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COMMUNITY RECORDER

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Bellevue, Cold Spring, Highland Heights, Newport, Southgate Email: kynews@communitypress.com Website: NKY.com T h u r s d a y, S e p t e m b e r 2 9 , 2 0 1 1

Volume 15, Number 32 © 2011 The Community Recorder ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Discount store brings property value concerns

Plans for a new Dollar General store at the entrance to the Summerlake subdivision off U.S. 27 in Alexandria have been approved. A standing room only crowd of more than 60 residents of the subdivision concerned about how the store will impact their property values and the traffic flow around the only entrance to their neighborhood watched the meeting and decision without having a chance to comment. NEWS, A3

Library history

Petitioners in Alexandria and Fort Thomas led the effort to start a county library system in the late 1970s, and now more than three decades later the southernmost part of Campbell County will get its own branch. The Campbell County Public Library system was started in October 1978 by the Campbell County Fiscal Court after Betty Daniels, a Fort Thomas native, led volunteer efforts to gather verified signatures of 11,651 registered voters in favor of the idea. Without Daniels, there might not be a county library system, said JC Morgan, the library’s director. NEWS, A4

B E C A U S E C O M M U N I T Y M AT T E R S

New truck for jail inmates’ community service By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

NEWPORT - A new $25,000 truck paid for with money generated from an inmate commissary fund will help keep the Campbell County jail’s community service program rolling. The truck was purchased using proceeds of the sale of snacks including chips, soft drinks and candy bars through inmates from through the Campbell County Detention Center’s commissary, said Jailer Greg Buckler. State law requires all profits from the commissary fund must be used for the benefit of the inmates and not on general jail operations, Buckler said. The vehicle is only for transporting prisoners to work sites, and can’t be used for other functions that don’t benefit the prisoners directly, he said.

THANKS TO GREG BUCKLER

A photo of the new truck purchased by the Campbell County Detention Center using inmate commissary funds for use exclusively for the community service program. It’s the third truck the jail has purchased with commissary funds. The last car was purchased about five years ago, Buckler said. The fund has also previously paid for the purchase of lawn care equipment and haulers used in the

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News. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283-0404 Retail advertising . . . . 513-768-8196 Classified advertising . . . . . 283-7290 Delivery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 781-4421 See page A2 for additional information

community service program. The new truck will be used to transport the non-violent and non-sexual offenders in the community service program to work sites and replaces an older vehicle, he said.

“We replaced a 1994 van that was on its third transmission,” Buckler said. Inmates in the community service program provided free labor to nonprofit organizations and local governments, and only non-violent and low-risk offenders can participate, according to a news release about the truck. The community service program is a benefit for the inmates because it helps them to reintegrate back into the workforce and society, Buckler said. Buckler said many of the inmates participating work in trades including construction, roofing, masonry and electric. The work they do sometimes helps keep them sharp in their field, he said. Each inmate also earns time off their sentence by working, Buckler said.

See TRUCK on page A2

Local student teaches music in Japan By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

An apple a day

Emily Armstrong, 15, of Newport, puts toppings on her caramel apple at the Sarelli’s Cafe booth at Fort Thomas’s Merchants & Music festival Saturday, Sept. 24.

Deer visits school grounds

St. Mary Church members didn’t have to rein in the deer walking around the parish school to touch and pet it after church on Sunday, Sept. 11, – the buck walked right up to them. “I had no intention of approaching this deer, and here it came right up to us,” said Paula Losure, Alexandria. SCHOOLS, A5

50¢

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Rising costs lead to higher tax rate By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

With an increase in costs in several areas and a decreasing property value to deal with, Southgate officials have raised the city’s tax rate. Unlike last year, when the city only took the compensating rate, this year they took the compensating rate plus 4 percent. Mayor Jim Hamberg said the city has seen an increase in the cost for a number of things, which played a part in the need to raise the rate. “Southgate doesn’t have much in reserves, so while we didn’t want to raise the rate, we didn’t really have a choice,” Hamberg said. Along with the increasing costs, the property value in the city went down by about $7 million, which city officials had not

anticipated, Hamberg said. Council member Chris Robisch said officials weren’t planning to raise the tax rate until the property value decreased. “In order to avoid layoffs and keep all the city services running as they are, we had to raise the rate,” Robisch said."Times are tough and there is nowhere else for us to get additional revenue.” Even with the increase, the city is trying to be conservative with its spending and didn’t give any city employees raises this year, Hamberg said. Joe Anderson, who is serving his first term on council this year, said it was different to look at the budget and raising the rate from the council’s perspective instead of just as a citizen. “With our budget the way it is, we needed this increase,” Anderson said. “In today’s economy, we have to be very conscious of how

we are going to keep things running without putting too much of a burden on citizens.” Anderson said before voting in favor of the increase, he did the math and found that the increase would only cost him and houses with similar property values a little more than $20 a year. “I decided I could live with that in order to keep the city going,” Anderson said. While the tax rate went up, the special tax that citizen’s voted to pay for the city’s new fire department building has gone down slightly this year from .474 per $100 of assessed value to .469 per $100 due to some extra leftover from the last assessment. Hamberg said he hopes to see the city’s property value go up in the future so they can avoid another rate increase. For more about your community, visit www.nky.com/southgate

Highland Heights resident Michael Bishop’s lifelong love for music has taken him far in life, as far as Japan. Michael, a music major at Centre College, will spend the next four months at a university in Japan, where he’ll not only take classes with Japanese students and play in the school’s band, but will also be getting a taste of what it’s like to be a teacher. Through a connection with a Centre College alumnus who now lives in Japan, Michael will be helping to teach music at a local high school. “I want to teach music at the high school or college level in the future, so this is a great opportunity for me,” Michael said. Michael will be going abroad with three other Centre students and each of them will live on the university’s campus and have host families in the area. “We will get to see each other sometimes, but for the most part we will be split up and be completely immersed in the Japanese culture,” Michael said. Michael’s grandmother, Georgia Bishop, said he has loved music since he was a young child and she is happy to see him doing something with it. “Him getting to go to Japan and teach music is really exciting,” Georgia said. “But, of the course, the grandma part of me worries a little bit.” Michael said the thought of being away from home for so long makes him a little nervous, but he is far more anxious and excited. “I’m really looking forward to the trip and to getting to work with the students doing something I’m passionate about,” Michael said. “I just love the self-expression in music and the way it makes me feel.”


A2

Campbell Community Recorder

News

September 29, 2011

East Row foundation to hold Stained Glass tour By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

After years of planning, Newport’s East Row Historic Foundation is preparing for its first-ever Stained Glass Walking Tour. The tour, which is Saturday, Oct. 15, features about 40 decorative glass windows and doors in the East Row neighborhood, ranging from stained glass windows in churches to stained glass door panels in historic homes in the area. Mary Beth Crocker, publicity chair for the event, said the idea for the tour came about when one of the foundation members mentioned making a poster featuring the stained glass pieces in the neighborhood. “That idea eventually turned into the idea to have a walking tour of the stained glass in the area,”

Crocker said. “The idea is to really show off the incredible amount of beautiful stained glass in our neighborhood.” Crocker said the foundation has already received a lot of interest in the event, from people who are intrigued by it either because they are interested in stained glass or because they like historical places. Every place featured on the tour, which is estimated to be about an-hour-andhalf long, was built in 1920 or earlier. The home of Mike and Michelle Noe, built on Park Avenue in 1891, is one of the homes featured on the tour. Michelle Noe said she is proud to have her home, which includes several pieces of original stained glass, featured on the tour. “I think any time we can

PHOTO TAKEN BY BRUCE MURRAY

Some of the stained glass in the home of Mike and Michelle Noe on Park Avenue is shown off. The Noe's home is one of about 40 places that will be featured on the East Row Historic Foundation's upcoming Stained Glass Walking Tour. demonstrate to the community how beautiful some of the historic places in the East Row are, it’s a great thing,” Noe said. “Tours like this bring in potential new

residents and encourage historic preservation, which is really a labor of love.” Noe said while keeping up the maintenance on historic home is hard work, it is

nice to see people’s reactions when they see it. “On nights like the (WEBN/Cincinnati Bell) fireworks, it’s nice to see all those people stopping to look at our home,” Noe said. The tour also features homes with a variety of architectural styles and several that were originally owned by notable historic figures like General James Taylor, the founder of Newport; George Wiedemann Jr., superintendent of the George Wiedemann Brewing Company; and Barney Kroger, founder of the Kroger Co. The event will begin and end at The Sanctuary, a century-old church that is now an event center that features three large memorial stained glass windows. The tour begins at 7 p.m. at the Sanctuary, located at

the corner of Sixth and Monroe streets, with a casual lecture on the history, design and artistry of decorative glass. The walking tour will follow at the ticketholder’s leisure and continue until 10 p.m. A reception will be held back at the Sanctuary from 8:30 p.m.-11 p.m. with complimentary hors d’oeuvres, drinks and wine. Tickets are available prior to the event at www.eastrow.org. There are 200 tour and reception tickets available for $12 and 150 touronly tickets are available for $8. If any tickets are remaining the day of the event, the will be sold at the door from 7:15-8 p.m. Only cash and checks will be accepted. For more about your community, visit www.nky.com/newport

Fixes on the way for two Grants Lick area roads By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

Campbell County will resurface two especially deteriorated county roads around Grants Lick with the

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help of state funding despite lacking an official road reconstruction budget. The county hasn’t had an official road resurfacing and reconstruction budget in the past three annual budgets. A contract with Barrett Paving to pave Lee Road and Tarvin Road was approved by the Campbell County Fiscal Court at a Sept. 22 special meeting in Newport.

The state will pay $126,000 of the estimated $146,000 cost, said Melissa Williams, director of administration. The contract approved with Barrett Paving is to pay $53.75 per ton of pavement. “Those were roads that were really badly in need of repair,” Williams said. For the past two years the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet has allowed counties to use a portion of

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“For every 40 hours they work they get a day off their sentence,” he said. “So, if they work a month that’s four days they get off their sentence.” The inmate community service program is also the biggest contributor in Campbell County to the state’s

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state Rural Secondary Roads funding for state roads known as “flex funds” on county roads, she said. Once the county decides on a road, the state has to sign-off on the project before the money can be spent and that approval just happened, Williams said. The county does have enough money in its road budget to pay the difference between what the state will cover and what the cost of the project will end up being, she said. It’s potentially a $20,000 difference, Williams said. Lee Road will be resurfaced from Ky. 1996 to Pleasant Ridge, a 2.2 milesection. And Tarvin Road will be resurfaced from the intersection with Lee Road to South Licking Pike, a

1.2-mile section, she said. There’s not a set start date for when the contractor must begin work, but there is a deadline, Williams said. “We’ve asked them to complete that this year, so we want the roads done in this calendar year,” she said. The county is in its third year of not anticipating any comprehensive resurfacing program for the roads it maintains, said Campbell County Administrator Robert Horine. “The fact is, three years ago when the economic downturn occurred our roads were in pretty good shape," Horine said. So, in a way it was an opportune time to defer funding for resurfacing projects and that's worked for a couple of years, he said.

At the same time, the county has luckily procured some state funds to address the most critical county road needs, Horine said. Lee and Tarvin roads are good examples of that, he said. “But we are reaching the point where we need to reinstate a resurfacing program and the good news is that we do not have big problems at the moment," Horine said. "But we can’t afford to wait much longer because then we’ll end up with backlog of work that will be beyond our means to repair. So we’re hoping the economy improves, revenues increase and we’re able to get back to resurfacing very soon.” For more about your community, visit www. nky.com/campbellcounty

roadside litter pickup program known as Adopt-aHighway, according to a news release from the jailer. “We are saving the taxpayers’ money and providing a valuable community service,” said Buckler in the news release. “If our inmates did not provide the work, either the taxpayers would have to pay for the work we do or it wouldn’t get done.” In 2010, inmates in the program saved participating

groups and governments $1.5 million by working 136,862 hours, Buckler said. The City of Newport is the used about 22,000 of those hours, more than any other entity in the community service program, last year, he said. “What the City of Newport does is they’re working side-by-side with their public works guys,” Buckler said. The inmates do everything from supplementing the work crews out doing asphalt work to weed-eating, trash collection and setup and cleanup the for city festivals, said Doug Roell, community services director for Newport. More than money, the inmates help the public works department save time by being able to respond to needs in the community quicker, Roell said. Instead of having to staff a worksite with five public works employees, one employee and several inmates can do the job together, he said. Generally, two inmates are paired with each public works employee, Roell said. “Really it’s manual labor supplementing our staff,” he said. “From time-to-time we’ve actually used inmates to stuff envelopes, whatever we can think of that is beneficial to the city.” For more about your community, visit www. nky.com/campbellcounty

Index



Calendar ......................................B2

Schools........................................A5

Classifieds.....................................C

Sports ..........................................A8

Life...............................................B1

Viewpoints ................................A11

Police reports............................B10

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News Michelle Shaw | Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1053 | mshaw@nky.com Chris Mayhew | Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1051 | cmayhew@nky.com Amanda Joering | Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1052 | ajoering@nky.com Melanie Laughman | Sports Editor . . . . . . . . 513-248-7118 | mlaughman@nky.com James Weber | Sports Reporter . . . . . . . . . 578-1054 | jweber@nky.com Advertising Debbie Maggard | Advertising Manager. . . . . . 578-5501 | dmaggard@nky.com Delivery For customer service. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 781-4421 Sharon Schachleiter | Circulation Manager. . 442-3464 | sschachleiter@nky.com Classified To place a Classified ad. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283-7290 | www.communityclassified.com To place an ad in Community Classified, call 283-7290.


News

CCF Recorder

September 29, 2011

A3

Alexandria Dollar General plans move forward By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

ALEXANDRIA - Plans for a new Dollar General store at the entrance to the Summerlake subdivision off U.S. 27 in Alexandria have been approved. The site plan for a store on land in front of the subdivision previously zoned suitable for highway commercial uses was approved by the Alexandria Planning and Zoning Commission Tuesday, Sept. 20. A standing room only crowd of more than 60 residents of the subdivision concerned about how the store will impact their property values and the traffic flow around the only entrance to their neighborhood watched the meeting and decision without having a chance to comment. The commission was serving in an administrative capacity and therefore outside comment was not relevant to the decision they had to make about the site plan, said John Jewell, chairman of the P&Z commission at the start of the meeting. “We will not be taking

Price said his client intends to build on the site and asking them to move it somewhere else was “nonstarter” and not a compromise. The property owners want to make sure it is a property that people would like to have in their community, he said. “We’re going to work towards putting a store there that will make you all happy at the end of the day,” Price said. The intent is to start construction as soon as possible, possibly within four to six weeks, he said. Resident Bryan Chomyszak said to Price that if the store is built, a lot of people will be mad at Dollar General. Chomyszak said the residents didn’t want the additional traffic a store will bring, and they believe the appearance of the store and signage will hurt their property values. After speaking with Price, Chomyszak said he was more upset the planning commission didn’t let residents express their comments for the record in the

Price said there are typically two truck deliveries per week to the store and a truck would not take more than one minute to get into the store’s lot and off the subdivision’s entry road. Jewell said two deliveries per week didn’t sound like much to be concerned about. As Jewell called for a vote to accept the site plan application two or three different members of the crowd shouted “deny this” and asked commission members to vote against the plan. Jewell then instructed commission members to disregard the comments and asked Alexandria Police Chief Mike Ward to require the audience to remain silent. Using a roll call vote, the commission approved the plan by a 4-3 margin. Voting yes were Jewell, Dan Feldman, Rick Neltner and Ron Johnson. Voting no were Sonny Markus, Susi Thomas and Stu Stormer. The crowd of Summerlake residents left the meeting, and Price spent almost 45 minutes addressing their questions and comments on the city hall steps.

public testimony tonight,” Jewell said. Only the question being considered was whether the site plan before the commission complies with the the city’s code of ordinances and zoning laws, he said. To consider other factors would violate Kentucky law, Jewell said. “Because whether you like it or whether you don’t it, comes down to does it comply to ordinances or does it not,” he said. Mike Price, of MAP Engineers in Chattanooga, Tenn., presented the site plan for the proposed 9,200-square-foot Dollar General store to be constructed with brick walls on all four sides. “Dollar General has identified this as an area that they’re interested in locating a store,” Price said. Price said the plan proposed is a good one and will be a benefit to the community. Commission member Rick Neltner said he was concerned about truck deliveries tying up the entrance to the subdivision when people were trying to go to work in the mornings.

himself, hadn’t known the property in front of their subdivision was zoned for highway commercial. “That’s the problem, it shouldn’t have been zoned commercial,” Schneller said. For more about your community, visit www.nky.com/alexandria

meeting even if the comments couldn’t be considered for the vote. “I think the citizens are disappointed that the Planning and Zoning Commission did not give us an opportunity to speak,” Chomyszak said. Resident Tom Schneller said residents, including

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Newport on the Levee has announced that two more tenants, Claire’s and Journey’s, have renewed their leases. Both stores opened with the center in 2001.

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A4

CCF Recorder

News

September 29, 2011

Petitioners started library system By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

ALEXANDRIA - Petitioners in Alexandria and Fort Thomas led the effort to start a county library system in the late 1970s, and now more than three decades later the southernmost part of Campbell County will get its own branch. The Campbell County Public Library system was started in October 1978 by

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Betty Daniels, of Silver Grove, holds a handwritten book inside her home on Sept. 19 that she authored documenting her time on the Board of Trustee for the Campbell County Public Library.

the Campbell County Fiscal Court after Betty Daniels, a Fort Thomas native, led volunteer efforts to gather verified signatures of 11,651 registered voters in favor of the idea. Daniels became the library board’s first president. A 1977 ballot initiative to start a county library system had failed by 136 votes with 7,900 voters casting votes for and 8,036 people voting against the idea. Without Daniels, there might not be a county library system, said JC Morgan, the library’s director. “She ran the volunteer library that was in Fort Thomas for five or six years, and then it was her and the Fort Thomas Women’s Club that really spearheaded the petition drive,” Morgan said of Daniels. Before the county library system started, a public library had existed in Newport since 1896, and The Carnegie Library at the corner of Fourth and York Street opened in June of 1902, according to an official history of the library system. Daniels said she wanted to use the library in Newport, but it was only for residents of the city. Daniels said she obtained a Cincinnati Public Library card and

THANKS TO THE CAMPBELL COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY

Provided photo from The Campbell County Public Library of the former Fort Thomas Branch on North Fort Thomas Avenenue prior to construction of the new Carrico/Fort Thomas Branch on Highland Avenue in 1995. used it for years. “Then as time went on it just didn’t seem fair,” she said. Daniels, who now lives in Silver Grove, said she became involved with operating a small volunteer library with in Fort Thomas that opened in 1971. In 1973, the library operated out of the first floor of the building that now houses Pendery Insurance on North Fort Thomas Avenue that had been a funeral home

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Location history

prior to the library moving in. The former funeral home location was in use until a new Fort Thomas branch was finished in December 2005. “We called it the Fort Thomas Library Association,” she said. “We had four officers, and members could join for $6 a year for one family.” The small library had both limited hours and books, she said. And another small fee-supported library was in operation out of the basement floor of the

former Alexandria city building around the same time, Daniels said. In 1975, the county received a $2,000 state grant to improve the services at the Fort Thomas and Alexandria locations and operate them as “demonstration libraries,” as a show of what libraries can do, Daniels said. When the petition drive in 1978 started, hundreds of people signed up as volunteers from all over the county except from Newport because they wanted to

The Campbell County Public Library took over operation of the Newport Library in 1979, buying the building for $1 on the condition the building would be returned to the city if a branch was not maintained in Newport. The library also operated a bookmobile and continued service from the Alexandria city building basement unti the Cold Spring Branch was completed in 1984. The Carrico/Fort Thomas Branch was opened in 1995, replacing the location at the former funeral home in Fort Thomas. A new Newport Branch building was opened in 2004. The library's planned fourth location, tentatively called the South Branch, will be built off U.S. 27 at Parkside Drive south of Alexandria is scheduled for completion in May 2013. Source: official history of the Campbell County Public Library. keep their library controlled by the city, Daniels said. “Fort Thomas and Alexandria were really keys to this because they had something established there and they were used to the idea,” she said. The library continues to be a great asset to the community, she said. “Volunteers can do an awful lot,” Daniels said. A main room in the Fort Thomas Branch is named for Daniels. For more about your community, visit www. nky.com/campbellcounty

Construction shuffles school parking By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

ALEXANDRIA - Construction around Campbell County High School has forced the removal of 100 student parking spots and in response students are carpooling, riding with parents, or staying on the bus. The school assigned 392 parking spaces to students last year, said assistant principal Daniel W. Franzen. The construction of the new area technology center/vocational school on the campus required the removal of approximately 100 staff parking spots this year, Franzen said. This year the bulk of the 100 teacher parking spots were assigned in the student parking lot, he said. A new athletics field, track and football stadium is also under construction on campus behind the regular parking areas. “This has bought us time to allow a major storm pipe to be installed across both the student and bus lots,” Franzen said. Additional parking spots have been created in the bus lot for staff, and the school is waiting on the existing sewer line to be rerouted before opening up those spaces, he said. “Once this is done, we can move more staff to the bus lot which will free up more spots for students in

the student lot,” Franzen said. Changes to the bus lot also required the help of district personnel to reconfigure the way students are loaded and unloaded in the bus lot, he said. “The construction has affected our student parking,” Franzen said. “We have some students who are carpooling and some still riding the bus instead of driving. Students and parents have been patient through this process.” The school has changed the way they assign spots and while being careful about potential changes to the movement and driving patterns of students, staff and buses to ensure safety is the number one priority, he said. Before the school year began, priority parking for students was for seniors first, Franzen said. “This would allow us to calculate the number of spaces we would need to accommodate seniors and also how many spots we had available for juniors,” he said. There are 210 seniors parking on the school’s lots, Franzen said. A random lottery was used to assign seniors specific spaces on the lots in order to make the process as equitable as possible, he said. The next step was to assign spots to juniors, and

65 have applied for a parking spot so far, and it’s expected all of them will be assigned a parking spot by Sept. 23, Franzen said. “We also know that as the year progresses, there will be more students who obtain their licenses and will want to drive to school,” he said. Erin Bishop, a junior of Cold Spring, said she didn’t get a parking space when school first started and she finally did by Friday, Sept. 16. The parking situation has gotten better as the year has gone on, Bishop said. “At first there weren’t spots, and there were a lot of people who were not happy,” she said of her peers. Mostly, students are happy now, Bishop said. “I’m just thinking to myself, I’m just happy I got a spot,” she said. Bishop said before she was granted a parking pass her mom was driving her back and forth to school. Everyone just needed to be a little patient, and all the students know what is under construction that is affecting parking, she said. “I’m going to be excited when the new sports stadium opens,” Bishop said. “It will make it worth not having a (parking) spot.” For more about your community, visit www.nky.com/alexandria

Women in politics panel is Oct. 5 The Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce’s Women’s Initiative will host “Women in Politics: Why Women Should Care” at 7:30 p.m.-9 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 5, at the Gardens of Park Hills. The event will include an open panel discussion with prominent female elected officials including Mayor Mary Brown of Fort Thomas; Kenton County

Commissioner Beth Sewell; Kenton County Circuit Court Judge Patricia Summe; and State Rep. Addia Wuchner of Boone County. Moderator of the event is Johnna Reeder, vice president of community relations and economic development for Duke Energy. “This is a topic that every professional woman should pursue,” Reeder said.

“If we have relationships with elected officials before we need them, it is much easier when our jobs or personal interests necessitate help from those in elected office.” The program fee is $15. To register for this event please call 859-558-8800 or go online at www.nkychamber.com. The deadline for registration is Monday, Oct. 3.


SCHOOLS

CCF Recorder

September 29, 2011

ACHIEVEMENTS

Editor Michelle Shaw | mshaw@nky.com | 578-1053

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NEWS

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ACTIVITIES

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HONORS

A5

RECORDER

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

N K Y. c o m

Email: kynews@communitypress.com

PHOTOS: CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Sashaying into school

THANKS TO PAULA LOSURE

Parker Losure, left, and Gary Steffen, pet a deer during a close encounter with wildlife on the campus of St. Mary School in Alexandria Sunday, Sept. 11.

St. Mary school grounds become deer crossing

Grants Lick Elementary School fourth-grade students Sydney Melton, left, and Natalie Smith make a grand entrance on a red carpet as part of Kentucky Kids Day festivities Thursday, Sept. 22. Firefighters, Alexandria’s mayor, and school district administrators line the hallway and front entrance welcoming students, and community volunteers were scheduled to serve the students lunch. Started in 1985, Kentucky Kids Day is an annual day for students to show them they are a “special and and unique individual who is respected and loved,” according to the Kentucky PTA’s website www.kypta.org. First-grade students Noah Vincent, left, and Aydan Hamilton, arrive dressed up for Kentucky Kids Day as they strut down a red carpet to start their day of classes at Grants Lick Elementary School Thursday, Sept. 22.

By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

ALEXANDRIA - St. Mary Church members didn’t have to rein in the deer walking around the parish school to touch and pet it after church on Sunday, Sept. 11, – the buck walked right up to them. Paula Losure, of Alexandria, said she took her 4-year-old daughter, Audrey, and son, Parker, a second-grade student at the school, to see if they could get a photo of a deer from afar they heard was lingering around the parish’s grounds on Sept. 11. “I had no intention of approaching this deer, and here it came right up to us,” Losure said. The deer didn’t look mangy or sick and didn’t seemed to be acting threatening in any way, she said. “It just had a very gentle way about it,” Losure said. “It just came up and sniffed us like a dog.” They ran into the deer right outside St. Mary School building, she said. Losure said her children, and Jacob Steffen, a fifth-grade student, touched the deer and the animal followed them to the

Alexandria Mayor Bill Rachford helps preschool student Benjamin Hafer down from a mini-van at the entrance to Grants Lick Elementary School for Kentucky Kids Day Thursday, Sept. 22.

THANKS TO PAULA LOSURE

St. Mary Parish members Monica Steffen, left, Audrey Losure, center, and Parker Losure, far right, laugh as a deer walks up to them at St. Mary School in Alexandria Sunday, Sept. 11. swing-sets on the playground. “It was just kind of a once-ina-lifetime opportunity, and I just had my camera and snapped away,” Losure said. “People were feeding it and petting it.” Losure said she heard later that someone had captured the deer and taken it to a wildlife refuge area after the animal kept hanging around that day, she said.

The deer proceeded up the school’s driveway and one of the sisters living at convent petted it, and then the animal went to Southern States, Losure said. According to Southern States’ store employees, the deer came inside and they captured it on video. “It was just like it was making its rounds to say hello,” Losure said.

Leah Wooten, left, and Hannah Breitenstein, fourth-grade students at Grants Lick Elementary School, dressed up in celebration of Kentucky Kids Day, walk the halls to class Thursday, Sept. 22.

St. Catherine continues efforts to promote active, healthy lifestyles By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

St. Catherine of Siena School in Fort Thomas is continuing its efforts to promote active, healthy lifestyles among students, parents and staff members. For the second year, the school is hosting Colts Get Fit, an after school running program. Parent Kelly Glasser, organizer of the program, said they decided to have the program again this year because they had such a good response. “We started this program in response to the rising trend of childhood obesity,” Glasser said. “It went very well last year, and we have even more students signed up this year.” Last year about 40 students participated in the program, held twice a week, and several of them went on to participate in local 5k runs after the program ended. This year, Glasser said she has already received about 90 permis-

St. Catherine students run during the Colts Get Fit program. sion slips from students who are interested in participating in the program, which began Thursday, Sept. 22. Third-graders Nick Beck and Nick McSwigan are participating

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

in the program for their second year. “My favorite thing to do to get fit is running, and I had a lot of fun doing Colts Get Fit last year,” Beck said.

The boys agreed that the program has helped keep them motivated to get fit. “It’s just a lot more fun exercising when you’re doing it with your friends,” McSwigan said. Glasser said it’s not just the students that are benefiting from the program. “We also have even more parents and teachers getting involved in the program and in exercising and eating well in general,” Glasser said. “I’m really impressed with everyone and how much they are supporting these efforts.” The program runs until April, and participants are then encouraged to participate in the kid’s fun run in the Flying Pig Marathon. Along with Colts Get Fit, the school also started a school wellness council last spring, which keeps track of the food served in the cafeteria and is working to make it more healthy, Glasser said. For more about your community, visit www.nky.com/fortthomas

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

First-grader CJ Smith stretches before running during the Colts Get Fit program Thursday, Sept. 22.


A6

CCF Recorder

September 29, 2011

Leading with the heart. It’s humanly possible. In this hectic life, it’s easy to forget the things that really matter. Your heart, for instance. But our cardiovascular team is thinking about your heart all the time. We’ve invested in world-class technology and the region’s best professionals. In fact, St. Elizabeth Edgewood is the leader in inpatient cardiac procedures in Greater Cincinnati. Which means you can devote your heart to what’s most important. stelizabeth.com

better together

N. Ky. pilot site for Gallup Student Poll

PROVIDED

Amy Leigh teaches students the history of the Water Tower.

Students participate in History Day in Fort Thomas

On Friday, Sept. 16, fourth-graders from Johnson Elementary, Moyer Elementary and Woodfill Elementary spent the day at Tower Park as a culminating event for their study of the History of Fort Thomas Unit. All fourth-graders from all three schools participated in a two-week unit of study about the history of Fort Thomas. Activities for the unit included reading the book "Images of America-

Fort Thomas" by local author Bill Thomas, visits to each school by Mayor Mary Brown and Debbie Buckley from the Fort Thomas History Museum. Students also did a historical walking tour of the center of town. Amy Leigh led students on this tour. One interesting assignment that students participated in was to research and create their own historical timeline of their fami-

lies' past in Fort Thomas. Some students researched back to events in the 1860s. The day of the Fort Thomas History Day at Tower Park students visited the following six locations and were presented with information on each site. • Fort Thomas History Museum • Armory • Water Tower • Carmel Manor • Landmark Tree Trail • Army Reserve Post

The Northern Kentucky Education Council and local leaders from education, business, government and the community are using new data to help ensure local youth are “Ready for the Future.” In 2010, Gallup selected Northern Kentucky as the national pilot site for an enhanced version of the Gallup Student Poll which captures individual student scores around hope, engagement and wellbeing. “We are honored that Northern Kentucky has been able to serve as the national pilot site for this poll,” said Marianne Schmidt-Hurtt, senior vice president of PNC Bank and chair of NKYEC Board of Directors. “We are focused on improving educational outcomes and these results will help us ensure that our youth are prepared and ready for the future.” Gallup’s research has shown that hope, engagement and well-being are key factors that drive future employment, retention, grades and achievement scores. “Many communities invest resources in tracking the skills and behaviors of their students to help drive success, but few are able to dig deeper to capture the attitudes and perceptions of students that drive performance,” NKYEC executive director Polly Lusk Page said. “Even among those who have such data, too few are using it and translating it into action.” Local school districts are using this data to help youth plan for their future and build both school and community-based support systems for students. “We can’t ignore our students’ thoughts and feelings,” said Kathy

Burkhardt, superintendent of Erlanger-Elsmere Schools. “We have been treating the symptoms, such as test scores and grade point averages, but not the causes, such as feeling hopeless about the future, not feeling engaged or not having a strong support system in place to help them reach their goals.” The enhanced version of the Gallup Student Poll was developed with support from the Ready by 21 National Partnership. NKYEC is serving as the lead agency for coordination and administration of the two-year pilot with support from the United Way of Greater Cincinnati and Vision 2015. Poll data can facilitate new conversations and solutions that lead to community engagement and school and student success. To help begin these conversations, NKYEC invited national youth development expert Karen Pittman to be the keynote speaker at its fall council meeting on Sept. 21. Pittman is the president and CEO of the Forum for Youth Investment and will share what it means for the entire community to take ownership in ensuring that children, youth and young adults are “Ready by 21” and “Ready for the Future.” “The conversation about the future of American youth starts with a shared understanding of hope, engagement and wellbeing,” Pittman said. “When local leaders, schools, businesses and community partners work together, communities can prepare a competitive workforce, strengthen the network of supports for all young people, support families and help all young people realize their full potential.”

Ladybug

Ladybugs, airliners, smart boards, and computers, are just some of the ways teachers at St. Joseph, Cold Spring use technology to keep students involved and enhance their education. Shown: St. Joseph third-grade student Abby Jones likes being able to share her math work with the rest of class by using the Ladybug. Bill Thomas leads students on the Landmark Tree Trail and students enter the giant sycamore tree.

PROVIDED

PROVIDE

Helping students overcome obstacles and plan for the future will not only make them more successful in school “they will be more successful in life,” said Northern Kentucky University President Jim Votruba. According to Shane Lopez, Ph.D., senior scientist and research director for Gallup, 20 years of field research demonstrate that more hopeful students do better in school and life than less hopeful students. Helping students become more hopeful can improve their ability to learn as well as make them more resilient for future challenges. Key Northern Kentucky Gallup Student Poll findings: • 55 percent qualify as hopeful – students possess numerous ideas and abundant energy for the future. National average – 50 percent. • 54 percent qualify as engaged – students are highly involved with and enthusiastic about school. National average – 52 percent. • 69 percent qualify as thriving – students think about present and future life in positive terms, they tend to be in good health and have strong social support. National average – 62 percent. Northern Kentucky results are based on an online poll completed in April 2010 by 20,552 students in 48 Northern Kentucky public schools, which represents 62 percent of public school student population, grades 5-12, in six Northern Kentucky counties. National Average results are based on an online poll completed by a convenience sample of 246,682 students, grades 5-12, conducted in October 2009, as part of the Gallup Student Poll initiative.


Schools

First-grader Ben Schuh tries his hand at golf during the festival.

September 29, 2011

CCF Recorder

A7

Parent volunteer Paige Sutkamp puts a spray paint tattoo on kindergarten student Will Oldiges.

Big fun at the Big Top PHOTOS: AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Shane Seese from the Cincinnati Circus Company makes a balloon animal during Woodfill Elementary School’s annual Big Top festival Sunday, Sept. 25.

Kindergarten student Rachel Ossege plays the penguin fish fling game.

Festival-goers play the Cake Walk game.

KnowHow2Go college rally to be held Oct. 8 Throughout Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky, in every neighborhood and every classroom are students with the potential to achieve dreams and become community leaders. Providing choices, information and inspiration are all among the goals organizers have for the fifth annual KnowHow2Go College Rally on downtown Cincinnati’s Fountain Square Oct. 8 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. The three-hour event will will include tables with information about schools, the application process, and financial assistance from 20 local, regional and national secondary education institutions. Also at the Rally will be

area mascots, music, high school and college student groups performing, and students representing area university sororities/fraternities. Partners for the KnowHow2Go are the YMCA Black & Latino, Achievers Program, Greater Cincinnati Foundation, Ohio State Scholars, Project GRAD, Cincinnati Youth Collaborative, Cincinnati State Technical and Community College, University of Cincinnati, Upward Bound, Gear-UP, Mt St. Joseph Upward Bound,101 The WIZ and other College Alliance partners. It’s all part of a national grassroots initiative, KnowHow2Go, aimed at empowering teens to take action that will lead them

Social media session for small business owners The Northern Kentucky University Small Business Development Center (SBDC) will offer Social, Mobile, Local: Technology Trends, Tools & Strategies for Small Business Success from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 26, at the Madison Event Center in Covington. Attendees will learn how to use social media to increase sales and brand awareness, tips for designing a compelling website, ways to use technology to increase efficiency and cost saving techniques.

Social, Mobile, Local will feature national keynote speaker Ramon Ray, editor and self-proclaimed technology evangelist for SmallBizTechnology.com. Additional presenters include: • Eric Spellmann, national speaker and president of Spellmann & Associates; • Dave Sevigny, owner, DMD Data Systems and SBA’s 2011 Kentucky Small Business Person of the Year; and • Jon Garon, director, NKU Chase Law & Infor-

Ever Feel Like Going Out In your Pajamas? Now You Can!

on a path toward success. The goal is to encourage the pursuit of further education beyond high school. Locally, partners are working to spread the message of the importance of college and educate teens on the necessary steps to get there. Bus shuttles will be available from various parts of town. Transportation preregistration is required. To learn more please contact Jesiah Brock at the YMCA, jbrock@cincinnatiymca.org. For more information, please visit http://learngrowthriveymca.com , KnowHow2Go/College Goal Sunday Cincinnati on Facebook, or contact Jesiah Brock at the YMCA, jbrock@ cincinnatiymca.org.

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Featuring: PARK LANE, THIRTY-ONE, PAMPERED CHEF,

TASTEFULLY SIMPLE, SILPADA, ANGEL CARDS BY HOLLY RUSCHMAN, SCENTY CANDLES, BEAUTY CONTROL, EXCELLENCE BY ELLA, MUSIC BY RAY HECKMAN, VISIBLE CHANGES

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Attendees will learn how to use social media to increase sales and brand awareness, tips for designing a compelling website, ways to use technology to increase efficiency and cost saving techniques. matics Institute. Cost is $49, $69 after Oct. 15; lunch is provided. For more information or to register, visit somolonky. eventbrite.com or call 1-877-592-4946.

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SPORTS

A8

CCF Recorder

Press Preps highlights

By James Weber jweber@nky.com

Boys golf

• Bishop Brossart tied Holy Cross 189-189 in boys golf Sept. 20. Bryan Knaus was medalist with 1-over 37.

Volleyball

• Silver Grove beat Bellevue 25-17, 25-22 Sept. 21. • Dayton won its own River City Classic tournament Sept. 24. Dayton beat Silver Grove 25-17, 25-23 in the championship match. Senior Carly Redleaf was the tourney MVP. Danielle Moses and Charlissa Smith were all-tourney picks.

Boys soccer

• Highlands beat East Jessamine 6-1 Sept. 21 and South Oldham 4-1 on Sept. 24 to improve to 8-7. Tucker Beerman scored twice against South Oldham. • Campbell County beat Simon Kenton 2-1 Sept. 22. Kyle Raney and Wesley Collins scored for the Camels, who are 4-9-2. • Bishop Brossart tied Boone County 1-1 Sept. 22 to go to 7-4-2.

Girls soccer

• NewCath beat Louisville Mercy 6-3 Sept. 24 to improve to 10-2.

Cross country

• Campbell County won the county championship cross country meet Sept. 20. The team score combined both the boys and girls races. Brossart’s Michael Caldwell was the individual boys champ. The girls champion was not known. • Newport Central Catholic junior Connor Bartels finished fourth in the Scott Classic Sept. 24 at Scott High School.

This week’s MVP

• Highlands’ Tucker Beerman for his consistently strong season (21 goals, second in Northern Kentucky to NCC’s Austin Juniet).

On deck

• The state golf tournament is Oct. 4-8 in Bowling Green. The boys is Oct. 4-5 and the girls tourney Oct. 7-8. Regional tournaments were completed after deadline.

At NKU

The Northern Kentucky University men’s golf team tied for third place at the Midwest Fall Regional with a twoday score of 599 at the par-72 Hawkshead Golf Course. NKU shot rounds of 299300 to tie Grand Valley State for third place. Indianapolis finished first in the 24-team field with a total of 589, followed by runner-up Ferris State with 592. NKU golfers Steve Rickels and Corey Richmond tied for eighth place individually at 145. The Norse return to action Oct. 10-11 with a regional meet at Sunset Hills, Mo.

September 29, 2011

HIGH SCHOOL | Editor Melanie Laughman | mlaughman@nky.com | 513-248-7118

|

RECREATIONAL

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

N K Y. c o m

Email: kynews@communitypress.com

RECORDER

Bluebird passing duo looks to future

By James Weber jweber@nky.com

FORT THOMAS - Patrick Towles and Austin Sheehan have been going to University of Kentucky football games together for the past six years, and Towles has thrown plenty of footballs to Sheehan during that stretch. They may be doing those things for several more years, as the Highlands High School senior football teammates are planning to be at UK next year, and not just as fans. Towles has verbally committed to UK for a scholarship offer. Sheehan has committed as a preferred walkon but is keeping his options open to scholarship offers. “I’m really looking forward to going to Kentucky,” Sheehan said. “It’s a dream come true. I thought it was the craziest thing ever, being able to go on the field after a game. Being able to play on that field will be unreal.” The quarterback/receiver combination for Highlands had a great season in 2010 and have blown those accomplishments away so far this year as Highlands is 5-0 after beating Covington Catholic Sept.

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

Highlands seniors Austin Sheehan (left) and Patrick Towles are the top passing combination in Northern Kentucky this season. They are shown Sept. 22 after practice at Highlands High School. 24. Through the Bluebirds’ first five games, Towles has thrown for 1,384 yards and 13 touchdowns despite only playing about half the game in three of Highlands’ contests. Sheehan has caught 14 of those passes for nearly half the yardage, 579. That’s an eye-popping 41 yards a reception. Neither player is

too surprised at the start they’ve had. “We’ve had so much time playing together since seventh grade,” Towles said. “This year, we’re just doing it in front of everybody.” They credit Cris Collinsworth, the former Cincinnati Bengal star receiver, with a lot of their improvements. Collinsworth, who joined the Highlands staff this year as

Week 5 football scores Highlands 42, Covington Catholic 37

The Bluebirds held on to defeat their rivals in the Class 4A district opener for both teams. Highlands improved to 5-0. Patrick Towles threw for 208 yards on just eight completions with one touchdown. He also rushed for 120 yards and three scores. Colin Seidl and Jake True had a touchdown rush and nearly 50 yards rushing apiece. Zach Harris had 67 yards on the ground. Austin Sheehan caught an 80-yard touchdown pass. Carter New had an interception. Next game: Highlands hosts new Class 4A district foe Harrison County (1-4) 7:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 30.

Owen County 38, Bellevue 12

The Tigers fell to 3-3, giving up 448 passing yards to Owen County quarterback Adam Hazelett. Owen is 5-0. Bellevue was led by senior running back Jordan Fogelman, who has 32 carries for 124 yards. Jake Sparks threw an 18-yard touchdown pass to Nolan Rechtin. Justin Hatch scored in the fourth quarter. Next game: Bellevue is off this week and begins Class 1A district play by hosting Beechwood 7 p.m. Friday, Oct. 7.

Newport 37, Ludlow 24

Newport improves to 3-3. Daylin Garland rushed for 180 yards and three touchdowns on 19 attempts, including TD runs of 34 and 60 yards to stake the Wildcats to a 14-0 lead. JaShawn Short threw a 37-yard TD pass to Robert Washington and scored on a 1-yard run. Short threw for 239 yards on 13 completions and rushed for 49. Washington had seven catches for 153 yards. Bradley Messer had an interception on defense. He also had 10 tackles, as did Shawn Roberts. Next game: Newport plays Holy Cross 7 p.m. Friday, Sept. 30 at Holmes High School.

Bracken County 22, Dayton 20

Dayton dropped to 1-5 with the tough loss to the home Polar Bears. Next game: Dayton is off this week and hosts Ludlow to begin Class 1A district play 7 p.m. Friday, Oct. 7.

Newport Central Catholic 62, Brossart 0

NCC improved to 5-0 and Brossart fell to 3-2 in the Class 2A district opener for both teams. It was Brossart’s first-ever

game in Class 2A. NewCath senior quarterback Brady Hightchew threw for three touchdowns and ran for one. Junior running back Dylan Hayes had 84 yards on six carries and two touchdowns. Seniors Mac Franzen and Nick Woltermann caught 80- and 46-yard touchdown passes, respectively, and they both intercepted a pass on defense. Garrett Frey had a seven-yard TD reception as all of Hightchew’s three completions went for scores. Noah Freppon and Matt Burns also had interceptions. Josh Cain, Matt Dettmer and Cole Zenni also had TD rushes. Jesse Orth threw for 87 yards but NewCath picked him off four times. Orth rushed for 36 yards. Jacob Elbert rushed for 18 yards and had four catches for 71 yards. Next game: Brossart hosts Lloyd in a 2A district game 7 p.m. Friday, Sept. 30, at Scott High School. NewCath hosts Holmes 7 p.m. Friday, Sept. 30 at Newport Stadium. Campbell County (0-5) is off this week and hosts Simon Kenton to begin Class 6A district play 7 p.m. Friday, Sept. 30.

receivers coach, has improved the team’s passing attack by working with Sheehan and his teammates on their routes, especially on short and medium passes. “Last year we had an NFL guy in Coach (Jared) Lorenzen who helped me out a lot,” Towles said. “This year, Coach Collinsworth has added a whole new dimension to our passing game. Last year, we threw it deep and ran the ball. This year, we’re really priding ourselves on trying to dominate a defense by picking them apart however we can. “In high school, there aren’t many defensive backs who can run 60 yards to defend a pass. With Ozzie’s (Sheehan’s) speed, I can throw the ball far enough and put defenses in a bind. With us having the intermediate game, that has really opened it up for the longer passes and the running game.” Towles and Sheehan enjoy the depth the Bluebirds have at receiver this year. Luke Turner and Donovan McCoy also had double-digit receptions going into the Covington Catholic game, and Towles had a game where he completed passes to eight different Bluebirds in a half. In a couple of blowout wins, Highlands had 15 different players catch a pass. Towles has been high in the national recruiting rankings for the past year. Sheehan started drawing Division I notice after a fast showing in the 100 meters at last May’s state track meet, where he had a faster time than many of the state’s more well-known gridiron prospects. Whatever his football future holds, Sheehan is enjoying being a Bluebird. “You grow up wanting to be a Bluebird, playing in the junior leagues,” Sheehan said. “As a kid you go on the field after the games and give the players high fives. Two games ago, some little kid came up to me and asked for my glove, and I was like ‘this is crazy.’ It was great. This is what I’ve done my whole life and now I’m a senior just passing on the tradition.” See more sports coverage at www.cincinnati.com/blogs/presspreps, www. facebook.com/presspreps or visit James on Twitter at @RecorderWeber.

Snyder ready to assist NCC in postseason By James Weber jweber@nky.com

NEWPORT - Although she didn’t realize it at the time, Taylor Snyder eventually enjoyed reaching a personal milestone against a rival. The senior setter for the Newport Central Catholic volleyball team set up her 2,000th career assist Sept. 20 in a win over Highlands. She posted 20 more in a win over Cooper Sept. 22 to improve NCC’s record to 135 and her assists total to 2,036.

Social media lineup

• Facebook: www.facebook.com/presspreps • Twitter: www.twitter. com/nkypresspreps Staff: James Weber, @RecorderWeber • Blog: www.cincinnati. com/blogs/presspreps

YOUTH

JAMES WEBER/ COMMUNITY RECORDER STAFF

Newport Central Catholic senior Lila Garner hits the ball against Cooper Sept. 22.

JAMES WEBER/ COMMUNITY RECORDER STAFF

Newport Central Catholic senior Taylor Snyder tips the ball over the next against Cooper Sept. 22. NCC beat Cooper 25-11, 25-11 in volleyball at Newport Central Catholic High School. “It’s really exciting,” she said. “I had no idea, the coaches didn’t tell me anything until after the match. I had no idea I was even that far. Highlands has always been a big rival.” Snyder has been on the NewCath team since her freshman year after starting out at Beechwood. She has been a key part of the team’s streak of 10th Region titles at NewCath, as the Thoroughbreds will be looking for their sixth

straight regional championship in October. Snyder, who has narrowed her college choices to Eastern Kentucky University or Northern Kentucky, is one of eight seniors on the team. “I can’t believe it’s senior year,” she said. “We’re all playing to have fun, we’re really excited and we want to go down to state again and do well down there.” Snyder is a capable hitter as well and got a chance for some kills against Cooper. “She’s a complete player. She’s the whole package,” head coach Vicki Fleissner said. “She’s a strong leader for us. She got a couple kills here tonight which she never gets to do, and I think she enjoys it when we get the other setter in there.” NCC has eight seniors in all, including Allison Corry, Lila Garner, Liz Gruenschlaeger, Jamie Kohls, Maggie O’Day, Hayley Sandhas and Becky VonHandorf. O’Day and Kohls had nine kills each against Cooper. Corry keyed a late six-point run in the first set with five aces using a full

JAMES WEBER/COMMUNITY RECORDER STAFF

Newport Central Catholic celebrates an ace by senior Allison Corry (1) Sept. 22. jump serve. O’Day, one of two Thoroughbreds over 6feet with Gruenschlaeger, has become the top offensive weapon this year. “She’s been hitting well all season,” Fleissner said. “She started on varsity as an outside hitter, we moved her to middle her sophomore year and each year she has gotten progressively better. This year she has really stepped up and become a go-to hitter for us.” Snyder enjoys the targets she has to set to. “It helps a lot and it’s really exciting when you set it up to them and they hit

that 10-foot line,” she said. “You want to scream you’re so excited. It’s fun to watch them get some kills. The seniors will have one last run together. NCC will play at St. Henry Oct. 1 and have its final regular season home game against Simon Kenton Oct. 4. The Thoroughbreds will then work for the postseason titles. Snyder enjoys the game no matter what. “I love the back-andforth games where it gets so intense you’re out of breath,” she said. “It’s so much fun. Even if you lose, you know you gave it your all.”


Sports & recreation

CCF Recorder

September 29, 2011

A9

Spike ‘n’ block

Silver Grove Payton Govan (33), right spikes the ball as Campbell County’s Hannah Weber (20) and Jenna Martin (23) try to block in the first game. Campbell County High School battled Silver Grove High School in a volleyball game at Campbell County High School Sept. 21 in Alexandria, KY. Campbell County won 25 to 12, 25 to 14.

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Thomas More College will host its 2nd annual March With the Lady Saints Sunday, Oct. 9, to help raise awareness and financial assistance for its female athletes. The event encourages people to show their support by obtaining sponsors and participating in a 30minute walk. Check-in begins at 2:30 p.m. outside the Connor Convocation Center on TMC’s campus in Crestview Hills. Awards and announcements will follow at 5:30 p.m. To register or to be placed on a team, call Jeff Hans at 859-3443336. For more information, visit thomasmore.edu.

NFL contest rescheduled

Due to wet and unsafe field conditions Monday, Sept. 26, the Kenton County Parks & Recreation and Independence Parks & Recreation rescheduled the NFL Youth Football Punt, Pass & Kick Competition for Sunday, Oct. 2. The event is free and open to boys and girls ages 6-15 (as of Dec. 31, 2011) and will be 1-3 p.m., Sunday, Oct. 2, in Memorial Park in Independence. No football shoes, cleats or turf shoes are allowed. Only gym shoes (soft sole) will be permitted. No bare feet are allowed. Participants must fill out an entry form that can be obtained on site. A valid birth certificate and parental signature are required. Age-group winners at the local competition will

BEST LIFE COLLEGE COACHING STUDY SKILLS CLASS receive ribbons. The top finishers from each of four age groups (6/7, 8/9, 10/11, 12/13, 14/15) at the local competition will advance to a sectional competition at Georgetown, Ky., with date to be announced. Visit www.ppk.nflyouthfootball.com. Call (859) 525-PLAY (7529) or (859) 356-5302.

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CCF Recorder

Sports & recreation

September 29, 2011

THANKS TO MARK COLLIER

Royals go undefeated

The third-grade girls Gametime Royals team went undefeated, 14-0, to win the winter league and tournament championships. Pictured is the team at Nothing But Nets, from left, front row: Piper Macke, Rebeka Sergent, Bailey Hall and Audrey Graves; back row: Coach Tricia Macke, Maggie Jones, Meghan Walz, Melanie Weyer and Coach Cindy Graves. Not pictured is Ali Gessner.

THANKS TO DAVID SCHUMACHER

Sharks remain on top

For the second year in a row, the Sharks baseball team finished at the top of their division in the Campbell County Knothole District 23 competition. Coached by Hank Nagel, the Sharks followed up their undefeated Class D2 season by winning the C1 title, advancing to the city tournament. They have posted a 30-2 record in division play over the past two seasons. Pictured, from left: Front row, Randy Mullins, Garrett Bates, Nick Stamm, Jacob Miller and Kaleb Ledonne; middle row: Brandon Becker, Derrick Guthier, J.D. Schumacher, Jordan Geiman, Tyler MacDonald and Justin Carroll; and back row, Coaches Jamie Stamm, Randy Becker, Hank Nagel, Ross Acheson, Tony Schadle and Eric Carroll.

Blue Jay 5K 12U winner

THANKS TO MARK COLLIER

The fourth-grade Gametime Royals boys team went undefeated, 14-0, to win the winter league and tournament championships. Pictured is the team at Nothing But Net, from left: Bailey Armstrong, Spencer Macke, Nate Roberts, Eddie Etter, Ben Sisson and Tanner Juett with coach Tricia Macke. Not pictured is Trenton Barrett.

Kings Basketball Camp

Christopher Hickman, 11, of Grant’s Lick proudly shows his medal for winning the 12 and under age group at the Blue Jay 5K for St. Joe’s Church in Cold Spring. Christopher finished 20th overall. He is a student at Sts. Peter and Paul School and the son of Rob and Rhonda Hickman of Grant’s Lick.

Eli Hornsby of Fort Thomas poses with his basketball during a summer Kings Basketball Camp at Town & Country Sports & Health Club in Wilder.

THANKS TO KERRIE EILERS

THANKS TO ED HICKMAN

THANKS TO ALISON JONES

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Students from Master Templeton’s Tri-State ATA in Florence competed in 36 events and brought home 27 trophies from an American Taekwondo Association (AKA) tournament in Bloomington, Ind. Pictured, from left, back row: Chris Jones of Union, Janet Hall of Fort Thomas, Master Marge Templeton of Southgate and Alison Jones of Union; and front row: Benjamin Weihoff of Florence, and Ben Lorson, Nealon Jones and Anneliese Jones, all of Union.

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The Northern Kentucky University volleyball team is ranked No. 18 nationally in the latest AVCA Division II poll. NKU (10-2) dropped six places in the poll after suffering a pair of losses on the road Sept. 23-24. The Norse had vaulted to No. 12 a week ago in the national rankings after beginning the season 10-0, the best start in school history. Concordia-St. Paul (130) remained atop this week’s poll, followed by Tampa (13-0), Cal State San

Bernardino (11-0), Minnesota-Duluth (14-0) and Washburn (11-1) to round out the top five. The Norse resume Great Lakes Valley Conference play Saturday, Oct. 1, at 5 p.m. when Drury visits Regents Hall.

Richels medals for NKU

Steve Rickels shot a oneunder-par 71 during the final round Tuesday, Sept. 20, to capture the medal as the Northern Kentucky University men’s golf team claimed firstplace honors at the Wisconsin-Parkside Fall Invitational.

Rickels finished with a two-round total of 145 (74-71) at The Club at Strawberry Creek to edge Southern Indiana’s Logan Osborne (146) for the medal. Osborne shot a 74 during the final round at the par-72 course. NKU’s Jones Brown finished third with a 149, while teammates Jeremy Martin and Zach Wright each shot 151 to tie for eighth place. Wright shot a 72 Tuesday. As a team, NKU totaled 594 (300-294) to win the title by eight strokes over runnerups Illinois-Springfield (602) and Wisconsin-Parkside (602).


VIEWPOINTS

September 29, 2011

EDITORIALS

|

LETTERS

|

COLUMNS

|

Campbell Community Recorder

CH@TROOM

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County Email: kynews@communitypress.com

N K Y. c o m

Editor Michelle Shaw | mshaw@nky.com | 578-1053

Building bridges to Hispanic community Relationships are very personal experiences for human beings. From the time of our birth, we learn the value of closeness to another person and the warmth that this closeness brings to our lives. BRIDGES for a Just Community exists at the nexus of building lasting, sustainable and equitable communities for all people strengthened by mutual respect, inclusion, justice and collaboration. It is through these values that BRIDGES stands in a powerful relationship with the Hispanic community to bring attention to the important contributions made by thousands of men, women and children who now call Greater Cincinnati “home.” Having contact with diverse groups is the first step in building relationships, which is why recent data signals progress. In BRIDGES’ recent study (The Greater Cincinnati Survey –

Spring 2010 with the University of Cincinnati), we learned that approximately one-third of region residents who are White Lynnette (32 percent) Heard said they have Community contact with a person Press guest Hispanic as a good columnist friend; and 36 percent of African Americans report the same relationship. Fortunately, in the 2010 survey, a majority of Hispanic residents said they have contact with a white person as a good friend (81 percent), which is substantially higher than the 2007 survey report. This progress bodes well as more efforts are made to build and sustain lasting relationships with people who are His-

Three steps to emergency readiness Natural disasters, terrorist attacks and other emergencies can be devastating. While Kentucky is most vulnerable to disasters such as flooding, ice storms, drought, strong winds and even tornados, there is much we can do to be ready. September is National Preparedness Month and I wanted to share with you the following three steps that can help you to be prepared for a broad range of emergencies. The first step is to put together an emergency kit that includes what you will need to make it on your own for at least three days. While you can include things that will make you more comfortable, you should prioritize necessities such as water, food, prescription medications, a flashlight with extra batteries and a first aid kit. You should also include tools, duct tape, a battery powered or hand crank radio to get news, a manual can opener, toilet paper, garbage bags, moist towelettes and copies of important family documents. You might consider creating two kits: one with everything you need to stay in place and a lightweight version that you can take with you if you have to evacuate. The second step is to develop family emergency plans for different scenarios. This can help to avoid confusion by deciding in advance on meeting spots and a designated contact person to communicate with separated family members. For your family contact, con-

sider an out-oftown family member or friend because U.S. Rep. locals might be Geoff Davis affected by the Community same incident and it may be Recorder easier to make a guest long distance columnist call. Your plan should include how to evacuate. Think about where you would go and alternative routes to get there. You should also check with your employer and your children’s schools to find out what their emergency plans are and how they will keep in touch with families during an emergency. The final step is to be informed about what might happen. While not all disasters can be predicted, you can prepare yourself to be ready to react to different scenarios by following the news and the local weather, as well as learning more about various manmade and natural threats. I hope that you and your family will take the time to assemble your emergency supply kit, make emergency plans, and stay informed. By following these three steps, we can better prepare ourselves for whatever disaster may come our way. Visit http://ready.gov or call 1-800-BEREADY to get more detailed information and ideas on how to prepare and respond to emergencies. U.S. Rep. Geoff Davis, R-Hebron, is a member of the U.S. House of Representatives.

panic. During this year’s Hispanic Heritage Month (Sept. 15 through Oct. 16), BRIDGES encourages our community to learn more about our Hispanic neighbors. A complete list of upcoming Hispanic events and activities is available online at www.cincinnatihhm.org. With the growth of the local Hispanic population in the 15county Tristate area, building and sustaining meaningful relationships makes a lot of sense. The number of Hispanic residents has more than doubled in the last 10 years (from 24,630 in 2000 to 55,120 in 2010), which accounts for more almost 25 percent of Greater Cincinnati’s population growth. The Hispanic population contributes $2.4 billion to the local economy. Not only are more Hispanics and Latinos living in the area, more are visiting the region as a direct result of efforts from local

Hispanic organizations. In the last few years, three national conventions advancing the Hispanic community have made Cincinnati their “home away from home” for a few days. In particular, just this past summer, Cincinnati played host to more than 19,000 attendees of the LULAC (League of United Latin American Citizens) national convention that poured millions of dollars into the local economy and offered unprecedented cultural experiences. We have much to learn from one another, and BRIDGES believes that every day of the year offers the potential to meet and begin to build a lasting relationship with someone from the Hispanic community. Especially during this year’s Hispanic Heritage Month, BRIDGES encourages everyone to participate by making an effort to get to know your Hispanic neighbors and participating in some of the special events and activities

A11

RECORDER

About letters & columns

We welcome your comments on editorials, columns, stories or other topics important to you in The Community Recorder. Include your name, address and phone number(s) so we may verify your letter. Letters of 200 or fewer words and columns of 500 or fewer words have the best chance of being published. All submissions may be edited for length, accuracy and clarity. Deadline: Noon Monday E-mail: mshaw@community press.com Fax: 283-7285. U.S. mail: See box below Letters, columns and articles submitted to The Community Recorder may be published or distributed in print, electronic or other forms. that will enrich our lives and build new relationships. For information BRIDGES for a Just Community, please visit www.bridgescincinnati.org. Lynnette M. Heard, M.Ed. is president and CEO of BRIDGES for a Just Community.

Ways to ‘Do your share’ There are many ways to help more people to recycle to help prevent the smog levels in the improve the overall well being of Tristate area from rising. Some are Mother Earth. Another thing homeowners small but practical and others are can do is create a compost pile in larger purchases. First, the easy and inexpen- their backyard. You can buy a composter from sive. Reduce energy by turning off lights in rooms you are not a home improvement store or you using. The mass quantities of can create one yourself with plasgreenhouse gases being exposed tic fencing and some wooden is from the power plants that gen- stakes. This can be used to recyerate the electricity. So do yourself cle biodegradable things such as a favor, save some money and fruit and vegetable scraps, grass put less stress on the power cuttings and shredded newspaper. plants. You can also turn up the Composting reduces the energy thermostat during the summer used to process this waste and r e m o v e s and down in the unnecessary winter months. If you know you are traveling trash from Keep your thermolandfills. stat at or above 78 a short distance, try walking W h e n degrees Fahren… If traveling long distances, c l e a n i n g heit during the inside your summer and at or you could carpool with house, try below 68 degrees neighbors or co-workers. switching to the winter. green prodThis creates a smaller difference in temperature ucts which are free from frabetween the inside and the out- grances, dyes and chlorine. They side of the house, reducing the are still tough on dirt but gentle on your family and pets. There loss of energy. Using a programmable ther- are many different organic mostat can save you about $180 cleansers available that are less every year in energy costs damaging to our environment. Some other inexpensive ways because it minimizes fluctuation. The fewer amount of time it takes to help reduce smog and other air to warm up or cool down a house, pollution is to refuel your car after 8 p.m. and avoid the use of gasthe more energy you are saving. If you know you are traveling powered lawn equipment before 8 a short distance, try walking if p.m. If you drive a vehicle that applicable. You can also ride a bike or Rollerblade. If traveling might be considered a “gas-guzlong distances, you could carpool zler,” this might not seem so inexpensive; but if you are in the marwith neighbors or co-workers. Recycling is also an effective ket for a new car, take a look at way to decrease overall energy something more fuel efficient, output and reduces the amount of even a hybrid. Homeowners can also purtrash in our landfills. We need

chase a reel mower completely eliminating head-splitting noise and smelly fumes Loren Koehler that come from Community gas-powered Press guest lawn mowers. A columnist reel mower is a manual grasscutter that is light and efficient and an economical way to cut smaller yards. Other major actions could include roof replacement utilizing commercial “smog eating tiles” which capture nitrogen oxide emissions from car exhaust and change them into calcium nitrates with the help of sunlight. The calcium nitrates are not harmful and they wash away with precipitation. Homeowners can also replace old doors and windows with energy saving ones, which cut down on cold drafts and overheated rooms resulting in lower energy output. Some of these clean air tips are simple and more practical than others, but they are all very helpful to the environment. Even the smallest thing can help. Try and stay active in your community and spread the word to trim down smog levels in the Tristate area. Log on to the Ohio-KentuckyIndiana Regional Council of Government’s Clean Air website at www.doyourshare.org. You can also ‘Like’ our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/doyourshare. Loren Koehler is a communications intern for the Ohio, Kentucky and Indiana Regional Council of Governments.

Create jobs with small business, not big government President Obama wants to put people back to work by getting Congress to pass a $400 billion jobs package. Here’s a better idea: Keep the $400 billion and leave small businesses alone. That’s because small business – not big government – is America’s true job creator. Small businesses create two-thirds of the country’s net new jobs and employ at least half of its nongovernment workforce, according to government statistics. The president’s solution is a big stimulus package focused on temporary tax breaks and infra-

Tom Underwood Community Recorder guest columnist

structure. Taxes are a big worry for small businesses, but according to the National Federation of Independent Business’ monthly Small Business Optimism Index, taxes aren’t the No. 1 problem facing America’s small businesses right now. The No. 1 problem is poor sales. People aren’t buying as many things as they did a few years ago. A temporary cut in the payroll tax would be nice, but if

sales are down, a temporary tax break isn’t going to convince anyone to start hiring. What small businesses really need is for Washington to take a serious look at tax reform and stop making things worse by coming up with new ways to tax them. For example, the unconstitutional health-care reform plan the president signed into law a year ago is going to cost employers $87 billion through a new Health Insurance Tax – known as “the HIT” – between 2014 and 2019. It’s technically a tax on the insurance companies, but they’re simply going to pass the cost along to

their customers. The president also should have taken this opportunity back off on the torrent of new regulations already in the pipeline. There’s been a 60 percent increase in major federal regulations since 2005. Today, there are upwards of 4,200 environmental, labor and other regulations pending at the federal level, and that makes it hard for small businesses to plan ahead – and discourages them from expanding and creating new jobs. NFIB is leading a coalition called Small Businesses for Sensible Regulations to give a strong

voice to the small businesses affected by over-regulation, because the scale of the problem seems to be lost on this president. Instead of doing anything as bold as backing off, the president is simply offering more of the same, and that’s a shame. Hopefully, Congress will set aside the president’s plan and encourage businesses to start growing again by simply getting out of their way. Tom Underwood is state director of the National Federation of Independent, Kentucky’s leading small-business association. He can be reached at tom.underwood@NFIB.org.

A publication of

COMMUNITY RECORDER

Campbell Community Editor . . .Michelle Shaw mshaw@nky.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .578-1053 Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Friday | See page A2 for additional contact information.

283-0404 | 228 Grandview Drive, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017 | 654 Highland Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075 | e-mail kynews@NKY.com | Web site: www.NKY.com


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CERTIFIED USED 2011 CAMRY - 10 IN STOCK.................... STARTING AT $17,499 2010 4 RUNNER 4X4 SR5 - 2 IN STOCK, LOW MILES..... $36,991 2011 AVALON ........................................ STARTING AT $29,995 2010 COROLLA LE - 10 IN STOCK............ STARTING AT $15,995 2009 COROLLA LE - 6 IN STOCK.............. STARTING AT $14,278 2009 CAMRY LE - 4 IN STOCK................. STARTING AT $15,998 2007 CAMRY XLE - V6, LOADED................................... $17,432 2011 CAMRY XLE - V6, LOADED.................................. $25,578 SIENNA VANS - 6 IN STOCK..................... STARTING AT $23,567 2010 FJ CRUISER 4X4 ........................... STARTING AT $29,995 2010 FJ CRUISER 4X4 LTD - TRD PKG, 9K MILES.......... $33,876 TACOMA - 5 IN STOCK............................. STARTING AT $19,453 TUNDRA 4X4 - 2 IN STOCK...................... STARTING AT $28,995 RAV 4 - 6 IN STOCK ................................ STARTING AT $16,488 HIGHLANDER - 6 IN STOCK ..................... STARTING AT $17,995 YARIS - 2 IN STOCK ................................ STARTING AT $12,995 2011 VENZA AWD - V6 ................................................ $33,995 2010 MATRIX.............................................................. $17,342 SCION TC - 2 IN STOCK ........................... STARTING AT $15,995

LUXURY

2009 AUDI A4 CONVERTIBLE - 13K MILES.................... $31,877 2008 LEXUS IS 250 AWD ............................................ $26,783 2007 CHRYSLER 300C ................................................ $17,788 2008 CHRYSLER SEBRING CONVERTIBLE LTD.............. $19,488

TRUCKS & SUV’S

2006 CADILLAC ESCALADE AWD ................................. $21,995 2007 CHEVY AVALANCHE 4X4 LTZ ............................... $26,995 2006 HUMMER H3 ...................................................... $18,548 2008 FORD EDGE LTD ................................................. $24,688 2008 FORD EXPEDITION XLT ....................................... $16,987 2007 FORD F150 4X4 - 34K MILES .............................. $19,765 2011 FORD RANGER XLT - 2K MILES............................ $17,986 2008 HYUNDAI TUCSON GLS ....................................... $14,862 2005 KIA SORENTO..................................................... $10,876 2006 NISSAN FRONTIER ............................................. $13,995 2008 JEEP COMPASS SPORT ...................................... $13,995 2010 DODGE JOURNEY SXT ........................................ $17,896 2007 FORD ESCAPE LTD ............................................. $14,487 FORD FOCUS- 4 IN STOCK ....................... STARTING AT $14,988 2009 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY - LOADED, 2 IN STOCK......... ............................................................. STARTING AT $19,995

CE-0000478580

2006 PORSCHE CAYMAN - 15K MILES ......................... $36,995 2010 ACURA LT TECH HPT - 14K MILES........................ $36,991 Plus tax title and registration. Price excludes $249 doc fee. $500 bonus/subvenention cash thruToyota Financial Services Only. No security deposit with approved credit thruTFS. All factory rebates applied. $350 disposition fee at lease termination. 12,000 miles per year, .15 per mile over limit. 0% APR, no down payment, on approved credit see dealer for details. 2 year prepaid Toyota Care is provided by Toyota Financial,Covers normal factory scheduled service. Plan is 2 years or 25K miles, whichever comes first. . 0% APR, Avalon 36 mos. $27.78 Camry & Tundra 60 mos, $16.67 PER 1000 borrowed. No Down Payment with Approved Credit. See dealer for warranty and Toyota Care details. Offer good 9/29-10/03/11.


Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County Email: kynews@communitypress.com

RECORDER

T h u r s d a y, S e p t e m b e r 2 9 , 2 0 1 1

PEOPLE

Dot and Tony Rizzo of Highland Heights scratch together a basket of eggs and chicken hats from Oktoberfest Zinzinnati to match the Campbell County Senior Picnic’s “Down on the Farm” theme.

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IDEAS

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RECIPES

Nellie and Ron Goodridge of Alexandria dance together under the main tent.

Rain dancing PHOTOS: CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Freida Hartig of Melbourne shields herself with an umbrella while walking to a line for lunch at the senior picnic.

Chuck Deuser of Madeira points out the direction of a dance floor turn to Joyce Barth of Highland Heights during the Campbell County Senior Picnic in Pendery Park in Melbourne Wednesday, Sept. 21.

Ferdinand and Carole Bartels dance to a cover of Van Morrison’s “Moondance” performed by the Met Trio under the confines of a tent sheltering them all from rain showers during the Campbell County Senior Picnic with a “Down on the Farm” theme in Pendery Park in Melbourne Wednesday, Sept. 21.

A pouring rain drenches people as Dr. Robert C. Kratz, a retired family practice doctor, shakes hands with people under the cover of an umbrella along with his daughter, center, Sen. Katie Stine, R-Southgate, and Campbell County Judge-executive Steve Pendery, far right, during the Campbell County Senior Picnic Wednesday, Sept. 21.

Betty Lightfoot of Fort Thomas wears a crown as she plays bingo.

Tom Kohlhepp sings at the Campbell County Senior Picnic Wednesday, Sept. 21 as part of the Met Trio. The trio’s members also include retired Campbell County Family Court Judge Michael Foellger, far left, on drums.

David Williams, left, Republican candidate for governor of Kentucky, shakes hands with Mary Culp of Dayton and others in line for lunch in the rain at the Campbell County Senior Picnic in Pendery Park in Melbourne Wednesday, Sept. 21.

James Perkins of Independence spins his dance partner Latonia resident and Fort Thomas native Ginny Jackson. Barabara Goetz of Fort Thomas, left, and Betty Fleckinger of Highland Heights clap their hands on the dance floor.

SHARE. SWAP. SYNC UP. MEET. where Cincy moms meet


B2

CCF Recorder

September 29, 2011

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD F R I D A Y, S E P T . 3 0

ART EXHIBITS

I Love the ‘80s, 11 a.m.-10 p.m., Art on the Levee Gallery, Newport on the Levee, Pop culture art show celebrates all things ‘80s: Movies and cartoons to music, fashion and more. Free. 859-261-5770; www.artonthelevee.com. Newport. Bits and Pieces, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, 1028 Scott Blvd., Showcases a collection of works connected by the use of repetition, be it small tiles, drawings, action figures or even Mylar balloons. Exhibition will feature solo shows by artists John Bavaro, Sheri Besso, John Koverman, Leslie Nichols, Kim Rae Taylor, Lathan Vargason and Rondle West. Through Oct. 7. 859-957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

FASHION SHOWS

One Night Stand MARA Lingerie Fashion Show, 7 p.m., The Ascent at Roebling’s Bridge, 1 Roebling Way, Presented by Ascent at Roebling’s Bridge. 859-292-5568; www.yourascent.com. Covington.

FESTIVALS

Rocktoberfest, 6 p.m.-midnight, St. Barbara Church, 4042 Turkeyfoot Road, Music by Doghouse 8 p.m.-midnight. Food, raffles, the Bourbon Trail, the Human Hamster Ball, games and more. Family friendly. Free. Through Oct. 1. 859-371-3100; www.therocktoberfest.org. Erlanger.

HOLIDAY - HALLOWEEN

USS Nightmare, 7 p.m.-1 a.m., BB Riverboats Newport Landing, 101 Riverboat Row, 30minute tour of haunted boat. Two levels and more than 40 horrifying areas. Nightmare Landing, family-fun center with enclosed waiting area. RIP express tickets “skip the line.” Tour not recommended for children under age 10 without adult. Family friendly. $60 super saver six-pack, $48 family fourpack; $20 RIP express, $16, $6 matinee. 859-802-5826; www.ussnightmare.com. Newport.

MUSEUMS

Cincinnati Meets the Beatles! 1964 & 1966 The Liverpool Sensations Invade the Tri-State, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., BehringerCrawford Museum, 1600 Montague Road, Exhibit features stunning photos of news photographer Gordon Baer. Family friendly. Included with admission: $7, $6 seniors, $4 children; free for members. 859-491-4003. Covington.

About calendar

To submit calendar items, go to “www.NKY.com” and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to “life@communitypress.com” along with event information. Items are printed on a space-available basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to “www.NKY.com” and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Dancing at Lughnasa, 8 p.m., Village Players, 8 N. Fort Thomas Ave., Dancing at Lughnasa is the story of five unmarried sisters eking out their lives in a small village in Ireland in l936. We meet them at the time of the festival of Lughnasa, which celebrates the pagan god of the harvest with drunken revelry and dancing. $15. 859-441-5683; www.villageplayers.biz. Fort Thomas.

REUNIONS

Campbell County High School Class of 1996 Reunion, 7-11:30 p.m., The Madison Event Center, 700 Madison Ave., Email cchs1996reunion@gmail.com for more information. Presented by Campbell County High School Class of 1996. 859-803-7520. Covington.

SPECIAL EVENTS

Day of Peace, 11 a.m.-1 p.m., Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, 1028 Scott Blvd., Community-wide effort to promote peace making and reduce violence in families, neighborhoods and schools in Northern Kentucky. Rally focuses on generating awareness to the realities of stalking and animal abuse, often hidden forms of domestic violence. Keynote speaker: Bridgett Wright. Free. Presented by Day of Peace Committee. 859-372-3572; www.wccky.org. Covington. S A T U R D A Y, O C T . 1

CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS

Kentucky Kuzzins, 8-10:30 p.m., Promenade Palace, 3630 Decoursey Pike, Mainstream level Western-style square dance club for experienced dancers. Family friendly. $5. Presented by Southwestern Ohio/Northern Kentucky Square Dancers Federation. 513929-2427. Covington.

MUSIC - CONCERTS

The Steve Augeri Band, 7:30 p.m., Newport Syndicate, 18 E. Fifth St., Dinner at 6 p.m. Former lead singer of Journey for nearly a decade. Hear hits like “Don’t Stop Believin’,” “Wheel in the Sky,” “Separate Ways,” “Lights” and “Higher Place.” Part of Newport Syndicate Concert Series. $75, $65, $55, $45, $40; plus fees. 859-491-8000; www.rwatickets.com. Newport.

MUSIC - COUNTRY

Bobby Mackey and the Big Mac Band, 7:30 p.m., Bobby Mackey’s Music World, 44 Licking Pike, With Kevin Woods, singer. Includes giveaways. $10 ages 18-21, $5 ages 21 and up; free before 10 p.m. on Friday. 859-431-5588; www.bobbymackey.com. Wilder. John Morgen and Takin’ the Rains, 9 p.m.1 a.m., Guys ‘n’ Dolls Restaurant and Nightclub, 4210 Alexandria Pike, $5. 859-4414888; www.guysndollsllc.com. Cold Spring.

MUSIC - INDIE

Zee Avi, 9 p.m., Southgate House, 24 E. Third St., Parlour. Doors open 8 p.m. Native of Borneo, an ancient island east of Malaysia. $13, $10 advance. 859-431-2201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport.

HOLIDAY - HALLOWEEN

USS Nightmare, 7 p.m.-1 a.m., BB Riverboats Newport Landing, $60 super saver six-pack, $48 family four-pack; $20 RIP express, $16, $6 matinee. Group discounts and coupons available online. 859-802-5826; www.ussnightmare.com. Newport. Pick Your Own Pumpkins, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Neltner’s Farm, 6922 Four Mile Road, Horsedrawn wagon rides, twoacre corn maze, petting zoo, pony rides, home-cooked food, farm shop, crafters, pottery, face painting, seasonal apples and folk art. $5 ages 3 and up. 859-496-7535; neltnersfarm.com/news. Camp Springs.

MUSIC - CONCERTS

The Devonshires, 9 p.m., Madison Theater, 730 Madison Ave., Doors open 8 p.m. Standing only on the main floor. $10. 859491-2444; www.madisontheateronline.com. Covington.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Dancing at Lughnasa, 8 p.m., Village Players, $15. 859-441-5683; www.villageplayers.biz. Fort Thomas.

TOURS

Newport Gangster Walking Tour, 10:30 a.m., 1:30 p.m. and 5 p.m., Gangsters Dueling Piano Bar, 18 E. Fifth St., Explore the streets where gangsters made their millions, gamblers lost their fortunes and their lives, and ladies of the night earned their reputations. $15. Presented by American Legacy Tours. 859-491-8000; www.newportgangsters.com. Newport.

Wine Tasting, 1-5 p.m., Cork ‘n Bottle Covington, Free. 859-261-8333; www.corknbottle.com. Covington. Wine Tasting, 1-6 p.m., StoneBrook Winery, Five for $5. 859-635-0111; www.stonebrookwinery.com. Camp Springs. Wine Tasting, 1-7 p.m., Camp Springs Vineyard, $1. 859-448-0253. Camp Springs.

FESTIVALS

Wee Fairy Folk Fest, Noon-5 p.m., MainStrasse Village, Main Street, Sixth Street Promenade. Celebration in which mystical beings existing in our imaginations can frolic in the streets of reality. Street vendors, aerial performers, petting zoos, comedy acts and musicians. Fantasy dress encouraged. Donations requested to cover cost of performers. Presented by Covington Arts District - Full Spectrum. 859-292-2322; covingtonarts.com/fullspectrum. Covington. Rocktoberfest, 5 p.m.-midnight, St. Barbara Church, Music by Code 9 8 p.m.-midnight. Free. 859-371-3100; www.therocktoberfest.org. Erlanger.

M O N D A Y, O C T . 3

W E D N E S D A Y, O C T . 5

T H U R S D A Y, O C T . 6

HOLIDAY - HALLOWEEN Pumpkin Patch Tour, 10 a.m.-noon and 3-5 p.m., Sunrock Farm, $10 two-hour tour, $7 one-hour tour, free under age 1. Registration required. 859-781-5502; www.sunrockfarm.org. Wilder.

AUDITIONS Katalyst Talent Agency Open Call, 4-7 p.m., Katalyst, LLC, 3037 Dixie Highway, Suite 214, All experience levels seeking representation with Katalyst. First come, first served. Requirements at website. Family friendly. Free. 859-581-4555. Edgewood.

HOLIDAY - HALLOWEEN Pumpkin Patch Tour, 3-5 p.m., Sunrock Farm, $10 two-hour tour, $7 one-hour tour, free under age 1. Registration required. 859781-5502; www.sunrockfarm.org. Wilder.

BENEFITS

S U N D A Y, O C T . 2

FESTIVALS Rocktoberfest, Noon-8 p.m., St. Barbara Church, Music by The Jay Fox Band Om Papa in the Rocktoberfest Beer Garden noon-4 p.m. Music by Ben Walz Band 4-8 p.m. Free. www.therocktoberfest.org; 859371-3100. Erlanger. HOLIDAY - HALLOWEEN

DRINK TASTINGS

THANKS TO MIKKI SCHAFFNER.

The Department of Theatre and Dance at Northern Kentucky University presents “Little Women the Broadway Musical,” Thursday, Sept. 29 through Sunday, Oct. 9, in NKU’s Corbett Theatre, Highland Heights. The musical is based on Louisa May Alcott’s 1869 classic book. Show times are 8 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday and 3 p.m. Sunday. Tickets are $14; $13 faculty, staff and alumni; $11 senior citizens; and $8 for students with a valid ID from any school and groups of 10 or more. For more information or to buy tickets, call 859-572-5464. Pictured is senior Katie Berger as Beth, senior Carmyn Howe as Meg, senior Brooke Rucidlo as Marmee, junior Harli Cooper as Amy and senior Monica Tenhover as Jo.

USS Nightmare, 7-11 p.m., BB Riverboats Newport Landing, $60 super saver six-pack, $48 family four-pack; $20 RIP express, $16, $6 matinee. Group discounts and coupons available online. 859-802-5826; www.ussnightmare.com. Newport. Pumpkin Patch Tour, 1-3 p.m. and 4-5 p.m., Sunrock Farm, 103 Gibson Lane, Hands-on animal fun: Milk a goat, hold chicks, brush a horse, feed the sheep and pet many different farm animals. Hay Ride to pumpkin patch to purchase pumpkins. Free apple cider and cookies on weekends at farm store. $10 two-hour tour, $7 one-hour tour, free under age 1. Registration required. 859-781-5502; www.sunrockfarm.org. Wilder. Pick Your Own Pumpkins, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Neltner’s Farm, Music by the Tillers 1-4:30 p.m. $5 ages 3 and up. 859-496-7535; neltnersfarm.com/news. Camp Springs.

LITERARY - LIBRARIES

Independence Inklings Writer’s Group, 2-4 p.m., William E. Durr Branch Library, 1992 Walton-Nicholson Road, Open to all writers, all skill levels and genres. Group interaction and guest speakers. Adults. Family friendly. Free. Presented by Kenton County Public Library. 859-962-4030. Independence.

MUSIC - BLUEGRASS

Bluegrass Jam, 8-11 p.m., Molly Malone’s Irish Pub and Restaurant, 112 E. Fourth St., No sign-up required. Ages 21 and up. Free. 859-491-6659. Covington.

ON STAGE - COMEDY

Stand-Up Comedy, 8:30 p.m., Beer Sellar, 301 Riverboat Row, Comedy featuring Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky’s best local comics and national acts seen on: NBC, HBO, FOX, Bob & Tom, BET, Comedy Central and WGN America. Hosted by Mike Gardner. Content rated R. Ages 21 and up. Music by DJ Alex Chinn Chilla 10 p.m. Free. 859-4316969. Newport.

RECREATION

Duplicate Bridge, 11:30 a.m.-3 p.m., Elsmere Senior Center, 179 Dell St., Lower Level. Open to all players. Family friendly. $5. Presented by Boone County Bridge Center. 859391-8639; www.boonecountybridgecenter.com. Elsmere. T U E S D A Y, O C T . 4

Tichenor Trojans Football Fund Raiser, 11 a.m.-11 p.m., Skyline Chili, 3159 Dixie Hwy., Tell cashier you are with Tichenor Football and percentage of bill benefits Tichenor Football. Email becky.hatton@insightbb.com for more information or flier. Presented by Tichenor Middle School Football. 859-3220217. Erlanger.

CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS

LITERARY - STORY TIMES

Pajama Story Time, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Cold Spring Branch Library, 3920 Alexandria Pike, Ages 3-6. Free. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 859-781-6166. Cold Spring. Baby Time, 9:30-10:30 a.m. and 10:30-11:30 a.m., Fort Thomas-Carrico Branch Library, 1000 Highland Ave., Clap, sing and bounce with your child. Ages 2 and under. Free. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 859-572-5033. Fort Thomas.

Pioneer Toastmasters Public Speaking Club Meeting, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Holiday Inn Riverfront, 600 W. Third St., Learning experience for those who wish to improve speaking and networking skills for work, one-onone or just for fun. Includes dinner if pre-registered. Family friendly. Presented by Pioneer Toastmasters. 513-541-9319. Covington.

ON STAGE - THEATER

HOLIDAY - HALLOWEEN

Thrift Sale, 7 a.m.-noon, United Christian Volunteers of Elsmere, 15 Kenton St., Weekly thrift sale. Family friendly. 859-727-4417. Elsmere.

USS Nightmare, 7-11 p.m., BB Riverboats Newport Landing, $60 super saver six-pack, $48 family four-pack; $20 RIP express, $16, $6 matinee. 859-802-5826; www.ussnightmare.com. Newport.

SCHOOLS

New Parent Meeting, 7-8:30 p.m., Beechwood High School, 54 Beechwood Road, Cafeteria Annex. Informational meeting for parents interested in club volleyball for their daughters. Free. Presented by Northern Kentucky Junior Volleyball. 859-620-6520; www.nkjv.net. Fort Mitchell.

Footloose, 8 p.m., Stained Glass Theatre, 802 York St., Based on the original screenplay by Dean Pitchford. Music by Tom Snow, lyrics by Dean Pitchford. Directed by Gary Rogers. $20. Presented by Footlighters Inc. 859652-3849; www.footlighters.org. Newport.

SHOPPING

SPECIAL EVENTS

Carnival Noir - A Night of Fantasy, 7 p.m., Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, 1028 Scott Blvd., Featuring the Bellydance Superstars, international touring troupe. Fairy tales and fantasy-themed costume party. Vendors and tarot readers available. Performances by local bellydancers, mimes, singers and contortionists. $20. 859-9571940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

ART EXHIBITS

Bits and Pieces, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, Free. 859-957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS Triangle Toastmasters Meeting, 7-8:30 p.m., Campbell County Fiscal Court, 1098 Monmouth St., Become a confident, more effective speaker. 859-652-3348. Newport.

COMMUNITY DANCE

Line Dancing, 7-9 p.m., Lookout Heights Civic Club, 1661 Park Road, Holly and Bernie Ruschman, instructors. Beginners welcome. Family friendly. $6, $3 for first-timers. Presented by H & B Dance Co. 859-727-0904. Fort Wright.

HEALTH / WELLNESS

Weight Loss Class, 6:30-7 p.m., Hickory Grove Baptist Church, 11969 Taylor Mill Road, $30 per month, $20 per month with three-month membership. First class free. Presented by Equipped Ministries. 859-8028965. Independence.

HOLIDAY - HALLOWEEN

Pumpkin Patch Tour, 10 a.m.-noon and 3-6 p.m., Sunrock Farm, $10 two-hour tour, $7 one-hour tour, free under age 1. Registration required. 859-781-5502; www.sunrockfarm.org. Wilder. THANKS TO SANDI STONEBRAKER

The Third annual Wee Folk Fairy Fest will be noon to 5 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 1, at MainStrasse’s Sixth Street Promenade in Covington. The festival, featuring a lineup of entertainment and art vendors, is based on the imaginative notion that for one day a year, MainStrasse opens a portal from the Fairy World for fairies and other magical beings to come through to play with humans. There will be a foot parade, led by a horse drawn carriage with the nominated Queen of the Fairies, at 3 p.m. Adults and children are encouraged to wear costumes.

ON STAGE - COMEDY

Underbelly, 9 p.m., Southgate House, 24 E. Third St., Doors open 8 p.m. Cincinnati’s strangest comedy show features improv, sketches, poetry, music and more. Ages 18 and up. $8, $5 advance. 859-431-2201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport.

PHOTO BY JOAN MARCUS

The Broadway musical, “Disney’s Beauty and the Beast” will be at the Aronoff Center through Oct. 9. It features the animated film’s Academy Award-winning score. Tickets start at $27.50. Visit www.BroadwayAcrossAmerica.com or call 800-982-2787. Pictured are Dane Agostinis as Beast and Emily Behny as Belle.


Life

CCF Recorder

September 29, 2011

B3

Soup plus bread equals a perfect rainy day meal It’s a soup and bread kind of day: drizzly rain, a bit chilly, and the sun hasn’t broken through the clouds at all. The recipes I’m sharing are perfect for autumn. I encourage you to try the bread. You won’t believe how easy it is, less than 5 minutes mixing up the dough, and by hand! Everyone will think it came from an artisan bakery. It’s the perfect accompaniment to my restaurantstyle black bean soup.

Rita’s black bean soup, like Panera’s

For Gerri. This is a good, basic black bean soup that is as close to Panera’s as I can get. But I’ll share yours, too, so don’t be shy about sending it in. Feel free to add more of any of the seasonings. 1 cup finely chopped onion 2 teaspoons minced garlic 1 generous cup finely chopped celery 1 ⁄2 cup finely chopped red bell pepper 1 teaspoon cumin Pinch or 2 of thyme 2 cans, 15 oz approx. black beans, undrained 1 can vegetable or chicken broth, 14.5 oz size 1 tablespoon cornstarch mixed with 1 tablespoon water Lemon juice to taste Cayenne pepper to taste Garnish: sour cream,

Rita Heikenfeld Rita’s kitchen

cilantro Film a pot with olive oil. A d d onion, garlic, celery, bell p e p p e r, cumin and thyme. Cook until onions are soft but

not brown. Add one can of beans and the can of broth. Bring to a boil, lower to a simmer, and cook about 10 minutes. Puree soup. I use a hand blender but you can use a potato masher – you’ll just get a chunkier soup. Add rest of beans and cornstarch mixture. Cook until thickened. Stir in lemon juice to taste and cayenne if you like. Garnish as desired. Serves 6.

Easy Artisan No-Knead Bread

Variations of this recipe have been around a few years. It really is so easy, but I’ve given detailed instructions anyway since this is a very unorthodox way of baking bread. Don’t be put off, either, by my long explanation. The best pan for this is a heavy Dutch oven or stockpot, anywhere from 5-7 quart with a lid and it has to be oven safe to 450. I use my Le Creuset enameled cast iron pan.

Check out the photo of this beautiful, crusty, better than bakery, bread. For more photos of the bread, from start to finish, check out my blog at Cincinnati.com 3 cups bread flour, plus bit more for dusting The original recipe says you can use either bread flour (it has more protein/gluten than all purpose so you get a more rustic texture) or all purpose. I’ve only made it with bread flour. 1 ⁄4 teaspoon instant yeast (Rapid rise) 11⁄2 teaspoons salt 11⁄2 cups + 1 tablespoon water Olive oil Flour or cornmeal for dusting (I used cornmeal) Whisk flour, yeast and salt together. Make a well in the center. Add water and stir with a spatula for about a minute, until blended. That’s all it takes, time wise. It will look wet and shaggy. Coat inside of a bowl with olive oil. Put dough in bowl and cover with wrap. Let rise 12-14 hours at room temperature, on counter if you want. It will double in size and still look real wet. Remove dough and fold

Find your community news at nky.com/local

RITA HEIKENFELD/CONTRIBUTOR

The best pan for this bread is a heavy Dutch oven or stockpot, anywhere from 57 quart with a lid and it has to be oven safe to 450. over a couple of times. Lay it on the counter or whatever that has been dusted with flour. Let rest 15 minutes. Shape into a ball – the ball will be somewhat flat. Coat a cotton towel (not terry cloth) that has been dusted with cornmeal or flour. Place dough on towel and cover with another

towel. Let rise 1-2 hours or until doubled in size. Now preheat your oven to 450 and while it’s preheating put the pan in with the lid on. Some recipes say to put the pan in the oven for at least 30 minutes, but I find the 20 minutes it takes to preheat my oven is just fine.

A Mile Of Festival

Carefully, with mitts, take the pan out of the oven and remove the lid, again with mitts. Turn the dough over into the pot, bottom side up. It it happens to land top side up, it’s OK. Shake the pot if you have to distribute the dough but don’t be too careful - it will bake up just fine. Cover and bake 30 minutes. Remove lid and bake uncovered another 15-30 minutes, until loaf is golden brown and, if you have a thermometer, stick it into the center and it will register 210 degrees when the loaf is done. In my oven this takes about 45-50 minutes total. Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator and author. E-mail columns@community press.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-2487130, ext. 356.

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SCRAP METAL HAS A NEW HOME. Brand new recycling facility opening October 17 at 4538 Kellogg Avenue.

Stop by and you’ll see we listen to our valued customers. Indoor pay windows, paved roadways, and a clean, friendly environment all add up to an experience that’s more rewarding.

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B4

CCF Recorder

September 29, 2011

Community | Life

Title insurance a safety net for buyers DeHart promoted to HR manager Today’s extremely low interest rates are prompting some people to look into getting their own home. Many are first-time buyers and, if you’re one of them, there’s one item you need to consider at the time of purchase. Tiah Collins of Westwood said she’s now learned the importance of buying what’s called title insurance. She and her husband had purchased a house on a land contract. “We paid the seller $1,500 a month from August 2006 to May 2007. At that time we were able to get approved for a loan through Wells Fargo Bank,” she said. Collins said they bought the house and began making payments to Wells Fargo. But then, last year, she said, “We got the sheriff knocking on our door saying the house had a ‘for sale’ date. The house was being foreclosed upon.” It turns out even though Collins was making her monthly mortgage pay-

Howard Ain Hey Howard!

ments, the loan belonging to the prior owner had never been paid off. “We were doing what we were supposed to do, but they say the seller’s loan was the first lien holder on the house,” Collins said. “Therefore, that was the best lien so … we’re just

out.” Wells Fargo also sued Collins because the house was being taken over by that prior lender. Fortunately, Wells Fargo was able to get its loan paid in full because it had required Collins to buy title insurance on behalf of the bank. Unfortunately, the Collins didn’t buy title insurance for themselves so they lost the house to the first lender. Had the Collins’ bought an owner’s title insurance policy, it would have paid

off the first lender and they could have remained in the house. “We didn’t buy title insurance because we didn’t know about it. We were first-time home buyers,” she said. On top of everything else, Collins said this whole affair is going to continue to haunt them because it’s going to go against their credit rating. “Had I known about title insurance, definitely I would have gotten it,” she said. Collins later sued the seller but the case was dismissed because no one was able to prove where the money went. Bottom line when buying a house, always hire an attorney to make sure you’re fully protected – especially if you’re a first-time home buyer. And be sure to consider buying a title insurance policy to protect yourself, not just your lender. Howard Ain answers consumer complaints weekdays on WKRC-TV Local 12. Write to him at 12 WKRC-TV, 1906 Highland Ave., Cincinnati 45219.

Scott DeHart, PHR, was recently promoted by the Cincinnati Association for the Blind and Visually Impaired (CABVI) to human resources manager. He joined CABVI in August, 2009. DeHart has a bachelor’s degree in management and human resources from Wright State University, and earned the designation of certified Professional in Human Resources. He is also currently attending the Chase College of Law at Northern Kentucky University. It was a college professor who is blind who first

sparked his interest in doing something to benefit people with disabilities. Not only DeHart was she a professional role model for him, she was his first access to seeing firsthand how jobs can be accessible to people with disabilities. She taught discrimination law using audio descriptors instead of notes to refer to during her class. DeHart and his wife, Lauren, reside in Wilder.

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COVINGTON - The Kentucky Historical Society will dedicate a historical marker to honor St. Elizabeth Healthcare at 10 a.m. Friday, Oct. 7, at 22 E. Seventh St. in Covington. Catholic converts Henrietta Cleveland and Sarah Peter founded the original St. Elizabeth hospital with Bishop George Carrell in Covington in January 1861. The Sisters of the Poor of St. Francis helped convert a vacant grocery store to serve those in need, including Civil War soldiers, slaves and orphans. St. Elizabeth Healthcare celebrated 150 years of operation this year. This historical marker is sponsored by Spectrum Computer Products Inc.

The Kentucky Historical Marker Program, administered by KHS in cooperation with the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet, commemorates historical sites, events and personalities throughout the state. Through the program, the wealth of Kentucky history is made accessible to the public on markers along the state’s roadways. The markers are on-the-spot history lessons that add drama and interest to the countryside for Kentuckians as well as tourists. For more information about the program, contact Becky Riddle, Kentucky Historical Marker program coordinator, at 502-564-1792, ext. 4474 or becky.riddle@ ky.gov.

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Community

Day of Peace brings awareness

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The second annual Wheelchair Veterans in Sports fundraiser will be 611 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 15, at The Newport Elks Club, 3704 Alexandria Pike, in Cold Spring. The spaghetti dinner with include draft beer and soda, along with split the

17th annual Day of Peace

11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday, Sept. 30, at the Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, Covington.

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Russell Swigart, who broke into Wright’s residence and stabbed to death two of her cats. Day of Peace is an annual event held to promote peace and reduce violence in families, neighborhoods and schools in Northern Kentucky. For more information, contact Tasha Wilder, Day of Peace committee chairperson, Women’s Crisis Center, 859-372-3572 or tashaw@wccky.org.

CCF Recorder

B5

Wheelchair Veterans in Sports fundraiser Oct. 15

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Northern Kentucky kicks off October as National Domestic Violence Awareness month with its 17th annual Day of Peace 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday, Sept. 30, at the Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, Covington. The event is free to the public and includes lunch. Local music group Ellery will perform. Mona Morrow, director of community affairs at WCPO-TV, will serve as the master of ceremonies. The event theme this year is: “Be a Courageous Voice for Peace!” and focuses on generating awareness to the realities of both stalking and pet abuse – often hidden forms of dating/domestic violence. Keynote Speaker is Bridgett Wright, Northern Kentucky resident and survivor in the 2009 conviction of

September 29, 2011

Check Exchange Turfway 859-647-2160 Latonia 859-431-8666 Newport 859-491-6888 Florence 859-746-0966

pot, raffles and door prizes, including a 43-inch plasma television. Local band Wizard will perform from 7-11 p.m. Tickets are $15 in advance; $20 at the door. For more information, call Mike at 859-391-2058 or Dan at 513-741-1686.

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Boy Scouts Adam Hoffmann, Alex Schwartz and Ben See, along with Troop 96 Assistant Scoutmaster, Mark See, met Senator Katie Stine and Mayor Bill Rachford after the ceremony.

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B6

CCF Recorder

Community

September 29, 2011

Ghoulish Gala benefit bewitches, bedazzles Oct. 29 Prepare to “Be Witched and Be Dazzled” at the third annual Ghoulish Gala, hosted by The Advocates to benefit the Northern Kentucky Children’s Advocacy Center. The Advocates are the fundraising group for the NKCAC which is located in Florence. Whether you attend to enjoy the outlandish costumes or dance the night away to The Chuck Taylors, not to mention enjoying a gourmet dinner, you’re sure to have an uncanny experience. Mark your calendar for Oct. 29 and make your reservations early, because this popular event sells out every year. Amy Wainio Brown of Union, Kimberly Carlisle of Union and Nancy Francis of Fort Wright have been named tri-chairs of the gala and are hard at work to create a supernatural evening. Tickets are $100 and are now on sale at www.nkycac.org. Other special features of the evening include the grand march of costumes, a cos-

1st Tweed & Friends 9pm-1am 15th Inside Out 9pm-1am 29th Monster Bash Costume Party 9pm-1am

Monday Men’s Night Thursday Ladies Night

This original autographed painting of Jay Bruce by Shawn Voelker will be featured in the silent auction at the 2011 Ghoulish Gala. tume contest and free professional photos. The gala also features silent and live auctions and a grand raffle with a top prize of a $10,000 shopping spree donated by Furniture Fair. Other grand raffle prizes

Sports TVs Karaoke Fridays Free Pool Mondays

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Ghoulish Gala tri-chairs, from left, Kimberly Carlisle of Union, Amy Wainio Brown of Union and Nancy Francis of Fort Wright join a spooky friend to prepare for the Ghoulish Gala. The event will benefit the Northern Kentucky Children’s Advocacy Center. Charlene Erler Legacy Award, given annually for a significant contribution to the Community Foundation of Northern Kentucky, which provides administrative and operational support to NKCAC. Event sponsors include Ghoulish Sponsors Furniture Fair and C&B Marine and Ghostly Sponsors Crawford Insurance, Terex Cranes, Lally Pipe & Tube, Carlisle Enterprises, Inc., UBS Financial Ser-

vices and Maxim Crane. For more information contact NKCAC at 859-572-3365 or visit our website at www.nkycac.org. The Northern Kentucky Children’s Advocacy Center is a nonprofit organization that provides services to children who have been sexually abused, severely physically abused and children who have witnessed violent crimes.

Woman’s Club presents comedy show Oct. 8-9

Your neighborhood spot for cold beer and great company anytime of the week

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October Events

PROVIDED

include large screen TVs and a Blu-ray/DVD player. The televisions and Blu-ray/DVD player were donated by Aaron’s Sales & Lease Ownership, an independently owned franchise of the Wilkins family. One of the many highlights of the silent auction is an original painting of Cincinnati Reds star right fielder Jay Bruce, autographed by Bruce and created by well-known local artist Shawn Voelker. The photo of Bruce on which the painting was based was taken in June 2011, right before Jay smashed a line drive, from which he later scored. Voelker, a favorite artist of many sports stars, has work featured in many corporate and private collections. He was one of the pioneers of the technique featured in this painting, combining foil and acrylics to create a unique work of art. The Ghoulish Gala will recognize Dr. Philip and Barbara Lichtenstein with presentation of the

The Fort Thomas Woman’s Club will present the CakeTown COMEDY JAM! Oct. 8-9 at the Village Players Theater in Fort Thomas. The two-hour show of light entertainment will feature stand up comedians, short comic plays, musical comedy and storytelling by Tristate performers, actors and writers. The Carol Burnett-type comic variety show is rated PG-13 and will feature a

lineup of local favorites, including Teri Foltz, recent Funniest Person in Cincinnati finalist; Thomas Cox, Funniest Person in Northern Kentucky 2009; John Bunyan, Funniest Person in Cincinnati 2010; Newport humorist Charles Egerton; award-winning Fort Thomas playwright Phil Paradis; Newport musical humorist Peter Lloyd; and musician Max Colvill, a senior at Highlands High School.

Donated and framed artwork by Fort Thomas artist Sara Hamel and framed photographs by Charles Edgerton and Jeff Porter, former Highlands student, will be offered for silent auction in the lobby prior to the show and during intermission. CakeTown COMEDY JAM! will be 8 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 8, and 3 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 9, at the Village Players Theater, 8 N. Fort Thomas Ave. Tickets are

$15 and can be purchased by calling 859-441-5683 or at the door. Proceeds will benefit the Fort Thomas Woman’s Club and the Village Players. All personnel, comedians, actors, performers and writers involved are volunteers. CakeTown COMEDY JAM! is produced by Teri Foltz, a recently retired Highlands English teacher. For more information, call Teri Foltz at 859-8033689.

Carnegie hosts Bellydance Superstars The fourth annual Carnival Noir Costume Party returns for a night of fairy tales and fantasy at The Carnegie Visual & Performing Arts Center on Thursday, Oct. 6. As a special Halloween treat, Carnival’s fairy tale themed show will be the opening act for the Bellydance Superstar dancers, as they team up with local bellydance troupes with Club Bellydance. Festivities start at 7 p.m. Tickets at $20 are on sale now. Club Bellydance is a twoact performance concept that

features select internationally renowned Bellydance Superstars (www.bellydancesuperstars.com ) dancers Sabah, Moria, Sabrina, Stefanya and Victoria and locally-based premier belly dancers Zahara's Tangled Web, Dante's Gypsy Circus, Alhambra and Anaya Gypsy. The Bellydance Superstars will showcase new choreography and ideas designed for the intimate, club-style show. Carnival Noir’s preshow also includes mimes, singers and contortionists. Moria Chappell will also be teaching a bellydance

workshop the following morning (Friday, Oct. 7), offering local dancers a chance to “study with a Superstar.” Prizes will be given during the costume party contest that follows the performances. Vendors and tarot readers will also be available. The Carnegie Visual & Performing Arts Center is located at 1028 Scott St., Covington. Hours are 7-11 p.m. For ticket information (discounts for groups of 10 or more), visist www.TheCarnegie.com or call 859957-1940.

Adult Day Program

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Being a caregiver for someone with Alzheimer’s disease or related dementia can be a very rewarding, yet challenging job. The goal of the Adult Day Program at Legacy Court is to help create a support network which allows those affected with memory loss to enjoy life on their own terms, and allows caregivers the peace of mind to attend to everyday life.

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Independent Living | Assisted Living Memory Care | Rehabilitation Skilled Nursing | Adult Day Programs 230 West Galbraith Road | Cincinnati, OH 45215 (513) (513)948-2308 457-4209 | www.seniorlifestyle.com


Community

September 29, 2011

CCF Recorder

B7

Fort Thomas resident recruits for chamber Camp Carnegie

PROVIDED

Camp Carnegie participants, from left to right, Morgan Thompson of Cincinnati, Marissa Brunner of Fort Thomas, Abagail Clark of Cincinnati, Savannah Pinson of Fort Mitchell and Loghan Currin of Walton perform on stage at The Carnegie for friends and family. Camp Carnegie is a two-week summer program that gives children the chance to explore the world of theatre through live performance, hands-on art making, dramatic exercises, script writing and other activities, ending with a final live performance.

In an effort to spur growth for businesses and in-turn, the region, Fort Thomas resident Matthew Rich is one of 30 current members of the Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber who is engaging and recruiting local businesses to become members. The Katz, Teller, Brant & Hild employee is a supporter of the Cincinnati region and the impact a Chamber membership has on growth in the community, having experienced it first-hand with his own membership.

N o w through Oct. 31, Rich and his fellow volunteers will meet one-on-one with busiRich ness executives across the Cincinnati USA region to advocate the advantages of being a Chamber member. They will discuss a variety of ways companies can save money, network, learn, activate a government voice

and support fun events while also keeping the region strong. “Volunteering my time wasn’t a difficult decision as the Chamber is an excellent resource that benefits the entire community,” said Rich. “If more businesses take advantage of the programs and services the Chamber has to offer, Cincinnati’s economic climate will vastly improve.” Rich will volunteer his time on top of fulfilling his role as an attorney at Katz, Teller, Brant & Hild.

Big fish

Tommy Ratterman of Bellevue with his Grandpa Dave Rechtin of Fort Thomas with the 39-inch, 21pound striper Tommy caught while fishing with his grandpa at Norris Lake in Lafollette, Tenn. THANKS TO TOM RATTERMAN

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Property improvement lights up the Levee Newport on the Levee has taken a step toward becoming a “greener” property. New, energy-efficient fluorescent light bulb fixtures were installed over the past few months in the Levee’s parking garage. The project, managed by Becker Electric, has proven to be environmentally conscience by reducing the electrical demand in the area, while also “brightening” up the garage with a wider light distribution. The property’s previous high intensity discharge (HID) system 150 watt fixtures were replaced with three lamp linear fluorescents that consume 85 watts instead of 185 watts. The transition to the new fixtures will ultimately save 946,080 kWh of energy, which is the equivalent of 171 fewer cars on the road each year. Another advantage of using the fluorescent bulbs is that the lamps last three times longer than the HID system, burning 30,000 hours compared to the 10,000 hour lamp life of HID’s, which saves the staff from a time consuming and what might be considered an unsafe practice of constantly switching light bulbs. “Our new, eco-friendly parking garage lighting upgrade is not only looking out for the environment, but for our visitors too,” stated Harold Dull, General Manager of Newport on the Levee. “The brighter, more even distribution of light that the new fixtures produce makes the garage extra inviting for our guests.”

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CLEARWATER - Indian Rocks Beach 2 BR , 2 BA Gulf Front con do. Heated pool, balcony. Many upgrades. 513-771-1373, 448-7171 www.go-qca.com/condo

CLEARWATER TO ST. PETE BEACHES Gulf front & bay side condos. All prices & sizes! Florida Lifestyle VAC. 1-800-487-8953. Jan. 2012, Monthly Discounts • www.ourcondo.com

N. MYRTLE BEACH Coastal Condos, Inc. 1-4 bdrm oceanfront & ocean view units. Call 1-800-951-4880 or visit www.coastalcondos.com

SEABROOK EXCLUSIVES Villas & Private Homes. Ocean, golf, tennis, equestrian. Pet friendly rentals. Free brochure. Book online! 888-718-7949. www.seabrook-vacations.info

TENNESSEE SANIBEL ISLAND Quality, beachfront condos. Excellent service! Great rates! www.SanibelIslandVacations.com 1-888-451-7277

NEW YORK MANHATTAN--NYC HOTEL $129/2 persons. Singles $124. Suites $139-$159. Lincoln Ctr area, Hudson River views, 18 flrs, kitchenette, 5 mins to midtown, safe, quiet, luxury area. RIVERSIDE TOWER, Riverside & 80th St. Call 1-800-724-3136 or visit: www.riversidetowerhotel.com

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Plan a stay with Seashore Vacations. Oceanfront condos. Walk to dine and shop. Golf discounts. Free tennis. Call 1-800-845-0077 or book online at www.seashorehhi.com.

Higher premiums and changes in drug coverage are two reasons why Medicare participants may want to compare Medicare prescription drug plans (Part D) this year. Many companies not only raise monthly premiums but often change which drugs they will cover for the upcoming year. Open enrollment this year has been moved up to October 15th thru December 7th. If you need assistance comparing plans the Senior Medicare Patrol (SMP) sponsored by Brighton Center is offering free counseling to Northern Kentucky residents For assistance contact SMP at 859-491-8303 ext. 2336.

1-7 Affordable, Deluxe Chalets & Cabin Rentals. Pigeon Forge in the Smokies. Vacation/Dollywood Specials. Free brochure. Call 1-800-833-9987. www.firesidechalets.com

A Beautiful Cabin Getaway Gatlinburg/Pigeon Forge. Hot tub, jacuzzi, fireplace, gas grill. $85/nt, 5 nt special $375. 800-793-8699. smokymtncrossrdrentals.com

Funded by the U.S. Administration on Aging CE-0000475408


B8

CCF Recorder

September 29, 2011

Community

Five graduate from Board Orientation class

The following five Northern Kentucky residents graduated from the United Way of Greater Cincinnati Board Orientation Leadership Development (BOLD) Class: Holly Barnes, KPMG LPP; Michael Napier, HORAN Securities; Andrea Schell, Anthem Blue Cross Blue Shield; Matthew Schneider, Ernst & Young; and Keisha Steward, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center.

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Participants in BOLD, a program for people with limited or no board experience, complete six half-day sessions to learn the latest in leadership and business management techniques as well as the core responsibilities of board members. They then select an agency in the community where they can put to use their newly-acquired skills. More than 400 BOLD graduates have served on Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky’s nonprofit boards and committees. For more information, visit www.uwgc.org/BOLD or call Nickol Mora at 513762-7235.

LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE is hereby given that the Kentucky Public Service Commission has scheduled a public hearing in a case styled “An Examination of the Application of the Fuel Adjustment Clause of Duke Energy Kentucky, Inc. from November 1, 2010 through April 30, 2011,” Case No. 2011-00249, beginning Tuesday, October 18, 2011 at 10:00 a.m., Eastern Daylight Time, at the Commission’s offices, 211 Sower Boulevard, Frankfort, Kentucky for the purpose of examination relating to Duke Energy Kentucky’s fuel adjustment clause from November 1, 2010 through April 30, 2011. CE-0000479009

Giant Tent Sale Oct 7-10, 2011

THANKS TO BESSIE TALIAFERRO

Five Northern Kentucky residents graduated from the United Way of Greater Cincinnati Board Orientation Leadership Development (BOLD) Class. Pictured is the 2011 BOLD graduating class including Matthew Schneider, Ernst & Young (front row, third from right); Holly Barnes, KPMG LLP (second row, first from left); Keisha Steward, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, and Andrea Schell, Anthem Blue Cross Blue Shield (third row, second and third from left); and Michael Napier, HORAN Securities (third row, fifth from left).

KHIP report results compare region to state

The 2010 Kentucky Health Issues Poll (KHIP) found that Northern Kentucky adults reported more walkable communities, but were less likely to support a statewide smoke-free law compared to the rest of the state. KHIP, conducted annually, identifies what residents think about various health issues that affect communities, the state and the nation. It is jointly funded by The Health Foundation of Greater Cincinnati and the Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky.

Like the statewide results, adults in Northern Kentucky: • Find eating in a smokefree restaurant more enjoyable – 53 percent; • Support smoke-free school campuses – 83 percent; • Support treatment over incarceration for people convicted of nonviolent illegal drug use – 76 percent or nonviolent crimes while under the influence of alcohol – 73 percent; • Support a complete ban on cell phone use while driving – 67 percent;

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WHATEVER YOUR BUSINESS OR SERVICE — LIST IT IN THE NORTHERN KENTUCKY BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL SERVICE DIRECTORY! To advertise contact Terri Gilland at 513.768.8608, fax 513.768.8632 or email tgilland@enquirer.com

• Need more information to understand how the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act will affect them and their families – 70 percent; • Are always, usually or sometimes stressed about having enough money to pay the rent or mortgage – 60 percent. In addition, Northern Kentucky adults were less likely to: • Support a statewide smoke-free law – 40 percent in Northern Kentucky; 48 percent statewide; • Support a law banning all cell phone use while driving – 67 percent in Northern Kentucky; 74 percent statewide; • Live below 100 percent of the Federal Poverty Guideline – 17 percent in Northern Kentucky; 25 percent statewide. For more information, visit www.healthfoundation.org/data_publications/k hip.html.

NAMI N. Ky. to hold first fundraising walk Oct. 8 NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness) Northern Kentucky, will hold its first “Steps Against Stigma” Fundraising Walk during Mental Health Awareness Week Saturday, Oct. 8, at Pioneer Park in Covington. Registration will begin at 10:30 a.m., and the walk will start at 11 a.m. This walk is the only fundraising event planned for NAMI Northern Kentucky in 2011. This event will be family friendly, and teams are welcome. Cost per person is $35, which includes lunch, T-shirt, and entertainment. To request a team packet or to provide corporate or private sponsorship, contact the NAMI NKY office at 859-261-4080. After the walk the group is hosting the NAMI NKY Annual Family Picnic from noon to 1 p.m. The day will end with the annual meeting from 1-1:30 p.m. For more information or to register, visit www.naminky.org or call 859-261-4080.

FIND news about the place where you live at NKY.com/local


Community

CCF Recorder

September 29, 2011

B9

‘Baseball & Beyond’ at NKU

PROVIDED

The Chick-fil-A cow entertained and helped serve drinks during the thank you luncheon sponsored by the Northern Kentucky Children’s Advocacy Center. They said thanks to multi-disciplinary team members. Here she gives a high five to Reece Stahl, being held by her mom, Kendra. Looking on is big sister Regan.

NKY advocacy center says thank you

Chick-fil-A cow. The Northern Kentucky Children’s Advocacy Center is a nonprofit organization that provides services to children that have been sexually abused, severely physically abused and children who have witnessed violent crimes. In addition, the NKCAC provides supportive services for nonoffending parents, caregivers, siblings, family members and professionals. As the designated regional children’s advocacy center, it serves Boone, Campbell, Carroll, Gallatin, Grant, Kenton, Owen and Pendleton counties. More information is available at www.nkycac.

guest Hall of Fame manager Tommy Lasorda, will honor the senator. Starting at 5 p.m. Lasorda and Bunning will mingle with guests at an intimate reception in the George and Ellen Rieveschl Digitorium in NKU’s Griffin Hall. All attendees will receive a

with a lecture, where Lasorda and Bunning will recall their Major League days and Bunning will reflect on the current political landscape. Tickets are $25. For more information, to purchase tickets or to make a donation to the preservation initiative, visit http://bunning.nku.edu or call 859-572-6062.

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NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN BY PROPER ORDER OF THE CAMPBELL DISTRICT COURT THAT THE FOLLOWING WERE APPOINTED FIDUCIARIES OF THE ESTATES LISTED BELOW FOR THE MONTH. ALL PERSONS HAVING A CLAIM AGAINST THE ESTATE SHALL PRESENT THEM VERIFIED ACCORDING TO LAW TO THE FOLLOWING FIDUCIARIES NO LATER THAN SIX MONTHS FROM THE DATE OF OPENING. DECEASED ANTOINETTE WOLFZORN

FIDUCIARY E. JOHN WOLFZORN 20 IRON BOTTOM LN. CHARLESTON, SC 29492

ATTORNEY JAMES DRESSMAN 207 THOMAS MORE PKWY CRESTVIEW HILLS, KY 41017

HAROLD CONRADY

MICHAEL BAKER 3267 NORTHGATE DR. CINCINNATI, OH 45248

JOSEPH BAKER 541 BUTTERMILK PK. COVINGTON, KY 41017

GEORGE RAGAN

MARIAN RAGAN 6707 MURNAN RD COLD SPRING, KY 41076

JAMES LUERSEN 515 MONMOUTH ST. NERWPORT, KY 41071

BRADLEY COMBS

DORTHEA THOMAS 14293 AULICK RD BUTLER, KY 41006

N/A

RUBY WICKELHAUS

DAVID WICKELHAUS 8350 VERDANT DR. WEST CHESTER, OH 45069

BRENDA PENROSE 6170 FIRST FINANCIAL DR. BURLINGTON, KY 41005

THOMAS EVISTON

AMANDA BRADFORD 121 S. 3RD ST. WILLIAMSBURG, OH 45176

N/A

DOLORES FRANZEN

GERALD FRANZEN 4533 MARTHA LANE FT. WORTH, TX 76103

HARRY RUST PO BOX 312 ALEXANDRIA, KY 41001

HERBERT SCHOULIES

JAMES TAYLOR 23 PARKER RD. NEWPORT, KY 41071

RICHARD JOHNSON 50 N. FT. THOMAS AVE. FT. THOMAS, KY 41075

CELIE KEENE 9589 ECHO HILLS ALEXANDRIA, KY 41001

Artist in ‘Off The Wall’exhibit

PROVIDED

Nancy Pendery's painting "Tapestry and Lace."

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CE-1001666718-01

Fort Thomas resident and Cincinnati Art Club member Nancy Pendery will celebrate the colorful yield of her summer painting experiences in a group art show at the historic Cincinnati Art Club Wessel Gallery in Mt. Adams. The “Off The Wall” event is open Oct. 1-2, 1-5 p.m. each day. The Wessel Gallery is located at 1021 Parkside Place, in Cincinnati. Each of the participating artists has a distinctive style, which will provide the show a multiple personality. More than 100 unique works of original art will be on display. Pendery has worked as an artist since 1989, starting with lessons at Baker Hunt and then watercolor classes with Don Dennis. She has studied with various other artists including Jack Meanwell, Ruthe Pearlman, Michael Scott, Charles Sovek, Susan Sarback, and David Mueller. Pendery enjoys doing other crafts such as quilting and jewelry making and has received awards from The Montgomery Art, Show, Women’s Art Club Annual Show, Masterworks, and “Best of Show” for a watercolor from the River Valley Regional Art Show in Indiana. Her work is featured in galleries in Louisville and Bar Harbor, Maine, as well as in collections including St. Luke Hospital, Anderson Consulting, Star Bank and a collection in London. Pendery works mostly in oil but enjoys watercolor, acrylic and pastel. The “Off the Wall” reception and exhibit are free and open to the public. For more information on the Cincinnati Art Club, visit www.cincinnatiartclub.com.

baseball signed by the two Hall of Famers. Tickets to the reception are $1,000. The group then will move to the University Center for a dinner where Bunning will discuss why he donated his papers to NKU. Items from Rex Morgan, the largest collector of Bunning memorabilia, will be on display during the dinner. Individual tickets to the dinner are $125. The evening will end

Once opened to the public, scholars researching Bunning’s life can learn about some of the key decisions Bunning faced while in office as well as see artifacts from his days as a Hall of Fame pitcher.

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TICKETS: $25 in Advance (ticket covers both shows), $30 at the door. Reservations must be in by October 5, 2011. Assigned seating. Order early to get the best seats. For Questions or Reservations, please call 859-866-6372 or email wildthing1@zoomtown.com Rinks Flea Market Bingo

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MARIAN MCNAY

MICHAEL MCNAY 612 OAK ST. NEWPORT, KY 41071

WILLIAM SPOOR 1134 CLEVELAND AVE. PARK HILLS, KY 41011

JANET BROWN

STEPHEN BROWN 3096 TREETOP WAY EDGEWOOD, KY 41075

FRANK BENTON PO BOX 72218 NEWPORT, KY 41071

FRED STEWART

ELSIE MCHUGH 543 HALLAM AVE. ERLANGER, KY 41018

RICHARD JOHNSON 50 N. FT. THOMAS AVE. FT. THOMAS, KY 41075

DIANE GASKINS

SARAH LAVELLE 700 HAND AVE. CINCINNATI, OH 45232

GERALD BENZINGER 207 THOMAS MORE PKWY CRESTVIEW HILLS, KY 41017

CHARLOTTE WAGNER

JULIE BRIDEWELL 125 BROOKWOOD DR. ALEXANDRIA, KY 41001

BRYAN UNDERWOOD PO BOX 277 MAYSVILLE, KY 41056

MYRON REINHARDT

CONNIE HULSMEYER 1200 SHALLOW LAKE CR. HOPKINSVILLE, KY 452240

EDWARD BUECHEL 6900 HOUSTON RD. STE 43 FLORENCE, KY 41042

BETTY SHEANSHANG

STEPHEN SHEANSHANG 373 KNOLLWOOD DR. HIGHLAND HEIGHTS, KY 41076

ROBERT JENNINGS 3 WHISPERING WOODS LANE ALEXANDRIA KY 41001

MARY DOUGHERTY

KAREN DEAN 33 TREMONT AVE. FT. THOMAS, KY 41075

JANN SEIDENFADEN 122 N. FT. THOMAS AVE. FT. THOMAS, KY 41075

BARBARA GIBBONS

RODNEY GIBBONS 2916 AFFIRMED DR. NORTH BEND, OH 45052

KENNETH FLACKS 9521 MONTGOMERY RD. CINCINNATI, OH 45242

JOHN MANNING

JAMES MANNING 38 SADDLE RIDGE TRAIL ALEXANDRIA, KY 41001

JANN SEIDENFADEN 122 N. FT. THOMAS AVE. FT. THOMAS, KY 41075

TIMOTHY SMITH SR.

CHRISTINA SMITH 201 CLAY ST. APT C-1 DAYTON, KY 41074

CHARLES LESTER 5247 MADISON PIKE INDEPENDENCE, KY 41051

TAUNYA NOLAN JACK CAMPBELL CIRCUIT CLERK BY: C.K. WASSER, DEPUTY CLERK CAMPBELL DISTRICT COURT PROBATE COURT

CE-1001666214-01

FLORENCE - On July 22, the Northern Kentucky Children’s Advocacy, with the help of Chick-fil-A’s Houston Road location, served a thank you luncheon to thank law enforcement, social workers, prosecutors and victim advocates for the hard work and dedication they provide to the children served by the NKCAC. The lunch was held at the Northern Kentucky Children Advocacy Center in Florence and food was provided by Chick-fil-a and Tim and Patti Lally. About 30 multi-disciplinary team members and their families enjoyed the luncheon and took photos with special guest: the

Northern Kentucky University will celebrate Jim Bunning, a national figure known for his Major League Baseball play and long political career, on Nov. 10 with “U.S. Senator Jim Bunning: Baseball and Beyond,” a reception, dinner and lecture to raise money to support the processing of Bunning’s Congressional papers and baseball memorabilia. The former Kentucky senator donated items from his years with the Detroit Tigers and Philadelphia Phillies, where he pitched no-hitters and perfect games, along with correspondence and reports from his 24 years as a U.S. representative and senator to NKU’s W. Frank Steely Library. His collection will join the political papers of Kentucky Congressmen Eugene Snyder and Ken Lucas, also housed in the Eva G. Farris Special Collections and Schlachter University Archives. Once opened to the public, scholars researching Bunning’s life can learn about some of the key decisions Bunning faced while in office as well as see artifacts from his days as a Hall of Fame pitcher. Preserving, digitizing and cataloguing his collection will require additional staff and resources. To speed the process, NKU is hosting a fundraiser, where Bunning’s friends and supporters, including special

CENTRAL CAMBELL FIRE DISTRICT DISTRICT BOARD MEMBERSHIP DESIGNATED 3RD THURSDAY OF THE MOTHE @ 7 P.M. 4113 MEETING DATE, ALEXANFRIA PIKE, COLD SPRING TIME & PLACE President/Chair: Member: Clarence Martin Gene McCord 5693 Weaver Lane 52 Robinson Road Cold Spring, Ky. 41076 Highland Heights, Ky. 41076 Term Expires June 30, 2014 Term Expires June 30, 2013 First Full Term, First Full Term Vice President: Chuck Pettit 23 Robinson Road Highland Heights, Ky. 41076 Term Expires June 30, 2013 Third or More Full Term,

Member: Dave Rust 5958 Crystal View Cold Spring, Ky. 41076 Term Expires June 30, 2012 Third or More Full Term,

Secretary: Joe Krebs 302 Main Avenue Highland Heights, Ky. 41076 Term Expires June 30, 2014 First Full Term,

Member: Al Garnick 75 Stoneyridge Cold Springs, Ky. 41076 Term Expires June 30, 2015 First Full Term,

Treasurer: Mark Schroder 10 Marian Drive Cold Spring, Ky. 41076 Term Expires June 30, 2012 First Full Term,

CE-1001666682-01


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RECORD

CCF Recorder

THE

September 29, 2011

BELLEVUE

Arrests/citations

Jason Craig, 35, 211 Berry, alcohol intoxication in a public place, second

NON-DENOMINATIONAL Family Worship Center 97 Three Mile Rd. Wilder, Ky. 41076 859-441-5433

| DEATHS | Editor Michelle Shaw | smhaw@nky.com | 578-1053

degree disorderly conduct at 211 Berry, Sept. 12. Sheri Gantzermorton, 37, 243 Van Voast, warrant at 243 Van Voast, Sept. 16. Breanna Robonson, 24, 8120 Duane Drive No. 14, Bellevue Beach Park at Bellevue Beach Park, Sept. 16. Manuel Rodriguez, 43, 218 Sixth St., expired plates, no license, no insurance at 605 Route 8, Sept. 17. Dennis Ray Harding III, 22, 471 Foote Ave., theft by unlawful taking at 400 block of Foote Ave., Sept. 18. Billy Woodruff, 40, 2521 Warren St., fourth degree assault at Tiger Stadium, Sept. 19. Felicia Johnson, 26, 415 Taylor, warrant at 415 Taylor, Sept. 19.

CAMPBELL COUNTY Arrests/citations

Service Time: Sunday 10:45am

LOVE & FAITH FELLOWSHIP CHURCH

720 York St., Newport KY 41071 859-581-4244 Pastor: Gordon Milburn Sunday School: 9:30 am Sunday Morning Worship: 10:30 am Sun. & Wed. Eve Service: 6:00 pm

Amy N. Fields, 25, 1070 Davjo, warrant at Ky. 9 and Licking Pike, Sept. 10. Michael E. Grothaus, 20, 10 Cedar Point, warrant at 8774 Constable Drive, Sept. 16. Joseph A. Lynch, 40, 10548 Mary Ingles Hwy., warrant, possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia at Mary Ingles Highway and Lois Lane, Sept. 15. Chad E. Crum, 33, 2612 Crisnic Court, warrant at AA Highway, Sept. 16.

BIRTHS

POLICE

|

REAL

AN ORDINANCE AMENDING CHAPTER 95 OF THE "CITY OF FORT THOMAS CODE OF ORDINANCES" BY ADDING AN EXCEPTION TO SECTION 95.05 TO ALLOW FOR THE DISCHARGE OF ARROWS FROM BOWS OR CROSSBOWS UNDER SPECIFIC CIRCUMSTANCES. WHEREAS, the city enacted ordinance O-35-2007 to allow for the discharge of arrows from bows and crossbows within the city; and WHEREAS, ordinance O-35-2007 included a "sunset clause" which required the expiration of the ordinance on February 1, 2011; and WHEREAS, Section 95.05 has expired and is no longer in effect; and WHEREAS, the city continues to experience deer-vehicle accidents in the city due to the deer population in the city; and WHEREAS, the Board of Council desires to provide for the discharge of arrows from bows and crossbows on certain properties in the city to help reduce the number of deer and improve public safety by reducing the number of deer-vehicle accidents in the city. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED THAT: SECTION I Section 95.05 of the City of Fort Thomas Code of Ordinances is hereby amended by adding as follows: § 95.05 DISCHARGE OF FIREARMS AND OTHER WEAPONS. No person shall discharge any firearm of any nature, nor use or discharge any sling, bow or other weapon in the City of Fort Thomas, except as specifically provided hereinbelow. The prohibition of this section shall not apply to any police officer or agent of this city acting in his or her official capacity. (A) Exceptions. The provisions of this subchapter shall not apply to any individual discharging an arrow from a bow or crossbow when such discharge meets all of the following requirements: (1) When such discharge occurs: (a) From one-half hour before sunrise to 10:00 AM from November 1 through November 21 or from January 1 through the end of the Kentucky archery hunting season for deer as established by the Common wealth of Kentucky for that year; or (b) Pursuant to a depredation permit issued by the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources; and (2) When the individual is discharging an arrow from a point not less than 200 feet from a residence, apartment, or business structure not on the property on which the discharge is occurring, or a street, highway, interstate, railroad or park, in the direction the arrow is discharged; and (3) When the individual is discharging an arrow in a manner where no residence, apartment or business structure not on the property on which the discharge is occurring, or a street, highway, interstate, railroad or park is less than 100 feet to both the left and right of the direction of the arrow’s trajectory; and (4) When the individual is discharging an arrow in a manner in which it does not leave the property from which it is being discharged; and (5) When the individual is discharging an arrow not more than 35 yards from the intended target; and (6) When the individual discharging an arrow is either the owner of the property upon which the arrow is being discharged or has the permission of the property owner upon which the arrow is being discharged; and (7) When the discharge occurs on a lot 3 acres or greater in area, or on a combination of contiguous lots under the same ownership which cumulatively are 3 acres or greater in area.

Incidents/investigations Animal complaint

ATTEST: _____________________ Melissa K. Kelly, City Clerk

1001666444

N K Y. c o m

Report of black Labrador dog ran in front of motorcycle and was struck at Ky. 536 and Ky. 915, Sept. 11.

Criminal mischief

Report of front door egged multiple times over past two weeks at 1106 Davjo, Sept. 12.

First degree criminal mischief

Report of electrical wiring cut from home under construction at 12767 Walnut Creek, Sept. 7.

Found property

Woman reported finding several syringes and other drug paraphernalia along roadway while jogging at Four Mile Road, Sept. 12.

Fourth degree assault

Report of juvenile male assaulted by another juvenile male at 9852 Man O War, Sept. 10. Woman reported being assaulted previous night at friend’s house when man punched her in face at 8774 Constable Drive, Sept. 10.

Fraudulent use of credit card

Third degree criminal mischief

About police reports

The Community Recorder publishes the names of all adults charged with offenses. The information is a matter of public record and does not imply guilt or innocence. video game console, games and controllers taken at 7031 Backus Drive, Sept. 11. Report of jewelry taken from apartment at 1164 Davjo Drive, apartment 4, Sept. 13.

Second degree possession of a controlled instrument

Report of three checks taken, forged and cashed at 6677 Murnan Road, Sept. 11.h

Theft by unlawful taking

Possible fraud

Report of S-10 pickup truck taken at Greis Road, Sept. 11. Report of dryer taken out of bed of pickup truck at 9855 Riva Ridge, Sept. 12.

Second degree burglary

Report of locks cut off sheds and sixgallon gas can taken at 11723 Burns Road, Sept. 10.

Report of wallet taken from truck and credit card used for purchases at Ky. 10 and Persimmon Grove Pike, Sept. 13.

Woman reported receiving credit card mail and call for another person at 8774 Constable Drive, Sept. 12.

Third degree burglary

ORDINANCE NO. O-18-2011 AN ORDINANCE AMENDING “CHAPTER 75, SCHEDULE I: ONE-WAY STREETS” OF THE CITY OF FORT THOMAS CODE OF ORDINANCES ESTABLISHING TRAFFIC DIRECTION ON WOODFILL AVENUE AS TWO-WAY AND REMOVING THE DESIGNATION OF SAME AS A ONEWAY STREET THEREFROM. WHEREAS, previously the Fort Thomas Board of Education has committed to substantial remodeling and capital improvements to Woodfill Elementary School; and WHEREAS, said remodeling and capital improvements negatively impacted school parking, parent drop-off and pick-up of students, and local traffic in the vicinity of the Woodfill Elementary; and WHEREAS, previously the Fort Thomas Board of Education and city staff met to review the impact of said remodeling and capital improvements, and to determine a traffic flow pattern which will provide the greatest relief to the negative impacts; and WHEREAS, the Fort Thomas Board of Council in its Ordinance O-14-2009 designated Woodfill Avenue as one-way in a northeasterly direction; and WHEREAS, the Fort Thomas Board of Education has substantially completed the remodeling and capital improvements to Woodfill Elementary School; and WHEREAS, the Fort Thomas Board of Education, city staff and the Fort Thomas Board of Council have all determined that removing the one-way traffic designation from Woodfill Avenue is appropriate to facilitate appropriate traffic patterns. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY OF FORT THOMAS, CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY, AS FOLLOWS: SECTION I That “Chapter 75, Schedule I: One-Way Streets” of the City of Fort Thomas Code of Ordinances be and the same is hereby amended by removing the following language: Street Direction Ord. No. Date Woodfill Avenue Northeast O-9-2009 7-6-09 SECTION II All Ordinances or parts thereof in conflict with the provisions of this Ordinance are, to the extent of such conflict, hereby repealed. SECTION III This Ordinance shall be in full force and effect after its passage and publication according to law. APPROVED: ______________________________ Mary H. Brown, Mayor 1st Reading: September 6, 2011 Adopted: September 19, 2011 Publication: September 29, 2011 ATTEST: ________________________________ Melissa K. Kelly, City Clerk CE-1001666464-01

LEGAL NOTICE Campbell County Fiscal Court is seeking proposals for professional consulting services for Tax Software Management Services RFP 2011-01. Campbell County will accept sealed proposals until 4:00 p.m. prevailing time on Wednesday, October 19, 2011 at the Campbell County Administration Building, (B) The provisions of this subchapter shall not apply to any individual 1098 Monmouth Street, discharging an arrow as part of an educational program on property Room 319/320, Newowned or controlled by the educational institution, specifically includ- port, KY 41071. To obRFP packet visit the ing, but not limited to, archery classes taught in a public or private tain County web-site www. school. campbellcountyky.org/ SECTION II oppportunities-bids- and proposals.html. Contact This Ordinance shall be in full force and effect from and after its pas- Linda Eads at 859-5471850 for information. sage, approval, and publication as required by law. Reciprocal preference for APPROVED: Kentucky resident bid___________________________ ders as described in KRS Mary H. Brown, Mayor 45A.490-494 shall be applied in accordance with 200 KAR 5:400. 1st Reading: September 6, 2011 Campbell County Fiscal Court reserves the right Adopted: September 19, 2011 to reject any and all proposals. 7036

Publication: September 29, 2011

Email: kynews@communitypress.com

RECORDER

POLICE REPORTS

Report of residence broken into and

ORDINANCE NO. O-14-2011

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

ESTATE

To place your BINGO ad call 513.242.4000

Report of tire of vehicle flattened at residence at 201 W. 2nd St., Sept. 11. Report of vulgar word spray painted on mail box at 231 Austin Drive, Sept. 13.

Third degree terroristic threatening

Report of man threatening to cut throat of woman in voice mails on her cell phone at 3906 Alexandria Pike, Sept. 10.

Vehicle mishap

Report of vehicle bottomed out in driveway to river camp and air bags deployed and woman’s finger broken at 6572 Mary Ingles Hwy., Sept. 11.

FORT THOMAS

Arrests/citations

Mary Kuyper, 28, 327 Newman Ave., warrant at 327 Newman Ave., Sept. 14. Robert Sanders, 30, 2526 Elliot Court No. 192, warrant, alcohol intoxication in a public place at 1429 Alexandria Pike, Sept. 14. Joshua Wolfe, 23, 1806 Asbury Way, DUI at Grandview Avenue at Alexandria Pike, Sept. 16. Laura Wieck, 33, 300 Brentwood Lane Apt. K, DUI at Memorial Parkway, Sept. 17. Betty Castle, 52, 2509 South Main St., warrant at Fort Thomas Plaza, Sept. 19. Maxwell Schmidt, 34, 2424 Priest Road, warrant at I-471, Sept. 17. Joshua Pierce, 31, 2353 Laurel Nicholsville Road, warrant at I-471, Sept. 17. Amanda Braden, 24, 7943 Broadwell, warrant at I-471, Sept. 17. Mark Schlasinger, 34, 156 Park Place, warrant at 156 Park Lane, Sept. 16. Joann Johnson, 50, 145 Mulberry St. Apt. 2, alcohol intoxication in a public place at 1011 South Fort Thomas Ave., Sept. 17. Damian Tiano, 41, 83 Greenbriar Ave., warrant at 2350 Memorial Parkway, Sept. 16.

Incidents/investigations Theft by unlawful taking

At 53 Bonnie Lane, Sept. 19. At 37 Shaw Lane, Sept. 20. At 67 Scenic View Drive, Sept. 20.

Theft by unlawful taking auto

At 33 Grant St., Sept. 19. At 84 Concord Ave., Sept. 19.

Theft by unlawful taking from auto At 124 Grand Ave., Sept. 16. At 124 Grand Ave., Sept. 16. At 54 Grant St., Sept. 19. At 109 Grant St., Sept. 19. At 88 Concord Ave., Sept. 19. At 14 Linden Court, Sept. 20. At 23 Tower Hill Road, Sept. 15.

Theft by unlawful taking from auto, third degree criminal mischief At 58 Grant St., Sept. 19.

Theft by unlawful taking, theft of motor vehicle registration plates

At 635 South Fort Thomas Ave., Sept. 19.

Third degree burglary, third degree criminal mischief At 16 Madonna Place, Sept. 19.

Third degree criminal mischief

At 78 Eagleview Lane, Sept. 18.

Unauthorized use of a motor vehicle

At 245 Clover Ridge Ave., Sept. 14.

NEWPORT

Arrests/citations

James Fields, 22, 3155 Reisinger Road, third degree assault, disarming a police officer at 130 East Third St., Sept. 18. Jenny Krauser, 31, 1109 Maureen Lane, fourth degree assault at 1 Levee Way, Sept. 17. David Davis, 41, 360 Prairie Ave. Apt. 303, first degree possession of a controlled substance at 10th and Liberty, Sept. 17. Dontez Laequawn Justice, 24, 807 Woodlawn Ave., first degree trafficking a controlled substance, first degree possession of a controlled substance, possession of marijuana at 600 block of Monmouth St., Sept. 14. James Irvin, 52, 815 Washington Ave. Third Floor, possession of a handgun by a convicted felon, first degree fleeing, tampering with physical evidence at Ninth and Central, Sept. 14. Donald Weinel, 54, 910 Roberts St. Apt. 3, second degree trafficking a controlled substance at 934 Washington Ave., Sept. 14. Tony Cooper, 26, 846 Monroe St. No. 2, fourth degree assault, obstructing governmental operations at 846 Monroe St., Sept. 13. Michael Smith, 28, 17 West Ninth St., second degree burglary, possession of burglary tools at 998 Monmouth St., Sept. 13. Charles Keeney, 43, 1003 Columbia St. No. 2, fraudulent use of a credit card at 402 East 10th St., Sept. 13. Edna Young, 35, 217 West Ninth St., fourth degree assault at 336 West Eighth St., Sept. 12. Charles Walker, 40, 336 West Eighth St., fourth degree assault at 337 West Eighth St., Sept. 13. Tony Lee, 34, 327 Lindsey St., fourth degree assault, third degree terroristic threatening at 327 Lindsey St., Sept. 12.

Incidents/investigations Receiving stolen property

At 802 Patterson, Sept. 14.

Theft by unlawful taking

At 1301 Monmouth St., Sept. 18. At 1301 Monmouth St., Sept. 14. At 130 Pavilion Parkway, Sept. 13.

MARRIAGE LICENSE Sarah Shannon, 32, of Seattle and Joseph Stem, 34, of Mariemont, issued Sept. 9. Tosha Sanders, 27, of Fort Thomas and Matthew Lee, 29, of Fort Lauderdale, issued Sept. 9. Elizabeth Zerhusen, 31, of Covington and John Clark, 31, of Champaign, issued Sept. 9. Kimberly Von Hoene, 30, of Covington and Brian Lucas, 33, of Cincinnati, issued Sept. 12. Teresa Ryan, 79, of Dayton and Fred MacKendricks, 79, of Bradford, issued Sept. 12. LeeAnn Vaughn, 40, of Fort Thomas and George Mcihalek, 41, of Covington, issued Sept. 12. Megan Kirkley, 46, of Muncie and Chad Weinman, 29, of Cleveland, issued Sept. 12. Tara Rusciolelli, 25, of Pittsburgh and Matthew Grey, 29, of Dayton, issued Sept. 12. Samantha Wilson, 22, of Cincinnati and William Best, 23, of Fort Thomas, issued Sept. 13. Jill Cline, 39, and Kenneth Piccirillo, 41, both of Fort Thomas, issued

Sept. 13. Carrie Ligon, 24, of Cincinnati and Robert Hall, 27, of Fort Thomas, issued Sept. 13. Valeria Cupi, 31, of Italy and Christopher Fernandez, 40, of Covington, issued Sept. 13. Shelly Bravaro, 34, of Fort Thomas and John Kerns, 51, of Covington, issued Sept. 14. Janet Bolton, 48, of Covington and David Daniels, 60, of Dayton, issued Sept. 14. Nadine Richid, 30, of Lebanon and Benjamin Gilbert, 36, of Cincinnati, issued Sept. 14. Jamie Sorrell, 28, and Ronald Dawn, 28, both of Fort Thomas, issued Sept. 14. Anne Maue, 27, of Mariemont and James Baker, 28, of Germany, issued Sept. 14. Karen Keuper, 24, of Cincinnati and Brent Reed, 31, of Mesa, issued Sept. 14. Melinda Kuper, 54, of Fort Thomas and Alex Painter, 51, of Covington, issued Sept. 15.

YMCA seeks nominations for teen character awards

© 2011 CareerBuilder, LLC. All rights researved.

LOST & FOUND Ads are FREE!!

513.242.4000

To place your BINGO ad call 513.242.4000

The YMCA of Greater Cincinnati is looking for teens in Northern Kentucky/Greater Cincinnati who are role models to others for leading a life by the YMCA’s core values of caring, honesty, responsibility and respect. They are role models for what it means to be a leader and an achiever, an advocate and a giver. And they are making this world a better place through their contributions. These are the qualities of YMCA Character Award recipients, teens in the

Greater Cincinnati area between the ages of 12 and 18 who are enrolled in elementary or secondary school during the 2011 to 2012 fall semester. The 2012 YMCA Character Awards Event is sponsored by Tom Gill Chevrolet in Florence. Nominations are being accepted through Oct. 15 online at http://learngrowthriveymca.com or by faxing the information to 513-961-3201 or by calling the Community Services YMCA at 513-961-3200.


CCF Recorder

September 29, 2011

B11

DEATHS About obituaries

Basic obituary information and a color photograph of your loved one is published without charge by The Community Press. Please call us at 283-0404 for more information. To publish a larger memorial tribute, call 513-242-4000 for pricing details. For the most up-todate Northern Kentucky obituaries, click on the “Obituaries” link at NKY.com.

Mary Louise Adick

Mary Louise Bowman Adick, 95, of Newport, formerly of Independence, died Sept. 18, 2011, at Baptist Convalescent Center in Newport. She was a homemaker. Her husband, Roland J. Adick, died previously. Survivors include her son, Michael Adick of Kenton Hills; daughters, Lynn Ross of Alexandria and Dolores Sommerkamp of Edgewood; eight grandchildren; and one great-grandchild. Interment was at St. Mary Cemetery, Fort Mitchell. Memorials: Baptist Convalescent Center, 120 Main St., Newport, KY 41071.

Elden Bailey

Elden Bailey, 75, of Alexandria, died Sept. 16, 2011, at his residence. He was a machinist for Carlton Machine & Tool Co. in Cincinnati and a member of the Methodist Church. He owned Bottom-Up Cafe in Covington for 18 years and enjoyed all sports. Two sons, Donald Bailey and Michael Blair, died previously. Survivors include his wife, Marsha Bailey of Covington; sons, William “Bill” Bailey of Alexandria and Barry Bailey of Covington; brother, Donald Bailey of Cincinnati; 10 grandchildren; and one greatgrandchild.

Steven Earl Clark

Steven Earl Clark, 54, of Bellevue, died Sept. 19, 2011, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. He was a sorter machine operator with U.S. Bank and followed baseball, especially the Cincinnati Reds. His father, John P. Clark, and mother, Marie A. Clark, died previously. Survivors include his daughters, Caitlin M. Clark and Jessica N. Clark, both of Bellevue; and sister, Patricia L. Clark of Bellevue. Burial was in St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas. Memorials: Charity of donor’s choice.

David Earl Dreihaus

David Earl Dreihaus, 48, of Dillsboro, Ind., formerly of Campbell County, died Sept. 18, 2011, due to injuries sustained in a motorcycle accident. He was employed at General Binding Corp. as a customer service representative. He enjoyed playing pool and was passionate about cars, having owned more than 50 of them in his lifetime. He was very mechanically oriented and had the ability to fix anything. His parents, Clayton “Corky” Phillip Dreihaus and Joyce Anne Lipscomb Dreihaus, died previously. Survivors include his wife, April Lynn Raffignone Dreihaus; sons, Dalton, Adam and Blake Driehaus; and father- and mother-in-law, Lowell and Kaye Raffignone, all of Dillsboro, Ind. Memorials: College fund for his children.

Murvil W. Hall

Murvil W. Hall, 84, of Warsaw, formerly of Dry Ridge, died Sept. 21, 2011, at Gallatin Health Care Center in Warsaw. She was a homemaker and a member of the Sherman Baptist Church. Her husband, Herbert E. Hall, died in 1993. Survivors include her son, Doug Hall of Alexandria; sister, Dean Collier of Williamstown; two grandchildren; and one great-grandchild. Burial was in Hill Crest Cemetery, Dry Ridge.

Raymond W. Hatton

Raymond W. Hatton, 82, of Latonia, died Sept. 20, 2011, at his home. He retired as a service engineer with R.A. Jones Co. in Crescent

Deaths | Continued B12

NOTICE OF HEARING

ORDINANCE NO. O-16-2011

Issuance of Bonds for Industrial Building and Pollution Control Facilities for Cities and Counties KRS 103.200 – 103.285 City of Newport, Kentucky Industrial Building Revenue Bonds Series 2011 (South Beach #3, LLC/SouthShore Apartment Project) Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Notice of Intent for Issuance of Bonds under KRS 103.200 – 103.285 (Industrial Building and Pollution Control Facilities for Cities and Counties), City of Newport, Kentucky has requested the State Local Debt Officer to approve the financial plan whereby the City of Newport, Kentucky proposes to issue Bonds in an amount not to exceed $16,000,000. The proceeds will be used to construct a 109,912 sq. ft. upscale apartment community with 93 units and 172 parking spaces located at 300 Riverboat Row, Newport, Kentucky. A hearing will be held in the Conference Room, Department for Local Government, 1024 Capital Center Drive, Suite 340 (U.S. 60 East), Frankfort, Kentucky, on Tuesday, November 1, 2011 at 2:00 p.m., (Prevailing Eastern Time) to consider whether or not the financial plan for the issuance of the Bonds should be approved. Petitioner, City of Newport, Kentucky is responsible for the publication of this notice and for the information contained herein. Specific questions about the project should be directed to the petitioners. The purpose of this notice is to comply with KRS 103.2101 and KRS 424.130 by notifying the public that the petitioner intends to issue the Bonds. At this hearing, any taxpayer may appear and will be given an opportunity to be heard. Junior Wright State Local Debt Officer Commonwealth of Kentucky 1001666810

LEGAL NOTICE The Campbell County Fiscal Court, at a regular meeting to be held on Wednesday, October 5, 2011, at 7:00 p.m. at the Campbell County Courthouse, 8352 E. Main Street, Alexandria, Kentucky, will call for second reading and consideration of passage the following ordinance, said ordinance having been read by title and a summary given for the first time at the September 22, 2011, special meeting of the Court. CAMPBELL COUNTY FISCAL COURT CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY ORDINANCE O-15-11 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CAMPBELL COUNTY FISCAL COURT UPDATING THE OFFICIAL ZONING MAP FOR UNINCORPORATED CAMPBELL COUNTY TO REZONE 14.95 ACRES LOCATED AT 8356 MARY INGLES HIGHWAY, ONE MILE SOUTH OF ONEONTA ROAD, UNINCORPORATED CAMPBELL COUNTY, AS DESCRIBED IN THE ATTACHED MAP, FROM A-1 (AGRICULTURE ONE) TO INST (INSTITUTIONAL) The full text of Ordinance O-15-11 will be on file in the Office of the County Clerk, Newport, Kentucky, and is on file in the Office of the Fiscal Court Clerk, Newport, Kentucky, and same is available for inspection and use by the public during regular business hours. I, Paula K. Spicer, Clerk of the Campbell County Fiscal Court, hereby certify that this summary was prepared by me at the direction of the Campbell County Fiscal Court and that said summary is a true and accurate summary of the contents of Ordinance O-15-11. Paula K. Spicer Fiscal Court Clerk 1001667035 LEGAL NOTICE The Cold Spring Planning and Zoning Commission will conduct a public hearing in the Cold Spring City Building at 5694 East Alexandria Pike, Cold Spring, Kentucky, on WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2011, at 7:30 PM. The purpose of this public hearing is to hear any interested party who wishes to speak or present any pertinent information relative to the following described item(s): APPLICANT: Cold Spring Planning Commission per Donna Schmidt, Chair REQUEST: proposed text amendments to the Cold Spring Zoning Ordinance deleting all current floodplain regulations and adding new floodplain regulations in keeping with U.S. FEMA requirements Information about this proposal is available for public review weekdays between 8 AM and 5 PM at NKAPC, 2332 Royal Drive in Fort Mitchell. If you have a disability for which the planning commission needs to provide accommodations, please notify the staff at least seven days prior to the public hearing. You may submit your request by calling 859.331.8980, faxing 859.331.8987, or emailing postmaster@ nkapc.org. Andrew M. Videkovich, AICP NKAPC Senior Planner

5874

ORDINANCE NO. O-17-2011 AN ORDINANCE PROVIDING FOR THE IMPOSITION, LEVY, COLLECTION, AND APPORTIONMENT OF THE TAXES OF THE CITY OF FORT THOMAS, CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY, FOR THE YEAR 2011; AND FIXING THE TAX RATE

AN ORDINANCE ESTABLISHING AND FIXING THE AMOUNT OF SERVICE CHARGES FOR THE COLLECTION AND REMOVAL OF SOLID WASTE AND CURBSIDE RESIDENTIAL RECYCLING FOR THE CITY OF FORT THOMAS, CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY. BE IT ORDAINED BY THE BOARD OF COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF FORT THOMAS, CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY:

BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY OF FORT THOMAS, CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY: SECTION I That for the year 2011 there is hereby imposed, levied and ordered to be collected as taxes of the City of Fort Thomas, Campbell County, Kentucky, the sum of $0.347 upon each one hundred dollars ($100.00) valuation of the real property and $0.347 upon each one hundred dollars ($100.00) valuation of personal property and mixed property and $0.3971 upon each one hundred dollars ($100.00) valuation of motor vehicles subject to taxation within the corporate limits of said City, as assessed, corrected, and returned, according to law, for said year, and $0.347 upon each one hundred dollars ($100.00) valuation of all franchise valuations as assessed and returned according to law for said year, to be used for defraying the current and incidental expenses of city government.

SECTION I The following charges for the collection and removal of solid waste and curbside residential recycling shall be levied against property owners as hereby designated: 2011 - 2012 TAX YEARS DESCRIPTION AMOUNT CHARGED ANNUALLY Residential Curbside $ 115.00 Commercial Curbside (Once Per Week) $ 150.00 Commercial Curbside (Twice Per Week) $ 270.00 Commercial 90 Gallon Waste Wheelers $ 270.00 2 Cubic Yard Container $ 663.00 3 Cubic Yard Container $ 906.00 4 Cubic Yard Container $ 1,165.00 6 Cubic Yard Container $ 1,507.00 8 Cubic Yard Container $ 1,879.00

SECTION II

SECTION II

The tax bills shall be made out, on behalf of the City Clerk, in accordance with the assessed valuation for the year 2011 as finally completed and reported to the Board of Council, and in accordance with the valuation as certified by the State Tax Commission of the Commonwealth of Kentucky as provided by law. The tax bills shall be printed in proper form to show clearly and fully the year in which the taxes are collected, the names of the owner(s) of the property, a brief description of the property, the rate of taxation for the various funds, the total amount due, and such other information as may be necessary in order to give a clear and complete statement to the taxpayer. The tax bills shall be substantially bound in book form with proper stubs, and the City Clerk shall sign and deliver the bills to the City Treasurer and shall take a receipt from the City Treasurer showing the total number of bills turned over to the City Treasurer and the aggregate amount thereof. SECTION III The taxes herein fixed and levied shall be due and payable at the Office of the City Treasurer, at the City Building, 130 North Fort Thomas Avenue, Fort Thomas, Kentucky 41075 or Post Office Box 75402, on the date in which the Ordinance is published and becomes effective.

If any part of this Ordinance is held invalid, such part shall be deemed severable and the invalidity thereof shall not affect the remaining parts of this Ordinance. SECTION III All ordinances, resolutions or part thereof, in conflict with the provisions of this Ordinance, are to the extent of such conflict, hereby repealed. SECTION IV This Ordinance shall apply to the tax years 2011 - 2012 and shall be effective when read, passed, and advertised according to law. A P P R O V E D : _______________ Mary H. Brown, Mayor 1st Reading: September 6, 2011 ADOPTED: September 19, 2011 Published: September 29, 2011 ATTEST: _____________________ Melissa K. Kelly, City Clerk

SECTION IV All bills not paid or postmarked by October 31, 2011, shall be delinquent and shall be stamped by the City Treasurer with the word "Delinquent" and shall be turned over to the City Clerk, together with a complete statement to the Board of Council of the total amount of the bills not collected. Upon each unpaid tax bill, a penalty of five percent (5%) of the amount of the total bill shall be added. The City Treasurer shall collect said unpaid bills with said five percent (5%) penalty added, and interest at the rate of eight percent (8%) per annum until paid, on the amount of the tax and waste fee. The City Treasurer shall make a full and complete settlement with the Board of Council and the Board of Education of the City of Fort Thomas at the meetings of said respective Boards in January, 2012, of all tax bills placed in his hands for collection for the year 2011, and shall furnish said Boards a list of Delinquents and insolvents. He shall, at the first Regular meeting of the Board of Council in January, 2012, deliver to the City Clerk all unpaid bills in his hands and the City Clerk shall add to and enter upon each of said bills an additional penalty of ten percent (10%) of the amount of the total bill, and shall redeliver said unpaid bills to the City Treasurer and take a receipt therefore. The City Treasurer shall then proceed to collect the said bills, with a total penalty of fifteen percent (15%) of said tax and waste fees added hereto as herein before provided, and interest from the first day of November, 2011, until paid, until further directed by the Board of Council, and as said amounts are collected, shall deposit them in the General Fund of the City of Fort Thomas to be apportioned and paid into the respective funds for which levied. SECTION V There is hereby imposed, levied and ordered to be collected a penalty of five percent (5%) upon all 2011 tax and waste fees not paid or postmarked by October 31, 2011, and an additional penalty of ten percent (10%) making a total of fifteen percent (15%) upon all 2011 tax and waste fees not paid or postmarked by January 1, 2012, which shall bear interest at the rate of eight percent (8%) per annum from November 1, 2011, until paid. In the event that a delinquent tax bill is referred to the City Attorney for collection, legal action will be initiated to collect the delinquent tax, interest, and penalty levied thereof, and the costs associated with collection, including but not limited to court costs, filing fees, and attorney fees. SECTION VI The City of Fort Thomas has a lien upon the property assessed for the tax and waste fees levied thereon and special assessments pursuant to the terms hereof, and all penalties, interest, fees, commission, charges, and other expenses, including court costs and attorneys fees incurred by reason of delinquency in payment of the tax bill or in the process of collecting such bill and such a lien has a priority over all other obligations or liabilities for which the property is liable.

1001666453

ORDINANCE NO. O-15-2011 AN ORDINANCE AMENDING ORDINANCE CHAPTER 98, SECTION 98.01 OF THE FORT THOMAS CODE OF ORDINANCES RELATING TO TREES BY ADDING A DEFINITION OF "NATIVE TREE". WHEREAS, on March 9, 2011, the Fort Thomas Tree Commission submitted a letter to the Fort Thomas Planning Commission recommending that the Tree Ordinance be amended to include a definition of "Native Tree"; and WHEREAS, on April 20, 2011, the Fort Thomas Planning Commission concurred in recommendation of the Tree Commission to amend the Tree Ordinance by including a definition of "Native Tree"; and WHEREAS, on June 20, 2011, the Tree Commission’s recommenda tion to amend the Tree Ordinance by including a definition of "Native Tree" was presented to the Fort Thomas Board of Council for consideration; and WHEREAS, the Kentucky State Nature Preserves Commission maintains a list of native trees of Kentucky and said list has been reviewed by the Fort Thomas Tree Commission, the Fort Thomas Planning Commission, and the Fort Thomas Board of Council; and WHEREAS, the Fort Thomas Board of Council has determined it would be beneficial to the community to amend the Tree Ordinance by including a definition of "Native Tree" and incorporating the list of native trees created by the Kentucky State Nature Preserves Commission therein by reference. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED BY THE BOARD OF COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF FORT THOMAS, CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY: SECTION I That Chapter 98, Section 98.01 of the City of Fort Thomas Code of Ordinances shall be amended by adding the definition of "Native Trees" as indicated hereinbelow. § 98.01 DEFINITIONS . NATIVE TREE - Any tree identified within the list entitled "Floristic Quality Assessment for Kentucky, Kentucky Energy and Environmen tal Cabinet, State Nature Preserves Commission, adapted from Shea, M., D. White, D.M. Ladd, and M. Evans (2004)" maintained by Tree Commission of the City of Fort Thomas, and incorporated herein by reference. SECTION II The provisions of this Ordinance are severable. If any provision, section, paragraph, or part thereof be held invalid, such decision shall not affect or impair the validity of the remainder of this Ordinance.

SECTION VII

SECTION III

This Ordinance shall be in full force and effect from and after its passage, approval, and publication as required by law.

This Ordinance shall be in full force and effect from and after its passage, approval and publication as required by law.

APPROVED: __________________ Mary H. Brown, Mayor First Reading: September 6, 2011 ADOPTED: September 19, 2011 Published: September 29, 2011 ATTEST: _____________________ Melissa K. Kelly, City Clerk

1001666457

____________

APPROVED: Mary H. Brown, Mayor

First Reading: September 6, 2011 ADOPTED:

September 19, 2011

ATTEST:

September 29, 2011

___________________________ Melissa Kelly, City Clerk

1001666448


B12

CCF Recorder

Community

September 29, 2011

Campbell County district judge receives Special Service Award Campbell County District Court Judge Karen A. Thomas received the Chief

Heath - Cooper

Mr. and Mrs. Casey Cooper are pleased to announce the engage ment of their daughter Courtney to Daniel Heath son of Michael and Barb Heath. Courtney is a 2007 gradu ate of Ryle High School, and will graduate from Cincinnati State this fall. Daniel is a 2007 graduate of Covington Catholic High School, and 2011 Graduate of Northern Kentucky University. The couple is planning a fall 2011 wedding.

Justice’s Special Service Award at the Kentucky Bar Association’s annual banquet June 16 in Lexington. The banquet took place during the KBA’s convention. Chief Justice of Kentucky John D. Minton Jr. presented the award to Thomas for her distinguished service to the commonwealth as a district judge and her tireless dedication to promoting the highest standards of courtesy and professionalism among Kentucky’s judiciary through her service as chief regional district judge for the Northern Region, president of the Kentucky District Judges Association and chair of the District Judges Education Committee. “The judicial system and the commonwealth have benefited tremendously from Judge Thomas’ vivacious personality and her commitment to her profession,” Minton said. “I truly appreciate her dedicated service and can’t thank her enough for the work she has done to improve the judicial system in Kentucky.” In presenting the award to Thomas, Chief Justice Minton praised her energy and work ethic and pointed out her efforts with Northern Kentucky Teen Court, the Drug Court program and

Northern Kentucky Regional Mental Health Court. She volunteers her time as a judge for the programs. He also discussed her work as an adjunct professor for Northern Kentucky University, where she teaches business law, and Northern Kentucky University Salmon P. Chase College of Law, where she has taught evidence, trial advocacy and pretrial litigation for more than 20 years. She has cotaught Barristers, Bobbies and Beheadings, a study abroad program in London, since 2008. As a member of the District Judges Legislative Committee, Judge Thomas has been a frequent presenter before the House and Senate judiciary committees and is well-known among both chambers of the Kentucky General Assembly, Minton said. “She has truly become a goodwill ambassador on behalf of the court system and has played a crucial role in keeping the lines of communication open between judges and legislators regarding important pieces of legislation,” he said. Thomas also stays active with professional organizations and the Northern Kentucky community, Minton said. She is a board member

for the Brighton Center, a nonprofit agency in Northern Kentucky that works with the court system on court-related programs, the Northern Kentucky University Alternative Dispute Resolution Center, the Northern Kentucky Council on Education and the Salmon P. Chase College of Law Alumni Association. She is a member of the Newport Historic District and the East Row Garden Club. Thomas has served as a District Court judge since November 1996, when she was appointed to the 17th Judicial District, Division 2, for Campbell County. She was subsequently elected to the judgeship. She previously served as a staff attorney for Boone and Gallatin circuit courts and was an attorney in a private practice that focused on litigation. Since 2001, Thomas has also served in the administrative position of chief regional district judge for the Northern Region by appointment of the chief justice. Chief regional judges are responsible for assigning special judges in cases of conflicts or vacancies and may serve in the absence of any judge within their region. They supervise the administrative business of the courts in their region and provide general direction and supervision to the nonjudicial personnel assigned to those courts. Thomas has served as president of the Kentucky District Judges Association since 2007. She has chaired the association’s Education Committee since 2002 and served as a member of its Legislative Committee since

2003. Thomas volunteers her time to preside over Northern Kentucky Teen Court and the felony Drug Court program in Campbell County and has implemented a diversion program for teenage drivers that includes driver education. She has served as a member of the National Task Force for Youth Courts and the National Association of Youth Courts Board of Trustees since being appointed to those boards in 2006. She is also a founding member of the National Association of Youth Courts. She has been a judge for the Kentucky High School Mock Trial regional and state competitions since she took the bench and has judged the National Mock Trial Competition. In 2007, Thomas was one of the two judges assigned to serve as mental health judges for the Northern Kentucky Regional Mental Health Court by order of the chief justice. The court is a pilot program that serves Boone, Campbell and Kenton counties. The program uses the Drug Court model to help reduce recidivism among defendants suffering from mental illness. As administrator of the program, Thomas brought together the key parties, including health care providers, jail staff and community resources. In addition to her work as an adjunct professor for Northern Kentucky University and Northern Kentucky University Salmon P. Chase College of Law, Thomas has been a guest speaker for the Kentucky Prosecutors Conference, the Kentucky Bar Association Annual Con-

vention, the Kentucky Drug Court Conference, Thomas More College and Northern Kentucky University Salmon P. Chase College of Law. She is a frequent presenter at the Kentucky District Judges College and the Kentucky Circuit Judges College and assists with orientation for new district judges. The Kentucky Court of Justice has recognized Thomas with three awards for her contributions to lawrelated education programs. She has also received the Northern Kentucky University Alumni Association Professional Achievement Award and the Chase Award of Excellence. Thomas is a member of the Northern Kentucky Bar Association and the Salmon P. Chase Inns of Court. She served on the American Judges Association Board of Governors, District VIII, from 2000 to 2006. She graduated second in her class at Northern Kentucky University Salmon P. Chase College of Law in 1985. She previously was a board member and an officer for Campbell County Public Defenders Inc. and was a member of the Development Committee for the Fort Thomas YMCA Board of Directors and the St. Anne’s Convent Lay Development Board. She was also a member and Program Committee chair for the Women’s Crisis Center Board of Directors. Thomas is a lifelong resident of Campbell County and resides in Newport with her husband, Vince, who is also an attorney.

DEATHS From B11

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Springs, was a member of Holy Cross Church and served in the U.S. Army. His wife, Dorothy Mae Blenke Hatton, died in 2007. Survivors include his daughter, Cheryl M. Moore of Taylor Mill; son, Rick Hatton of Union; brothers, Frank Hatton of Tennessee, Willis Hatton of Cold Spring and Carl Hatton of Newport; one grandchild; two great-grandchildren; two step grandchildren; and six step greatgrandchildren. Interment was at Mother of God Cemetery, Fort Wright. Memorials: In the form of Masses.

Betty Ziegler Iacobucci

Betty Ziegler Iacobucci, 70, of Fort Thomas, died Sept. 15, 2011, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. She was a retired Newport night club owner. Her husband, Nicky Iacobucci; and two brothers, Billy “Bones” Ziegler and Ricky Ziegler, died previously. Survivors include her daughters, Niko Iacobucci and Natasha Von Strohe; brother, Dale Ziegler; niece, Shandra Ziegler; and the Trotta family. Burial was at St. Joseph New Cemetery, Cincinnati. Memorials: Active Day Adult Daycare, 725 Alexandria Pike, Suite 100, Fort Thomas, KY 41075.

Floyd G. James

No purchase necessary. Must be a resident of Kentucky who is 18 years or older to enter. Deadline to enter is October 7, 2011 at 9:00 a.m. For a complete list of rules visit www.cincinnati.com/blogs/contestwinners.

Floyd Gregory James, 34, of Highland Heights died Sept. 18, 2011, at his residence. He was a construction laborer. Survivors include his mother and stepfather, Richard and Debbie Hope Adkins Teaford of Highland Heights; father, Greg James of Florence; brother, Matthew Teaford of Highland Heights; sister, Elizabeth James of Florence; aunt, Linda Smith-Bidwell of Bromley; sons, Dylan and Prestyn; daughters, Paige, McKeenzie and Jessica; his companion, Melina Foy, and her family, Reese and Cooper Foy. Burial was in Pleasant View Baptist Church Cemetery, Dry Ridge.

Memorials: Floyd James Memorial Fund, c/o Hamilton-Stanley Funeral Home, P.O. Box 130, Williamstown, KY 41097.

Bette Stenken Morrison

Bette Stenken Morrison, 88, of Fort Thomas, formerly of Newport, died Sept. 20, 2011, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. She was a homemaker and a member of Fort Thomas Seniors and St. Thomas Parish in Fort Thomas. Her husband, Emerson Gail Morrison, died in 1984. Survivors include her sons, David Morrison of Cincinnati and Eric Morrison of Florence; brother, Charles Stenken of Fort Thomas; sister, Anna Branson of Highland Heights; four grandchildren; and three greatgrandchildren. Burial was in St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas.

Sylvia Bartel Parrish

Sylvia Bartel Parrish, 81, of Ludlow, formerly of Newport, died Sept. 22, 2011, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. She was a retired kitchen worker at Carmel Manor Nursing Home in Fort Thomas. Her husband, James Parrish, died previously. Survivors include her sons, David, James and Kenneth Parrish; daughters, Elizabeth Wayson and Kathryn Runyon; nine grandchildren; 13 great-grandchildren; and two great-great-grandchildren. Burial was in Evergreen Cemetery, Southgate.

Ruby Stewart

Ruby Stewart, 85, of Cold Spring, formerly of Vevay, Ind., died Sept. 17, 2011, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. She was a longtime employee of Durkee Foodservice and had recently celebrated her 65th wedding anniversary. Her son, Kenneth Stewart, died previously. Survivors include her husband, Elbert Stewart; daughters, Betty Scott of Cold Spring and Carol Spitzer of Florence; two grandchil-

dren; and two great-grandchildren. Burial was at Forest Lawn Memorial Gardens, Erlanger. Memorials: Alzheimer’s Association, 644 Linn St., Suite 1026, Cincinnati, OH 45203.

Virginia C. Thomes

Virginia Catherine Steffen Thomes, 87, of Fort Thomas, died Sept. 17, 2011. She was a homemaker and member of St. Therese Church in Southgate. Her husband, Joseph A. Thomes, and a grandson died previously. Survivors include her children, Mary Jo Braun of Southgate, Karen Moll of New Jersey, Pat Frey and Joseph Thomes, both of Florida, Suzane English of Cincinnati, Lisa Edwards of Indiana, Marilyn Gorres of Dry Ridge, Les Thomes of Fort Thomas, Greg Thomes of Perry Park and David Thomes of Florence; sister, Carol Fehl of Cincinnati; 34 grandchildren; and 40 great-grandchildren. Burial was at St. Stephen Cemetery. Memorials: St. Therese Church, 11 Temple Place, Southgate, KY 41071 or Carmel Manor, 100 Carmel Manor Road, Fort Thomas KY 41075.

Helen Louise Winkle

Helen Louise Winkle, 83, of Carrollton, formerly of Pendleton County, died Sept. 23, 2011, at Carroll County Memorial Hospital in Carrollton. She was a homemaker. A daughter, Wanda Lou Stewart; four sisters, Bea, Inez, Merrill and Leona; and three brothers, Tommy, Bill and Elmer, died previously. Survivors include her children, Martha Louise Beasley of Campbellsburg, Ky., Kenneth Ray Winkle and Frances Helen Chipman, both of Carrollton; brother, Donald Fredrick of Falmouth; and sister, Florence Tucker of Dayton; and 10 grandchildren. Interment was in Pythian Grove Cemetery, Berry. Memorials: American Cancer Society, 297 Buttermilk Pike, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017.

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