Issuu on Google+

C AMPBELL COMMUNITY RECORDER

RAIN AT THE PARADE B1

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Bellevue, Cold Spring, Highland Heights, Newport, Southgate 75¢

THURSDAY, JULY 11, 2013

BECAUSE COMMUNITY MATTERS

The family of Jaymie Jamison poses for a picture during the first Panties Across the Bridge event hosted in 2011 to spread awareness about cervical cancer. The family is holding the third annual event Saturday, July 13, in honor of Jamison, who lost her battle with cervical cancer in 2011. THANKS TO ALICIA EADS

Foundation works to spread awareness Panties to be strung across Purple People Bridge By Amanda Joering ajoering@nky.com

NEWPORT — This Saturday, July 13, passersby will notice something different about the Purple People Bridge. The Jaymie Jamison Foundation, whose mission is to spread awareness about cervical cancer, will be stringing thousands of pairs of panties across the bridge. Shannon Helton, sponsorship coordinator for the foundation, said each pair of panties represent a life lost to cervical cancer. “We ask that people come and donate panties to encourage or honor their loved ones who have been affected by cervical cancer,” Helton said. “It’s really a site to see.” The idea for the event, now in its third year, came about after Brown County resident Jaymie Jamison, mother of four,

READER RECIPES

was diagnosed with cervical cancer. Cheryl Saylor, Jamison’s mother, said she was driving across the river with Jamison’s daughter, 14 at the time, who looked over to the Purple People Bridge and said they should cover it with panties to raise awareness. “We decided to do it, and what started as a grassroots community effort turned into a full-fledged foundation,” Saylor said. “We want to spread awareness, help fund research, and do pretty much anything we can to help families who are dealing with cervical cancer.” The event also serves as a way to remember and honor Jamison, who lost her battle with cervical cancer in 2011. “This event has been a way for all us of, especially her children, to work through our grief and remember her,” Saylor said. “Her son was only 4 when she died, so this is the only real attachment he has to his mom.” Helton said the event will include a health expo on the See JAMISON, Page A2

FOR THE BIRDS Mike shares tips for making your own hummingbird nectar. B4

Rita shares a friend's recipe for Healthy berry fruit gelatin snacks. B3

The Black-n-Bluegrass Rollergirls try to block the jammer from the Cincinnati Rollergirls during the Crosstown Knockdown at the Bank of Kentucky Center. KAMELLIA SMITH FOR THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Jamming with the Black-n-Bluegrass Girls By Kamellia Soenjoto Smith Recorder Contributor HIGHLAND

HEIGHTS

Four girls tried to block her way but she pushed back, looking for any chance to get by. Then a small opening appeared. It was just big enough. She leaned forward on her roller skates, scrunched her shoulders together, and squirted through. People watching clapped their hands and cheered. But

this wasn’t some case of bullying on the sidewalk, it was roller derby. And she’d just scored. Her name is Tiffany Work. She’s been competing in roller derby for six years. She loves it and calls it “addicting.” “It has given me a lot more confidence over the years,” Work said. “Maybe not so much being tough but being able to really speak up for myself.” On Saturday night, June 22,

her team from Northern Kentucky, the Black-n-Bluegrass Rollergirls, battled the Cincinnati Rollergirls. The Bank of Kentucky Center at Northern Kentucky University was filled with screaming fans. All the roller girls on the team have a “skate name.” Work’s is Petal to the Metal. “Petal with a “t,” like a flower petal, because I’m a florist,” she said. “So I’m a fast floSee ROLLING, Page A2

Budget brings few changes By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

COLD SPRING — The city’s budget for the new fiscal year starting July 1, 2013, projects more than $100,000 less in revenue for waste collection that is made up for in savings on waste collection costs. Revenue was flat “year over year” with a decrease in revenue because of favorable negotiations on new waste collection rates, said Steve Taylor, the city’s administrator.

The city switched waste collection services in the summer of 2012 to Best Way Disposal, Inc. The change reflects $101,107 in less revenue for waste assessment the city will receive in the 2014 fiscal year, but also reflects a savings of about $60 less the city has to charge residents in a waste collection fee. The city’s biggest revenue sources, property, payroll and insurance taxes, are all staying about the same, Taylor

Contact us

News .........................283-0404 Retail advertising .......513-768-8404 Classified advertising ........283-7290 Delivery .......................781-4421

said. Property taxes, the city’s biggest revenue source, are budgeted to raise about the same amount of $937,000 in 2013-14’ as in 2012-13’. Payroll taxes are budgeted to also stay the same as the previous year at $861,300. Insurance tax is budgeted to stay the same as what was collected in 2012-13’ at $682,500. » By department, the city’s public works budget will deSee BUDGET, Page A2 Vol. 17 No. 21 © 2013 The Community Recorder ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

See page A2 for additional information

:*R*D?F;!B% 85 J*F?= @( 2*?7!.* G K@P 6PB*, <N M?!= MB@.#*RCFBB

$85 AC Tune-Up 3*%9RF? :@=; A U/-T

CE-0000553425

Schedule Your AC Tune-Up Now And Receive:

IV'TH "'"G/$-'

I'/+H V-)GV''E

www.SchnellerAir.com S h ll ll Ai Ai

1 /EES 2F;!=(F.;!@B O9F?FB;** @? J@9 8@B4; 5FN& 1 $ L@B;# K6 <3Q>M860K O9F?FB;**&

Kris and John Knochelmann* Sr.

NEWS

A2 • CAMPBELL COMMUNITY RECORDER • JULY 11, 2013

Heroin’s impact in Cold Spring on rise By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

COLD SPRING — In Cold Spring, the affects of heroin use show up in thefts happening in retail stores and in 911 calls for overdoses. Cold Spring Police Department Chief Ed Burk said over the last two years he has seen a

Index Calendar ............B2 Classifieds ............C Food ..................B3 Life ....................B1 Police ................ B8 Schools ..............A5 Sports ...............A7 Viewpoints .........A9

steady increase of heroin-related thefts and incidents. The main issues with heroin are not direct drug dealing that other areas of Northern Kentucky are dealing with, Burk said. Burk said some of the police crime statistics back up the increase in heroin in the community, but they don’t tell the whole story. When incidents of theft happen at stores, there may not be a charge of drug or drug paraphernalia possession, he said. That doesn’t mean the two issues are unrelated, and many incidents don’t result in direct charges for possession of heroin or drug paraphernalia, Burk said.

CAMPBELL

COMMUNITY RECORDER Find news and information from your community on the Web Bellevue • nky.com/bellevue Cold Spring • nky.com/coldspring Highland Heights • nky.com/highlandheights Newport • nky.com/newport Southgate • nky.com/southgate Campbell County • nky.com/campbellcounty

News

Michelle Shaw Editor ..........................578-1053, mshaw@nky.com Chris Mayhew Reporter .......................578-1051,cmayhew@nky.com Amanda Joering Reporter ....................578-1052, ajoering@nky.com Melanie Laughman Sports Editor ............513-248-7573, mlaughman@nky.com James Weber Sports Reporter ................578-1054, jweber@nky.com

Advertising

To place an ad .................................513-768-8404, EnquirerMediaAdvertising@enquirer.com

Delivery

For customer service .........................781-4421 Sharon Schachleiter Circulation Manager ..442-3464, sschachleiter@nky.com

Classified

To place a Classified ad ......................283-7290, www.communityclassified.com

To place an ad in Community Classified, call 283-7290.

“I know in talking with people who have been arrested, they tell me that this is why they’re doing it,” he said. “They have a heroin habit.” In a one-year period, reported thefts have increased by 20 percent at Home Depot, and144 percent increase at Kohl’s, he said. Reported thefts Kohl’s increased from 29 between January 2011 to January 2012 to 71 between January 2012 to January 2013. In general, thefts have increased by 9.6 percent across the city, he said. “I have noticed the increase in drug paraphernalia, specifically people being caught and they’ve got hypodermic syringes on them, spoons, cook

Rolling Continued from Page A1

rist.” She has to be fast, she’s a jammer. “You have two jammers, one for each team. And you have four blockers from each team. So there are 10 girls out there all at once,” she explained. “The jammers are trying to get through all the blockers.” A team’s blockers will try to help their jammer advance while the others will try to keep her back and, if possible, knock her down. “So you’re playing offense and defense at the same time,” she continued. “After you make through once, you start scoring. Every

kits,” Burk said. “They’re out there.” Even if an accused shoplifter doesn’t have drugs or paraphernalia on them, they often openly admit to heroin being the motivator for the theft, he said. “That’s why they’re stealing, to feed the habit,” Burk said. People can help by calling police if they see anything unusual like people shooting up in a parking lot, he said. “Likewise, if they have friends or loved ones who do have a drug problem – you need to get them to seek help,” Burk said. Central Campbell Fire District Chief Gerald Sandfoss said there was time you pass an opposing blocker you get a point.” To join the team, a beginner needs to attend a “boot camp” to learn the basic skills. What kind of skills? “Being able to skate backward, being able to stop, whips and pushes,” she answered. “We teach them how to fall properly. You don’t want to flail all over the place. You want to be able to get back up really fast.” It’s a rough sport. Work once broke her ankle. It’s common for the rollers to come home with bruises on their body. Becka Obermeyer, who’s known as Beka Rekanize, had to make sure that people wouldn’t misunderstand her bruises. “I was really up front when I started my new job,” she said. “I talked to my supervisor because I didn’t want them to think that there was some kind of trouble at home.” Dave Powell was one of the louder fans in the crowd. “It’s an amazing sport to watch. It’s fast, it’s athletic,” he said. Emily Matthews was there to cheer on one of her friends. “It’s great to see women come together,” she pointed out. Powell agreed. “It’s super empowering for women.”

Jamison Continued from Page A1

bridge from noon to 6 p.m. including booths with information about healthy living and opportunities to get cardiovascular screenings and mammograms. Event participants can also bring pictures of their loved ones who are struggling with, or lost their battle with gyneco-

Budget Continued from Page A1

CE-0000561898

crease $53,000 to a total operating cost of almost $202,000, according to the city’s budget work sheets. » A $118,000 decrease in the administrative spending mostly reflects the same decrease in revenue to pay for garbage and recycling program expenses. The city is still budgeting the same amount, $1,800 as in 2012-

an increase in calls for service for overdoses two years ago. The fire district serves the cities of Cold Spring, Highland Heights and Crestview. By year, the fire district’s calls to respond to overdoses: 2009: 10 2010: 17 2011: 30 2012: 25 2013 (as of June 14): 6 “We’ve seen significant increase in heroin and overdoses, and we’ve had several deaths that are related to heroin overdoes,” Sandfoss said. It increases the fire district’s business, even when there is not an overdose death, he said. “A lot of time when

they’re overdosed we have to give them drugs and that brings it out of their induced state, and most of the time they refuse treatment,” Sandfoss said. The person is awake in the ambulance and then refuses treatment, but there is a cost for the medicine and the fire district also receives no reimbursement because there is no transport to the hospital. “Of course our job is not to worry about that,” he said. “Our job is to worry about the patient, which we do, but we see a lot of non-transports. But, our use of drugs that treat overdoses, we’ve seen a significant increase.”

Blocker “Stephena Rollbert” from the Black-n-Bluegrass Rollergirls shakes hands with fans before the bout. KAMELLIA SMITH FOR THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

There are about 35 women in The Black-nBluegrass Rollergirls. To participate in an adult league, a “girl” has to be at least 18 years old, but there is no upper limit. “Last year we had a girl that retired at 53,” Work said. Frances Hoetker, known as Edel Vice,

joined the team just last December. “I saw a game in Chicago and I didn’t realize the sport still existed. I thought ‘I have to do this’,” recalled the recent college graduate. “I absolutely love this sport. I can see myself playing until I’m broken and in my 40s.”

logical cancer. Beginning at 4 p.m., musicians will perform including Spencer Sutherland, Jordan Jackson, Comet Bluegrass All Stars, Gypsy Rose and Dylan Holland. Helton said she hopes that the musicians, which include some young, local “heartthrobs,” will bring a big crowds, in particular younger girls, so the foundation can educate them about cervical cancer and the HPV vaccina-

tion. The event will also include inspirational speeches, including one by Christina Klein, an ovarian cancer survivor and founder of Making Noise About Ovarian Cancer. For the first time, the foundation will also be lighting the bridge teal, the color of gynecological cancer awareness. The bridge will stay lit throughout the night, Helton said.

13’ to pay the city’s portion for a Sanitation District No. 1 of Northern Kentucky storm water surcharge. The city continues to battle SD1 in court for the right to opt out of the SD1’s storm water plans to create a city plan, and for a refund to the city of the fee property owners have paid to SD1. » The police department’s operating budget will decrease by $8,000 from the previous year for a total of $1.612 mil-

lion. The most notable savings in the police department budget is almost $30,000 less in capital outlay for items like police cruisers. Salaries for the police department’s officer will increase from a total of $585,00 to $602,000. » Park Board operating expenses will decrease by almost $10,000 to $64,540 for the year. There is $6,000 in the park budget for health and recreation.

NEWS

JULY 11, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • A3

<M% =K!@,<;>% ?# , @%: '?'!%1 <$) ,JJ"@)D GA3H '4+&) '90. )C20)//)/ 95 N620)//NE) J)E)J 4( EN/F9J +09691 *J)95 JN5)/ (046 54/) .4 .9NJ (406 N./ 7F0E97)4F/ /NJ$4F)..)1 <$) F56N/.9L98J) /2JN. 704//$9N0 &0NJJ) 977)5.F9.)/ N./ J4D- DN+) /.957)1 ,5+ .$) 9E9NJ98J) (FJJ" DN+.$ 097).097L /.BJ) I%' .9NJJ962/ 69L) 95 9&&0)//NE) /.9.)6)5.1

=&- JEC0 ':'%&

',@> ?)>

2. >B *TBB?% #@BD

"JC644 D @257 <JJ?8CE

O44

!&*2& S

=&- JEC0 #&&7

=&- JEC0 #&&7

>B+C $ *B=C>@( >B=@RC! +@,C!E%@ :'@ ?,T,@, !@,C' *T%@BF%% E,@%'B

2.. ERDR>%'

!$)&(( 2.01 *$(,))#

2G4<4

<C4EE 'I9 )3 2,.H,H. =F 29BI>,3G '9AF;,3

=&- JEC0 ($5+2!&5

=&- JEC0 ($5+2!&5

G4 D>T?

J1 @:=/$2

2<4<4

S

S

<: D>T?

<: D>T?

2J4I<

!$)(-$ 2.01 *%),/$/

G4 D>T?

:U...

S

"$)&)& 2.01 *$',###

S

!$$#%+ 2.01 *%%,-+#

G4 D>T?

GG.<4

S

B## D?@A

GG4<4

S

?,-%

<: D>T?

G44<4

S

OI ,> >TR? A@R*%

*)) %9H, &.A %&,A" =88 =8 >2 D=CB/, 3-B/ &77.=6A" $.A"-B ?1<54# '-B/ !:#5GG "=3C 7)9, B&0# B-B)A# &C" 8AA,;;; *)) )A&,A &.A %&,A" =88 =8 ?@ D=CB/, 3-B/ :G#GGG D-)A, & HA&. 7)9, B&0# B-B)A &C" 8AA, 3-B/ !:#5GG "=3C &C" 3-B/ %&C+ &77.=6&)1 (07-.A, FE:E<G:?

*9Q"8 B1H B1L *36N7QHQ R50Q5H3L/ &H PQ;+/7QL#3LH>936&KM5QH ')-17 *<=, >2 :" >1 (,5 !+9;632 &8

7)0..)--/)-?./

3*#'3 %9053+ "9!(*.:2%053(*. 8+1- *" : ) 7" , &5$(*. : 3*205(*. 8 *" : 4 7" , 30!(*. 6/7" : ;7"

'*)) .-&*! )", "(#%+$

><1< &6&$% *,%8$%4 2)0

><<3 '#4=2!%4 06+8 9 '6.804= 06.4"8$

!*"!!!

+

*&'#

!*")))

+

><1> '#%,= '4.;% >!0

(')$ )-"&.&,

*&'#

!)"!!!

+

*82?

3..L %E%Y# 'W,CY#C CA C#% I3Q<>T,OOOOOO @QLXQQQ 3.Q3 !U,A <.. DED YC,& IA;T>KOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO @Q3X;;< 3..K !EC% !E'-B $(; YC,& I3QK<<,OOOOOOOOOOOOOOO @KXLLL 3..T !EC% !E'-B B#B C#% I3Q>><,OOOOOOOOOOOOOO @QQXQQQ 3.Q3 WEF%, 'U+U' H( C#% IA;TT3OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO @QKXTTQ

><<7 '#4=2!%4 ?<< 06.4"8$

BAIS IA;TK<

(')$ )-"/%&,

*&'#

!%"$$$

+

B:81?N UZ? G?5"88:Z

3..> W&-F%,U ,''#FA YB *HI IA;TT>OOOOOOOOOOOOO @>X>QQ 3.QQ W&-F%,U ,''#FA YHB YC,& IA;T.;OOOOOOO @TXTTQ 3.Q3 W&-F%,U B,FA, !# YHB *HI IA;T;TOOO @Q>X>>> 3.Q3 J##D 'EGD,BB BDECA YC,& IA;T>TOOOO @QLXLLL 3..< J##D HU*#CA& BDECA *H-# I3Q;3.,OOOO @QQXQQQ

*&'#

!&"&&&

+

C?V

><1> '#4=2!%4 ><< 06.4"8$

><</'#%,=2"!,%4*&615<<

(')$ )'#!/-

(')$ )-""..,

(')$ )'#!!%

*&'#

!#"$$$

+

*8"Z9

YR8V

YR8V

><<- (:+ 5>5 )"

><1> 8"22*8 ,%42* 2!

(')$ )'#!#%,

(')$ )-".&+*

*&'#

2$%%# 0&(

+/34 !"1 /".3/ 3)3,-

0&( 2$%%#

*&'#

!$"!''

+

*&'#

!("!!!

+

*8"Z9

'8"MM:ZX ;)%X 'N?0X *8"Z9

3..T J##D D,ACUEA BDECA *H,'I I3QK4>*OOOO @TXTQQ 3.Q3 J##D D,ACUEA BDECA *H,'I IA;T43OOOO @Q<XTT> 3.QQ IU, EDAUG, B( *H-# I3Q>;L,OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO @3QX333 3.Q. IU, BE-H BDECA )WUA# I3QQ<.*OOOOOOOOOO @Q4X>>> 3..T GUAB-*UBWU #'HUDB# YA I3QKL.,OOOOOOOOOOOO@QLXTT>

3..T FUBB,F +#CB, B BUH+#C I3Q4KL,OOOOOOOOOO @QQXQQQ 3..< DEFAU,' YAE 3%C 'D# C#% IA;T;Q*OO @3.XQQQ QTTT AE&EA, C,+; ;)% YC##F IA;TLK, OOOOOOO @LX444 3..> +) AE-,C#Y 3 +CK !BU YC,& IA;>K.,OO @QKX444 D82M 5"/X 8:Z?7M? "7V =??MO #/P:N?M L6QL6Q4

')-17 *<=, >2 :" >12 (,5 !+9;632 &8 4 !$%% (#** 7)0..)--/)-?./ 3*#'3 %9053+ "9!(*.:2%053(*. 8+1- *" : ) 7" , &5$(*.:3*205(*. 8 *" : 4 7" , 30!(*. 6/7" : ;7"

NEWS

A4 • CCF RECORDER • JULY 11, 2013

BRIEFLY days, 7:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. Fridays, and 8 a.m. to noon Saturdays. For more information about Curves, call 4419699.

A recent article about Spatola Wrestling opening in the Fort Thomas Plaza stated that the new business opened in a former Curves location. While the wrestling studio did open in a former Curves location, there is still an open Curves located two doors down from Spatola Wrestling in the plaza at 90 Alexandria Pike #5. The hours the Fort Thomas Curves location are 7:30 a.m to 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays, 8 a.m. to noon and 3 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays and Thurs-

Sheriff expands Alexandria office’s hours

ALEXANDRIA — The hours the Alexandria satellite office of the Campbell County Sheriff is open are being extended. The office, located at 8330 West Main St., was opened April 29 where the Campbell County Clerk’s Alexandria is office is also located. The new hours for the Alexandria office are

from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday, and from 9 a.m. to noon Saturday. It’s the same hours of operation as the main office in Newport, said Sheriff Jeff Kidwell. The main Sheriff office is located in the Campbell County Administration Building at 1098 Monmouth St., Newport. The Sheriff’s Alexandria office opened with a limited schedule until usage and traffic patterns could be monitored to determine the hours to best serve residents, according to a news release from Kidwell. “I am glad to see that this new office has taken off so well and has had

THREE DAYS ONLY

such a high rate of usage by our citizens,” said Kidwell in the news release. “There have been some days that the new office has done more car inspections and other services than our main office.”

NCC hosts annual golf outing

Newport Central Catholic’s annual golf outing will be held Friday, Aug. 3 at Hickory Sticks Golf Course. The outing will include golf, prizes, raffles, food and drinks. Proceeds will go towards athletic and extracurricular activities for the students. For more information or to register contact Rob Lohr at rob@classicprintingandgraphics.com or Paul Johnson at pejohnson@fuse.net.

EMT classes offered in Alexandria

ALEXANDRIA — The Alexandria Fire District will offer an EMT classes be-

July 18-20th.

Christmas & Gifts

Closed July 16-17th to get ready for the sale

STOREWIDE SALE OF THE YEAR! ENTIRE STORE 20% OFF* CLEARANCE ITEMS 50%-70% OFF GET HERE EARLY FOR BEST SELECTION!

Excludes personalized items. Discount not valid with coupons, any other offers or discounts or on prior purchases.

*

CE-0000556536

(859) 904-4640 www.bryanthvac.com

No Breakdown A/C Tune-up

$64.95

Tuesday-Saturday 10-5, Closed Sundayy & Mondayy

Like us on Facebook

(859) 904-4640 *Offer expires 7/30/13. Some restrictions apply. Call for details. $64.95 refunded per system serviced. Breakdown must be diagnosed and repaired by Bryant HVAC, Inc. Not valid with any other offers or promotion with existing customers. CE-0000556477

Home of Lifetime FREE Oil Changes All Cars & Trucks Gas - Diesel Retail, Commercial, Fleet NO EXCEPTIONS All in stock or special orders

900 West Eighth Street West Eighth Downtown Cincinnati Free Service Shuttle *

I-75

352-5800

www.FullerisFord.com

CE-0000555025

Linn

Downtown

Share information on your civic group

The Community Recorder is compiling a listing of civic groups that meet regularly in our Northern Kentucky neighborhoods. We will regularly share this list with readers who want to get involved in community service. Clubs and organizations are asked to mail or email the following information: » Name of civic or community group. » Regular meeting

If your system breaks down during the next six months, we will REFUND you the cost of the tune-up guaranteed*

26 North Main Street • Walton, Kentucky 41094 859 485-BELL (2355)

www.sleighbellschristmas.com

ginning Friday, Aug. 16. Class sessions will be from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. each Tuesday and Friday for more than five months or about 22 weeks. The class will be taught by Ken Smith, lead instructor for the fire district. Cost of the class is $475 payable in installments of $275 and $200. People need to bring a valid drivers license, and copies of their high school diploma or GED with their application. Applications are available at the fire district office, 7951 Alexandria Pike, Alexandria. Applications are due by 5 p.m. Friday, Aug. 2. For information call the fire district at 859-635-5991 or email tford@afdky.org or sdecker@afdky.org.

time and date (for instance, the second Tuesday of the month). » Regular meeting place. Please give exact location. » Contact name, email and/or website. » Description of club in 10 words or less. Email this information to mshaw@nky.com or mail in to Michelle Shaw, Community Recorder, 228 Grandview Drive, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017.

Home-grown harvest

Home gardening is growing bountifully in Northern Kentucky, but before you take a bite out of that huge home-grown tomato, take a photo for the Recorder. We would love to see the colorful vegetables and fruits from your home gardens, and the creative ways you are making even the smallest spaces into productive patches. Gardeners tending their crops would also make great photos. We'll run a selection of "Home-grown Harvest" photos in the Recorder in early August. Email your photo to mshaw@nky.com. Please include your name, community and phone number in case we have questions.

E.S.G.

IN BUSINESS SINCE 2003

CE-0000559645

Curves location still open in Fort Thomas

Concrete/Hardscapes Driveways/Patios/Walks Pavers/Retaining Walls Free Estimates • Referrals

3801 OLD KY. 17 • FT. WRIGHT, KY 41017 • 8597507071

SCHOOLS

JULY 11, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • A5

Editor: Michelle Shaw, mshaw@nky.com, 578-1053

ACHIEVEMENTS | NEWS | ACTIVITIES | HONORS

COMMUNITY

RECORDER

CommunityPress.com

Incoming fourth-grader Robert Kirkwood, wearing his magical cape, enjoys a game of Quidditch during the Harry Potter Magic camp.

Students play Quidditch during the Harry Potter Magic camp. AMANDA JOERING/COMMUNITY RECORDER

AMANDA JOERING/COMMUNITY RECORDER

PROGRAM BRINGS

MAGIC

TO FORT THOMAS

By Amanda Joering ajoering@nky.com

FORT THOMAS — Incoming fourth- and fifth-graders delved into the magical world of Harry Potter during the Fort Thomas Summer Enrichment Program’s Harry Potter Magic Camp June 24-28. The camp included practicing potions, herbology, astronomy, and a game of Quidditch.

Incoming fourth-grader Molly Baumer guards her goal during a game of Quidditch during the Fort Thomas Enrichment Program's Harry Potter Magic camp. AMANDA JOERING/COMMUNITY RECORDER

iPads change how NDA students learn By Amy Scalf ascalf@nky.com

PARK HILLS — Notre Dame

Academy’s S.W.A.T. team has helped students and teachers held hostage by a lack of technological expertise. Members of the Students Working to Advance Technology, or S.W.A.T. team, worked with NDA’s dean of instructional technology Molly Mullee to build a support system for nearly 600 students and more than 40 faculty members using the digital tablets. Their work went beyond school. They presented at the annual Kentucky Society for Technology in Education Conference in Louisville about how their school experience changed during the 2012-2013 year, the first year that each student used an iPad for work in and out of class.

Students have ‘taken it and run with it’

iPads perfect for taking notes

Mullee said they are the only students to have ever presented at the conference. “I go every year, and all I do is talk about what they do in their classrooms and how they’re structuring it. The immediate stakeholders are the learners, so it really only made sense to put the presentation in their hands,” she said. “We were one of the first schools to do this, so we couldn’t Google what’s been going on. We had to figure it out ourselves, so we went to tell other schools how we’re doing what we’re doing,” said incoming senior Hannah Hatch. Mullee said, “It’s their thing, and they’ve taken it and run with it. The sky’s the limit.”

The students can cite specific examples of how they’ve changed. “I could see people in my grade were hesitant to use the iPads, especially for taking notes. They stuck with notebooks. Then they realized what a great asset it is,” said sophomore Cassidy Ryan. “By the end of the year, 95 percent of the people in my classes were taking notes only on the iPad.” NDA Principal Laura Koehl said because of the success using the iPad’s organizational tools, the administration will no longer purchase paper planners for students. “I can study from my notes now because I can read them,” said Hannah Ziegelmeyer. “You can’t forget your iPad like a notebook, or have ripped notebook pages. All my notes are on

the iPad. I like it a lot better.”

Easier to do math without an eraser

“It’s easier to edit notes on the iPad, especially math. I run out of eraser,” she said. Since the conference presentation, the students have also given similar talks to visiting faculty members, and to their own teachers. S.W.A.T. member Savannah Tucker called the iPad’s use “revolutionary.” “I can no longer use the excuse that I left my homework at school,” she said. “Introverted students don’t have to speak up in class. They can email questions. The assignment email or handout has all the details, due date, project description. It’s all right there.” Tucker also said it’s easier for students to collaborate on projects using Google Docs, FaceTime and Skype.

Students, parents and faculty also have 24/7 access to tech support from a resource on iTunes U. She said teachers also have gone through some changes.

Teachers have ‘flipped’ their classrooms

Mullee said some teachers have “flipped” their classrooms, recording lectures for students to watch in the evenings, then working together through what used to be “homework” during class time. She said the change allows students to ask teachers questions as they’re figuring out their “homework,” and lets students help each other. “They’re changing the paradigm,” said Mullee. “There is endless possibility. There is never a time that we can say we can’t do that, because there is always a way. That’s a great lesson to learn at any age.”

2013 CAMPBELL COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES The following students are members of the Campbell County High School graduating class of 2013: Matthew Ryan Abercrombie, Ryne Nicole Marie Adams, Taylor Jo Adams, Keri Elizabeth Ager, Devin Edward Allmoslecher, Alexander Joel Anderson, Austin Conner Anderson, Kyle Spencer Angel, Cody A. Annis, Nicola Emile Ansara, Jacob Theodore Antony, Jack James Apted, Jacob Charles Apted, Teri Rae Marie Armstrong, Kent Alex Bachman, Allyson Nicole Baker, Courtney Faith Baker, Jordan Callie Ball, Brianna Nicole Barrett, Taryn Rachelle Barrett, Cory Nelson Barth, Megan Carol Baxter, Mohammed Hani Bayyari, Phillip Michael

Beckerich, Timothy Frank Beckerich, Nathaniel Ray Begley, Ronald David Keith Behymer, Joren Kai Berry, Nicole Elizabeth Bezold, Justin Alexander Biery, Erin Nicole Bishop, Ashlynn Marie Black, Autumn Boehmer, Nicole Yvonne Bonapfel, Erika Ashley Brock, Gabrielle Shelby Broomall, Dominique Ann Brossart, Richard Allen Brun, Joel Brune, Amber Nicole Brunner, Austin Howard Bryan, Benjamin Buchanan, Richard Arthur Buechel, Cody Dustin Burgess, Joshua Matthew Burling, Amber Nicole Burris, Kody Sinnett Bush, Cody Christopher Canaday, Mariah Renee Carnes, Zachary Dale Carnes, Logan Joaque Carrier, Matthew George Chalk, Alicia

Lynn Chilelli, Amanda Nicole Chilelli, Ryan Scott Chitwood, Joshua Bryan Chomyszak, Amanda Sue Clark, Jared Phillip Clark, Alexander Michael Claspill, Taylor Sue Cloyd, Elizabeth Nicole Collins, Michael Thomas Collins, Sara Jordan Cornetet, Benjamin Daniel Couch, Daniel James Couch, Jeffrey Thomas Courter, Kelsey Nicole Cox, Derek William Cryer, Megan Elizabeth Cummins, Dylan Patrick Daniel, Tanner Adam Ray Daniels, Shelby Lynne Davis, Jasmine Lynn Dean, Stephanie Carmen Dean, Travis Austin Decker, Hugo Andres Delcastillo, Emma Jeanne Demaree, Jacob Daniel DeMoss, Steven Michael Deutsch II,

Emily Elizabeth Diesman, Maxwell Kenton Diesman, Phillip Martin Dischar, Gray Esipp Dodd, Nicholas Matthew Dorsey, Felicia Nicole Douglas, Matthew Jonathon Dreyer, Tyler Ray Durham, Paige Nicole Durst, Nicholas Steven Eastham, Miranda Jade Eberle, Matthew Keith Edwards, Clinton Daniel Ellis, Brianna Nicole Ellison, Austin William Enzweiler, Brandon Gerald Enzweiler, Briana Lynn Enzweiler, Hunter Elijah Fangman, Emiley Rose Ferrara, Preston Douglas Field, Dakota Daniel Fields, Kayla Marie Fornash, Daniel Scott Fox , Emily Rose Fox, Michaela Quinn Francis, Sarah Olivia Frank, Allison Marie Franzen, Aubrey Elizabeth Franzen, Robert

Timothy Franzen, Gwendelyn Abigail Freudenberg, Joshua Edward Frommeyer, Lucas Charles Fryman, Dakota Dan Fugate, Marcus Allen Furguson, Kevin Paul Gabbard, Danielle Lynn Gannon, Jenna Carol Garofolo, Kristen Lynn Geiger, Jordan Nichole Geiman, Kelsey Elizabeth Geiman, Stephen Erik Goerler, Brian Jacob Goins, Rebecka Paige Golfman, Juston Scott Gosney, Haylie Aarin Grayson, Felisha Dawn Gregory, Paul Daniel Griffis, Meagan Anne Lyn Griffith, Miranda Cheyenne Griffith, Erin Marie Grubb, Kaleb Morgan Hadden, Cameron James Sparks Hamilton,

See 2013 GRADUATES, Page A6

NEWS

A6 • CCF RECORDER • JULY 11, 2013

2013 CAMPBELL COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES Continued from Page A5 Kaylee Brooke Hamilton, Brayden Elias Hannah, Brianna Rae Hart, Austin G. Hartzel, Xavier Michael Hatton, Sophia Risch Head, Richard Robert Hedger, Nature Danielle Helm , Caleb Gregory Helton, Chase Austin Helton, Christian Scott Hembree, Jonathan James Hemsath, Derick Wayne Herald, John Dylan Tete Herald, Mariah Lynn Hernandez, Alexis Tiara Hildebrand, Garrett Wayne Hiller, Mariah Jean Hiller, Christopher William Hisle, Jesse Timothy Hoff, Daniel Brien Honaker, Brandon Lee Patrick Hornsby, Brynn Catherine Hounshell, Tyler Joseph Huck, Abbigail Lea Hunn, Angelica Margaret Hurd, Jordin Rachele Hurrelbrink, Michaela Ellen Hyden, Kayla Nicole Ice, Jason Charles Johns, Colin Joseph Johnsen, Daisy Rose Johnson, Devon Allen Johnson, Eric Richard Johnson, Mary Eliza Abigail Johnson, Michael Wayne Johnson, Timothy Chase Johnson, Cailey Renae Jones, Austin Lee Joyner, Molly Elizabeth Karrick, Ross Edward Karrick, Brett Austin Keeton, Jared

Douglas Kennedy, Lindsey Hannah Kidwell, Molly Elizabeth Kitchen, Christen Johanna Kittle, Mara Elizabeth Klaene, Austin J. Kofford, Erin Rae Koke, Miranda Lynn Kopp, Mitchell James Kramer, Tyler Robert Kramer, Joseph Charles Kuebbing, Benjamin Ray Lamb, Samantha Rae Lamb, Paige Christine Langworthy, Angela M. Lauer, Michael John Lauer, Brandon Michael Lawson, Joshua Roy Lawson, Emily Nicole Ledman, Tristine Jeane Lee, Collin Blaine Lewis, Tyler Joseph Lloyd, Mackenzie Noel Loerich, Dylan Richard Long, Theada Lora Long, Paul Longshore, Mollie E. Luken, Grant Andrew Mahoney, Annelise Elizabeth Mai, Dylan Scott Mains, Drew Atlantis Martin, Lorin Joy Martin, Nicole Lynn Martin, Morgan Maxwell, Allie Marie Mayne, Alexis K. McCarthy, Patrick Gunner McCord, Nathaniel Michael Alex McGovney, Amanda Rose McIntosh, Alexander Wolfgang McIntyre, Samantha Sue McNew, Hannah Summer McSwain, Molly Elizabeth Measner, Cynthia Ann Mentrup, Adam Reed Meyer, Kristin Ashley Montgomery, Michael E. Moore, Robert Brian Moore, Danielle

Nicole Morgan, Justin Ryan Morgan, Vincent Colton Murphy, Jacob Daniel Murrell, Stephen Alexander Myers, Chaya Takara Neace, Matthew W. Neiser, Allyssa Ann Neises, Tamyla Marie Nelms, Melanie Jean Nelson, Brett Robert Norber, Roosevelt C. Obison, Megan Nicole Oldiges, Travis Wayne Pack, Paige Alyson Painter, Jannelle Uluwehilani Paro, Chelsea Michelle Parr, Gavin Edward Peddicord, Holly Rose Peek, Erin Ray Penick, Jeremy Perce, Andrew Thomas Perrin, Julia Elizabeth Peters, Alexandra Michelle Pflum, Brittany Nicole Poole, Adam Allen Powers, Alex Henry Prodoehl, Elizabeth Rebecca Rachford, Jordan Allan Racke, Kelsey Rene Rackers, Joseph T. Ragio , Caitlin Rose Rauch, Joseph Michael Rawe, Sarah Rawe, Abigail Rawlings , Allison E. Ray, Madison Anne Razor, Jefferie Owen Redmon, Jr, Daniel James Reinhart, Ian James Remley, Madison Dene Rich, Everleigh Rose Rieckhoff, Austin Taylor Robertson, James Tyler Robinson, Taylor Lynn Robinson, William Ray Roby, Alyssa Suzanne Rogers, Dalton Slade Rogers, Amber Nicole Roseberry, Ashlee Lynn Ross, Samantha Lynn

Rush, Caitlyn Michelle Sampson, Megan Elizabeth Sampson, Sara Marie Sandlin, Zoe Francine Sarakatsannis, Joseph Scardino, David J. Schack, Benjamin Robert Schadler, Taylor Joyce Schafer, Isaiah David Schneider, Kylyn Denise Schnelle, Austin Kyle Schnitzler, Kraig Daniel Schnitzler, Nicole F. Schout, Kenneth Lee Schuchter, Caroline Elizabeth Schultz, Joshua William Schultz, Ryan William Schultz, Tristen Louis Schulze, Jesse James Schwartz, William Ryall Seiter, Joshua Todd Seitz, Brittany Ann Shaw, Ciera Renae Shields, Kaytlin Paige Siegmundt, Megan Mackenzie Sizemore, Morgan Annice Smallwood, Candell Marie Smith, Jesie Michelle Smith, Rachael Elizabeth Smith, Hannah Victoria Snape, Fabio Souza, Kristen Nicole Spahr, Betty Ann Spangler, Matthew Luke Spradlin, Travis William Stadtmiller, Danielle Elizabeth Stamper, Emma Stamper, Megan Elizabeth Steele, Matthew Thomas Steinhauer, Josie Kathleen Stephens, Hannah Christine Stewart, Zachary Mark Straub, Nelson Alexander Strinko, Jonathan Wayne Stull, Samantha Leigh Styer, Saira Shakoor Sumra, Kelton John

Swinford, Ethan Ross Swope, Kiersten L. Sydnor, Christina Gail Tackett, Lauren Elizabeth Tallon, Ravyn Gabrielle Tanner, Kiara Jean Taravella, Cody Gene Teegarden, Bethany Nicole Tester, William Anthony Thompson, Casey Alexandra Tiemeier, Ryan James Tromm, Christina Rachelle Tully, Jacob Daniel Turner, Madeline Marie Turner, William Tyler Turner, Dylan Michael Valdez, Kyle Gerritt VanDruten, Cody Lee Vickers, Caitlyn M. Viox, Chelsea Leann Vires, Marissa Nicole Visse, Brandi M. Von Mason, Chad Edward Wagner, Valerie Wagner, Justin Walerius, Tyler Jay Walsh, Zachary James Walters, Jacob Aaron Walton, Adam Michael Wathy, Chelsea Rose Weckbach, Meghan Lorraine Weckbach, Kenneth Ray Wehby, Timothy N. Weimer, Brenda Michelle Weinel, Brianna Marie Wilbur, Robin Marie Wildhaber, Breanna Rae Williams, Broc Joshua Wilson, Kristin Marie Winbigler, Marissa Kathlene Winkle, Jared Christopher Wittrock, Corbin John Woods, Christian Yi, Kayla Christine Zappa, James Logan Zechella.

2013 HIGHLANDS HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES The following students are members of the Highlands High School graduating class of 2013: Ava MaryRose Abner, Mary Margaret Allis, Jessica Marie Augsbach, Christian Barrett Austin, Sarah Eleanor Baker, Jessica Marie Bamberger, William Patrick Bardgett, Todd William Edward Barton, Clayton James Bathiany, Lexie Jordan Beccaccio, Samira A’Sha Bedford, Taylor Gray Benton, Alexandra Jo Birkley, Hailie Elisabeth Blair, Sarah Elizabeth Boehm, Emily Celeste Brenner, Hannah Mojave Brewer, Erika Jean Brock, Creston Steven Brooks, Melissa Brownell, Kelsie Rae Buckler, Laura Corrine Buel, Brittany Marie Burill, Autumn Marie Jammie Burke, Corin Nicole Burke, Nathan Alan Caldwell, Petr Prochenko Carter, Zachary Adams Carter, Katherine Morgan Castleberry, Cecily Claire Chambers, David Andrew Christian, Michael Christopher Cirulli, Kelsey Ranee Clark, Olivia Marie Clark, John

Abraham Collinsworth, Spencer Allen Comstock, Matthew Cole Connett, Justis Sean Cornett, Katherine Irene Crawford, Jonathon Steven Cruse, Jesse Kathryn Daley, Mitchell Cullen Dee, Alyson Nicole Dickens, Natalie Ann Donnermeyer, Ryan Casey Donovan, Walter Richard Dunlevy, Bradley Charles DuPont, Michael Joseph Feiertag, Tyler Thomas Felts, Alexandra Estelle Fessler, Michaela Lane Fettig, Vanessa Jordyn Fisse, Makayla Lee Fite, Allison Elizabeth Foellger, John Jay Fossett Jr., Taylor Lee Fossett, Alexis Taylor Freeman, Ezekiel Thibias Garfinkle Plymesser, Madeline Marie Gates, Matthew Jordan Goetz, William Kenneth Grau, Franklin Meade Graves, Jack Berkley Grimm, Nathan Osborne Groneck, Jacob Thomas Gronotte, Olivia Frances Grothaus, Janet Amelia Ling Hall, Noah Chapman Hamant, Brooke Emily Hamilton, Kathryne Lynne Hanks, Rachael Anne

2013 NEWPORT CENTRAL CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES The following students are members of the Newport Central Catholic High School graduating class of 2013: Patrick Dale Allen, Quinn Johnathon Anost, Madison Elizabeth Ballard, Kaitlyn Nicole Barnes, Connor Matthew Bartels, Samuel Emmett Barth, Morgan Taylor Bonar, Joseph Henry Broering, Caitlin Paige Brooks, Michael John Bueter, Nicole Colleen Buller, Ashlyn Paige Burnett, Joshua James Cain, Peter James Collopy, Daniel James Connolly, Bessie Rose Marie Davis, Brennan Patrick Devoto, Tyler Andrew Duke, Colin Christopher DuPont, Christina Marie Enzweiler, Alison Marie Fechenda, Jason Michael Feltner, Brycen Paul Ferrara, Dillon Thomas Floyd, Noah Thomas Freppon, Maria Lynn Froendhoff, Megan Elizabeth Gappa, Lauren Lynn Giesman, Alexander Robert Grau, Nathan Joseph Grosser, Michael Cody Guthier, Jacob David Haas, Zachary Taylor Haas, Courtney Marie Hagedorn, Jillian Elizabeth Hamilton, Mark Richard Hans, Chad Louis Hayden, Dylan Lee Hayes, Graeham Thomas Heil, Olivia Marguerite Heitzman, Kelsey Ann Hensley, Whitney Katherine Hightchew, Kevin Jacob Hoffstedder, Jillian Elise Hoover, Jordan Matthew Jamell, Samantha Eileen

Kroger, Candace Elyse Leyland, Joshua Michael Liles, Payge Marie Lipscomb, Madison Elizabeth Little, Catherine O’Brien Louis, Lydia Marie Ludwig, Mason Louis Mariani, Michael Joseph McGinnis, Douglas Eugene Meadows, Randall Chase Miller, Zachary Jacob Moore, Rachel Lynn Morford, Allison Lauren Muck, Amber Lee Muench, Erika Nicole Muench, Blake Francesca Murnane, Rachel Elizabeth Murrin, Mason Zachary Myers, Rachel Alexis Neal, Catherine Lynn Overstreet, Dominic Marco Pangallo, Charlette Anne Parr, James Francis Hugh Payne, Zachary Nicholas Petroze, Natalie Cate Pferrman, James R. Raleigh Jr., Paul Elliot Rust, Daniel Raymond Ruwe, Christopher Joseph Schack, Steven Albert Schneider, Derek Anthony Secrist, Christina Marie Seibert, Nicholas Wayne Seibert, Kyle Timothy Simon, Amanda Jean Smiley, Andrea Kay Smiley, Courtney Ann Sohnlein, Laci Marie Sohnlein, Anna Regina Sosso, Robert Elliot Stephens, Morgan Taylor Stockslager, Ashley Marie Swope, Nathan Robert Tackett, Brady Lee Thacker, Sydney Christine Tolle, Ethan Michael Wagner, Emily Judith Weyer and Elizabeth Irene Willett.

2013 NEWPORT HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES The following students are members of the Newport High School graduating class of 2013: Ashley Hattie Bishop, Delia Joyce Bolin, Chelsie Lynn Clark, Nicole Renee Crail, Sierra Dawn Crowe, Ashley Nicole Cullum, Kaelynn Elizabeth Deaton, Jordan Helah Derkson, Kyli Breanne Evans, Kaitlyne Nicole Farmer, Caitlin B. Greer, Tori Nichole Gregory, Felisha Dawn Haney, Melissa L. Hayes, Kelsi Rachelle Heckler, Kayla Marie Herald, Deko Idle, Melissa Lynn Jackson, Amanda Marie Knoche, Deborah J. Kroth, Linda M. Leslie, Tiffany B. Lyons, Marisa Marie Machcinski, Samantha Jo Mahan, Dawna Martin, Gabriella L. McMillan, Jessica N. Merrill, Whitney Renee Nesbitt, Amber Marie Nickell, Nikkita R. Price, Skye B. Raleigh, De’Andrea Brooke Richmond, Casey M. Roehm, Angie Olenka Roldan, Cori E. Swafford, Mikayla Dawn Terry, Jennafir Marie Thompson, Alea Viola Trent, Taylor Nicole Turner, Taylor Alexis Tyler, Madelyne M. Williams, Sarah Elizabeth Willoughby, Karissa Renea Wilson, Paige N. Wilson, James R. Abrams, Jonathan Kyle An-

derson, Gary Jonathan Bailey, Gunnar Lee Baisden, Tyler L. Baldwin, Landon Jason Billings Jr., Christian Olorin Bowerman, Tyler Clinton Chipman, Marquis Anthony Commodore, Tyler M. Cullum, Pistol Dance, Jonathan Michael Dolwick, Daylin Garland, Robert William Gemmer, Markel William Griffith, Timothy James Guilkey, Cody Aaron Hall, Anthony James Hammond, Zachary E. Hennemann, Kevin Tyler Hogle, Brandon Edward Laycock, Joseph Wayne Leopold, Rey David Franco Mejia, Matthew John Merkle, Michael Todd Mills, Michael P. Muldoon, James Stephen Nolan, Cody Wayne Pearson, Zachary T. Penn, James Richard Poynter, Christopher Lee Reed, Steve William Richmond, Brian Roberts, Corey Thomas Lee Robinson, Devin Michael Roenker, Randall A. Seibert, Robert T. Sharp, JaSean Antonio Sharp, Sawyer Luther Spicer, Joshua R. Stanfield, Justin Lee Thompson, James David Turner, Jonathan T. Turner, James Cody Vires, John William Jeffery Wolford, Tevin Dewayne Woolridge and Aroyal Wright.

Haupt, Jacob Charles Heck, Eric Alan Hempleman, Jehad Abdullah Henderson, Mackenzie Renée Hill, Karl James Hinkel, Madeline Scheherazade Hoctor, Emerson Davis Holladay, Katijo Diane Howard, Mayson Matthew Hurtt, Maria Elizabeth Johnson, Jillian Christina Jones, Megan Brianna Kallmeyer, Linden Vincent Kidwell, Stephen Nathaniel Kierein, Ryan Benjamin Kissel, Madison Veronica Klump, Jeffrey Daniel Knable, Trevor Jacob Kraft, Samantha Jo Kraus, Jesse David Kreuzmann, Cameron Steven Kruse, Paige Christine Kruse, Amanda Jake Kuhlmann, Hannah Kristin Laskey, Alysia Anne Laycock, Jacob Douglas Lester, Jacob Andrew Liggett, Sydney Anne Lindeman, Caroline Susan Link, Jacob Gentry Lloyd, Harley Ryan Long, Kathryn Carolyn Zhao Lukjan, Megan Nicole Maley, Brittany Nicole Malmgren, Blake Spencer Martinez, Mallory Anne Martz, Andres Issac Mata, Patrick

Michael McCafferty, Donovan Marcus McCoy, Rebekah Marie McGahee, Parker Austin McIntosh, Nicholas Orion Mester, Jeffrey Clay Mettens, Hector Samael Molina, Quentin William Murray, Blake Stephen Murrell, Trevor James Murrell, Blake Henry Myers, Michael Dylan Myers, Camri Yonet Nelson, Brian Austin Ormes, Austin Thomas Owens, Kara Gabrielle Painter, Joseph Henry Paolucci, Emma Marie Paquin, Emilie Grace Parton, Margaret Kathryn Peale, Rachel Nicole Pelgen, Austin Joseph Peterson, Eric Anthony Peterson, Hanna Marie Pfotenhauer, Kali Marjorie Pierre, Connor Randolph Poston, Troy Jakob Prather, Samantha Marie Reynolds, Margaret Lucille Rose, Taylor Nicole Roy, Shawn Carl Sargent, Leah Ann Schaefer, Ryan David Schalk, Sydnie Anne Schell, Ethan William Schmits, Robert John Reid Schroder, Gabriel Robert Schultz, Matthew Alan Schultz, Nicklaus Greg-

2013 BISHOP BROSSART HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES The following students are members of the Bishop Brossart High School graduating class of 2013: Robert William Barnett, Emily Anne Barth, Mackenzie Elizabeth Bertram, Paige Annemarie Bracke, Danielle Louise Braun, Alex Gregory Braun, Thomas James Burns, Andrew Timothy Callahan, Natalie Kate Campbell, Zachariah Scott Class, Brian Thomas Clift, Jenna Sue Dawn, Catherine Ashley DeMoss, Jacob Troy Dennis, McKenzie Ann Dischar, Shannon Kate Donnelly, Lauren Elizabeth Donnermeyer, Delaney Marie Elam, Jacob William Elbert, Michael William Fessler, Michelle Elizabeth Fischer, Jared Matthew Fischesser, Austin Rhodes Frey, Jordan Nicholas Frommeyer, Jessica Lauren Gerner, Lauren Ann Goderwis, Allison Nicole Greely, Emily Rose Greis, Maria Christine Greis, Sydney Irene Grosser, Tori Catherine Hackworth, Rachel Lauren Hartig, Jacob Thomas Hartig, Amanda Noelle Hasl, Brannon Martin Hehn, Jeffrey Thomas Heil, Abigail Marie Hull, Elena Elizabeth Humpert, Corinne Rose Icard, James Lawrence Kelley, Kristin Jean Klocke, Sarah Jessica Klump, Kassidy Nikole Koetting, Kylie Michelle

Kramer, Sarah Margaret Kramer, Tricia Jean Kramer, Madeline Kay Kues, Jeffrey Michael Kuhl, Michael David Landwehr, Courtney Morgan Ledonne, Taylor Marie Leick, Sherry Xuan Luo, Jacob Richard Mader, Mason Leland Maxwell, Guilherme Mezzon Mezzari, Michelle Elizabeth Neiser, Katelyn Michele Nelson, Courtney Nicole Neltner, John Henry Nienaber, Tanner Scott Norton, David William Paulin, Amanda Rose Pfefferman, Emily Ann Powell, Mary Kay Reilly, Erica Marie Riedeman, Mallory Elizabeth Rolf, Katelin Jeanine Sandfoss, Kaitlyn Nicole Sansom, Justin Jay Saunders, Anna Marie Schabell, Heath Davis Schmidt, Elizabeth Rose Schmidt, Kaitlyn Nicole Schultz, Alexander Joseph Schwartz, Lauren Renee Seiter, Bridget Lynn Sheanshang, Emily Nicole Sherry, Micaela Lynn Smith, Sara Ellen Terhaar, Zane Augustus Thornton, Clair Marie Tischner, Raymond Lawrence Twehues, Benjamin Michael Patrick Uebel, Kimberly Michelle Ward, Catrina Holmes White, Samuel Joseph Wilson, Kelsey Marie Zalac and Adyson Margaret Renee Zion.

ory Schultz, Emily Jean Schweiss, Sarah Elizabeth Schweitzer, Mary Pauline Scott, Colin Edward Seidl, Conner Jed Shively, Victoria Marie Simons, Benjamin Alexander Smith, Nicholas Daniel Snider, Libbie Christina Sparks, Cameron Jacob Springelmeyer, William Montgomery Stine II, Benjamin Matthew Streeter, Erin Rose Stubbs, Cassandra A. Studer, Spencer Thomas Swayne, Meredith Dawn Terry, Caitlyn Marie Thiel, Jason Gabriel Thome, Kaitlin Hannah Thurston, Brack James Tucker, Katrina Jane Turner, Lukas Andrew Turner, Kathyrn Mason Van Curen, Jack Robert Venneman, Scott Andrew Vennemann, Abigail Shaw Vogel, Katherine Ashley Walls, Garrett Lee Wehrle, Howard Grant Wendling, Richard Wayne Whitford Jr., Amanda Lynn Williams, Courtney Diane Wiseman, Roger Bailey Witte, Nancy Anna Wood and Scott William Zimmerman.

2013 BELLEVUE HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES The following students are members of the Bellevue High School graduating class of 2013: Justin Daniel Babb, Catherine Maria Ball, Austin A. Barnes-Waibel, Michael Barrett, Madeline Mary Blevins, Mitchell L. Brantley, David A. Bricking, Chris C. Brown, Cody R. Corman, Shyanne Paige Creech, Devyn Michael Frank, Nicholas Anthony Haire, Lukas Chase Hammond, Dylan Robert Hays, Joseph Casey Hornback, Tyler Wayne Howe, Jordan Hughes, Kalynn Marie Jones, Curtis Klette, Stephanie Knoll, John C. Koeninger, Branden L. Lawrey, Madison Elizabeth Martin, Shelby Lee McIntosh, Richard Anthony Meredith, Jeffrey Morgan, Devin Scott Myers, Cameron Alden Pangallo, Makenzie Taylor Phelps, Daniel William Piceno, Noah David Placke, Nolan Harrison Rechtin, Jordan Xavier Roberts, Austin Robert Rosenbaum, Kendall Michelle Schmits, Jennifer Lynn Sexton, Joshua E. Sherlock, Joseph T. Steffen, Coleman Ryan Stinnett, Elizabeth Anne Sweeney, Zachary P. Terry, Felicia Dawn Todd, Ethan James Ryan Tolliver, Anthony James Townsley, Tanner B. Vance, Justin R. Velazco, Jeffrey W. Vires, Sammantha Waller and Brieana Lee Wiefering.

2013 DAYTON HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES The following students are members of the Dayton High School graduating class of 2013: Logan Bayley Asher, Alyssa Violet Baker, Kali Paij Baker, Zachary Lee Rae Barnett, Jacob Eugene Brock, Scott Allen Burchfield, Katelyn Marie Burns, Connor Matthew Cadle, Evan Andrew Cavanaugh, Kelsey Paige Collett, Marvin Wesley Combs, Alyscia Leah Ariel Davis, Caitlin Elizabeth Hall, Alexis Nichole Hansel, Dustin

Adam Hayes, Derek Stephen Holt, Mackenzie Wayne Kiefer, Rockford Lee Koehler, Alexandra Nicole Kraft, Jacob Bryan Lenz, Bryan Austin Lewallen, Tanner Dean Joel Lovell, Brooke Ann Irene Matthews, Sydney Michelle McIntyre, Evelynn Shayron-Kay Meyer, Holly Virginia Milburn, William Douglas Moreland, Danielle Nicole Moses, Ashley Raven Noble, Ashley Marie Osborne, Lyndsay Kaye Owens,

Andrew Mitchel Peterson, Allison Nicole Rayborn, Emily Jade Richardson, Luke David Rogg, Trevor Dylan Scott, Christopher Mathew Shanks, Natasha Marie Tiemeyer, Taylor Ann Turner, Ashley Noel Unsell, Derrick Jacob Vice, Dejujuan Zee Walker, Kristen Lynn Wayman, Jonathan Michael Williams, Felicia Ann Wilson and Tyler Lee Edward Yeager.

2013 COVINGTON LATIN SCHOOL GRADUATES The following students are members of the Covington Latin School graduating class of 2013: Whitney Ash, Katie Bischoff, Alex Bitter, Mitchell Blewett, Sam Bohman, Alexis Brown, Mikayla Brown, Jessica Chan, Patrick Clancy, Dorien Clark, Elizabeth Clements, Brendan Connelly, Clare Dunn, Phillip Dunn, Emma

Ganshirt, Emma Gripshover, Andrea Halenkamp, Emily Herzog, Bridgette Hildreth, Diane Jackson, Daniel James, Ben Knapmeyer, Oliva Kusch-Kavanagh, Elisabeth Logan, Anna Matchinga, Alexa Mitchell, Matthew Moellman, Gretchen Mueller, Leona Nease, Jonathan

Nelson, David Nussman, Mandy Paganetto, Alex Paoli, Nick Pilcher, George Rice, Peter Rodgers, Nick Roettker, Louie Sand, Christine Smith, Patrick Stewart, Alex Trunnell, LeighAnn Turner, Matthew Waters, Paul Wintring, Jacob Wooldredge and Jessica Wooldredge.

SPORTS

JULY 11, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • A7

Editor: Melanie Laughman, mlaughman@communitypress.com, 513-248-7573

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | RECREATIONAL

COMMUNITY

RECORDER

CommunityPress.com

Taylor Robinson and her boyfriend, Nate McGovney, attended the July 2 no-hitter game courtesy of the Cincinnati Reds for her win as the Alexandria Recorder Sportswoman of the Year. THANKS TO TAYLOR

Pangallo’s Auto on 27 Class B2 Knothole team is playing in the city tournament this week. THANKS TO SID

ROBINSON

BRAVARD

Great NKY athletes see great performance By Adam Turer presspreps@gmail.com

When we introduced the 2013 Sportsmen and Sportswomen of the Year, we mentioned the winners received complementary tickets from the Cincinnati Reds. We did not know at the time that many deserving student-athletes from Northern Kentucky would share a historic moment together. The winners were presented with two game dates from which to choose: July 2 or Aug. 25. Those who chose the July 2 date chose wisely. They witnessed the first no-hitter in Great American Ballpark history, and the first Reds nohitter in Cincinnati since1988. Homer Bailey was one seventh-inning walk away from pitching a perfect game. It was a memorable night for the Sportsmen and Sportswomen in attendance. “Baseball’s not usually my cup of tea, but that was the most exciting sports game I’ve ever been to,” said St. Henry’s Libby Leedom, who won the Sportswoman honor in the Community Recorder. “It was incredible to witness something so historic.” Leedom took her father, “a huge sports fan,” to the game. It was a memory they will

cherish for a lifetime. “It felt great witnessing history with Homer Bailey pitching a no-hitter,” said Bishop Brossart’s Justin Saunders. “It was a lot of fun.” Alexandria Recorder winner Taylor Robinson of Campbell County took her boyfriend, Campbell County’s Nate McGovney, to the game. “It was such an awesome, fun, eventful night and obviously the perfect night to attend a Reds game,” Robinson said. “I’m so thankful to have been given the opportunity to witness history and to be a part of an experience that will never be forgotten. “I couldn’t have asked for a better game to attend. We had a blast!” Newport Central Catholic’s Colin DuPont, who was the winner for the Campbell County/Community Recorder, said “it was a good time.” Highlands High School’s Luke Turner and Jesse Daley winners in the Ft. Thomas Recorder newspaper - had the exact same reaction: “It was awesome!” For those winners who were unable to attend the July 2 game, there is still hope that they will see something special later this summer. The pressure is on the Reds starting pitcher on Aug. 25.

PRESS PREPS HIGHLIGHTS By James Weber JWEBER@NKY.COM

Golf outing for Hall of Fame

» The Northern Kentucky Sports Hall of Fame will have its annual golf outing 7:30 p.m. Saturday, July 20, at Devou Park Golf Course. Limited to 36 teams at $55/player. For information on availability and sponsorship, contact Jack Aynes at 491-2587.

KHSAA Notes

» In data gathered for submission to the National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS), football represents the most popular sport in Kentucky in terms of participants during the 201213 academic year with 13,315 students (54 girls) competing for 222 schools. Baseball ranked second

among boys’ sports with 7,278 participants across 261 schools, followed by basketball (6,874), track and field (6,476), and soccer (6,059). Volleyball was the most popular sport on the girls’ side with 6,260 participants covering 257 schools, followed by fastpitch softball (5,754), soccer (5,551), track and field (5,476) and basketball (5,359). The 2012-13 season marked the debuts of competitive cheer, archery and bass fishing as KHSAA-sponsored sport activities. Competitive cheer had a strong showing during its debut season with 5,114 female competitors and 179 males across 248 schools. Archery had a total of 1,961 participants (1,077 boys) competing for 70 schools, while Bass Fishing was sponsored by 31 schools and had 346 students compete.

Pangallos take Knothole by storm

Pangallo’s Auto on 27 Class D2 Knothole team is playing in the city tournament this week.

By James Weber jweber@nky.com

CAMPBELL COUNTY — Sid Bravard is accustomed to coaching Knothole youth baseball deep into July. He is doing double duty this year as Bravard is coaching two teams still alive in the city tournament, which began July 8. Both teams are named for sponsor Pangallo’s Auto on 27 in Southgate. Bravard is the head coach of the Class D2 version and one of several assistants for the older Class B2 squad led by John McDaniel. Bravard, McDaniel and Mark McCulley are on the staffs of both teams. Bravard’s younger team is 27-2 overall entering the final phase of the competition. “(It’s) commitment and hard work,” he said. “We do not have coaches or kids that miss practices. Even on a last-minute call for practice, our attendance is 100 percent. Everyone, including parents, have made this team their priority.“ The Pangallos are two of the 15 teams in Campbell County

THANKS TO SID BRAVARD

who entered play this week with a chance at the city title in Division 1. The tourney pits Northern Kentucky’s best against those from across the river in Ohio. It changed formats this year. Instead of only the regional champion in each class playing in a four-team bracket, four teams from each region make up a 16-team bracket, seeded by how they finish in the region. The D2 Pangallos are from all over the northern part of the county, including Newport,

Bellevue, Dayton, Southgate and Fort Thomas. “We are strongest in both areas of pitching and hitting,” Bravard said. “We are averaging 12 runs a game and only giving up about two runs a game. Our team batting average is around .500. We have four strong pitchers that have been instrumental in our 27 victories.“ Bravard said the team had to See KNOTHOLE, Page A8

Freedom baseball makes its mark By Adam Turer

presspreps@gmail.com

FLORENCE — The Florence Freedom are making their mark on baseball, at the independent and professional levels. The Freedom head into their final week before the All-Star break just one game back of first place in the Frontier League’s East Division. Four Freedom players were named to the All-Star team, twice as many All-Stars as the Freedom had last season. Florence has five games to play before the All-Star break, staring with a home game on Wednesday, July 10, and including a home doubleheader on Thursday, July 11. Shortstop Junior Arrojo is headed to his second straight All-Star game and will be joined by teammates Byron Wiley (designated hitter), Michael Oros (starting pitcher), and Jorge Marban (relief pitcher). The All-Star game takes place on July 17 in Washington, Pa. Oros leads the league with a 1.33 earned run average. First baseman Jeremy Hamilton, a local product from Princeton

High School in Cincinnati, is second in the league with a .330 batting average. Oros, Hamilton, and Wiley are each playing their first year for the Freedom. After losing a doubleheader on Sunday, July 7, the Freedom fell to 26-19 on the season. Last year, the franchise made its first appearance in the Frontier League championship series, falling just short of a championship. “We’re in a good position, but we’ve been a little bit inconsistent in the first half,” said manager Fran Riordan. “I like our ballclub a lot.” As with any independent baseball league, high roster turnover is expected after each season. Arrojo, in his third year with Florence, and Marban, in his second year, provide veteran leadership. Riordan is managing the Freedom for the second-straight season, providing stability for a team that showed much potential a year ago. “Junior sets the tone for who we are as a team,” said Riordan. “He knows the way I like to see the game played and leads by example.”

Unlike the veteran Arrojo, Wiley and Hamilton did not play any organized baseball last year. After not seeing live pitching last year, both are among the league leaders in several batting categories this season. “When you have a year off, it can go two ways,” said Riordan, who played five years in the Frontier League before he began coaching. “If you work hard and you have that passion and desire, you can come back hungry.” The Freedom are finding success in the Frontier League and in Major League Baseball. Steve Delabar, who pitched four games for the Freedom in 2008, is one of five players competing for the final American League All-Star fan vote. The Freedom are fully behind Delabar’s campaign. “It is something pretty special,” said Riordan. “Our whole organization is taking the final vote very seriously. Even though he only played here for a short time, it means a lot to everyone in the Florence Freedom organization.” Fans can vote for Delabar here: http:// atmlb.com/16ngCBZ

SPORTS & RECREATION

A8 • CCF RECORDER • JULY 11, 2013

Knothole Continued from Page A7

play well to win the regional, using “small ball” to pull out a 4-2 win in the semifinals and turning a key double play in a 5-1 win in the championship game. The regional title helped them get a better draw in the city bracket. Players are Lyndon Bartel, Dominic Clayton, Austin Duncan, Brandon Hambrick, Joel Iles, Kaleb Lee, Brian Lewis, Ross Pangallo, Nevin Peek, Brennan Seiter and Kyle Smith. Assistants are Steve Pangallo, Mark McCulley, John McDaniel, Mark Combs and Herbie Rardin. The B2 team has representatives from Wilder as well as the same hometowns of the D2 squad. “Team chemistry played a big role on this team, a core group of the players have played together for several years,” Bravard said. “Each player has contributed to the success of this team by playing any position necessary. We have some very big hitters that consistently put runners on base and regularly put balls out of the park. We also have a very deep pitching staff of about six pitchers that have a lot of experience.” The B2 team is 16-2 overall, with both losses coming to an NKY Rays team that has twice won the overall city title. Pangallo turned it around to beat the Rays in the regional final, 3-2, which Bravard said was a defining moment. Pangallo

Golfers busy in July

retired the Rays with the bases loaded to win the game. Players are Brett Biehl, Deegan Gearding, Will Harris, Brennan Hall, Jared Iles, Allen Kuhl, Jalen McDaniel, Gavin Messman, Stephen Pangallo, Nick Petroze, Gunner Smith, Tyler Spicer, Hunter Raleigh. McDaniels’ other assistants are Steve Pangallo, John Fetters, Mark McCulley and Mike Kuhl. The veteran Rays, from Cold Spring and Fort Thomas, consist of Ryan Adkins, Jacob Chamberlin, Grady Combs, Joel Day, Jack Hegge, Brett Mockbee, Drew Rom, Jackson Recht, Elliot Schuett, Joe Steiden, John Taul, and Aaron Verst. Head coach Greg Combs said the team has been playing together for six years and its strength is pitching. Also representing District 22, three teams won both the district and regional titles en route to the city tourney: the Stingrays in B1, the Crusaders in C2 and Highland Spring in C1. The Shamrocks and Lil’ Nasty Boys also advanced from C2, and the Fort Thomas Big Stixx from C1. Six teams advanced from District 23. In Class B1, the Crush were regular season district champs, and Weinel Roofing won their district in Class D. Four others were district runner-up and did well enough in the regional to move on: Skyline in Class A, Kenmark in B2, A.P. Schweitzer in B1 and Hammers in C1.

Community Recorder

The Northern Kentucky Men’s Amateur tournament runs July 9-12 at Triple Crown Country Club in Union. The finals are scheduled for Friday, July 12. A total of 88 participants began play in qualifying July 9, which was one medal-play round. Match play was to follow. The women’s amateur

championship begins July 22 at Boone Links. The 7-Up Junior Golf Tour continues Monday, July 15, at Highlands Country Club and Tuesday, July 16, at Twin Oaks Golf Course in Covington. The tour continues July 22 at Cherry Blossom and July 24 at Triple Crown before the championship tourney the following week. At Hickory Sticks July

ST. JOE’S UNDEFEATED IN HOOPS

SIDELINES Jaguars baseball The Northern Kentucky Jaguars baseball team is looking for U11 players for the 2014 season. Tryouts are 9 a.m. to noon, July 20 and 27, and 6 p.m. July 29, at Idlewild Field 6; or by appointment. Call 513-313-9468.

NewCath golf outing The Newport Central Catholic golf outing is scheduled for Friday, Aug. 2, at Hickory Sticks Golf Course. The event, sponsored by the Parent, Alumni and Boosters Organization (PABO), includes prizes, raffles, food and drink. The proceeds benefit the athletic and extracurricular activities of the students. Email Rob Lohr at rob@classicprintingandgraphics.com or Paul Johnson at pejohnson@fuse.net for reservations and hole sponsorship information.

The eighth-grade girls team from St. Joseph in Cold Spring has been together since third grade and their overall record the past six years is 159-6, with three of the losses to older teams. They are two-time Diocesan Champions and went undefeated this year at 27-0. From left are: Front, Makenzie Stewart, Rachel McDonald, Meg Martin, Taylor Tolle; back, Kara Schuler, Kendall Schuler, Kathryn Schreiber and Ruthie Barth. Coaches (not pictured): Christie McDonald, Tom Freppon Sr. and Chris Schreiber. THANKS TO CHRISTIE MCDONALD

Red Devils registration The Campbell County Red Devils are seeking boys and girls ages 5-14 for their football and cheerleading teams. The organization has been in existence for more than 50 years and is a member of the Northern Kentucky Youth Football League. The next registration date is July 12, 6 p.m. until dark, at Friendship Park, 5589 E. Alexandria Pike, in Cold Spring. Football fees are $120; cheer-

7%B HF;I

=%*-%

()!'@ /%#*= $= /%(*+%>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> F406GGG 3"05 .,265 "415, ,5!"15''''-$+/+%#

B<@%/ &"-'7):+>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> F436A33

'7)/+%-< D%#"'@% -+!C ?/303 9 A *+ +#"- 5/"'% =-/5 40;6.3G

'7:2)%-+ /%(*+% >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>F4A6GGG

%! "#$ %!

/',-!)

-+!C ?AA0,G

-+!C ?/3E; 9 A *+ +#"- 5/"'% =-/5 4086A8G

%! "#$ %!

HI3AA,

0

*$+%/ 08,F #: /%(*+%3 0,FF (47)'*-" 9 0I3GH5 B<=%/ &!-'4)7+ -+!C ?/,A8 A *+ +#"- 5/"'%

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

H <%*/- 4$ -'"%&)=%& :*!7+%7*7'% H <%*/- 47-+*/ 6 H <%*/- -!/!)-2?: /*&!4

$= /%(*+%>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> F406.GG B<@%/ &"-'7):+>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>F406;,8 3"05 .,265 "415, ,5!"15 '''''-$#/+#$ @7<*@+< /%(*+% >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> F4A6.GG +/*&%F": (7:)- >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> F4A6.GG

-+!C ?/31; 9 A *+ +#"- 5/"'%

=-/5 40.60,.

'+,!!!

% !"# HF;I

()!'@ =*'/4--% $= /%(*+%>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> F4A6.GG B<@%/ &"-'7):+>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>F4360,8 3"05 .,265 "415, ,5!"15'''' -$)/))) '7:2)%-+ /%(*+% >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>F406GGG

-+!C ?/,A8 A *+ +#"- 5/"'% =-/5 43,6;,.

=%*+"%/ 1*'@*#%3 $4# =!#"+-

H83AAA

0

&"($$"%%'"!!!#

2*11.#+*%4+'%*(,*"$/,-30!&,') &&(' ",0/3-5.4- 21 %0.# &)$ 6/407-!7* 1+

!"# HF;I

#:' -*D*7* H,FF

HI3,,,

0

!& $#" !&

!"&& #%&& '$((

=%*-%

H

%! "#$ %!

%

&!$%

Newport Central Catholic High School invites all boys entering the sixth, seventh, or eighth grade in the fall of 2013 to play on its junior high football team. Contact coach Jeff Brauley at Jeffrey.Brauley@ubs.com, or 859-572-0203.

#:' -!%//* ;,FF /%# '*(

()!'@ D%/*74

#:' +%//*!7 -=%E;

Junior high football

!"# HF;I

!"# HF;H

!"# HF;I

The deadline for softball teams to register for the annual Cincinnati Metro Championship Tournament is Monday, July 15. The tournament bracket drawing is July 23 at Rumpke Park, with games running July 25 through Aug. 4. The tournament entry fee is $295. Applications are available online at www.rumpkeballpark.com or at the Rumpke Park offices at 10400 Ohio 128, Harrison, OH 45030.

0H38A, &)% *+ -!#7!7# 6 HG :47+"74 -%')/!+< &%14-!+ 6 HF@ :!=% =%*-%

'(,!!!

%

Metro deadline

*&#.

;

$= /%(*+%>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>F406GGG 3"05 .,265 "415, ,5!"15 ''''-$*/(&# B<@%/ &"-'7):+>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> F4,6A8A '7:2)%-+ /%(*+% >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> F4A6GGG

The Sharks SWOL 13U select basetball team is having tryouts, 6-8 p.m. July 16, at President Park (Snow Field) in Edgewood. Email Ken Shumate at k.shumate@zoomtown.com; or call 859-512-8541; or call Randy Suttles at 513-312-8550.

%

H <%*/- 4$ -'"%&)=%& :*!7+%7*7'% H <%*/- 47-+*/ 6 H <%*/- -!/!)-2?: /*&!4

=*-+ 47% *+ +"!1/!'%

Select baseball tryouts

()!'@ D%/*74 &.$0 0;,G2C> '"!!

0;3FFF -:*/+ =%*-+ /%(*+% 6 0IAA, &)% *+ -!#7!7# HG :47+"- 6 74 -%')/!+< &%14-!+

!"# HF;H

leading fees are $175. Participants will get 100 raffle tickets to sell for $1 each to help offset costs. For more information, visit www.freewebs.com/reddevilsfootball.

7%B HF;I

()!'@ %7'4/% 0;5A2C>

!7E+/*7-!+3 /%-%/D% +4&*<.

with a 78. In the girls division, Chelsea Schack had her first Annika win and Monica Spritzky her second Wie division win, which promotes her to the Annika division. Points leaders through July 8: 11 and under (Evan Schwartz), 12-13 (Mitchell Schilling), 14-15 (Clark Chandler), 16-18 (Luke Tobergte) and girls (Taylor Schwarz).

2, leading the way was Newport Central Catholic standout Drew McDonald (16-18), who tied the Tour record with a 7-under round of 64. Also in the 1213 boys division, Ryan Clements shot a 1-under 70 to lead the way. Other winners included a tie between Rylan Wotherspoon and Luke Herbst with 2-over 37’s. Dylan Phillips pulled out the win in the boys 14-15 division

-+!C ?0GGA0 =-/5 4016E8.

*$+%/ 0;FFF #: /%(*+% *7& (47)- '*-"

41%7 -)7&*< ;HE,

402)16/, ("4)+.4 !,5)3"1 ("4)&-%#.4 3/2 '$.4)*.4

VIEWPOINTS

K1

JULY 11, 2013 • CAMPBELL COMMUNITY RECORDER • A9

COMMUNITY

RECORDER

Editor: Michelle Shaw, mshaw@nky.com, 578-1053

EDITORIALS | LETTERS | COLUMNS | CH@TROOM

CommunityPress.com

Guiding a common agenda for N. Ky. Vision 2015 was launched eight years ago with a charge to implement a bold, strategic plan for Northern Kentucky. The organization’s most innovative and important work is highlighted in the recently released Vision 2015 Annual Kara Williams Report to the Community. COMMUNITY RECORDER GUEST Vision 2015 COLUMNIST was created as a shared public plan that represents the region’s priorities. Six focus areas emerged: Economic competitiveness; educational excellence; livable communities; urban renaissance; regional stewardship; and effective governance. The 2013 community report details achievements in each focus area, including the opening of the Licking River

Greenway and Trails, the first class of UpTech graduates, and The Catalytic Development Funding Corp. of Northern Kentucky reaching its goal of raising $10 million for the development of market race housing and commercial projects in the region’s urban core. Northern Kentucky is a region recognized for its ability to work together to get things done, a concept known as “collective impact.” Vision 2015’s annual report focuses on the five pillars of the collective impact model: Common agenda; measuring results consistently; mutually reinforcing activities; continuous communication; and backbone support organization. Using these five pillars and working with community, business, government, education and other leaders from both sides of the Ohio River, Vision 2015 helps establish and guide a common agenda for Northern Kentucky.

In 2012, Vision 2015 partnered with Agenda 360 – Southwest Ohio’s regional action plan for job growth, talent acquisition and economic opportunity – on a number of initiatives, including The Story Project. We introduced The Story Project to create a common narrative for the region. It is a project that uncovers our region’s DNA and through powerful storytelling identifies what sets us apart from competing regions.

We must overhaul the role of the TSA You probably think this doesn’t apply to you. Wrong. Even if you never enter an airport your hard earned dollars are paying big salaries and big benefits to thousands of federal TSA workers right now. How many times a year do you fly on an airplane? Millions of Americans have Glenn Mollette never flown on a commercial COMMUNITY plane and RECORDER GUEST COLUMNIST millions more have only flown a couple of times. Statistics of who have and have not flown vary. Fifty million people in the United States are living in poverty and on food stamps. Are these people jet setting around the country? Another one hundred million people in the United States are still earning about $40,000 or less each year. Do you think these individuals have lots of plane cash stashed aside? They do not. Consider the millions who seldom take a vacation and prefer to drive when they do and you start seeing a smaller number of frequent air travelers. How many people fly each year in the United States? Air travel: About 42 percent of U.S. adults reported traveling by air for leisure trips taken between August 2008 and July 2009. The percentage of air travelers increases to 48 percent among U.S. adults who traveled for business purposes in the past year. (Source: travelhorizonsTM, July 2009) Air travel hassles: A June 2008 study by the U.S. Travel Association revealed a deep frustration among air travelers that caused them to avoid an estimated 41 million trips over the past 12 months at a cost of more than $26 billion to the U.S. economy. Air travelers expressed little optimism for positive change, with nearly 50 percent saying

ABOUT LETTERS AND COLUMNS We welcome your comments on editorials, columns, stories or other topics important to you in the Community Recorder. Include your name, address and phone number(s) so we may verify your letter. Letters of 200 or fewer words and columns of 500 or fewer words have the best chance of being published. All submissions may be edited for length, accuracy and clarity. Deadline: Noon Friday E-mail: mshaw@community press.com Fax: 283-7285. U.S. mail: See box below Letters, columns and articles submitted to the Community Recorder may be published or distributed in print, electronic or other forms.

that the air travel system is not likely to improve in the near future. The effect of avoided trips cost airlines more than $9 billion in revenue; hotels nearly $6 billion and restaurants more than $3 billion. Federal, state and local governments lost more than $4 billion in tax revenue because of reduced spending by travelers. (Source: Air Travel Survey, 2008) Check USTravel.org for more statistics. So let’s say 165 million Americans are flying occasionally while the other 165 million are driving or taking other transportation. Why should half of the country who never fly be paying for something they never use? Plus, the payment is big. The TSA federal budget is over $7.6 billion. This is in comparison to a $3.2 billion green energy budget. The average paycheck for the 3,900 employees at the Washington, D.C., office is $103,852 while one executive made over $5 million for nine months of work. Employees have grown from 16,500 to over 65,000 employees. Like most government entities it continues to grow and devour more of your paycheck.

CAMPBELL

COMMUNITY RECORDER

A publication of

Airlines utilizing private contractors should provide and pay the bill for those who watch the scanners and check the bags. The people flying should pay the costs. Airplane tickets are high enough. I fly occasionally. I really don’t want to pay more. However, it’s not fair for those who never fly to bear the cost. Government involvement means more burdens for more taxes on average America that is already stressed to the max on paying taxes. Further, the TSA is going too far in harassing people at the airports of America. Elderly people, little children and women are being violated and harassed every day in our country. What seemed like a good idea after 911 has become extreme. I understand why the TSA came into existence but like the Patriot Act it needs some edits and compromises. Persons now have to practically undress and are subjected to some stranger patting them down. This is a violation of our civil liberties. I am not opposed to scanners that detect metal objects, people emptying their pockets and bag checks. However, subjecting people to pat downs and invasive x-rays have to be eliminated. Every pilot or copilot should be allowed to carry a gun. We now have cabin doors that protect the cockpit crew from an intruder. These cabin doors are vital to our flight security and cost thousands of dollars. Every plane should have a U.S. Marshal or designated plain-clothed security guard on board. I agree that every airport should have the presence of the proper authorities necessary to take someone to jail if necessary. Anyone posing a threat should be detained and escorted to jail. I am a believer in transportation security but we must overhaul the role of the Transportation Security Administration and who pays for it. Glenn Mollette is author of “American Issues, Every American Has An Opinion.”

In the spirit of the collective impact model, Vision 2015 consistently measures results using clear, objective data. Vision 2015’s Regional Indicators Report expanded this year to include The 2020 Jobs Outlook and Diverse by Design: Meeting the Talent Challenge in a Global Economy. These reports compare data across 11 metropolitan regions we compete with for jobs and talent. Vision 2015 found success in linking organizations with mutually reinforcing missions, including Green Umbrella and the Northern Kentucky Education Council (NKYEC). Green Umbrella aligns the missions of its 280 members to help our region become one of the top-10 most sustainable communities in the country by 2020. Vision 2015’s annual report highlights the launch of an NKYEC toolkit that assists businesses in engaging students. At its core, Vision 2015 is a

backbone support organization. No complex region can accomplish its goals without a central organization staying on mission and measuring progress. Vision 2015 does more than support the region’s development; it catalyzes its progress with a call to action to enact change and improve Northern Kentucky by and beyond 2015. You can join the conversation and the effort. » Like us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/vision2015. » Follow us on Twitter: www.twitter.com/vision2015 » Drop by for a visit: 50 East River Center Blvd. Suite 465 in Covington’s RiverCenter office tower. » Give us a call: 859-2912020. » View the annual report and learn more about Vision, visit www.vision2015.org. Kara Williams is the vice president of strategic initiatives at Vision 2015.

Bring jobs ‘out of the shadows’ When I did something stupid, my mother would raise her voice and say “Have you lost your livin’ lovin’ mind?” It was a rhetorical question – her way of telling me I was, in fact, doing something stupid. Largely as a result of this stern upbringing, and from having frequently Rob Hudson been stupid COMMUNITY before, I RECORDER GUEST COLUMNIST know a thing or two about the subject. Recent events inspire me to rhetorically inquire, “Has Washington, D.C., has lost its livin’ lovin’ mind?” We are fixated on immigration reform – which would make illegal immigrants legal and provide a “path to citizenship.” It’s a matter of priorities, and it has been for awhile. By any computation, every day Congress is in session costs tens of millions of dollars. As debate rages on, the tab will reach hundreds of millions of dollars just to deal with immigration reform. The bill has ballooned to 1,200 pages and, once again, I suspect nobody voting on it will have the time to read it. Meanwhile, real unemployment for our Americans here legally has remained above 8 percent for more than five years. Would it be more helpful for Congress to focus on making it easier for employers to hire unemployed Americans rather spending its time adding millions of illegal immigrants to our workforce? I think I know how unemployed Americans would answer this question. The mantra is that we need to bring illegal immigrants “out of the shadows.” Imagine what it’s like to be an illegal immigrant. Every day you wake up and you know your presence is

228 Grandview Drive, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017 654 Highland Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075 phone: 283-0404 email: kynews@communitypress.com web site: www.nky.com

illegal. You obtain fake identification. You lie to get employment. You lie to legal authorities. You remain in the shadows because most days you are engaging in a pattern of deception. This is a harsh truth which is uncomfortable to discuss. But if we are going to grant illegal immigrants some form of amnesty, I can’t help but ask for some corresponding job-related “amnesty” initiatives to bring jobs “out of the shadows.” How about some tongue in cheek, tit-for-tat? 1. Employers should be granted amnesty from all litigation brought by the federal government. At least these employers have been here legally, contributing to our economy. 2. Employers should be granted amnesty from our complex tax code. Overhaul and get it down to 10 pages. Single spaced instead of double spaced should do it. 3. Employers should be granted amnesty from all pending government investigations – if they’re willing to hire new employees with the money they save. 4. Amnesty on all banking rules for business expansion loans if the expansion will result in jobs. Jobs are worth taking a chance on with loan rule amnesty. I wish we didn’t have an illegal immigration problem, but my sympathy lies with millions of law-abiding, chronically unemployed Americans. I’m sure there are great free market proposals out there which would liberate businesses and grow jobs. The immigration debate will end at some point, at which time there will be enough oxygen in the room to focus on jobs – assuming we don’t lose our livin’ lovin’ minds. Rob Hudson is a lawyer at Frost Brown Todd in Florence. He is author of “A Better Tomorrow – Fighting for Capitalism and Jobs in the Heartland.”

Campbell Community Editor Michelle Shaw mshaw@nky.com, 578-1053 Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday See page A2 for additional contact information.

NEWS

A10 • CCF RECORDER • JULY 11, 2013

859-635-6400 KERRYCHEVROLET.COM

7500 Alexandria Pike, Alexandria, KY

STOP BY AND SEE OUR NEWLY RENOVATED DEALERSHIP!

SERVING NORTHERN KENTUCKY COMMUNITIES FOR 20 YEARS!

LARGE SELECTION OF NEW CHEVROLETS SAME DAY DELIVERY

CRUZE

THE ALL NEW IMPALA

0% APR FINANCING 72 MOS

0% APR FINANCING 72 MOS SILVERADO

ON THE SPOT FINANCING EQUINOX

TRAVERSE

MALIBU

500 NEW AND USED CHEVROLETS AVAILABLE! PLUS TAX, TITLE AND REGISTRATION WITH APPROVED CREDIT. 0% $13.87 PER THOUSAND BORROWED. NO DOWN PAYMENT. OFFER ENDS 7/18/13. CE-0000562174

LIFE

THURSDAY, JULY 11, 2013

Fort Thomas resident Kaya Santini, 3, poses for a picture while watching the parade. AMANDA JOERING/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

COMMUNITY RECORDER

PEOPLE | IDEAS | RECIPES

Members of Manyet Dance perform during the parade. AMANDA JOERING/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

PARADE-GOERS BRAVE RAIN

FORT THOMAS — Despite the rainy weather, parade-goers and

participants from throughout Campbell County came to the annual Fourth of July parade in Fort Thomas.

Parade participants ride in Thomas the Tank Engine. AMANDA JOERING/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

A line of Corvettes make their way down South Fort Thomas Avenue during the parade. AMANDA JOERING/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Members of the Veterans of Foreign Wars John R. Little post based in Southgate wave to parade-goers. AMANDA JOERING/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Tom Rechtin Sr. drives his antique fire truck in the parade. AMANDA JOERING/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Participants ride a a pedal wagon in the parade. AMANDA JOERING/THE

Aubree Colston, left, and Brynn Colston pose for a picture while watching the Fort Thomas parade Thursday, July 4.

COMMUNITY RECORDER

AMANDA JOERING/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Members of the Highlands High School band brave the rain to play in the parade. AMANDA JOERING/COMMUNITY RECORDER

RAIN OR SHINE! Saturday d July 27, 2013 • 9am - 5pm 859-635-9587

Presented by Campbell County Farmland Work Group

campbellcd@fuse.net www.home.fuse.net/campbellcd

CE-0000556170

B2 • CCF RECORDER • JULY 11, 2013

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD FRIDAY, JULY 12

ABOUT CALENDAR

Art Events Wine and Canvas, 6:30-9:30 p.m., Newport Syndicate, 18 E. Fifth St., Painting class with cocktails. No experience necessary. $35. Reservations required. Presented by Wine and Canvas. 513-317-1305; www.wineandcanvas.com. Newport.

To submit calendar items, go to www.NKY.com and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to life@ communitypress.com along with event information. Items are printed on a spaceavailable basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to www.NKY.com and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page.

Attractions Summer Family Discount Hours, 4-7 p.m., Newport Aquarium, Newport on the Levee, Free admission for up to two children ages 2-12 with each full-paying adult, available online only. Admission: $23, $15 ages 12 and under. Through Aug. 30. 859-261-7444; www.newportaquarium.com. Newport.

Music - DJ The American Cornhole Organization Cornhole World Championships VIII are July 17-20 at Turfway Park in Florence. For more information, visit www.americancornhole.com. THANKS TO FRANK GEERS

view blooms, horses and historic barn. Bring camera. Choose from hundreds of varieties of daylilies to take home and plant in your own garden. Free admission. 859-635-7845; arrasmithfarm.com. Melbourne.

Dining Events

Music - Classic Rock

Christian Moerlein Beer and BBQ Cruise, 7:30-10 p.m., BB Riverboats Newport Landing, 101 Riverboat Row, Tasting of Christian Moerlein beer samples and buffet featuring brisket, chicken and pulled pork. Music by local band. Member of Christian Moerlein team directing tasting and talking about history of brewery. Ages 21 and up. $55. Reservations required. Presented by BB Riverboats. 859-261-8500; www.bbriverboats.com. Newport.

Second Saturday Concert Series: BlueStone Ivory, 7 p.m., Bellevue Beach Park, 100 Ward Ave., Horn-charged classic rock band. Free. Presented by City of Bellevue. 859-431-8888; www.bellevueky.org. Bellevue.

Drink Tastings

On Stage - Comedy

Friday Night in the Aisles Wine Tasting, 4-8 p.m., Party Source, 95 Riviera Drive, Flight of four wines, free of charge. Ages 21 and up. 859-291-4007; www.thepartysource.com. Bellevue.

Corey Holcomb, 7:30 and 10 p.m., Funny Bone Comedy Club, $10-$15. 859-957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

Exhibits Northern Kentucky Music Legends, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, 1600 Montague Road, Highlights performers, bands, DJs, composers, lyricists and other musical artists from Northern Kentucky who have spent 20-plus years sharing love of music with the public. Included with admission. 859-491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

Music - Rock Parti Gras Band, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., JerZee’s Pub and Grub, 708 Monmouth St., Free. 859-4913500. Newport. Psychostick, 7 p.m., The Thompson House, 24 E. Third St., $10. 859-261-7469; www.thompsonhousenewport.com. Newport.

On Stage - Comedy Corey Holcomb, 8 and 10:30 p.m., Funny Bone Comedy Club, Newport on the Levee, $10-$15. 859-957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

Special Events Queen City Sausage Festival, 5-11 p.m., Festival Park Newport, Riverboat Row, Food vendors, retail sausage shop, daily brat eating contest, games and entertainment. Free. Presented by Queen City Sausage and Provision Inc.. 513-541-5581; www.queencitysausage.com. Newport.

SATURDAY, JULY 13 Attractions Summer Family Discount Hours, 4-7 p.m., Newport Aquarium, Admission: $23, $15 ages 12 and under. 859-2617444; www.newportaquarium.com. Newport.

Farmers Market Newport Farmers’ Market, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., Historic Newport Business District, Monmouth Street, Held at 709 Monmouth St. in city parking lot adjacent to Pepper Pod Restaurant. Homegrown fruits, vegetables and annual and perennial flowers. Presented by City of Newport. 859-292-3666. Newport.

Garden Shows Daylily Sale, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Arrasmith Farm, 3595 Fender Road, Stroll through gardens to

Exercise Classes Cardio Dance Party!, 7:30-8:30 p.m., Locomotion on the Levee, $10 drop-in. 513-617-9498; www.cardiodanceparty.com. Newport.

Exhibits Northern Kentucky Music Legends, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, Included with admission. 859491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

Music - Blues s.org. Fort Thomas.

Cruises Pirates of the Ohio Cruise, 3-4:30 p.m., BB Riverboats Newport Landing, 101 Riverboat Row, Afternoon cruise with games for entire family. Children receive free pirate hat, eye patch and treasure map. $16. Reservations required. Presented by BB Riverboats. 859-2618500; www.bbriverboats.com. Newport.

Aquarium, Admission: $23, $15 ages 12 and under. 859-2617444; www.newportaquarium.com. Newport.

S

WEDNESDAY, JULY 17 Attractions Summer Family Discount Hours, 4-7 p.m., Newport Aquarium, Admission: $23, $15 ages 12 and under. 859-2617444; www.newportaquarium.com. Newport.

Music - Rock Stonehaus Trail, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., JerZee’s Pub and Grub, 708 Monmouth St., Includes drink specials. Ages 21 and up. Free. 859-491-3500; www.jerzeespub.com. Newport.

Special Events Queen City Sausage Festival, noon-11 p.m., Festival Park Newport, Free. 513-541-5581; www.queencitysausage.com. Newport.

Tours Ultimate Gangster Tour, 2 p.m., Gangsters Dueling Piano Bar, 18 E. Fifth St., More in-depth tour expands on Newport’s history. Includes visiting three additional locations not on regular tour. $30. Presented by American Legacy Tours. 859-491-8000; www.americanlegacytours.com. Newport.

SUNDAY, JULY 14 Art Events Art in the Park, 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Bellevue Beach Park, 100 Ward Ave., Regional artists and craftsmen selling original work. Exhibit and sale is also juried competition. Activities for children, dance class, music and more. Presented by Bellevue Renaissance. 859-431-8866; www.shopbellevueky.com. Bellevue.

Attractions Summer Family Discount Hours, 4-7 p.m., Newport Aquarium, Admission: $23, $15 ages 12 and under. 859-2617444; www.newportaquarium.com. Newport.

Karaoke and Open Mic DJ-led Karaoke, 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m., Miller’s Fill Inn, 52 Donnermeyer Drive, All domestic beers: $2. Special prices on well liquors. Ages 21 and up. Free. 859-4313455; www.facebook.com/ millers.fillin. Bellevue.

Music - Rock 100 Proof, 8-11:45 p.m., The Thompson House, 24 E. Third St., $10. 859-261-7469; www.thompsonhousenewport.com. Newport. Lamps and Voids, 8-11:55 p.m. Doors open 7 p.m., The Thompson House, 24 E. Third St., $10. 859-261-7469; www.thompsonhousenewport.com. Newport.

On Stage - Comedy Corey Holcomb, 7:30 p.m., Funny Bone Comedy Club, $10-$15. 859-957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

Special Events Queen City Sausage Festival,

Devout Wax, 8 p.m.-1:30 a.m., The Southgate House Revival, 111 E. Sixth St., The Lounge. Vinyl night. Margaret and Jonathan spin eclectic wax. Including an all spin-by-request set, bring your own records. Also, local/regional-only set. Ages 21 and up. Free. 859-4312201; www.facebook.com/ DevoutWax. Newport.

AMC Summer Nights series continues with "The Hunger Games," 10 a.m. Monday, July 15, at the AMC Newport On The Levee. The $3 tickets benefit several charities, including Will Rogers Institute, Autism Society of America and Autism Speaks. FILE PHOTO noon-9 p.m., Festival Park Newport, Free. 513-541-5581; www.queencitysausage.com. Newport.

MONDAY, JULY 15 Attractions Summer Family Discount Hours, 4-7 p.m., Newport Aquarium, Admission: $23, $15 ages 12 and under. 859-2617444; www.newportaquarium.com. Newport.

Films AMC Summer Nights, 10 p.m. “The Hunger Games.”, AMC Newport On The Levee 20, One Levee Way, Suite 4100, Eightweek program to view blockbuster movies and benefit several charities. Benefits Will Rogers Institute, Autism Society of America and Autism Speaks. $3. Through Aug. 14. 859-2616795; www.amctheatres.com/ summermovienights. Newport.

Erlanger.

Clubs & Organizations Triangle Toastmasters Meeting, 7-8:30 p.m., Campbell County Fiscal Court, 1098 Monmouth St., Become a confident, more effective speaker. Free. Presented by Triangle Toastmasters. 859-652-3348; triangle.toastmastersclubs.org. Newport.

Exercise Classes Cardio Dance Party!, 7:30-8:30 p.m., Locomotion on the Levee, 1 Levee Way, $10 drop-in. Presented by Cardio Dance Party. 513-617-9498; www.cardiodanceparty.com. Newport.

Films AMC Summer Nights, 10 p.m. “The Hunger Games.”, AMC Newport On The Levee 20, $3. 859-261-6795; www.amctheatres.com/summermovienights. Newport.

Karaoke and Open Mic

Music - Concerts

Open Mic, 9 p.m.-2 a.m., The Southgate House Revival, 111 E. Sixth St., The Lounge. Awardwinning open mic features singer-songwriters, comedians, marimba players, storytellers and more. Ages 21 and up. 859-431-2201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport.

Fort Thomas Summer Series, 7 p.m. John Erwin Band., Tower Park, 950 S. Fort Thomas Ave., Amphitheater. Bring seating. Rain moves concert to community center. Free. Presented by Fort Thomas Recreation Department. 859-781-1700; www.ftthoma-

Films AMC Summer Nights, 10 p.m. “The Hunger Games.”, AMC Newport On The Levee 20, $3. 859-261-6795; www.amctheatres.com/summermovienights. Newport.

Karaoke and Open Mic DJ-led Karaoke, 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m., Miller’s Fill Inn, Free. 859-431-3455; www.facebook.com/millers.fillin. Bellevue.

Support Groups Northern Kentucky Epilepsy Support Group, 6-7:30 p.m., St. Elizabeth Florence, 4900 Houston Road, Emergency Department Conference Room (lower level). Monthly gathering of adults with epilepsy, as well as parents, families and caregivers of those affected by epilepsy. Ages 18 and up. Free. Presented by Epilepsy Foundation of Greater Cincinnati and Columbus. 877-804-2241; www.epilepsy-ohio.org. Florence.

Live Blues Jam, 7:30-11:30 p.m., Miller’s Fill Inn, 52 Donnermeyer Drive, Free. 859-431-3455; www.facebook.com/millers.fillin. Bellevue.

Music - Cabaret Don Fangman, 6:30-9 p.m., Knotty Pine On The Bayou, 6302 Licking Pike, Don Fangman sings Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, Tony Bennett, Neil Diamond, Michael Buble and Andrea Bocelli. Free. 859-781-2200. Cold Spring.

Music - Concerts Live at the Levee, 7-10 p.m. Music by Randy McCalister., Newport on the Levee, 1 Levee Way, Riverwalk Plaza. Summer concert series. Free. 859-8151389; www.newportonthelevee.com. Newport.

Music - Country Original Hillbilly Thursdays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m., The Southgate House Revival, 111 E. Sixth St., The Lounge. Country, bluegrass, Americana and old fashioned hillbilly music. Different artist each week. Includes 50 cents off Jack Daniels. Ages 21 and up. Free. 859-431-2201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport.

Music - Rock Eric Taylor, 8 p.m., The Southgate House Revival, 111 E. Sixth St., Revival Room. Singer and songwriter. $12, $10 advance. 859-431-2201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport.

Music - World Alpen Echos, 7:30-11 p.m., Hofbrauhaus, 200 E. Third St., Free. 859-491-7200; www.hofbrauhausnewport.com. Newport.

On Stage - Comedy

THURSDAY, JULY 18

John Morgan, 8 p.m., Funny Bone Comedy Club, Newport on the Levee, $10-$15. 859-9572000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

Art Events

Recreation

Wine Tasting and Gallery To Go Paint Party, 7 p.m., DEPS Fine Wine and Spirits, 424 Alexandria Pike, Tasting summer wines and painting a beach scene. No painting skills necessary. 859-816-9053; gallerytogoparty.webs.com. Fort Thomas.

Aerial Fitness, 6-7 p.m., Locomotion on the Levee, 1 Levee Way, Work on core body strength and endurance and use aerial equipment for workout. Rigorous course suitable for all fitness levels. Ages 18 and up. $15. Presented by Cincinnati Circus Company. Through July 31. 513-921-5454; www.cincinnaticircus.com. Newport.

Attractions Summer Family Discount Hours, 4-7 p.m., Newport

TUESDAY, JULY 16 Art Events Wine and Canvas, 6:30-9:30 p.m., Naked Tchopstix, Newport on the Levee, Painting class with cocktails. No experience necessary. $35. Reservations required. Presented by Wine and Canvas. 513-317-1305; www.wineandcanvas.com. Newport.

Attractions Summer Family Discount Hours, 4-7 p.m., Newport Aquarium, Admission: $23, $15 ages 12 and under. 859-2617444; www.newportaquarium.com. Newport.

Business Meetings NKY Chamber Eggs ‘N’ Issues: UC President Santa Ono, 7:30-9 a.m., Receptions Banquet and Conference Center Erlanger, 1379 Donaldson Road, President Ono provides insights on how UC is forging stronger connections to Northern Kentucky community. Learn how their partnerships and recruitment efforts are creating new opportunities in the area. Ages 21 and up. $15 chamber members; $30 future chamber members. Registration required. Presented by Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce. 859-578-8800.

The Queen City Sausage Festival is July 12-14 in Festival Park Newport, Riverboat Row. THANKS TO MARK BALASA

LIFE

JULY 11, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • B3

Readers shares recipes for eggs, berry snack At the rate readers are sharing recipes, I should be able to share one in just about every column. I met Jackie Messersmith, an Anderson Township reader, and her family when we Rita were leavHeikenfeld ing Four RITA’S KITCHEN Seasons Marina. We lunched there and were ready to jump in our boat to go back home when Jackie introduced herself. While the husbands talked about boats, Jackie and I talked about food. She is sharing her family’s favorite brunch recipe. “My Aunt Wilma made this for breakfast whenever we came to visit. My kids love it and wish I’d make it more often than special occasions,” she told me.

Betty’s special breakfast eggs via Jackie Messersmith Devil six hard-cooked eggs with: 3 tablespoons sour cream, regular or low fat 2 tablespoons yellow mustard

Place in single layer in sprayed 9-inch by 13-inch pan. Sauté until soft in 2 tablespoons butter: ⁄2 cup diced bell pepper ⁄3 cup diced onion

1

1

Add and cook until bubbly: 1 can cream of mushroom soup (Jackie uses low-fat) 1 cup sour cream

Topping:

birthday, “helped” me pick raspberries from our patch. She broke into a big smile with all three teeth showing when I gave her a bite of the fruit snack. That’s equal to two thumbs up! Adults like these, too. Use any combination of berries you like. Here’s my adaptation. 1 heaping cup fresh raspberries or other berries or 1 cup frozen 21⁄4 cups natural apple juice, chilled (I used frozen, no sugar-added concentrate in equal parts concentrate and water) 2 packets unflavored gelatin (1 tablespoon plus 2 teaspoons) Honey/sweetener to taste, optional (I didn’t use any)

Cook berries and 11⁄2 cups juice at a gentle boil until berries soften. Puree in blender. Sprinkle gelatin over rest of cold juice, give it a stir and let stand a minute or so until gelatin absorbs the water. Add this to blender mixture and blend until gelatin dissolves. Add sweetener if desired. Line an 8-inch by 8-inch pan with clear wrap, overlapping sides. Pour mixture in. Put in refrigerator until firm. Turn pan over, remove plastic and cut into squares. Store in refrigerator. Tip: Brush pan with water before lining with wrap. Wrap will stick easily.

Rita's friend offers a recipe for healthy berry fruit gelatin snacks. THANKS TO RITA HEIKENFELD.

3 tablespoons packed brown sugar 2 tablespoons grated fresh ginger root 2 nice cloves garlic, minced 1 tablespoon roasted sesame oil Several dashes pepper 11⁄2 pounds flank steak

Mix sauce, sugar, ginger, garlic, oil and pepper together in a large zipper storage bag. Add steak, seal bag and turn to coat. Lay bag on its side and press out all the air. This helps the marinade cling to the steak. Marinate in refrigerator up to a day. Remove steak and reserve marinade. Grill, turning once, about 15 minutes or so for medium rare. Let rest 5 minutes. Meanwhile, bring reserved marinade to a boil and boil 1 minute. Slice steak thinly against grain and serve with marinade. Tip: Tamari is a stronger tasting soy sauce and can be gluten

How’s Your

Bath Tub? E... BEFOR

Asian grilled flank steak

Sometimes I crave foods with Asian flavors and this steak is my newest favorite. It takes just minutes on the grill and is good with a side of broccoli and steamed, buttered potatoes.

& AFTER!

free. You can use your favorite soy sauce. Regarding “light” soy sauce, read labels as some “light” sauces contain more sodium than you may want. Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator and author. Find her blog online at Cincinnati.Com/blogs. Email her at columns@communitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-248-7130, ext. 356.

Local library trustee attains state certification Community Recorder

Cathy Howard, a member of the Campbell County Public Library Board of Trustees, has completed the Kentucky Public Library Trustee Certification Program. The Trustee Certification program is the first of its kind in the state and is available to all Kentucky public library trustees through the Kentucky Department for Libraries and Archives (KDLA). It was created to provide trustees with tools to help them fulfill their responsibilities to the libraries and their communities. A total of 101 Kentucky public library trustees have completed the certification program, which is voluntary and includes five one-hour classes. Topics covered are trustee and director roles, effective board organization, budget and finances, policies and advocacy.

Four of the classes were created by the American Library Association with the remaining class designed and delivered by KDLA staff. KDLA provides equitable access to quality library and information resources and services, as well as helps public agencies ensure that legislatively mandated documentation of government programs is created, efficiently maintained and made accessible For more information on KDLA resources, programs and services visit www.kdla.ky.gov or call 502-5648300 ext. 315.

BIG COIN SHOW! 30th Annual

Greater Cincinnati Numismatic Exposition at the

SHARONVILLE CONVENTION CENTER

Quality of life at the end of life.

Friday & Saturday June 12th & 13th 10am-6pm

AUCTION 4PM SAT Bidders must pre-register to bid in this auction! Lot viewing during the show.

(859) 301-4600 | www.stelizabeth.com/hospice

100 National Dealers No Admission Charge!

CE-0000560171 CE-0000542758

SA T ISFY YO U R D ESIR E

D O W N TO W N

⁄2 cup Tamari soy sauce (see tip)

1

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Cover eggs with soup mixture and sprinkle with cheese. Bake 20 minutes. Betty likes to serve this on top of toasted English Muffins, with fresh fruit and crisp bacon as sides.

Healthy berry fruit gelatin snacks

My best friend and Indiana reader, Carol Spry Vanover, is always on the lookout for healthy recipes. “Check this out,” she said. This is a colorful, proteinand antioxidant-packed berry treat. Granddaughter Emerson, who just celebrated her first

BREAKING NEWS UPDATES EVERY MORNING

$275.00

Lifetime Warranty Available Expires 8-01-13

Rinks Flea Market Bingo Follow us on... www.facebook.com/RinksBingo w twitter.com/RinksBingo

Bath Tub & Tile Reglazing Tile Regrouting & Sealing LIFE TIME WARRANTY

T H E M O ER BU R G ER

$4,000 Guaranteed Payout Each Night! $5 - 6-36 Faces $10 - 90 Faces Computer

Fri, Sat Nights/www.RinksBingo.com

513-931-4441 • 513-931-0259

CE-0000551442

⁄2 cup shredded mild cheddar cheese

1

513-507-1951 859-341-6754

Erectile Dysfunction Doesn’t Have to Get You Down.

Nie’s Pharmacy & Wellness Center will work with Your doctor to find the most appropriate therapy to get you smiling again.

Download the NKY app on your iPhone for the latest in traffic, weather and crime in your region.

EA T

(859) 449-7000

11745 Madison Pike, Independence, KY CE-0000557242

www.NiesPharmacy.com

CE-0000559721

PLA Y

ST A Y

LIFE

B4 • CCF RECORDER • JULY 11, 2013

For the birds ... hummers, that is

PRESIDENT’S AWARD

Jerry and Joy Hodges accept the President’s Award at the July 1 Florence Rotary Club meeting from outgoing club president Brad Shipe. The Campbell County residents’ efforts at putting out Florence Rotary’s weekly newsletter were praised by Shipe. NANCY DALY/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

t and Him Crucified Jesus Chris We believe there are people who:

1. Want plain Bible teaching only 2. Want their children in real classes where the Bible is taught 3. Want to worship to glorify God and not to be entertained.

Laycock Roofing established 1945 under new ownership same employees • same quality of work

Visit with us at The Northern Ky. Church of Christ 18 Scott Dr. • Florence, KY (859) 371-2095 Sunday: Morning Worship - 9:45am Evening Worship - 6:00pm Wednesday evening Bible Study - 7:30 www.nkcofc.com We have electronic Bible Study tools available for your use.

we do: tear offs, cover ups, gutters, leaks, and new roofs. commercial and residential roofing

the solution, because microwaving causes a breakdown in the sugar molecule that Mike can change Klahr the nutriHORTICULTURE tional valCONCERNS ue. Cool the mixture and refrigerate. If you continue to have a problem with bees at the feeder, reduce the amount of sugar (or add more water) to create a 5-to-1 ratio. The birds will still use it, but bees probably will not. Do not add red dye. Some information suggests that red dye can actually harm the birds. Most commercial feeders have sufficient red to attract the birds. Never add honey to the mixture. It will create mold and fungal disease problems. Active feeders will be emptied in a hurry. If you do not get any activity at a feeder for several days, take the feeder down, empty the solution, and replace it with fresh

Where Hometown Charm Meets the Art of Gifting

859-757-0168

CE-0000560559

Never Ordinary but Affordable… Jewelry, Baby, All Occasion Gifts, Home Accents and more! Open MON – FRI 10 am - 6 pm SAT 10 am - 5 pm 3 N Fort Thomas Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075

859-609-6427

NON-DENOMINATIONAL Family Worship Center

!# ' & 8 ! " # ' ! " $ 8 # * 4 %'#86(%2 #'4:7

97 Three Mile Rd. Wilder, Ky. 41076 859-441-5433

SERVICE TIME Sunday, 10:45 a.m.

2%5: +0&*7)'$ *0 %/' ,* ; $*!0.*5$ %/' 369-"*) 511 0*!-

LOVE & FAITH FELLOWSHIP CHURCH

720 York St., Newport KY 41071 859-581-4244 Pastor: Gordon Milburn Sunday School: 9:30 am Sunday Morning Worship: 10:30 am Sun. & Wed. Eve Service: 6:00 pm

15 South Fort Thomas Ave. Fort Thomas, KY 41075

@3+ =+4),$5B 948,/>+> <4( ;=A1$.- 3<#+ )3+ -.') ;.>)3+>4 =+4),$5B 4+"'1 64B )/-+? <4B "<B B., "<4) /)1 " *85#.0)4 )5-6 " $5769 *5)4#,69 !;,,545 #)7 2042 6!2;;, 6:;836 !;/58#45 " ()3583#0)+5)3 #)7 320)46 3; 7; " *160)566 #)7 5)385:85)518 85:;836 " ';/58)+5)3 #)7 :;,030!6 " &1+#) 0)358563 63;8056 " %2;3; 4#,,58056 #)7 /075;6

NON-DENOMINATIONAL

www.christchurchuccft.org

CE-0000560249

859-441-2565 No matter who you are, or where you are on life’s journey,

you are welcome here! Traditional Service Sunday 9:00 - 10:00 a.m.

:,!'$>/!+ ).(<B <) #%29-;<1:,/3-5)/+1 62>+<(B < ',!'$>/!+>7 6$)/#<)+ B.,> <$$.,4) '. B., 4+#+> -/'' < -/4,)+ .* 0>+<) ;.>)3+>4 =+4),$5B $.#+><0+1 #%29-;<1*-.)=0.+

Contemporary Service Sunday 11:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

4*00'"% !+%/ (#8 %=A&948,/>+> 5+4),$5B+48,/>+> CE-0000540064

CE-0000553217

We pray that you are one of those people.

Question: What is the best recipe for making my own solution of hummingbird nectar, and how can I stop the bees from getting into my hummingbird feeder? Answer: Commercial hummingbird food mixes often cost more than homemade sugar-water solutions, and many of them also contain preservatives that might harm the birds. Here is how to make your own: Mix up a solution of about four parts water to one part sugar. This is the best ratio, because it is about the average amount of sucrose produced in typical flowers that attract hummingbirds. Do not make the solution any stronger, or it begins to attract butterflies and bees instead, since most flowers pollinated by butterflies and bees have an average nectar content of 42 percent. Boil the water and sugar for two minutes. Boiling it for this length of time slows fermentation, which is bad for the birds. Do not microwave

Rev. Ryan Byers, Pastor

Music Ministries led by Toni Sheffer and Max Gise

COMING UP Summer Tree ID Walk: 9:30-11:30 a.m. Thursday, July 11, Boone County Arboretum, 9190 Camp Ernst Road, Union, Shelter No. 2. Free, but please register by calling 859-586-6101, or enroll on-line at www.ca.uky.edu/boone Starting the Fall Vegetable Garden: 9:30-11:30 a.m. Tuesday, July 16, Boone County Extension Office, Burlington. Free, but please register by calling 859586-6101, or enroll online at www.ca.uky.edu/ boone

sugar water. Every week or so feeders, even active feeders, should be taken down and cleaned with a mild soap detergent, rinsed with bleach, and then rinsed thoroughly with water. There is great debate about when to take a hummingbird feeder down. Some people say the birds will not migrate if feed is still available, which is not true. You should leave your feeder up as long as the birds are coming to it. Migrant hummers normally show up by late July and will continue passing through until October or even later. While feeding is the best method of bringing the birds into your yard, you can also provide natural sources of nectar by planting certain flowers and shrubs, such as buckeyes, summersweet Clethra, rose mallow Hibiscus, Carolina silverbell, rhododendrons, weigela, trumpet creeper, passionflower, flowering tobacco, red Salvia, dianthus, zinnia, Mexican sunflower (Tithonia), snapdragon, Heuchera, copper or red iris, fire pinks, columbine, phlox, beardtongue, Monarda bee balm, obedient plant, cardinal flower, monkey flower, foxglove and gayfeather (blazingstar). Mike Klahr is the Boone County extension agent for horticulture.

County jobless rates released for May 2013 Community Recorder

Unemployment rates decreased in 32 Kentucky counties between May 2012 and May 2013, while 78 county rates rose and 10 stayed the same, according to the Kentucky Office of Employment and Training. In Boone County, unemployment was at 6.9 percent in May 2013, up .6 percent from April 2013, and down .3 percent from May 2012. In Campbell County, unemployment was at 7.4 percent in May 2013, up .5 percent from April 2013, and down .2 percent from May 2012. In Kenton County, unemployment was at 7.3 percent in May 2013, up .5 percent from April 2013, and even with May 2012.

LIFE

JULY 11, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • B5

AT THE LIBRARY

Cold Spring Branch

3920 Alexandria Pike, Cold Spring, KY 41076, 859-781-6166 Super Saturday: Construction Camp: 11 a.m. Saturday, July 13. Build with LEGOS, boxes and your imagination. Registration required. Ages 3-and-older. Tristate Bigfoot Returns!: 2 p.m. Saturday, July 13. Discover more about Tristate Bigfoot’s research on this mysterious creature. This program is appropriate for all ages. No registration is required but space is limited. All ages. Skin Care Crafts: 6 p.m. Tuesday, July 16. Learn how to make face scrubs, lotions and soap using ordinary household products. Registration required; space is limited. All supplies provided. Ages 11-18. Cup of Crime Mystery Book Club: 7 p.m. Wednesday, July 17. Discuss “The Pawn” by Steven James. New members welcome. Adults. Adventure Club: The Water Show: 4 p.m. Thursday, July 18. Wear your bathing suit and don’t forget your towel. Registration required. Ages 6-11. Improve Your Memory!: 7:30 p.m. Thursday, July 18. Eliminate moments of forgetfulness by learning techniques to improve your memory and brain function. Sal Piacente, a casino consultant with experience in card counting, teaches audiences how to improve their memories using the same memory techniques used by expert card counters. Registration required. Adults. Super Saturday: Mr. Potato Head Party: 11 a.m. Saturday, July 20. Registration required. Ages 3-and-older. Super Saturday: LEGO Club: 2 p.m. Saturday, July 20. Construct LEGO masterpieces at the library. LEGOs will be provided. Registration required. Ages 6-11. Counted Cross-Stitch for Teens: 6 p.m. Tuesday, July 23. This program is perfect for a beginner or someone wanting to improve their counted cross-

stitch skills. Registration required. All supplies provided. Ages 11-18. Highlights from the Cincinnati Art Museum: 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, July 24. Attend a presentation from the Speakers Bureau of the Cincinnati Art Museum. Trained docents will guide patrons through a tour of the early works located inside the Cincinnati Art Museum. Registration required. Adults. Adventure Club: Dinosaur Show Finale: 4 p.m. Thursday, July 25. This funny, magical, educational show is filled with magic and great information for all audiences. Registration required. Ages 6-11. Teen Summer Lock In: 7 p.m. Friday, July 26. Stay up all night playing games, both electronic and tabletop, with your friends. Registration required; space is limited. Moving/game Rating: PG-13/T for Teens. Parental permission slips required. Ages 11-18. Real Men Read Book Club: 7 p.m. Thursday, July 25. Discuss “Year of Wonder: A Novel of the Plague” by Geraldine Brooks. Books selected for The Real Men Read Book Club (for men and women) focus on biographies and adventure stories. New members always welcome.

Carrico-Fort Thomas

1000 Highland Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075, 859-572-5033 The Baby Big Top: 10 a.m. Saturday, July 13. Circus stories and songs. Registration required. Ages infants to 2. CCPL Board Meeting: 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, July 16. The Board meets at 4:30 p.m. on the third Tuesday of every month. Meetings take place on a rotating basis among the library branches. Apps for Organization: 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, July 17. Learn how to use apps like Evernote and Wunderlist to organize your life. Registration required. Adults. Teen Writing Workshop: 4 p.m. Thursday, July 18. Freelance writer, Carla Nocera Cherry, shares beneficial writing exercises for aspiring scribes. Regis-

tration required. Snacks provided. Ages 12-18. Super Saturday: Construction Zone: 10 a.m. Saturday, July 20. Bring your construction-workerin-training to the library’s construction zone and get close to some heavy machines. County music artist Billy Brown will perform a family friendly concert at 11 a.m. Registration required. Families. Adventure Club: Dinosaur Show: 4 p.m. Monday, July 22. Magic Don brings the world of dinosaurs back to life during The Incredible Dinosaur Show. Registration required. Ages 6-11. Instagram 101: 4 p.m. Tuesday, July 23. Bring in your digital photos on a flash drive and have them altered with cool retro effects. Registration required. Ages 11-18. Art After Hours: Art Exhibition, Music, Food and Wine: 7 p.m. Friday, July 26. The CarricoFort Thomas Branch will remain open until 9 p.m. to showcase the work of 16 local artists from Northern Kentucky and Cincinnati. The exhibit will feature a variety of media and each artist will be available to discuss their art. Attendees will also enjoy a traditional Celtic performance by Kyle Meadows and Tisa McGraw. The 2013 Art After Hours is generously sponsored by Jeff Thomas Catering, Fantasy in Frosting, Fort Thomas Florist and Greenhouses and Stonebrook Winery. Teens and adults. Summer Reading Finale: Teen Game Night: 7 p.m. Saturday, July 27. Celebrate the end of Summer Reading with games, snacks and prizes. Registration required. Snacks provided. Ages 12-18.

original T-shirt. Bring in a clean T-shirt that you want to update or the library will provide one to you. All supplies provided. Ages 12-18. Stith Happens: Sci-fi Book Club: 7 p.m. Thursday, July 11. Discuss this month’s selection, “Perdido Street Station” by China Mieville. New members welcome. Adults. Sit and Be Fit: 10:30 a.m. Friday, July 12 and 19. Sit and Be Fit returns for another six-week program. Sit and be Fit incorporates light cardio with muscle strength and range of motion exercises. Please wear loose-fitting clothing, rubber-soled shoes that tie or Velcro closed and bring a bottle of water. No leather soles or open-toe shoes. Registration required. Disclaimer: Not all exercises are suitable for everyone. Consult your doctor before participating in this or any exercise program. Ages 10-18. Super Saturday: Under the Sea with the Newport Aquarium: 2 p.m. Saturday, July 13. Residents from the Newport Aquarium will pay us a visit today. Registration required. All ages. Teen Yoga: 1 p.m. Sunday, July 14. Wear comfortable clothes. Disclaimer: Not all exercises are suitable for everyone. Consult

your doctor before participating in this or any exercise program. Ages 12-18. Adventure Club: Mr. Potato Head Party: 2 p.m. Tuesday, July 16. Registration required. Ages 6-11. Impromptu Gaming: 2 p.m. Wednesday, July 17. Snacks provided. Ages 12-18. Fly Fishing: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, July 20. Class members will receive simple explanations and hands-on demonstrations of essential equipment, some of the knots used, and fly casting from experienced volunteer instructors with a passion for the sport. Presented by the Northern Kentucky Fly Fishers. Registration required. Adults. Super Saturday: I Love Dirt: 2 p.m. Saturday, July 20. Enjoy mud painting and more. Snacks provided. Ages 3-5. Summer Wreath Making: 6:30 p.m. Monday, July 22. Learn to

make a paper umbrella wreath and make your front door look as summery as the rest of your landscaping. Registration required. Adults. Adventure Club: The Great Dinosaur Show: 2 p.m. Tuesday, July 23. Registration required. Ages 6-11. Friendship Bracelets: 2 p.m. Thursday, July 25. Learn how to make your own colorful friendship bracelets for yourself or share with a good friend. Ages 12-18. End of Summer Party: 8 p.m. Saturday, July 27. Once the library closes and the sun sets the annual End of Summer Reading Party begins. Snacks provided. Ages 12-18. Super Saturday: Dig This Worm Farming: 2 p.m. Saturday, July 29. Get down and dirty with worms today and make a worm farm to take home. Registration required. All ages.

“I’m Alive... because of organ donation!”

• OUTDOOR FURNACES • Eliminate High Heating Bills!

Say YES when you renew your license.

Incredible Rebates up to $1,600 for a limited time Don’t wait any longer! Start saving money on your heating bill when you heat your entire home, water and more with the safe, comfortable heat of a Central Boiler outdoor furnace. ace.

Newport

901 E. Sixth St., Newport, KY 41011, 859-572-5035 Friends Book Sale: 9 a.m. Thursday, July 11: Come to the Friends Book Sale on the lower level of the Newport Branch. Hours are 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday, and 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Friday and Saturday. T-Shirt Decorating: 2 p.m. Thursday, July 11: Create an

Maxim

We didn’t invent fire, just better ways to use it.

Megan,Transplant Recipient

E-Classic E Classi

CLASSIC, E-CLASSIC & MAXIM FURNACES IN STOCK & READY FOR DELIVERY!

Eagle Outdoor Furnaces • Lebanon, Ohio Call Jeff Huddleson at 1-513-638-5717 Visit us at: EagleOutdoorFurnaces.com

CE-0000561100

Supported by

www.trustforlife.org

866-945-5433

CE-0000562172

The Campbell County Public Library offers the following programs in July.

Be Treated By a Pro Whether you’re a working professional, participate in weekend

activities or just tired of living with pain – let our experienced clinical team at NovaCare Rehabilitation get you back to life.

Our one-on-one, individualized treatment programs, partnered with the warm therapeutic properties of water help to strengthen and shape movement and function.

2600 Alexandria Pike Highland Heights, KY 41076 859.572.0710 ! FAX 859. 572.0716 Our highly trained clinical team provides the following services: ! Sports Medicine

! Functional Capacity Evaluations (FCEs)

! Orthopaedic Rehabilitation

! Post Offer Employment Testing (POETS)

! Spine Rehabilitation

! Wheelchair Evaluations

! Aquatic Therapy

! Instrument Assisted Soft Tissue Mobilization

! Custom Orthotics ! Prosthetics Training

Standing left to right: Sheri Utz, Mike Quinn, Jennifer Lehmkuhl, Marcin Jez, Mark Miller, Chad Woods Sitting left to right: Debbie Franzen, Erica Reynolds novacare.com/markets/Cincy-Nky-Dayton.aspx CE-0000560037

LIFE

B6 • CCF RECORDER • JULY 11, 2013

Medical Reserve Corps seeks volunteers Community Recorder

The Northern Kentucky Medical Reserve Corps provides citizens of both medical and nonmedical backgrounds with a way to help their communities during a public-health emergency. Anyone interested in joining the Medical Reserve Corps is invited to attend an orientation session 9-11 a.m. Saturday, July 20, at the health department’s district office, 610 Medical Village Drive, in Edgewood. A light breakfast will be provided. The Northern Kentucky Medical Reserve Corps is a branch of the

federal government’s Medical Reserve Corps program, and its goal is to provide a volunteer pool for the Northern Kentucky region that can enhance and support public health agencies and the health care infrastructure during a crisis. Since the Medical Reserve Corps was created in 2002, the program has grown to more than 200,000 volunteers in nearly 1,000 units across the country. Northern Kentucky’s MRC unit alone has more than 450 members. Volunteers would be asked to serve in their own community; but may also choose to volunteer

for the Tristate region or for communities in need around Kentucky. Volunteers will be offered trainings throughout the year that will support personal preparedness and basic disaster response skills, as well as developing specialized skills needed for a public health emergency response. Anyone age 18 or older is eligible, and people with both medical and non-medical training are encouraged to join. For more information about the Medical Reserve Corps, call Jean Caudill at 859-363-2009 or email Jean.Caudill@nkyhealth.org.

Meal preparation a valuable life skill There are many skills we need to succeed in life. Managing meal preparation is an important skill that will serve us well into our golden years. Summer may be a prime time to have some fun in the kitchen while helping the children in your life learn. At a very young age children can contribute to the meal. They can count the dishware needed for the meal. Or, give them a chance to measure ingredients for a recipe. Help them identify the colors and shapes of the foods being prepared. Yes, it may take a bit longer for the task to be completed, but in the later years you’ll appreciate the time spent. As children age let them do basic meal preparation and planning.

Help them know what a wellbalanced meal is then let them plan the menu one night a Diane week or Mason month. EXTENSION You may NOTES have to eat some of the same foods over and over, but when your children are living on their own you’ll rest a little easier knowing they know how to fix their own meals. Encourage your children to include fruits and vegetables in their meal plans. Also, encourage them to try new recipes and foods. Help your children know how to use and clean the appliances in

MOTCH Since 1857

The Pampered Pooch Salon

EXPERT WATCH AND JEWELRY REPAIR • FULL WATCH REPAIR

299 Johns Road Butler, KY 41006 Bring in this ad & get

$5 off your first visit

for small & medium dogs

$10 off your first visit

FULL SERVICE JEWELRY STORE

859-757-1001 check out our website at www.ThePamperedPoochSalon.com

CE-0000559410

Open 7 Days A Week By Appointment Only

CE-0000555733

CE-0000551326

for large dogs.

613 Madison Avenue Covington, Kentucky 41011 WE BUY GOLD! 859-757-4757 www.motchjewelers.com

your kitchen. Take the time to teach them safety tips to avoid burns, fires, and injuries. Of course there will be spills and messes as children learn to cook. Messes can always be cleaned up. Remember to match the job to the attention span and skill level of the child. Break tasks into simple steps. Be willing to repeat directions so the child will be successful. Keep in mind that supervision is needed when kids are learning a new skill. Do not allow young children to use sharp knives or utensils or handle hot liquids or pans. Also, be sure all hands are washed with warm soap and water often. As adults we also need to remember that praise and congratulations are always in order as the kids in our lives tackle new skills. We also have to remember that teaching our children to clean up after themselves is just as important as teaching them to cook. Gather the kids, grab a recipe and enjoy spending some time together while preparing something everyone will enjoy sampling. Diane Mason is county extension agent for family and consumer sciences at the Boone County Cooperative Extension Service.

YOU TAKE CARE OF FOSTER KIDS. WE TAKE CARE OF YOU. At Sunrise, we know that parenting isn’t an 8 to 5 job with weekends off, and neither is ours. Unlike other organizations, we’re here for you 24/7, ready to help you with your questions or concerns whenever you need us. That’s why so many have already joined Sunrise, because we understand the needs of foster parents. If you’re interested in joining Sunrise, call 855-33-iCARE or visit www.sunrise.org. We’ll make your foster care experience the best it can be.

EXPERIENCE FOSTER CARE WITH SUNRISE.

Helping children in crisis shine.

We hold ourselves to the highest accountability standard. We are the only non-profit private child care provider in Kentucky offering a full array of services that is accredited by the Joint Commission, the premiere health care accreditation organization in the country.

Owensboro – Elizabethtown – Mt. Washington – Somerset Morehead – Ivel – Paducah – Bowling Green – Louisville – Lexington Danville – Florence – Hopkinsville CE-0000558958

LIFE

JULY 11, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • B7

Strange Brew, New Lime perform at Behringer-Crawford By Nancy Daly ndaly@nky.com

The band Strange Brew accepts its induction June 2 into the Northern Kentucky Music Legends Music Hall of Fame. FILE PHOTO

one of the busiest bands in Greater Cincinnati in the 1960s and recorded for Columbia Records. Songs included “Whenever I Look In Her Eyes,” “And She Cried” and “The Gumdrop Trilogy.” The 2013 Music@BCM series features an eclectic mix of concerts, ranging from brass to the blues to the bayou. The series of Thursday night concerts runs through Aug. 1. The doors open at 6 p.m. for food and drinks,

CE-0000560906

COVINGTON — It’s a “legendary” blast from the past as Northern Kentucky Music Legends Strange Brew and New Lime unite for Music@BCM this Thursday, July 11. These bands were an integral part of the early Northern Kentucky rock music scene in the 1960s and ‘70s, performing at local venues like Skinny Bobby Harper’s Club TULU. Now, they’re bringing these rock and roll glory days into the new century at Behringer-Crawford Museum. Strange Brew, consisting of Bob Eubanks, Scott Sprague, Jerry Gifford and Mike Meredith, were among 13 inductees at the June 2 inaugural induction ceremony of the Northern Kentucky Music Legends Hall of Fame at the Behringer-Crawford Museum. An exhibit honoring the inductees runs through Sept. 1. New Lime, which included Mickey Foellger, a senior status circuit judge for the commonwealth of Kentucky, was considered

LEGAL NOTICE Notice is hereby given that IPSCO Tubulars (KY) Inc. located at 100 Steel Plant Road, Wilder, Kentucky 41071, has filed an application with the Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet to temporarily place fill materials in the southern portion of the facility within the limits of the 100year floodplain as part of ongoing facility expansion activities. The IPSCO facility is located at 100 Steel Plant Road, in Wilder, Kentucky between Route 9 and the Licking River. Any comments or objections concerning this application shall be directed to: Kentucky Division of Water, Surface Water Permit Branch, Flood Plain Management Section, 200 Fair Oaks Lane, Frankfort, Kentucky 40601. Phone: (502) 5643410. 1001768030

We Are The Energy Experts! Making Your Home: & ,.#+ *.4$.#?527+ & :5$+# & 8+57?@=+# & )1+#"3 )$>/=+1?

:/@+-<7+ 3.<# home energy 5<-=? ?.-53( 513-621-4620 05?/@ ?@+ ;=-+.! 5? 999(+1+#"3+6%+#?!(2=' CE-0000560521

and the concert runs from 7 to 9 p.m. Admission is $5 for adults and $3 for children. Music@BCM will continue on July 18 with a night of blues from the

Bluebirds. For more information, contact the museum at 859-491-4003 or info@bcmuseum.org.

Follow @Nancy_Daly on Twitter.

LEGAL NOTICE Notice is hereby given that IPSCO Tubulars (KY) Inc. located at 100 Steel Plant Road, Wilder, Kentucky 41071, has filed an applica tion with the Kentucky Energy and Environ ment Cabinet to temporarily place fill materi als in the northern portion of the facility within the limits of the 100-year floodplain as part of ongoing facility expansion activities. The IPSCO facility is located at 100 Steel Plant Road, in Wilder, Kentucky between Route 9 and the Licking River. Any comments or objections concerning this application shall be directed to: Kentucky Division of Water, Surface Water Permit Branch, Flood Plain Management Section, 200 Fair Oaks Lane, Frankfort, Kentucky 40601. Phone: (502) 5643410. 1001768027 NOTICE TO BID The Campbell County Fiscal Court will accept sealed bids for Hot Bituminous Materi als, Oil and Tar, Stone and Culvert Pipe for use by the County Road Department. Sealed Bids will be accepted until 10:00 A.M. prevailing time, Friday, July 19th, 2013. Bids will be opened publicly at that time in the Conference Room 137 at the Campbell County Administration Building, 1098 Monmouth Street, Newport, Kentucky 41071. To obtain a bid packet contact Diane Bertke at 859547-1825 or visit the Campbell County website www.campbellcountyky.org. For particulars and/or specifications, contact Luke Mantle at or Tim Hartig at 859-6359100. Firm pricing is required for all bids. Campbell County Fiscal Court reserves the right to reject any and all bids. 1769908

Shop local, find Waldo Community Recorder

Blue Marble Books and 25 participating Fort Thomas businesses are once again teaming up for the monthlong scavenger hunt – running through Friday, July 26 – searching for Waldo, the famous book character, in an ongoing effort to promote the “shop-local” message. Blue Marble Books will host the wrap-up party and drawing 1

p.m. Saturday, July 27, in celebration of the Where’s Waldo contest. In order to qualify for the drawing, participants will need to find Waldo at 20 of the 25 participating businesses. Entry forms can be picked up at Blue Marble Books. Prizes will include Waldo books, posters, stickers and gift certificates to local businesses. Refreshments of cookies and juice will be served during the wrap-up party.

TO ALL INTERESTED CITIZENS OF CAMPBELL COUNTY KENTUCKY The Kentucky Department for Local Government is accepting applications for 2013 Grant Block Development Community The Campbell County (CDBG) funding. Fiscal Court intends to apply for CDBG funds to assist in construction of a 48 unit Scholar House and Child Development Center to be located in Newport, Kentucky. The County will hold a public hearing prior to submission of its application. The hearing will be held on Friday, July 19, 2013 at 11:00 am EDT in the first floor Fiscal Court meeting room at 1098 Monmouth Street, Newport, Kentucky. The following information concerning the CDBG program is now available for public inspection during regular business hours at the Office of the Judge/Executive, 1098 Monmouth Street, Newport, Kentucky. A. Amount of funds available and range of activities that may be undertaken. B. Estimated amounts of funds proposed to be used for activities benefiting persons of low and moderate income. Plans for minimizing displacement of C. persons as a result of activities associated with CDBG funds and plans for providing assistance to those persons to be actually displaced as a result of CDBG-funded activities. D. Records regarding the past use of CDBG funds. E. A summary of other important program requirements. Comments on Application Beginning July 12, 2013, a copy of the proposed CDBG application shall, be available for public review and comment at the Office of the Judge/Executive, 1098 Monmouth Street, Newport, Kentucky at 1098 Monmouth Street, Newport, KY until close of business on July 24, 2013. Discrimination Clause The Fiscal Court does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, religion or disability, and provides, upon request, reasonable accommo dation, including auxiliary aids and services, to afford an individual with a disability an equal opportunity to participate in all services, programs and activities. Any persons requiring special needs assistance to attend the public hearing should contact Robert Horine at 859-547-1805 at least five days prior to the hearing. The TDD number for the hearing impaired is 1-800648-6057. 1770102

A Research Study for TEENS with ADHD

Is your teen still struggling with

ADHD?

Learn about this research study of an investigational medication for teens diagnosed with ADHD. Qualified participants may receive at no cost: • Investigational medications for ADHD • Study-related care and monitoring • Possible compensation for time and travel

At the completion of the study, your teen may qualify for a 3 month supply of an FDA-approved medication to treat ADHD in adolescents.

For more information

Call 866-470-6567 OR Text FOCUS3 to 87888

LIFE

B8 • CCF RECORDER • JULY 11, 2013

DEATHS Janet Ampfer Janet Ann Ampfer, 79, of Alexandria, died June 26, 2013, at her home She was a member of St. Joseph Church in Cold Spring, Good Sam Angels and Vagabond Squares, and loved to travel and go camping with her family. Survivors include her husband, Lee; sons, Steve and Paul Ampfer; daughter, Karen Humphreys; sisters, Sister Helen Louise Bart-

lett, Joan Miller, Jacqueline Darpel and Jean Marie Bartlett; brother, Louis Bartlett; seven grandchildren and five greatgrandchildren. Interment was at St. Mary Cemetery. Memorials: Hospice of the Bluegrass.

Mary Burkart Mary I. Stobaugh Burkart, 88, of Hamilton, Ohio, formerly of Newport, died June 27, 2013, at

ORDINANCE NO. O-11-2013 AN ORDINANCE ESTABLISHING COMPENSATION OF NON-ELECTED OFFICERS, NON-UNION EMPLOYEES, AND GENERAL SERVICES DEPARTMENT LABORERS WHO ARE MEMBERS OF AFSCME LOCAL #286, FOR THE 2013-2014 FISCAL YEAR AND PROVIDING FOR THE MANNER OF PAYING SUCH COMPENSATION.

Hospice of Hamilton. She was a retired cafeteria worker at Lakeside Nursing Home and a court clerk for the Newport Police Department. Her husband, William Burkart, died previously. Survivors include her daughter, Lisa Busam; nieces and nephews. Burial was at St. Stephen Cemetery in Fort Thomas. Memorials: Animal Friends Humane Society, 1820 Princeton Road, Hamilton, OH 45011; or Hospice of Cincinnati, P.O. Box 633597, Cincinnati, OH 452633597.

Freda Carmack Freda Rosella “Rosie” Carmack, 82, of Alexandria, died June 27, 2013, at her home. She was a member of St. Mary, PTA and the RCIA, was

Basic obituary information and a color photograph of your loved one is published without charge by The Community Press. Please call us at 283-0404 for more information. To publish a larger memorial tribute, call 513-2424000 for pricing details. For the most up-to-date Northern Kentucky obituaries, click on the “Obituaries” link at NKY.com. involved with the Alexandria Fair for many years, and enjoyed cooking and baking. Her husband, Sonny Carmack, died previously. Survivors include her children, Terry Carmack, Clint Carmack, Mindy Kuper-Painter and Doug Carmack; nine grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. Burial was at Alexandria Cemetery. Memorials: Hospice of St.

WHEREAS, the Mayor of the City of Fort Thomas, with approval of the Board of Council when applicable, has previously appointed all Employees and non-elected City Officers to serve at the pleasure of the Mayor; and WHEREAS, the duties of said Officers and positions have been set forth in the “Personnel and Pay Classification Plan” adopted by Ordinance 0-21-81; NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY OF FORT THOMAS, CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY: SECTION I GENERAL SERVICES EMPLOYEES WHO ARE MEMBERS OF AFSCME LOCAL #286 That the rates of pay of the employees of the General Services Department of the City of Fort Thomas, Kentucky, who are members of AFSCME Local #286, be and the same are hereby fixed and determined so that said employees shall receive for their services pay at the following hourly rates for the 2013-2014 Fiscal Year, effective on July 1, 2013, as hereinafter shown: POSITION

HOURLY RATE OF PAY

Laborer, Class A Laborer, Class B

$24.67 $23.67

Employees who elect to opt-out of health insurance shall receive $2.22 per hour in addition to their regular hourly rate of pay. Employees with five or more, but less than ten, years of service shall receive $0.29 per hour in addition to their regular hourly rate of pay. Employees with ten or more, but less than fifteen, years of service shall receive $0.39 per hour in addition to their regular hourly rate of pay. Employees with fifteen or more years of service shall receive $0.48 per hour in addition to their regular hourly rate of pay. Employees who achieve Roads Scholar certification, as administered by the Kentucky Department of Transportation, shall receive $0.05 per hour in addition to their regular hourly rate of pay. Employees who achieve Road Master certification, as administered by the Kentucky Department of Transportation, shall receive $0.10 per hour in addition to their regular hourly rate of pay. Employees will be paid at the above hourly rates for the first forty (40) hours of work each week and one and one-half (1½) times that rate for all additional hours worked each week. The work week for the Department shall be defined as beginning at 12:00 a.m. Sunday and continuing until Saturday at 11:59 p.m. SECTION II NON-ELECTED OFFICERS AND NON-UNION EMPLOYEES That the following employees will be paid at the stated rates in bi-weekly installments for the 2013-2014 Fiscal Year, commencing on July 1, 2013: POSITION

ANNUAL SALARY

City Administrative Officer Director of General Services / Asst. to CAO City Treasurer / Director of Finance Police Chief Fire Chief General Services Foreman Main Street Coordinator / Economic Dev. Dir. POSITION

$99,359.35 $97,595.92 $94,711.92 $94,711.92 $73,123.79 $50,000.00 $28.44 $31.67 $17.34 $19.64 $26.01 $16.02 $11.73 $11.22 $20.24 $34.68 $19.45 $26.61 $21.48 $11.99

SECTION V All ordinances, resolutions or parts thereof in conflict with the provisions of this ordinance are, to the extent of such conflict, hereby repealed. SECTION VI This ordinance shall take effect and be in force at the earliest date provided by law. APPROVED: 1st Reading: June 17, 2013 ADOPTED: July 1, 2013 Published: July 11, 2013

Mary H. Brown, Mayor

ATTEST: Melissa Kelly, City Clerk

NOTICE Fort Thomas Board of Adjustment Public Hearing The Board of Adjustment of the City of Fort Thomas, Kentucky, will hold a Public Hearing at the City Building, 130 North Fort Thomas Avenue, Fort Thomas, Kentucky, on Tuesday, July 23, 2013 at 6:00 P.M. for the following cases: CASE NO. 13-1333 - A hearing of an application filed by St. Andrews Church, owner of property located at 3 Chalfonte Place, requesting a Conditional Use Permit to construct and install a Columbarium attached to the church. CASE NO. 13-1334 - A hearing of an application filed by Barbara Burkhard, owner of property located at 42 Linden Avenue, requesting a Dimensional Variance to allow the extension of the front porch. CASE NO. 13-1335 - A hearing of an application filed by Steve Bailey, owner of property located at 1214 S. Ft. Thomas Avenue, requesting Dimensional Variances to allow the construction of deck and garage. Any adjoining property owner who is unable to attend this hearing is encouraged to submit signed, written comments to the Board concerning the proposed project. Said written correspondence shall be received no later than the time of public hearing, and thereupon shall be a matter of public record. All correspondence shall be directed to City of Fort Thomas, General Services Department, Attn: Julie Rice, 130 N. Ft Thomas Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075 The City of Fort Thomas will make every reasonable accommodation to assist qualified disabled persons in obtaining access to available services or in attending City activities. If there is a need for the City to be aware of a specific disability, you are encouraged to contact the City Building, General Services Department at (859) 572-1210 so that suitable arrangements can be considered prior to the delivery of the service or the date of the meeting. City of Ft. Thomas General Services Department

Elizabeth South, 483 South Loop Road, Edgewood, KY 41017; or the American Cancer Society, 297 Buttermilk Pike, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017.

James Dawn James Dawn, 89, of California, died June 28, 2013, at Florence Care Center. He worked as a welder. His wife, Betty Dawn, died previously. Survivors include his brothers, Jack Dawn and Doug Dawn; sisters, Marie Gaskins and Gayle Wanner. Burial was at Alexandria Cemetery.

Louise Green Louise Green, 86, of Butler, died June 29, 2013, at River Valley Nursing Home. She was involved with the Ladies of VFW in Alexandria. Survivors include her son, James Green of Cincinnati; daughter, Sherry King of Alexandria; sister, Sandy Warren of North Umberland, Pa.; three grandchildren, four greatgrandchildren and one greatgreat-grandchild. Burial was at Forest Lawn in Erlanger. Memorials: River Valley Nursing Home, 305 Taylor St., Butler, KY 41006.

Steven Hagedorn Steven J. “Ace” Hagedorn, 55, of Fort Thomas, died June 28, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. He was a Highlands High School graduate, earned a degree in agriculture from the University of Kentucky, retired after working for the Commonwealth of Kentucky, worked for the Kentucky Division for Air Quality, and loved music and the outdoors. His brother, Robert Hagedorn, and father, Jack Hagedorn, died previously. Survivors include his son, Brad Hagedorn of Georgetown; daughter, Amy Hagedorn of Lexington, and Joan Hagedorn of Lexington; mother, Naomi “Dutz” Hagedorn of Fort Thomas; brothers, Jack Hagedorn of Cold Spring, Bill Hagedorn of Cold Spring, David Hagedorn of Fort Thomas, and Ken Hagedorn of Hebron; sisters, Mary Buring of Cold Spring, and Jane Hasenstab of Cold Spring. Memorials: charity of donor’s choice.

1769929

$111,152.85

HOURLY RATE OF PAY

City Clerk / Executive Secretary Finance Officer / Purchasing Agent Finance Clerk (RC) Finance Clerk (NR) Facilities Maintenance Supervisor Parks and Greenspace Laborer II Parks and Greenspace Laborer I (Cox/Wolfe) Parks and Greenspace Laborer I (Grosser) Recreation Secretary / Administrative Assistant Building Inspector / Zoning Administrator General Services Administrative Assistant Mechanic Police Clerk Fire Clerk (Part Time)

Mildred Krift

ABOUT OBITUARIES

%'"!((!$&##(!"(!

PUBLIC NOTICE Fort Thomas Independent Schools Non-Discrimination Policy Statement Students, their families, employees and potential employees of the Fort Thomas Independent Schools are hereby notified that the Fort Thomas Independent School District does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, religion, marital status, sex or disability in employment, vocational programs, or activities as set forth in compliance with federal and state statutes and regulations. The Fort Thomas Independent School District offers programs as follows for all students regardless of race, color, national origin, including those with limited English proficiency, sex or disability: •The Fort Thomas Independent School District contracts with the area vocational schools in offers program as follows for: all students in grades 11 and 12: Health Sciences I and II; Electrical Construction I and II; Auto Body Repair I and II; Automotive Technology I and II; Masonry I and II; Carpentry I and II; Welding I and II; Information Technology I and II. •The following career and technical education courses are offered at Highlands High School to students in grades 9-12: Business Principles and Applications; Computer and Technology Applications I, II, III, and IV; Business Law/Business Management; Business Economics/Sports Marketing; Cooperative Business and Office Program; Accounting and Finance Foundations; Financial Accounting; Financial Services I & II; Computer Troubleshooting; Business Office Assistant; AP Computer Science; Contemporary Issues; Life Skills; Child Care Services; Parenting and Child Development; Food and Nutrition; Fashion and Interior Design I and II; Hospitality Careers; Technology Concepts; CADD I: Technology Design & Applications I ; CADD II: Technology Design & Applications II; Special Technology Topics: Manufacturing; Conceptual Engineering Technology; Special Technology Topics: Engineering. Any persons having inquiries concerning Fort Thomas Independent Schools’ compliance with Title II, Title IV, Title VI, Title VII, Title IX, the American with Disabilities Act (ADA) and/or Section 504 may contact: Rita Byrd,Assistant Superintendent (Compliance Official) Fort Thomas Independent Schools 28 N. Ft. Thomas Ave. Fort Thomas, KY 41075 859.781.3333 rita.byrd@fortthomas.kyschools.us

OR

Gene Kirchner, Superintendent Fort Thomas Independent Schools 28 N. Ft. Thomas Ave. Fort Thomas, KY 41075 859.781.3333 gene.kirchner@fortthomas.kyschools.us

To obtain this information in a language other than English, call 859.781.3333.

9686

Mildred Katherine Krift, 88, of Alexandria, died June 28, 2013. She was a member of the Alexandria VFW 3205 and worked at Sunshine Cleaners. Survivors include her daughter, Patty Spurr; four grandchildren and 13 great-grandchildren. Burial was at Alexandria Cemetery.

Reuben McCain Reuben Clay McCain, 80, of California, Ky., died June 28, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He graduated from Bellevue High School where he participated on the baseball and bowling teams, was an Army veteran, worked at the Gibson Greeting Card Company where he met his wife, retired after 33 years of work at the Western-Southern Life Insurance Company, was an active member of Plum Creek Christian Church where he served as deacon, elder, Sundayschool teacher, choir member, softball coach and pitcher, and founder of the benevolence team which served the local community with food and clothing for those in need. He enjoyed devotional writing, writing poetry, golfing, softball, bowling, euchre and watching the Reds and UK teams play ball. His wife, Betty McCain; sisters, Mary Beth Baynum and Lois Hitch, died previously. Survivors include his sons, David McCain and Daniel McCain; daughters, Karen Mack, Amy Schmidt and Rebecca White; and brother, James Richard McCain; 12 grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Burial with military honors was at the Plum Creek Cemetery. Memorials: Plum Creek Christian Church Office, 13455 Alexandria Pike, Butler, KY 41006.

Jack Porter Sr. Jack Lee Porter Sr., 85, of Southgate, died June 28, 2013, at Carmel Manor in Fort Thomas. He was an outgoing distribution worker with U.S. Postal Service in Newport, a World War II Army veteran, and member of the James W. Costigan American Legion Post No. 11 in Newport. His daughter, Cherie Porter, died previously. Survivors include his wife, Betty Stuart Porter; son, Jack Porter Jr. of Fort Thomas; granddaughter, Chelsea Porter of Fort Thomas; and friend, Peggy Bramble of Fort Thomas. Burial was at Evergreen Cemetery in Southgate. Memorials: Carmel Manor, 100 Carmel Manor Road, Fort Thomas, KY 41075.

Charles Randall Charles Elmer Randall, 65, of Newport, formerly of Melbourne, died June 24, 2013, at his home. He was an Air Force veteran of Vietnam, retired welder for Ortner Freight Car Company and a former employee of Silver Grove Schools. Survivors include his daughters, Christie Randall, Ginger Randall and Nicole Randall; sons, Charles Elmer Randall II, Daniel Randall and Brian Randall; brother, Gary Randall; sister, Marlene Joering; 14 grandchildren. Interment with military honors was at the Evergreen Cemetery in Southgate. Memorials: American Diabetes Association, 4555 Lake Forest Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45242.

Cabinet seeks ‘kynectors’ Community Recorder

The Office of the Kentucky Health Benefit Exchange has issued a request for proposal seeking organizations to assist consumers who enroll for health care benefits through kynect, Kentucky’s Healthcare Connection. View the solicitation at http://bit.ly/kynecter.

LIFE

JULY 11, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • B9

POLICE REPORTS BELLEVUE Arrests/citations Jessica Wyrick, 23, 135 Lafayette, possession of drug paraphernalia, public intoxication at Bellevue Beach Park, June 17.

CAMPBELL COUNTY Arrests/citations Scott A. Green, 24, 88 Crosstown Drive, warrant at Alexandria Pike and Enzweiler, May 31. Shane T. Williams, 37, 695 Clay Ridge Road, DUI - aggravated circumstances - first offense, careless driving, warrant at Alexandria Pike, June 2. Courtney A. Shaw, 21, 999 David Road, warrant at South Licking Pike and Tarvin, June 2. John Lawson, 43, 5137 Whitney, warrant at 5137 Whitney Drive, June 3. Donnell M. Miller, 20, 4824 Stewart Ave., operating on suspended or revoked operators license, no registration plates, improper display of registration plates at I-275 at the AA Highway, June 3. Leisa M. Decker, 29, 105 Millsdale Opas Unit 1, DUI - aggravated circumstances - first offense, reckless driving, failure of owner to maintain required insurance at AA Highway and Rockyview, June 3. Felicia N. Johnson, 27, 415 Taylor Ave., warrant, speeding, possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia at AA Highway and Country Lake, June 3. Rhonda J. Langford, 30, 105 Southwest St., procession of controlled substance - heroin, second-degree possession of controlled substance - drug unspecified, possession of drug paraphernalia, seconddegree unlawful transaction with a minor, careless driving at Licking Pike, June 3. Wendell McKenzie, 43, 321 5th Ave., possession of drug paraphernalia, public intoxication controlled substance excludes alcohol at AA Highway, June 4.

Incidents/investigations Criminal littering Report of beer can thrown out of car window at California Crossroads and AA Highway, June 1. Domestic related Reported at Mary Ingles Highway, June 3. First-degree criminal trespass Report of unknown person entered residence and then fled into woods at 8928 Alexandria Pike, May 31. Fourth-degree assault Report of woman came to residence started punching residents at 9945 Man O War Circle, June 1. Gun run Report of possible accidental discharge of firearm and man shot himself in hand at Martin Lane, June 3. Missing person Report of juvenile reported missing found by police during traffic stop at 2500 Grandview Road, June 2. Property damage Report of tree cut down on neighbor's property unintentionally fell onto other property and damaged car at 747 Mallard Drive, June 4.

MARRIAGE LICENSES Fu Yu, 50, of Taipei and Gene Swick, 59, of Columbus, issued June 24.

ABOUT POLICE REPORTS The Community Recorder publishes the names of all adults charged with offenses. The information is a matter of public record and does not imply guilt or innocence. Property dispute Reported at 9600 Indian Trace Road, May 31. Second-degree burglary Report of window broken and tools and electronics taken from residence at 11723 Burns Road, June 2. Theft by unlawful taking Report of prescription bottle and other items taken from truck at Mary Ingles Highway, June 1.

FORT THOMAS Arrests/citations Theresa McKinney, 38, 714 North Limestone B, warrant at I-471 north, July 3. Renee Busher, 52, 44 Hollywoods Lane, receiving stolen property at 44 Hollywoods Drive, July 1. Bobby Plau, 18, 2232 Joyce Ave., DUI at Newman Avenue, June 30. Martin Schuster, 71, 14 Biel Street, fourth-degree assault, alcohol intoxication in a public place at North Grand Avenue, June 30. De'Eric Avery, 21, 8140 Diane

Lane, warrant at 2306 Alexandria Pike, June 30. Roy Evans, 43, 618 Main St., warrant at 20 Holmes Ave., June 26. Jack Murphy, 40, 49 Main St., warrant at Woodland Place, June 19. Anthony Page, 20, 1030 York St., alcohol intoxication in a public place at I-471, June 21. Adam Kues, 28, 158 North Grand Ave. No. 58, warrant at 158 Grand Ave. no. 58, June 24. Crystal Hudson, 32, 18 Miriam Drive, warrants at Walnut Street at Lindsey, June 24.

Incidents/investigations Second-degree burglary At 215 Military Parkway, June 24. At 41 Lumley Ave., June 21. At 21 Carolina Ave., June 22. Third-degree criminal mischief At 720 South Fort Thomas Ave., June 22.

Arrests/citations James Woolley, 56, 47 East McMicken Ave., theft by unlawful taking at 82 Carothers Road, June 27. Gerald Fee, 46, 340 Lindsey Ave. No. 3, theft by unlawful taking at 130 Pavilion Parkway, June 29. Cynthia Barnett, 41, 5054 Emmas Way, first-degree possession of a controlled substance, public intoxication at Boone Street, June 26.

Call Livelinks. The hottest place to meet the coolest people.

y

CE-0000562180

888.979.2264

INVITATION TO BID Type I Ambulance FIRE DEPARTMENT OF BELLEVUE-DAYTON

FIDUCIARY

ATTORNEY

LAURIE GLOVER

RONNIE GLOVER 166 DOGWOOD DR. HIGHLAND HEIGHTS, KY 41076

MARCUS CAREY 3814 DIXIE HIGHWAY ERLANGER, KY 41018

DOROTHY KAPPESSER

JANICE EGAN 226 MISTY COVE WAY COLD SPRING, KY 41076

JAMES LUERSEN 1403 ALEXANDRIA PK. FT. THOMAS, KY 41075

WM. FORTNER

DOUGLAS FORTNER 6634 LEBANON ST. CINCINNATI, OH 45216

DONALD HEMMER 250 GRANDVIEW DR. STE 500 FT. MITCHELL, KY 41017

PAMELA BOWLING

NATASHA BOWLING 7 APPLE BLOSSOM LN. ALEXANDRIA, KY 41001

STEPHEN VENARD 463 COMMONWEALTH AVE. ERLANGER, KY 41018

MARY NUTZEL

VICKIE REBHOLZ 1123 LICKERT RD. ALEXANDRIA, KY 41001

HARRY RUST PO BOX 312 ALEXANDRIA, KY 41001

FREDA JONES

KURT JONES 121 ORCHARD TERRACE COLD SPRING, KY 41076

GREG KRIEGE 3699 ALEXANDRIA PK. COLD SPRING, KY 41076

JEAN SCOTT

WILLIAM SCOTT 5547 WESTWOOD NORTHERN CINCINNATI, OH 45248

JOHN BROOKING 909 WRIGHTS SUMMIT PKWY FT WRIGHT, KY 41011

MARY PARR

LINDA WRIGHT 4109 LORI DR ERLANGER, KY 41071

FRED SUMME 4 W 4TH ST. NEWPORT, KY 41071

PATRICIA SCHLABACH 10030 BENNIGTON DR CINCINNATI, OH 45241 ROBERT FLECKENSTEIN SR. ROBERT FLECKENSTEIN JR. 759 MALLAD DR. ALEXANDRIA, KY 41001

EDWARD BUECHEL 6900 HOUSTON RD STE 43 FLORENCE, KY 41042

JEANNE SLATER

TIMOTHY SLATER 172 RIVERSIDE PKWY FT THOMAS, KY 41075

MIKE KEHOE 135 HIGHLAND AVE. FT THOMAS, KY 41075

MENTOR GRAVES

5/3 BANK

JANN SEIDENFADEN 122 N FT. THOMAS AVE. FT. THOMAS, KY 41075

ALMA MCDINE

DAMON MCDINE 624 TRUMAN LANE BELLEVUE, KY 41073

EDWARD ZERHUSEN 207 THOMAS MORE PKWY CRESTVIEW HILLS, KY 41017

JAMES TAYLOR

JERRI TAYLOR 23 PARKER RD. NEWPORT, KY 41071

RICHARD JOHNSON 50 N FT. THOMAS AVE. FT THOMAS, KY 41075

HOLLY GRIFFIN

SHAWN WILCOX 1271 HANDS PIKE COVINGTON, KY 41017

BARBARA STRADY 3420 ATRIUM BLVD. STE 160 MIDDLETOWN, OH 45005

HELEN CUMMINS

RONALD CUMMINS 10 S BROOKS AVE. CHATTANOOGA, TN 73411

ADAM BLEILE 810 SYCAMORE ST. CINCINNATI, OH 45202

ALBERT KNIGHT

RICHARD TEETER 515 TELESCOPE #304 WILDER, KY 41076

N/A

The Fire Department of Bellevue-Dayton is soliciting bids from qualified vendors to purchase a Type I 4x4 Ambulance for the Fire Department, 514 6th Avenue Dayton, KY 41074.

MARIE KINSTLER

ANN BRICKING 3648 NELTNER RD. ALEXANDRIA, KY 41001

HARRY RUST PO BOX 312 ALEXANDRIA, KY 41001

DAVID KAISER

Sealed bids will be accepted until 4:00 P.M. on Wednesday, July 17, 2013, at which time they will be opened publicly and read aloud.

VICTOR FEINAUER 4953 DODSWORTH LN. COLD SPRING, KY 41076

FRED SUMME 4 W 4TH ST. NEWPORT, KY 41071

WILLIAM REIS

MARY ANN REIS 11951 WESLEY CHAPEL RD CALIFORNIA, KY 41007

HARRY RUST PO BOX 312 ALEXANDRIA, KY 41001

JOSEPH BARRETT

VERA FISSEL 16 S SHERRY LN BELLEVUE, KY 41073

JANN SEIDENFADEN 122 N FT THOMAS AVE FT THOMAS, KY 41075

MARY RATLIFF

PEGGY NECAMP 537 ROYAL CREST DR. COPLEY, OH 44321

JAMES LUERSEN 1403 ALEXANDRIA PK FT THOMAS, KY 41075

JAMES KOCHER

SUSAN BREVING 2109 GLENWAY AVE. COVINGTON, KY 41014

FRED SUMME 4 W 4TH ST. NEWPORT, KY 41071

Bids should be submitted to: Office of Fire Chief Attention: Karen Strickley, Secretary Fire Department of Bellevue-Dayton 514 6th Avenue Dayton, KY 41074 Bids must be delivered in person. It is the sole responsibility of the vendor to see that his/her bid is received in proper time. No late bids will be considered. Bids should be submitted in duplicate form in a sealed envelope clearly marked "FDBD Type I Ambu lance" with the name of the bidder, and with the date and time of the bid opening. Specifications and bid documents are availa ble from the Fire Department. Questions regarding this bid should be directed to Michael Auteri, Fire Chief, at 859-261-0083. ___________________________________ Michael Auteri, Fire Chief Fire Department of Bellevue-Dayton 70218

LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT THE FOLLOWING SETTLEMENTS HAVE BEEN PRESENTED TO THE CAMPBELL DISTRICT PROBATE COURT, WRITTEN EXCEPTIONS TO THE BELOW SETTLEMENTS MUST BE FILED NO LATER THAN 20 DAYS FROM THE DATE OF THIS ADVERTISEMENT. IF NO EXCEPTIONS ARE FILED SAID SETTLEMENTS WILL BE CONFIRMED AND ORDERED RECORDED. DECEASED BETTY JANE ADAMS DOROTHY WEICK CARL AUCHTER EUGENE MAHONEY JR.

Incidents/investigations

Fraudulent use of a credit card At 1901 Monmouth St., June 23. Theft by unlawful taking At 1 Levee Way, June 25. At 1751 Monmouth St., June 28. Theft of motor vehicle registration plate At 1302 Monmouth St., June 28.

DECEASED

Ahora en Español 18+

www.livelinks.com

St., theft by unlawful taking at 1751 Monmouth St., June 19. Dwaine Brocks, 54, 1227 Parkview, theft by unlawful taking at 22 East 15th St., June 18. Malcom Folmar, 20, 1422 Garrard St., theft by unlawful taking at 7 15th St., June 18.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN BY PROPER ORDER OF THE CAMPBELL DISTRICT COURT THAT THE FOLLOWING WERE APPOINTED FIDUCIARIES OF THE ESTATES LISTED BELOW FOR THE MONTH. ALL PERSONS HAVING A CLAIM AGAINST THE ESTATE SHALL PRESENT THEM VERIFIED ACCORDING TO LAW TO THE FOLLOWING FIDUCIARIES NO LATER THAN SIX MONTHS FROM THE DATE OF OPENING.

NEWPORT

make a real connection

Try it Free!

Adam Downard, 35, 2506 New Zion Road, first-degree possession of a controlled substance at 160 Pavilion Parkway, June 20. William Sinclair, 27, 1716 Frintz Ave., first-degree trafficking a controlled substance at Brighton Street, June 11. Tori Anderson, 20, 38 East Ninth

FIDUCIARY JENNIFER HATER MARGARET WEICK CECILE AUCHTER EUGENE MAHONEY III

SETTLEMENT TYPE FINAL FINAL FINAL FINAL

EXCEPTIONS CAN BE MAILED TO ATTENTION PROBATE CLERK C/O 330 YORK STREET NEWPORT, KY 41071 BY: C.K. WASSER, DEPUTY CLERK CAMPBELL DISTRICT COURT TAUNYA NOLAN JACK, CAMPBELL CIRCUIT CLERK 1769885

SALLY MILLER 1847 TRAILS END MAPLE GLEN, PA 19004 ANNE LIVINGSTON 62 DUMFRIES AVE FT THOMAS, KY 41075 HELEN SCHERDER

AMY KYLE 845 CHARLOTTE DR. ALEXANDRIA, KY 41001

RICHARD JOHNSON 50 N FT THOMAS AVE. FT THOMAS, KY 41075

ANNE OBRECHT

CHESTER OBRECHT 533 DEER RUN RD COLD SPRING, KY 41076

RICHARD BONENFANT 510 WASHINGTON AVE. NEWPORT, KY 41071

RITA HILS

THOMAS HILS 6176 STRAWBERRY LN FLORENCE, KY 41042

GREG KRIEGE 3699 ALEXANDRIA PK COLD SPRING, KY 41076

KATHLEEN MAHER 1727 BEAVER RD. WALTON, KY 41094 ELSIE TURNER

WILBURN TURNER 938 COLUMBIA ST NEWPORT, KY 41071

JOHN HAYDEN 505 YORK ST. NEWPORT, KY 41071

MARIE DONALDSON

CYNTHIA SIMPSON 105 WINDSOR CT ALEXANDRIA, KY 41001

RICHARD JOHNSON 50 N FT THOMAS AVE. FT THOMAS KY 41075

ANA RITTER

TIMOTHY RITTER 19236 MEADES RIDGE RD PATRIOT, IN 47038

N/A

GENEVA SCHMITT

BARBARA HERBST 745 PINTAIL CT ALEXANDRIA, KY 41001

TAUNYA NOLAN JACK CAMPBELL CIRCUIT CLERK BY: CK. WASSER, DEPUTY CLERK CAMPBELL DISTRICT COURT PROBATE COURT $&)(%%("#*!!')%(

LIFE

B10 • CCF RECORDER • JULY 11, 2013

&'$%#"'%!'

9G/313>D-A0"</35>G>C) :@/31C6EG@9/5?

9G/313>D-A0"E;@</31>GC6EG@C /31E;@</31>G >'J( !09B )1AJH

-)AAAE==

-)AAAE==

*

*

-A0"E;@</31>G C6EG@>C @ ?)((=, '/A, )#, )I, LO; 'I9F1E9F #2((I?

14-/ .')0))+ 6347& .'0""" -5!#25 .'0"""

#"&( %$'!(

@7>C> E==>GC >31 #,0',0"

0#)%%4

*

#"&( %$'!(

14-/ .'%0,+" 6347& .'0""" -5!#25 .'0"""

04)(4A

*

-A0" </35>G>C @ ?)((=, '/A, )#, )I, A=

(6'"'$

(6*+"'

- =<EG>35> =G>>1E8 @25?>@C D2@7 @>C@ 1G2F>!!!894 /,.6 705 2*15) C;88>G5><>9G/@2E3C6>52/<C -AA# =EG1 =$-4A C;6>G 1;@B </G2/@ NAOL*GL ?9)(BA'D, )0#(B ?>B0J(, =1(?(I, 0E( 0#E(B, *LJ F1I(?, I1J( E(#H ?>0AJ )20>0

-4)4((

*

-AA( 1E1:> G/8 04AA H;/1 5/9 NAOLL* $O, -"-, >B" )J4, %G; #2((I?, D(=I1E(B

0()((4

*

-AA# 8>G5;GB :G/31 8/GH;2C <C

0-)%(4

C/<>C 7E;GC+ F8<6>PC :6O.*G 5&3 :6K M ?7+ :6@.*G !!!'=:&<+%%"+3(#;+(-+'$:"

7440 >%%/ :+*3#9%+ @39!6!B%& -*"*/*9 D89 8 -2%%&9 *== *=): B"%%=- E&6G;G AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA ),$*%(,

74C7 &1&#% #+*3& '*+*=*3 D89 -+4B 7 #49 2B9 2'9 '& E'6C0HAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA ),+*%('

744A &1&#% +*6 7.44 -@*& '*( -=+9 .?.9 "%:!9 2B9 2=9 -<+%/%4 '& E&6G8CAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA )$%*%(( 74CC &1&#% 3!B+1 D89 .?.9 '"/4:% B"%%=-9 2B9 2=9 '& E&6G86AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA )$%*%((

74CC &1&#% '*+*=*3 '+%: D89 *)+49 *5'9 2B9 2=AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA )$%*%('

74CC )'!13 B' '1@/% -!=D%/9 *)+49 *5'9 2B9 2=9 -)7/44$ AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA )$(*%,'

74C4 $1+& %)'*/% 89B .?.9 D89 *)+49 *5'9 '=%*7AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA )$#*%#,

744? 6@)B*3# #B *)+49 11@ :!=%-9 (=*'@AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA )$!*%((

74C4 6*2&* ?D #/*7& +4)/!7#9 /%&9 =%*+"%/9 -)7/44$9 =4*&%&9 HF@ :!=%-AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA )$!*(('

74CC >%%/ '16/*)) *)+49 *5'9 2B9 2=9 '&9 =4B :!=%- E'6C8F AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA )$!*,('

74C4 B151B* '*6+5 9% '"44-% $/4: 89 #44& '4=4/-9 =4B :!=%-9 *)+49 *5'AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA )$'*%(, 744? '"%=+19%B '191+*&1 /!';@/ (=*'@9 '/%B '*(9 *)+49 *5'9 =4B :!=%-3 AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA )$&*%'+

7440 3!))*3 +1#@% *B&9 (=*'@9 *)+49 *5'9 2B9 2=9 '&9 *=): B"%%=- E'6G8GAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA )$&*%++ 744A &1&#% &@+*3#1 9!6!B%& "*/& +4 $!7& :4&%=9 "%:!9 =%*+"%/9 +4B 2@#9 HG> '"/4:% B"%%=-9 E&6G,;C A )$&*'('

7440 &1&#% #+*3& '*+*=*3 )% D89 *)+49 *5'9 2B9 2=9 -+4B 7 #4 E&6G1FAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA )$"*&('

744A >%%/ 9!(%+B5 /%&9 D89 .?.9 *)+49 *5'9 2B9 2= E'6G80 AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA )$+*%++ 744? &1&#% &*;1B* /<@ %?+ '*(9 D89 *)+49 *5' =4'*= +/*&% E'6C1.C AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA )$+*&((

9;1:>@ 9;BC.

)'IF D('A2 (=1>10E, **J F1I(?,0E( 0#E(B, $O, I('>2(B, A'BB1'4( >0), ("A()>10E'I $'I9(H

*

74CC >%%/ '"%+1;%% 9!6!B%& C.@ :!=%-9 =%*+"%/9 7*DA9 -)7/44$AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA )",*%((

7440 3!))*3 )%3B+* *)+49 *5'92B9 2=AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA )%*%(' 744? B151B* '*6+5 9% -!=D%/9 *)+49 *5'9 #/%*+ -'"44= '*/ AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA )#*%%' 744? &1&#% #+*3& '*+*=*3 )8B (=)%9 D89 *)+49 *5'9 =%*+"%/9 &D&9 -)7/44$ AAAAAAAAAAAAAA )!*&%'

)'*&'+ 744. '"%=5 (9*2%+ ,87 *)+49 =4*&%& AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA )&*&(( 744C '"%=5 (9*2%+ H &/9 *)+492-9 2( AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA ),*%%' 7447 B151B* '*6+5 9% (=)%9 *)+49 *5'9 7%B '*/ +/*&%3AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA

40"&#4-&0(AI

0A'4 E72E 62?> !+1/ 3 2)4(1 ($1/ *, )'"&0# (%)/ .-0


Campbell community recorder 071113