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CAMPBELL COUNTY RECORDER THURSDAY, JANUARY 24, 2013

NORTHERN KENTUCKY SENIOR GAMES B1

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County pension rate decline a first By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

Local government contributions to pension funds for public employees have been on a steady increase for 10 years until 2013. “They have provided us with our contribution rates for next year, and inexplicably they’re going down,” said Campbell County Administrator Robert Horine. Employees from cities, the county, and other entities, including fire districts, pay into

the County Employees Retirement System (CERS), which is one part of the Kentucky Retirement Systems. The statecontrolled Kentucky Retirement Systems sets pension contribution rates for all the pension funds, Horine said. According to the website https://www.kyret.ky.gov/, KRS “is responsible for member investments and benefits for over 337,000 government employees.” The confusion about the CERS rates going down is in reaction to the overall state pen-

sion system being underfunded, he said. CERS has been on a “10year ramp up” in pension contribution rates to become fully funded, and is in better shape financially than the state workers’ retirement fund, Horine said. The county anticipates paying $1.5 million in pension contributions in 2013, up 23 percent just from the 2009 contribution of $1.22 million, he said. Apparently, the 2013 rate decrease was achieved over anticipated savings on the health insurance side, Horine said.

The point is not that the county wants to pay more in pension contributions, he said. “We’re like wait a minute, when you’re in a hole, you don’t dig the hole deeper,” Horine said. Horine said he and others don’t understand why the state pension board didn’t at least hold rates the same. The rates of pension contribution are based upon a percentage of match an employees’ salary. There are separate rates for hazardous employees including police and firefighters,

and non-hazardous employees. The non-hazardous rate will decrease in 2013 to 18.89 percent, down from the 19.55 percent from 2012. The 2013 hazardous rate will be 35.7 percent, down from the 2012 rate of 37.6 percent. Horine said he expects rates to continue to increase in future years as they have in the past, but the unexpected break is welcome. “This is a fluke, this does not mean we’re out of the woods,” he said. “This means that we’re just following the formula.”

Residents still opposed to sewer line By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

FORT WRIGHT — A group of Camp Springs residents opposing plans to build a main sewer line through farms in the historic community reiterated their displeasure to the board of Sanitation District No. 1 of Northern Kentucky Tuesday, Jan. 15. Residents of the community have been speaking out to SD1 against the plans to build the force main sewer line since July 2010. The planned project to build a force main sewer line from Silver Grove to Alexandria through Camp Springs is scheduled for completion by 2014, but construction has not started yet. “We are standing firm that we are opposed to it, it will ruin the culture of our historic community as well as a lot of affects to our businesses, agri-tourism," said Anna Zinkhon, who owns a horse farm in Camp Springs. "It goes against the Campbell County Comprehensive Plan." Zinkhon said a group of residents is working with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and will be bringing in the Sierra Club on the issue. “We want you to understand you’re going to spend a lot of money disagreeing with us,” she said. “Your money would be better spent taking the project around us.” SD1 board chairperson Chuck Heilman, who is also a Camp Springs resident, said the project was initiated prior to his arrival on the board, but that he has worked with staff on the project extensively. The route SD1 is pursuing goes straight up Four Mile Road, and is a “pretty straight shot” from Silver Grove to the Riley Road pump station in Alexandria, Heilman said.

COMFORT FOOD Rita shares recipes for Quick sloppy Joes, Ellen’s orzo-roni and Blender banana bread. B3

“So, we’re talking about substantially more money for going the other routes,” Heilman said. After the meeting, Heilman said he is not sure, as far along into the project is, what the options are with regards to considering other alternatives. According to Jamie Holtzapfel, communications director for SD1, the selected Four Mile Road route will cost an estimated $5.7 million. Estimates from 2011 for the alternate routes range from $12.95 million to $14 million because of new pump stations that will need to be built to push the contents of the pipe uphill, according to Holtzapfel. The alternate routes are to either take a pipe from Silver Grove up Dodsworth Lane to East Alexandria Pike to the AA Highway or to have the pipe go from Silver Grove through Melbourne up Ten Mile Creek Road to Fender Road and then back to the Riley Road pump station. Mark Ramler, of Newport, who was born and raised in Camp Springs and has written a book of preservation guidelines for Camp Springs while obtaining a degree in historic preservation from the University of Kentucky, said the sewer pipe risks too much. There are 27 properties in Camp Springs on the National Register of Historic Places, Ramler said. “Of these 27 properties there’s about a dozen of them along Four Mile Road and Four Mile Creek.” he said. “It’s the lifeblood of our community. These are a rare group of German vernacular stone buildings.” Ramler said Four Mile Road is the only state desigSee SEWER, Page A2

CHANGE YOUR 'MINDSET' Campbell County Schools wants everyone in the community to both read “Mindset.” A3

Tyler Poirier arranges books inside the Bellevue Book Nook, a Little Free Library she created in front of St. John United Church of Christ in Bellevue as her Girl Scout Gold Award project. AMANDA JOERING/COMMUNITY RECORDER

Girl Scout builds first N. Ky. Little Free Library By Amanda Joering ajoering@nky.com

BELLEVUE — Thanks to the work of one local Girl Scout, Bellevue is now the home of Northern Kentucky’s first Little Free Library. Last year, Walnut Hills High School senior, Tyler Poirier, began looking for ideas for projects she could do to earn her Girl Scout Gold Award. The project had to be something that benefited the community and would be sustainable. In her research, Tyler said she came across the Little Free Library, a worldwide nonprofit, community movement with a mission to promote literacy and a love of reading by building free book exchanges. “I thought creating a Little Free Library would be a great project for me because I love books and I love reading,” Tyler said. While she lives in Cincinnati, Tyler and her family attend St. John United Church of Christ in Bellevue, where she is a member of the dream team, whose

focus is community outreach. Tyler said that by building the library outside the church in Bellevue, she figured she could tie in both her gold award project and her work with the dream team. After getting approval from the Girl Scout Council in September, Tyler got to work on drawing up plans and constructing the Bellevue Book Nook, a small, free library where people can get books and donate their unwanted books. Tyler said with the location front of her church, at 520 Fairfield Ave., she thought it would be really convenient and noticeable to people walking and driving through the city. After collecting book donations from family, friends and church members, Tyler stocked the Book Nook and opened it to the public earlier this month. Right away, the Book Nook, which features books of all genres for all ages, was a hit. “Three days after it opened, 75 percent of the books were gone,” said Penny Poirier, Tyler’s mom and Girl Scout leader. For the Postmaster

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“I love reading, so I don’t think there is anything better than to be able to walk by this library and grab a book.” To keep the library stocked, Tyler placed a book case in the front hall of the church, where she is keeping more donated books. Penny said she is happy with the way her daughter’s project came together. “I’m thrilled that she was able to find something that she liked and that everyone was willing to get behind,” said Penny. “The church has been really supportive of this project.” While the Book Nook is open, it’s still a work in progress since Tyler plans to add landscaping around it, put a logo on the side and put up shingles on the roof, Penny said. Soon, Tyler said she will be going back in front of the Girl Scout Council, who will review her project and hopefully present her with the gold award, the highest achievement in Girl Scouts. For more information, visit www.littlefreelibrary.org.

The Campbell County Recorder 654 Highland Suite 27 Fort Thomas, KY 41075

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Vol. 34 No. 51 © 2013 The Community Recorder ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


NEWS

A2 • CAMPBELL COUNTY RECORDER • JANUARY 24, 2013

Daley retiring as fire chief Board of Trustees meeting, and the board accepted his resignation and retirement at the Jan. 17 meeting. Daley's resignation is effective Feb. 28. Board chairperson Gary McCormick said Daley has been talking about retiring for a while, and a search is on for another full-time chief. It's time to create a new budget, so a new chief is needed soon, McCormick said. "We need to not drag our feet, we need to get it done," he said. There is a Feb. 11 deadline for applicants for the chief position. McCormick declined to release Daley's letter of resignation at this time.

By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

MENTOR — A search for the third chief of Campbell County Fire District No. 1 since it was created by a merger of three fire departments in 2002 is under way with the retirement of Chief John Daley. Daley offered to resign at the December

Index Calendar .................B2 Classifieds ................C Food ......................B3 Life ........................B1 Police .................... B8 Schools ..................A3 Sports ....................A4 Viewpoints .............A7

Board member Anna Zinkhon made a motion that the board passed unanimously to approve the resignation and accompanying letter with "all the conditions set in it." Daley said he was the first paid chief for the fire district, and he has decided to retire. He has been chief for eight-anda-half years. The first chief when the district was formed was Tom Pelle, a volunteer. "We've really grown a lot and we started with two 40-hour people, and we grew to eight fulltime including myself," Daley said. The district also has 14 part-time staff. "We have round-theclock people," he said.

There are always at least two people on duty at all hours, Daley said. The three district fire stations are in Camp Springs, Silver Grove and Mentor. The fire district covers a 41-squaremile area, he said. The district also provides ambulance service for Melbourne, a city that has its own volunteer fire district. In a typical year, there are about 480 ambulance or "squad" runs a year and 240 calls for fire service, Daley said. One of the biggest challenges facing the district is budgeting, he said. Paying state medical and pension contributions, not counting salaries, is fully a fifth of the district's about $1 million

St. Philip Ladies Stagette

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Classified

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MELBOURNE — An afternoon for ladies has been organized at St. Philip Parish in Melbourne from 2-6 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 10. The doors for the St. Philip Ladies Stagette will open at 1 p.m., and there will be bingo, raffles, prizes and dinner and desserts. Tickets are prepaid only and $15 per person. For information call Theresa at (859) 635-6080.

Koenig leads NKY legislators

Rep. Adam Koenig, R-

To place an ad in Community Classified, call 283-7290.

Erlanger, has been elected by the Northern Kentucky Legislative Caucus as the caucus chairperson for 2013-14’. There are 16 members including senators and representatives comprising the Northern Kentucky caucus, according to a news release from the Northern Kentucky Area Development District. Koenig represents the 69th house district, which encompasses the far southwestern portion of Campbell County, the southernmost and western portions of Kenton County, and parts of Boone County. For information about the legislators including contact information and descriptions of what areas they represent visit the Kentucky Legislative Research Commission website www.lrc.ky.gov.

Event stresses horses and helmets

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of trust me," Daley said. People living within the fire district seem to be very fire-conscious, and fires are at a minimum usually, he said. There have been no fatalities of firefighters in the district, and only a few minor injuries during his time as chief, Daley said. Maintaining volunteers is a challenge every fire department is having right now, and it is why the fire district has had to expand the paid staff, he said. "The next person is going to have that challenge too," Daley said. Volunteer numbers are dwindling, he said. "We still have enough to function, and we're still dependent on them," he said.

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annual budget, he said. Hurting the district is the fact that it was legally created when three districts merged after a state deadline pertaining to buying medical insurance had passed. The state law requires the district to take the state medical plan, but older entities had the option to opt-out of it, he said. "We can't actively go out and shop the medical rates," Daley said. During his time as chief the district bought lots of firefighting apparatus including two new ambulances, two new fire pumpers and one new firefighting tanker truck, he said. "I've had a great relationship with my board members, they put a lot

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nated scenic highway in the county. “The residents of Camp Springs are not against development, nor are they against SD1, but we are against hasty and irresponsible planning that jeapordizes an entire community,” he said. Ramler said the advice of the county’s comprehensive plan to evaluate adverse impacts on viable farmland during decisionmaking processes, also needs to be followed. “By proposing this force main through the historically significant farming community of Camp Springs, I think SD1 is disregarding the Campbell County master plan” he said. Ramler said the Camp Springs valley was likely chosen by SD1 because it is the cheapest option, but that is a “narrow-minded and short-range approach.” “This project jeopar-

stallment of the helmet safety symposium Riders4Helmets, according to a news release from the horse council. Camp Springs area resident Anna Zinkhon, president of the horse council, said the event will appeal to people throughout Kentucky, is meant to attract people from the Northern Kentucky especially. “Education about safety while around horses, including the protection that helmets provide to riders, is an important part of owning and riding horses,” Zinkhon said in the news release. “This symposium brings together national experts in helmet safety.” Representatives from various corners of the equestrian world will discuss the importance of wearing helmets, rider safety and education, and improving helmet design, according to the news release. Some of the specific symposium topics include: » Traumatic brain injuries and concussions: The latest research, long term effects and revolutionary technologies. » Helmets in the Western world. » Helmets on the trail. » Youth education.

» Gaining acceptance in the equestrian community for helmet use. » Current helmet rules: Clarification across the disciplines. For information visit the website www.kentuckyhorse.org.

dizes our growing agritourism community, our working farms, our significant historic resources and our quality of life,” he said. “You cannot put a price on that.” Kevin Neltner, operator of Neltner Farm in Camp Springs, said other businesses have received variances to take the pipe under the road or around their property, and he has not. “I think I’ve been treated just like a little farm,” Neltner said. Thousands of people visit the farm every fall, which is also a major producer of vegetables for consumers, he said. The pipe will “zig-zag” through his fields and goes behind his greenhouse. “One of those pipes breaks, I’m done,” Neltner said. “Whose going to eat a tomato that had (waste) on it.” New SD1 board members Rick Wessels and Garth Kuhnhein said the issue of the unhappiness of Camp Springs residents was new to them.

Wessels said the board just approved a financial bond related to the project last month. “I guess I was under the impression that there was widespread support,” Wessels said. Wessels said he wanted more information about the project before talking about considering other routes. SD1’s executive director David E. Rager said staff will come back and present the project to the board again and cover why the route was picked, how previous decisions were made, what the options are and where the agency is on regulatory compliance. “We’re kind of at the 11th hour,” Rager said. SD1 is still in the process of talking to property owners for easements – and some people have signed agreements. “But for those who say, wait a minute, I want to hear what the board has to say, we’ll respect that until we figure out what the board’s decision is,” he said.

Fire department Valentine’s dance

ALEXANDRIA — A community Valentine’s dance will be at the Alexandria Fire Department, 7951 Alexandria Pike, from Saturday, Feb. 9. The evening will begin with a happy hour from 6-7 p.m. Dinner will be served from 7-8 p.m., and dancing will be from 8 p.m. until midnight. The cost for tickets in advance is $65 per couple or $35 per person. People purchasing a ticket at the door the evening are not guaranteed dinner, according to a news release from the fire department. Tickets at the door will cots $75 per couple or $45 per person. There will be an open bar the entire night with music by Young’s DJ Service and food by Express Catering. For tickets call Sandy at the firehouse Monday through Friday at (859) 635-5991 or stop in the office in person.


SCHOOLS

JANUARY 24, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • A3

COMMUNITY

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Editor: Michelle Shaw, mshaw@nky.com, 578-1053

ACHIEVEMENTS | NEWS | ACTIVITIES | HONORS

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School asks community to discuss 'Mindset' By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

ALEXANDRIA — Campbell County Schools wants everyone in the community to both read “Mindset” and buy into the book’s message of believing success is attainable with some effort. The district is sponsoring a community-wide book study of “Mindset: The New Psychology of Success” by Carol Dweck. A kickoff event has been planned at the Alexandria Education Center, 51 Orchard Lane, from 6:30-7:30 p.m. Monday, Jan. 28. “We want everyone on board, not just teachers in a classroom,” said Associate Superintendent Shelli Wilson. The book speaks to multiple audiences, and helps people think about how to approach learning in all situations and apply a growth mindset, Wilson said. “In this book there is a chapter that speaks to parents, it speaks to coaches, it speaks to classroom teachers,” she said. It’s a way of looking at challenges, and how to continuously improve in anything a person does in life, Wilson said. “Your mindset can frame

Join the discussion Opportunities to participate in online book discussions for “Mindset” will be offered throughout February and March. A final book discussion and public panel will be announced later for a date in March. Registration for the book study group started at the district website http:// www.campbellcountyschools.org/ Jan. 14.

how you approach every task in life,” she said. The district is committed to creating a growth mindset in each student, said Connie Pohlgeers, director of school improvement and community education. The idea of taking positive risks and setting goals is something important to educate the entire community about, Pohlgeers said. Focusing on honing new skills and hard work paying off are values the book promotes, she said. “It’s the whole idea of you are only limited by what you think you can do,” Pohlgeers said.

Prospective students invited to Holy Trinity open house By Amanda Joering ajoering@nky.com

Holy Trinity Elementary and Junior High Schools are showing what they have to offer prospective students at an upcoming open house Sunday, Jan. 27. The event, which allows for the families of current students to see what they are working on, also gives those who are interesting in learning more about Holy Trinity an chance to see what the schools are all about, said Principal Jeff Finke. “We use this opportunity to show parents what we have to offer and why Holy Trinity is a great place to educate children,” Finke said. Finke said during the event, prospective students and their families will be assigned to a current student or family, who will show them around the school, introduce them to teachers, administrators and other families and help them get registration information. Amy Hennekes, president of the school’s Parents’ Club, which will be represented at the event, said the open house is a

great chance for prospective parents to talk to current parents about why they chose Holy Trinity and get an idea of what they can expect at the school. “We pay tuition to send our kids to a private school, but the benefit you get for the tuition at Holy Trinity is much more than just education,” Hennekes said. “Here, we are like a family, and we all support each other.” Holy Trinity, which serves the parishes of St. Bernard, Divine Mercy and Holy Spirit, draws in students from Newport, Bellevue, Dayton and beyond, Finke said. Currently, enrollment between the two schools is 130, up from 114 last year, Finke said. “This is the highest enrollment we’ve had in the last six years,” said Finke, who said they still have more room to grow. Prospective families can tour the junior high school, which is grades 6-8, from noon to1p.m. at 840 Washington Ave., Newport and the elementary school, which is kindergarten through fifth grade, from 1:302:30 p.m. at 235 Division St., Bellevue.

SCHOOL NOTES NKU hosts ExploreMore! Enrichment Program

The Northern Kentucky University Institute for Talent Development and Gifted Studies is accepting applications for the spring ExploreMore! Enrichment Program through Monday, Feb. 18. ExploreMore! classes will begin Saturday, March 2 and continue for consecutive Saturdays until March 23. The program, which offers a variety of courses to qualified students, is geared towards students in kindergarten through eighth grade. This spring’s classes include topics such as Canine 101, Gobs

of Goo, Extreme Animals, Avengers Assemble, Beginning Karate, Video Game Design and more. Registration is available online at gifted.nku.edu or by calling 572-5600.

NHS hosts Parents Teachers Talking Together event

Newport High School is hosting a Parents Teacher Talking Together event from 3-7 p.m. Tuesday, March 5. During the event, parents will have a chance to talk to teachers about their children. For more information, contact Kathy Roberts at 292-3023.

Campbell Ridge Elementary School fourth-grader and Alexandria resident Taylor Fry holds a carton of milk Tuesday, Jan. 15, she used as inspiration for her first place winning entry in the Kentucky Farm to School art contest. CHRIS MAYHEW/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Fry cooks up winning art poster By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

ALEXANDRIA — Taylor Fry, a fourth-grader at Campbell Ridge Elementary School, has won first place in the Kentucky “Farm to School” art contest. Fry said she looked at the “TruMoo” milk carton she drinks at school and visualized how it got to her cafeteria tray. “I used to live on a farm and have cows, and my dad worked on a dairy farm,” she said. Fry said she decided to show in pictures how the milk came from cows in a field, was sent to a store and then to the school since the motto of the contest was “Farm to School.” Receiving news of winning the state contest was unexpected and surprising, she said. “Because we have a lot of good artists in my class,” Fry said. Patricia Sullivan, the school’s nutrition manager, said many students created excellent posters, but Fry really understood and showed the purpose behind the contest. Farm to School is an initiative to bring local farm products and schools together, according to Kentucky program page on the national website www.farmtoschool.org. Sullivan said a first ever “Farm to School” Day Oct. 17, was connected with the art contest to show children about where food comes from. The day included a live cow calf, a bee hive, and demonstrations about canning, she said. Chickens brought for the day actually laid eggs that day while at the school, Sullivan said. “We try to teach the kids it’s not a matter of just going to the store and buying food,”

A picture of Campbell Ridge Elementary School fourth-grade student Taylor Fry's winning state "Farm to School" 2012 art contest entry. Fry is a resident of Alexandria. THANKS TO STEPHANIE CALDWELL

she said. Sullivan works in the cafeteria at Campbell Ridge. Many students, even ones who come from local farms, often don’t clearly understand where their food is coming from, she said. Sullivan said Campbell Ridge art teacher Julie Burkhardt deserves credit for directing students to create entries for the contest. A selection of 30 other pictures created by students for the contest will be displayed on the walls of the cafeteria. Stephanie Caldwell, the district’s food service director, said students from three grades at Campbell Ridge entered the contest, and she was

glad to have the art teacher encouraging students to enter. Jim Whaley, a chef for Jefferson County Public Schools in Louisville, will visit Campbell Ridge and the district’s food service director because of Fry’s winning entry, according to a news release from Campbell County Schools. Fry’s artwork winning the contest is a big achievement because hundreds of students from around Kentucky created entries, Sullivan said. Fry also receives $50 for her winning entry. “We are just really, really proud of her, and it was a great piece,” she said.


SPORTS

A4 • CCF RECORDER • JANUARY 24, 2013

Editor: Melanie Laughman, mlaughman@communitypress.com, 513-248-7573

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | RECREATIONAL

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Wagner thrilled to be at NCC

County has 3 recent head coach changes By James Weber jweber@nky.com

NEWPORT — Dan Wagner has been a longtime member of the Newport Central Catholic family, but his favorite moment of last week involved his immediate family. Wagner was named as new head football coach at NewCath last week, moving up from defensive coordinator after Eddie Eviston left to become offensive coordinator at Georgetown

College, his alma mater. Eviston led the Thoroughbreds to two Class 2A state championships in his three seasons and was 35-8 overall. “It’s special,” Wagner said. “They don’t do this very often up there. It’s something I’ve always wanted to do dating back to way back then. When all was said and done, the best thing was telling my mom and dad I got the job; it was the neatest thing. I’m fortunate enough to still have them around.” Wagner was defensive coordinator for NCC since 1999, working under both Eviston and Bob Schneider, who retired

after the 2009 season and is tie for second in Kentucky with 345 wins. A 1978 NewCath graduate, Wagner played for Schneider and started coaching the freshman team at NCC in 1980. Before returning to NewCath in 1999, Wagner coached at Campbell County, Norwood and Indian Hill high schools. But part of his mind was always on top of the hill overlooking the downtown Cincinnati skyline. “I like the way it feels like home,” he said. “You can talk to anyone who went there and it’s See COACH, Page A6

NCC head football coach Dan Wagner talks to players after getting the job. THANKS TO MARY CIAFARDINI

Versatile Brossart gets results By Adam Turer

presspreps@gmail.com

It was a familiar result, but it never gets old. For the 10th time in 11 years, Bishop Brossart’s boys basketball team won the 10th Region All “A” Classic. This year’s edition of the Mustangs is off to a 17-3 start while doing things differently than previous teams. “We’re a much more versatile team than we have been the last couple of years,” said head coach Mike Code. Despite the fact that there are only two seniors on the roster — guard Ben Uebel and forward Justin Saunders — the Mustangs are not short on varsity experience. Most of the juniors on this year’s squad played significant varsity minutes as sophomores a season ago. “Even though we only have two seniors, we’re actually more experienced than we were last year,” said Code. Uebel’s play has been a difference-maker. The point guard is playing with the confidence that comes after having a full year of starting under his belt. The stability he provides at the point has allowed the offense to thrive through his facilitation. “He has really improved,” Code said. “He’s much more confident this year. There’s

not a lot you can show him that he hasn’t seen in his year and a half of experience.” Junior guard Jake Jennings has provided a lift off of the bench. Junior forward Erik Rieger’s improvement has been a pleasant surprise. Finding contributions from the roster’s depth has helped the Mustangs through some early season adjustments. “We changed a few things,” said Code. “It took us a little while to get used to it.” The biggest difference for the Mustangs this year has been their transition offense. With athletic big men, the Mustangs do not want to slow the game down and feed the post. Instead, they want to outrun teams with slower post players. “We want to get out and run more than we have in years past,” Code said. “We have very mobile posts and we want to take advantage of that.” Brossart will face a familiar foe in the first round of the Touchstone Energy All “A” Classic. Last year, Louisville Collegiate defeated Brossart in the All “A” Classic. The Mustangs will once again face the Seventh Region champions in the first round of the state tournament. The teams tip off at 1 p.m. on Thursday, Jan. 24.

NewCath celebrates at the end of its regional title game. JAMES WEBER/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

‘Breds head to All ‘A’ state

The Newport Central Catholic boys basketball team is returning to the All “A” Classic state tournament after a oneyear absence after beating Newport 61-54 Jan. 19 at Bellevue. Michael Bueter broke a 48-48 tie with a three-pointer and the Thoroughbreds held off the Wildcats. NCC starts play Thursday, Jan. 24, in Frankfort.

PRESS PREPS HIGHLIGHTS By James Weber jweber@nky.com

This Week’s MVP

» Michael Bueter (NewCath) and Justin Saunders (Brossart) for being tourney MVP in the All “A” regionals.

Sweet 16

» The Draw Show for the 2013 KHSAA Boys’ and Houchens Industries/KHSAA Girls’ State Basketball Tournaments will be Friday, Jan. 25, at 1 p.m. CWKYT (Ch. 14) in Lexington will provide a live broadcast of the pairings, with a live feed available online at www.khsaa.tv. Brackets with official times and pairings will be posted to the Riherd’s/KHSAA Scoreboard and the KHSAA website at the conclusion of the program. The 2013 Boys’

Sweet 16® will be held March 6-10 at Rupp Arena in Lexington, with the Houchens Industries/KHSAA Girls Sweet 16® taking place March 13-16 at E.A. Diddle Arena in Bowling Green.

Boys basketball

» St. Henry beat Dayton 69-29 Jan. 17. » Campbell County beat Nicholas County Jan.19, 77-58. Corey Holbrook and Deondre Jackson had 13 points apiece. » Highlands beat Campbell County 56-52 Jan. 17. » NewCath beat Bellevue 73-31Jan.17 in the All “A” tourney. Jake Schulte had 13 points. » Newport beat Ludlow 8844 in the All “A” tourney. Jasean Short had 26 points and Jaquan Short 16. Newport See HIGHLIGHTS, Page A5

Newport’s Aroyal Wright tries to shoot past NewCath’s Jake Schulte. NCC beat Newport 61-54 in the All “A” Ninth Region final Jan. 19 at Bellevue. JAMES WEBER/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

NCC senior Michael Bueter hits the eventual game-winning three-pointer to break a 48-48 tie. NCC beat Newport 61-54 in the All “A” Ninth Region final Jan. 19 at Bellevue. JAMES WEBER/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER


SPORTS & RECREATION

JANUARY 24, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • A5

Breds, Bluebirds bowlers surge into regionals By James Weber jweber@nky.com

CAMPBELL COUNTY —

The boys bowling team at Newport Central Catholic has been good under pressure. So when the stakes reached their peak, the Thoroughbreds used their confidence to edge rival Highlands in the last match of the regular season Jan. 17 at Walt’s Center in Newport. NCC won 4-3 over Highlands, pulling into a final tie with the Bluebirds for the regular-season Division 2 title. Both teams were 6-2 in district play, and NewCath finished 37-26 in points while Highlands finished 58-12. “I’m glad that we won to end it for the seniors on a good note before we go into the regionals,” said freshman Bobby Meyer. “Our team is really close together. We’re all closely knit.” Highlands dominated play after two team combined games and led by 274 pins, eventually winning a third point for total pins. But NewCath won the final four games in the match to claim the overall win. The final two games were in the Baker system, in which five teammates roll two frames apiece for one score. NewCath won 194168 then 201-169 in the deciding contests. “Everybody has done

a great job,” said NCC boys coach Denny Barnes. “I have kids who never bowled before and they’re learning and doing a great job. We’re usually not good at Baker games. Today, we averaged 195 and If we can do that, we’ll make some hay.” The upcoming regional tournament is decided on Baker games. “They’re decent bowlers. Bakers is just a different game,” Barnes said. “They’re not used to moving lanes. It takes them longer to adjust and you don’t have time to adjust.” Meyer, a freshman, was the anchor bowler in the Baker games and had to perform in the 10th frame in both contests to clinch the win. “It’s not that much pressure unless you need a strike in the 10th frame,” he said. “I just try to go out and throw a strike.” Grosser, a senior, is one of five seniors and one of the leaders who have experience with pressure. Grosser split time last fall playing goalkeeper in soccer and being the placekicker for NewCath’s state champion football squad. He is one of five Thoroughbreds averaging in the 160’s or 170’s. “It helps, especially in Bakers because you’re on the spot to throw one strike and set up the next

“I’m glad that we won to end it for the seniors on a good note before we go into the regionals.” BOBBY MEYER

person,” Grosser said. “Getting used to the pressure in football and soccer is defintitely preparing me for this.” In NewCath’s two team wins, Luke Holtz (193), Ty Meyer (166) and Joey Niehaus (152) edged Highlands 511-508 in one. Bobby Meyer (213), Elliot Rust (201) and Max McHugh (181) bounced back to beat their averages for a 595-515 win. Highlands is led by freshman Jake Farley, who averages 214 for the year. Brack Tucker and Brandon Caruso each average 189. Farley placed ninth in last year’s Region 5 singles tournament, just shy of a medal. “I’ve been very impressed with Jake Farley,” said Highlands head coach Glenn Schmidt. “He’s done very well. He finished high as an eighth-grader and this year he’s even stronger and I hope he can do even better.” Tucker had a 241 and 192 against NewCath and Farley shot 217-199. Nick Mester shot a 224 and Ja-

mie Killen 215 in the Bluebirds’ early wins. The Bluebirds also have high hopes for the Region 5 tournaments this year. The individual championship was Jan. 22 after Recorder print deadlines, and the team tournament is Wednesday, Jan. 30. All regionals are at Super Bowl Bellewood in Newport. Campbell County and Simon Kenton have been the top teams in Region 5 but neither one had a match at Bellewood this season, nor have Highlands and NewCath. “Our goal is to go to the state tournament and I think we can do it,” Schmidt said. “Campbell and Simon are in our region and with it being a neutral site, we’ll all be on an even playing ground. It’ll be an interesting regional tournament.” The NewCath girls team beat Highlands in similar fashion, winning four of the games and losing total pins for a 4-3 win. NCC finished 35-21 in points and 4-3 in district play. Highlands is 26-37 and 3-4. Newport won Division 2. Senior Olivia Heitzman had a 165 and 140 to lead NCC in solo games. Katelyn Schneider posted a168 and 161 for Highlands. Follow James on Twitter @RecorderWeber and check out more coverage at nky.com/preps.

HIGHLIGHTS Continued from Page A4

then beat Holy Cross 5554 in the semis. Jasean Short had the winning free throw with 0.4 seconds to go. Aroyal Wright had 17 points. Newport lost 61-54 to NewCath in the finals.

Girls basketball

» Beechwood beat Newport 64-44 Jan. 15. » Dixie Heights beat Dayton 62-25 Jan. 17. » Scott beat Campbell County 77-72 Jan. 18 in 37th District play. » Villa Madonna beat Bellevue 35-25 Jan. 15. » Brossart beat Holmes 60-54 Jan. 15. Sarah Futscher had 27 points and Abby Stadtmiller, 10. » Dayton beat Calvary Christian 41-39 Jan. 15. Hannah Deaton had 13 points. Dayton beat Silver Grove 54-22 Jan. 18, with Danielle Moses scoring 15. » Highlands beat Boone County 60-35 Jan. 15. Jesse Daley had 15 points, Brianna Adler 12, Alex Combs 12 and Leah Schaefer 10. » Newport beat Calvary 47-29 Jan. 17. Courtney Kilburn had 12 points and Katlyn Hoeh, 10. Newport beat Eminence 41-27 Jan. 19 to improve to 10-9.

ty 63, 9. Simon Kenton 56, 10. St. Henry 40, 11. Villa Madonna 32, 12. Beechwood 12, T13. Conner 4, T13. Holmes 4. Girls team scores: 1. Notre Dame 325, 2. Highlands 262, 3. Ryle 171, 4. Dixie Heights 137, 5. Simon Kenton 83, 6. Boone County 80, 7. Scott 76, 8. Beechwood 65, 9. Cooper 61, 10. Holy Cross 53 11. Campbell County 39, 12. St. Henry 31, 13. Holmes 8, 14. Villa Madonna 2

NKU Notes

» Northern Kentucky University’s Tyler White was the Atlantic Sun Conference co-Newcomer of the Week for Jan. 15. White, a freshman guard, netted a career-high 18 points against Lipscomb to lead NKU to a 67-53 victory. NKU hosts Mercer 7 p.m. Thursday and Kennesaw State 7 p.m. Saturday. The women’s team hosts Kennesaw 4:30 p.m. Saturday and Mercer 7 p.m. Monday.

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SPORTS & RECREATION

A6 • CCF RECORDER • JANUARY 24, 2013

NKU selects Hall of Fame inductees Community Recorder

The following individuals have been selected for induction into the David Lee Holt Northern Kentucky University Athletics Hall of Fame. » Craig Sanders, (19982002) men’s basketball » Kristin Koralewski, (2002-04) volleyball » Jason Martin, (19992002) baseball

Coach Continued from Page A4

the same. Everyone knows each other and it’s a comfortable feeling.” Like Eviston, a former NCC standout who was on Schneider’s staff during his final years, the school didn’t have to go far for the next head man. “After meeting with Dan, we knew we had the man we wanted for the job,” said NCC athletic director Rob Detzel. “Dan is a NewCath guy and his record as an assistant speaks for itself. Hiring Coach Wagner will make for a smooth transition for our football program, and we believe he will continue the great tradition that is Newport Central Catholic football.” Wagner said almost the entire coaching staff will return and the team has to find a regular-season game and scrimmage for the 2013 season.

» Shannon Smith, (1995-99) women’s basketball » Kim Keyer-Scott, (2001-05) women’s golf » Stephanie Leimbach, (2002-05) softball » Dr. James Claypool, administrator » Dr. James Votruba, Northern president » Nancy Winstel, women’s basketball head coach

The inductees will be honored Sunday, Feb. 17, in a ceremony at The Bank of Kentucky Center. The cost to attend the induction ceremony, which includes a reception at noon, lunch at 1 p.m. and program at 2 p.m., is $30 per person, or $240 for a table of eight. Call Kurt Moeller at 859572-6632 for ticket information.

NewCath was one of three schools in the county to replace its head football coach so far in January, and the other two also tabbed new leaders with much winning experience. Bellevue appointed Johnny Poynter as its new head coach, replacing Mike Croley, who was 14-10 in two seasons. Poynter, like Wagner, moves up from the defensive coordinator spot at the team. He helped coach Bourbon County to a state championship in 1997 as an assistant, and was head coach at three schools from 2002-11, Pike County Central, Trimble County and Bourbon County. According to Bellevue, Poynter led Pike to a school record for wins, Trimble to its firstever playoff win, and Bourbon to its first winning season in 12 years and first playoff win in 15. Brossart tabbed Lee Teegarden to lead its program. Teegarden, a life-

long Alexandria native, has an extensive coaching background. He was assistant varsity football coach, head junior varsity and head freshmen coach at Campbell County High School from 19982002. He was assistant football coach and offensive coordinator at Ryle High School from 2003-05 while doing his student teaching and working at Gray Middle School as a certified special education teacher. He coordinated both the offense and offensive line. He was head coach at Pendleton County from 2006-2009, improving Pendleton from 0-11 to 7-4 in 2009 before returning to Ryle as offensive coordinator. The 2010 Ryle team scored the third most points in 6A, finishing 12-1 overall. Follow James on Twitter @RecorderWeber and check out more coverage at nky.com/preps.

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VIEWPOINTS

JANUARY 24, 2013 • CAMBELL COUNTY RECORDER • A7

COMMUNITY

RECORDER

Editor: Michelle Shaw, mshaw@nky.com, 578-1053

EDITORIALS | LETTERS | COLUMNS | CH@TROOM

CommunityPress.com

Kentucky cracks Top 10 in education Failure and lagging behind. That used to be Kentucky’s national story when it came to schools, and so the release of any education rankings was cause for embarrassed cringing. No longer. Thanks to decades of hard work and aggressive policy changes, Kentucky has a new reputation: National leader. And it’s a cause of celebration. That new narrative was bolstered and solidified by the recent update of one of the education world’s most respected and comprehensive assessments of school performance and improvement. The publication Education Week – a national, independent source that relies on comprehensive research and current realities – ranked Kentucky 10th in the nation in its annual “Quality Counts” report. The report is based on an assessment of more than 150 key education indicators, and grades states on their education policy efforts and outcomes.

Steve Beshear

Terry Holliday

COMMUNITY PRESS GUEST COLUMNIST

COMMUNITY PRESS GUEST COLUMNIST

The seeds of Kentucky’s improvement were sown with the passage of the Kentucky Education Reform Act in 1990 and later with the approval of 2009’s Senate Bill 1 – both of which demanded significant changes in teaching and assessments. As a result, Kentucky has moved up in the Education Week rankings for the past several years. In 2010, we placed 34th in the nation. Last year we jumped to 14th. And with the 2013 report, Kentucky has broken into the top 10 with a grade of B-, bettering the national average of C+. The highest ranked state was Maryland with a B.

Be a lamp, a lifeboat or a ladder

Learning about International Humanitarian Law (IHL) is relevant, meaningful and useful for young people in all societies, regardless of the absence of war or conflict and understanding our roles and what we can do as a citizen is a helpful tool. We currently have the Dyah Miller highest percentage of COMMUNITY RECORDER GUEST younger generCOLUMNIST ation (those born after 1980) that will shape the future; therefore helping them to understand their roles as a global citizen is paramount. The American Red Cross helps the public, especially younger generations, to understand their world through international humanitarian law education, both in and out of classrooms. This year, the Cincinnati Chapter will join seven other chapters nationally to implement the IHL Peer Education Program for young people. The program will run from Feb. 23 through the end of April and consists of three stages: Explore, Address, and Implement. The main training on Feb. 23-24 will be led by Rachele Tardi, senior adviser for peer education from Washington, D.C., who has a wide range of peer education experience with the British Red Cross. The participants, Team Members (ages 13-17) and Team Mentors (ages 18-25), will be working to explore the importance of protecting the rights of people affected by war, address an IHL-related issue, and implement an action project on what they learned from the training. One team will be selected and sponsored to attend the first National

Youth Conference in Washington, D.C., on June 1-2. The participants will also be able to use this experience to fulfill their service learning hours for school. The application deadline for this program is Feb. 1. One of the great emphases of this project will be role playing, which give young people a personal experience to understand an “abstract” concept such as International Humanitarian Law. Role playing helps to put an idea into a humanitarian perspective. It may be harder to understand an idea, but it’s easier when we put a face into the story. One day I am a shopkeeper in Bangkok, Thailand, who risks losing business for protecting a victim of a street violence. Another day I am a Catholic factory worker who went to incredible lengths to save a Jewish stranger from the Nazis in Germany. The next, I am Grace Lorch, a white woman, who risked her life to escort Elizabeth Eckford through the mob in 1954 in front of Little Rock Central High School. Taking on these roles helps us understand the concept of a “bystander” in conflict and war situation. International Humanitarian Law is not only relevant for those working in war situation, actually what happens in the world right now affects us locally. Jelaluddin Rumi, a 14th century Sufi poet said, “Be a lamp, a lifeboat, or a ladder.” The decision is yours. Dyah Miller serves as international services coordinator at the American Red Cross Cincinnati Chapter. Originally from Indonesia, she spent two years as a Rotary World Peace Fellow. To obtain more information about the IHL Peer Education program and applications for both Team Members and Team Mentors, email dyah.miller@redcross.org or call 513-579-3023.

CAMPBELL

COUNTY RECORDER

A publication of

“Quality Counts” examines a wide range of policies and results. On one level, it’s a measure of current performance, but it’s also a measure of forward progress. Clearly, Kentucky is on the move. Most notably, Kentucky ranked in the top 20 in four out of the six categories examined. The state was recognized for: » connecting the K-12 education system with early learning, higher education and the world of work. » efforts to improve teaching. » K-12 achievement. (Kentucky was among the states showing the most rapid improvement.) » standards, assessments and accountability. We can, and should, be proud of these statistics. They reflect the amazing work being undertaken by teachers, administrators, staff, board members, parents, students, business and community leaders and lawmakers. It is difficult work. Yet, despite budget

cuts, no money for textbooks, higher expectations, new standards and a new testing and accountability system, Kentucky teachers and students are succeeding. However, there is one area of the “Quality Counts” report that we should heed as a warning and as a clarion call for action. That is the area of school finance. In education funding, Kentucky failed miserably – a low F. Kentucky spends $1,685 less per pupil than other states on average, and only about 12 percent of our students go to school in districts with funding that matches or exceeds the national average (adjusted for regional cost differences). We have much to celebrate in this “Quality Counts” report. But imagine where our students could be if we were adequately funding our schools. The recession and its aftermath required 13 separate budget reductions. While basic classroom funding was preserved, an increase in the

number of students meant less money spent per student and reduced services to children. Our basic funding formula for classroom funding – Support Educational Excellence in Kentucky (SEEK) – has not changed since 2008. If we continue to flat-fund our classrooms, the progress we’ve made, as noted in “Quality Counts,” will stagnate or possibly erode. Our children will be the ones who lose. We could and we should be doing more to adequately fund education in Kentucky. It’s time we find new revenue that both fosters economic activity and also allows us to invest in our people, our workforce and our schools. It is an investment in Kentucky’s future and one that will pay off exponentially with a more competitive workforce, stronger economy and improved quality of life for the people of the commonwealth. The authors are Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear and Education Commissioner Terry Holliday.

SUPPORTING THE LIFELINE FUND

Members of Northern Kentucky Knights of Columbus present a check for $7,500.00 to Catholic Charities for the Catholic Charities Lifeline Fund. Pictured are Wayne Brown, Monica Kuhlman, Vicky Bauerle, Carl Biery, Dennis Elix, Golf Chairman, Carol Elix and Bill Theis. THANKS TO BILL THEIS

United Republican Party? I don’t think so The Enquirer recently reported that the Northern Kentucky Tea Party and traditional Republican Party have united. I’m skeptical. If true, it would seem to reflect their recognition of their mutual long-term vulnerability following the last election. But I’m still skeptical. Let’s look to the recent past. In 2010 local Republican favorite son Trey Grayson, Col Owens after having won two stateCOMMUNITY RECORDER GUEST wide elecCOLUMNIST tions, was defeated in his bid for the U.S. Senate by Rand Paul, a downstate doctor who had never run for election. The local party establishment was not happy. And from what I hear, many have neither forgotten nor forgiven since. Meanwhile, over the past three year the Northern Kentucky Tea Party has opposed county library taxes, school taxes, the Area Planning Commission Tax, and somewhat unbelievably, a modest increase in water treatment rates to pay for removal of known carcinogens from our drinking water. As I’ve observed to some, these folks seem to have

a problem not only with government but with certain fundamental components of our evolving civilization. Except, of course, that they drive on publicly financed roads, in cars that meet government standards, breathe clean air, drink the water, eat FDA approved meat, rely on anti-discrimination and workplace safety laws, participate in Medicare, enroll their children and grandchildren in public schools, obtain government-protected mortgages, invest in government-protected financial institutions and securities exchanges, expect massive government assistance to combat natural disasters, and rely on police and fire professionals, military defense forces, and our justice system to protect them from a myriad of natural and man-made adversities. In other words: they rely on multitudes of government services while maintaining a mental fantasy life in which they are ruggedly independent, reliant on no one, and have little obligation to pay for services they share along with their fellow citizens. Former U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes – hardly a liberal – said over a century and a half ago that “taxes are the price we pay for civilization.” As local Republican leaders

228 Grandview Drive, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017 654 Highland Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075 phone: 283-0404 email: kynews@communitypress.com web site: www.nky.com

know, especially business and Chamber of Commerce leaders, we all prosper in an economy built on people pursuing their dreams within a framework of reasonable government regulation that protects vital public interests. They know that governmental investments in education, transportation, infrastructure, and jobs and employment supports have been instrumental in supporting our economic development. They know, from experience, that the Tea Party obsession with minimalist government is not the pathway to a higher standard of living and quality of life. From all this I conclude that reports of unification, like reports of Mark Twain’s death, are highly exaggerated. Political parties are primarily about winning elections – but they are also, like religious traditions, carriers of culture, in this case our political, social and economic culture. If the Tea Party has captured the Republican Party, many traditional Republicans will not find a compatible home there. So: if you find yourself in that situation, come and talk with us in the Democratic Party. You might be surprised at the comfort level you find. Col Owens is an attorney from Fort Mitchell and chairman of the Kenton County Democratic Party.

Campbell County Editor Michelle Shaw mshaw@nky.com, 578-1053 Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday See page A2 for additional contact information.


NEWS

A8 • CCF RECORDER • JANUARY 24, 2013

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THURSDAY, JANUARY 24, 2013

LIFE

COMMUNITY RECORDER

PEOPLE | IDEAS | RECIPES

NORTHERN KENTUCKY

SENIOR GAMES WINTER EDITION

Independence resident Judy Carmack takes her shot during the pop-a-shot game. AMANDA JOERING/COMMUNITY RECORDER

Fourth annual games event biggest yet By Amanda Joering ajoering@nky.com

Fort Thomas hosted the fourth annual Northern Kentucky Senior Games winter edition Thursday, Jan. 17. More than 100 local seniors participated in the event, making it the biggest event yet. The event, a collaborative effort put on by local recreation departments and other organizations, includes various activities and games for seniors.

Amanda Ray from Boone County Parks helps John McGinty with the shuffle board game. AMANDA JOERING/COMMUNITY RECORDER

Burlington resident Joyce Crabtree plays the ski jump game on the Nintendo Wii. AMANDA JOERING/COMMUNITY RECORDER

Dry Ridge resident Michael Schultz lines up his shot during the pool game. AMANDA JOERING/COMMUNITY RECORDER

Villa Hills resident Nancy Flanagan celebrates her hole-in-one at the golf game. AMANDA JOERING/COMMUNITY RECORDER

BEST FRIENDS FOREVER

Classmates became fast friends By Amanda Joering ajoering@nky.com

FORT THOMAS — A chance pairing by their teacher led two Fort Thomas girls to form a close friendship. When Hannah Phillips started at Moyer Elementary School in first grade, her teacher asked her classmate, Maddy Mason, to help her out. “The teacher asked me to be her helper since she was new,” said Mason. “We had a lot in common and became

friends right away.” The girls, now in fifth grade at Moyer, are still best friends, sharing their common interests and spending time in and out of school together. Phillips said every year except second grade, the girls have been in the same class. The pair have lunches together, joined the studio art club after school and hang out on the weekends. “We like to do things like go to Kings Island, go swimming, and have sleepovers,” Mason

said. Phillips said they also help each other with homework when one of them doesn’t understand an assignment. Mason said she likes how artistic, funny and smart Phillips is and how good she is at making friends. “I think Maddy is funny, very helpful and so nice to other people,” Phillips said. Both girls plan to attend Highlands Middle School then Highlands High School.

Moyer Elementary School best friends Hannah Phillips and Maddy Mason pose for a picture. AMANDA JOERING/COMMUNITY RECORDER


B2 • CCF RECORDER • JANUARY 24, 2013

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD FRIDAY, JAN. 25

Music - Rock

Art Exhibits

Oreo Jones, 8 p.m., The Southgate House Revival, 111 E. Sixth St., $8, $5 advance. 859-4312201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport. Strange Creature, 10 p.m., The Southgate House Revival, 111 E. Sixth St., Free. 859-431-2201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport.

Pulp Art, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, 1028 Scott Blvd., All six galleries showcase paper art, featuring work of Kristine Donnelly, Mary Gaynier, Travis Graves, Jennifer Grote, Matt Kotlarczyk, Sara Pearce, Margaret Rhein, Carl Schuman, Jonpaul Smith, Allison Svoboda and Roscoe Wilson. Free. 859-9571940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington. Domino 02: Aqua, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Artisans Enterprise Center, 27 W. Seventh St., International art exhibition featuring 12 artists from Cincinnati, Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Italy and Switzerland. Local artists Kim Burgas, Jeffrey CortlandJones, John Humphries and Sheida Soleimani participated at request of curator Cate Yellig. Benefits OMID USA. Free. Through Feb. 16. 859-292-2322; www.omid-usa.org. Covington.

On Stage - Comedy Rob Little, 8 p.m., Funny Bone Comedy Club, Newport on the Levee, $10-$15. 859-957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

On Stage - Theater Camelot in Concert, 7:30 p.m., Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, $19-$28. 859-9573456; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

THURSDAY, JAN. 31 Art Exhibits

Music - Blues SIMO, 9 p.m. Doors open 8 p.m., The Southgate House Revival, 111 E. Sixth St., Revival Room. Psychedelic blues rock power trio. Ages 18 and up. Free. 859-431-2201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport.

Camelot in Concert will be performed now through Feb. 3, at Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, 1028 Scott Blvd., Covington. Tickets cost $19 to $28. For more information, call 859-957-3456. Pictured are performers Doug Carpenter, Mark Hardy and Danielle Knox. THANKS TO SHANNAN BOYER

Music - Concerts

ABOUT CALENDAR

Heartless Bastards, 9 p.m. Doors open 8 p.m., The Southgate House Revival, 111 E. Sixth St., Hometown heroes have turned into Austin, Texas, stars. Ages 18 and up. $18, $15 advance. 859-431-2201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport.

To submit calendar items, go to www.NKY.com and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to life@ communitypress.com along with event information. Items are printed on a spaceavailable basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to www.NKY.com and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page.

Music - Rock Lt. Dan’s New Legs, 10 p.m., Jefferson Hall, 1 Levee Way, Suite 2118, 859-491-6200; www.jeffersonhall.com. Newport.

On Stage - Comedy John Caparulo, 8 p.m. 10:30 p.m., Funny Bone Comedy Club, Newport on the Levee, Special engagement, no coupons or passes accepted. $20. 859-9572000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

On Stage - Theater Camelot in Concert, 7:30 p.m., Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, 1028 Scott Blvd., In the magical age of Merlin and the Round Table, Arthur and Guenevere preside over tranquil Camelot until bold Sir Lancelot and the queen succumb to a romance. $19-$28. Through Feb. 3. 859-957-3456; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

SATURDAY, JAN. 26 Art Exhibits Pulp Art, noon-3 p.m., Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, Free. 859-957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

Auditions American Girl Fashion Show Model Auditions, 9-11:30 a.m., Kerry Toyota, 6050 Hopeful Church Road, More than 350 local girls ages 4-13 needed to present historical and contemporary fashions to celebrate being an American Girl as part of American Girl Fashion Show April 26-28 at Music Hall. Free. Presented by Aubrey Rose Hollenkamp Children’s Trust Foundation. 513-265-5801; www.aubreyrose.org/americangirlshow. Florence.

Karaoke and Open Mic Super Bowl of Karaoke, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Super Bowl Bellewood, 1211 Waterworks Road, $12 buckets, $3 domestics, $2 jello shots. With DJ Weezy and DJ Love MD. No cover. Presented by Super Bowl. 859-781-1211; www.superbowlnky.com. Newport.

Music - Concerts Heartless Bastards, 9 p.m. Doors open 8 p.m., The Southgate House Revival, $18, $15 advance. 859-431-2201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport.

Music - Rock Madison Theater Band Challenge, 7 p.m. Round 2. With Death Of A Poet, Eyes On Tomorrow, Kill Box, the Dugongs, the Newt, the String Theory and We Are As Ronin., Madison Theater, 730 Madison Ave., $10.

Music - DJ

Kevin Fox will perform 10 p.m. Friday, Jan. 25, at Strasse Haus, 630 Main St., Covington. Admission is free. For more information, call 859-261-1199. FILE PHOTO 859-491-2444; www.madisontheateronline.com. Covington. Playfully Yours, 9 p.m. With Photo Electric and SHOZO. Doors open 8 p.m., The Southgate House Revival, 111 E. Sixth St., Revival Room. Ages 18 and up. $8 ages 18-20: $5 ages 21 and up. 859-431-2201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport. Groove an EDM Showcase and Dance Party, 8 p.m. Doors open 7 p.m., The Thompson House, 24 E. Third St., With Dj BrIzO, Marky C, DJ Nave, DJ Kloud, Project Rain, Get Dangerous and others. 859-261-7469; www.thompsonhousenewport.com. Newport. Revelator, 8 p.m. With Rhythm and Booze, One Day Alive and Reason 420., The Thompson House, 24 E. Third St., $10. 859-261-7469; www.thompsonhousenewport.com. Newport. The Curve, 10 p.m., Jefferson Hall, 1 Levee Way, Suite 2118, 859-491-6200; www.jeffersonhall.com. Newport.

Nature Animal Tracking, 3-4:30 p.m., Campbell County Environmental Education Center, 1261 Race Track Road, Walk around trail and explore animal tracks. Dress for weather. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Conservation District. 859-572-2600; ces.ca.uky.edu/ campbell. Alexandria. Lecture and Observatory Open House, 7 p.m., Thomas More College Bank of Kentucky Observatory, 333 Thomas More Pkwy., Dr. Wes Ryle, physics assistant professor, presents a brief introduction and lecture "So Far from Home: The Voyager and Pioneer Probes" in Steigerwald Hall. Move to observatory and gaze at the stars, moon and Jupiter through telescopes. Weather permitting. Free. Presented by Thomas More College. 859-341-5800; www.thomasmore.edu/observatory. Crestview Hills.

On Stage - Comedy John Caparulo, 7:30 p.m.; 10 p.m., Funny Bone Comedy Club,

$20. 859-957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

SUNDAY, JAN. 27

Domino 02: Aqua, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Artisans Enterprise Center, Free. 859-292-2322; www.omidusa.org. Covington.

Music - Rock

Karaoke and Open Mic

Matt Cowherd, 10 p.m., Jefferson Hall, 1 Levee Way, Suite 2118, 859-491-6200; www.jeffersonhall.com. Newport. Freak, 7 p.m. With When Things Get Sketchy, Split the Abyss, Killing Session, Dead Society, Hell Scorched Earth and Unkured., The Thompson House, 24 E. Third St., $8. 859-261-7469; www.thompsonhousenewport.com. Newport.

Open Mic, 9 p.m.-2 a.m., The Southgate House Revival, 111 E. Sixth St., The Lounge. Awardwinning open mic features singer-songwriters, comedians, marimba players, storytellers and more. Ages 21 and up. 859-431-2201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport.

Nature Winter Birding, 10 -11:30 a.m., Campbell County Environmental Education Center, 1261 Race Track Road, Take a lesson on bird identification. Then, hike around interpretive trail to see and hear birds. Make a pine cone feeder to take home inside the center. Limited amount of binoculars available. Bring your own binoculars. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Conservation District. 859-572-2600; ces.ca.uky.edu/ campbell. Alexandria.

On Stage - Comedy John Caparulo, 7:30 p.m., Funny Bone Comedy Club, $20. 859957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

Special Events Cincinnati Entertainment Awards, 7 p.m. Doors open at 6 p.m., Madison Theater, 730 Madison Ave., Cincinnati’s only annual local music celebration. Standing only on the main floor. VIP information and performances TBA. Benefits Cincinnati USA Music Heritage Foundation. $20. 859-491-2444; www.cincyticket.com. Covington.

MONDAY, JAN. 28 Art Exhibits Pulp Art, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, Free. 859-957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

Music - Rock Kopecky Family Band and the Eastern Seas, 9 p.m. With Justin WW and Even Tiles., The Southgate House Revival, 111 E. Sixth St., $10, $8 advance. 859431-2201; www.ticketfly.com. Newport.

On Stage - Theater Camelot in Concert, 7:30 p.m., Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, $19-$28. 859-9573456; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

TUESDAY, JAN. 29 Art Exhibits Pulp Art, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, Free. 859-957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington. Domino 02: Aqua, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Artisans Enterprise Center, Free. 859-292-2322; www.omidusa.org. Covington.

Clubs & Organizations Triangle Toastmasters Meeting, 7-8:30 p.m., Campbell County Fiscal Court, 1098 Monmouth St., Become a confident, more effective speaker. Free. Presented by Triangle Toastmasters. Through April 2. 859-6523348; triangle.toastmastersclubs.org. Newport.

Exercise Classes Cardio Dance Party!, 7:30-8:30 p.m., Locomotion on the Levee, 1 Levee Way, $10 drop-in. Presented by Cardio Dance Party. 513-617-9498; www.cardiodanceparty.com. Newport.

Devout Wax, 8 p.m.-1:30 a.m., The Southgate House Revival, 111 E. Sixth St., The Lounge. Vinyl night. Margaret and Jonathan spin eclectic wax. Including an all spin-by-request set, bring your own records. Also, local/regional-only set. Ages 21 and up. Free. 859-4312201; www.facebook.com/ DevoutWax. Newport.

Music - Rock Mobley, 8 p.m. With the Yugos and Canoes., The Southgate House Revival, 111 E. Sixth St., $8 ages 18-20; $5 ages 21 and up. 859-431-2201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport.

On Stage - Theater Camelot in Concert, 7:30 p.m., Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, $19-$28. 859-9573456; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 30 Art Exhibits Pulp Art, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, Free. 859-957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington. Domino 02: Aqua, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Artisans Enterprise Center, Free. 859-292-2322; www.omidusa.org. Covington.

Films One Night Stand: Creating a Play in a Day, 7:30 p.m. Imax also., AMC Newport On The Levee 20, One Levee Way, Suite 4100, Fast-paced and hilarious film follows some of New York’s top comedic actors, writers, composers and directors as they are given 24 hours to write, cast compose, rehearse and perform short musicals at New York City’s Gramercy Theatre. Ticket pricing TBA. Presented by Fathom Events. 859-261-6795; www.fathomevents.com. Newport.

High School Sports Covington Catholic Athletic Hall of Fame Induction, 6 p.m., Gardens of Park Hills, 1622 Dixie Highway, Inducting Tim Grogan ’02, Jarod Kees ’98, Ben Schreiber ’97 and Dennis Walsh. Dinner and ceremony at 7 p.m. Ages 18 and up. $30. Reservations required. Presented by Covington Catholic High School. 859-491-2247; covcath.org. Park Hills.

Pulp Art, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, Free. 859-957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington. Domino 02: Aqua, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Artisans Enterprise Center, Free. 859-292-2322; www.omidusa.org. Covington.

Exercise Classes Yoga, 6 p.m., Scheben Branch Library, 8899 U.S. 42, Basic/ beginner yoga practice offers holistic approach to maintaining healthy weight with increased flexibility, more stamina and lean muscle. Bring mat. All levels. $25 per month. Registration required. Presented by Boone County Public Library. Through Feb. 28. 859-334-2117. Union. Cardio Dance Party!, 7:30-8:30 p.m., Locomotion on the Levee, $10 drop-in. 513-617-9498; www.cardiodanceparty.com. Newport. Inner GLOW Yoga, 5:30-6:30 p.m.; 6:45-7:45 p.m., Glow Gallery Studio, 264 W. Pike St., Faith-based yoga movement class uses breath to guide from one posture to the next while surrounded by artwork in contemporary art gallery space. $10. 513-295-5226; www.facebook.com/NickisYogaRoom. Covington.

Home & Garden Choosing Trees and Shrubs for Your Soil and Site, 1-3 p.m., Boone County Cooperative Extension Service, 6028 Camp Ernst Road, Learn how to select plants adapted to various difficult sites and soils, such as high or low soil pH, heavy clay soils, poor drainage, shade, etc. Free. Presented by Boone County Cooperative Extenson Service. 859-586-6101; www.ca.uky.edu/ boone. Burlington.

Music - Country Original Hillbilly Thursdays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m., The Southgate House Revival, 111 E. Sixth St., The Lounge. Country, bluegrass, Americana and old fashioned hillbilly music. Different artist each week. Includes 50 cents off Jack Daniels. Ages 21 and up. Free. 859-431-2201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport. Briana Tyson, 7 p.m. With Rebecca Richart., The Thompson House, 24 E. Third St., Parlor. Singer-songwriter, producer and Instrumentalist from Nashville. $5. 859-261-7469; www.thompsonhousenewport.com. Newport.

On Stage - Comedy Rob Little, 8 p.m., Funny Bone Comedy Club, $10-$15. 859-9572000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

On Stage - Theater Camelot in Concert, 7:30 p.m., Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, $19-$28. 859-9573456; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington. The Great American Trailer Park Musical, 8 p.m., Stained Glass Theatre, 802 York St., There’s a new tenant at Armadillo Acres, and she’s wreaking havoc all over Florida’s most exclusive trailer park. When Pippi, the stripper on the run, comes between the Dr. Philloving, agoraphobic Jeannie and her tollbooth collector husband, the storms begin to brew. $20. Presented by Footlighters Inc.. Through Feb. 16. 859-652-3849; www.footlighters.org. Newport.


LIFE

JANUARY 24, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • B3

Comfort foods offers quick, easy meals

Quick sloppy Joes

For the mom who wanted to make a barbecue-type sandwich for her preschooler but didn’t want something real spicy. This freezes well. This is good on slider buns topped with slaw for Super Bowl parties as well. Or put in a fondue pot and serve with Frito scoops or tortilla chips. 1 pound lean ground beef 1 ⁄4 cup diced onion or more to taste 1 diced bell pepper (optional) 12 oz. bottle chili sauce Brown sugar to taste: Start with 3 tablespoons and go from there

Sauté beef, onion and bell pepper until beef is cooked. Add remaining

bread to taste good, the bananas have to be really ripe, like black-speckled ripe, for the bread to have a good, sweet banana flavor. If you don’t have a blender, you can do this by hand.

Rita’s blender banana bread uses banana puree. THANKS TO RITA HEIKENFELD.

ingredients. Bring to a gentle boil, lower to a simmer for a few minutes.

Ellen’s orzo-roni

Ellen Mueller is my Greek cooking buddy at Jungle Jim’s. We teach Lebanese/Greek menus together and joke that our moms and aunts are up in heaven arguing about whose food is better. Here’s a comforting pasta dish that Ellen says her girls, Maggie and Alex, ask for on a regular basis. “Better than the boxed stuff,” she told me. Orzo is rice-shaped pasta sometimes called rosemarina. ⁄4 cup butter 1 small onion, finely diced 1 garlic clove, minced 4 oz. sliced cremini mushrooms 1 cup orzo 4 oz. spaghetti broken into thirds 4 cups low sodium chicken broth 3 tablespoons chopped parsley 1

Salt and pepper to taste

Melt butter in skillet. Add onion and sauté until translucent. Add garlic and cook another minute. Add mushrooms and cook until soft and juices have released. Add orzo and spaghetti and coat well with butter. Add broth, stir, bring to boil. Cover and reduce to simmer. Simmer 15 minutes or until most of liquid is absorbed. Add parsley and season. Ellen says it will be a little saucy, which is what you want.

3 very ripe bananas whirled in blender to make 1 cup puree 1 cup vegetable oil 2 large eggs 2 teaspoons vanilla 11⁄2 cups flour 1 cup sugar 1 teaspoon baking soda 1 ⁄2 teaspoon salt 1 cup walnuts, chopped in blender (optional) Little bit of sugar for

moving from pan.

sprinkling on top (optional)

Brush a loaf pan with soft butter or spray with cooking spray. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. To puree in blender add oil, eggs and vanilla. Whirl until blended. Whisk flour, sugar, soda, salt and nuts together in bowl. Pour banana mixture over dry ingredients and mix just until blended. Don’t over mix. Pour into pan, sprinkle with extra sugar, and bake 45 minutes or so until center springs back when lightly pressed. Cool on rack a few minutes before re-

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management program.

Hehman hired

Furlong Building Enterprises in Wilder, a commercial and industrial construction firm, announced that Bert Hehman of Hebron has joined the company as director of business development. Hehman is responsible for attracting new business for the company and working with clients. Prior to joining Furlong, Hehman worked at the Bank of Kentucky, Colliers International and Paul Hemmer Company. He is a graduate of Xavier University and has real estate and construction experience . His expertise includes

Refrigerate or freeze ripe bananas! The skin will turn black, but inside will be creamy yellow. Mix nuts with flour mixture so they stay suspended in your baked goods and don’t sink to the bottom. Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator and author. Find her blog online at Cincinnati.Com/blogs. Email her at columns@communitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-248-7130, ext. 356.

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This is the most moist and delicious banana bread I’ve made in a long time. I have a “tastes like Bob Evans” banana bread recipe on my blog (Cincinnati.Com/blogs) that uses half as much butter as oil, along with buttermilk, and that’s a good one, too. The one thing I will tell you, though, is for any banana

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For the past several days, I’ve been testing recipes for classic stews, including chicken fricassee and beef bourguignon. I’m in the tweaking stage for a beef stew that has an olive butter swirl in Rita it. When it Heikenfeld gets to the RITA’S KITCHEN “oh my gosh this is perfect” stage, I’ll be one happy cook. Meanwhile, your requests have been for anything but long-cooking, gourmet food. I agree it’s good to have meals that are quick, appealing and not budget-busting. Here’s some to try.

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LIFE

B4 • CCF RECORDER • JANUARY 24, 2013

Moving on after the loss of a pet “Please, please give me one!” Nosey barked as I opened the oven door and carefully removed two cookie sheets full of crispy peanut butter dog biscuits. “They’re too hot, you have to wait for them to cool,” I said firmly, placing them on top of the refrigerator, safely out of paws reach. “Come on, Lady!” she howled, twirling around the kitchen in a display of begging that could get her cast on ABC’s “Dancing With the Stars.” “You could blow on one for me or better yet, dunk one in some milk. That would cool it off!” “Good try,” I laughed,

getting a paper towel and wiping the drool from her mouth. “Now, go lie down and wait.” Marsie Hall Basset Newbold Hounds MARSIE’S are not MENAGERIE very patient. That’s one of many things I’ve learned over the past two years. And that’s why I was baking the dog biscuits, to help celebrate Nosey’s second “Gotcha Day.” It is hard to believe that it has been two years since my husband Tom and I drove two hours in

a blizzard to pick up that seven pound puppy. We were numb, our hearts broken, as our fifteenand-a-half year old Cocker Spaniel, Nipper had died that very morning. My Father, insisted that we get another dog that very day. “Marsolete,” he said, kindly yet firmly, “Listen to your dear old Dad. You and Tom need another puppy now. You shouldn’t have empty arms for so much as a day. I’m not saying that you shouldn’t grieve Nipper, but, I know you. You are the kind of person who has to have a dog. You will get another someday, so do it today. I’ll buy you any

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“Is that the one you want, Sweetie?” Tom asked. I nodded and he embraced us both. It wasn’t the way we would have wished it to be, but that was the way it was. We had given Nipper the best life we could and now that it was over, we were blessed with the opportunity to have another dog. We grieved Nipper, but, Nosey in her charming little puppy way, kept pulling us back to the here and now as we attended to her needs. Two years later, Nosey has become an integral part of our lives. We will never forget Nipper, but we have truly moved on. We opened our hearts and Nosey stepped right in, not taking Nipper’s place, but creating her own. Truly, love is our greatest renewable resource. For more pet care tips, visit www.marsiesmenagerie.com. If you have any ideas for future columns, please contact Marsie Hall Newbold at marsolete@insightbb.com.

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backs, but, you know what? We didn’t care. It worked for us and we were happy. Tom and I agreed that my dad was right, that we would be getting another dog and the only question was when. Overwhelmed by grief, we decided to take a leap of faith and take his advice, so, I made a few calls and found a breeder who had a litter of Basset Hound puppies that were ready for adoption on that very day. We located that little white farmhouse and trudged through a foot of snow to get to the front door. The family who owned it welcomed us warmly and led us into their living room complete with a lit Christmas tree, candles and a blazing fire in a rustic stone fireplace. I had told them on the telephone that we were looking for a little girl, so, moments later, their daughter entered the room with a Basset Hound puppy under each arm. There had been two females in the litter, one blondish and white and the other, tri-color. I reached for the tri-color one and started to laugh and cry at the same time.

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dog you want. Just get a puppy who needs you in the here and now. That will be the very best way for you to move on.” My first reaction was to argue that it was too soon. After all, Nipper had only been gone for a few hours. Getting a new dog that quickly seemed cold. What kind of people would run out and got a new dog that quickly? But, Tom and I were beside ourselves with grief. Nipper was nearly 16 years old and had been ill for some time. But, though his death was not totally unexpected, it hit us doubly hard. We had married later in life and not had any human children, so he had become a surrogate, a “fur baby” that we doted on and made pretty much the center of our universe. We were besotted with Nipper. He was not the first dog that Tom and I had owned, but he was the first one that we had shared as a couple. Nipper was ours and he added a great deal of love and laughter for our marriage. He went on vacation with us, we added his name and paw print to our Christmas cards and he even had his own fan club, a group of neighborhood children who would come to visit him. We created dozens of little traditions and sayings that only we were privy to. Nipper was (as I was fond of saying): “The perfect furry embodiment of our love.” I’ll admit that we became one of those “dog crazy” couples that people laugh at behind their

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LIFE

JANUARY 24, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • B5

Let’s get back to work

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There are many “Write if more unemployed you get work.” or underemployed In the 1950s, mature workers out a radio comethere than the Task dian would sign Force ever imagoff with this ined! phrase. Who The 55+ Task would have Force will be hostthought that in Ken Rechtin ing an educational 2013 finding COMMUNITY opportunity for work for seaRECORDER GUEST COLUMNIST seasoned, experisoned, profesenced, mature prosional, experifessionals. enced workers would be such a chore? In my last column, I Putting your wrote about the efforts of Experiences Back to a 55+ Task Force that was Work formed about a year ago to address the issue of A free educational unemployment among opportunity for seasoned seasoned, mature workmature professionals will ers. I wrote about the be held 8:30 a.m.to noon preconceptions that emTuesday, Feb. 19, at Maployers have about the zak Corp., 8025 Producmature worker and a tion Drive, Florence, KY little about the obstacles 41042. that we face when we try Topics include: to reenter the workforce. » Understanding the The calls came floodjob search process in ing in. Every one of these today’s world. (Much has callers has a story: changed since many of “Ken, I am 66 years us have looked for work!) old, I don’t need health » Working with an care, I retired about a executive recruiter(unyear ago and I am bored, derstanding the role of a I want to go back to recruiter and how they work...” can help. “Ken, I love the col» Networking: What is umn, I’m glad a group is it? How do you do it? Is it beginning to be the adeffective? (Learn 10 Tips vocate for us...” to overcome the fear of “Ken, I was unwillingnetworking.) ly retired by the compa» Overcoming job ny that I worked for 24 search obstacles. (Someyears...” times the real obstacle is “Ken, I haven’t looked us.) for a job since I just fin» Resource informaished college. I really tion for older adults (So, don’t know how or where where can we go for to begin...” additional help?) “Ken, you have This is just the beginopened a can of worms ning of the Task Force’s here! Now, what are you work. The group has going to do to help us? Do plans for more efforts in you have a job for me?” the coming year. So, to

end with another old radio saying: “Please stay tuned for further announcements!” There are a limited number of seats available for this seminar; you can call Senior Services at 859-491-0522 to reserve your place. Or sign up online at http://bit.ly/ VrRwzy. I can be reached at 859-292-7971, or email me at krechtin@seniorservicesnky.org. Or write to me at Senior Services of Northern Kentucky, 1032 Madison Ave., Covington, Kentucky 41011. Ken Rechtin is the interim executive director of Senior Services of Northern Kentucky and a Campbell County commissioner and one of the “baby boomers” (he is 62 years old!).

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LIFE

B6 • CCF RECORDER • JANUARY 24, 2013

Emerging artists on display 70th Anniversary West-Marro

Harry Lee and Almeda Rea of Florence, KY celebrated 70 years of marriage on Saturday January 19th, with their children, Maid of Honor Rae M. Beasley, sister of the Bride, and brother of the Groom, Robert and Pat Rea, at Jewels on Main Restaurant in Warsaw, Kentucky. Harry Lee married the former Almeda Mangold on January 23, 1943 in Warsaw, Kentucky. Harry Lee was originally a farmer, but retired after many years in Management as the Superintendent of the Building and Track Maintenance at Latonia/ Turfway Race Course. During the early years of their marriage Almeda was a homemaker, she also retired from Latonia/ Turfway as Director of Admissions. They have 5 children: Nancy Ann (Hugh) Boden, Howard, Mary Elaine (Robert) McCurdy, Dennis (JoeAnn) and Linda (Harry) Snyder, 11 grandchildren, 15 great grandchildren and 2 great great grandchildren.

Mr. & Mrs. Frank Marro of Indep,KY announce the engagement of their daughter, Malina Marro, to William West son of Bertha Tolle of Florence and Eric West of Morning View. The future bride is currently studying English Edu. at NKU. The future groom will graduate in August with his associates degree in business management. Both are managers at local businesses. The wedding will be in September this year.

In Memoriam

Summerfair Cincinnati will host its annual exhibit featuring the artwork of students from local colleges and universities. Fourteen local art students have been selected to display their artwork in Summerfair Cincinnati’s 2013 Emerging Artist Exhibition, opening Jan. 25. Those selected to exhibit in the Emerging Art-

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nati. “This exhibit is an opportunity for these students to showcase their tremendous work to the community. Their talent says so much to the future of Cincinnati’s already rich pull of talented artists.” The exhibition will showcase a diverse collection of pieces. “Art enthusiasts can expect to see everything from pho-

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tography and sculptures to fabric design, printmaking and multi-media,” said Strubbe. The exhibition will open to the public on Friday, Jan. 25, at the Clifton Cultural Arts Center during the opening reception from 6-8 p.m. The reception is free to attend and open to the public. As it has done in the past, Summerfair Cincinnati will present one $1,000 Purchase Award to one of the 14 participating students. The artwork selected will become part of the permanent collection in the Summerfair Cincinnati gallery. Participating schools and students: » University of Cincinnati, DAAP Dan Vance Dan Dickerscheid Lindsey Sahlin » Xavier University Katherine Colborn Alex Beard Elizabeth Leal » Mount St. Joseph Erin Barrett Cherie Garces Robin Hoerth » Northern Kentucky University Didem Mert Kelly Shierer » Miami University Ana Keefer Kristen Uhl Neil Simak The exhibit will be on display through Feb. 14, Mondays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Thursdays from noon to 7 p.m. and Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Clifton Cultural Arts Center. Additional information about Summerfair Cincinnati can be found by visiting www.summerfair.org or calling 513-531-0050.

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LIFE

JANUARY 24, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • B7

DEATHS Julia Adams Julia Adams, 54, of Falmouth, died Jan. 4, 2013. Survivors include her parents, Beecher and Wanda Baker Davis of Cincinnati; husband, Randy Adams of Falmouth; daughters, Carrie Baker of Butler, Cassie Geiger of Alexandria; son, Randell Adams of Lexington; sisters, Cynthia Fries of California, Patty Adams of Alexandria, Sandy Hurst of Butler, Glenda Merritt of Alexandria, Becky Seiter of Brooksville and Connie Breeze of Augusta; and four grandchildren. Burial was at Butler Cemetery in Butler.

Dennis Bricking Dennis Edward Bricking, 70, formerly of Southgate, died Jan. 12, 2013, at Baptist Hospital East in Louisville. He attended Newport Catholic High School and received his bachelor’s of art degree and jurist doctorate from the University of Kentucky. After marrying, he moved to Louisville to join the Legal Aid Society as a staff attorney and began a 36-year tenure there, including 30 years as director. Survivors include his wife, Patricia Bricking; daughters, Jennifer Bricking, Elizabeth Bricking and Erica Bricking; five grandchildren; brothers, Bill Bricking and Richard Bricking; and sister, Mary Anne Crowley. Memorials: Louisville Bar Foundation, Dennis E. Bricking Memorial Fund, or the National Multiple Sclerosis Society at http://bit.ly/7lNrj5.

Kenneth Brockman Sr. Kenneth L. Brockman Sr., 72, of Silver Grove, died Friday, Jan. 4, 2013. He was a Retired Welder for Grefco and International Permalite. His wife, Grace Brockman; three brothers, Owen, Glenn and Melvin; and two sisters, Margie and Helen, died previously. Survivors include his sons, Steve, Kenny and Denny Brockman; daughter, Langda Brockman, brothers, Gary and Scott; sisters, Gloria, Shirley, Joann and Langda; and 12 grandchildren.

ABOUT OBITUARIES Basic obituary information and a color photograph of your loved one is published without charge by The Community Press. Please call us at 283-0404 for more information. To publish a larger memorial tribute, call 513-2424000 for pricing details. For the most up-to-date Northern Kentucky obituaries, click on the “Obituaries” link at NKY.com. Burial was at Brockman and Kerr Cemetery in Russell Springs. Memorials: Hospice of the Bluegrass of Northern Kentucky.

2013, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. He was preceded in death by his maternal grandfather, Steve Steffen. Survivors include his mother, Tricia Steffen; father, Lawrence Eversole; sister, Layla Eversole; paternal grandparents, Song Chae and Lawrence Eversole; maternal grandmother, Linda Steffen; maternal great-grandmother, Norma Hicks; and paternal great-grandmother, Son Hi Sun. Burial was in St. Stephen Cemetery in Fort Thomas.

Kathleen Clark Kathleen Clark, 65, died Jan. 7, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. Survivors include her husband Edwin L. Clark; children, Timothy Mattingly of Rodgersville, Tenn., James Mattingly of Dayton and Kimberly Mattingly of Newport; four stepchildren, 14 grandchildren; and seven great-grandchildren. Burial was at Evergreen Cemetery.

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Linda Gilb Linda L. Gilb, 64, of Alexandria, died Jan. 13, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. She was a manager for Frisch’s in Fort Thomas. Survivors include her daughters, Heather Stephens of Alexandria, Candy Covey of Falmouth and Angie Saylor of Fort Thomas; son, Chris Gilb of Independence; sisters, Connie Hernandez of Lake Forest, Calif., and Jan Cuevas of Anaheim, Calif.; brother, Lloyd Durham of Bellevue; and 10 grandchildren. Memorials: St. Elizabeth Hospice, 483 South Loop Dr., Edgewood, KY 41017.

Mary Ellis Mary Cecilia Ellis, 84, of Covington, died Tuesday, Jan. 15, 2013, at Madonna Manor Nursing Home in Villa Hills. She worked as a secretary with C&O Railroad, Wadsworth Electric, and Owens Corning and Fiberglass, enjoyed gardening, and was a member of Holy Cross Parish in Latonia and Mother of God Parish in Covington. Her husband, George E. Ellis, and daughter, Beverly Fowee, died previously. Survivors include her daughters, Anita Scharfenberger of California and Lisa D. Ellis of Melbourne; son, Ron Ellis of Lakeside Park; three grandchildren; three great-grandchildren; and three great-greatgrandchildren. Interment was at Forest Lawn Memorial Park in Erlanger. Memorials: St. Elizabeth Hospice, 483 South Loop Dr., Edgewood, KY 41017.

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Charles “Charlie” Gosney Holmes Sr., 86, formerly of Bellevue, died Jan. 12, 2013, in Edgewood. He graduated from Bellevue High School in 1945, was a Navy veteran of World War II, retired as vice president from Fifth Third Bank, was a Kentucky Colonel, and a member and held offices in the Alexandria Lions Club, Hill-

Rainer Baedal Eversole, 8 months, of Newport, died Jan. 2,

See DEATHS, Page B8

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LIFE

B8 • CCF RECORDER • JANUARY 24, 2013

DEATHS Continued from Page B7 crest Colonels, Bellevue Veterans Club, Alexandria Veterans of Foreign Wars, Bishop Brossart Boosters and St. Mary’s Seniors. His siblings, Ava Wandelohr Horne, Colonel William Webster Holmes, John Coleman Holmes, Mary Lee Roberts and James Wandelohr Holmes, died previously. Survivors include his wife, Claire Lou Amend; children, Charlene Gail White; Connie Gaye Larson; Charles Gosney Holmes Jr., Clayton George Holmes, Christopher Gary Holmes; sisters, Margaret Worth Brewer and Anna Bryan Holmes of Fort Thomas; and eight grandchildren. Internment was at Butler Cemetery in Pendleton County. Memorials: Alzheimer’s Association, 644 Linn St., Suite 1026, Cincinnati, Ohio 45203 or St.

Mary of the Assumption Parish, 8246 East Main St., Alexandria, Kentucky 41001.

William Lantz William C. “Bill” Lantz, 86, of Fort Thomas, died Jan. 1, 2013, at his residence. He was a Navy veteran of World War II and a retired office manager with Fechheimer Brothers Co. He was a sports fan and enjoyed the Reds, Bengals and University of Kentucky. He was a member of St. Thomas Church. Survivors include his sister, Betty Jane Scherrer of Fort Thomas; a nephew; a niece, two greatnephews; a great-niece; and a great-great-nephew and -niece. Burial was at St. Mary’s Cemetery in Fort Mitchell. Memorials: St. Thomas Church Building Fund, 26 E. Villa Place, Fort Thomas, KY 41075.

Zella Lee Zella Lucille Crail Lee, 93, of Dayton, died Jan. 1, 2013. She lived a music filled life as a pianist, organist and choir direc-

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tor, who served several local churches and provided the music for many weddings, community talent shows and during the past year, entertained fellow residents at the Newport Convalescent Center. Her husband, Carlton W. Lee, and son, Daniel Lee, died previously. Survivors include her children, Nancy Lee Howes of Anderson Township, Ohio and Carol Lee Hull of Dayton; nine grandchildren; 11 great-grandchildren; and five great-great-grandchildren. Burial was at Flagg Spring Cemetery in Newtown, Ohio. Memorials: First Baptist Church of Dayton, 501 Dayton Ave., Dayton, KY 41074.

Ila Murray Ila Bess “Nonny” Murray, 94, of Edgewood, died Jan. 14, 2013, at Elmcroft of Florence. She was a retired registered nurse for the American Red Cross and worked as a nurse for the Veteran Affairs Hospitals in Cincinnati and Huntington, W.V. She was a member of St. Pius X Church in Edgewood and Catholic Daughters of America. Her husband, John W. Murray; two brothers, Charles and Carl Bess; and sister, Veda Stern, died previously. Survivors include her daughter, Gail Darpel of Edgewood; son, Geo William “Bill” Murray of Alexandria; brother, James Bess of Fayetteville, W.V.; 14 grandchildren, 37 great-grandchildren; and a great-great grandchild. Interment was at Ridgelawn Memorial Park in Huntington. Memorials: Catholic Charities, 3629 Church St., Latonia, KY, 41015.

Mary Ann Neltner

INVITATION TO BID Date: January 24, 2013 PROJECT: Ashton Road Water Main Replacement City of Fort Mitchell, Kenton County, Kentucky SEALED BIDS WILL BE RECEIVED AT: Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) 2835 Crescent Springs Road P.O. Box 18640 Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 February 6, 2013 UNTIL: Date: 9:00 AM (Local Time) Time:

Mary Ann Neltner, 85, of Melbourne, died Jan. 4, 2013, at the Baptist Convalescent Center in Newport. She was a charter member of Camp Spring Fire Department Ladies Auxiliary and a member of St. Joseph Catholic Church of Camp Springs. Her husband, Arlin, and sister,

At said place and time, and promptly thereafter, all Bids that have been duly received will be publicly opened and read aloud. The proposed Work is generally described as follows: Construction of approximately 240 linear feet of 6" PVC water main and 885 linear feet of 8" PVC water main together with the appurtenances and related work along Ashton Road in the City of Fort Mitchell, Kenton County, Kentucky. All Bids must be in accordance with the Instructions to Bidders and Contract Documents on file, and available for examination at: Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) 2835 Crescent Springs Road Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 Or CDS Associates, Inc. 7000 Dixie Highway Florence, Kentucky 41042 Phone: (859) 525-0544 Copies of the Bidding Documents may be obtained from the office of CDS Associates at the address indicated herein. Charges for all documents obtained will be made on the following basis: Charge $ 30.00 Complete set of Bidding Documents $ 15.00 Mailing and Handling (U.S. Mail) (if requested) Charges for Bidding Documents and mailing and handling, if applicable, will not be refunded. Bids will be received on a unit price and/or lump sum basis as described in the Contract Documents. Bid security, in the form of a certified check or a Bid Bond (insuring/bonding company shall be rated "A" by AM Best) in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the maximum total bid price, must accompany each Bid. The Successful Bidder will be required to furnish a Construction Payment Bond and a Construction Performance Bond (insuring/bonding company shall be rated "A" by AM Best) as security for the faithful performance of the contract and the payment of all bills and obligations arising from the performance of the Contract. Contractor and all Subcontractors will be required to conform to the labor standards set forth in the Contract Documents. This project does not fall under the provisions of KRS 337.505 to 337.550 for prevailing wage rates. Evaluation of Bids and the awarding of a final contract are subject to the reciprocal preference for Kentucky resident bidders pursuant to KRS 45A490 to 45A.494 and (KAR 200 5:400). Owner reserves the right to reject any or all Bids, including without limitation the right to reject any or all nonconforming, nonresponsive, incomplete, unbalanced, or conditional Bids, to waive informalities, and to reject the Bid of any Bidder if Owner believes that it would not be in the best interest of Owner to make an award to that Bidder. Owner also reserves the right to negotiate with the apparent qualified Bidder to such an extent as may be determined by Owner. Minority Bidders are encouraged to bid. Bids shall remain subject to acceptance for 60 days after the day of bid opening or for such longer period of time to which a Bidder may agree in writing upon request of the Owner. If a Contract is to be awarded, the Owner will give the successful Bidder a Notice of Award during the period of time during which the successful Bidder’s bid remains subject to acceptance. Richard Harrison, Vice President of Engineering, Water Quality, & Production Northern Kentucky Water District 1001745668

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Louise Buchman, died previously. Survivors include her sons, David and Darryl Neltner, and two grandchildren. Memorials: Baptist Convalescent Center, St. Joseph Church Camp Spring or St. Elizabeth Hospice.

Doris Pratt Doris G. Pratt, 59, of Newport, died Jan. 13, 2013, at her residence. Survivors include her sons, Carter Wayne Gray and Michael A. Gray, both of Newport; sisters, Donna M. Alcorn and Carolyn Roberts, both of Newport; and two grandchildren. Burial was at Johns Hills Cemetery. Memorials: donations toward funeral expenses.

Helen Scherder Helen L. Scherder, 88, of Crestview Hills, died Sunday, Jan. 13, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. Her husband, Donald C. Scherder, died previously. She was a homemaker, member of St. Pius X Church and Hilltoppers, former postulate with the Sisters of Notre Dame and enjoyed playing cards. Survivors include her daughters, Karen Ford of Crestview Hills, Amy Kyle of Alexandria, Renee Newman of Petersburg and Donna Clifford of Alabama; 14 grandchildren; and seven great-grandchildren. Interment was at St. Mary Cemetery in Fort Mitchell. Memorials: St. Elizabeth Hospice, 483 South Loop Road, Edgewood, Kentucky 41017.

Mima Turner Mima Mae Turner, 85, of Southgate, died Monday, Jan. 14, 2013, at her residence. Her husband, Edward Turner, and a grandchild, died previously. Survivors include her son, Edward Turner; daughters, Elizabeth Thompson, Sarah Herald and Janice Herald; five grandchildren; 10 great-grandchildren; and sister, Rosie Raleigh. Burial was at Evergreen Cemetery.

Mary Vick Mary Louise Vick, 77, of Bellevue, died Jan. 3, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. She was the former owner of the Alexandria Kennels. Survivors include her husband, Harold Vick Sr. of Bellevue; son, Harold Vick Jr.; daughter, Jean Braun; sister, Gloria Jean Smith; nine grandchildren; and 21 great-grandchildren. Burial was at Evergreen Cemetery in Southgate. Memorials: Northern Kentucky Women’s Crisis Center, 835 Madison Ave., Covington, Ky 41011.

Senior Services awarded grant Community Recorder

The Greater Cincinnati Foundation has approved Senior Services of Northern Kentucky for a grant award of $50,000 in support of the New Freedom Transportation program. Through the New Freedom Transportation program, Senior Services will be able to provide transportation for people who are 60 and above in age and people with disabilities in Boone, Kenton and Campbell counties. This program is funded by the Ohio Kentucky Indiana Regional Council of Governments and requires a100 percent financial match in order to receive the $268,050 that could potentially be allocated

POLICE REPORTS FORT THOMAS Arrests/citations John Jones, 22, 45 Holly Lane, DUI at 539 Waterworks Road, Jan. 10. Tracy Van Buren, 46, , alcohol intoxication in a public place at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas, Jan. 10. Angel Ochoa, 35, 510 Fifth Ave., warrant, giving officer false name or address at 227 Clover Ridge Ave., Jan. 10. Ryan Shattuck, 26, 1723 Hovey No. 18, warrant at South Fort Thomas Avenue, Jan. 14. Shelia Richardson, 46, 110 Creekwood Drive, warrant at 1000 Highland Ave., Jan. 11. Bridget Russell, 30, 124 East Eighth St. Apt. 3, second degree disorderly conduct at 628 Monmouth St., Jan. 13. Robin Trabish, 51, 3330 Rio Grande Lane, operating a motor vehicle on a suspended or revoked license, warrant at Alexandria Pike, Jan. 12. Joel Davis, 25, 4579 Roxbury Circle 2B, possession of drug paraphernalia at Alexandria Pike, Jan. 12.

Incidents/ investigations SPECIAL COUNCIL MEETING The City Council of Highland Heights has scheduled a Special Council Meeting on Monday, January 28, 2013 at 7:00 p.m. at the Civic Center, 176 Johns Hill Road. The specific purpose of the meeting is to establish Council Committees, members thereof and their description of duties. 1745691 Public Notice Notice is hereby given that Michael and Nichole Bachman 6734 East Alexandria Pike, Cold Spring, KY 41076, has filed an application with the Energy and Environment Cabinet to Construct a low water crossing. The property is located at 6734 East Alexandria Pike in Cold Spring, KY 0.5 miles from AA highway at 41076, southern portion of the City of Cold Spring, and is to cross over Owl Creek. Any comments or objections concerning this application shall be directed to: Kentucky Division of Water, Surface Water Permit Branch, Flood Plain Management Section 200 Fair Oaks Lane, Frankfort, Kentucky 40601. Phone: (502) 564-3410. 1744693 LEGAL NOTICE The Newport Planning and Zoning Board will hold a public hearing on Tuesday, February 5, 2013 at 5:00 p.m. in the Newport Municipal Complex, 998 Monmouth Street, Newport, Kentucky.The hearing will be held for interested parties to hear and present evidence relative to the following agenda items: PZ-13-01 The applicant is requesting a text amendment to allow a freestanding ATM drive-thru in the CBD Requested by: Fifth Third Bank PZ-13-02 The applicant is requesting a change of concept plan for Newport Pavilion Requested by: Anchor Associates Inquiries regarding this should be addressed to:

public

hearing

J. Gregory Tulley AICP Development Services Director 1001745721 City of Newport 998 Monmouth Street Newport, Kentucky 41071 859-292-3637

over a two-year period. Those also providing funding for the New Freedom Transportation program match include R.C. Durr Foundation, which granted $25,000 for 2012. This financial gift was funded in part by each of these funds administered by The Greater Cincinnati Foundation; the Association of Home Care Agencies Fund, Burleigh Family Fund, Carol Ann and Ralph V. Haile, Jr. and US Bank Foundation Northern Kentucky Fund, and the Katherine H. Wilcox Memorial Fund. These donors will help ensure the funds necessary to provide seniors and persons with disabilities transportation to medical appointments.

Second degree burglary At 76 Stacy Lane, Jan. 11.

Theft by deception At 1938 North Fort Thomas Ave., Jan. 10. Theft by unlawful taking At 1175 South Fort Thomas Ave., Jan. 9. At 32 Biouvac Ave., Jan. 10. At 940 Highland Ave., Jan. 14. At 27 Azalea Terrace, Jan. 11. At 1100 South Fort Thomas Ave., Jan. 10. At 61 Burney Lane, Jan. 10. Third degree criminal mischief At 830 Alexandria Pike, Jan. 14.

NEWPORT Arrests/citations Laura Lockard, 24, 99 Park Ave., theft by unlawful taking at Newport Shopping Center, Jan. 14. Randall Roberts, 22, 833 Main St. Apt. 1, theft by unlawful taking at 82 Carothers Road, Jan. 15. Gerald Stewart, 31, 33 Linden Ave., fourth degree assault at 437 Brighton St, Jan. 12. Michael McConnell, 36, 834 Patterson St., third degree burglary at 325 Lindsey St., Jan. 10.

Incidents/ investigations Theft by unlawful taking At Monmouth Street, Jan. 10. At 831 Central Ave., Jan. 9.

ABOUT POLICE REPORTS The Community Recorder publishes the names of all adults charged with offenses. The information is a matter of public record and does not imply guilt or innocence.

MARRIAGE LICENSES LEGAL NOTICE Khushi Oil LLC, mailing address 8244 Alexandria Pike, Alexandria, KY 41001 herby declares intentions to apply for a RETAIL BEER license no later than Feburary 05, 2013 The business to be licensed will be located at 8244 Alexandria Pike, Alexandria, KY, doing business as KR Food Mart. The (owner(s), Principal Officers and Directors, Limited Partners or Members) are as follows: Member, Kokila Patel, 800 Bretwood Lane APT = J Alexandria KY, Any person, association, corporation, or any body politic may protest the granting of the license(s) by writing to Dept of Alcoholic Beverage Control, 1003 Twilight Trail, Frankfort, KY 40601-8400, within 30 days of the date of this legal publication. 1001745567

Elizabeth Kuhnhein, 29, of Maysville and Wrede Smith III, 28, of Madison, issued Nov. 10. Sherry Weber, 58, of Valeio and Richard Wientejes, 60, of Fort Thomas, issued Nov. 16. Brittany Schneider, 28, of Alexandria and Robert Stadtmiller, 32, of Fort Thomas, issued Nov. 21. Tonya Weigt, 44, of Lima and Richard Alexander, 36, of Highland Heights, issued Dec. 12. Megan Sandfoss, 27, of Fort Thomas and Daniel Runion, 24, of Newport, issued Dec. 19. Jill Wolfe, 34, of Hamilton and Frank Cimakasky, 51, of Wilkes-Barr, issued Jan. 7. Shannon Sanford, 30, of Cincinnati and Armando Ramirez-Herrera, 34, of Izvcar De Matamoros, issued Jan. 9. Jennifer Huelsman, 50, of Cincinnati and Robert Thompson, 75, of Covington, issued Jan. 9. Berline Short, 54, of Kansas City and Michael MacDonald, 55, of Boston, issued Jan. 10.


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Firm

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Queen 2pc Set ... Reg. $548

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