, students competing for the scholarship must plan to be enrolled full-time at a Kentucky postsecondary institution, including those offering two-year and fouryear degree programs. “The Northern Kentucky Work Ethic Program was developed to encourage standards in students that were deemed necessary for success in today’s workforce,” said Amanda Dixon, manager of education solutions at the Chamber. “The 10 standards that were selected are: attendance, tardiness, discipline, grade point average, community service/internship,

organization, punctuality, respectfulness and group cooperation,” she said. “Fostering and developing these traits in our education system will serve to make Northern Kentucky students highly marketable as they enter the job market,” said Dixon. Candidates are evaluated based on a 500-word essay, meeting established criteria for earning the Work Ethic Diploma as determined by their school, financial need, and a commitment to display a positive work ethic as they continue onto postsecondary education or the workforce. To obtain an application or for more information, contact Amanda Dixon at 578-6396 or adixon@nkychamber.com.

2006, Wolfe has served as team captain and has received recognition at various tournaments. Most notably, she represented Kentucky at the Interstate Oratorical Contest in 2007. “Gina is not a traditional forensic student,” said head coach Dr. Michelle Deeley Wilhite. “She struggles to even be part of the team. She is a single parent raising a school-aged daughter and works full time to support her family while she attends college. Despite these and other obstacles, she manages to attend two tournaments a year and maintains a strong grade point aver-

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The story is based on an ancient poem about the Chinese hero, Mulan. It is a story of a girl who fights to protect her country and her family. The performance will be held at the school’s Memorial Hall. Performances will be at 8 p.m. Friday, March 26; 7 p.m. Saturday, March 27 and 2 p.m. Sunday, March 28.

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St. Joseph School Cold Spring’s eighth-grade drama club will be performing “Fa Mulan” March 26, 27 and 28. This is the fourth production of the drama club.

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Gateway student, speech coach receive honors at tournament A Gateway Community and Technical College student has been recognized as the outstanding female forensic student in Kentucky, and the college’s speech and debate coach was honored as coach of the year at the Kentucky Forensic Association State Tournament held on Feb. 19-20 at Murray State University. Rosemary “Gina” Wolfe, an Associate in Science major from Bellevue, won the Harlan Hamm Award. The state coaches’ association chooses the award recipient based on leadership, forensic success and community service. A founding member of the GCTC speech team since

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CCF Recorder

Schools

March 25, 2010

NEWS FROM NKU NKU wins 11 KIPA journalism awards

The student staff of Northern Kentucky University’s independent student newspaper, The Northerner, earned 11 journalism awards during the annual convention of the Kentucky Intercollegiate Press Association (KIPA). NKU student entries earned five first-place awards, two second-place awards, two third-place awards and two honorable mentions. Entries were judged by journalism professionals throughout the country.

Co-editors Mark Payne and Emily Teaford accepted the honors at the 44th KIPA conference, hosted by Transylvania University in Louisville. Judges complemented the overall quality of entries, noting The Northerner’s innovative web and newspaper design. The Northerner received first-place awards for: • Overall Web Site, for the Fall 2009 staff’s innovative Web presentation; • Best Web Special Section, for Brad Bowman’s work on map of area crime;

• Best Inside Web Page, for Joe Castelli’s interactive piece on a student art exhibition; • Best Inside Web Page, for Jeremy Jackson’s reporting on NKU’s arts performance; • Best Review, for a movie review of “The Watchmenâ€? by 2009 graduate Tim Owens Second-place certificates went to the spring 2009 staff for best home page and to Patrick Delaney for an inside web page collection of his comic strip “Undergrad.â€? Third-place honors went to Delaney for his comic strip

“Undergrad� and to Michael Collins for sports headline. Honorable mentions were presented to Teaford for feature page layout in The Northerner’s redesigned tabloid format and to Owens for news headline. The Northerner staff competes in KIPA Division A, which includes universities with enrollment greater than 10,000. The newspaper is advised by Student Media Director Gayle Brown.

Major donation from Greenway Medical Technologies

Northern Kentucky University has announced that Greenway Medical Technologies, Inc., based in Carrollton, Ga., is providing NKU with its integrated electronic health record (EHR), practice management and interoperability solution PrimeSuiteÂŽ; clinical

   



One winner will receive 4 opening day tickets, 4 Reds t-shirts, 4 Reds hats and one $25 gift certiďŹ cate to the Reds Team Shop in a random drawing Friday, April 2, 2010. Hurry! Call 888.248.1180 by March 31, 2010. Brought to you by:

NO PURCHASE NECESSARY TO ENTER OR TO WIN. A PURCHASE WILL NOT INCREASE YOUR ODDS OF WINNING. SUBJECT TO FEDERAL, STATE, LOCAL AND MUNICIPAL LAWS AND REGULATIONS. VOID WHERE PROHIBITED. The Enquirer’s Reds Package Sweepstakes (the “Sweepstakesâ€?) is open to legal residents of Ohio, Indiana, and Kentucky who are 18 years or older at the time of entry. Employees of The Enquirer (“Sponsorâ€?), Gannett Co., Inc., Telereach, Inc., and each of their respective afďŹ liated companies, and advertising and promotional agencies, and the immediate family members of, and any persons domiciled with, any such employees, are not eligible to enter or to win. The “Sweepstakesâ€? will begin at 8:00 a.m. (E.T.) on March 21, 2010 and all entries must be received by 9:00 p.m. (E.T.) on March 31, 2010. Phone Entry: Enter by calling one of the “Sweepstakesâ€? ofďŹ cial entry lines (1.866.327.5723, 1.866.786.1690, 1.888.248.2122 or 1.888.248.1180) between the hours of 8:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. (E.T.) Monday – Friday and 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. (E.T.) Saturday – Sunday and completing all of the required information and following all instructions. All call-ins will receive a promotional offer from The Enquirer, no purchase necessary to win. In-Person Entry: Enter in person by completing an OfďŹ cial Entry Form available at The Cincinnati Enquirer, 312 Elm Street, Cincinnati, OH 45202 during regular business hours and depositing your entry form in the entry box. One (1) entry per household. One (1) Grand Prize Winner will be selected in a random drawing from among all eligible entries to be held on or about April 2, 2010. Grand Prize Winner will receive a Reds Package including four (4) Cincinnati Reds Opening Day tickets for Monday, April 5, 2010 at 1:10 p.m. (E.T.), four (4) Reds t-shirts, four (4) Reds hats and one (1) $25.00 gift certiďŹ cate to the Reds Team Shop. (ARV: $625.00) Odds of winning depend on the number of eligible entries received. Winner will be notiďŹ ed by telephone on or about April 2, 2010. By participating, entrants agree to be bound by the complete OfďŹ cial Rules and the decisions of the judges. For a copy of the prize winners list (available after April 9, 2010) or the complete OfďŹ cial Rules, send a SASE to “Winners List/OfďŹ cial Rulesâ€? (as applicable), The Enquirer’s Reds Package Sweepstakes, The Enquirer 312 Elm Street, Cincinnati, Ohio 45202. By entering the Sweepstakes, entrants release The Enquirer (“Sponsorâ€?), Gannett Co., Inc., TeleReach, Inc. and any other promotional sponsors from any claims, demands losses or liabilities arising in connection with the Sweepstakes, or the receipt or use of any prize awarded. 83953.2

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trials and research analytics solution PrimeResearch ™; and revenue cycle management solution PrimeRCMŽ. While the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) and other agencies are making major investments in advancing healthcare technology training and an expanded workforce, current university and college curricula lacks leading-edge Health IT solutions. NKU, on the other hand, boasts one of the largest and most progressive graduate programs in health informatics in the nation. Greenway’s donation of industry-leading HIT solutions will allow NKU to merge programs within its College of Health Professions and College of Informatics to provide training for all clinical students and make the new programs available to other institutions through programs

being established by ONC. The university plans to begin the implementation of Greenway’s solutions this week. The use of Greenway’s integrated solutions is allowing NKU to use Workforce Investment Board (WIB) grant funds obtained within ARRA legislation to create Healthcare Technology and Business Process Analysis programs within the two colleges, which will, for example, make Greenway’s automated solutions accessible to 750 nursing students and 200 allied health students. The university’s HCI lab will research simulation models of cost savings attributable to healthcare information exchange and interoperability, while a related project plans to create a virtual medical center demonstrating how a fully-functional EHR solution integrates with patient care.

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Montessori Education Week

In celebration of Montessori Education Week, Trent Montessori, located in Mansion Hill, Newport, held special events each day, including Pajama Day. Here Trent students, from left are: Elsa Neurohr, Annalise Neurohr, Emmeline Parento-Dumbauld, Madeline Bruns, and Mickey Marron are showing off their pajamas. In background: Parent Carolyn Bruns and Trent teacher Miss Hester.

COLLEGE CORNER Eastern Progress wins awards

The Eastern Progress, the student-produced newspaper at Eastern Kentucky University, fared well at the annual Kentucky Intercollegiate Press Association college newspaper awards contest, hosted at Transylvania University. Competing against counterparts from Western Kentucky University, University of Kentucky, Murray State University, University of Louisville and Morehead State University, Eastern captured 16 awards. Students from Campbell County who received awards are: Steve Thomas, Alexandria, second place, general inter-

est column; third place, investigative reporting. Maggie LaFleur, Ft. Thomas, second place, feature page layout, feature headline; third place, overall layout.

Duke University

Lauren Sanders of Fort Thomas was recently named to the dean’s list with distinction at Duke University for 2009 fall semester. Sanders is currently a freshman in the Trinity College of Arts and Science. To make the Arts & Sciences dean’s list, students must rank in the top third of their college; for dean’s list with distinction, the top tenth of their college. Sanders is a 2009 graduate of Highlands High School.

For information on the school, visit www.duke.edu.

University of Kentucky

University of Kentucky recently announced that sisters, Ashley and Lindsey Sharp, have been named to the dean’s list for the 2009 fall semester. Ashley Sharp, who graduated from Notre Dame Academy, is a senior at UK in the College of Education. She will graduate in May. Lindsey Sharp, who graduated from Bishop Brossart, is a freshman at UK. Ashley and Lindsey Sharp are the daughters of Tom and Janine Sharp of Highland Heights. For information on the school, visit www.uky.edu.


SPORTS

CCF Recorder

March 25, 2010

HIGH SCHOOL | Editor Melanie Laughman | mlaughman@nky.com | 513-248-7118

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Fast, quality team subdues Newport

By James Weber

Wildcats’ Sweet 16 history

jweber@nky.com

The last time Newport played in the boys’ basketball Sweet 16, the Wildcats fell to the eventual state runner-up. Forty-eight years later, the Wildcats ran into a team of similar quality. Newport fell 70-51 to Christian County March 17 in a first-round game of the Sweet 16 at Rupp Arena. Newport ended the season 29-6, losing a showdown to determine the second team in the state to get to 30 wins this year. Christian County lost to Scott County in the quarterfinals. “I know our kids were ready to play,” Newport head coach Aric Russell said. “We played hard. We lost to a really good team.” Newport was playing its first state tourney game since 1962 and has not won a game there since 1955. The Colonels broke a seven-game losing streak in the Sweet 16 dating back to 1983. After a bit of a rocky start, Newport went on a 16-6 run to take its biggest lead, five points, at 20-15 midway through the second quarter. To that point, Newport had shown its typical balance as five different Wildcats had scored and four of them had hit a threepoint basket. But the Colonels ended the half with a 12-4 run, six of them coming on treys by Donovan Kates, which hurt Newport’s defensive game plan. Kates led CC with 22 points, and guard Anthony Hickey had 20. “We were going to let (Kates) shoot a little bit, and then we had to start guarding him,” Russell said. In the third quarter, Christian went on a 15-4 run capped by five straight Kates’ points, including another trey. Newport committed six turnovers in the quarter. “It was difficult because of their pressure defense,”

Thirteen appearances, 14-14 all-time record. 1920: Lost to Covington 42-12. 1925: Beat Henderson 29-17, beat Owensboro 33-22, lost to DuPont Manual 24-10. All-tournament team: Lewis Sloan, Fred McLane. 1932: Beat Corydon 28-16, beat Waco 21-16, lost to Hazard 2824. All-tournament team: Tom Reis. 1935: Beat Frankfort 30-20, beat Maysville 23-18, beat Danville 22-13, lost to St. Xavier 32-18. All-tournament team: Albert Howe, Jimmy Ford. 1936: Beat LaGrange 30-28, lost to Paris 20-7. 1937: Beat Carrolton 43-19, lost to Hazard 30-22. 1940: Lost to Ashland Blazer 39-29. 1950: Lost to Clark County 58-47. 1952: Lost to Hindman 53-51. 1954: Beat Lafayette 50-45, beat Bourbon Vocational 58-46, beat Ashland Blazer 73-69, lost to Inez 63-55. All-tournament team: Larry Redmond, Ed Huffman. 1955: Beat Olive Hill 70-51, beat St. Xavier 58-54, lost to Hazard 72-62, lost to Henderson 68-62 (third-place game). All-tournament team: Ed Huffman. 1962: Lost to Ashland Blazer 61-57. 2010: Lost to Christian County 70-51. JAMES WEBER/STAFF

Newport seniors Casey McDaniel (left) and Brandon Tucker react near the end of Newport’s 70-51 loss to Christian County March 17 during the first round of the Sweet 16 at Rupp Arena.

2010 Newport stats

Scoring (entering Sweet 16): McDaniel 14.9, Foster 14.1, Luther 11.7, Collins 7.9, Tucker 6.7, Sizemore 5.7, Travis Jones 3.1. Rebounding: Luther 7.5, McDaniel 7.4, Foster 5.6, Collins 5.3, Tucker 3.4, Sizemore 2.5. Assists: Sizemore 117, Foster 112, Luther 77, Collins 58, McDaniel 52, Tucker 40. Steals: Luther 63, Foster 62, Collins 50, McDaniel 45, Sizemore 42, Tucker 31. Blocks: Collins 119, Luther 74, McDaniel 34, Foster 22. Threes: Sizemore 50, Foster 35, Tucker 34, Luther 26, Jones 22, McDaniel 18.

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

Newport senior Brandon Tucker shoots a three during Newport’s 70-51 loss to Christian County March 17.

Newport senior center Casey McDaniel said. “We took ourselves out of the game. We didn’t really run our offense and we went oneon-one a lot.” The Wildcats never got closer than nine points in the fourth quarter as Hickey, a highly talented point guard, and the rest of the

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

Newport senior Cody Collins heads to the basket during Newport’s 70-51 loss to Christian County March 17 during the first round of the Sweet 16 at Rupp Arena. Colonels consistently beat their pressure. “Hickey is the quickest person I’ve defended this year,” Newport senior guard DaMarkco Foster said. “You’ve got to play mind

games with him, and it didn’t work.” Said Russell: “At times, I thought they had six or seven guys on the floor instead of five. It’s something we work on. Their

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

Newport senior Casey McDaniel falls to the floor as he draws a foul during the first half of Newport’s 70-51 loss to Christian County March 17 during the first round of the Sweet 16 at Rupp Arena. quickness got to us and got in our heads a little bit. When you’re trying to play catchup with a team that

fast, it’s almost impossible.” Foster had 21 points to lead Newport and McDaniel had 10.

Wildcats postseason run memorable By James Weber

jweber@nky.com

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

Newport senior DaMarkco Foster shoots during Newport’s 70-51 loss to Christian County March 17 during the first round of the Sweet 16 at Rupp Arena.

They made history just by being there. Being there wasn’t enough as the Newport boys’ basketball team wanted to be in the Sweet 16 all week, but it was a memorable experience for the Wildcat players. “It was the experience I thought it would be,” said senior center Casey McDaniel. “The loss hurt, but I’ll still remember it. “It means a lot, especially freshman year when we had a mediocre team. This year we got over all the humps. We worked hard in practice and I’m glad we got to come down here.” Newport was in the Sweet 16 for the first time since 1962. The Wildcats had made 12 appearances in the state tournament from 1920-62, making the state final twice. With their 13th trip this year, they broke a tie with Holmes and Highlands for the most among current Ninth Region teams.

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

Newport senior DaMarkco Foster drives to the basket during Newport’s 70-51 loss to Christian County. “The loss does hurt, but we’ve got to move on, keep our heads up,” senior Anthony Luther said. “It means a lot for the city and a lot to us. We had a good team; it’s upsetting it had to end like this.” The Wildcats had two pep rallies and encouragement all week leading up to the game. This included a visit from players on the 1962 regional championship team.

Newport senior Brandon Sizemore makes a layup during Newport’s 70-51 loss to Christian County. “They came in and showed us clippings,” McDaniel said. “They told us to play hard and give it your all. It could be your last game ever.” In the end, the team tied the school record for wins (29). Seniors are Brandon Sizemore, Brandon Tucker, Anthony Luther, Casey McDaniel, DaMarkco Foster, Cody Collins, Devin Opitz, Timothy Slusher, and Njamile Upshaw.

Newport senior Casey McDaniel drives in for a successful layup during Newport’s 70-51 loss to Christian County. Newport’s listed enrollment of 511 was the lowest among the 16 state tourney teams. “I couldn’t be more proud of these kids,” head coach Aric Russell said. “I love them like sons. They’re such a great group. For a small school like us, a public school, an inner-city school, to do what we did is almost unheard of nowadays. In a week or two, we’ll realize what a great accomplishment we had. It will be hard saying goodbye to those kids.”


A10

CCF Recorder

Sports & recreation

March 25, 2010

Campbell County teams hit the diamond By James Weber jweber@nky.com

Here is a look at other baseball teams in Campbell County.

Bellevue

Rob Sanders returns for his fifth season as Tigers head coach. The Tigers were 16-14 last year and lost to Newport Central Catholic in the 36th District Tournament. Bellevue returns five senior starters in Alex Hegge (catcher/infield), Ricky Buckler (shortstop), Tony Piper (pitcher/first base), Mike Young (pitcher/infield), and Chad Thompson (infield/catcher). Joe Fessler (outfielder) is a sixth senior. Standout shortstop Hunter Jones, son of former

Cincinnati Red Tracy Jones, has moved to California. Beyond those returning seniors, Sanders expects several eighth-graders to play key roles. He said the team’s strengths are solid starting pitching and defense.

Bishop Brossart

The Mustangs went 1217 last season for Matt Grosser, who returns for his second season as head coach. Junior outfielder/pitcher Travis Norton hit .359 last year. Junior shortstop Nick Hamberg hit .367 last year. Sophomore outfielder Trevor Bezold hit .328 last season as a freshman. Junior Ian Hehman and senior David Greis are other

top returning pitchers. Seniors Anthony Steffen and Steve Popovich return in the infield.

Campbell County

Scott Schweitzer inherits a young Camel baseball team as he takes over as new head coach. The Campbell County graduate played minor league baseball for five seasons. The Camels were 18-9 last season. They return five starters including Michael Kramer, Nate Losey, Adam Broering, Ryan Steffan and Jonathan Rust. Schweitzer said the team will be athletic and fundamentally sound, and its main strength is defense. He is also confident about the team’s run production. The pitching staff is inexperienced. “Though the Camels lack experience at the varsity level, they return a core group that has played together for many years,” Schweitzer said. “The level of competition that this team has been successful against will allow it to be a contender in the 37th District with a return to the 10th Region tournament well within their sights.”

Dayton

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

Bishop Brossart's Steve Popovich, then a junior, makes contact against the Camels in April 2009.

Roger Hamilton returns for his fourth season as head coach. His team went 6-11 last year.

Hamilton returns six veteran seniors in Greg Kraft, Tim Massey, Pat Schwierjohann, James Jones, Rob Collins and Brandon Thornton. “We have a lot of good talent with our returning seniors and we have a good group of young talent that I feel will make their presence known,” Hamilton said. “We expect all of our seniors to produce well with us this year since these five have been in the program all the way through.” Hamilton said 30 players tried out this season, an increase over last year. Dayton is set to open the year March 25 at Williamstown. Dayton’s first home game is Tuesday, March 29, against Bracken County.

Highlands

Jeremy Baioni returns for his second year as Highlands’ head coach. The Bluebirds were just 14-20 last year, but finished strong, winning the 36th District championship and falling to Beechwood, 5-2 in the Ninth Region quarterfinals. They return just two starters from that team in seniors Sam Liggett and Chris Rizzo. Liggett, a catcher and four-year starter, has verbally committed to Division III Transylvania. He is the

MATTHEW BECK/CONTRIBUTOR

Bellevue pitcher Chad Thompson during a scrimmage with Boone County. team’s defensive MVP the past three years. Rizzo, a senior infielder, is a three-year starter and leadoff hitter. Other top players are seniors Corey Dill (pitcher/infielder) and Troy Hebel (infielder). “This team has some great senior leadership,” Baioni said. “While we won’t have a large senior class, they are all leaders that set a good example for their younger teammates. This will be a very resilient team because of this leadership.”

Newport

Grady Brown returns for his seventh season as head coach. His final one, too, as

Brown plans to retire after this season. His Wildcats went 9-11 last year, being eliminated in the 36th District by Newport Central Catholic. He returns six starters including seniors Brandon Sizemore, Ian Plank and Adam Reynolds; and juniors Rodney Orr, Travis Jones and Shawn Klaas. Most of those starters can and will play multiple positions this season, Brown said. Jones hit .390 last year and Sizemore hit .350. Klaas is the top returning pitcher with a 2.50 ERA last season. Brown said his team’s strengths are defense up the middle and pitching. Offense is his main concern. Newport’s first home game is scheduled for March 30 against Cooper.

Silver Grove

Bruce Shay returns for his second season as head coach. The Big Trains were 617 last year. He said he had bigger numbers come out for the team this year. Freshman Dallas Dunaway started last year in the infield and could be the top pitcher this year. Junior outfielder/pitcher Travis Baumann was the top hitter last year at .385. Senior Justin Denham is the team captain. Senior Jeff Morris is also a top returning hitter.

NewCath reloads behind veteran pitchers By James Weber jweber@nky.com

Jeff Schulkens is one of Northern Kentucky’s winningest active coaches with 232 career victories entering this season.

He led the Thoroughbreds to a 20-9 record last year and the Ninth Region semifinals, where they lost 12-2 to Covington Catholic. NewCath was also 36th District runner-up. He returns just three

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Senior outfielder Dominic Millard is one of Newport Central Catholic’s top returning players. Union. NCC’s first home game is McNick Monday, March 29. “I told them yesterday we have it tough starting

out,” Schulkens said. “We’ve never been afraid to play anybody and we’ll go and play the best teams we could find.”

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and also starts at shortstop. Cain is also a returning pitcher. Kelly returns as catcher. “I feel confident when I send out Shaun Meyer and Jake Cain to the mound,” Schulkens said. “We’re looking for kids to fill in some of the other spots in the field.” Meyer was 6-1 with a 3.98 ERA last season. Cain was 2-2 and struck out an impressive 44 batters in just 26 innings. Meyer, Cain and Kelly all hit over .30 last season. Meyer was at .360 and the other two hit .320. “Those three are ready to go, and we’ll find others who will be ready,” Schulkens said. NewCath will throw its newer players right into action against a tough early schedule. NCC’s first four games are against Ryle, Conner, Boone County and Cincinnati McNicholas. The Ryle game starts the year Friday, March 26, in

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Northern Kentucky University senior Kevin Jordan was recently named the Great Lakes Valley Conference Baseball Pitcher of the week. Jordan made five appearances on the mound for the Norse the week of March 8, helping his club to victories in each outing. He was 2-0 on the week with nine strikeouts in 14 and one-third innings. He threw two scoreless innings in NKU’s 7-4 win over

UC Clermont March 10, allowing no hits and striking out two. Jordan returned March 13 in a doubleheader at Rockhurst to throw two scoreless innings of relief in a 7-1 Norse win in the opener. He started game two and allowed just one run in five innings of work. Jordan earned a 7-4 win in the nightcap and surrendered just three hits and struck out three in seven innings on the day. On March 14, Jordan again made two appearances in NKU’s sweep over Quincy. In NKU’s 10-5 win in the opener, Jordan closed out the game by picking up a strikeout in the bottom of the ninth. He then worked five innings of relief in a 3-2 Norse win in game two. Jordan allowed just two hits and struck out

three to earn the victory. Jordan, who holds the NKU record with 85 career appearances, is now 2-1 on the season with a 1.90 earned run average. He has made 10 appearances on the year and has 16 strikeouts in 23 and two-third innings.

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Follow the Community Press and Community Recorder newspapers on Facebook! Search “Pages” for Community Press/Recorder Sports and become a fan. On the page, viewers will find photos, story links and discussions. Questions? Contact Melanie Laughman at mlaughman@communitypress.com.


Sports & recreation

CCF Recorder

March 25, 2010

Distinguished service

PROVIDED

St. Ursula Academy teacher and alumna of Northern Kentucky University, Julie Perry, receives one of NKU’s highest honors, the Distinguished Service Award, Feb. 5. This award recognizes alumni who have contributed time, talent, and effort enhancing the quality of life at NKU, or alumni who have made significant contributions, making their community a better place to live. Perry, a resident of Mariemont and graduate of NKU, has taught and coached at St. Ursula Academy for 29 years. As volleyball coach at SUA, she coached her teams to eight state titles and one national title. Perry was nominated for the Distinguished Service Award by Leon Booth, NKU’s past President.

PROVIDED

Saints secure win

A11

St. Mary’s eighth-grade Saints capture the Our Lady of Victory tournament Feb. 20. They beat St. Barts and Our Lady of Visitation in pool play. In the championship bracket they beat Our Lady of Grace and two-time defending city champion St. Antoninus. They then beat Guardian Angel to set the match up in the finals against St. Joe’s Crescent Springs. In a hard-fought game the Saints rallied at the end to defeat the Cavaliers 36-29 to take home the hardware. Saints players Jake Jennings, Alex Trentman were first team all tournement honorees. Austin Shannon made the second team. Alex Trentman also received the tournament's Most Valuable Player Award. The Saints are coached by Rick Williams and Dan Wagner. Kneeling is Jake Jennings. In front row are Michael Caldwell, Andrew Kramer, Drew Berkemeyer and Zach Schneider. In back row are Coach Rick Williams, Ted MacDonald, Austin Shannon, Alex Trentman, Joey Dawn, Luke Ridder and coach Dan Wagner.

CE-0000389610.INDD

Hall of Fame, January 2010 class

The Northern Kentucky Sports Hall of Fame inducted five new members Jan. 20 in Villa Hills. The guest speaker was former NKU head basketball coach Ken Shields. Front row, from left: Dennis Bright, Shields, Tom McClanahan (son of deceased inductee David McClanahan). Back row: Paul Fiser, Jim Osborn, Mike Ryan.

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Six honored by NKY hall of fame Tony Sandfoss

Tony Sandfoss, an Alexandria resident, is proud of coming from a family of seven. He played high school and college basketball. He also played on an AAU team that traveled Europe and played at Newport Central Catholic, where he was a four-year starter. In his senior year, Sandfoss was All Ninth Region, was named to the Dave Cowens Mr. Hustle Award and is an honorable mention McDonald’s American. Sandfoss played at Northern Kentucky University on a basketball scholarship. He had the opportunity to play for Mote Hills during Mote’s last season. He is proud of his daughter, Courtney, who also plays for Newport Central Catholic. This tandem is the only father/ daughter Combo to be in the NewCath 1,000 point club.

Kellie (Harrison) Foote

Kellie Foote of Goshen, Ky., has had a full career as a high school and college athlete. Kellie started in volleyball, basketball and track at Dixie Heights. Her honors are: Volleyball – twotime All Region, three times All Tournament, Defensive Player of the Year; basketball – two-time All Region, three-time All District, Post/ Enquirer All Star three years, Defensive Player of the Year, Dixie Heights Team Captain; track and field – All State three times, All Region three times, All Conference three times, Post/Enquirer three times, Dixie MVP three times. Foote holds the record for block shots in one game (17), and holds the high jump mark at 5 feet, 6 inches. Foote played college ball at Midway College.

Christina (Freppon) McDonald

Christina McDonald of Cold Spring has accomplished much as a high school and college athlete and coach. In high school, she played at Newport Central Catholic along with a line of Freppons. In basketball, she was all-time leading scorer and rebounder. She was selected to All Region and All District selection three times each.

She was selected the Loyce Meadows Award as the Ninth Region outstanding student-athlete. In volleyball, she played on three regional championship teams. She was selected to numerous all tournament teams, and was selected to All State tournament selection senior year. In softball, she played on three regional and state tournament teams. She played on the 1984 state tournament championship team. She was also selected Northern Kentucky Player of the Year three times. In college, she played on three NCAA Tournament Teams. She was selected Great Lakes Player of the Year 1991, and Kodak All American honorable mention 1991. She was the female NKU Student-Athlete of the Year in 1991. McDonald also coached Newport Central Catholic girls for 12 years. She has more than 200 wins, won five All A Regionals, and has coached in the All A Finals twice. She won two Ninth Regional titles, and was named Coach of the Year by the KABC and Enquirer twice.

Tom Freppon

Tom Freppon of Cold Spring played his high school career at Newport Central Catholic as it seems all of the Freppon family has done. A very accomplished basketball player at Newport Catholic and Thomas More College, Freppon was selected All Ninth Region, All State honorable mention, Ninth Region

Player of the Year 82-83 season, plus all tournament teams in the Famous Recipe Tournaments both as a Ninth and a 10th Region selection. Freppon has been honored on All District and Ninth Region tournament teams. Freppon finished his playing days at Thomas More College. Freppon now stays in touch with basketball as an accomplished basketball official in the Ninth Region for more than 23 years.

Edward Bishop

Edward Bishop of Erlanger was a baseball and softball umpire for 13 years. His most exciting moment was calling a Henry Clay out stealing while falling down. The first baseman told Ed he has been watching way too much TV. Bishop’s greatest moment was when he had the opportunity to umpire with his son. After this game a coach came up to him and asked his name. The coach asked if he spelled his name with one “I.” Bishop said, “yes.” The coach replied, “That is what I thought; we had a one-eye umpire.” He played lots of softball on good teams with the likes of Bill Bosse Jr.

College. He also coached knothole baseball for more than 25 years. He had the opportunity to coach the likes of Leo Foster. He coached the Holy Cross Vets to the Greater Cincinnati championship. Hergott also played more than 20 years and has the opportunity to play two World Class B tournaments with Universal. Hergott is most proud of his coaching career. He calls himself the all-time gym rat. He coached of 25 years, has won the knothole Greater Cincinnati championship, and coached basketball at Holy Cross, the Fenwick Club and McGregor Sporting Goods. He also played in the Greater Cincinnati Industrial League. In football, he coached the Fort Mitchell Spartans for more than 10 Years. In golf, he played in numerous Kenton County club championships and has won First Flight. As a senior he placed second.

Tom Hergott

Tom Hergott of Fort Mitchell has played, coached and umpired in the sports of baseball, softball, basketball and golf. Hergott has played knothole, American Legion, Buckeye League and college baseball at Villa Madonna

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A12

Campbell County Recorder

March 25, 2010

EDITORIALS

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LETTERS

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COLUMNS

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CH@TROOM

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

N K Y. c o m

Editor Michelle Shaw | smhaw@nky.com | 578-1053

RECORDER

CH@TROOM

Last week’s question

Next question:

Do you think businesses are right to block employees’ access to NCAA Tournament-related Web sites during the tournament? Why or why not?

What are your favorite Opening Day traditions? Do you plan to go this year?

“Block the games? My office is having a watching party!” N.H.

Send your response to kynews@communitypress.com with “chatroom” in the subject line.

“Absolutely! I cannot plead innocence to ‘goofing off’ at times during my 31-year career in business, but I realize now how unfair, and actually immoral that is, in most cases (especially when it comes to people who are paid hourly). “Business owners hire people to do certain ‘work.’ They don’t pay people to come in and entertain themselves, while ignoring what they are paid to do. Those businesses have every right to block access to NCAA Web sites.” Bill B. “When you are at work, you are paid to work, not to check sports results or watch games. “Of course it is best if your employer can trust you to do the right thing, but if he has evidence that you don’t then he has every right to take appropriate action.” D.R. “I was a former employee of a major bank in our area and on opening day of baseball you could not have hit a VP with a bat on this day. “This is a time for the little people mostly, yet I know of executives that participate. I don’t agree that people spend productive hours watching, but do agree that updates can be made available. I don’t have percentages, but I know from the past that females do rather well and in some cases – won.” D.J. “Yes - the companies own the computers, the bandwidth, and their employees’ time. You should just take a day or two off to watch the games.” J.J. “I think businesses have the right to expect maximum productivity from their employees. I am confident Kentucky employers know how to get maximum effort from their employees during the NCAA tournament.” G.G. “Yes, they are being paid to do a job and it would be a distraction. Watching on their break would be OK. Most important games are played on Saturday and Sunday, anyway. As for me, I will call in sick!” Duke “During working hours absolutely ... hello! They are paying their employees to work not watch TV. If they want to watch it that bad they can take a vacation day!” Florence, Ky.

“I do think an employer has the right to block employees’ access to NCAA tournament-related Web sites as well as any other Web sites that are not related to the employee’s job. Employer’s are constantly trying to limit the amount of company time spent on personal business … phone calls, e-mails, texting. There is so much out there to distract an employee’s attention. The less available distractions, the more productive an employee will be.” D.M.R. “Absolutely. Businesses have the right to expect their employees to be focusing on the job when at work. If employees want to watch the games, take vacation time.” M.S. “The employer should not have to do this – the employee is supposed to be working! It is sad employers find it necessary to block the sites.” D.H.

Painting the town

From left, Campbell Ridge Elementary School third-grade students Trent Guckiean, Jessica Walsh, Sam Gross, and Andrew Helton donate a 10-foot-long mural depicting important social institutions of Alexandria at the Alexandria Community Center March 8 they had they painted with their classmates in teacher Ashley Ritchie’s class. The murals were the culmination of a study of cultures and societies and social studies and a visit from a representative from ArtWorks, an organization that encourages using mural paintings to beautify and educate a community.

“Yes I do. Employers have enough problems without employees spending untold hours completing brackets and watching games. It’s only fair to the employers and clients to make the job come first.” B.H. “Employers should be allowed to control non-business related access if they are providing the Internet service during business hours. They have a right to control (to a reasonable degree) the distractions for the people they are paying to work.” D.K. “Yes. Employers are right to block employee access to NCAA sites during the tournament. Employers pay their employees to work, not catch up on the tournament results.” M.S. “Yes businesses are within their rights to block employees’ access to NCAA tournament-related Web sites during the tournament because the employer isn’t paying them to watch basketball in all likelihood – and especially not to use the employer’s resources for same.” Sherry Kelley Marshall “Yes I do think a company has the right to block access to these Web sites. People are there to work. It’s nice if a company lets employees have access to these sites, but unfortunately some people take advantage of the opportunity to not get anything done and ruin it for the others.” P.F.

About guest columns

We welcome guest columns on all sides of an issue; however, potential columnists should reserve space in advance with Editor Michelle Shaw by calling 578-1053. Include with your column your name, address, daytime telephone number, and a two-to-three line biography outlining your expertise related to this topic. Either include a color headshot of yourself, or make arrangements when you call to have your photo taken here. We reserve the right to edit for length, accuracy and clarity. Columns may be no more than 500 words. Deadline: Noon Monday for next Thursday’s issue. E-mail: mshaw@communitypress.com Letters, columns and articles submitted to The Community Recorder may be published or distributed in print, electronic or other forms.

PROVIDED

A close-up of part of the 10-foot-long mural of Alexandria painted by third grade students from Campbell Ridge Elementary School that's on display at the Alexandria Community Center.

A look back: Community in 19th century Belleview Bottoms As we observe our constantly changing society, the tendency is to look nostalgically back on what must have been a simpler, more rustic past. One would not have to go too far into Boone County’s past to remember what it was like in its more bucolic days, but recently I laid my hands on a journal kept by Silas Dinsmoor in the 1840s and thought it would be an interesting source of comparison. When we critique urban society we often bemoan the loss of that sense of community that seems so much a part of rural life and yet is so difficult to recreate in the city or suburb. What was the basis of that community feeling? Born in New Hampshire in 1766, Silas and Mary Dinsmoor moved to a small farm in Belleview Bottoms, Boone County, in 1831 after spending several decades in the Deep South. Their new farm included an orchard “heavily laden with excellent fruit,” pasture for cattle and horses, enough land for plenty of oats, corn, and a “luxuriant garden,” and even a 30-acre island in the Ohio River. The two-room cottage was split between a dining room/bedroom and a parlor/bedroom. As was typical for the time, the kitchen was in a separate building. Visiting was one of the primary

Cathy Collopy Dinsmore Homestead

means by which neighbors were able to maintain a sense of togetherness. Although visits between neighbors were most important when someone was ill, visiting one another during healthy times was a way to keep abreast of local news and agricultural successes and failures. It was not unusual for Silas and Mary to entertain five or six neighbors with tea or dinner – even in their two-room cottage. Occasionally people from outside the local community visited and brought news from beyond the small world most people inhabited, like the Reverend Lynn from Richwood Presbyterian Church, whom Silas found to be “an agreeable intelligent & interesting gentleman.” “Community” was reinforced by births and deaths, many of which were noted by Dinsmoor. Since death was such a presence in society and could strike a person of any age, people in the 19th century seem to have been better at weaving it into their everyday lives. By sitting up with the sick, comforting them, and witnessing their demise, Dinsmoor and others were preparing themselves for their own unavoidable futures. On his 77th birthday, he wondered,

A publication of Your Community Recorder newspaper serving all of Campbell County

PROVIDED

COUNTY RECORDER

Campbell County Editor . . . . . .Michelle Shaw smhaw@nky.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .578-1053

Although visits between neighbors were most important when someone was ill, visiting one another during healthy times was a way to keep abreast of local news and agricultural successes and failures. “How long shall it be ere my change comes?” Questions such as this were contemplated by neighbors of different faiths as they came together for Church meetings, Sunday schools, and funerals. Dinsmoor’s journal (soon to be available online at the Boone County Public Library), illustrates the importance of community in one small corner of Boone County. The Boone County Historic Preservation Review Board meets at 5 p.m. the second Thursday of every month. Meetings are open to the public. For more information about historic preservation in Boone County please contact the Review Board at 859-334-2111 or mbecher@boonecountyky.org. The Review Board is online at www.boonecountyky.org/pc.

s

A WORLD OF DIFFERENT VOICES

Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Friday | See page A2 for additional contact information. 283-7285 | 228 Grandview Drive, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017 | 654 Highland Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075 | e-mail kynews@NKY.com | Web site: www.NKY.com


Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

RECORDER

T h u r s d a y, M a r c h 2 5 , 2 0 1 0

PEOPLE

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RECIPES

SMALL BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Martin Lucero, manager of Jalapeno’s Mex-Mex in Cold Spring, inside the independently owned restaurant that’s decorated with authentic photographs and chairs made in Mexico.

Traditional Mexican recipes focus of Cold Spring restaurant With homemade salsas and sauces, Jalapeno’s Mex-Mex in Cold Spring is serving up traditional Mexican recipes. Opened about seven months ago, the restaurant’s decor is mostly brought from Mexico with photographs and handmade round wood and leather chairs designed for comfort, said Martin Lucero, manager. Orders are brought to the table seven days a week from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. The restaurant is located at 4135 Alexandria Pike, Cold Spring. And the food is more complicated than just burritos, Lucero said.

Fajitas are one of the specialties, but so too is the grilled shrimp wrapped in bacon, homemade barbecue and Adobo sauces, and a fish fillet cooked in garlic, he said. “We make everything from scratch,” he said. There is also a salsa bar with more than six different varieties of hot and mild sauces and salsa, and the restaurant is non-smoking for customers and staff. The food created by the restaurant is more elaborate than many other Mexican restaurants, Lucero said. “Others claim to be authentic, not us, we claim to be the best,” he said.

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

One of the many training groups at Bob Roncker's Running Spot in Newport make their way towards the Purple People Bridge during training.

Roncker’s groups hit the spot for marathon training By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

THINGS TO DO

Celebrate 1990

Make a collectible even more valuable by taking your Maker’s Mark limited edition bottle honoring the 1990 World Series champion Cincinnati Reds to Turfway Park March 27 to be signed by Eric Davis (photo) and Chris Sabo. The bottle signing will take place from 8 a.m. to 11 a.m. at Gate B. 400 free tickets will be given out on a first come-firstserve basis, one ticket per person, to persons 21 years and older. Each ticket holder may bring two of the bottles to be autographed. For more information, visit www.turfway.com.

Birth of the blues

The Kentucky Symphony Orchestra will perform a special two-night concert, March 26-27 at Highlands High School, celebrating the birth of blues music and the origins of ragtime, dixieland, stride and early jazz. The show will take place at

8 p.m. both nights and will focus on popular tunes and styles from 1896 to 1932. Tickets are $28 and $23 for seniors and students. For tickets and more information, call 431-6216 or visit www.kyso.org. Highlands High School is located at 2400 Memorial Parkway in Fort Thomas.

Save Me San Francisco

Train will perform at the Madison Theater April 1 at 8 p.m. as part of its “Save Me San Francisco” tour. The doors will open at 7 p.m. The band won two Grammy Awards for its single “Drops of Jupiter (Tell Me)” and currently has another top-ten single on the Billboard Hot 100 chart titled, “Hey, Soul Sister.” Tickets are $35 and $32 in advance. For ticket information, call 800-745-3000 or visit www.ticketmaster.com. The Madison Theater is located at 730 Madison Ave. in Covington.

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Whether they’re beginners or seasoned runners, Bob Roncker’s Running Spot’s training groups have something to offer everyone. Roncker’s offers training groups for everything from the Flying Pig Marathon to the Heart Mini-Marathon, helping runners and walkers achieve a higher fitness level and prepare mentally through a month-by-month training schedule they design. At the store’s location by Newport on the Levee, groups are training for the Flying Pig full and half marathons. “We have seasoned vets and first-timers this year in our group of more than 1,000 people,” said manager Jeff Branhan. “The training is progressive as we continue to work up towards the big day.” The groups meet twice a week and follow a laid-out plan for the rest of the days, Branhan said. Training started at the beginning of the year to prepare for the Flying Pig, which is Sunday, May 6. For participant Trent South, this year will be his second time running the Flying Pig after joining the training group last year. “I had always bought shoes at the Running Spot and I heard about the group, decided to join and I really liked it,” South said. “When you run alone you lose motivation, but

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Kasey Coaes (left) and Kasey Gust, both from Cincinnati, chat while they stretch in preparation for the run.

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Steve Albers from Loveland stretches before beginning a run with the Bob Roncker's Running Spot training group in Newport. The group is training for the Flying Pig Marathon, which is Sunday, May 2. when you’re running with a group you don’t and you feel like you’re part of something.” After running his first marathon, the Flying Pig

last year, South went on to run in a marathon in Indianapolis and the ING Marathon in Miami. All four of the Bob Roncker’s Running Spot stores

in Newport, Loveland, Glendale and O’Bryonville have training groups that run throughout the year. For information visit www.runningspot.com.


B2

CCF Recorder

March 25, 2010

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD F R I D A Y, M A R C H 2 6

MUSIC - CONCERTS

BENEFITS

Kiwanis International Auction and Gala, 7 p.m.-midnight, Newport Syndicate, 18 E. Fifth St. Dinner, dancing, raffle drawings, cash prizes, open bar and auction. Benefits Kiwanis International for underprivileged children. $100 per couple. Presented by Kiwanis Club of Riverfront. 491-8000. Newport.

The Joint is Jumpin’, 8 p.m. Highlands High School, 2400 Memorial Parkway, Kentucky Symphony Orchestra’s Newport Ragtime Band performs works from 1896-1932. James R. Cassidy, music director. $28, $23; $18 ages 60 and up, $10 students. Reservations required. Presented by Kentucky Symphony Orchestra. 431-6216; www.kyso.org. Fort Thomas.

COMMUNITY DANCE

ON STAGE - THEATER

Friday Night Ballroom Dance, 8 p.m.-10 p.m. Step-N-Out Studio, 721 Madison Road, Group lesson 8-8:30 p.m. DJ dance to multiple styles of ballroom dance music begins 8:30-10 p.m. $5. 291-2300; www.stepnoutstudio.com. Covington.

FOOD & DRINK

Fish and Shrimp Fry, 4 p.m.-7:30 p.m. St. Joseph Church - Camp Springs, 6833 Four Mile Road, Features Mr. Herb’s baked or fried fish, fried catfish, salmon, deep-fried shrimp, crab cakes, a sampler platter and sides. Dinners and sandwiches. Carryout available. $4.50-$11. Presented by St. Joseph Church. 635-5652. Camp Springs. Fish Fry, 4 p.m.-8 p.m. St. Thomas School, 428 S. Fort Thomas Ave. Serving fish sandwiches, shrimp, sides, pizza, french fries, homemade desserts and drinks. Benefits St. Thomas School activities. $1.50-$6. 5724641; www.sttschool.org. Fort Thomas. Fish Fry, 5 p.m.-7 p.m. St. Bernard Church, 401 Berry St. Church Hall. Fish, salmon patty, shrimp, fries, macaroni and cheese, and sweet or sour coleslaw. Carryout available. $6. 431-9705. Dayton. Fish Fry, 4 p.m.-7:30 p.m. Silver Grove Volunteer Fire Department, 5011 Four Mile, Includes fish, shrimp, chicken tenders, frog legs, hush puppies, macaroni and cheese and coleslaw. Carryout available, call ahead. Benefits Silver Grove Volunteer Fire Department. $4.75-$6.50, 25 cents carryout fee. 441-6251. Silver Grove. St. Mary Parish Fish Fry, 4:30 p.m.-7:30 p.m. St. Mary School, 9 S. Jefferson, Cafeteria. Cod, catfish and shrimp dinners with two sides and dessert. Pizza and carryout available. Benefits The church. $7-$8. Presented by St. Mary of the Assumption Parish. 6354188. Alexandria. Fish Fry, 4 p.m.-7 p.m. Holy Trinity Junior High School, 840 Washington Ave. Fish, shrimp, grilled cheese, fries, hush puppies, coleslaw, macaroni and cheese, and drink. Carryout available. 75 cents-$7. 491-7612. Newport. Fish Fry, 4 p.m.-8 p.m. Knights of Columbus, Father DeJaco Council 5220, 11186 Licking Pike, Fish dinners and sandwiches, baked fish, shrimp, fries, cheese pizza, macaroni and cheese, hush puppies, and coleslaw. Carryout available. 75 cents-$6.50. 6359863. Alexandria. Fish Fry, 5 p.m.-8 p.m. St. Therese School, 2516 Alexandria Pike, Cafeteria. Fish or shrimp platter, fish sandwich, cheese pizza, beer, soft drinks and desserts. No fish fry on March 19. $5-$7. 441-5755; http://www.sainttherese.ws. Southgate. Fish Fry, 4 p.m.-8 p.m. Wilder City Building, 520 Licking Pike, Basement. Includes either fish, chicken or shrimp and sides consisting of coleslaw, macaroni and cheese or french fries. $7. Presented by Wilder Fire Department. 581-8884. Wilder.

HEALTH / WELLNESS

Brain Injury Conference: Art of Living.. Life After Brain Injury, 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Northern Kentucky Convention Center, 1 W. RiverCenter Blvd. Three tracks of sessions designed to raise awareness of brain injury, provide education, resources and support. Exhibitor booths. Silent auction, raffle and door prizes. Benefits BRIDGES, Inc. $80 professionals; $20. Registration required. Presented by BRIDGES, Inc. 502-494-2868; www.bridgesnky.org/TBI_Conference.html. Covington.

Omnium Gatherum, 8 p.m. Stauss Theatre, 101 Fine Arts Center, Northern Kentucky University, Pulitzer Prize nominated play takes the audience to a dinner where guests confront the global implications of September 11 and beyond in an urgent, impassioned and hilarious work. $12, $11 faculty, staff, and alumni, $10 ages 60 and up, $8 students. Presented by Northern Kentucky University Theatre and Dance. Through April 3. 5725464; www.nku.edu/~theatre. Highland Heights. Beckett and Bock, 8 p.m. Monmouth Theatre, 636 Monmouth St. Includes “The Shaker Chair” by Adam Bock; “Come and Go” and “Play” by Samuel Beckett. $15, $12 seniors and students. Reservations recommended. 240-0319. Newport.

RECREATION

Family Fun Night, 6 p.m.-9 p.m. Pictures with Easter Bunny available. Town and Country Sports and Health Club, 1018 Town Drive, Family-organized games, optional crafts, Aeroball, rock climbing, Wii Sports, sports wall and swimming. Family friendly. $5 per family. Reservations required. 442-5800; www.towncountrysports.com. Wilder. S A T U R D A Y, M A R C H 2 7

FOOD & DRINK

Wine Tasting, 2 p.m.-6 p.m. Springtime Wines Part 1: Great value reds. D.E.P.’s Fine Wine & Spirits Fort Thomas, Free. 781-8105; www.depsfinewine.com. Fort Thomas. Wine Tasting, 1 p.m.-8 p.m. Camp Springs Vineyard, $1. 448-0253; www.campspringsvineyard.com. Camp Springs.

HOLIDAY - EASTER

Easter Egg Hunt, 1 p.m.-2 p.m. Alexandria Community Park, Alexandria Drive, Bring baskets for hunt for hundreds of candy-filled eggs. Ages 12 and under. Children grouped in four age ranges with appropriate difficulty levels. Family friendly. Free. Presented by Alexandria Park and Recreation Board. 6350335. Alexandria. Easter Egg Hunt, 1 p.m.-2 p.m. Pride Park, 5614 Taylor Mill Road, For ages newborn through 12 years. Hunt sections divided into age groups. Please bring basket or bag for your child. Free. 581-3234. Taylor Mill.

LITERARY - SIGNINGS

James Claypool, noon-2 p.m. Kentucky Haus Artisan Center, 411 E. 10th St. Author discusses and signs “Images of America - Kentucky’s Bluegrass Music.”. Free. 261-4287; www.kentuckyhaus.com. Newport.

MUSIC - BENEFITS

Winter Blues Festival, 8 p.m. Madison Theater, 730 Madison Ave. NKU Jazz Ensemble, William Hogg, director. With G. Miles and the Hitmen. Benefits Campbell Lodge Boys’ Home. Benefits Empower program at Campbell Lodge Boys’ Home. $10. Presented by Northern Kentucky University Department of Music. 572-6399; music.nku.edu. Covington.

MUSIC - BLUES

Ricky Nye and Rob Lumbard, 9 p.m. Southgate House, 24 E. Third St. Free. 431-2201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport.

For more about Greater Cincinnati’s dining, music, events, movies and more, go to Metromix.com.

MUSIC - CONCERTS

The Joint is Jumpin’, 8 p.m. Highlands High School, $28, $23; $18 ages 60 and up, $10 students. Reservations required. 431-6216; www.kyso.org. Fort Thomas. Jonatha Brooke, 9 p.m. Doors open at 8 p.m. Southgate House, 24 E. Third St. $18, $15 advance. 431-2201. Newport.

ON STAGE - COMEDY

Billy Gardell, 7:30 p.m. Dinner available. $17. Funny Bone Comedy Club, 957-2000. Newport.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Top Girls, 3 p.m. Stauss Theatre, 101 Fine Arts Center, Northern Kentucky University, A London employment agency’s managing director’s celebration of success becomes an introspective look at the sacrifices she has made on her rise to that success. In repertory. $12, $11 faculty, staff, and alumni, $10 ages 60 and up, $8 students. 572-5464; www.nku.edu/~theatre. Highland Heights. Omnium Gatherum, 8 p.m. Stauss Theatre, $12, $11 faculty, staff, and alumni, $10 ages 60 and up, $8 students. 572-5464; www.nku.edu/~theatre. Highland Heights. Beckett and Bock, 8 p.m. Monmouth Theatre, $15, $12 seniors and students. Reservations recommended. 240-0319. Newport. S U N D A Y, M A R C H 2 8

ART EXHIBITS More Than Ink, noon-6 p.m. Art on the Levee Gallery, Free. 261-5770; www.artonthelevee.com. Newport. FOOD & DRINK

Wine Tasting, 1 p.m.-6 p.m. Camp Springs Vineyard, $1. 448-0253; www.campspringsvineyard.com. Camp Springs.

HOLIDAY - EASTER

Easter Party, 1:30 p.m.-4 p.m. Erlanger Branch Library, 401 Kenton Lands Road, Visit with Easter Bunny, games and crafts. Bring camera for photos with Easter Bunny. 9624000. Erlanger.

MUSIC - CHORAL

The Seven Last Words of Christ, 3 p.m. St. John’s Church, 627 Pike St. Choral Club of Northern Kentucky to perform Theodore DuBois’s work. With Karl Lietzenmayer, director, and Anita Carmack. Free. 331-3774. Covington.

MUSIC - CONCERTS

Citay, 9 p.m. Doors open at 8 p.m. Southgate House, 24 E. Third St. $10, $8 advance. 431-2201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport.

ON STAGE - COMEDY

Billy Gardell, 7:30 p.m. Dinner available. $15. Funny Bone Comedy Club, 957-2000. Newport.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Top Girls, 2 p.m. Stauss Theatre, $12, $11 faculty, staff, and alumni, $10 ages 60 and up, $8 students. 572-5464; www.nku.edu/~theatre. Highland Heights. Omnium Gatherum, 7 p.m. Stauss Theatre, $12, $11 faculty, staff, and alumni, $10 ages 60 and up, $8 students. 572-5464; www.nku.edu/~theatre. Highland Heights. Beckett and Bock, 2 p.m. Monmouth Theatre, $15, $12 seniors and students. Reservations recommended. 240-0319. Newport.

PATRICK REDDY/STAFF

Hold Me Back (left) won the $500,000 Lane’s End Stakes at Turfway Park in 2009. This year’s big race will take place March 27. For tickets, call 371-0200. For race times and schedule of events, visit www.turfway.com. M O N D A Y, M A R C H 2 9

LITERARY - STORY TIMES

Preschool Story Time, 10 a.m. Newport Branch Library, 901 E. Sixth St. Stories, songs and crafts. Ages 4-5. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 572-5035. Newport. Toddler Story Time, 10 a.m. Cold Spring Branch Library, 3920 Alexandria Pike, Stories, songs and activities. Ages 2-3. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 781-6166. Cold Spring. Pajama Story Time, 7 p.m. Fort ThomasCarrico Branch Library, 1000 Highland Ave. Stories, songs and activities. Ages 3 and up. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 572-5033. Fort Thomas. Tot Time, 11 a.m. Cold Spring Branch Library, 3920 Alexandria Pike, Short stories, games, dancing and baby signing. Ages 18 months2 1/2 years. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 781-6166. Cold Spring.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Top Girls, 8 p.m. Stauss Theatre, $12, $11 faculty, staff, and alumni, $10 ages 60 and up, $8 students. 572-5464; www.nku.edu/~theatre. Highland Heights. T U E S D A Y, M A R C H 3 0

KARAOKE AND OPEN MIC

Karaoke, 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Arnie’s on the Levee, 120 E. Third St. $3 Red Stag cocktails. 4314340. Newport.

LITERARY - LIBRARIES

About calendar

To submit calendar items, go to “www.NKY.com” and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to “life@communitypress.com” along with event information. Items are printed on a space-available basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to “www.NKY.com” and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page. W E D N E S D A Y, M A R C H 3 1

LITERARY - CRAFTS

Play Art, 4 p.m. Newport Branch Library, 901 E. Sixth St. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 572-5035. Newport.

LITERARY - STORY TIMES

Toddler Story Time, 11 a.m. Fort ThomasCarrico Branch Library, Free. Registration required. 572-5033. Fort Thomas. Toddler Story Time, 11 a.m. Cold Spring Branch Library, Free. Registration required. 781-6166. Cold Spring. Toddler Story Time, 9:30 a.m. Newport Branch Library, 901 E. Sixth St. Stories, songs, finger plays and craft. Ages 2-3. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 572-5035. Newport. Baby Time, 10 a.m. Cold Spring Branch Library, 3920 Alexandria Pike, Clap, sing and bounce with your child. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 781-6166. Cold Spring. Lap Time, 9:30 a.m. Fort Thomas-Carrico Branch Library, 1000 Highland Ave. Quiet rhymes, bounces, lullabies and books with your baby. Ages birth to walkers. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 572-5033. Fort Thomas.

MUSIC - BLUES

Shemekia Copeland Blues Band, 8 p.m. Doors open 7:30 p.m. Southgate House, 24 E. Third St. $20, $17 advance. Presented by JBM Promotions, Inc. 431-2201. Newport.

T H U R S D A Y, A P R I L 1

EXERCISE CLASSES

Zumba Fitness Class, 7 p.m.-8 p.m. Dance Express, 725 Alexandria Pike, Fuses hypnotic Latin rhythms and easy-to-follow moves to create one-of-a-kind fitness program. Ages 16 and up. $8. 581-4062. Fort Thomas.

MUSIC - BIG BAND

Karie Laur: Bluegrass Music, 7 p.m. Behringer-Crawford Museum, 1600 Montague Road, Join Laur and her guests where they will illuminate the hidden treasures of Kentucky music . Each program: $10, $5 members. 491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

MUSIC - CONCERTS

Train - Save Me San Francisco Tour, 8 p.m. Doors open at 7 p.m. Madison Theater, 730 Madison Ave. With Butch Walker and the Black Widows. $35, $32 advance. 800745-3000; www.ticketmaster.com. Covington.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Omnium Gatherum, 8 p.m. Stauss Theatre, $12, $11 faculty, staff, and alumni, $10 ages 60 and up, $8 students. 572-5464; www.nku.edu/~theatre. Highland Heights.

Let’s Talk About It, 6:30 p.m. Fort ThomasCarrico Branch Library, 1000 Highland Ave. Discussion about the character. With Northern Kentucky University faculty. Refreshments provided. Adults. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 572-5033. Fort Thomas.

LITERARY - STORY TIMES

Preschool Story Time, 1:30 p.m. Cold Spring Branch Library, 3920 Alexandria Pike, Ages 4-5. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 7816166. Cold Spring. Preschool Story Time, 11 a.m. Fort ThomasCarrico Branch Library, 1000 Highland Ave. Stories, songs, finger plays and craft. Ages 4-5. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 5725033. Fort Thomas. Pajama Story Time, 7 p.m. Newport Branch Library, 901 E. Sixth St. Ages 3 and up. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 572-5035. Newport. Baby Time, 9:30 a.m. Newport Branch Library, 901 E. Sixth St. Clap, sing and bounce with your child. Birth to age 2. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 572-5035. Newport.

PROVIDED

Mickey Mouse hosts a musical party at the Mickey Mouse Clubhouse with favorite Disney pals in “Playhouse Disney Live!” at 3 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. Friday, March 26, at the U.S. Bank Arena. Characters from “Little Einsteins,” “My Friends Tigger & Pooh,” and “Handy Manny,” will all take the stage live for a musical celebration. Tickets are $17, $22, $30, and $45. Call 513-562-4949 or visit www.ticketmaster.com or www.disneylive.com.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Omnium Gatherum, 8 p.m. Stauss Theatre, $12, $11 faculty, staff, and alumni, $10 ages 60 and up, $8 students. 572-5464; www.nku.edu/~theatre. Highland Heights.

PROVIDED

The first Cincinnati Beerfest will offer more than 130 beers, from Cincinnati and around the world, celebrating the city’s brewing heritage, Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, March 26-28, at the Duke Energy Center. There will also be entertainment and hometown food. Hours are 6-10 p.m. Friday, 5-9 p.m. Saturday, and 1-5 p.m. Sunday. Tickets are $35 online, $40 at the door or $70 for a three-day package. Ages 21 and up. A portion of the proceeds will go to the Freestore Foodbank. Visit www.cincinnatibeerfest.com.


Life

CCF Recorder

March 25, 2010

B3

When will I ever be a normal person?

We can base it on low esteem or unrealistic comparisons. The fact remains that too many of us, even apparently successful people, have an unspoken suspicion of being â&#x20AC;&#x153;less than othersâ&#x20AC;? or â&#x20AC;&#x153;not normal.â&#x20AC;? T h a t sad and s e c r e t inkling leads to the silent question, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Will people ever me, or Father Lou see I see Guntzelman myself, as Perspectives a normal and typical human?â&#x20AC;? What a relief it is to realize emotionally and intellectually that there is no such thing as being normal. Jungian analyst Lawrence Jaffe says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Normality is an abstraction derived from the study of statistics. It doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really exist.â&#x20AC;? That usually takes a long time to grasp. Instead of appreciating our unique grandeur, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re busy comparing ourselves to others, trying to be â&#x20AC;&#x153;normal,â&#x20AC;? like them. Take, for example, scien-

Whether we are extroverts or introverts; gregarious of lovers of solitude; a mathematician or an artist â&#x20AC;&#x201C; to thine own self be true. Or as St. Francis de Sales proclaimed: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Be yourself! But be your best self.â&#x20AC;? tists studying stones in a certain river. They develop certain statistics. These statistics inform them that the average, or normal, stone in that riverbed is four inches long and two inches wide. Yet, a search may never find a stone exactly that size. Doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the same process occur in scientifically studying and trying to find the normal person? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Man is not complete,â&#x20AC;? writes Jung, â&#x20AC;&#x153;when he lives in a world of statistical truth. He must live in a world where the whole of a man, his entire history, is the concern, and not that of merely statisticsâ&#x20AC;Ś When everything is statistical all individual qualities are wiped outâ&#x20AC;Ś and he becomes a statistical average, a number; that is, he becomes nothing.â&#x20AC;? We need to constantly be reminded, as Isaac Singer reminds us in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Love and

Exile,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Every human character occurs only once in the whole history of human beings.â&#x20AC;? This uniqueness means the best advice to another is that which Shakespeareâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Polonius gave his son, Laertes, â&#x20AC;&#x153;This above all; to thine own self be true, and it must follow, as night the day, that thou canst not then be false to any man.â&#x20AC;? Whether we are extroverts or introverts; gregarious of lovers of solitude; a mathematician or an artist â&#x20AC;&#x201C; to thine own self be true. Or as St. Francis de Sales proclaimed: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Be yourself! But be your best self.â&#x20AC;? Each of us is a mystery. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re meant to be something unprecedented, not clones of someone else. One of the hallmarks of Carl Jungâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s psychology is individuation (misunderstood at times as individuality, or a focused self-centeredness.) Individuation can

be defined as becoming what we have it in us to become. It means becoming our Creatorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s image of us. There would be no such thing as individuation if there were not roadblocks, obstacles and detours on the path of our life. Then we would not need to deal with them in our own way and by our own choices. Just as there would be no path we made if there were no wilderness and undergrowth. The path toward our goal is an inner path. The singularity of our paths is part of what makes finding it and staying on it so difficult. In â&#x20AC;&#x153;Liberating the Heart,â&#x20AC;? Lawrence Jaffe writes: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nothing is so important as to carry your own cross, says Christ. That means the same as finding and following the path of individuation which has been prepared for you from

Father Lou Guntzelman is a Catholic priest of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati. Contact him at columns@ communitypress.com or P.O. Box 428541, Cincinnati, OH 45242.

eternity. This is the most difficult path but paradoxically also the easiest because it is the only one which will allow you to die with the knowledge that you lived out your life through and through.â&#x20AC;?

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B4

CCF Recorder

Life

March 25, 2010

What to do with your basket of eggs

It’s not official, but on my little patch of heaven, spring is here. That means pruning berry canes, raking leaves and debris from the asparagus patch, and readying the gardens for planting. It also means planning Easter brunch. I’ve been experimenting with different kinds of egg casseroles, since that’s usually the basis of our brunch. Today I’m sharing one that is too easy but looks like you went to a lot of trouble making it. My kind of recipe!

Quiche muffins

This is a master recipe,

so do with it as you like. Any kind of cooked m e a t w o r k s well. Or none. I Rita m a d e Heikenfeld mine with 1 Rita’s kitchen ⁄2 pound cooked sausage and chives. I layered the add-ins before pouring in the egg mixture, as it was easier to divide evenly. Recipe doubles or triples well. Don’t omit the baking powder. It gives just the right amount of lift. Yield

will depend upon size of muffin tins.

Master recipe:

5 large or extra large eggs 1 ⁄2 cup milk 1 ⁄2 teaspoon baking powder Salt and pepper 11⁄2 cups to 2 cups shredded cheese Good add-ins: 1⁄2 pound cooked sausage or bacon, crumbled, handful of chopped chives, frozen spinach, thawed and drained well, sautéed onions, leeks, mushrooms, etc. Preheat oven to 350. Beat eggs, milk, baking powder, salt and pepper

together. Spray a 6- or 8-cup muffin tin really well, since the egg mixture tends to stick. Divide cheese among muffin tins along with other add-ins before pouring base mixture on. Check after baking 20 minutes. Toothpick inserted in center should come out clean, but don’t overbake. Can be baked up to a day ahead and microwaved gently to rewarm, or in 350 degree oven, covered, until hot throughout. Tip from Rita’s kitchen: Check baking powder for leavening power. Pour a teaspoon into 1⁄2 cup warm water. It should fizz right away if it’s fresh. Write date when you open can on the lid. It’s good for about one year if kept away from heat and light.

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Naturally colored Easter eggs

MARCH 27 & 28

I have my mom, Mary Nader, to thank for making us such “green” advocates. She colored our eggs with onion skins. When we were kids, we liked commercially colored eggs better, but as I grew older, I came to appreciate just what the onion skin eggs meant. More than just coloring, they were a way of telling a story and passing history on to the next generation. I do the same with the little ones today, and have expanded that to include more natural dyes.

Little quiches made in muffin tins. Here’s how I do it: In a saucepan, place as many papery outer skins of yellow and/or red onions that you have. Cover with an inch of water. Bring to a boil, lower to a simmer and cook until onion skins have colored the water, about 10 minutes. Use this same method for red cabbage (just chunk it up), beets, greens, etc. Even used coffee grounds can be used. Strain and add a tablespoon or so of clear vinegar to set the dye. Put boiled eggs in. Depending upon how long they sit in the dye, the eggs made with yellow onion skins will be pale yellow to dark amber. Red onion skins produce eggs that are brick/brown red. Red cabbage is the winner: it makes beautiful teal blue eggs! Turmeric makes the eggs more brilliantly yellow than the marigolds my dad, Charlie Nader, used to plant

COURTESY RITA HEIKENFELD

in front of the porch on the tiny front lawn. Turmeric colored eggs require a different method: Stir 3 tablespoons or so of turmeric in 11⁄2 cups water in saucepan. Bring to boil. Remove, let cool but don’t strain. Add a tablespoon or so of vinegar. Place boiled eggs in dye, stirring to coat. When you remove the eggs, gently wipe off turmeric with soft cloth or run them very quickly under running water.

Rooting out recipes

Kroger’s chicken salad: Kroger shared their recipe, which was at the top of the list of requests by you. It’s a quantity recipe so I have to tweak it for the home cook. I’ll work on that as soon as I can. Rita Nader Heikenfeld is Macy’s certified culinary professional. E-mail columns@community press.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-2487130, ext. 356.

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Community

CCF Recorder

March 25, 2010

B5

Gardening trend getting practical this year Each year, the Garden Media Group does a lot of surveying and research to develop a list of gardening trends for t h e upcoming year. And I must say that it has been very interesting to watch Ron Wilson t h e s e trends In the garden over the years, to see how gardening and styles of gardening have changed (Baby Boomers, Gen X&Y, economy, etc., are all a part of the trend changing factors). And for 2010, the Garden Media Group says the trend emerging is: A return

to Main Street American values. “Just look around you,” says Susan McCoy, trend spotter and outdoor living expert. “Our relationship with money has changed. Hard work, common sense and a return to small town values are causing a shift in priorities from boardrooms to backyards. “According to our 2010 Garden Trends Report, the rewards of growing your own – from basil to berries to flowers – are boundless.” So, what are those 2010 trends? 1.) Main Street is in and Wall Street is out. 2.) Edible gardens are in and big lawns are out. 3.) Slow gardening is in and instant gratification is out.

4.) Mindful is in and bling is out. 5.) Eco-boosting is in and chemical dependent gardens are out. 6.) Multitasking is in and single-purpose gardening is out. 7.) Perennials and shrubs are in and divas are out. Visit www.gardenmediagroup.com for more trend information.

Award winners for 2010

Each year several plant associations choose their plant of the year, based on plant trials, voting by professional growers, etc. Here at some of the 2010 Plants of the Year for you to consider planting in your gardens this year: 2010 Perennial – Bap-

tisia australis (false blue indigo) – PPA / www.perennialplant.org 2010 Herb – Anethum graveolens (dill – dill weed) – IHA / www.IHerb.org 2010 Urban Tree – Cercis canadensis (eastern redbud ) -SMA / www.urbanforestry.com 2010 Hosta – Hosta “first frost” – American Hosta Growers 2010 Rose AARS- “Easy Does It” -AARS / www.rose.org 2010 All-America Selections – Gaillardia “Mesa Yellow,” Snapdragon “Twinny Peach,” Viola “Endurio Sky Blue Martien,” Zinnia “Zahara Starlight Rose,” Echinacea p. “PowWow Wild Berry,” Marigold “Moonsong Deep Orange,” Zinnia “Double Zahara

Cherry” and “Double Zahara Fire,” Watermelon “Shiny Boy,” and “Cajun Belle” pepper (sweet and mildly hot!). www.all-americaselections.org 2010 Year of the Marigold and the Squash – National Garden Bureau Inc. ( www.ngb.org) Spring is here! I’m ready to get started – how about you? Talk to you next time, “In the garden.”

Ron Wilson is marketing manager for Natorp’s Inc. Garden Stores and is the garden expert for 55KRC-AM and Local 12. Reach him at columns@communitypress.com.

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RELIGION NOTES Community Family Church

The Community Family Church in Independence will present, “The Witness,” an Easter musical production April 1-4. The musical will be at 7:30 p.m. April 1-3 and at 6:30 p.m. April 4. The presentation will be staged in the Family Life Center at the church at 11875 Taylor Mill Road. The performance is free and open to the public. Visit www.cfcky.com or call 356-8851.

First Baptist Church

The First Baptist Church in Bellevue will host a concert March 28 at 10:40 a.m. by the Ball Family Singers.

For more information, call 431-5532. The church is at 254 Washington Ave.

First Christian Church

First Christian Church in Fort Thomas will be celebrating its 49th annual Living Portrayal of Leonardo da Vinci’s “Last Supper” April 1. The celebration will begin at 8 p.m. and there is a strong request that all are seated by 7:55 p.m. For more information, call 441-8658. The church is at 1031 Alexandria Pike.

First Presbyterian Church

The First Presbyterian Church in Dayton will hold its annual Spring Rummage Sale

April 8 from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. and April 9 from 8:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. For more information, call 261-7896. The church is located at 800 Ervin Terrace.

Fort Thomas First Presbyterian

On Palm Sunday, March 28 at 11 a.m., soprano and violin soloists will join the choir for “Laudate Dominum” from Mozart’s Solemn Vespers at the Fort Thomas First Presbyterian Church. For more information, call 441-8939. The church is at 220 S. Ft. Thomas Ave.

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B6

CCF Recorder

Community

March 25, 2010

BUSINESS NOTES Klein promoted to sales manager

Crawford Insurance, which has been serving Northern Kentucky and Greater Cincinnati since 1951 announces the promotion of Dale Klein to Sales Manager. Klein’s primary responsibility will be to oversee the Sales Division for Commercial, Life, Health and

Benefits Division. “Dale has been a key part of our success, and we were thrilled to promote him to this important position," said Penny Crawford Cook, Director of Marketing at Crawford Insurance. Klein joined Crawford Insurance in 1996 as an insurance agent and quickly rose to several supervisory and

management positions. Crawford Insurance is a family owned and operated, full service insurance agency, specializing in auto, home, business, group, life insurance and financial services. They have two locations, the Bellevue and Maysville offices. For more information, visit www.crawfordins.com.

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Chinese New Year

Publishes every Tuesday in The Kentucky Enquirer, every Thursday in The Community Recorder. Search ads online any day, any time at NKY.com.

Cecilia Trentacoste of Northern Kentucky University’s Early Childhood Center celebrates the Chinese New Year while in the butterfly classroom.

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Easter is just around the corner so Bellevue Renaissance is scrambling eggs along Fairfield Avenue. The merchants along Fairfield Avenue are bringing back the wildly popular “Scrambled Eggs” Easter Shop Bellevue event from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. April 2. Visitors will find eggs at the many shops, art galleries, and eateries in Bellevue’s historic shopping district. At each participating business visitors will receive an egg filled with a surprise. Eggs have been “scrambled” between the merchants, so visitors won’t have any idea what surprise they’ll receive at each location. Will it be a gift certificate, a discount coupon, a free gift, a sweet treat? Or will they be the

lucky one to receive “The Golden Egg,” one which contains a $100 Bellevue shopping spree? Visitors may receive one egg at each business they visit, so the more places they visit, the more specials and gifts they’ll collect. Due to the limited number of eggs available, only shoppers 18 years or older may receive an egg.

‘Into the Fire’ March 30

The Northern Kentucky University Activities Programming Board will join forces with the Office of Testing & Disability Services, NKU V.E.T.S., the Military History Lecture Series, Phi Alpha Theta, Office of Career Development and the Veterans Advocacy Committee to present a special performance of “Into the Fire” March 30 at 7

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p.m. in the Student Union Ballroom. “Into the Fire” is a free public performance about returning veterans with disabilities and combat-related trauma and their stories as they reintegrate into their families, communities, educational institutions and the workforce. The actor/playwrights recreate the stories of both male and female veterans who have returned from Iraq, Afghanistan and Vietnam. For more information contact Josh Gruenke at 5726514 or gruenkej1@nku.edu.

Dinner at VFW

The ladies auxiliary of Campbell County Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3205 in Alexandria is having a spaghetti dinner from 4:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. Friday, March 26. Costs for the dinner of spaghetti, homemade sauce (meatless), meatballs, salad, drinks and dessert are $6 for adults and $4 for children. The V.F.W. hall is at 8261 Alexandria Pike, quarter mile south of the intersection of East Main Street and Alexandria Pike. Proceeds will benefit troops overseas, patriotic essay contests and donation of flags to many schools. For information call 394-3068.

Smoking cessation

Three sessions of the Cooper-Clayton Smoking Cessation Program are starting in April. Cooper-Clayton is a comprehensive, 13-week program that helps participants stop smoking. The classes will meet: • 6 p.mp to 7 p.m. on Tuesdays, starting April 6, at St. Elizabeth Florence, 4900 Houston Road, Florence, Ky. • 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. on Wednesdays, starting April 7, at St. Elizabeth Cardiac Care, 830 Thomas More Parkway, Suite 102, Edgewood, Ky. • 6 to 7 p.m. on Tuesdays, starting April 13, at St. Elizabeth Grant, 238 Barnes Road, Williamstown, Ky. The Cooper-Clayton classes are free, but participants must purchase nicotine patches, gum or lozenges, if utilized. Participants have had much success with the Cooper-Clayton program because it combines nicotine replacement therapy with a weekly support group. As many as 45 percent of heavy smokers who use the Cooper-Clayton method successfully stop smoking. To register for the program or for more information on the Cooper-Clayton classes, visit www.nkyhealth.org or call 363-2093 or 824-5074.


Community

CCF Recorder

March 25, 2010

B7

FISH FRIES IN NKY FISH FRIES St. Joseph Church, 4 p.m.-7:30 p.m., Camp Springs, 6833 Four Mile Road. Features Mr. Herb’s baked or fried fish, fried catfish, salmon, deep-fried shrimp, crab cakes, a sampler platter and sides. Dinners and sandwiches. Carryout available. $4.50-$11. Presented by St. Joseph Church. For more information call 635-5652. Camp Springs. Wilder Fire Department Fish Fry, 4 p.m. - 8 p.m., will be hosted every Friday during Lent at the Wilder City Building, 520 Licking Pike. Dinner will include fish, shrimp, chicken, desserts and more. Eat in or carry out is available. For more information call 4315884. Wilder. St. Thomas School, 4 p.m.-8 p.m., 428 S. Fort Thomas Ave. Serving fish sandwiches, shrimp, sides, pizza, french fries, homemade desserts and drinks. Benefits St. Thomas School activities. $1.50-$6. For more information call 572-4641; www.sttschool.org. Fort Thomas. St. Therese School, 5 p.m.-8 p.m., 2516 Alexandria Pike, cafeteria. Fish or shrimp platter, fish sandwich, cheese pizza, beer, soft drinks and desserts. $5-$7. For more information call 441-5755; http://www.sainttherese.ws. Southgate. St. Bernard Church, 5 p.m.-7 p.m., 401 Berry St. Church Hall. Fish, salmon patty, shrimp, fries, macaroni and cheese, and sweet or sour coleslaw. Carryout available. $6. For more information call 431-9705. Dayton. Silver Grove Volunteer Fire Department, 4 p.m.-7:30 p.m., 5011 Four Mile. Includes fish, shrimp, chicken tenders, frog legs, hush puppies, macaroni and cheese and coleslaw. Carryout available, call ahead. Benefits Silver Grove Volunteer Fire Department. $4.75$6.50, 25 cents carryout fee. For more information call 441-6251. Silver Grove. Holy Trinity Junior High School, 4 p.m.-7 p.m., 840 Washington Ave. Fish, shrimp, grilled cheese, fries, hush puppies, coleslaw, macaroni and cheese, and drink. Carryout available. 75 cents-$7. For more information call 491-7612. Newport. Knights of Columbus, 4 p.m.-8 p.m., Father DeJaco Council 5220, 11186 Licking Pike.

Fish dinners and sandwiches, baked fish, shrimp, fries, cheese pizza, macaroni and cheese, hush puppies, and coleslaw. Carryout available. 75 cents-$6.50. For more information call 635-9863. Alexandria. St. Mary School, 4:30 p.m.-7:30 p.m., 9 S. Jefferson in Alexandria, school cafeteria. Cod or catfish or shrimp dinners with two sides and dessert. Pizza and carryout available. For more information, call 635-4188. Alexandria. Bellevue Veterans Club, 5. p.m. 24 Fairfield Ave. Menu includes fish, fish sandwich, shrimp, cheese sticks, hush puppies, fries, slaw and macaroni and cheese. Children’s meal includes chicken nuggets and fries. Cost $3-$7, carryout available. For more information, call 360-2046 or visit www.bellevuevets.com. Bellevue. Fort Wright Civic Club, 5 p.m.-8 p.m., 115 Kennedy Road. Includes sandwich meals and dinners. Carryout available. Benefits Local charities. $4-$7. For more information call 331-1150. Fort Wright. Knights of Columbus, 4 p.m.-8 p.m., Father Bealer Council, 605 Lytle Ave. Fish, chicken, jumbo shrimp, popcorn, hot dogs, hamburgers and sides. Carryout available. $1.50-$7. Presented by Knights of Columbus 3908, Fr. Bealer Council. For more information call 589-342-6643. Elsmere. Knights of Columbus, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., Father Bealer Council, 605 Lytle Ave. Fish fries and hushpuppies, fish sandwich fries or coleslaw. $1.75-$5. Presented by Knights of Columbus 3908, Fr. Bealer Council. For more information call 342-6643. Elsmere. Edgewood Senior Center, 5 p.m.-8 p.m., 550 Freedom Park Drive. Fried fish, beerbattered fish, baked fish, shrimp, hot dogs or chicken nuggets. Includes choice of 2 sides; french fries, onion rings, coleslaw or mac & cheese. Children’s meal available. Call 3310033 for carryout orders. $6.50-$7. Presented by Edgewood Fire/EMS. For more information, call 341-2628. Edgewood. Ryland Heights Fire Protection District, 4 p.m.-8 p.m., 10041 Decoursey Pike. Fish, chicken strips and shrimp along with side items and desserts. Carryout available. $7. For more information call 356-7970; www.rylandheightsfire.org. Ryland Heights. St. Patrick Catholic Church, 4:30 p.m.-7:30 p.m., 3285 Mills Road, Fried fish, shrimp,

grilled salmon, pizza and beer. Carryout available. With entertainment. $4-$8.50. For more information call 356-5151. Taylor Mill. Tickets Sports Cafe Fish Fry, 11 a.m.-10 p.m., 100 W. Sixth St. All-you-can-eat fried fish, fries and coleslaw. Mixed drinks, beer and soft drinks available. No sharing and no carryout. $7.95. For more information call 431-1839; www.ticketssportscafe.com. Covington. Mary Queen of Heaven School, 4 p.m.-8 p.m., 1130 Donaldson Highway, Gymnasium. Line forms at 3:30 p.m. Mary Queen of Heaven School, Baked and fried fish, shrimp, salad meals for children, desserts and beverages. Codfather, man in fish costume, will visit. Father Rick Wurth passes out snacks to those people waiting in line. Call ahead for carryout. $2-$9. For more information call 371-2622; www.mqhschool.com. Erlanger. Chick-fil-A, 10:30 a.m.-10 p.m., 4980 Houston Road, Cod filet on Chick-fil-A’s signature buttery bun available for purchase. For more information call 594-4600. Florence. St. Joseph Academy, 4:30 p.m.-8 p.m., 48 Needmore St. Fried or baked fish, shrimp, children’s pizza dinner, desserts, drinks and sides. Weekly raffles. Drive-through available. $40-$45 family dinners; $5-$9.50 dinners or sandwich. For more information call 4856444; www.saintjosephacademy.net. Walton. St. Timothy Parish, 5 p.m.-7:30 p.m., 10272 U.S. 42, Brodnick Hall. Baked and fried fish dinners and sandwiches, shrimp dinner, pizza and desserts. Crafts and activities for children. Drive-thru available beginning 4:30 p.m. $4-$8.50. For more information call 384-1100, ext. 23. Union. St. Paul Church, 5 p.m.-8 p.m., 7303 Dixie Highway. Fridays through March 26. Weekly special is grab spinach and alfredo pizza. Homemade pies will be available as well as children’s meals. Proceeds from the event will provide school gym equipment and support academic and athletic programs. Information or to place advance order, call 6474072. Florence.

Fish Fry not listed? Please send your information to calendar@cincinnati.com.

The Community Foundation of Northern Kentucky is now taking nominations for the 2010 Charlene Erler Legacy Award. The award was established in 2009 to recognize the volunteer leadership of Charlene Erler, who helped establish the Community Foundation of Northern Kentucky and now serves as president and chairman of the board. The Legacy Award is presented annually to a volunteer leader who exemplifies Erler’s spirit of service to the Northern Kentucky community. Nominees should have made a significant contribution of time, service or resources to further the mission of the Community Foundation of Northern Kentucky by enhancing and improving health, social and educational services in Northern Kentucky. The 2009 award presentation noted that while a legacy is based on past accomplishments, it also looks to the future by carrying forward the individual’s previous gifts to make the future better for others. This view of a legacy should be considered in making a nomination. Any member of the community may submit a nomination. In addition to the nominee’s contributions to the community and spirit of service, the nomination should address the nominee’s leadership, perseverance and character. Nominations should be sent to the Community Foundation of Northern Kentucky, 4890 Houston Road, Florence, Ky. 41042. The deadline is April 30. The honoree will be notified in August and the award will be presented at the foundation’s gala on Oct. 30. Nomination forms are available at the foundation’s Web site at www.cfnky.org or by calling 859-572-3365. The Community Foundation of Northern Kentucky provides financial and oper-

ational support for a number of programs and services that benefit the Northern Kentucky region. These include the Northern Kentucky Children’s Advocacy Center, Women’s Health of Northern Kentucky, scholarships and other designated funds.

KCHA awards

On behalf of the Kentucky Cutting Horse Association, Jeff Fisk of Walton, presents youth awards to Matthew Dedden of Burlington and Sarah Boden of California. Dedden also won awards in the $50,000 and $10,000 Amateur Classes.

IN THE SERVICE Hagedorn completes training

Marine Corps Pvt. Andrew W. Hagedorn recently completed 12 weeks of basic training at Marine Corps Recruit Depot, Parris Island, S. C. designed to challenge new Marine recruits both physically and mentally. Hagedorn and fellow recruits began their training at 5 a. m., by running three miles and performing calis-

thenics. In addition to the physical conditioning program, Hagedorn spent numerous hours in field assignments which included learning first aid, uniform regulations, combat water survival, marksmanship, hand-to-hand combat and assorted weapons training. They performed close order drill and operated as a small infantry unit during field training. Hagedorn and fellow recruits ended the training

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The St. Elizabeth Healthcare mobile mammography van will be visiting various locations all across Northern Kentucky this month. The upcoming mobile van schedule is as follows: March 26 7:30 - 10 a.m. Newport High School March 29 1 - 5 p.m. St. Philip Church in Melbourne

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phase with The Crucible, a 54-hour, team evolution culminating in an emotional ceremony in which recruits are presented the Marine Corps Emblem and addressed as “Marines” for the first time in their careers. He is the son of Cheri and Bill Hagedorn of Highland Heights.

Frees- See

Dr. Jennifer Frees of Cold Spring, Kentucky and Paul See of Camp Springs, Kentucky would like to announce their engagement to be married. The couple was engaged in December 2009. Wedding plans are being finalized.

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LUTHERAN

Sunday Worship: Traditional 8:00 & 11:00am Contemporary 9:00am Sunday School 9:50am Contemplative 5:30pm

St. Luke Lutheran Church ELCA 4800 Alexandria Pk, Cold Spring, KY 859-441-2848 M Worship Sun 8:30 &10:30am Sunday School 9:30am All Are Welcome www.stlukecoldspring.org

NON-DENOMINATIONAL LOVE & FAITH FELLOWSHIP CHURCH

720 York St., Newport KY 41071 859-581-4244 Pastor: Gordon Milburn Sunday School: 9:30 am Sunday Morning Worship: 10:30 am Sun. & Wed. Eve Service: 6:00 pm


B8

CCF Recorder

Community

March 25, 2010

Workshop discusses weight-loss secrets A free workshop on secrets to permanent weight loss will take place at 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 13, at the Cold Spring Library. The event is sponsored

by the Foundation for Wellness Professionals whose Northern Kentucky representative is Dr. Christian J. Hay, D.C., of Newport. The workshop will dis-

cuss why diets donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t work, how hormones affect weight loss and the effect of sugar on metabolism. Call 859-581-1010 to register.

Burlington Pharmacy launches health series Burlington Pharmacy has launched a series of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Take Charge of Your Healthâ&#x20AC;? clases. The monthly series of classes will teach about common health problems.

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every month. Future classes include diabetes in May, diet and exercise in June, pain and arthritis in July , over-thecounters and natural medicines in August, and womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s health in September. Classes are $10. Attending three classes makes participants eligible for a free 30-minute appointment with the pharmacist to discuss medicines or another topic. Burlington Pharmacy is located at 5555 North Bend Road, Burlington. Call 859586-6700.

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PROVIDED

Dressed for success

Garrett Ahlbrand, a seventh-grade member of the student council at St. Joseph School in Cold Spring, proposed March 4 be Success Day as a fundraiser for that organization. So March 4, students dressed up in their finest for fun and to raise money. Shown: Maria Kinnett, Laurel Hunter, Megan Jones, Jacob Thieman, Beth Ampfer, Elena Schmidt, and Hope Borchers.

Volunteers needed for Appalachian fest The 41st annual Appalachian Festival seeks volunteers at least 18 years old to help in all aspects of presenting this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s edition of one of the areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most popular springtime events. The Appalachian Festival is Motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day weekend, May 7-9, at Coney Island. The 41st annual festival

celebrates the areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rich mountain heritage with down-home entertainment, crafts, food and cultural attractions. Proceeds from the threeday festival go toward grants to area organizations and individual artists involved in promoting Appalachian culture. Volunteers are needed for

committee assignments and on-site help during the popular three-day festival. Volunteers are particularly needed on Friday, May 7, to help with Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day activities, such as kidsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; crafts and games. Those interested in volunteering should call 513251-3378 or e-mail volunteer@appalachianfestival.org.

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March 25, 2010

CCF Recorder

Crafters, vendors needed BAWAC Inc. needs crafters, handmade items and vendors for its first Craft Fair to be held in conjunction with the Burlington Spring Horse Show May 28-29. The craft show will be

held at the Boone County Fair Grounds in Burlington during Memorial Day weekend. Hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. May 29. Booth space is $40 and benefits BAWAC.

BAWAC Inc. is a community rehabilitation center. It is located at 7970 Kentucky Drive in Florence. For information contact Kathy Ward or Reggie at 371-4410 or e-mail kathy. ward@bawac.org.

Chick-fil-A hosts senior bingo The Chick-fil-A restaurant on Houston Road hosts bingo for customers ages 55 and older every Thursday morning 8 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. Participants have the opportunity to win free Chick-fil-A food and other prizes, while enjoying its

breakfast items, including the new 100 percent Colombian coffee and yogurt parfait. “At Chick-fil-A, we believe in bringing community members together to create meaningful relationships – and a little healthy

competition,” said franchise operator Dustin DiChiara. “We hope our customers will consider kicking off their Thursday mornings at Chick-fil-A,” he said. The restaurant is located at 4980 Houston Road in Florence. Phone 594-4600.

NKY SPRING AND SUMMER CAMPS S U N D A Y, M A R C H 2 8

SUMMER CAMP - YMCA

Open House, 1 p.m.-4 p.m. Camp Ernst, 7615 Camp Ernst Road. Popcorn, smores, tractor rides, horse ring rides, and camp staff answer questions about camp program. 586-6181; www.myYcamp.org. Burlington. W E D N E S D A Y, A P R I L 1 4

SUMMER CAMP - MISC.

Miss Julia’s Camp for Young Ladies, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Daily through June 18. Dinsmore Homestead, 5656 Burlington Pike, Embroidery, dancing, elocution, art of conversation, hiking, picnic and tea party. Snacks and water provided. Lunch not included. Ages 11 and up. $100, $85 members. Reg-

CE-

istration required. 586-6117. Burlington. S U N D A Y, A P R I L 2 5

SUMMER CAMP - YMCA

Open House, 1 p.m.-4 p.m. Camp Ernst, Free. 586-6181; www.myYcamp.org. Burlington. M O N D A Y, M A Y 2 4

SUMMER CAMP - YMCA R.C. Durr YMCA Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. School’s Finally Out. Daily through May 28. R.C. Durr YMCA, 5874 Veterans Way, Themed weeks. Scholarships and care available. State child care assistance accepted. Ages 5-11. $170, $125 members. Registration required. 534-5700. Burlington. R.C. Durr YMCA Preschool Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-noon Part-day. At the

Beach. Daily through May 28. R.C. Durr YMCA, 5874 Veterans Way, Themed weeks. Scholarship and daycare available. State child care assistance accepted. Ages 3-5. $170, $125 members; part-day: $105, $75 members. Registration required. 534-5700. Burlington. R.C. Durr YMCA Teen Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through May 28. R.C. Durr YMCA, 5874 Veterans Way, Themed weeks. Scholarships available. State child care assistance accepted. Ages 11-15. $175, $130 members. Registration required. 5345700. Burlington. R.C. Durr YMCA Summer Camp Leadership in Training Program, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through May 28. R.C. Durr YMCA, 5874 Veterans Way, Assist staff wit activities. Participants are selected through an interview process. Ages 13-16. $60, $30 members. Registration required. 534-5700; www.myy.org. Burlington.

PROVIDED

Making bread

The eighth-grade class at St. Joseph in Cold Spring has been looking at the way one reaction leads to another. They have been discussing reactions of the chemical nature as well as reactions of human nature. In science class, the students have been studying the fungus kingdom. The students made bread to demonstrate how yeast eats sugar and creates carbon dioxide. They discussed the different chemical reactions that happen with the combining of the ingredients. The eighth-graders compared this with the unleavened bread of biblical times. In their religion and service projects, they have discussed how one action influences the lives of others and the different reactions that result. Shown: Jordan Johnston, Gio Bakunawa, Andrew Smith, Andrew Branch, Kalvin Moore, Connor Hanneken, and Clay Verst .

CE-0000389257.INDD

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B10

ON

RECORD

CCF Recorder

THE

March 25, 2010

| DEATHS | Editor Michelle Shaw | smhaw@nky.com | 578-1053 BIRTHS

POLICE REPORTS

BELLEVUE

The Community Recorder publishes the names of all adults charged with offenses. The information is a matter of public record and does not imply guilt or innocence.

Report of unknown person used check without authorization at store at 5400 Alexandria Pike, March 8.

Dennis Lee Baker, 47, 830 Isabella St., theft by unlawful taking at 15 Donnermeyer Drive, March 9. Edward Habel, 45, 716 Taylor Ave., warrant at 716 Taylor Ave., March 12. Timothy Robinson, 28, 103 Bluegrass Ave. No. H104, DUI at Taylor and Fairfield, March 13. Jason Hearst, 23, 150 Fairfield Ave. No. 2, warrant at 150 Fairfield Ave. no. 2, March 15. Eugene Dubose, 40, 2508 St. Leo, theft by unlawful taking at 53 Donnermeyer Drive, March 18.

Fourth degree assault

Reported at 330 Salmon Pass, March 15.

Theft by unlawful taking

Report of identification and social security card taken from purse at Alexandria Pike, March 4. Report of Ipod taken from dressing room at 395 Crossroads Blvd., March 5. Report of satellite radio taken from vehicle at 7 Rosa Place, March 14. Report of GPS and cigars taken from vehicle at 72 Madonna Lane, March 14. Report of cell phone and GPS taken from vehicle at 4410 Alexandria Pike, March 16. Report of golf clubs and GPS taken from different vehicles at 27 Madonna Lane, March 16. Report of pistol, knife, flashlight and CDs taken from vehicle at 36 Madonna Lane, March 17.

COLD SPRING Arrest

Jeffrey C. Sams, 43, 10 Andrew Circle, fourth degree assault at 375 Crossroads Blvd., March 2. Brian D. Fanning, 28, 823 Johns Hill Road, second degree forgery at 4135 Alexandria Pike, March 3. Julia L. Vires, 40, 3 Veterans Drive, theft by unlawful taking or shoplifting at 70 Martha Layne Collins Blvd., March 3. Leslie W. King, 19, 1514 Scott St., giving officer false name or address at Ky. 915 and Ky. 9, March 11.

Theft by unlawful taking or shoplifting

Report of cologne taken without pay-

ing at 5400 Alexandria Pike, March 15.

Third degree criminal mischief

Report of parked vehicle's door damaged at 663 Silverledge Drive, March 12.

Unauthorized use of motor vehicle

Reported at 491 Ivy Ridge Road, March 9.

FORT THOMAS

Incidents/reports Fraudulent use of a credit card Reported at 914 Highland Ave., March 12.

Reported at 132 North Grand Ave., March 14. Reported at 25 Indiana Ave., March 15. Reported at 501-5 Chesapeake Ave., March 17.

INDEPENDENT AUDITOR’S REPORT To the Honorable Mayor and Members of the Council City of Crestview, Kentucky We have audited the accompanying financial statements of the governmental activities of the City of Crestview, Kentucky (City), as of and for the year ended June 30, 2009, which collectively comprise the City’s basic financial statements as listed in the table of contents. These financial statements are the responsibility of the City’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audit. We conducted our audit in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United States of America. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion. In our opinion, the financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the governmental activities of the City of Crestview, Kentucky as of June 30, 2009, and the respective changes in financial position and, where applicable, cash flows thereof for the year then ended in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. The management’s discussion and analysis, on pages 4-6, and budgetary comparison information, on page 18, are not a required part of the basic financial statements, but are supplementary information required by accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. We have applied certain limited procedures which consisted principally of inquiries of management regarding the methods of measurement and presentation of the required supplementary information. However, we did not audit the information and express no opinion on it. In accordance with Government Auditing Standards, we have also issued our report dated January 8, 2010 on our consideration of City of Crestview, Kentucky’s internal control over financial reporting and our tests of its compliance and other matters with certain provisions of laws, regulations, contracts and grant agreements. That report is an integral part of an audit performed in accordance with Government Auditing Standards and should be read in conjunction with this report in considering the results of our audit Van Gorder, Walker & Co., Inc. Erlanger, Kentucky January 8, 2010 CITY OF CRESTVIEW, KENTUCKY BUDGETARY COMPARISON SCHEDULE – BUDGET TO ACTUAL – GENERAL FUND For the Year Ended June 30, 2009

Resources (inflows): Franchise fees General fund transfers Grants Insurance premium taxes Interest income LGEA funds Licenses Municipal road aid Penalties Real estate taxes Tangible property taxes Trash collection fees Total resources

Variance with Final Budget Favorable (Unfavorable) $ 80 (15,000) 3,775 76,733 3,902 20 538 136 2501 3,373 (191) 75,867

Charges to appropriations (outflows): General government Bank service charges Building expenses Citizens’ activities Commission salaries Contingency fund Contract labor Dues and subscriptions Grass cutting and park maintenance Insurance Meetings and seminars Monument rehab Office supplies and equipment Postage and delivery Printing and reproduction Professional fees Public safety Street project Street repairs Telecommunications expense Trash collection expense Utilities Total general government Capital Outlay Debt Service Total charges to appropriations Excess of resources over appropriations

$

-

50 3,770 2,000 9,200 4,135 2,000 1,000

-

50 3,770 2,000 9,200 4,135 2,000 1,000

153 3,291 1,630 8,612 2,473 768

(103) 479 370 588 4,135 (473) 232

7,000 6,970 500 17,500

-

7,000 6,970 500 17,500

9,603 6,401 24 27,743

(2,603) 569 476 (10,243)

1,000 750 1,500 2,800 10,000 5,000 11,000

-

1,000 750 1,500 2,800 10,000 5,000 11,000

1,300 520 1,493 3,691 10,000 25,020

(300) 230 7 (891) 5,000 (14,020)

3,500 26,000 3,360

-

3,500 26,000 3,360

3,442 25,840 3,319

58 160 41

119,035 29,000

-

119,035 29,000

135,323 39,242

148,035

-

148,035

174,565

$

-

$

-

$

49,337

-

(16,288) (10,242) (26,530)

$

REAL

Gloria Brooks

Gloria Brooks, 77, Fort Thomas, died March 14, 2010, at Hospice of St. Elizabeth Health Care in Edgewood. Known as “Brooksie,” she worked as a laundress at Highland Country Club in Fort Thomas for 25 years and was a member of St. Catherine of Siena Church in Fort Thomas. Her husband, James Brooks, died previously. Survivors include her daughter, Stephanie Ann Brooks Sanchez of Fort Thomas; son, Steven Brooks of Fort Thomas; sisters, Margaret Buscarino and Josie Abbott, both of Cincinnati; brother, Stephen Passafiume of Cincinnati and four grandchildren. Burial was in St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas.

Richard Bryant

Theft by unlawful taking

Budgeted Amounts Original Revisions Final Actual $ 4,200 $ $ 4,200 $ 4,280 15,000 15,000 3,775 61,000 61,000 137,733 4,500 4,500 8,402 10 10 30 75 75 75 7,900 7,900 8,438 100 100 236 31,501 29,000 29,000 3,623 250 250 25,809 26,000 26,000 223,902 148,035 148,035

|

ESTATE

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

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ws@

unit

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DEATHS

About police reports

Incidents/reports First degree forgery

Arrest

POLICE

49,337

PUBLIC NOTICE CITY OF CRESTVIEW CAMPBELL COUNTY, KY The June 30, 2009 audit for the City of Crestview, Campbell County, KY 41076 has been completed and is available for public inspection at the City Building, 14 Circle Drive, Crestview, KY 41076 by appointment with the City Clerk/Phone 859-441-4620. Any citizen may obtain a copy of the audit for personal use. Duplication costs of $.25 per page. Copies of the financial statement are available at no cost from the City Treasurer c/o the Crestview City Building, 14 Circle Drive, Crestview, KY 41076/ Phone 859-441-4620.

Richard Gene Bryant, 45, Southgate, died March 14, 2010, at his residence. He worked at Corken Steel and was a member of Hunting Outfitters and the Ten Point Club. Survivors include his partner Krista Armstrong of Southgate; son, Ian Richard Bryant of Cincinnati; daughter, Anessa Renee Stamper of Newport; sisters, Wanda Carter of Morris Hill, Ind., Dorothy King and Linda Tapp both of Independence, and Barbara Davidson of Norwood. Burial was at Evergreen Cemetery, Southgate.

Thomas Butts Sr.

Thomas R. “Tom” Butts Sr., 55, Erlanger, died March 18, 2010, at his home. His wife, Roxann Butts, died in 2009. Survivors include his son, Thomas Butts Jr. of Chesapeake, Va.; daughter, Carrie Butts of Erlanger; brothers, Donald Butts of Cincinnati, John Butts of Dallas, Texas, Dennis Butts of Alexandria, and James Butts and Michael Butts, both of Erlanger; and five grandchildren. Burial was in Forest Lawn Memorial Park of Erlanger. Memorials: American Heart Association, Ohio River Valley Chapter, 5211 Madison Road, Cincinnati, OH 45227.

Thomas Campbell

Thomas Jefferson Campbell, 41, Newport, died March 15, 2010, at his home. Survivors include his parents, Jim Campbell of Hidden Valley and Peggy West McCarthy of Newport; son, Thomas James Campbell of Fort Thomas; daughter, Ashley Renee Campbell of Fort Thomas; brother, Joe McCarthy; sisters, Teresa Durham and Missy Teegarden; and three grandchildren. Burial was in Glen Haven Cemetery. Memorials: St. Jude Children’s Hospital or Shriner’s Hospital for Children, c/o the funeral home.

Mona Chapin

Mona L. Chapin, 58, Cold Spring, died March 14, 2010, at West Chester Nursing and Rehabilitation Center. She was a librarian for the Cincinnati Art Museum for 30 years. Survivors are a brother, Tom Chapin of Cold Spring; and a sister,

Rise’ Chapin Gustin of Indianapolis. Burial was in St. John Cemetery, Fort Mitchell. Memorials: Arthritis Foundation, Ohio River Valley Chapter, 1724 Miami Ave., Cincinnati, OH, 45243.

R. Lucille Denson

R. Lucille Denson, 88, of Broken Bow, Neb., formerly of Alexandria, died March 11, 2010, at the Custer Care Retirement Home, Broken Bow, Neb. She was a homemaker. Her husband, Richard Denson, died in 1999. Survivors include her son, David Denson of Broken Bow; daughters, Rose Wheeler of Grand Island, Neb., Laura Sheanshang of Alexandria and Alma Beland of Burwell, Neb.; 11 grandchildren; 11 great-grandchildren. Services were held in Broken Bow, Neb.

Mary Fennell

Mary Louise Fennell, 79, Bellevue, a homemaker, died March 9, 2010, at Hospice of the Bluegrass Care Center in Fort Thomas. Her husband, Walter G. Fennell, died previously. Survivors include her daughter, Linda Fennell; sons, James Fennell, Donnie Fennell and Scott Fennell; brother, Walther Fightmaster of West Harrison, Ind.; sister, Jennie Alfers of Norwood, Ohio; nine grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. Burial will be in Evergreen Cemetery, Southgate. Memorials: Billy Graham Evangelistic Association, 1 Billy Graham Parkway, Charlotte, NC 28201.

Audrey Fritsche

Audrey Palmer Fritsche, 90, Fort Thomas, died March 17, 2010, at Highlandspring of Fort Thomas. She was a bookkeeper with J.S. Friedman Advertising, member of Highland United Methodist Church in Fort Thomas, Holly Hill Children’s Home Guild in California and the Pink Ladies of St. Luke Hospital in Fort Thomas. Her husband, Richard K. Fritsche died previously. Survivors include her son, Randall P. Fritsche of Fort Thomas; daughter, Christina J. Fritsche of Cincinnati; two grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Burial was in Evergreen Cemetery in Southgate. Memorials: American Heart Association, 5211 Madison Road, Cincinnati, OH 45227 or American Diabetes Association, 644 Linn St., Suite 304, Cincinnati, OH 45203.

Edgar Fultz, Jr.

Edgar Fultz, Jr., 53, Covington, died March 19, 2010, at home. He was the owner of Fultz & Sons Tree Service, and a member of the Locust Pike Free Pentecostal Church of God. He is survived by his son, Dennis Goerner of Covington; daughters Nicole Kelly and Tina Baynum of Covington, and Michelle Baynum of Highland Heights; his parents, Edgar and Louise Fultz of Covington; sisters Patricia Shepherd of Crittenden and Kathy Woodrum of

LEGAL NOTICE Clearwire, LLC is proposing the construction of a telecommunications installation on the parcel known as 601 Washington Avenue in the City of Newport, Campbell County, Kentucky. The telecommunica tions installation will consist of the installation of antennas on the rooftop of the building located at the address referred to above. Any interested party wishing to submit comments regarding the potential effects the proposed facility may have on any historic property may do so sending comThe amount and percent of increase are listed be- by ments to: Project OHlow: Increase Rate Class Dollar Percent CIN 12017 c/o Nonrecurring Charges Infinigy Engineering Automatic Meter Reading (AMR) Remote & Surveying, PLLC, Disconnect or Connect $30.00 100% The effect of the proposed rate on the average 11 Herbert Drive, Latham, New York monthly bill by rate class is provided below 12110 or via teleIncrease Rate Class Dollar Percent phone at 518-690Nonrecurring Charges 0790. 6448

Official Notice Owen Electric Cooperative Corporation, with its principal office at 8205 Hwy 127 N., Owenton, KY 40359 intends to file a new nonrecurring rate with the Kentucky Public Service Commission. This filing will result in a new rate applicable to customers facing disconnection. The rates proposed in this application are the rates proposed by Owen Electric Cooperative Corporation. However, the Kentucky Public Service Commission may order rates to be charged that differ from these proposed rates. Such action may result in rates for consumers other than the rates in this application. Any corporation, association, body politic or person may by motion within thirty (30) days after publication or mailing of notice of the proposed rate changes request leave to intervene. The motion shall be submitted to the Public Service Commission, 211 Sower Boulevard, P.O. Box 615, Frankfort, Kentucky 40602, and shall set forth the grounds for the request including the status and interest of the party. Intervenors may obtain copies of the application and testimony by contacting Mr. Michael Cobb, Owen Electric Cooperative, 8205 Hwy 127 N, Owenton, KY 40359. A copy of the application and testimony is available for public inspection at the utility’s offices.

Automatic Meter Reading (AMR) Remote Disconnect or Connect $30.00 100% The present and proposed rate structure of Owen Electric Cooperative are listed below Rates Rate Class Present Proposed Nonrecurring Charges Automatic Meter Reading (AMR) Remote Disconnect or Connect $0.00 $30.00

If you’re looking for buyers, you’re in the right neighborhood. Call Community Classified

513.242.4000

Covington; and two grandchildren. Burial was at Johns Hill Cemetery in Highland Heights.

Robert Groves

Robert A. “Bobby” Groves, 69, Warsaw, died March 15, 2010, at the Hospice of the Bluegrass - Northern Kentucky Care Center in Fort Thomas. He was a foreman for the Trenwa Co., Warsaw, a member of the Gallatin County Lions Club, Good Guys Club and Glencoe Church of Christ. He also served in the U. S. Army. His brothers, Jimmy and Henry Groves, and sister, Betty Hill, died previously. Survivors include his wife, Lois O’Connor Groves; sons, Jeff Groves of Glencoe, Shennon Groves of Bowling Green and Tommy O’Connor of Glencoe; sisters, Mary Louise Beach of Newport, Bonnie Lou Edmondson of Crittenden and Carolyn Jean Henderson of Erlanger; brother, Gary Groves of Warsaw; and five grandchildren. Burial was in Warsaw Cemetery. Memorials: Hospice of the Bluegrass-Northern Kentucky, 7388 Turfway Road, Florence, KY 41042.

Larry Hatter

Larry J. Hatter, 62, of Independence, formerly of Ludlow, died March 19, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He was a truck driver and member of Central Church of the Nazarene of Fort Wright, the Ludlow High School Sports Hall of Fame and the Northern Kentucky Sports Hall of Fame. He also was a member of the Ludlow Volunteer Fire Department and coached Ludlow Youth Football. Survivors include his wife, Beverly Troxel Hatter of Independence; daughters, Phyllis Cooks of Hebron and Keri Sullivan of Erlanger; sons, Estell Hatter of Crittenden, Terry Hatter of Hebron and Curtis Hatter of Plano, Texas; stepdaughter, Kelly Fugate of Ludlow; sisters, Sharlene French of Alexandria and JoAnn Powers of Ludlow; brothers, Garry Hatter of Ludlow and Jerry Hatter of Villa Hills; 10 grandchildren; two great-grandchildren and two greatgreat-grandchildren. Burial was in Highland Cemetery, Fort Mitchell. Middendorf-Bullock Funeral Home of Ludlow handled the arrangements. Memorials: Larry J. Hatter Funeral Fund, C/O Middendorf-Bullock Funeral Home, 461 Elm St., Ludlow, KY 41016.

John Henry

John Frederick Henry, 80, Highland Heights, died March 15, 2010, at Florence Park Care Nursing & Rehab Center in Florence. He worked for Westinghouse and was a member of Asbury United Methodist Church in Highland Heights. His wife, Betty Jean Bolser Henry, died previously. Survivors include his daughter, Susan Brady of Florence; son, Mike Henry of Butler; sisters, Betty Henn of Highland Heights, Mary Hurst of Falmouth and Bonnie Miley of Ludlow; five grandchildren and six greatgrandchildren. Burial was in Evergreen Cemetery in Southgate. Memorials: Hospice of the Bluegrass, 7388 Turfway Road, Florence, KY 41042.

Frances Holt

Frances Holt, 69, Falmouth, died March 12, 2010, at her daughter’s home in Falmouth. She enjoyed sewing, arts and crafts, and flowers. Survivors include her son, Rodney Polly of Falmouth; daughter, Pam Haddix of Falmouth; brother, Donald Holt of Butler; four sisters, Marlene Holt of Falmouth, Darlene Phelps of North Carolina, Eula Spradlin of Alexandria, and Bonnie Decker of Mount Vernon; five grandchildren and one great-grandchild.

Jeanne Horn

Jeanne M. Horn, 83, Bellevue, died March 15, 2010, at her residence. She was a homemaker and a member of the former St. Anthony Church, Bellevue, where she was active in the Mother’s Club, the Loyal Boosters, and a Boy Scout and Girl Scout leader. She was preceded in death by her husband, Peter F. Horn. Survivors include her daughters, Mary Ann Kembre of Cold Spring and Maureen Waters of Fort Thomas; sons, Dan Horn of Bellevue and Dave Horn of Independence; 6 grandchildren and 8 great-grandchildren. Burial was in the St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas. Memorials: St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, 501 St. Jude Place, Memphis, TN 38105.

Deaths continued B11


March 25, 2010 INVITATION TO BID March 25, 2010

DEATHS

PROJECT: Furnishing and Delivery of Flowable Fill and Concrete

From B10

SEALED BIDS WILL BE RECEIVED AT:

Robert Ihrig

Robert “Red” Ihrig, 87, Alexandria, died March 20, 2010, at Carmel Manor Nursing Home in Fort Thomas. The World War II Navy veteran worked at Interlane Steel in Wilder. Survivors include his wife, Laura Ferguson Ihrig of Alexandria; sons, Bob Ihrig and Roger Ihrig, both of Alexandria; sister, Jane Hirth of California City, Calif.; four grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. Burial was in Highland Cemetery, Fort Mitchell.

Aaron Massey

Aaron M. Massey, 21, Covington, died March 3, 2010, at his home. He was a construction worker and a member of the Boys and Girls Clubs of Covington. Survivors include his wife, Angel Massey of Florence; daughter, Karma Massey of Florence; mother, Jean Fultz of Covington; father, Thomas Massey of Covington; brothers, Jesse and Joshua Massey, both of Covington, Zachary Massey of Silver Grove and William and Carl Fultz, both of Covington; sisters, Stephanie Fultz of Florence, and Sarah and Rachael Massey, both of Covington. Cooper Funeral Home handled the arrangements.

John McCullough

John R. McCullough, 86, Cold Spring, died March 17, 2010, at East Galbraith Nursing Home in Cincinnati. He worked for thirty-six years at Ford Motor Co., and was a World War II Army veteran, member of First Baptist Church of Cold Spring; Campbell County VFW Post 3205 in Alexandria; Alexandria Lodge #152 F. & A.M.; Indra Consistory of the Scottish Rite Valley of Covington; Super Seniors of Alexandria; and United Auto Workers Local 863 and a Kentucky Admiral. Survivors include his wife of 63 years, Genevieve Weinel McCullough; his sons, Jim McCullough of Edgewood and Alan McCullough of Cold Spring; five grandchildren and 10 great-grandchildren. Burial was in Alexandria Cemetery in Alexandria. Alexandria Funeral Home in Alexandria handled the arrangements. Memorials: Hospice of The Bluegrass, 7388 Turfway Road, Florence, KY 41042 or First Baptist Church of Cold Spring, 4410 Alexandria Pike, Cold Spring, KY 41076.

Paul Newman

Legal Notice The Campbell County Fiscal Court, at a regular meeting of the Court on Wednesday, March 3, 2010 adopted the following Ordinance upon the second reading. Ordinance was read by title and summary given for the time at the January 20, 2010 meeting of the Court. CAMPBELL COUNTY FISCAL COURT CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY ORDINANCE NO. 0-01-10 AN ORDINANCE RELATING TO THE 2009-2010 ANNUAL BUDGET AND AMENDMENTS THEREOF SECTION ONE The annual budget for Fiscal Year 2009-2010 is amended to: a: Increase/Decrease the receipts of the General Fund by $371,000.00 to include unbudgeted receipts from: 01-8099-0309-00 Prior Year Surplus 19,000.00 01-0000-4504-06 Fed Grant-DOE Energy/Conservation 352,000.00 b: Increase/Decrease expenditure accounts of the General Fund: 01-8099-0309-00 DOE Grant Admin/Consult Fees 35,500.00 01-8099-0348-00 DOE Grant-Program Support 58,500.00 01-8099-0741-02 DOE Grant Other Capital Outlay 277,000.00 SECTION TWO The amounts adjusting the receipts and expenditure accounts in Section One are for governmental purposes. Read by title and a summary given at the Campbell County Fiscal Court meeting on the 20th day of January, 2010. County Judge/Executive Approved as to form and classification this___day of_________,2010

State Local Finance Officer This budget ordinance amendment was duly adopted by the Fiscal Court of Campbell County, Kentucky, this day, the______day of__________,2010 County Judge/Executive

CE-1001544554-01.INDD

Fiscal Court Clerk

SEALED BIDS WILL BE RECEIVED AT: Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) 2835 Crescent Springs Road P.O. Box 18640 Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 Date: Time:

SEALED BIDS WILL BE RECEIVED AT: Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) 2835 Crescent Springs Road P.O. Box 18640 Erlanger, Kentucky 41018

April 8, 2010 9:00 AM Local Time

At said place and time, and promptly thereafter, all Bids that have been duly received will be publicly opened and read aloud. The proposed Work is generally described as follows: Construction of approximately 1,500 linear 8" water main together with the appurtenances and related work along Weaver Lane in the City of Cold Spring, Campbell County Kentucky. All Bids must be in accordance with the Instructions to Bidders and Contract Documents on file, and available for examination at:

About obituaries

Basic information and a color photo is published without charge by The Community Recorder. Call us at 283-0404. To publish a larger memorial tribute, call 513-242-4000 for pricing.

Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) 2835 Crescent Springs Road Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 Or Erpenbeck Consulting Engineers, Inc. 4205 Dixie Highway Elsmere, KY 41018 Copies of the Bidding Documents may be obtained from the office of Erpenbeck Consulting Engineers, Inc. at the address indicated herein. Charges for all documents obtained will be made on the following basis: Complete set of Bidding Documents Mailing and Handling (FedEx or USPS) (if requested)

Charge $ 35.00 $ 15.00

Bid security, in the form of a certified check or a Bid Bond in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the maximum total bid price, must accompany each Bid. The Successful Bidder will be required to furnish a Construction Payment Bond and a Construction Performance Bond as security for the faithful performance of the contract and the payment of all bills and obligations arising from the performance of the Contract. Contractor and all Subcontractors will be required to conform to the labor standards set forth in the Contract Documents. This project does not fall under the provisions of KRS 337.505 to 337.550 for prevailing wage rates. Owner reserves the right to reject any or all Bids, including without limitation the right to reject any or all nonconforming, nonresponsive, incomplete, unbalanced, or conditional Bids, to waive informalities, and to reject the Bid of any Bidder if Owner believes that it would not be in the best interest of Owner to make an award to that Bidder. Owner also reserves the right to negotiate with the apparent qualified Bidder to such an extent as may be determined by Owner. Minority Bidders are encouraged to bid. Bids shall remain subject to acceptance for 90 days after the day of bid opening or for such longer period of time to which a Bidder may agree in writing upon request of the Owner. If a Contract is to be awarded, the Owner will give the successful Bidder a Notice of Award during the period of time during which the successful Bidder’s bid remains subject to acceptance. Richard Harrison, Vice President of Engineering Northern Kentucky Water District 1001546704

To Place Legal Advertising Call 513.242.4000

6711

PROJECT: Aggregate Materials

Bids will be received on a unit price and/or lump sum basis as described in the Contract Documents.

Deaths continued B12

I, Paula K. Spicer, Clerk of the Campbell County Fiscal Court, hereby certify that this summary was prepared by me at the direction of the Campbell County Fiscal Court and that said summary is a true and accurate summary of the contents of Ordinance O-03-10.

INVITATION TO BID March 25, 2010

Jim Phillips

Cheylia Jade Marie Groneck Price, stillborn, Cold Spring, on March 13, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Hospital, Florence. She is survived by her mother, Crystal Groneck, of Cold Spring; father Colton Price of Alexandria; her grandparents and great-grandparents.

CAMPBELL COUNTY FISCAL COURT CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY ORDINANCE O-03-10 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CAMPBELL COUNTY FISCAL COURT ADOPTING A REVISED FEE SCHEDULE TO INCLUDE ADDITIONAL BUILDING PLAN REVIEW AND INSPECTION SERVICES RESULTING FROM THE KENTUCKY DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING, BUILDING AND CONSTRUCTION APPROVING EXPANDED JURISDICTION FOR CAMPBELL COUNTY The full text of Ordinance O-03-10 will be on file in the Office of the County Clerk, Newport, Kentucky and is on file in the Office of the Fiscal Court Clerk, Newport, Kentucky, and same is available for inspection and use by the public during regular business hours.

PROJECT: Weaver Lane Water Main Replacement

Charges for Bidding Documents and mailing and handling, if applicable, will not be refunded.

Cheylia Price

The Campbell County Fiscal Court, at a regular meeting of the court on Wednesday, March 17, 2010 at 5:30 p.m., at the Campbell County Administration Building, Fiscal Court Chambers, 1098 Monmouth Street, Newport, Kentucky, adopted the following ordinance upon the second reading, said ordinance having been read by title and summary given for the first time at the March 3, 2010 regular meeting of the Court.

INVITATION TO BID Date: March 25, 2010

UNTIL:

Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) 2835 Crescent Springs Road P.O. Box 18640 Erlanger, Kentucky 41018

LEGAL NOTICE

Paula K. Spicer Fiscal Court Clerk

Paul E. Newman, 72, of Coconut Creek, Fla., formerly of Alexandria, died Feb. 21, 2010, at Northwest Medical Center, in Margate, Fla. He was a retired automotive paint salesman. Survivors include his wife, Donna Newman of Coconut Creek, Fla.; daughters, Paula Parrott, Barbara Schadler, Loraine Franks and son, Rick Newman, all of Alexandria; stepchildren, Don Connley of Fayetteville, N.C., Scott Connley of Lake Worth, Fla., Paula Retana of Coconut Creek, Fla., Teri Krug of Las Vegas, Nev., Bryan Connley of Royal Palm Beach, Fla., Todd Laker of Boynton Beach, Fla. and Buck Browning of Jupiter, Fla.; 15 grandchildren and 2 great-grandchildren. Memorial service will be held March 27 from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. at VFW 8261 Alexandria Pike in Alexandria.

Jim Phillips, 64, Alexandria, died March 11, 2010, at Hospice of the Bluegrass Care Center in Fort Thomas. He was a self-employed mechanic. Survivors include his wife, Denise Dorger Phillips of Alexandria; son, Troy Phillips of Alexandria; daughter Trudi Ashinger of Cincinnati; brother, Jerry Phillips of Rhode Island and two grandchildren. Swindler & Currin Funeral Home in Latonia is handled the arrangements for the family. Memorials: Charity of donor’s choice.

CCF Recorder

Deadline: Friday at 5 p.m.

UNTIL:

Date: Time:

April 8, 2010 9:00 a.m., local time

At said place and time, and promptly thereafter, all Bids that have been duly received will be publicly opened and read aloud. The proposed work is generally described as follows: the furnishing and delivery of various quantities of aggregate materials to the Districts’ facility located at 2835 Crescent Springs Road, Erlanger, Kentucky; 100 Aqua Drive, Cold Spring, Kentucky, and/or to different work site locations in the Owner’s service area in accordance with specifications prepared by the Northern Kentucky Water District. These work site locations are where the Owner or the Owner’s contractor has made repairs to the water main or other appurtenances. The amount of aggregate materials will be ordered by the tonnage needed and will vary from work site to work site. Bids are to cover the actual quantities of aggregate materials for a one year period beginning May 1, 2010 and shall remain in effect for the entire one-year period regardless of the quantity ordered. The estimated quantities are for Bid comparison only. Bids will be received on a unit price basis as described in the Contract Documents All Bids must be in accordance with the Bidding Documents on file, and available for examination at: Northern Kentucky Water District, 2835 Crescent Springs Road, Erlanger, Kentucky 41018. Copies of the Bidding Documents may be obtained from the office at the address indicated herein by contacting Denise Manning at (859) 426-2718. There is no charge for these documents. Owner reserves the right to reject any or all Bids, including without limitation the right to reject any or all nonconforming, non-responsive, incomplete, unbalanced, or conditional Bids, to waive informalities, and to reject the Bid of any Bidder if Owner believes that it would not be in the best interest of Owner to make an award to that Bidder. Owner also reserves the right to negotiate with the selected Bidder to such an extent as may be determined by Owner. Also if, in Owner’s opinion, a particular product and/or supplier offer distinct advantages over other Bidders, the Owner may award to a Bidder that is not the lowest. Distinct advantages may include shipping time, standardization or ultimate economy. Owner reserves the right to have separate awards for individual bid items from different Bidders. Owner further reserves the right to reject all bids, to waive any informalities and to negotiate for the modification of any bid, or to accept a bid which is deemed the most desirable and advantageous from the standpoint of customer value and service and concept of operations, even though such bid may not, on its face, appear to be the lowest price. Minority Bidders are encouraged to bid. Bids shall remain subject to acceptance for 60 days after the day of bid opening. Richard Harrison, Vice President of Engineering Northern Kentucky Water District 1001546162

UNTIL:

Date: Time:

April 8, 2010 10:00 a.m., local time

At said place and time, and promptly thereafter, all Bids that have been duly received will be publicly opened and read aloud.

B11

PUBLIC NOTICE The Fuel Stop, Mailing address 4720 Mary Ingles Hwy., Cold Spring, KY 41076 Hereby declares intention(s) to apply for a Schedule B-Retail Beer license(s) no later than March 22, 2010. The business to be licensed will be located at 4720 Mary Ingles Highway, Silver Grove, Kentucky 41085, doing business as The Fuel Stop. The (owner(s); Principal Officers and Directors; Limited Partners; or Members) are as follows: Owner, Delbert Combs of 4680 Mary Ingles, Cold Spring, KY 41076. Any person, association, corporation, or body politic may protest the granting of the license(s) by writing the Office of Alcoholic Beverage Control, 1003 Twilight Trail, Frankfort, KY 406018400, within 30 days of the date of this legal publication.46687

The proposed work is generally described as follows: the furnishing and delivery of various quantities of flowable fill and/or concrete to different work site locations in the Owner’s service area in accordance with specifications prepared by the Northern Kentucky Water District. These work site locations are where the Owner or the Owner’s contractor has made repairs to the water main or other appurtenances. The amount of flowable fill or concrete will vary from work site to work site (typical needs are 2 - 6 yards but could range from ½ - 12+ yards). Bids are to cover the actual quantities of flowable fill and concrete purchased during a one year period beginning May 1, 2010 and shall remain in effect for the entire one-year period regardless of the quantity ordered. The estimated quantities are for Bid comparison only. LEGAL NOTICE Bids will be received on a unit price basis Alexandria Fire District as described in the Contract Documents All Bids must be in accordance with the Bidding Documents on file, and available for examination at: Northern Kentucky Water District, 2835 Crescent Springs Road, Erlanger, Kentucky 41018. Copies of the Bidding Documents may be obtained from the office at the address indicated herein by contacting Denise Manning at (859) 426-2718. There is no charge for these documents. Owner reserves the right to reject any or all Bids, including without limitation the right to reject any or all nonconforming, non-responsive, incomplete, unbalanced, or conditional Bids, to waive informalities, and to reject the Bid of any Bidder if Owner believes that it would not be in the best interest of Owner to make an award to that Bidder. Owner also reserves the right to negotiate with the selected Bidder to such an extent as may be determined by Owner. Also if, in Owner’s opinion, a particular product and/or supplier offer distinct advantages over other Bidders, the Owner may award to a Bidder that is not the lowest. Distinct advantages may include shipping time, standardization or ultimate economy. Owner reserves the right to have separate awards for individual bid items from different Bidders. Owner further reserves the right to reject all bids, to waive any informalities and to negotiate for the modification of any bid, or to accept a bid which is deemed the most desirable and advantageous from the standpoint of customer value and service and concept of operations, even though such bid may not, on its face, appear to be the lowest price. Minority Bidders are encouraged to bid. Bids shall remain subject to acceptance for 60 days after the day of bid opening. Richard Harrison, Vice President of Engineering Northern Kentucky Water District 1001546194

BINGO

To place your ad visit CommunityClassified.com INVITATION TO BIDDERS LEGAL NOTICE SEALED PROPOSALS will be received by the City of Newport, Kentucky, in the Office of the City Clerk located at 998 Monmouth Street, Newport, Kentucky, 41071, until two o’clock (2:00) p.m., on April 8, 2010 and then publicly opened and read aloud in the Multi-Purpose Room, 1st Floor of the Newport Municipal Building for the: "Annual Supplies 2010" Copies of the Specification Documents may be obtained or examined in the Office of the City Clerk, 998 Monmouth Street, Newport, Kentucky 41071. Pursuant to specifications on file in the Office of the City Clerk of the City of Newport two copies of proposals are to be submitted in a sealed envelope labeled as follows: "Annual Supplies 2010" Successful vendor must be an Equal Employment Opportunity Employer, which prohibits discrimination because of race, creed, color, national origin, sex, age, handicap, political affiliation or beliefs. The City of Newport is an Equal Employment Opportunity Employer. In addition, the successful vendor must obtain an Occupational License from the City Finance and Administration Department prior to commencing work. The City of Newport will award the contract to the lowest responsible vendor based upon the Owner’s opinion. The City reserves the right to reject any or all proposal and to waive any informalities or irregularities in the proposals received. Any and all questions dealing with this proposal should be reduced to writing and faxed to Evone Bradley, City Clerk at (859) 292-3669 or emailed to ebradley@newportky.gov. CITY OF NEWPORT, KENTUCKY Q. Evone Bradley, City Clerk. Published on March 25, 2010. 1001546395

will hold an election for the position of property owner representa tive on the Fire District Board on Saturday, June 26, 2010. The election will begin at 11:00 A.M. and end at 2:00 P.M. The election will be held at Alexandria Fire Distrist, 7951 Alexandria Pike, Alexandria, Kentucky 41001. Anyone interested in applying to run for this position can pick up an application at the Alexandria Fire Station, 7951 Alexandria Pike, Alexandria, Kentucky 41001 between 8:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M., Monday to Friday, and return the completed application no later than Monday, May 10, 2010, at 4:00 P.M., to the Alexandria Fire Station, 7951 Alexandria Pike, Alexandria, Kentucky 41001. An applicant must be eighteen (18) years of age, be a property owner residing with the Alexandria Fire District, pay taxes on the property located with the Alexandria Fire District and may not be a member of the Alexandria Fire District Fire Department. Anyone has questions can contact the Fire District Attorney, Thomas A. Wietholter, at his office (513)621-2666. 46151

LEGAL NOTICE The Old Coney Company, Inc., Mailing address 8242 Alexandria Pike, Alexandria, KY 41001 Hereby declares intention (s) to apply for a Retail Beer and Restaurant Wine by the Drink license(s) no later than March 25, 2010. The business to be licensed will be located at 8242 Alexandria Pike, Suite 100, Alexandria, Kentucky 41001, doing business as The Old Coney Company, Inc. The owner(s); Principal Officers and Directors; Limited Partners; or Members) are as follows: President, Susan S. Neltner of 3647 Meadowview Dr., Alexandria, KY 41001; and Vice President Rick D. Neltner of 3647 Meadowview Dr., Alexandria, KY 41001. Any person, association, corporation, or body politic may protest the granting of the license(s) by writing the Office of Alcoholic Beverage Control, 1003 Twilight Trail, Frankfort, KY 406018400, within 30 days of the date of this legal publication. 6376 If you’re looking for buyers, you’re in the right neighborhood. Call Community Classified

513.242.4000


B12

CCF Recorder

On the record

March 25, 2010

DEATHS From B11

Church, 1274 Parkway Ave., West Covington, KY 41016.

Brenda Ratterman

Brenda Sue Ratterman, 55, Covington, died March 16, 2010, at her home. She was disabled. Her brother, John Randolph, sister, Linda Perry and parents, John Russell Randolph and Mildred Randolph, died previously. Survivors include her son, Tom Ratterman of Bellevue; brothers, Ken Randolph of Cincinnati and Roger Randolph of Kettering; sister, Stella Freeman of Kettering; and two grandchildren. Burial was in Baltimore Pike Cemetery, Cincinnati. Memorials: Kenton County Animal Shelter, 1020 Mary Laidley Drive, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017.

Pasquale Romito

Pasquale Joseph Romito, 84, of Covington, formerly of Newport, died March 16, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He was a mail clerk supervisor for the Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Corryville. He was a member of St. Ann Mission Church, West Covington, and a life member of the Disabled American Veterans. He was also a WW II Army Veteran. His wife, Mary Lee Bertke Romito, died previously. Survivors include his sons, David William Romito of Edgewood and Mark Allen Romito of Florence; brother, John V. Romito of Covington; four grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. Burial was in St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas. Memorials: St. Ann Mission

Realty in Newport, she was a member of the Northern Kentucky Board of Realtors, the Newport High School Alumni Association, and she was a Kentucky Colonel. Her husband, Richard Schmidt, died previously. Survivors include her daughter, Cathie Goodwin of Fort Thomas; son, Rick Schmidt of Fort Thomas; and two grandchildren. Burial was in Evergreen Cemetery, Southgate. Memorials: Newport High School Alumni Association, C/O Lois Gore, 148 Hidden Ridge, Cold Spring, KY 41076.

Kevin Ruehl

Kevin B. Ruehl, 51, Southgate, died March 14, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He was a self-employed construction worker. He was active with Newport youth football and the Southgate youth basketball programs and was a member of Squires Auto Club and the Cavalcade of Customs and coached American Legion baseball. Survivors include his wife, Cheryl McKinney Ruehl of Edgewood; son, Kyle Ruehl of Southgate; his mother, Norita Heidman of Cold Spring; his father, Donald Ruehl of Independence; sisters, Cathy Ruehl and Denise Ruehl, both of Cold Spring, and Monica Seibert of Newport; brothers, Greg Ruehl of Burlington and Andrew Ruehl of Alexandria. Memorials: Southgate Lions Club Education Foundation C/O Donna Hoffman 6 Wm. Blatt Ave., Southgate, KY 41071; Kenton County Animal Shelter, 1020 Mary Laidley, Covington, KY 41017, Newport Fire Fighters Youth Football League, 3493 Ridgewood Dr., Erlanger, Ky 41018., or Kyle Ruehl Education Fund C/O Huntington Bank, 2252 Burlington Pike, Burlington, KY 41005.

Catherine Smith

Catherine Ann Smith, 62, Bellevue, died March 12, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. She was a social worker and member of Northern Kentucky Right to Life. Her husband, Edward T. Smith, died previously. Survivors include her son, Edward T. Smith II, of Bellevue; brothers, James N. Borcher and Thomas A. Borcher, both of Cincinnati; sisters, Nancy L. Riley of Williamstown, Ruth A. Smith of Erlanger and Margaret C. Rainey of Hamilton, Ohio. Stith Funeral Home in Florence handled the arrangements.

Jo Ann Stewart

Mary Lou Schmidt

Jo Ann Stewart, 59, Dayton, died March 14, 2010, at her residence. She was a graduate of Dayton High School and a purchasing agent/customer service representative for Riverside Supervalu, Dayton. Survivors include her daughters,

Mary Lou Schmidt, 85, Fort Thomas, died March 19, 2010, at Hospice of the Bluegrass - Northern Kentucky Care Center in Fort Thomas. A Realtor and the owner of Enos

Carrie Downard and Angie Duell, both of Dayton; sister, Rose Kravitz of Kentucky; brothers, Jim Stewart of Georgia, Tom Stewart of Indiana and Dick Stewart of Ohio; and two grandchildren. Memorials: American Cancer Society, 297 Buttermilk Pike, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017.

James Sullivan

James D. Sullivan, 63, Cold Spring, died March 16, 2010, at Hospice of St. Elizabeth Health Care. He worked for Interstate Brand Corp. in Cincinnati, was a Vietnam War Army veteran, recipient of a Purple Heart and Bronze Star, a Free Mason and a member of the National Rifle Association. Survivors include his wife, Maria Sullivan of Cold Spring; daughters, Jamie Sullivan of Independence; Virginia Riggs-Horton of Earl, Ky., Peggy Holbrook of Florence, Melissa Sullivan of Newport; brothers, Harold Sullivan of Newport, Gary Sullivan of Dayton; sister, Connie Cooper of Walton; eight grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. Memorials: James Sullivan Memorial c/o Maria Sullivan at Citizens Bank in Highland Heights.

Lloyd Tarvin

Lloyd W. Tarvin, 94, California, died March 20, 2010, at his home. He was the owner of Tarvin’s Handy Liquor Store in Newport. As a member of the Army Air Corps in World War II, he won a commendation with his fellow mechanics from his commanding general, Brig. Gen. Isaac Ott, for

shattering the world record for repairing and overhauling aircraft engines at his Air Service Command depot in England. His first wife, Edith Tarvin, and his second wife, Imogene Tarvin, died previously. Survivors include his sons, Gregory Tarvin of Alexandria and Curtis Tarvin of Cape Coral, Fla.; daughters, Carol Baker of California and Susan Booth of Florence; stepdaughter, Shelley Koontz of Bonner, Mont.; sisters, Thelma Weckbach and Virginia Miller, both of California; three grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. Burial was in Mount Gilead Cemetery in Carthage. Memorials: Hospice of the Bluegrass, 7388 Turfway Road, Florence, KY 41042.

Margie Thomas

Margie Thomas, 81, Fort Thomas, died March 19, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. She was owner of F & N Steakhouse in Dayton. She was an active volunteer and supporter of The Point/ARC, Covington, and a member of St. Catherine of Siena Church in Fort Thomas. Her husband, Eugene Thomas, and sister, Helen Senter, died previously. Survivors include her daughter, Margene Grizzell of Fort Thomas, and two grandchildren. Burial was in Mother of God Cemetery. Memorials: The Point/ARC of Northern Kentucky, Activities Program in memory of Margie Thomas, 104 Pike St., Covington, KY 41011.

Shirley Thornton

Shirley Winter Thornton, 64, Brooksville, died March 19, 2010, at Meadowview Regional Medical Center. Survivors include her husband, Frank Thornton Sr.; son Frank “Mickey” Thornton Jr. of Maysville; sisters, JoAnn Winter Edie of Brooksville and Donna Sue Winter Smith of Newport; brother, James Lloyd Winter of Calvin, Ky.; and three grandchildren. Burial was in Lenoxburg Cemetery.

Richard Wahler

Richard A. Wahler, 84, Newport, died March 6, 2010, at Hospice of the Bluegrass Care Center in Fort Thomas. He was an exam auditor and an Army veteran of World War II and the Korean War. Survivors include his brothers, Donald H. Wahler of Minneapolis, Thomas ‘Duke’ Wahler of Kingman, Ariz., and Robert Wahler of Hixson, Tenn. Serenity Funeral Care handled the arrangements.

Gerald Wight III

Gerald F. “Jay” Wight III, 51, Dayton, died March 18, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. He was a truck driver for Furniture Fair. Survivors include his son, Jeremy Wight of Bellevue; sisters, Bunny McCray of Cold Spring; Susan Hood of Lexington, S.C., and Tonia Scholl of Fort Thomas; companion, Beverly Markwell, and two grandchildren. Burial was in Evergreen Cemetery in Southgate. Memorials: American Cancer Society, 297 Buttermilk Pike, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017.

Former senator, attorney Donald Johnson always put others first Donald “Don” L. Johnson, 79, often went out of his way to help others throughout his life. Hundreds of the people whose lives he touched waited up to two hours in line Thursday, March 11, at Muehlenkamp-Erschell Funeral Home to say goodbye to Don, who passed away Sunday, March 7, at Hospice of the Bluegrass in Fort Thomas. Don practiced law for 46 years, served 16 years as a Kentucky State Senator and served on the Kentucky Board

of Governors’ from 1980 to 1987. In 1996, he served as a Special Kentucky Supreme Johnson Court Justice. Don’s son, attorney Richard “Hutch” Johnson, said his father, who was raised in Newport, always wanted to do what he could for others. “He was very fair with people and down to earth,” Hutch said. “He wanted to

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help out everyone from his old neighborhood in Newport.” As an adult, Don moved to Fort Thomas where he lived and raised his family for 40 years. “Dad never forgot his roots and always helped people out to get people on their feet,” said Don’s son Hank Johnson. “He worked his whole life so we could have things he never had.” Covington attorney Phil Taliaferro said even though they came from different political parties, Don helped and protected him early in

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son of Melbourne and Richard “Hutch” Johnson of Fort Thomas, mother, Iva Johnson of Cincinnati; sister, Beverly Kowolonek of Florence; brother, Henry Johnson Jr. of Lexington and five grandchildren. Memorials can be made to the Hospice of the Bluegrass Northern Kentucky, 7388 Turfway Road, Florence, KY 41042 or the Alzheimer's Association, 644 Linn St. Suite 1026. Cincinnati, OH 45203. Online condolences are at www.dmefuneral.com.

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“Both parties would call upon him for his legislative expertise and wisdom,” Stephenson said. “He often brought about compromise and was a statesman in the legislature.” “We could all take a lesson from his life.” Steve Belmont, a friend of the family, said Don lived his life in service of others. “I was proud to have known and loved him,” Belmont said. Don is survived by his wife,Barbara Stadtmiller Johnson; sons, Hank John-

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